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Sample records for range-front normal faults

  1. Long Valley caldera and the UCERF depiction of Sierra Nevada range-front faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Long Valley caldera lies within a left-stepping offset in the north-northwest-striking Sierra Nevada range-front normal faults with the Hilton Creek fault to the south and Hartley Springs fault to the north. Both Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF) 2 and its update, UCERF3, depict slip on these major range-front normal faults as extending well into the caldera, with significant normal slip on overlapping, subparallel segments separated by ∼10  km. This depiction is countered by (1) geologic evidence that normal faulting within the caldera consists of a series of graben structures associated with postcaldera magmatism (intrusion and tumescence) and not systematic down-to-the-east displacements consistent with distributed range-front faulting and (2) the lack of kinematic evidence for an evolving, postcaldera relay ramp structure between overlapping strands of the two range-front normal faults. The modifications to the UCERF depiction described here reduce the predicted shaking intensity within the caldera, and they are in accord with the tectonic influence that underlapped offset range-front faults have on seismicity patterns within the caldera associated with ongoing volcanic unrest.

  2. Tertiary Normal Faulting in the Canyon Range, Eastern Sevier Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills; Anders

    1999-11-01

    The contact between pre-Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks in the western Canyon Range, west-central Utah, has been interpreted as a large, low-angle normal fault that marks the breakaway zone of the hypothesized, basin-forming Sevier Desert detachment. Recent fieldwork suggests that the contact may in fact be depositional along much or all of its length. Deformational fabric in the supposed footwall likely traces to the Mesozoic Sevier orogeny rather than to Tertiary detachment faulting. Kinematic indicators at the range front are not generally consistent with low-angle normal-fault motion; instead, well-exposed high-angle faults are the dominant range-bounding structures. The Tertiary conglomerates of the western Canyon Range foothills, previously viewed as an evolving syntectonic deposit related to detachment faulting, are here reinterpreted as three distinct units that reflect different periods and tectonic settings. The pattern in these conglomerates, and in fault-offset gravity-slide deposits that mantle the western foothills, is consistent with block faulting and rotation along several generations of high-angle structures. Local seismic-reflection data lend qualitative support to this interpretation, and underscore the need to consider alternative working hypotheses for evolution of the Sevier Desert basin.

  3. Normal Fault Growth on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. P.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Ferrill, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Displacement versus length relationships of faults on Earth and Mars have been used to describe and interpret the evolution of faults and fault systems, infer differences in the relative strengths of strata, and evaluate variations in fault-system response to differences in gravity from planet to planet. In this presentation, we focus on maximum throw versus trace length (Dmax/L) of continuously mappable faults and Dmax/L of individual fault segments. Fault analyses on Mars have the advantage of a planetary surface devoid of vegetation and largely unaffected by weathering and erosion. Areas on the flanks of Alba Patera, Mars, were chosen because they are well imaged by all generations of data coverage, contain fault systems that have a range of developmental characteristics, and formed in a relatively simple tectonic setting dominated by extension. Footwall and hanging wall cutoff traces of more than 300 faults were interpreted using Viking imagery and ArcGIS software. Throw was obtained by calculating the elevation difference between adjacent footwall and hanging wall points using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data. Throw versus along-strike trace length plots were constructed for each interpreted fault. Single fault segments are defined as having one well-defined displacement maximum bounded by two near-zero displacement minima. Segments within a multi-segment fault were identified by counting displacement maxima along the fault trace. The number of segments incorporated into multi-segment faults is positively correlated with the fault trace length. In a plot of Dmax versus L, whole faults are distributed approximately along a locus of Dmax = K × Ln, where K = 5 × 10-4 to 5 × 10-2 and n = 1. This is in agreement with previous studies of faults on Mars. Single fault segments form a distinct population whose distribution is described approximately by the same equation but where K = 1.7 × 10-3. Dmax/L ratios for multi-segment faults represent an apparently self

  4. Breaks in Pavement and Pipes as Indicators of Range-Front Faulting Resulting from the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake near the Southwest Margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Peterson, David M.; Phelps, Geoffery A.

    1995-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provide indicators for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California. The spatial distribution of 1284 sites of such damage documents the extent and distribution of detectable ground deformation. Damage was concentrated in four zones, three of which are near previously mapped faults. The zone through Los Gatos showed the highest concentration of damage, as well as evidence for pre- and post-earthquake deformation. Damage along the foot of the Santa Cruz Mountains reflected shortening that is consistent with movement along reverse faults in the region and with the hypothesis that tectonic strain is distributed widely across numerous faults in the California Coast Ranges.

  5. Comparison of upwards splaying and upwards merging segmented normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, U. A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Lonergan, L.; Bevan, T. G.

    2017-07-01

    A common model for normal fault growth involves a single fault at depth splaying upwards into a series of en-echelon segments. This model is applied to faults as well as a range of extension fractures, including veins, joints and igneous dykes. Examples of splaying growth fault systems in the Columbus Basin, offshore Trinidad, are presented. They include the commonly described upwards splaying type, but also one fault zone with an upward change from disconnected overlapping synthetic faults to a continuous fault. One fault zone with high-displacement fault segments is separated by a relay ramp at depth, becomes breached higher up, developing into a continuous fault at its upper part, where displacements are least. This example suggests that whilst kinematic linkage typically precedes geometric linkage in the evolution of relay ramps, low-displacement parts of a fault system may be geometrically linked whereas higher displacement areas are only kinematically linked.

  6. Normal fault growth in analog models and on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Morris, Alan P.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Normal faults observed in extensional clay models evolve by displacement (throw) accumulation and concomitant trace length increase, and by segment linkage. The first of these processes leads to an increase in the maximum throw to trace length ( Dmax/ L) ratio, whereas the second leads to a decrease in this ratio. With increasing extension individual faults evolve along stepwise tracks in Dmax/ L parameter space, although at any given time a summary plot of Dmax versus L for the entire fault population will typically span one order of magnitude in Dmax/ L ratio and two orders of magnitude in trace length, obscuring the stepwise nature of fault evolution and giving the impression of self-similar fault growth along a locus of constant Dmax/ L ratio. In addition, the number of simple faults (faults with a single throw maximum) incorporated into a compound fault (a fault with multiple throw maxima) is strongly correlated with the fault's trace length, indicating that trace length increase is dominated by linkage not throw accumulation. When analyzed for evidence of relict simple faults (expressed as throw maxima), normal faults observed on Mars exhibit similar characteristics to those developed in analog clay models. By analogy, we infer that Mars normal faults evolve in a similar fashion to faults in clay models.

  7. Normal fault growth in analog models and on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, D. Y.; Morris, A. P.; Ferrill, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Normal faults evolve from systems of unconnected fault ruptures, to poorly connected networks formed by linkage of propagating faults, to strongly interconnected fault networks with isolated fault blocks. This evolution tends to progress with increasing duration or magnitude of extension. Individual faults develop sawtooth along-strike displacement profiles, which are attributed to growth by fault linkage. The relationship between maximum displacement and tracelength (Dmax/L) of faults has been studied for at least two decades, in particular the extent to which this relationship represents self-similar fault development or not, and whether it represents some fundamental characteristic of the faulted medium, displacement accumulation, or fault linkage processes. There is, however, a distinction between displacement versus length relationships for individual faults, fault arrays consisting of multiple cooperating faults, and individual faults within a fault array, and there is a growing body of evidence that fault ruptures do not grow by self-similar increments, but evolve to higher maximum displacement to length ratios with successive slip events. Normal faults observed in extensional clay models evolve by displacement (throw) accumulation and concomitant trace length increase, and by segment linkage. The first of these processes leads to an increase in the maximum throw to trace length (Dmax/L) ratio, whereas the second leads to a decrease in this ratio. With increasing extension individual faults evolve along stepwise tracks in Dmax/L parameter space, although at any given time a summary plot of Dmax versus L for the entire fault population will typically span one order of magnitude in Dmax/L ratio and two orders of magnitude in trace length, obscuring the stepwise nature of fault evolution and giving the impression of self-similar fault growth along a locus of constant Dmax/L ratio. In addition, the number of simple faults (faults with a single throw maximum

  8. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    An energetic sequence of shallow earthquakes that began in early March 2011 in western Nevada, near the community of Hawthorne, has slowly decreased in intensity through mid-2011. To date about 1300 reviewed earthquake locations have been compiled; we have computed moment tensors for the larger earthquakes and have developed a set of high-precision locations for all reviewed events. The sequence to date has included over 50 earthquakes ML 3 and larger with the largest at Mw 4.6. Three 6-channel portable stations configured with broadband sensors and accelerometers were installed by April 20. Data from the portable instruments is telemetered through NSL's microwave backbone to Reno where it is integrated with regional network data for real-time notifications, ShakeMaps, and routine event analysis. The data is provided in real-time to NEIC, CISN and the IRIS DMC. The sequence is located in a remote area about 15-20 km southwest of Hawthorne in the footwall block of the Wassuk Range fault system. An initial concern was that the sequence might be associated with volcanic processes due to the proximity of late Quaternary volcanic flows; there have been no volcanic signatures observed in near source seismograms. An additional concern, as the sequence has proceeded, was a clear progression eastward toward the Wassuk Range front fault. The east dipping range bounding fault is capable of M 7+ events, and poses a significant hazard to the community of Hawthorne and local military facilities. The Hawthorne Army Depot is an ordinance storage facility and the nation's storage site for surplus mercury. The sequence is within what has been termed the 'Mina Deflection' of the Central Walker Lane Belt. Faulting along the Whiskey Flat section of the Wassuk front fault would be primarily down-to-the-east, with an E-W extension direction; moment tensors for the 2011 earthquake show a range of extension directions from E-W to NW-SE, suggesting a possible dextral component to the Wassuk

  9. Centrifuge modeling of buried continuous pipelines subjected to normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Majid; Rojhani, Mahdi; Galandarzadeh, Abbas; Takada, Shiro

    2013-03-01

    Seismic ground faulting is the greatest hazard for continuous buried pipelines. Over the years, researchers have attempted to understand pipeline behavior mostly via numerical modeling such as the finite element method. The lack of well-documented field case histories of pipeline failure from seismic ground faulting and the cost and complicated facilities needed for full-scale experimental simulation mean that a centrifuge-based method to determine the behavior of pipelines subjected to faulting is best to verify numerical approaches. This paper presents results from three centrifuge tests designed to investigate continuous buried steel pipeline behavior subjected to normal faulting. The experimental setup and procedure are described and the recorded axial and bending strains induced in a pipeline are presented and compared to those obtained via analytical methods. The influence of factors such as faulting offset, burial depth and pipe diameter on the axial and bending strains of pipes and on ground soil failure and pipeline deformation patterns are also investigated. Finally, the tensile rupture of a pipeline due to normal faulting is investigated.

  10. Kinematically Coupled Strike-Slip and Normal Faults in the Lake Mead Strike-Slip Fault System, Southeast Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenhorn, S. A.; Marshall, S. T.; Cooke, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Lake Mead fault system consists of a ~95 km long, northeast-trending zone of strike-slip faults of Miocene age that accommodate a total left-lateral offset of 20-65 km. We use a combination of detailed field mapping and numerical modeling to show that a previously unnamed left-lateral strike-slip segment of the Lake Mead fault system and a dense cluster of dominantly west-dipping normal faults acted in concert to accommodate regional left-lateral offset. We suggest that the strike-slip fault that we refer to as the Pinto Ridge fault: (1) was kinematically related to other faults of the Lake Mead fault system; (2) was responsible for the creation of the normal fault cluster at Pinto Ridge; and (3) utilized these normal faults as linking structures between separate strike-slip fault segments to create a longer, through-going fault. Results from numerical models demonstrate that the observed location and curving strike patterns of the normal fault cluster is consistent with the faults having formed as secondary structures as the result of the perturbed stress field around the slipping Pinto Ridge fault. Comparison of mechanical efficiency of various normal fault geometries within extending terranes suggests that the observed west dip of normal faults reflects a west- dipping anisotropy at depth, such as a detachment. The apparent terminations of numerous strike-slip faults of the Lake Mead fault system into west-dipping normal faults suggest that a west-dipping detachment may be regionally coherent.

  11. Turnout Fault Diagnosis through Dynamic Time Warping and Signal Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turnout is one key fundamental infrastructure in the railway signal system, which has great influence on the safety of railway systems. Currently, turnout fault diagnoses are conducted manually in China; engineers are obliged to observe the signals and make problem solving decisions. Thus, the accuracies of fault diagnoses totally depend on the engineers’ experience although massive data are produced in real time by the turnout microcomputer-based monitoring systems. This paper aims to develop an intelligent diagnosis method for railway turnout through Dynamic Time Warping (DTW. We firstly extract the features of normal turnout operation current curve and normalize the collected turnout current curves. Then, five typical fault reference curves are ascertained through the microcomputer-based monitoring system, and DTW is used to identify the turnout current curve fault through test data. The analysis results based on the similarity data indicate that the analyzed five turnout fault types can be diagnosed automatically with 100% accuracy. Finally, the benefits of the proposed method and future research directions were discussed.

  12. Seismic evidence of conjugate normal faulting: The 1994 Devil Canyon earthquake sequence near Challis, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Suzette M. [Boise State Univ., ID (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Aftershock hypocenters of the 1984 Devil Canyon, Idaho earthquake indicate the sequence was associated with conjugate normal faulting on two northwest-striking normal faults that bound the Warm Spring Creek graben.

  13. Earthquake Nucleation on Faults With Heterogeneous Frictional Properties, Normal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sohom; Viesca, Robert C.

    2017-10-01

    We examine the development of an instability of fault slip rate. We consider a slip rate and state dependence of fault frictional strength, in which frictional properties and normal stress are functions of position. We pose the problem for a slip rate distribution that diverges quasi-statically within finite time in a self-similar fashion. Scenarios of property variations are considered and the corresponding self-similar solutions found. We focus on variations of coefficients, a and b, respectively, controlling the magnitude of a direct effect on strength due to instantaneous changes in slip rate and of strength evolution due to changes in a state variable. These results readily extend to variations in fault-normal stress, σ, or the characteristic slip distance for state evolution, Dc. We find that heterogeneous properties lead to a finite number of self-similar solutions, located about critical points of the distributions: maxima, minima, and between them. We examine the stability of these solutions and find that only a subset is asymptotically stable, occurring at just one of the critical point types. Such stability implies that during instability development, slip rate and state evolution can be attracted to develop in the manner of the self-similar solution, which is also confirmed by solutions to initial value problems for slip rate and state. A quasi-static slip rate divergence is ultimately limited by inertia, leading to the nucleation of an outward expanding dynamic rupture: asymptotic stability of self-similar solutions then implies preferential sites for earthquake nucleation, which are determined by distribution of frictional properties.

  14. Secondary Normal Faulting Near the Terminus of a Strike-Slip Fault Segment in the Lake Mead Fault System, SE Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The 95 km long Lake Mead Fault System (LMFS), located about 50 km east of Las Vegas and about 100 km west of the relatively undeformed Colorado Plateau, consists of a group of NE/SW-trending Miocene left-lateral strike-slip faults with a total offset of 65-110 km. Previous work suggests that the LMFS acted as a transform zone to accommodate differential extension between the southern Basin and Range to the north and the metamorphic core complexes of the Colorado River extensional corridor to the south. Studies of individual faults of the LMFS have shown that strike-slip faulting was the dominant mode of deformation while normal faulting, pull-apart basins, and push up structures formed as localized secondary structures related to strike-slip faults. This study focuses on the portion of the LMFS west of the Overton Arm of Lake Mead, which consists of the Bitter Spring Valley Fault (BSVF) and the Hamblin Bay Fault (HBF). Both faults have estimated offsets of 20-60 km, but past mapping efforts have been inconsistent with respect to the BSVF trace locations and degree of fault complexity. In order to demonstrate that the apparent complexity of the BSVF is the result of segmentation and secondary normal faults associated with individual segments, we focused field mapping efforts on an apparent segment of the BSVF near Pinto Ridge, located southwest of the Echo Hills and about 5 km NW of the more prominent HBF. We have identified nine normal faults that initiate near the SW tip of a segment of the BSVF and die out to the south before reaching the HBF. The offset on all these faults is a maximum at their northern intersection with the BSVF, then steadily decreases to zero away from the BSVF. These normal faults range from 0.6 km-2.25 km in length and have variable fault trace patterns. The normal fault originating closest to the SW tip of the BSVF segment curves with increasing distance away towards parallelism with the BSVF. The eight other normal faults are all oriented

  15. Relationships between along-fault heterogeneous normal stress and fault slip patterns during the seismic cycle: Insights from a strike-slip fault laboratory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Peyret, Michel; Cattin, Rodolphe; Maerten, Frantz

    2017-12-01

    We use a strike-slip fault analog model to study experimentally the role played by along-fault non-uniform and asymmetric applied normal stress on both coseismic slip and long-term fault behavior. Our model is based on a visco-elasto-plastic multi-layered rheology that allows to produce several hundreds of scaled analog microquakes and associated seismic cycles. Uniform or heterogeneous applied normal stress along the fault plane is imposed and maintained constant during the whole experiment durations. Our results suggest that coseismic slip patterns are strongly controlled by spatial normal stress variations and subsequent accumulated shear stress along fault strike. Major microquakes occur preferentially in zones of major shear stress asperities. Coseismic slip distributions exhibit a pattern similar to the along-fault applied normal stress distribution. The occurrence of isolated low to moderate microquakes where residual stresses persist around secondary stress asperities, indicates that stress conditions along the fault also control the whole variability of fault slip events. Moreover, when fault slip stability conditions are modulated by normal stress distribution, our experiments suggest that the along-fault stress heterogeneity influences the seismic cycle regularity and, consequently, long-term fault slip behavior. Uniform applied normal stress favors irregular seismic cycles and the occurrence of earthquakes clustering, whereas non-uniform normal stress with a single high amplitude stress asperity generates strong characteristic microquake events with stable return periods. Together our results strengthen the assumption that coseismic slip distribution and earthquake variability along an active fault may provide relevant information on long term tectonic stress and could thus improve seismic hazard assessment.

  16. Analog Modeling of Normal Fault Growth on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, D. Y.; Morris, A. P.; Ferrill, D. A.

    2011-03-01

    Physical analog modeling and analyses of martian fault systems support the interpretation that simple faults on Mars do not grow in a self-similar manner and that compound fault systems develop in a stepwise pattern in Dmax/L space.

  17. Reactivation of normal faults as high-angle reverse faults due to low frictional strength: Experimental data from the Moonlight Fault Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Tesei, T.; Scott, J. M.; Collettini, C.

    2017-12-01

    Large normal faults are frequently reactivated as high-angle reverse faults during basin inversion. Elevated fluid pressure is commonly invoked to explain high-angle reverse slip. Analogue and numerical modeling have demonstrated that frictional weakening may also promote high-angle reverse slip, but there are currently no frictional strength measurements available for fault rocks collected from large high-angle reverse faults. To test the hypothesis that frictional weakening could facilitate high-angle reverse slip, we performed single- and double-direct friction experiments on fault rocks collected from the Moonlight Fault Zone in New Zealand, a basin-bounding normal fault zone that was reactivated as a high-angle reverse fault (present-day dip angle 60°-75°). The fault core is exposed in quartzofeldspathic schists exhumed from c. 4-8 km depth and contains a <20 m thick sequence of breccias, cataclasites and foliated cataclasites that are enriched in chlorite and muscovite. Friction experiments on water-saturated, intact samples of foliated cataclasite at room temperature and normal stresses up to 75 MPa yielded friction coefficients of 0.19<μ < 0.25. On the assumption of horizontal maximum compressive stress, reactivation analysis indicates that a friction coefficient of <0.25 will permit slip on high-angle reverse faults at hydrostatic (or even sub-hydrostatic) fluid pressures. Since foliated and phyllosilicate-rich fault rocks are common in large reactivated fault zones at basement depths, long-term frictional weakening is likely to act in concert with episodic build-ups of fluid pressure to promote high-angle reverse slip during basin inversion.

  18. Kinematic Earthquake Ground‐Motion Simulations on Listric Normal Faults

    KAUST Repository

    Passone, Luca

    2017-11-28

    Complex finite-faulting source processes have important consequences for near-source ground motions, but empirical ground-motion prediction equations still lack near-source data and hence cannot fully capture near-fault shaking effects. Using a simulation-based approach, we study the effects of specific source parameterizations on near-field ground motions where empirical data are limited. Here, we investigate the effects of fault listricity through near-field kinematic ground-motion simulations. Listric faults are defined as curved faults in which dip decreases with depth, resulting in a concave upward profile. The listric profiles used in this article are built by applying a specific shape function and varying the initial dip and the degree of listricity. Furthermore, we consider variable rupture speed and slip distribution to generate ensembles of kinematic source models. These ensembles are then used in a generalized 3D finite-difference method to compute synthetic seismograms; the corresponding shaking levels are then compared in terms of peak ground velocities (PGVs) to quantify the effects of breaking fault planarity. Our results show two general features: (1) as listricity increases, the PGVs decrease on the footwall and increase on the hanging wall, and (2) constructive interference of seismic waves emanated from the listric fault causes PGVs over two times higher than those observed for the planar fault. Our results are relevant for seismic hazard assessment for near-fault areas for which observations are scarce, such as in the listric Campotosto fault (Italy) located in an active seismic area under a dam.

  19. Theoretical and experimental estimation of geometric relationship of non-parallel conjugate normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fusheng; Koyi, Hemin

    2017-04-01

    Intersecting and crossing conjugate normal faults develop at different scales. Equations of geometric parameters of non-parallel conjugate normal faults can be deduced from their trigonometric relations. Physical models can also be used to verify the theoretical calculations and compared with natural examples. In this study, we have used a theoretical approach to outline some key geometric parameters of conjugate normal faults (intersection angles, plunge of intersection line, and vertical and horizontal distances of the intersection point, etc.) and compared them to equivalent geometric values in scaled analogue models. The comparison shows that theoretical plots used for geometric estimation of conjugate normal faults constrain reasonably the geometric parameters in natural cases. Data from the Lufeng Sag of Pearl River Mouth Basin in the northern part of South China Sea, where conjugate non-parallel basement faults propagate and intersect in cover units are compatible with the theoretical geometric estimation.

  20. Evolution of dilatant fracture networks in a normal fault — Evidence from 4D model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marc; van Gent, Heijn; Bazalgette, Loïc; Yassir, Najwa; Hoogerduijn Strating, Eilard H.; Urai, Janos L.

    2011-04-01

    Dilatant fractures in normal fault zones are widely recognized as major pathways of fluid flow in the upper crust where the ratio of rock strength and effective stress is suitable for their formation, but the structure of these fracture networks in 3D, their connectivity and their temporal evolution is poorly known. Here we build on 2D studies of scaled models of fracture networks in dilatant normal fault zones, using a series of X-ray computer tomographic scans of a physical model. We show how the dilatant fracture network evolves in 3D, as a complex self-organizing system with self-similar geometry. We processed the CT-scan data using a threshold filter to identify the open fracture volume, to allow visual and quantitative analysis of the evolving fracture system in 3D. Dilatant jogs initiated along the evolving fault plane coalesce into a self-similar percolating volume (Fd = 1.91). The fracture volume increases non-linearly with progressive displacement as the velocity of the fault blocks diverges from the master fault orientation and we infer that the normal stress on the fault decreases correspondingly. This process continues until the system triggers the formation of antithetic faults, with a corresponding increase in normal stress on the master fault and a decrease in the rate of fracture volume creation. We infer that although parameters like the width of the fractures are not scaled with the same ratio as length and stress, the processes and evolution of fracture geometries in our model are robust and apply to a wide range of normal fault zones in nature. Since our physical model does not involve chemical processes such as cementation or fault healing, the experiment suggests that fault systems can show a non-linear change of fracture network properties caused by a geometric evolution only.

  1. Laboratory observations of fault strength in response to changes in normal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Lozos, Julian; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Oglesby, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in fault normal stress can either inhibit or promote rupture propagation, depending on the fault geometry and on how fault shear strength varies in response to the normal stress change. A better understanding of this dependence will lead to improved earthquake simulation techniques, and ultimately, improved earthquake hazard mitigation efforts. We present the results of new laboratory experiments investigating the effects of step changes in fault normal stress on the fault shear strength during sliding, using bare Westerly granite samples, with roughened sliding surfaces, in a double direct shear apparatus. Previous experimental studies examining the shear strength following a step change in the normal stress produce contradictory results: a set of double direct shear experiments indicates that the shear strength of a fault responds immediately, and then is followed by a prolonged slip-dependent response, while a set of shock loading experiments indicates that there is no immediate component, and the response is purely gradual and slip-dependent. In our new, high-resolution experiments, we observe that the acoustic transmissivity and dilatancy of simulated faults in our tests respond immediately to changes in the normal stress, consistent with the interpretations of previous investigations, and verify an immediate increase in the area of contact between the roughened sliding surfaces as normal stress increases. However, the shear strength of the fault does not immediately increase, indicating that the new area of contact between the rough fault surfaces does not appear preloaded with any shear resistance or strength. Additional slip is required for the fault to achieve a new shear strength appropriate for its new loading conditions, consistent with previous observations made during shock loading.

  2. The Deformation of Overburden Soil and Interaction with Pile Foundations of Bridges Induced by Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang-Chun; Li, Chien-Hung; Chan, Pei-Chen; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2017-04-01

    According to the investigations of well-known disastrous earthquakes in recent years, ground deformation induced by faulting is one of the causes for engineering structure damages in addition to strong ground motion. Most of structures located on faulting zone has been destroyed by fault offset. Take the Norcia Earthquake in Italy (2016, Mw=6.2) as an example, the highway bridge in Arquata crossing the rupture area of the active normal fault suffered a quantity of displacement which causing abutment settlement, the piers of bridge fractured and so on. However, The Seismic Design Provisions and Commentary for Highway Bridges in Taiwan, the stating of it in the general rule of first chapter, the design in bridges crossing active fault: "This specification is not applicable of making design in bridges crossing or near active fault, that design ought to the other particular considerations ".This indicates that the safty of bridges crossing active fault are not only consider the seismic performance, the most ground deformation should be attended. In this research, to understand the failure mechanism and the deformation characteristics, we will organize the case which the bridges subjected faulting at home and abroad. The processes of research are through physical sandbox experiment and numerical simulation by discrete element models (PFC3-D). The normal fault case in Taiwan is Shanchiao Fault. As above, the research can explore the deformation in overburden soil and the influences in the foundations of bridges by normal faulting. While we can understand the behavior of foundations, we will make the bridge superstructures into two separations, simple beam and continuous beam and make a further research on the main control variables in bridges by faulting. Through the above mentioned, we can then give appropriate suggestions about planning considerations and design approaches. This research presents results from sandbox experiment and 3-D numerical analysis to simulate

  3. Numerical analysis of the effects induced by normal faults and dip angles on rock bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lishuai; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Peipeng; Zheng, Pengqiang; Xu, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The study of mining effects under the influences of a normal fault and its dip angle is significant for the prediction and prevention of rock bursts. Based on the geological conditions of panel 2301N in a coalmine, the evolution laws of the strata behaviors of the working face affected by a fault and the instability of the fault induced by mining operations with the working face of the footwall and hanging wall advancing towards a normal fault are studied using UDEC numerical simulation. The mechanism that induces rock burst is revealed, and the influence characteristics of the fault dip angle are analyzed. The results of the numerical simulation are verified by conducting a case study regarding the microseismic events. The results of this study serve as a reference for the prediction of rock bursts and their classification into hazardous areas under similar conditions.

  4. Quantifying Coseismic Normal Fault Rupture at the Seafloor: The 2004 Les Saintes Earthquake Along the Roseau Fault (French Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J. A. L.; Escartin, J.; Leclerc, F.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Odemar Science Party, T.

    2016-12-01

    While >70% of Earth's seismicity is submarine, almost all observations of earthquake-related ruptures and surface deformation are restricted to subaerial environments. Such observations are critical for understanding fault behavior and associated hazards (including tsunamis), but are not routinely conducted at the seafloor due to obvious constraints. During the 2013 ODEMAR cruise we used autonomous and remotely operated vehicles to map the Roseau normal Fault (Lesser Antilles), source of the 2004 Mw6.3 earthquake and associated tsunami (1 km) to outcrop (models and the texture-mapped imagery, which have better resolution than any available acoustic systems (behavior of this submarine fault. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of extensive, high-resolution underwater surveys using underwater vehicles and novel imaging techniques, thereby opening new possibilities to study recent seafloor changes associated with tectonic, volcanic, or hydrothermal activity.

  5. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  6. East-west extension and Holocene normal-fault scarps in the Hellenic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, R.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Papanastassiou, D.

    1992-06-01

    Examination of surface fault traces with Spot images and in the field corroborates the inference that the active tectonics of southern Peloponnesus and Crete are dominated by approximately north-south normal faulting and approximately east-west extension. The heights of Holocene normal-fault scarps yield first-order regional estimates of fault slip rates between 0.1 and 2-3 mm/yr. Most of the surface scarps probably ruptured during past earthquakes, such as that which destroyed Sparta in 464 B.C. On the Sparta fault the Holocene average slip rate and the recurrence time of large earthquakes may be ˜1 mm/yr and 3000 yr, respectively. The regional pattern of Quaternary faulting suggests that the east-west extension near the Hellenic subduction zone is fast (about 5%-10%/m.y.). The change from north-south to east-west extension in the late Pliocene (˜2-4 Ma) implies that the Aegean is starting to collide with the northern margin of Africa.

  7. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajduś Antoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  8. The influence of normal fault on initial state of stress in rock mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajduś, Antoni; Cała, Marek; Tajduś, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Determination of original state of stress in rock mass is a very difficult task for rock mechanics. Yet, original state of stress in rock mass has fundamental influence on secondary state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of mining headings. This, in turn, is the cause of the occurrence of a number of mining hazards, i.e., seismic events, rock bursts, gas and rock outbursts, falls of roof. From experience, it is known that original state of stress depends a lot on tectonic disturbances, i.e., faults and folds. In the area of faults, a great number of seismic events occur, often of high energies. These seismic events, in many cases, are the cause of rock bursts and damage to the constructions located inside the rock mass and on the surface of the ground. To estimate the influence of fault existence on the disturbance of original state of stress in rock mass, numerical calculations were done by means of Finite Element Method. In the calculations, it was tried to determine the influence of different factors on state of stress, which occurs in the vicinity of a normal fault, i.e., the influence of normal fault inclination, deformability of rock mass, values of friction coefficient on the fault contact. Critical value of friction coefficient was also determined, when mutual dislocation of rock mass part separated by a fault is impossible. The obtained results enabled formulation of a number of conclusions, which are important in the context of seismic events and rock bursts in the area of faults.

  9. Annual Variation of Seismicity due to Surface Loads in Normal Fault Systems in Southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Luo, Y.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    It had been found that there are seasonal variations of seismicity related to surface hydrology at Main Himalaya Thrust (MHT) fault. In this work, we analyzed the historical micro-earthquakes recorded by China Digital Seismograph Network (CSDN) in normal faulting systems in southern Tibet, to test whether such a phenomenon exist here and to figure out the possible modulation mechanism. There are several N-S striking normal fault systems (e.g. Yadong-Gulu, Shenza-Dingjie rifts) across the southern Tibetan plateau, which are supposed to accommodate the crust extension induced by Indo-Eurasia collision. The quake catalog covers the time span of 2008-2014. All quake events are relocated using the double-differencing method. The catalog was then declustered using CLUSTER2000 (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/software/). The declustered catalog was then averaged for one-month period. The monthly catalog shows that the number of earthquake is maximum during the winter months (from January to March), although the maximum values do not agree for individual years (Fig. 1). Such a variation is similar to that found at MHT. Contrary to the situation at MHT (thrust fault), we found it might be explained directly by surface mass redistributions. The contemporary continuous GPS observations confirm that Tibetan plateau crust moves up and down periodically and reaches its lowest position in summer under the surface hydrological load. According to the Coulomb failure criterion (S=τ-μ(σn-pf) , where S is Coulomb Stress, σn is normal stress, τ is shear stress), an increase of mass load in summer in Tibet will cause an increase in normal stress at the (gently dipping) fault plane and accordingly a decrease in Coulomb stress, which thus inhibits the occurrence of quakes on those normal fault planes.

  10. Pliocene onset of widespread normal faulting in the southern Puna Plateau, southern central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Lopez, M. C.; Hongn, F. D.; Marrett, R.; Seggiaro, R.; Strecker, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Normal faults are often observed in many compressional Cenozoic mountain belts and paleotectonic settings and have been associated with a late-stage development in orogen evolution. Often, such normal faults are found in high-elevation sectors in the orogen interior and may form graben, closely spaced arrays or they are kinematically linked with strike-slip faults. In contrast, at lower elevations and in the adjacent foreland regions coeval shortening may be sustained. This situation typifies the active tectonics of the southern central Andes of NW Argentina characterized by the Puna Plateau (22° to 27° S lat), the world’s second largest orogenic plateau with an average elevation of 3.7 km and the adjacent Andean foreland. The Puna contains neotectonic landforms that host widespread active normal faults, closely associated with mafic centres. In contrast, the shortening continued in the foreland. The onset of the extensional kinematic in the Puna has been inferred to be Quaternary in age as many mafic volcanic manifestations were generated during the ultimate 2 Ma. However, our new structural observations and Ar/Ar dating of volcanic deposits and dykes suggests that widespread extension in the Puna started much earlier. We are able to show that the southern margin of the Puna is characterized by extensional structures at different length scales, including extensional fractures, sometimes hosting dykes, as well as normal fault arrays that cut volcanic edifices and flows, visible on satellite imagery. Fault kinematic analysis and an assessment of dyke and fracture orientations documents that the region at about 27°S lat is affected by N-S extension. This must be a regional phenomenon as similar observations can be made in areas farther north as well. Our geochronology work on lava flows and dykes in this region suggests that an extensional regime may have been in existence by 7-6 Ma and extensional processes were well underway by 4 Ma. The often observed

  11. Uniform pattern of normal faulting at the temporally distributed centers of eruption along the path of the Yellowstone hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, Armita; Babaie, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    The northeasterly migration of the Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) has led both to the successive eruption of lava from a temporally ordered set of calderas, and related thermally-induced normal faulting along the Snake River Plain (SRP) over the past 16.6 Ma. We have applied a series of structural and statistical methods to analyze the spatial distribution and orientation of the normal faults to understand the kinematics of the mid-Tertiary-Quaternary faulting event along the SRP in the northern Rockies. The azimuths of the linear directional mean (LDM) and the directional (autocorrelation) anisotropy ellipses in the semivariograms, applying Ordinary Kriging, for different sets of normal fault traces give an estimate for the horizontal component of extension for normal faulting. The sub-parabolic spatial pattern of the normal fault LDMs, and their sub-parallel alignment with the minor axes of the Standard Deviation Ellipses (SDEs) in and around different caldera, suggest uniform normal faulting during thermally-induced extensions along the SRP. The asymmetric, sub-parabolic distribution of the spatial trajectories (form lines) of the LDMs and the major axes of the directional (anisotropy) ellipses of the traces of normal faults in the youngest three calderas are similar to the reported parabolic distribution of earthquake epicenters along active normal faults around the YHS. The parallelism of the axis of the sub-parabolic pattern with the trajectories of the LDMs, the major axes of the directional anisotropy ellipses, and the deduced extension directions for each caldera, suggest systematic and progressive normal faulting due to the thermal regime of the hotspot as it migrated to the northeast. This implies that the age of normal faulting progressively decreases to the northeast.

  12. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  13. Deformation bands in normal fault damage zones, Southwestern Sinai, Suez rift, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Kh. S.

    2017-03-01

    The present study provides evidence that the NW-SE normal faults in Nubian Sandstone reservoirs (Malha and Naqus formations) are surrounded by damage zones in which the rocks are affected by cataclastic deformation bands and small scale faults. The paleostress analysis of the small faults indicates that σ3 has NE-SW direction while σ1 is sub-vertical. The thickness of the bands is ranging from 3 mm to 1 cm. The density and thickness of the bands increase toward the faults and decrease backward. The deformation bands form two prominent sets. The first set is running in the NW-SE direction parallel to the main faults and dip towards the northeast and southwest, i.e. synthetic and antithetic conjugate sets. The second set has NE-SW direction and dip mainly in the NW in the Malha Formation and in the SE in Naqus Formation. The two sets of deformation bands mutually crosscut each other, suggesting that both sets developed during the same deformation event. The deformation bands are planar features and occur singly or form braided clusters. The microscopic studies indicate that the host rock is mainly quartz arenite and composed of fine to very fine, well sorted quartz grains which weakly fractured and cemented by calcite. The microscopic studies of the bands indicate that they composed of strong grain crushing (cataclasis) and clay minerals. This composition is probably causes reduction of porosity and permeability within the deformation bands. The reservoir rocks in the damage zones of the normal faults are divided into polygonal areas by the deformation bands.

  14. Internal structure, fault rocks, and inferences regarding deformation, fluid flow, and mineralization in the seismogenic Stillwater normal fault, Dixie Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Jonathan S.; Bruhn, R.L.; Forster, C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Outcrop mapping and fault-rock characterization of the Stillwater normal fault zone in Dixie Valley, Nevada are used to document and interpret ancient hydrothermal fluid flow and its possible relationship to seismic deformation. The fault zone is composed of distinct structural and hydrogeological components. Previous work on the fault rocks is extended to the map scale where a distinctive fault core shows a spectrum of different fault-related breccias. These include predominantly clast-supported breccias with angular clasts that are cut by zones containing breccias with rounded clasts that are also clast supported. These are further cut by breccias that are predominantly matrix supported with angular and rounded clasts. The fault-core breccias are surrounded by a heterogeneously fractured damage zone. Breccias are bounded between major, silicified slip surfaces, forming large pod-like structures, systematically oriented with long axes parallel to slip. Matrix-supported breccias have multiply brecciated, angular and rounded clasts revealing episodic deformation and fluid flow. These breccias have a quartz-rich matrix with microcrystalline anhedral, equant, and pervasively conformable mosaic texture. The breccia pods are interpreted to have formed by decompression boiling and rapid precipitation of hydrothermal fluids whose flow was induced by coseismic, hybrid dilatant-shear deformation and hydraulic connection to a geothermal reservoir. The addition of hydrothermal silica cement localized in the core at the map scale causes fault-zone widening, local sealing, and mechanical heterogeneities that impact the evolution of the fault zone throughout the seismic cycle. ?? 2010.

  15. New Attenuation Relationship for Peak Ground and Pseudo-Spectral Acceleration of Normal-Faulting Earthquakes in Offshore Northeast Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground motions from normal-faulting earthquakes are generally considered to be smaller than those of strike-slip and thrust events. On 11 April 2011 a crustal normal-faulting earthquake [the Fukushima earthquake (Mw 6.6] occurred in Eastern Japan. The peak ground acceleration (PGA observed was considerably higher than the predictions of several ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs, which were derived mainly from thrust or strike-slip earthquakes. In northeast Taiwan, the tectonic structure of the Ryukyu Arc and the Okinawa Trough typically entail normal-faulting earthquakes. Because of the normal-faulting earthquakes relevance to ground motions and nuclear power plant sites in northeast Taiwan, we evaluated the impact of the ground motion of normal-faulting earthquakes in offshore northeast Taiwan using a newly constructed attenuation relationship for PGA and pseudo-spectral acceleration (Sa. We collected 832 records from 13 normal-faulting earthquakes with focal depths of less than 50 km. The moment magnitude (Mw of the 13 events was between 4 - 6. The Sa and PGA of normal-faulting earthquakes offshore northeast Taiwan determined with the newly constructed attenuation relationship were higher and lower, respectively, than those obtained using attenuation equations commonly used in the Taiwan subduction zone.

  16. Geochemistry, mineralization, structure, and permeability of a normal-fault zone, Casino mine, Alligator Ridge district, north central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. Jill; Evans, James P.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the geochemical signature and structure of the Keno fault zone to test its impact on the flow of ore-mineralizing fluids, and use the mined exposures to evaluate structures and processes associated with normal fault development. The fault is a moderately dipping normal-fault zone in siltstone and silty limestone with 55-100 m of dip-slip displacement in north-central Nevada. Across-strike exposures up to 180 m long, 65 m of down-dip exposure and 350 m of along-strike exposure allow us to determine how faults, fractures, and fluids interact within mixed-lithology carbonate-dominated sedimentary rocks. The fault changes character along strike from a single clay-rich slip plane 10-20 mm thick at the northern exposure to numerous hydrocarbon-bearing, calcite-filled, nearly vertical slip planes in a zone 15 m wide at the southern exposure. The hanging wall and footwall are intensely fractured but fracture densities do not vary markedly with distance from the fault. Fault slip varies from pure dip-slip to nearly pure strike-slip, which suggests that either slip orientations may vary on faults in single slip events, or stress variations over the history of the fault caused slip vector variations. Whole-rock major, minor, and trace element analyses indicate that Au, Sb, and As are in general associated with the fault zone, suggesting that Au- and silica-bearing fluids migrated along the fault to replace carbonate in the footwall and adjacent hanging wall rocks. Subsequent fault slip was associated with barite and calcite and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids deposited at the southern end of the fault. No correlation exists at the meter or tens of meter scale between mineralization patterns and fracture density. We suggest that the fault was a combined conduit-barrier system in which the fault provides a critical connection between the fluid sources and fractures that formed before and during faulting. During the waning stages of deposit formation, the fault behaved as

  17. The Padul normal fault activity constrained by GPS data: Brittle extension orthogonal to folding in the central Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Borque, Maria Jesús; Sánchez-Alzola, Alberto; Martinez-Martos, Manuel; Alfaro, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    The Padul Fault is located in the Central Betic Cordillera, formed in the framework of the NW-SE Eurasian-African plate convergence. In the Internal Zone, large E-W to NE-SW folds of western Sierra Nevada accommodated the greatest NW-SE shortening and uplift of the cordillera. However, GPS networks reveal a present-day dominant E-W to NE-SW extensional setting at surface. The Padul Fault is the most relevant and best exposed active normal fault that accommodates most of the NE-SW extension of the Central Betics. This WSW-wards dipping fault, formed by several segments of up to 7 km maximum length, favored the uplift of the Sierra Nevada footwall away from the Padul graben hanging wall. A non-permanent GPS network installed in 1999 constrains an average horizontal extensional rate of 0.5 mm/yr in N66°E direction. The fault length suggests that a (maximum) 6 magnitude earthquake may be expected, but the absence of instrumental or historical seismic events would indicate that fault activity occurs at least partially by creep. Striae on fault surfaces evidence normal-sinistral kinematics, suggesting that the Padul Fault may have been a main transfer fault of the westernmost end of the Sierra Nevada antiform. Nevertheless, GPS results evidence: (1) shortening in the Sierra Nevada antiform is in its latest stages, and (2) the present-day fault shows normal with minor oblique dextral displacements. The recent change in Padul fault kinematics will be related to the present-day dominance of the ENE-WSW regional extension versus NNW-SSE shortening that produced the uplift and northwestwards displacement of Sierra Nevada antiform. This region illustrates the importance of heterogeneous brittle extensional tectonics in the latest uplift stages of compressional orogens, as well as the interaction of folding during the development of faults at shallow crustal levels.

  18. The January 25th, 2014 Kebumen earthquake: A normal faulting in subduction zone of Southern Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhalawan, Yopi Ruben; Sianipar, Dimas; Suardi, Iman

    2017-07-01

    Normal faulting mechanism of earthquake in subduction zone is quite interested to study further. We investigated the Kebumen, January 25, 2014 earthquake sequences by retrieving focal mechanisms using full moment tensor inversion. We used BMKG seismic data from stations in the vicinity of Central Java region for these inversions. Then we correlated the static coulomb stress change by the mainshock to the aftershocks. We found that mainshock is a normal faulting earthquake with nodal plane 1; strike 283, dip 22 and rake -100; nodal plane 2 with strike 113, dip 68 and rake -86. Using distribution analysis of high precision aftershocks after relocated; we considered that the reliable fault plane was nodal plane 1 with strike trending SE-NW. The focal mechanisms provide an estimate of the local stress field in the Wadati-Beniof Zone of Southern Java subduction zone. There is also conclution stating that the mainshock may trigger the aftershocks mainly in three zones, i.e. in continental crustal, upper mantle and on the oceanic slab. This is visually showed that the high quality aftershocks located in positive zones of static coulomb stress change.

  19. Permeability evolution of normal faults with clay smear: insights from structural observations in water saturated sandbox models and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettermann, Michael; Urai, Janos L.; Vrolijk, Peter J.

    2017-04-01

    Fault processes are complex phenomena that defy reliable prediction. Clay smear in particular is difficult to predict for sub-surface flow applications and would benefit from an improved understanding of controlling processes. In this study, we present a series of water-saturated sandbox experiments producing large clay smear surfaces up to 500 cm2. In these experiments, we couple across-fault flow measurements with structural analysis of post-mortem excavated clay smear surfaces. To develop a tool for evaluating the evolving fault structure during formation, we compare measured flow data to simplified numerical flow simulations. Results show diagnostic relationships between the observed fault structures and measured cross-fault flow. In experiments with one or two clay layers and a cumulative thickness of 10 mm and 100 mm displacement, we observe that normally consolidated clay, in a structural domain of graben faulting, initially yields in hybrid brittle/ductile failure. Characteristic for this type of failure is an early breaching of the clay layer by brittle fracturing causing increased cross-fault flow. However, the type of failure varies laterally and shear failure occurs as well. We observed that holes preferably form beneath extensional parts of the footwall cutoff. These can be identified in map-view as the fault curves towards the hanging wall. During the evolution of the fault, this is typically followed by fault back-stepping, formation of clay smears and reworking of clay fragments in the fault. These processes lead to slower increases of cross-fault flux. Holes that formed during the early breaching of the clay layer mostly remain open during the evolution of a fault, although there is some evidence for occasional resealing of holes. Fault zones are segmented by fault lenses, breached relays and clay smears in which sand and clay mix by deformation. Experiments with two clay layers show that holes rarely form at the same position on the fault planes

  20. Normal faulting in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin: Paleoearthquake history and kinematics of the Spili Fault, Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Moraetis, Daniel; Benedetti, Lucilla; Guillou, Valery; Bellier, Olivier; Hristopulos, Dionisis

    2014-09-01

    The late-Cenozoic kinematic and late-Pleistocene paleoearthquake history of the Spili Fault is examined using slip-vector measurements and in situ cosmogenic (36Cl) dating, respectively. The Spili Fault appears to have undergone at least three successive but distinct phases of extension since Messinian (˜7 Ma), with the most recent faulting resulting in the exhumation of its carbonate plane for a fault-length of ˜20 km. Earthquake-slip and age data show that the lower 9 m of the Spili Fault plane were exhumed during the last ˜16,500 years through a minimum of five large-magnitude (Mw > 6) earthquakes. The timing between successive paleoearthquakes varied by more than one order of magnitude (from 800 to 9000 years), suggesting a highly variable earthquake recurrence interval during late Pleistocene (CV = 1). This variability resulted to significant fluctuations in the displacement rate of the Spili Fault, with the millennium rate (3.5 mm/yr) being about six times faster than its late-Pleistocene rate (0.6 mm/yr). The observed variability in the slip-size of the paleoearthquakes is, however, significantly smaller (CV = 0.3). These data collectively suggest that the Spili Fault is one of the fastest moving faults in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin.

  1. Digital Computer Transient Models of Three-Phase Inverter Systems Under Normal and Fault Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawish, Said Abdelhamid Atiya

    In many industrial applications, variable speed drives of electrical machines are needed. This speed control can be met either by dc or ac machines. The ac machines have several distinct advantages compared to dc machines due to the absence of commutators, therefore, a variable -voltage, variable-frequency power supply is normally required for speed control of ac machines. This power supply can be obtained by a dc link converter system that consists of a rectifier and inverter. In this dissertation the waveforms and transient response of a three-phase forced-commutated inverters are simulated on a digital computer from basic circuit theory. Both the voltage source inverter (VSI) and the current source inverter (CSI) are simulated using thyristors with real characteristics. The simulation is further modified to give three-phase currents with adjustable frequency to be used in adjustable speed induction motor drives or the starting of synchronous motors from rest. The digital simulation of Gate Turn-Off (GTO) thyristor inverters feeding an induction motor is presented and can allow for step frequency change for the study of adjustable speed induction motor drives. A naturally-commutated three-phase inverter using thyristors with real characteristics was also simulated to study VSIs and CSIs. The interactions between the load parameters and the inverter circuit parameters are investigated. The parameters studied include ratio of dc voltage to amplitude of ac voltage, ratio of smoothing inductance to load inductance and triggering angle (alpha). Since the naturally-commutated CSI system is widely used in power applications, it was investigated under different types of fault s occurring both on the line and in the inverter circuit. These faults include three-phase short circuits, thyristor failures, line-to-line faults, false triggering and open circuits. A digital computer was used to simulate these faults and the system response because it is difficult to obtain the

  2. First evidences of fast creeping on a long-lasting quiescent earthquake normal-fault in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadini, Roberto; Aoudia, Abdelkrim; Barzaghi, Riccardo; Crippa, Bruno; Marotta, Anna Maria; Borghi, Alessandra; Cannizzaro, Letizia; Calcagni, Laura; Via, Giorgio Dalla; Rossi, Grazia; Splendore, Raffaele; Crosetto, Michele

    2009-11-01

    A key issue in our understanding of the earthquake cycle and seismic hazard is the behaviour of an active fault during the interseismic phase. Locked and creeping faults represent two end-members of mechanical behaviours that are given two extreme rupturing hazard levels, that is, high and low, respectively. Geophysical and space geodetic analyses are carried out over the Pollino Range, an extensional environment within the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary, to disclose the behaviour of the long-lasting quiescent Castrovillari normal fault. Fault trenching evidenced at least four large earthquakes (6.5-7.0 Mw) in the past and an elapsed time of 1200 yr since the last event. Inversion of Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Global Positioning System over a decade shows fast creeping at all depths of the fault plane. The velocity-strengthening creeping zone reaches maximum rates 20 mm yr-1 against an average rate of about 3-9 mm yr-1. It limits the southern-weakening locked part of the fault. An essential condition for the generation of a large earthquake on the Castrovillari fault, as has occurred in the past, is a rupture through the velocity-strengthening zone. The Castrovillari fault yields the best evidence for being both a strong and weak fault during its earthquake cycle. Creeping at rates faster than its tectonically driven ones, it must thus consist of a mix of unstable and conditionally stable patches ready to sustain a sizeable earthquake. Quantifying and mapping the slip rate over the fault plane is important because they influence fault moment budget estimate and helps to constrain constitutive laws of fault zones. Aseismic slip also redistributes stress in the crust, thereby affecting the locations of future earthquakes.

  3. Numerical reconstruction of Late-Cenosoic evolution of normal-fault scarps in Baikal Rift Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzov, Leonid; San'kov, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Numerical landscape development modeling has recently become a popular tool in geo-logic and geomorphic investigations. We employed this technique to reconstruct Late-Cenosoic evolution of Baikal Rift Zone mountains. The objects of research were Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland. These structures are formed under conditions of crustal extension and bounded by active normal faults. In our experiments we used instruments, engineered by Greg Tucker (University of Colo-rado) - CHILD (Channel-Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development) and 'Bedrock Fault Scarp'. First program allowed constructing the complex landscape model considering tectonic uplift, fluvial and hillslope processes; second program is used for more accurate simulating of triangular facet evolution. In general, our experiments consisted in testing of tectonic parameters, and climatic char-acteristic, erosion and diffusion properties, hydraulic geometry were practically constant except for some special runs. Numerous experiments, with various scenarios of development, showed that Barguzin range and Svyatoy Nos Upland has many common features. These structures characterized by internal differentiation, which appear in height and shape of slopes. At the same time, individual segments of these objects are very similar - this conclusion refers to most developing parts, with pronounced facets and V-shaped valleys. Accordingly modelling, these landscapes are in a steady state and are undergoing a uplift with rate 0,4 mm/yr since Early Pliocene (this solution accords with AFT-dating). Lower segments of Barguzin Range and Svyatoy Nos Upland also have some general fea-tures, but the reasons of such similarity probably are different. In particular, southern segment of Svyatoy Nos Upland, which characterized by relative high slope with very weak incision, may be formed as result very rapid fault movement or catastrophic landslide. On the other hand, a lower segment of Barguzin Range (Ulun segment, for example

  4. Discrete element modeling of Martian pit crater formation in response to extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Kevin J.; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Ferrill, David A.

    2011-04-01

    Pit craters, circular to elliptical depressions that lack a raised rim or ejecta deposits, are common on the surface of Mars. Similar structures are also found on Earth, Venus, the Moon, and smaller planetary bodies, including some asteroids. While it is generally accepted that these pits form in response to material drainage into a subsurface void space, the primary mechanism(s) responsible for creating the void is a subject of debate. Previously proposed mechanisms include collapse into lave tubes, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. In this study, we employ two-dimensional discrete element models to assess both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting as mechanisms for forming pit craters. We also examine the effect of mechanical stratigraphy (alternating strong and weak layers) and variation in regolith thickness on pit morphology. Our simulations indicate that both extensional fracturing and dilational normal faulting are viable mechanisms. Both mechanisms lead to generally convex (steepening downward) slope profiles; extensional fracturing results in generally symmetric pits, whereas dilational normal faulting produces strongly asymmetric geometries. Pit width is established early, whereas pit depth increases later in the deformation history. Inclusion of mechanical stratigraphy results in wider and deeper pits, particularly for the dilational normal faulting, and the presence of strong near-surface layers leads to pits with distinct edges as observed on Mars. The modeling results suggest that a thicker regolith leads to wider but shallower pits that are less distinct and may be more difficult to detect in areas of thick regolith.

  5. Seismic Source Parameters of Normal-Faulting Inslab Earthquakes in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Quetzalcoatl; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2016-08-01

    We studied 62 normal-faulting inslab earthquakes in the Mexican subduction zone with magnitudes in the range of 3.6 ≤ M w ≤ 7.3 and hypocentral depths of 30 ≤ Z ≤ 108 km. We used different methods to estimate source parameters to observe differences in stress drop, corner frequencies, source dimensions, source duration, energy-to-moment ratio, radiated efficiency, and radiated seismic energy. The behavior of these parameters is derived. We found that normal-faulting inslab events have higher radiated seismic energy, energy-to-moment ratio, and stress drop than interplate earthquakes as expected. This may be explained by the mechanism dependence of radiated seismic energy and apparent stress reported in previous source parameter studies. The energy-to-moment ratio data showed large scatter and no trend with seismic moment. The stress drop showed no trend with seismic moment, but an increment with depth. The radiated seismic efficiencies showed similar values to those obtained from interplate events, but higher than near-trench events. We found that the source duration is independent of the depth. We also derived source scaling relationships for the mentioned parameters. The low level of uncertainties for the seismic source parameters and scaling relationships showed that the obtained parameters are robust. Therefore, reliable source parameter estimation can be carried out using the obtained scaling relationships. We also studied regional stress field of normal-faulting inslab events. Heterogeneity exists in the regional stress field, as indicated by individual stress tensor inversions conducted for two different depth intervals ( Z 40 km, respectively). While the maximum stress axis ( σ 1) appears to be consistent and stable, the orientations of the intermediate and minimum stresses ( σ 2 and σ 3) vary over the depth intervals. The stress inversion results showed that the tensional axes are parallel to the dip direction of the subducted plate. At depths

  6. Comparison of {gamma}-ray profile across active normal and reverse faults; Seidansogata to gyakudansogata katsudanso ni okeru hoshano tansa kekka no hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, A.; Wada, N.; Sumi, H. [Shimada Technical Consultants, Ltd., Shimane (Japan); Yamauchi, S.; Iga, T. [Shimane Univ., Shimane (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Active faults confirmed at trench and outcrop were surveyed by the {gamma}-ray spectrometry. The active fault found at trench is a normal fault, and that found at outcrop is a reverse fault. The {gamma}-ray spectral characteristics of these two types of faults were compared to each other. The normal fault is named as Asagane fault located in Aimi-machi, Saihaku-gun, Tottori prefecture. The reverse fault is named as Yokota reverse fault located in Yokota-cho, Nita-gun, Shimane prefecture. Rises of radon gas indicating the existence of opening cracks were confirmed above the fault for the normal fault, and at the side of thrust block for the reverse fault. It was considered that such characteristics were caused by the difference of fault formation in the tensile stress field and in the compressive stress field. It was also reconfirmed that much more information as to faults can be obtained by the combined exploration method using the total counting method and the spectral method. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Growth Normal Faulting at the Western Edge of the Metropolitan Taipei Basin since the Last Glacial Maximum, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Tung Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth strata analysis is an useful tool in understanding kinematics and the evolution of active faults as well as the close relationship between sedimentation and tectonics. Here we present the Shanchiao Fault as a case study which is an active normal fault responsible for the formation of the 700-m-thick late Quaternary deposits in Taipei Basin at the northern tip of the Taiwan mountain belt. We compiled a sedimentary record, particularly the depositional facies and their dated ages, at three boreholes (SCF-1, SCF-2 and WK-1, from west to east along the Wuku Profile that traverses the Shanchiao Fault at its central segment. By incorporating the global sea level change curve, we find that thickness changes of sediments and changes of depositional environments in the Wuku area are in a good agreement with a rapid sea level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM of about 23 ka. Combining depositional facies changes and their ages with their thickness, we are able to introduce a simple back-stripping method to reconstruct the evolution of growing strata across the Shanchiao Fault since the LGM. We then estimate the vertical tectonic slip rate since 23 ka, which exhibits 2.2 mm yr-1 between SCF-2 and WK-1 and 1.1 mm yr-1 between SCF-1 and SCF-2. We also obtain the Holocene tectonic subsidence rate of 2.3 mm yr-1 at WK-1 and 0.9 mm yr-1 at SCF-2 since 8.4 ka. We thus conclude that the fault zone consists of a high-angle main fault to the east between SCF-2 and WK-1 and a western lower-angle branch fault between SCF-1 and SCF-2, resembling a tulip structure developed under sinistral transtensional tectonism. We find that a short period of 600-yr time span in 9 - 8.4 ka shows important tectonic subsidence of 7.4 and 3.3 m for the main and branch fault, respectively, consistent with possible earthquake events proposed by previous studies during that time. A correlation between geomorphology and subsurface geology in the Shanchiao Fault zone shows

  8. Low-angle normal faults in the south-central Brooks Range fold and thrust belt, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, R.R.; Oldow, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    A north-south structural transect through the south-central Brooks Range, Alaska, exposes three lithologically distinct, fault-bounded packages of rock, all regionally metamorphosed during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous contractional deformation that formed much of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. These are, from south to north and structurally highest to lowest, (1) the prehnite-pumpellyite facies ophiolitic rocks of the Angayucham terrane, (2) the low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Rosie Creek allochthon, and (3) pumpellyite-actinolite to glaucophane-epidote facies metamorphic rocks of the schist belt. The presence of rocks metamorphosed and deformed at shallow levels of the fold and thrust belt (the Angayucham terrane and Rosie Creek allochthon) lying structurally above rocks representing the deepest exposed levels of the fold and thrust belt (the schist belt) indicates that the imbricate stack is disrupted by south-dipping, low-angle normal faults along the southern margin of the Brooks Range. The authors propose that normal faults developed in response to the uplift of the schist belt and the overlying metasedimentary and ophiolitic allochthons by north-directed thrusting in the late Early Cretaceous. Thrusting resulting in the oversteepening of the imbricate stack, causing compensatory normal faulting along the southern flank of the ramp structure. Normal faults may have provided at least local structural control of the locus of Albian and younger sedimentation in the Koyukuk basin. 34 references.

  9. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Daniel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Geothermal plays in extensional and transtensional tectonic environments have long been a major target in the exploration of geothermal resources and the Dixie Valley area has served as a classic natural laboratory for this type of geothermal plays. In recent years, the interactions between normal faults and strike-slip faults, acting either as strain relay zones have attracted significant interest in geothermal exploration as they commonly result in fault-controlled dilational corners with enhanced fracture permeability and thus have the potential to host blind geothermal prospects. Structural ambiguity, complications in fault linkage, etc. often make the selection for geothermal exploration drilling targets complicated and risky. Though simplistic, the three main ingredients of a viable utility-grade geothermal resource are heat, fluids, and permeability. Our new geological mapping and fault kinematic analysis derived a structural model suggest a two-stage structural evolution with (a) middle Miocene N -S trending normal faults (faults cutting across the modern range), - and tiling Olio-Miocene volcanic and sedimentary sequences (similar in style to East Range and S Stillwater Range). NE-trending range-front normal faulting initiated during the Pliocene and are both truncating N-S trending normal faults and reactivating some former normal faults in a right-lateral fashion. Thus the two main fundamental differences to previous structural models are (1) N-S trending faults are pre-existing middle Miocene normal faults and (2) these faults are reactivated in a right-later fashion (NOT left-lateral) and kinematically linked to the younger NE-trending range-bounding normal faults (Pliocene in age). More importantly, this study provides the first constraints on transient fluid flow through the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He thermochronometry in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area in Nevada.

  10. Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  11. 3D multi-scale velocity structure of an active seismogenic normal fault zone (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondriest, Michele; Mitchell, Tom; Vassallo, Maurizio; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Passelegue, Francois; Pischiutta, Marta; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    The characterization of physical properties of fault zones (e.g., ultrasonic velocities, elastic moduli, porosity and fracture intensity of the fault zone rocks) is a relevant topic in reservoir geology (exploration and exploitation) and fault mechanics, for the modelling of both long-term quasi-static and fast dynamic fault zone evolution with time. Here we characterized the shallow subsurface velocity-elastic structure of the active Vado di Corno normal fault zone (Campo Imperatore, Central Apennines, Italy) which is up to > 300 m thick. Based on a detailed structural mapping of the fault footwall block covering a 2 km long fault segment, four main structural units separated by principal fault strands were recognized: (i) cataclastic unit, (ii) breccia unit, (iii) high-strain damage zone, (iv) low-strain damage zone. The single units were systematically sampled along a transect ( 200 m) orthogonal to the average strike of the fault and characterized in the laboratory in terms of petrophysical properties (i.e., Vp, Vs, static and dynamic elastic moduli, porosity). The cataclastic and breccia units (Vp = 4.68±0.43 kms-1, Vs = 2.68±0.24 kms-1) were significantly "slower" compared to the damage zone units (Vp = 5.43±0.53 kms-1, Vs = 3.20±0.29 kms-1). A general negative correlation between ultrasonic velocity and porosity values was reported. Moreover three dimensional acoustic anisotropy was quantified within the different units with respect to the mapped fault strands, and related to the deformation fabrics (i.e., open fractures, veins) observed at the sample scale. A Vp - Vs seismic refraction tomography was then performed in the field along a profile ( 90 m) across the fault zone. The tomographic results clearly illuminated fault-bounded rock bodies characterized by different velocities (i.e., elastic properties) and geometries which match with the ones deduced from the structural analysis of the fault zone exposures. Fracture intensity measurements (both at

  12. Investigations into the Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone (FLVFZ) and its interactions with normal faulting within Eureka and Deep Springs Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, M. J.; Rhodes, E.; Yin, A.

    2016-12-01

    In most textbooks, the San Andreas Fault is stated to be the plate boundary between the North American and the Pacific plates, as plate tectonics assumes that boundaries are essentially discrete. In the Western United States this is not the case, as up to 25% of relative plate motion is accommodated on other structures within the Walker Lane Shear Zone (WLSZ) in a diffuse 100 km margin (Faulds et al., 2005; Oldow et al., 2001). Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone (FLVFZ), situated at the northern border of Death Valley National Park, is the northern continuation of the Furnace Creek Fault Zone (FCFZ), and is an important transfer structure within the Walker Lane Shear Zone. Though the FLVFZ has a long term rate (since 10 Ma) of 5 mm/yr (Reheis and Sawyer, 1997), it has a highly variable slip rate. In the middle Pleistocene, the rate has a maximum of up to 11 mm/yr which would accommodate nearly the entirety of slip within the Walker Lane, and yet this rate decreases significantly ( 2.5 to 3 mm/yr) by the late Pleistocene due to unknown causes (Frankel et al. 2007). This variation in slip rate has been proposed by previous workers to be due to strain transience, an increase in the overall strain rate, or due to other unknown structures (Lee et al., 2009). Currently, we are investigating the cause of this variation, and the possibility of the transfer of slip to faults south of the FLVFZ on oblique normal faults within Eureka and Deep Springs Valleys. Preliminary data will be shown utilizing scarp transects, geomorphic scarp modeling, and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating techniques.

  13. Deep postseismic viscoelastic relaxation excited by an intraslab normal fault earthquake in the Chile subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Lidong; Ryder, Isabelle; Métois, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The 2005 Mw 7.8 Tarapaca earthquake was the result of normal faulting on a west-dipping plane at a depth of 90 km within the subducting slab down-dip of the North Chilean gap that partially ruptured in the 2014 M 8.2 Iquique earthquake. We use Envisat observations of nearly four years of postseismic deformation following the earthquake, together with some survey GPS measurements, to investigate the viscoelastic relaxation response of the surrounding upper mantle to the coseismic stress. We constrain the rheological structure by testing various 3D models, taking into account the vertical and lateral heterogeneities in viscosity that one would expect in a subduction zone environment. A viscosity of 4-8 × 1018 Pa s for the continental mantle asthenosphere fits both InSAR line-of-sight (LOS) and GPS horizontal displacements reasonably well. In order to test whether the Tarapaca earthquake and associated postseismic relaxation could have triggered the 2014 Iquique sequence, we computed the Coulomb stress change induced by the co- and postseismic deformation following the Tarapaca earthquake on the megathrust interface and nodal planes of its M 6.7 foreshock. These static stress calculations show that the Tarapaca earthquake may have an indirect influence on the Iquique earthquake, via loading of the M 6.7 preshock positively. We demonstrate the feasibility of using deep intraslab earthquakes to constrain subduction zone rheology. Continuing geodetic observation following the 2014 Iquique earthquake may further validate the rheological parameters obtained here.

  14. COMPARISON OF COSEISMIC IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCE WAVEFORMS REVISITED: STRIKE-SLIP, NORMAL, AND REVERSE FAULT EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur Cahyadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Total Electron Content (TEC measurements with Global Positioning System we studied ionospheric responses to three large earthquakes with difference focal mechanism that occurred in the Sumatra Andaman 26 December 2004, North off Sumatra 11 April 2012, and North Japan 7 December 2012. These earthquakes have different focal mechanisms, i.e. high-angle reverse, strike-slip, and normal faulting, respectively. TEC responses to the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and north Japan 2012 events initiated with positive changes. On the other hand, the initial TEC changes in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake showed both positive and negative polarities depending on the azimuth around the focal area. Such a variety may reflect differences in coseismic vertical crustal displacements, which are dominated by uplift and subsidence in the Sumatra 2012 event. This phenomena has same characteristic with 1994 Kuril Arch earthquake. There are three different propagation velocity in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake, within the first 300 km until 430 km, the CID propagation velocity was ~3 km/s, which is equal to the secod sound speed at the height of the ionospheric F-layer. Starting from 380 km until 750 km out from the epicenter, the disturbance seems to divide into two separate perturbations, with each propagating at a different velocity, about 1 km/s for the one and about 0.4 m/s for the other. The apparent velocity in the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and Japan 2012 propagated ~ 1 km/s and ~ 0.3 km/s, consistent with the sound speed at the ionospheric F layer height and internal gravity wave respectively. Resonant oscillation of TEC with a frequency of ~ 3.7 mHZ and ~4.4 mHz have been found in the Sumatra 2012 and Sumatra Andaman 2004 events. Those earthquakes, which occurred during a period of quiet geomagnetic activity, also showed clear preseismic TEC anomalies similar to those before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2007 Bengkulu earthquake.   The positive anomalies started 30-60 minutes

  15. Pre-existing normal faults have limited control on the rift geometry of the northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claringbould, Johan S.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Gawthorpe, Robert L.; Odinsen, Tore

    2017-10-01

    Many rifts develop in response to multiphase extension with numerical and physical models suggesting that reactivation of first-phase normal faults and rift-related variations in bulk crustal rheology control the evolution and final geometry of subsequent rifts. However, many natural multiphase rifts are deeply buried and thus poorly exposed in the field and poorly imaged in seismic reflection data, making it difficult to test these models. Here we integrate recent 3D seismic reflection and borehole data across the entire East Shetland Basin, northern North Sea, to constrain the long-term, regional development of this multiphase rift. We document the following key stages of basin development: (i) pre-Triassic to earliest Triassic development of multiple sub-basins controlled by widely distributed, NNW- to NE-trending, east- and west-dipping faults; (ii) Triassic activity on a single major, NE-trending, west-dipping fault located near the basins western margin, and formation of a large half-graben; and (iii) Jurassic development of a large, E-dipping, N- to NE-trending half-graben near the eastern margin of the basin, which was associated with rift narrowing and strain focusing in the Viking Graben. In contrast to previous studies, which argue for two discrete periods of rifting during the Permian-Triassic and Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, we find that rifting in the East Shetland Basin was protracted from pre-Triassic to Cretaceous. We find that, during the Jurassic, most pre-Jurassic normal faults were buried and in some cases cross-cut by newly formed faults, with only a few being reactivated. Previously developed faults thus had only a limited control on the evolution and geometry of the later rift. We instead argue that strain migration and rift narrowing was linked to the evolving thermal state of the lithosphere, an interpretation supporting the predictions of lithosphere-scale numerical models. Our study indicates that additional regional studies of

  16. Normal faulting of the Daiichi-Kashima Seamount in the Japan Trench revealed by the Kaiko I cruise, Leg 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Cadet, J.-P.; Aubouin, J.; Boulegue, J.; Dubois, J.; von, Huene R.; Jolivet, L.; Kanazawa, T.; Kasahara, J.; Koizumi, K.-i.; Lallemand, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Pautot, G.; Suyehiro, K.; Tani, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Yamazaki, T.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed topographic and geophysical survey of the Daiichi-Kashima Seamount area in the southern Japan Trench, northwestern Pacific margin, clearly defines a high-angle normal fault which splits the seamount into two halves. A fan-shaped zone was investigated along 2-4 km spaced, 100 km long subparallel tracks using narrow multi-beam (Seabeam) echo-sounder with simultaneous measurements of gravity, magnetic total field and single-channel seismic reflection records. Vertical displacement of the inboard half was clearly mapped and its normal fault origin was supported. The northern and southern extensions of the normal fault beyond the flank of the seamount were delineated. Materials on the landward trench slope are displaced upward and to sideways away from the colliding seamount. Canyons observed in the upper landward slope terminate at the mid-slope terrace which has been uplifted since start of subduction of the seamount. Most of the landward slope except for the landward walls aside the seamount comprises only a landslide topography in a manner similar to the northern Japan Trench wall. This survey was conducted on R/V "Jean Charcot" as a part of the Kaiko I cruise, Leg 3, in July-August 1984 under the auspices of the French-Japanese scientific cooperative program. ?? 1987.

  17. Pros and cons of rotating ground motion records to fault-normal/parallel directions for response history analysis of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

    2014-01-01

    According to the regulatory building codes in the United States (e.g., 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here, for the first time, using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak values of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were computed for rotation angles ranging from 0 through 180° to quantify the difference between peak values of EDPs over all rotation angles and those due to FN/FP direction rotated motions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

  18. Characterization of gear faults in variable rotating speed using Hilbert-Huang Transform and instantaneous dimensionless frequency normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Wang, C. C.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the feasibility of utilizing the instantaneous dimensionless frequency (DLF) normalization and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to characterize the different gear faults in case of variable rotating speed. The normalized DLF of the vibration signals are calculated based on the rotating speed of shaft and the instantaneous frequencies of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) which are decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) process. The faulty gear features on DLF-energy distribution of vibration signal can be extracted without the presence of shaft rotating speed, so that the proposed approach can be applied for characterizing the malfunctions of gearbox system under variable shaft rotating speed. A test rig of gear transmission system is performed to illustrate the gear faults, including worn tooth, broken tooth and gear unbalance. Different methods to determine the instantaneous frequency are employed to verify the consistence of characterization results. The DLF-energy distributions of vibration signals are investigated in different faulty gear conditions. The analysis results demonstrate the capability and effectiveness of the proposed approach for characterizing the gear malfunctions at the DLFs corresponding to the meshing frequency as well as the shaft rotating frequency. The support vector machine (SVM) is then employed to classify the vibration patterns of gear transmission system at different malfunctions. Using the energy distribution at the characteristic DLFs as the features, the different fault types of gear can be identified by SVM with high accuracy.

  19. Post 4 Ma initiation of normal faulting in southern Tibet. Constraints from the Kung Co half graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahéo, G.; Leloup, P. H.; Valli, F.; Lacassin, R.; Arnaud, N.; Paquette, J.-L.; Fernandez, A.; Haibing, L.; Farley, K. A.; Tapponnier, P.

    2007-04-01

    The timing of E-W extension of the Tibetan plateau provides a test of mechanical models of the geodynamic evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone. In this work we focus on the Kung Co half graben (Southern Tibet, China), bounded by an active N-S normal fault with a minimum vertical offset of 1600 m. To estimate the onset of normal faulting we combined high and medium temperature (U-Pb, Ar/Ar) and low temperature ((U-Th)/He) thermochronometry of the Kung Co pluton, a two-mica granite of the northern Himalayan granitic belt that outcrop in the footwall of the fault. Biotite and muscovite Ar/Ar ages , are close from each other [˜ 16 Ma ± 0.2 (Ms) and ˜ 15 ± 0.4 Ma (Bt)], which is typical of fast cooling. The zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He ages range from 11.3 to 9.6 Ma and 9.9 to 3.7 Ma respectively. These He ages are indicative of (1) fast initial cooling, from 11.3 to ˜ 9 Ma, gradually decreasing with time and (2) a high geothermal gradient (˜ 400 °C/km), close to the surface at ˜ 10 Ma. The Kung Co pluton was emplaced at about 22 Ma (U-Pb on zircon) at less than 10 km depth and 520-545 °C. Subsequent to its shallow emplacement, the pluton underwent fast thermal re-equilibration ending around 7.5 Ma, followed by a period of slow cooling caused either by the end of the thermal re-equilibration or by very slow exhumation (0.02-0.03 mm/yr) from ˜ 7.5 Ma to at least 4 Ma. In either case the data suggest that the exhumation rate increased after 4 Ma. We infer this increase to be related to the initiation of the Kung Co normal fault. A critical examination of previously published data show that most ˜ N-S Tibetan normal faults may have formed less than 5 Ma ago rather than in the Miocene as assumed by several authors. Such a young age implies that E-W extension is not related to the Neogene South Tibetan magmatism (25 to 8 Ma). Consequently, models relating E-W extension to magmatism, such as convective removal of the lower lithosphere, may be inappropriate

  20. Physical (centrifuge) modelling of localization of fold-thrust structures by normal faults, and implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J.M. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1997-09-01

    A study was conducted in which laboratory scale models of faults were constructed. The laminae was composed of plasticine to represent competent rock such as carbonates and coarse clastics, and of silicone putty to represent incompetent rock such as shale. The objective of the study was to determine the factors that affect the location and timing of nucleation of foreland fold-thrust structures as well as the amount of thrust displacement. It was suggested that folds and thrusts which were nucleated due to reactivation of normal faults could be prospective exploration targets because associated structural traps could have formed sufficiently early in the generation-migration sequence to have retained an early hydrocarbon charge.

  1. Coseismic Pit Crater, Normal Fault, and Extensional Fissure Formation in Unconsolidated Sediment and Basalt in Northern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrill, D. A.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Smart, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Two rifting-related seismic events in 1975 and 1978 along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the northern coast of Iceland produced an array of surface deformation features in Holocene basalt flows and overlying unconsolidated sediments. New field mapping and aerial photograph interpretation is coupled with analysis of maps of seismic activity and level-line survey results to constrain the timing, style, and magnitude of this deformation. Fault scarps and fissures in basalts can be traced laterally down a gentle northward dip projecting into unconsolidated braided stream deposits, providing an impressive view of the deformation style in the two contrasting mechanical layers. We report on detailed field mapping of two of these laterally traceable structures conducted in the summer of 2008 and analysis of a suite of aerial photographs from 1958 to 1998. Map-scale structures in the basalts with little or no sedimentary cover include (i) fault scarps, (ii) fissures, and (iii) locally-developed gentle dip away from the related normal fault. Dilation of faults and extension fractures in the basalt has led to rock toppling and rock fall causing widening of fissures. Wedging of toppled rock blocks at the tops of fissures has locally produced keystone arches and bridges across the tops of open fissures. Different stages in the progression of fissure formation and collapse, including (i) fissure, (ii) widened fissure with cavern, (iii) localized collapse pit, and (iv) elongate collapsed fissure, can be observed over along-strike distances of 10's of meters. Where unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits >3 m thick cover the basalts (200 m to the north along strike) structural geomorphologic features are dominated by (i) grabens, (ii) pit craters, and (iii) elongate troughs. Graben-bounding normal faults cutting the sedimentary cover in many cases have displacements >1 m. Pit craters have cone to bowl shapes, commonly occur within grabens, and have depths up to 2.8 m. The mapped

  2. Gently dipping normal faults identified with Space Shuttle radar topography data in central Sulawesi, Indonesia, and some implications for fault mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Space-shuttle radar topography data from central Sulawesi, Indonesia, reveal two corrugated, domal landforms, covering hundreds to thousands of square kilometers, that are bounded to the north by an abrupt transition to typical hilly to mountainous topography. These domal landforms are readily interpreted as metamorphic core complexes, an interpretation consistent with a single previous field study, and the abrupt northward transition in topographic style is interpreted as marking the trace of two extensional detachment faults that are active or were recently active. Fault dip, as determined by the slope of exhumed fault footwalls, ranges from 4?? to 18??. Application of critical-taper theory to fault dip and hanging-wall surface slope, and to similar data from several other active or recently active core complexes, suggests a theoretical limit of three degrees for detachment-fault dip. This result appears to conflict with the dearth of seismological evidence for slip on faults dipping less than ~. 30??. The convex-upward form of the gently dipping fault footwalls, however, allows for greater fault dip at depths of earthquake initiation and dominant energy release. Thus, there may be no conflict between seismological and mapping studies for this class of faults. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Finding faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Duke, J. [Surpac Minex Group (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    The Surpac Minex Group has been building a geologic model to represent the coal seam structure at the Carbones del Cerrejon LLC mine in north eastern Colombia which is bonded by major reserve and normal faults. This is being achieved through a new software faulting tool. The tool combines existing Minex modelling with new fault interpretation tools. New software that permits 3-D photogrammetry and seismic data can also be incorporated. 6 figs.

  4. Variation in aseismic slip and fault normal strain along the creeping section of the San Andreas fault from GPS, InSAR and trilateration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandone, F.; Johanson, I.; Bürgmann, R.; Agnew, D.

    2004-12-01

    In central California most of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by strike slip along the San Andreas fault system. However, a small amount of convergence is accommodated by compressional structures in the California Coast Ranges on both sides of the fault. Recent examples of such activity are the Coalinga and the 2003 San Simeon earthquakes. Along the central San Andreas fault (CSAF), from San Juan Bautista to Parkfield, almost all the slip along the CSAF in the brittle upper crust is accommodated aseismically. We use GPS, InSAR and trilateration data to resolve both the distribution of aseismic slip along the CSAF, and the deformation across adjacent, secondary fault structures. In 2003 and 2004, we conducted several GPS surveys along the CSAF. We resurveyed 15 stations of the San Benito triangulation and trilateration network, which extends 40 km to the northeast of the creeping segment. We combine these measurements with old EDM measurements and data from a GPS campaign in 1998. We also occupied 13 sites along the creeping segment, for which previous data exist in the SCEC archive. These dense GPS measurements, along with data from permanent GPS stations in the area, allow us to constrain the regional strain distribution and contributions from adjacent faults. With the addition of InSAR data, we can also better resolve active strain accumulation and aseismic slip along the CSAF. We use a stack of about 10 interferograms from ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites spanning 8 years. InSAR is well suited to monitoring details of the shallow slip along the CSAF and, in concert with the broadly spaced GPS velocities, to resolving the distribution of deformation along and across the plate boundary. The results are the basis for determining the kinematics of spatially variable fault slip on the CSAF, and help to better constrain the fault's constitutive properties, and fault interaction processes.

  5. Seismic images of an extensional basin, generated at the hangingwall of a low-angle normal fault: The case of the Sansepolcro basin (Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchi, Massimiliano R.; Ciaccio, Maria Grazia

    2009-12-01

    The study of syntectonic basins, generated at the hangingwall of regional low-angle detachments, can help to gain a better knowledge of these important and mechanically controversial extensional structures, constraining their kinematics and timing of activity. Seismic reflection images constrain the geometry and internal structure of the Sansepolcro Basin (the northernmost portion of the High Tiber Valley). This basin was generated at the hangingwall of the Altotiberina Fault (AtF), an E-dipping low-angle normal fault, active at least since Late Pliocene, affecting the upper crust of this portion of the Northern Apennines. The dataset analysed consists of 5 seismic reflection lines acquired in the 80s' by ENI-Agip for oil exploration and a portion of the NVR deep CROP03 profile. The interpretation of the seismic profiles provides a 3-D reconstruction of the basin's shape and of the sedimentary succession infilling the basin. This consisting of up to 1200 m of fluvial and lacustrine sediments: this succession is much thicker and possibly older than previously hypothesised. The seismic data also image the geometry at depth of the faults driving the basin onset and evolution. The western flank is bordered by a set of E-dipping normal faults, producing the uplifting and tilting of Early to Middle Pleistocene succession along the Anghiari ridge. Along the eastern flank, the sediments are markedly dragged along the SW-dipping Sansepolcro fault. Both NE- and SW-dipping faults splay out from the NE-dipping, low-angle Altotiberina fault. Both AtF and its high-angle splays are still active, as suggested by combined geological and geomorphological evidences: the historical seismicity of the area can be reasonably associated to these faults, however the available data do not constrain an unambiguous association between the single structural elements and the major earthquakes.

  6. Uplift and tilting of the Shackleton Range in East Antarctica driven by glacial erosion and normal faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxman, Guy J. G.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Bentley, Michael J.; Forsberg, Rene; Ross, Neil; Watts, Anthony B.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Jordan, Tom A.

    2017-03-01

    Unravelling the long-term evolution of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital for understanding past ice sheet dynamics and stability, particularly in marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. Here we model the evolution of the bedrock topography beneath the Recovery catchment, a sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet characterized by fast-flowing ice streams that occupy overdeepened subglacial troughs. We use 3-D flexural models to quantify the effect of erosional unloading and mechanical unloading associated with motion on border faults in driving isostatic bedrock uplift of the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains, which are flanked by the Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams. Inverse spectral (free-air admittance) and forward modeling of topography and gravity anomaly data allow us to constrain the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (Te) in the Shackleton Range region to 20 km. Our models indicate that glacial erosion, and the associated isostatic rebound, has driven 40-50% of total peak uplift in the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains. A further 40-50% can be attributed to motion on normal fault systems of inferred Jurassic and Cretaceous age. Our results indicate that the flexural effects of glacial erosion play a key role in mountain uplift along the East Antarctic margin, augmenting previous findings in the Transantarctic Mountains. The results suggest that at 34 Ma, the mountains were lower and the bounding valley floors were close to sea level, which implies that the early ice sheet in this region may have been relatively stable.

  7. Software for determining the direction of movement, shear and normal stresses of a fault under a determined stress state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez del Castillo, Alejandra; Alaniz-Álvarez, Susana Alicia; Nieto-Samaniego, Angel Francisco; Xu, Shunshan; Ochoa-González, Gil Humberto; Velasquillo-Martínez, Luis Germán

    2017-07-01

    In the oil, gas and geothermal industry, the extraction or the input of fluids induces changes in the stress field of the reservoir, if the in-situ stress state of a fault plane is sufficiently disturbed, a fault may slip and can trigger fluid leakage or the reservoir might fracture and become damaged. The goal of the SSLIPO 1.0 software is to obtain data that can reduce the risk of affecting the stability of wellbores. The input data are the magnitudes of the three principal stresses and their orientation in geographic coordinates. The output data are the slip direction of a fracture in geographic coordinates, and its normal (σn) and shear (τ) stresses resolved on a single or multiple fracture planes. With this information, it is possible to calculate the slip tendency (τ/σn) and the propensity to open a fracture that is inversely proportional to σn. This software could analyze any compressional stress system, even non-Andersonian. An example is given from an oilfield in southern Mexico, in a region that contains fractures formed in three events of deformation. In the example SSLIPO 1.0 was used to determine in which deformation event the oil migrated. SSLIPO 1.0 is an open code application developed in MATLAB. The URL to obtain the source code and to download SSLIPO 1.0 are: http://www.geociencias.unam.mx/ alaniz/main_code.txt, http://www.geociencias.unam.mx/ alaniz/ SSLIPO_pkg.exe.

  8. Modeling the Effects of a Normal-Stress-Dependent State Variable, Within the Rate- and State-Dependent Friction Framework, at Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kenny J.; Oglesby, David D.

    2017-03-01

    The development of the rate- and state-dependent friction framework (Dieterich Appl Geophys 116:790-806, 1978; J Geophys Res 84, 2161-2168, 1979; Ruina Friction laws and instabilities: a quasistatic analysis of some dry friction behavior, Ph.D. Thesis, Brown Univ., Providence, R.I., 1980; J Geophys Res 88:10359-10370, 1983) includes the dependence of friction coefficient on normal stress (Linker and Dieterich J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992); however, a direct dependence of the friction law on time-varying normal stress in dynamic stepover and dip-slip fault models has not yet been extensively explored. Using rate- and state-dependent friction laws and a 2-D dynamic finite element code (Barall J Int 178, 845-859, 2009), we investigate the effect of the Linker-Dieterich dependence of state variable on normal stress at stepovers and dip-slip faults, where normal stress should not be constant with time (e.g., Harris and Day J Geophys Res 98:4461-4472, 1993; Nielsen Geophys Res Lett 25:125-128, 1998). Specifically, we use the relation d ψ/d t = -( α/ σ)(d σ/d t) from Linker and Dieterich (J Geophys Res 97:4923-4940, 1992), in which a change in normal stress leads to a change in state variable of the opposite sign. We investigate a range of values for alpha, which scales the impact of the normal stress change on state, from 0 to 0.5 (laboratory values range from 0.2 to 0.56). For stepovers, we find that adding normal-stress dependence to the state variable delays or stops re-nucleation on the secondary fault segment when compared to normal-stress-independent state evolution. This inhibition of jumping rupture is due to the fact that re-nucleation along the secondary segment occurs in areas of decreased normal stress in both compressional and dilational stepovers. However, the magnitude of such an effect differs between dilational and compressional systems. Additionally, it is well known that the asymmetric geometry of reverse and normal faults can lead to greater

  9. The timing of fault motion in Death Valley from Illite Age Analysis of fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, E. A.; Haines, S. H.; Van der Pluijm, B.

    2014-12-01

    We constrained the timing of fluid circulation and associated fault motion in the Death Valley region of the US Basin and Range Province from Illite Age Analysis (IAA) of fault gouge at seven Low-Angle Normal Fault (LANF) exposures in the Black Mountains and Panamint Mountains, and in two nearby areas. 40Ar/39Ar ages of neoformed, illitic clay minerals in these fault zones range from 2.8 Ma to 18.6 Ma, preserving asynchronous fault motion across the region that corresponds to an evolving history of crustal block movements during Neogene extensional deformation. From north to south, along the western side of the Panamint Range, the Mosaic Canyon fault yields an authigenic illite age of 16.9±2.9 Ma, the Emigrant fault has ages of less than 10-12 Ma at Tucki Mountain and Wildrose Canyon, and an age of 3.6±0.17 Ma was obtained for the Panamint Front Range LANF at South Park Canyon. Across Death Valley, along the western side of the Black Mountains, Ar ages of clay minerals are 3.2±3.9 Ma, 12.2±0.13 Ma and 2.8±0.45 Ma for the Amargosa Detachment, the Gregory Peak Fault and the Mormon Point Turtleback detachment, respectively. Complementary analysis of the δH composition of neoformed clays shows a primarily meteoric source for the mineralizing fluids in these LANF zones. The ages fall into two geologic timespans, reflecting activity pulses in the Middle Miocene and in the Upper Pliocene. Activity on both of the range front LANFs does not appear to be localized on any single portion of these fault systems. Middle Miocene fault rock ages of neoformed clays were also obtained in the Ruby Mountains (10.5±1.2 Ma) to the north of the Death Valley region and to the south in the Whipple Mountains (14.3±0.19 Ma). The presence of similar, bracketed times of activity indicate that LANFs in the Death Valley region were tectonically linked, while isotopic signatures indicate that faulting pulses involved surface fluid penetration.

  10. The influence of joint parameters on normal fault evolution and geometry: a parameter study using analogue modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    Dilatant faults often form in rocks containing pre-existing joints, but the effects of joints on fault segment linkage and fracture connectivity is not well understood. Studying evolution of dilatancy and influence of fractures on fault development provides insights into geometry of fault zones in brittle rocks and will eventually allow for predicting their subsurface appearance. In an earlier study we recognized the effect of different angles between strike direction of vertical joints and a basement fault on the geometry of a developing fault zone. We now systematically extend the results by varying geometric joint parameters such as joint spacing and vertical extent of the joints and measuring fracture density and connectivity. A reproducibility study shows a small error-range for the measurements, allowing for a confident use of the experimental setup. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. We varied the vertical extent of the joints from 5 to 50 mm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. A counterintuitive result is that joint depth is of only minor importance for the evolution of the fault zone. Even very shallow joints form weak areas at which the fault starts to form and propagate. More important is joint spacing. Very large joint spacing leads to faults and secondary fractures that form subparallel to the basement fault. In contrast, small

  11. Role of low angle normal faulting and basement thrusting on the structural architecture of the Northern Apennines (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molli, Giancarlo; Carlini, Mirko; Vescovi, Paolo; Artoni, Andrea; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Camurri, Francesca; Clemenzi, Luca; Storti, Fabrizio; Torelli, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    The Northern Apennines of Italy are a classical site for studying fundamental issues in thrust wedges, such as ophiolite formation and emplacement, interplay between tectonics and sedimentation, role of out-of-sequence thrusting, syn-orogenic versus post-orogenic extension, along strike segmentation, etc. Accordingly, the Northern Apennines have been extensively studied since more than two centuries ago. Despite the huge amount of available data with different resolution, a 3D comprehensive regional view combining in a modern framework all available surface and subsurface information for contiguous sectors of the chain is still lacking. We performed such an attempt in the area framed between the Taro valley to the north and the northern termination of the Alpi Apuane to the south. The region includes the main morphostructural zones of the North-West Apennines from the Tyrrhenian coast West-Northwest of La Spezia, through the main topographic divide of the Apennines, to the external frontal part of the chain. The area has been investigated through a multidisciplinary approach that integrated: 1) surface geological data collected during the last two decades of structural and stratigraphic field works in the internal as well as external sectors of the chain; 2) subsurface geological data including: a) interpretation of 1200 Km of seismic reflection profiles tied to surface geology and b) analysis of 39 boreholes stratigraphies. The construction of two regional NE-SW trending cross-sections (the Levanto-Pontremoli-Parma to the North and the La Spezia-Sarzana-North Apuane-Cerreto to the South), connected by the NW-SE trending Taro River-Lunigiana Area-Alpi Apuane composite section, allowed us to illustrate (i) the role of out-of-sequence blind thrusting in the basement, (ii) the presence of low angle normal faulting and its relationships with recent to active high angle normal faulting. Both extensional and contractional systems have relevant implications for the

  12. Testing the influence of vertical, pre-existing joints on normal faulting using analogue and 3D discrete element models (DEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettermann, Michael; von Hagke, Christoph; Virgo, Simon; Urai, Janos L.

    2015-04-01

    Brittle rocks are often affected by different generations of fractures that influence each other. We study pre-existing vertical joints followed by a faulting event. Understanding the effect of these interactions on fracture/fault geometries as well as the development of dilatancy and the formation of cavities as potential fluid pathways is crucial for reservoir quality prediction and production. Our approach combines scaled analogue and numerical modeling. Using cohesive hemihydrate powder allows us to create open fractures prior to faulting. The physical models are reproduced using the ESyS-Particle discrete element Modeling Software (DEM), and different parameters are investigated. Analogue models were carried out in a manually driven deformation box (30x28x20 cm) with a 60° dipping pre-defined basement fault and 4.5 cm of displacement. To produce open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper were mounted in the box to a depth of 5 cm at a spacing of 2.5 cm. Powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely (column height of 19 cm), and the paper was removed. We tested the influence of different angles between the strike of the basement fault and the joint set (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20°, and 25°). During deformation we captured structural information by time-lapse photography that allows particle imaging velocimetry analyses (PIV) to detect localized deformation at every increment of displacement. Post-mortem photogrammetry preserves the final 3-dimensional structure of the fault zone. We observe that no faults or fractures occur parallel to basement-fault strike. Secondary fractures are mostly oriented normal to primary joints. At the final stage of the experiments we analyzed semi-quantitatively the number of connected joints, number of secondary fractures, degree of segmentation (i.e. number of joints accommodating strain), damage zone width, and the map-view area fraction of open gaps. Whereas the area fraction does not change

  13. Effects of lateral variations of crustal rheology on the occurrence of post-orogenic normal faults: The Alto Tiberina Fault (Northern Apennines, Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauselli, Cristina; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-11-01

    The Northern Apennines (NA) are characterized by formerly compressive structures partly overprinted by subsequent extensional structures. The area of extensional tectonics migrated eastward since the Miocene. The youngest and easternmost major expression of extension is the Alto Tiberina Fault (ATF). We estimate 2D rheological profiles across the NA, and conclude that lateral rheological crustal variations have played an important role in the formation of the ATF and similar previously active faults to the west. Lithospheric delamination and mantle degassing resulted in an easterly-migrating extension-compression boundary, coinciding at present with the ATF, where (i) the thickness of the upper crust brittle layer reaches a maximum; (ii) the critical stress difference required to initiate faulting at the base of the brittle layer is at a minimum; and (iii) the total strengths of both the brittle layer and the whole lithosphere are at a minimum. Although the location of the fault is correlated with lithospheric rheological properties, the rheology by itself does not account for the low dip ( 20°) of the ATF. Two hypotheses are considered: (a) the low dip of the ATF is related to a rotation of the stress tensor at the time of initiation of the fault, caused by a basal shear stress ( 100 MPa) possibly related to corner flow associated with delamination; or (b) the low dip is associated to low values of the friction coefficient (≤ 0.5) coupled with high pore pressures related to mantle degassing. Our results establishing the correlation between crustal rheology and the location of the ATF are relatively robust, as we have examined various possible compositions and rheological parameters. They also provide possible general indications on the mechanisms of localized extension in post-orogenic extensional setting. The hypotheses to account for the low dip of the ATF, on the other hand, are intended simply to suggest possible solutions worthy of further study.

  14. Imaging normal faults in alluvial fans using geophysical techniques: Field example from the coast of Gulf of Aqaba, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    In this work we use geophysical methods to locate and characterize active faults in alluvial sediments. Since only subtle material and velocity contrasts are expected across the faults, we used seismic refraction tomography and 2D resistivity imaging to locate the fault. One seismic profile and one 2D resistivity profile are collected at an alluvial fan on the Gulf of Aqaba coast in Saudi Arabia. The collected data are inverted to generate the traveltime tomogram and the electric resistivity tomogram (ERT). A low velocity anomaly is shown on the traveltime tomogram indicates the colluvial wedge associated with the fault. The location of the fault is shown on the ERT as a vertical high resistivity anomaly.

  15. Holocene Time-slip history of normal fault scarps in western Turkey: 36Cl surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari Amiri, N.; Sümer, Ö.; Tikhomirov, D.; Özkaymak, Ç.; Uzel, B.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Vockenhuber, C.; Sözbilir, H.; Akçar, N.

    2016-12-01

    Bedrock fault scarps built in carbonates are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct long-term seismic outline using 36Cl cosmogenic nuclides. The western Anatolia is an active seismic region, in which several major graben systems are formed mainly in carbonates commenced by roughly N-S extensional regime since the early Miocene. The oldest known earthquake in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East dates back to 464 B.C. However, to evaluate the earthquake pattern, a complete seismic data over a large time-scale is required. For modelling of seismic periods, a Matlab® code is used based on acceleration of production rate of 36Cl following exposure of fresh material to cosmic rays. By measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height on the fault surface, the timing of significant ruptures and vertical displacements are explored. The best scenario is obtained with the minimum difference between the modelled and measured 36Cl. An ideal target spot is a minimum-eroded surface with length of at least two meters from the intersection of the fault with colluvium. After continuous marking of 10 cm height and 15 cm width on the fault, the samples of 3 cm thick are collected. The geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are measured. Topographic shielding, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are also estimated. Afterwards, the samples are physically and chemically prepared in laboratory for elemental analysis and AMS measurements. In this study, we collected 584 samples from seven major faults in western Anatolia. Our first results indicate five earthquake sequences in the Priene-Sazlı fault since early Holocene with a recurrence interval of approximately 2000 years and slip of 1.3 to 2.9 meters. The two most recent ruptures are correlated with 1955 and 68 AD earthquakes. A slip rate of roughly 1 mm/yr throughout the activity periods is estimated. Regarding the rupture length, the fault has potential

  16. Kinematics and dynamics of salt movement driven by sub-salt normal faulting and supra-salt sediment accumulation - combined analogue experiments and analytical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsitzka, Michael; Kukowski, Nina; Kley, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    In extensional sedimentary basins, the movement of ductile salt is mainly controlled by the vertical displacement of the salt layer, differential loading due to syn-kinematic deposition, and tectonic shearing at the top and the base of the salt layer. During basement normal faulting, salt either tends to flow downward to the basin centre driven by its own weight or it is squeezed upward due to differential loading. In analogue experiments and analytical models, we address the interplay between normal faulting of the sub-salt basement, compaction and density inversion of the supra-salt cover and the kinematic response of the ductile salt layer. The analogue experiments consist of a ductile substratum (silicone putty) beneath a denser cover layer (sand mixture). Both layers are displaced by normal faults mimicked through a downward moving block within the rigid base of the experimental apparatus and the resulting flow patterns in the ductile layer are monitored and analysed. In the computational models using an analytical approximative solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, the steady-state flow velocity in an idealized natural salt layer is calculated in order to evaluate how flow patterns observed in the analogue experiments can be translated to nature. The analytical calculations provide estimations of the prevailing direction and velocity of salt flow above a sub-salt normal fault. The results of both modelling approaches show that under most geological conditions salt moves downwards to the hanging wall side as long as vertical offset and compaction of the cover layer are small. As soon as an effective average density of the cover is exceeded, the direction of the flow velocity reverses and the viscous material is squeezed towards the elevated footwall side. The analytical models reveal that upward flow occurs even if the average density of the overburden does not exceed the density of salt. By testing various scenarios with different layer thicknesses

  17. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  18. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  19. A grid side converter current controller for accurate current injection under normal and fault ride through operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjidemetriou, Lenos; Kyriakides, Elias; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    requirements. In addition, the renewable energy systems require fault ride through capability in order to support the power grid under balanced or unbalanced low voltage grid faults. Therefore, the development of advanced current controller techniques is essential for the grid side power electronic converters...... controller is designed using multiple synchronous reference frames and can inject full positive or full negative sequence balanced sinusoidal currents under abnormal grid conditions. The accurate performance with robustness against unbalanced and harmonic distorted grid voltage indicates that the proposed...

  20. Postseismic Deformation of Large Normal Faulting Earthquakes in the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain with Implications for Lithospheric Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Smith, R. B.; Puskas, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent deformation of the Hebgen Lake fault, MT, was measured by trilateration and campaign GPS from 1973 to 2000 following the 18 August 1959 Mw=7.3 Hebgen Lake earthquake that occurred at the northwest edge of the Yellowstone volcanic system in an extensional tectonic regime. Integrated analysis of the geodetic measurements shows time-dependent extension of baseline-length across the area with average rates of 4 to 6 mm/yr. Rheological models derived by these data using VISCO1D suggest that the lithosphere is stronger near the fault zone, and weaker in the vicinity of the Yellowstone caldera where higher heat flow and a thinner brittle crust were suggested by surface temperature measurements, gravity data, and earthquake focal depths. Our models also imply a more viscous lower crust than the upper mantle, in agreement with a corollary that the continental mantle has relatively low long-term stress. Since 2005, the EarthScope-PBO project has deployed an array of 12 continuously operated GPS stations across the Hebgen Lake fault and aftershock zone to assess intraplate postseismic deformation and to model lithospheric rheology. The comparison between the observed and modeled horizontal velocities of the continuous GPS stations suggested that the magnitude of postseismic relaxation from the Hebgen Lake earthquake is less than 20% of the contemporary ground motion. In addition, we evaluated continuous GPS data from 14 stations that span the Lost River fault, ID, to measure the postseismic deformation associated with the1983 Mw=6.9 Borah Peak earthquake. The data reveal extensional rates of 1-2 mm/yr across the Lost River fault zone. Preliminary results of viscoelastic modeling using the results from our Hebgen Lake rheologic model suggest that the combined postseismic relaxation of the above two earthquakes produced horizontal ground motions up to ~1-2 mm/yr across the Lost River fault, thus notably affecting the contemporary deformation field of the eastern

  1. River profile response to normal fault growth and linkage: an example from the Hellenic forearc of south-central Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Sean F.; Wegmann, Karl W.

    2017-02-01

    Topography is a reflection of the tectonic and geodynamic processes that act to uplift the Earth's surface and the erosional processes that work to return it to base level. Numerous studies have shown that topography is a sensitive recorder of tectonic signals. A quasi-physical understanding of the relationship between river incision and rock uplift has made the analysis of fluvial topography a popular technique for deciphering relative, and some argue absolute, histories of rock uplift. Here we present results from a study of the fluvial topography from south-central Crete, demonstrating that river longitudinal profiles indeed record the relative history of uplift, but several other processes make it difficult to recover quantitative uplift histories. Prior research demonstrates that the south-central coastline of Crete is bound by a large ( ˜ 100 km long) E-W striking composite normal fault system. Marine terraces reveal that it is uplifting between 0.1 and 1.0 mm yr-1. These studies suggest that two normal fault systems, the offshore Ptolemy and onshore South-Central Crete faults, linked together in the recent geologic past (ca. 0.4-1 My BP). Fault mechanics predict that when adjacent faults link into a single fault the uplift rate in footwalls of the linkage zone will increase rapidly. We use this natural experiment to assess the response of river profiles to a temporal jump in uplift rate and to assess the applicability of the stream power incision model to this setting. Using river profile analysis we show that rivers in south-central Crete record the relative uplift history of fault growth and linkage as theory predicts that they should. Calibration of the commonly used stream power incision model shows that the slope exponent, n, is ˜ 0.5, contrary to most studies that find n ≥ 1. Analysis of fluvial knickpoints shows that migration distances are not proportional to upstream contributing drainage area, as predicted by the stream power incision model

  2. The complex architecture of the 2009 MW 6.1 L'Aquila normal fault system (Central Italy) as imaged by 64,000 high-resolution aftershock locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoroso, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Piccinini, D.; Schaff, D. P.; Waldhauser, F.

    2011-12-01

    On April 6th 2009, a MW 6.1 normal faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in Central Italy. We present high-precision hypocenter locations of an extraordinary dataset composed by 64,000 earthquakes recorded at a very dense seismic network of 60 stations operating for 9 months after the main event. Events span in magnitude (ML) between -0.9 to 5.9, reaching a completeness magnitude of 0.7. The dataset has been processed by integrating an accurate automatic picking procedure together with cross-correlation and double-difference relative location methods. The combined use of these procedures results in earthquake relative location uncertainties in the range of a few meters to tens of meters, comparable/lower than the spatial dimension of the earthquakes themselves). This data set allows us to image the complex inner geometry of individual faults from the kilometre to meter scale. The aftershock distribution illuminates the anatomy of the en-echelon fault system composed of two major faults. The mainshock breaks the entire upper crust from 10 km depth to the surface along a 14-km long normal fault. A second segment, located north of the normal fault and activated by two Mw>5 events, shows a striking listric geometry completely blind. We focus on the analysis of about 300 clusters of co-located events to characterize the mechanical behavior of the different portions of the fault system. The number of events in each cluster ranges from 4 to 24 events and they exhibit strongly correlated seismograms at common stations. They mostly occur where secondary structures join the main fault planes and along unfavorably oriented segments. Moreover, larger clusters nucleate on secondary faults located in the overlapping area between the two main segments, where the rate of earthquake production is very high with a long-lasting seismic decay.

  3. Should ground-motion records be rotated to fault-normal/parallel or maximum direction for response history analysis of buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Juan C.; Kalkan, Erol

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, regulatory seismic codes (for example, California Building Code) require at least two sets of horizontal ground-motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal and fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately—when FN and then FP direction are aligned with transverse direction of the building axes. This approach is assumed to lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. The validity of this assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of single-story structures having symmetric (torsionally stiff) and asymmetric (torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of near-fault ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield-strength reduction factors, R, are varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. Further validations are performed using 3D computer models of 9-story structures having symmetric and asymmetric layouts subjected to the same ground-motion set. The influence of the ground-motion rotation angle on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in both linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form benchmarks for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions and also the maximum direction (MD). The MD ground motion is a new definition for horizontal ground motions for use in site-specific ground-motion procedures for seismic design according to provisions of the American Society of Civil Engineers/Seismic Engineering Institute (ASCE/SEI) 7-10. The results of this study have important implications for current practice, suggesting that ground motions rotated to MD or FN/FP directions do not necessarily provide

  4. The 1996 Mw 6.6 Lijiang earthquake: Application of JERS-1 SAR interferometry on a typical normal-faulting event in the northwestern Yunnan rift zone, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lingyun; Wang, Qingliang; Xu, Jing; Feng, Jiangang

    2017-09-01

    The northwestern Yunnan rift zone in the Yunnan Province of China is a seismically active region located along the western boundary of the Sichuan-Yunnan Block on the eastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.6 (Mw) occurred in this region on February 3, 1996. The Lijiang earthquake was the largest normal-faulting event to occur along the western boundary of the Sichuan-Yunnan Block in the last 40 years. In this study, we used L-band JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1) SAR data sets from two descending orbits to detect surface deformation signals surrounding the epicentral region in order to estimate the source parameters through an inversion of the displacement fields. The results indicated that the earthquake can be explained by slip along two segments of the ∼N-S trending listric normal fault, named the Lijiang-Daju fault. Coseismic deformation patterns and slip distributions revealed that the earthquake consisted of two sub-events, which were also suggested by seismological results. Based on an analysis of the static Coulomb stress change, the second sub-event was likely triggered by the first sub-event. The central segment of the Lijiang-Daju fault, which has an eastward-convex geometry, did not rupture during the earthquake. This phenomenon was probably related to a geometrical discontinuity at the fault-bend area of the Lijiang-Daju fault.

  5. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  6. Coulomb stress transfer and fault interaction over millennia on non-planar active normal faults: the Mw 6.5-5.0 seismic sequence of 2016-2017, central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildon, Zoe K.; Roberts, Gerald P.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Iezzi, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    In order to investigate the importance of including strike-variable geometry and the knowledge of historical and palaeoseismic earthquakes when modelling static Coulomb stress transfer and rupture propagation, we have examined the August-October 2016 A.D. and January 2017 A.D. central Apennines seismic sequence (Mw 6.0, 5.9, 6.5 in 2016 A.D. (INGV) and Mw 5.1, 5.5, 5.4, 5.0 in 2017 A.D. (INGV)). We model both the coseismic loading (from historical and palaeoseismic earthquakes) and interseismic loading (derived from Holocene fault slip-rates) using strike-variable fault geometries constrained by fieldwork. The inclusion of the elapsed times from available historical and palaeoseismological earthquakes and on faults enables us to calculate the stress on the faults prior to the beginning of the seismic sequence. We take account the 1316-4155 yr elapsed time on the Mt. Vettore fault (that ruptured during the 2016 A.D. seismic sequence) implied by palaeoseismology, and the 377 and 313 yr elapsed times on the neighbouring Laga and Norcia faults respectively, indicated by the historical record. The stress changes through time are summed to show the state of stress on the Mt. Vettore, Laga and surrounding faults prior to and during the 2016-2017 A.D. sequence. We show that the build up of stress prior to 2016 A.D. on strike-variable fault geometries generated stress heterogeneities that correlate with the limits of the main-shock ruptures. Hence, we suggest that stress barriers appear to have control on the propagation and therefore the magnitudes of the main-shock ruptures.

  7. The relationship between normal and strike-slip faults in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, and its implications for stress rotation and partitioning of deformation in the east-central Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atilla; de Joussineau, Ghislain

    2014-06-01

    This study expands on our earlier studies of the evolution of fracturing and faulting in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed over a large area in the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada. Based on a nearly three-dimensional data set collected from 200-m-high cliff-face exposures with stair-case morphology composed of steep and flat parts, we find that a series of inclined, relatively low-angle normal faults and their splay fractures are precursors of the strike-slip fault network that we previously documented. We discuss the significance of this finding in terms of the tectonics of the broader area, stress rotation, partitioning of deformation, and the development of fracture clusters with compartmentalization of the structures as a function of spatial, depositional and deformational domains.

  8. Faults Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  9. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  10. Slip Rates and Scarp Profiles, Using Terrestrial LiDAR to Quantify Deformation on the Aberdeen Fault, South-Eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P.; Cowgill, E.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution topographic measurements form the basis for slip-rate studies along active fault systems. However, meter-scale features such as fault scarps or offset terrace risers are insufficiently resolved on available remotely-sensed digital elevation models (e.g., 10 m NED), rendering it necessary to make field- based topographic measurements. Terrestrial or tripod mounted LiDAR (T-LiDAR) is a recent technology that has proved useful for making these types of high resolution measurements. In this study we used T-LiDAR to constrain the morphology of a series of fault scarps offsetting an alluvial fan and the flank of a cinder cone along the Aberdeen fault in the eastern Owens Valley. This site lies on the western edge of the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ), a region defined by northwest striking right lateral faulting in south eastern California and western Nevada that accommodates 20-25% of Pacific-North American relative plate motion. The Aberdeen fault is one of a series of northeast striking normal faults that are thought to transfer slip from west to east within the ECSZ. With the T-LiDAR unit, we collected a ~17 million point data set covering an area of ~350 x 150 m from which we generated a 20cm DEM. These data allowed us to study and measure in great detail the series of fault scarps that offset the flank of the cinder cone and the alluvial fan. Located at the northeast end of the Aberdeen fault, this series of scarps exhibits a ~70° change in azimuth moving east along strike as the fault curves into the range front. Using a hillshade image created from the 20cm DEM, we selected three points from one continuous scarp that offsets the fan and the cinder cone from which we calculated a fault dip of 39°. The high resolution of the hillshade DEM also proved critical in interpreting slip history on this section of the Aberdeen fault by showing definitive evidence for two faulting events. Using a series of scarp profiles derived from the T-LiDAR data

  11. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  12. Seismological Studies for Tensile Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Bin Ou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A shear slip fault, an equivalence of a double couple source, has often been assumed to be a kinematic source model in ground motion simulation. Estimation of seismic moment based on the shear slip model indicates the size of an earthquake. However, if the dislocation of the hanging wall relative to the footwall includes not only a shear slip tangent to the fault plane but also expansion and compression normal to the fault plane, the radiating seismic waves will feature differences from those out of the shear slip fault. Taking account of the effects resulting from expansion and compression to a fault plane, we can resolve the tension and pressure axes as well as the fault plane solution more exactly from ground motions than previously, and can evaluate how far a fault zone opens or contracts during a developing rupture. In addition to a tensile angle and Poisson¡¦s ratio for the medium, a tensile fault with five degrees of freedom has been extended from the shear slip fault with only three degrees of freedom, strike, dip, and slip.

  13. Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

    2013-07-01

    Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

  14. Late Cenozoic cooling history of the central Menderes Massif: Timing of the Büyük Menderes detachment and the relative contribution of normal faulting and erosion to rock exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Glotzbach, Christoph; Heineke, Caroline; Nilius, Nils-Peter; Hetzel, Ralf; Hampel, Andrea; Akal, Cüneyt; Dunkl, István; Christl, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Based on new thermochronological data and 10Be-derived erosion rates from the southern part of the central Menderes Massif (Aydın block) in western Turkey, we provide new insights into the tectonic evolution and landscape development of an area that undergoes active continental extension. Fission-track and (U-Th)/He data reveal that the footwall of the Büyük Menderes detachment experienced two episodes of enhanced cooling and exhumation. Assuming an elevated geothermal gradient of 50 °C/km, the first phase occurred with an average rate of 0.90 km/Myr in the middle Miocene and the second one in the latest Miocene and Pliocene with a rate of 0.43 km/Myr. The exhumation rates between these two phases were lower and range from 0.14 to 0.24 km/Myr, depending on the distance to the detachment. Cosmogenic nuclide-based erosion rates for catchments in the Aydın block range from 0.1 to 0.4 km/Myr. The similarity of the erosion rates on both sides of the Aydın block (northern and southern flank) indicate that a rather symmetric erosion pattern has prevailed during the Holocene. If these millennial erosion rates are representative on a million-year timescale they indicate that, apart from normal faulting, erosion in the hanging wall of the Büyük Menderes detachment fault did also contribute to the exhumation of the metamorphic rocks.

  15. Integrated seismic interpretation of the Carlsberg Fault zone, Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Thybo, Hans; Jørgensen, Mette Iwanouw

    2005-01-01

    We locate the concealed Carlsberg Fault zone along a 12-km-long trace in the Copenhagen city centre by seismic refraction, reflection and fan profiling. The Carlsberg Fault is located in a NNW-SSE striking fault system in the border zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent...... the fault zone. The fault zone is a shadow zone to shots detonated outside the fault zone. Finite-difference wavefield modelling supports the interpretations of the fan recordings. Our fan recording approach facilitates cost-efficient mapping of fault zones in densely urbanized areas where seismic normal...

  16. Optimal fault signal estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Niemann, H.H.; Saberi, A.; Sannuti, P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider here both fault identification and fault signal estimation. Regarding fault identification, we seek either exact or almost fault identification. On the other hand, regarding fault signal estimation, we seek either $H_2$ optimal, $H_2$ suboptimal or Hinfinity suboptimal estimation. By

  17. Development of Fault Models for Hybrid Fault Detection and Diagnostics Algorithm: October 1, 2014 -- May 5, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Howard; Braun, James E.

    2015-12-31

    This report describes models of building faults created for OpenStudio to support the ongoing development of fault detection and diagnostic (FDD) algorithms at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Building faults are operating abnormalities that degrade building performance, such as using more energy than normal operation, failing to maintain building temperatures according to the thermostat set points, etc. Models of building faults in OpenStudio can be used to estimate fault impacts on building performance and to develop and evaluate FDD algorithms. The aim of the project is to develop fault models of typical heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment in the United States, and the fault models in this report are grouped as control faults, sensor faults, packaged and split air conditioner faults, water-cooled chiller faults, and other uncategorized faults. The control fault models simulate impacts of inappropriate thermostat control schemes such as an incorrect thermostat set point in unoccupied hours and manual changes of thermostat set point due to extreme outside temperature. Sensor fault models focus on the modeling of sensor biases including economizer relative humidity sensor bias, supply air temperature sensor bias, and water circuit temperature sensor bias. Packaged and split air conditioner fault models simulate refrigerant undercharging, condenser fouling, condenser fan motor efficiency degradation, non-condensable entrainment in refrigerant, and liquid line restriction. Other fault models that are uncategorized include duct fouling, excessive infiltration into the building, and blower and pump motor degradation.

  18. Groundwater flow through anisotropic fault zones in multiaquifer systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, E.I.; Bakker, M.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical faults through the shallow crust are commonly believed to act as either barriers to horizontal groundwater flow normal to the fault, conduits to horizontal flow tangential to the fault, or a combination of both. In addition, enhanced vertical permeability has been identified as a common

  19. A New Fault-tolerant Switched Reluctance Motor with reliable fault detection capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Fault-Tolerant Switched Reluctance (FTSR) motor is proposed in this paper. A unique feature of this special design is that it allows use of the unexcited phase coils as search coils for fault detection. Therefore this new motor has all the advantages of using search coils for reliable fault detection......For reliable fault detection, often, search coils are used in many fault-tolerant drives. The search coils occupy extra slot space. They are normally open-circuited and are not used for torque production. This degrades the motor performance, increases the cost and manufacture complexity. A new...... while no extra search coil is actually needed. The motor itself is able to continue to work under any faulted conditions, providing fault-tolerant features. The working principle, performance evaluation of this motor will be demonstrated in this paper and Finite Element Analysis results are provided....

  20. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collettini, C.; Niemeijer, A.; Viti, C.; Marone, C.

    2009-01-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak1–6 compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength7. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals4, high fluid pressures within the fault core8,9 and dynamic processes such as

  1. A Concept for fault tolerant controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    This paper describe a concept for fault tolerant controllers (FTC) based on the YJBK (after Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno and Kucera) parameterization. This controller architecture will allow to change the controller on-line in the case of faults in the system. In the described FTC concept, a safe mode...... controller is applied as the basic feedback controller. A controller for normal operation with high performance is obtained by including certain YJBK parameters (transfer functions) in the controller. This will allow a fast switch from normal operation to safe mode operation in case of critical faults...

  2. Fault diagnosis of sensor networked structures with multiple faults using a virtual beam based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Jing, X. J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a virtual beam based approach suitable for conducting diagnosis of multiple faults in complex structures with limited prior knowledge of the faults involved. The ;virtual beam;, a recently-proposed concept for fault detection in complex structures, is applied, which consists of a chain of sensors representing a vibration energy transmission path embedded in the complex structure. Statistical tests and adaptive threshold are particularly adopted for fault detection due to limited prior knowledge of normal operational conditions and fault conditions. To isolate the multiple faults within a specific structure or substructure of a more complex one, a 'biased running' strategy is developed and embedded within the bacterial-based optimization method to construct effective virtual beams and thus to improve the accuracy of localization. The proposed method is easy and efficient to implement for multiple fault localization with limited prior knowledge of normal conditions and faults. With extensive experimental results, it is validated that the proposed method can localize both single fault and multiple faults more effectively than the classical trust index subtract on negative add on positive (TI-SNAP) method.

  3. Fault Severity Evaluation and Improvement Design for Mechanical Systems Using the Fault Injection Technique and Gini Concordance Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fault injection and Gini concordance based method has been developed for fault severity analysis for multibody mechanical systems concerning their dynamic properties. The fault tree analysis (FTA is employed to roughly identify the faults needed to be considered. According to constitution of the mechanical system, the dynamic properties can be achieved by solving the equations that include many types of faults which are injected by using the fault injection technique. Then, the Gini concordance is used to measure the correspondence between the performance with faults and under normal operation thereby providing useful hints of severity ranking in subsystems for reliability design. One numerical example and a series of experiments are provided to illustrate the application of the new method. The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately model the faults and receive the correct information of fault severity. Some strategies are also proposed for reliability improvement of the spacecraft solar array.

  4. Detachment faults:Evidence for a low-angle origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert J.; Lister, Gordon S.

    1992-09-01

    The origin of low-angle normal faults or detachment faults mantling metamorphic core complexes in the southwestern United States remains controversial. If σ1 is vertical during extension, the formation of, or even slip along, such low-angle normal faults is mechanically implausible. No records exist of earthquakes on low-angle normal faults in areas currently undergoing continental extension, except from an area of actively forming core complexes in the Solomon Sea, Papua New Guinea. In light of such geophysical and mechanical arguments, W. R. Buck and B. Wernicke and G. J. Axen proposed models in which detachment faults originate as high-angle normal faults, but rotate to low angles and become inactive as extension proceeds. These models are inconsistent with critical field relations in several core complexes. The Rawhide fault, an areally extensive detachment fault in western Arizona, propagated at close to its present subhorizontal orientation late in the Tertiary extension of the region. Neither the Wernicke and Axen nor Buck models predict such behavior; in fact, both models preclude the operation of low-angle normal faults. We must seek alternative explanations or modify existing models to explain the evidence that detachment faults form and operate with gentle dips.

  5. On concentrated solute sources in faulted aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. I.; Werner, A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Finite aperture faults and fractures within aquifers (collectively called 'faults' hereafter) theoretically enable flowing water to move through them but with refractive displacement, both on entry and exit. When a 2D or 3D point source of solute concentration is located upstream of the fault, the plume emanating from the source relative to one in a fault-free aquifer is affected by the fault, both before it and after it. Previous attempts to analyze this situation using numerical methods faced challenges in overcoming computational constraints that accompany requisite fine mesh resolutions. To address these, an analytical solution of this problem is developed and interrogated using statistical evaluation of solute distributions. The method of solution is based on novel spatial integral representations of the source with axes rotated from the direction of uniform water flow and aligning with fault faces and normals. Numerical exemplification is given to the case of a 2D steady state source, using various parameter combinations. Statistical attributes of solute plumes show the relative impact of parameters, the most important being, fault rotation, aperture and conductivity ratio. New general observations of fault-affected solution plumes are offered, including: (a) the plume's mode (i.e. peak concentration) on the downstream face of the fault is less displaced than the refracted groundwater flowline, but at some distance downstream of the fault, these realign; (b) porosities have no influence in steady state calculations; (c) previous numerical modeling results of barrier faults show significant boundary effects. The current solution adds to available benchmark problems involving fractures, faults and layered aquifers, in which grid resolution effects are often barriers to accurate simulation.

  6. Influence of host lithofacies on fault rock variation in carbonate fault zones: A case study from the Island of Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, E. A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Relatively few studies have examined fault rock microstructures in carbonates. Understanding fault core production helps predict the hydraulic behaviour of faults and the potential for reservoir compartmentalisation. Normal faults on Malta, ranging from fracture networks that develop into breccias. Alternatively, this lithofacies is commonly recrystallised. In contrast, in the coarse-grained, heterogeneous grain-dominated carbonates the development of faulting is characterised by localised deformation, creating protocataclasite and cataclasite fault rocks. Cementation also occurs within some grain-dominated carbonates close to and on slip surfaces. Fault rock variation is a function of displacement as well as juxtaposed lithofacies. An increase in fault rock variability is observed at higher displacements, potentially creating a more transmissible fault, which opposes what may be expected in siliciclastic and crystalline faults. Significant heterogeneity in the fault rock types formed is likely to create variable permeability along fault-strike, potentially allowing across-fault fluid flow. However, areas with homogeneous fault rocks may generate barriers to fluid flow.

  7. Fault-Tolerant Approach for Modular Multilevel Converters under Submodule Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Fujin; Tian, Yanjun; Zhu, Rongwu

    2016-01-01

    The modular multilevel converter (MMC) is attractive for medium- or high-power applications because of the advantages of its high modularity, availability, and high power quality. The fault-tolerant operation is one of the important issues for the MMC. This paper proposed a fault-tolerant approach...... for the MMC under submodule (SM) faults. The characteristic of the MMC with arms containing different number of healthy SMs under faults is analyzed. Based on the characteristic, the proposed approach can effectively keep the MMC operation as normal under SM faults. It can effectively improve the MMC...... performance under SM faults but without the knowledge of the number of the faulty SMs in the arm, without extra demand on communication systems, which potentially increases the reliability. The time-domain simulation studies with the PSCAD/EMTDC are conducted and a down-scale MMC prototype is also tested...

  8. Adaptive PCA based fault diagnosis scheme in imperial smelting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhikun; Chen, Zhiwen; Gui, Weihua; Jiang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fault detection scheme based on a recursive principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to deal with the problem of false alarm due to normal process changes in real process. Our further study is also dedicated to develop a fault isolation approach based on Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLR) test and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) which is one of general techniques of PCA, on which the off-set and scaling fault can be easily isolated with explicit off-set fault direction and scaling fault classification. The identification of off-set and scaling fault is also applied. The complete scheme of PCA-based fault diagnosis procedure is proposed. The proposed scheme is first applied to Imperial Smelting Process, and the results show that the proposed strategies can be able to mitigate false alarms and isolate faults efficiently. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fault classification method for the driving safety of electrified vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Daniel; Drugge, Lars; Stensson Trigell, Annika

    2014-05-01

    A fault classification method is proposed which has been applied to an electric vehicle. Potential faults in the different subsystems that can affect the vehicle directional stability were collected in a failure mode and effect analysis. Similar driveline faults were grouped together if they resembled each other with respect to their influence on the vehicle dynamic behaviour. The faults were physically modelled in a simulation environment before they were induced in a detailed vehicle model under normal driving conditions. A special focus was placed on faults in the driveline of electric vehicles employing in-wheel motors of the permanent magnet type. Several failures caused by mechanical and other faults were analysed as well. The fault classification method consists of a controllability ranking developed according to the functional safety standard ISO 26262. The controllability of a fault was determined with three parameters covering the influence of the longitudinal, lateral and yaw motion of the vehicle. The simulation results were analysed and the faults were classified according to their controllability using the proposed method. It was shown that the controllability decreased specifically with increasing lateral acceleration and increasing speed. The results for the electric driveline faults show that this trend cannot be generalised for all the faults, as the controllability deteriorated for some faults during manoeuvres with low lateral acceleration and low speed. The proposed method is generic and can be applied to various other types of road vehicles and faults.

  10. Episodic activity of a dormant fault in tectonically stable Europe: The Rauw fault (NE Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Koen; Wouters, Laurent; Vanneste, Kris; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Vandenberghe, Dimitri; Beerten, Koen; Rogiers, Bart; Schiltz, Marco; Burow, Christoph; Mees, Florias; De Grave, Johan; Vandenberghe, Noël

    2017-03-01

    Our knowledge about large earthquakes in stable continental regions comes from studies of faults that generated historical surface rupturing earthquakes or were identified by their recent imprint in the morphology. Here, we evaluate the co-seismic character and movement history of the Rauw fault in Belgium, which lacks geomorphological expression and historical/present seismicity. This 55-km-long normal fault, with known Neogene and possibly Early Pleistocene activity, is the largest offset fault west of the active Roer Valley Graben. Its trace was identified in the shallow subsurface based on high resolution geophysics. All the layers within the Late Pliocene Mol Formation (3.6 to 2.59 Ma) are displaced 7 m vertically, without growth faulting, but deeper deposits show increasing offset. A paleoseismic trench study revealed cryoturbated, but unfaulted, late glacial coversands overlying faulted layers of Mol Formation. In-between those deposits, the fault tip was eroded, along with evidence for individual displacement events. Fragmented clay gouge observed in a micromorphology sample of the main fault evidences co-seismic faulting, as opposed to fault creep. Based on optical and electron spin resonance dating and trench stratigraphy, the 7 m combined displacement is bracketed to have occurred between 2.59 Ma and 45 ka. The regional presence of the Sterksel Formation alluvial terrace deposits, limited to the hanging wall of the Rauw fault, indicates a deflection of the Meuse/Rhine confluence (1.0 to 0.5 Ma) by the fault's activity, suggesting that most of the offset occurred prior to/at this time interval. In the trench, Sterksel Formation is eroded but reworked gravel testifies for its former presence. Hence, the Rauw fault appears as typical of plate interior context, with an episodic seismic activity concentrated between 1.0 and 0.5 Ma or at least between 2.59 Ma to 45 ka, possibly related to activity variations in the adjacent, continuously active Roer Valley

  11. Active faulting and folding along the Jumilla Fault Zone, northeastern Betics, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Balen, R. T.; Forzoni, A.; Van Dam, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Jumilla Fault Zone (JFZ) is an ENE-WSW topographic lineament in the external part of the eastern Betic Cordillera. It represents an active fault. Three small basins are aligned along the JFZ, the La Celia-, Alqueria- and Jumilla basins. The tectonic geomorphology of the La Celia- and Alqueria basins consists of folds, a set of normal fault scarps, strike-slip lineaments, fault-springs, tectonically-modified drainage lines and elevated gypsum/anhydrite diapirs. Two of the scarps are normal faults generated by the extensional collapse of one of the folds. The other scarps are secondary normal faults generated by transtensional left-lateral motions along the JFZ. Normal fault scarps that developed on conglomerates are considerably steeper (~ 30°) than those affecting softer marly materials (post-Messinian deposits in the studied basins. The discrepancy between the age of the tectonic landforms and the late Neogene age of the basin infill can be explained by an endo- to exhorheic change in the drainage system, due to the capture of the ancient basin lake system by tributaries of the nearby Segura river. The cessation of sedimentation in the basins resulted in the preservation of tectonic landforms.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Thrust Fault Rupture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuchian, Vahe

    Thrust fault earthquakes are investigated in the laboratory by generating dynamic shear ruptures along pre-existing frictional faults in rectangular plates. A considerable body of evidence suggests that dip-slip earthquakes exhibit enhanced ground motions in the acute hanging wall wedge as an outcome of broken symmetry between hanging and foot wall plates with respect to the earth surface. To understand the physical behavior of thrust fault earthquakes, particularly ground motions near the earth surface, ruptures are nucleated in analog laboratory experiments and guided up-dip towards the simulated earth surface. The transient slip event and emitted radiation mimic a natural thrust earthquake. High-speed photography and laser velocimeters capture the rupture evolution, outputting a full-field view of photo-elastic fringe contours proportional to maximum shearing stresses as well as continuous ground motion velocity records at discrete points on the specimen. Earth surface-normal measurements validate selective enhancement of hanging wall ground motions for both sub-Rayleigh and super-shear rupture speeds. The earth surface breaks upon rupture tip arrival to the fault trace, generating prominent Rayleigh surface waves. A rupture wave is sensed in the hanging wall but is, however, absent from the foot wall plate: a direct consequence of proximity from fault to seismometer. Signatures in earth surface-normal records attenuate with distance from the fault trace. Super-shear earthquakes feature greater amplitudes of ground shaking profiles, as expected from the increased tectonic pressures required to induce super-shear transition. Paired stations measure fault parallel and fault normal ground motions at various depths, which yield slip and opening rates through direct subtraction of like components. Peak fault slip and opening rates associated with the rupture tip increase with proximity to the fault trace, a result of selective ground motion amplification in the

  13. GN and C Fault Protection Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This is a companion presentation for a paper by the same name for the same conference. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on the fundamentals of fault tolerant design for GN&C. The common heritage of ideas behind both faulted and normal operation is explored, as is the increasingly indistinct line between these realms in complex missions. Techniques in common practice are then evaluated in this light to suggest a better direction for future efforts.

  14. Is there really an active fault (Cibyra Fault?) cutting the Stadion of the ancient city of Cibyra? (Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitez, İrem; Yaltırak, Cenk

    2013-04-01

    The Cibyra segment of the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone (BFFZ) is in a tectonically very active region of southwestern Anatolia. The presence of the Cibyra Fault was firstly suggested by Akyüz and Altunel (1997, 2001). Researchers identified traces of historical earthquakes in Cibyra by taking into account the collapsed seat rows on the east side of the stadion as reference. They claimed that the NNE-SSW left lateral fault Cibyra Fault (related to Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone) continues through Pliocene sediments on both eastern and western sides of the stadion of Cibyra. The questionable left-lateral fault had been examined in detail by ourselves during our 60-days accommodation in the ancient city of Cibyra excavations for the Burdur-Fethiye Fault Zone Project in 2008, 2009 and 2012. A left-lateral offset on the Stadion was firstly mentioned in a study whose aim is to find the traces of Burdur-Fethiye Fault (Akyüz and Altunel, 2001) and many researchers accepted this fault by reference (for example Alçiçek et al. 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006 and Karabacak, 2011). However as a result of the field observations it is understood that there is no fault cutting the Stadion. By the reason of the fact that there are a lot of faults in the region, however the fault that devastated the ancient city is unknown. The deformation traces on the ruins of the ancient city display a seismic movement occured in the region. It is strongly possible that this movement is related to the NE-SW left lateral oblique normal fault named as Cibyra Fault at the northwestern side of the city. Especially the ravages in the eastern part of the city indicate that the deformations are related to ground properties. If the rotation and overturn movement are considered and if both movements are the product of the same earthquake, the real Cibyra Fault is compatible with normal fault with left lateral compenent. After the 2011 excavations and 2012 field studies, the eastern wall of the Stadion showed that

  15. Fault detection and isolation in systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The problem of fault detection and isolation of parametric faults is considered in this paper. A fault detection problem based on parametric faults are associated with internal parameter variations in the dynamical system. A fault detection and isolation method for parametric faults is formulated...

  16. Iowa Bedrock Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This fault coverage locates and identifies all currently known/interpreted fault zones in Iowa, that demonstrate offset of geologic units in exposure or subsurface...

  17. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  18. Software fault tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Kazinov, Tofik Hasanaga; Mostafa, Jalilian Shahrukh

    2009-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce errorfree software, software fault tolerance is and will contiune to be an important consideration in software system. The root cause of software design errors in the complexity of the systems. This paper surveys various software fault tolerance techniquest and methodologies. They are two gpoups: Single version and Multi version software fault tolerance techniques. It is expected that software fault tolerance research will benefit from this research...

  19. Integrated seismic interpretation of the Carlsberg Fault zone, Copenhagen, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lars; Thybo, Hans; Jørgensen, Mette I.

    2005-08-01

    We locate the concealed Carlsberg Fault zone along a 12-km-long trace in the Copenhagen city centre by seismic refraction, reflection and fan profiling. The Carlsberg Fault is located in a NNW-SSE striking fault system in the border zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent earthquakes indicate that this area is tectonically active. A seismic refraction study across the Carlsberg Fault shows that the fault zone is a low-velocity zone and marks a change in seismic velocity structure. A normal incidence reflection seismic section shows a coincident flower-like structure. We have recorded seismic signals in a fan geometry from shots detonated both inside the low-velocity fault zone and up to ~500 m away from the fault zone. The seismic energy was recorded on three receiver arrays (1.5- to 2.4-km-long arcs) across the expected location of the ~400- to 700-m-wide fault zone at distances of up to ~7 km from the shots. Shots detonated inside the fault zone result in (1) weak and delayed first arrivals on the receivers located inside the fault zone compared to earlier and stronger first arrivals outside the fault zone; (2) strong guided P and S waves as well as surface waves inside the fault zone. The fault zone is a shadow zone to shots detonated outside the fault zone. Finite-difference wavefield modelling supports the interpretations of the fan recordings. Our fan recording approach facilitates cost-efficient mapping of fault zones in densely urbanized areas where seismic normal incidence and refraction profiling are not feasible.

  20. Basement Fault Reactivation by Fluid Injection into Sedimentary Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Eichhubl; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Many suspected injection-induced earthquakes occur in crystalline basement rather than in the overlying sedimentary injection reservoir. To address why earthquakes nucleate in the basement rather than the injection layer we investigate the relationship between pore pressure diffusion, rock matrix deformation, and induced fault reactivation through 3D fully coupled poroelastic finite element models. These models simulate the temporal and spatial perturbation of pore pressure and solid stresses within a basement fault that extends into overlying sedimentary layers and that is conductive for flow along the fault but a barrier for flow across. We compare the effects of direct pore pressure communication and indirect poroelastic stress transfer from the injection reservoir to the fault on increasing the Coulomb failure stress that could reactivate the basement fault for normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting stress regimes. Our numerical results demonstrate that volumetric expansion of the reservoir causes a bending of the fault near the injector and induces shear tractions along the downdip direction of the fault in the basement. These induced shear tractions act to increase the Coulomb failure stress for a normal faulting stress regime, and decrease the Coulomb failure stress for a reverse faulting regime. For a strike-slip faulting stress regime, the induced shear tractions increase the Coulomb failure stress both in the reservoir and basement. The induced normal traction on the fault reduces the Coulomb failure stress in all three tectonic regimes, but is larger in the reservoir than in the basement due to the more pronounced poroelastic effect in the reservoir. As a result, strike-slip stress regimes favor fault reactivation in the basement. Whereas the magnitude of the direct pore pressure increase exceeds the magnitude of induced poroelastic stress change, the poroelastic stress change increases the Coulomb failure stress in the basement fault for the normal

  1. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  2. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  3. Model-Based Fault Diagnosis in Electric Drive Inverters Using Artificial Neural Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masrur, Abul; Chen, ZhiHang; Zhang, Baifang; Jia, Hongbin; Murphey, Yi-Lu

    2006-01-01

    .... A normal model and various faulted models of the inverter-motor combination were developed, and voltages and current signals were generated from those models to train an artificial neural network for fault diagnosis...

  4. Coordination Control Strategy for Compound Fault of MMC-HVDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ming Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-line to ground fault of DC side and sub-module fault are typical faults of MMC-HVDC. When each of the above faults occurs, the system will give a signal for circuit-breaker releasing, this will result in interruption of power delivery, the stability of the system is greatly reduced. When these two faults occur simultaneously, research on control strategy for compound fault will help to improve the reliability of the system. While single-line to ground fault of DC side happens, only the electric potential auxiliary point of DC side is changed, system’s power transport normally. When sub-module is fault, redundancy fault-tolerated control strategy is presented, which replace the failed sub-modules with equal number of redundant sub-modules, it can restrain the fluctuation of direct current. A double terminals and 21 voltage-level MMC-HVDC system simulation model is set up in PSCAD/EMTDC. From the computation and simulation results, it is concluded that the proposed control strategy is correct for above compound fault, it can achieve rapid recovery after faults, effectively improve fault tolerance of the system, develop the stability and reliability of the system.

  5. Information Based Fault Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2008-01-01

    Fault detection and isolation, (FDI) of parametric faults in dynamic systems will be considered in this paper. An active fault diagnosis (AFD) approach is applied. The fault diagnosis will be investigated with respect to different information levels from the external inputs to the systems....... These inputs are disturbance inputs, reference inputs and auxilary inputs. The diagnosis of the system is derived by an evaluation of the signature from the inputs in the residual outputs. The changes of the signatures form the external inputs are used for detection and isolation of the parametric faults....

  6. Surface breakthrough of a basement fault by repeated seismic slip episodes: The Ostler Fault, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisetti, Francesca C.; Gorman, Andrew R.; Sibson, Richard H.

    2007-12-01

    The Ostler Fault is one of the major active reverse faults in the piedmont of the Southern Alps, SE of the Alpine Fault. We present a new geological and morphotectonic map of the southern Ostler Fault, integrated with two seismic reflection profiles across the active central segments of the fault. Segmented, subparallel scarps define a N-S belt (˜40 km long and 2-3 km wide) of pure reverse faults, which upthrow and back-tilt a panel of Plio-Pleistocene terrestrial units (2.4-1.0 Ma) plus the overlying glacial outwash (chronology of newly faulted markers, and tectonically controlled diversion of paleodrainages, all indicate progressive S to N breakthrough of the surface trace of the Ostler Fault in the last 2.4 Ma. The new seismic data define a main fault segment dipping 50°-60°W to depths of ˜1.5 km, with a vertical throw of 800 m, and a shortening of ˜30%. The fault geometry and kinematics and the subsurface data favor the interpretation that the Ostler Fault propagated updip across the Plio-Quaternary terrestrial sequence as the emerging, high-angle splay of an inherited Late Cretaceous-Paleocene normal fault, that underwent repeated cycles of compressional reactivation in the last 2.4 Ma.

  7. Fault isolability conditions for linear systems with additive faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...... can occur simultaneously, whereas faults belonging to different fault sets appear disjoint in time. The proposed fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme consists of three steps. A fault detection (FD) step is followed by a fault set isolation (FSI) step. Here the fault set is isolated wherein...... the faults have occurred. The last step is a fault isolation (FI) of the faults occurring in a specific fault set, i.e. equivalent with the standard FI step....

  8. Deformation characteristics and history along the Ilkwang Fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K.; Kim, Y.; Yang, S.; Choi, J.

    2009-12-01

    The NNE-SSW trending Ilkwang Fault is one of the major structural features around SE Korea. It is a high angle, right-lateral strike-slip fault with a displacement of about 1.2 km. The basement around the fault is Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic rocks forming a part of the Gyeongsang Basin in SE Korea, and it is intruded by later igneous rocks. The fault has not been studied intensively due to poor exposure along the fault. However, understanding the characteristics of the Ilkwang Fault is important because three nuclear power plants and one nuclear waste disposal site are located around the fault. We have mainly investigated along the new road-cut sections of the Busan-Ulsan Highway. Many geologic structures such as dykes, folds, and faults are measured in several studied sites. The analyzed structural patterns indicate multi-deformation including reactivation of pre-existing faults. In this study, we analyzed variation patterns of attitude on the beddings and fractures around some parts of the Ilkwang Fault. The strike/dip variation from the general attitude of the structural elements (e.g. beddings) is here used as an indicator of deformation intensity across the fault. This analysis indicates that respect distances (highly deformed area affected by faulting) along the Ilkwang Fault is about 1 km in sedimentary rocks and 200 m in volcanic rocks, respectively. It indicates that the Ilkwang Fault is a relatively big fault, and layered sedimentary rock is relatively weaker than massive volcanic rock under brittle deformation. Deformation history in the studied area, based on kinematic analysis of faults, joints and dykes, is as follows: 1) NNE-SSW trending reverse fault and fold. 2) E-W trending reverse fault and N-S trending acidic dykes. 3) ENE-WSW trending left-lateral fault, NNE-SSW trending right-lateral fault, and NE-SW trending basic dykes. 4) E-W trending normal fault. 5) N-S or NNE-SSW trending reverse fault.

  9. Identification of Lembang fault, West-Java Indonesia by using controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanny, Teuku A.

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine boundary and how to know surrounding area between Lembang Fault and Cimandiri fault. For the detailed study we used three methodologies: (1). Surface deformation modeling by using Boundary Element method and (2) Controlled Source Audiomagneto Telluric (CSAMT). Based on the study by using surface deformation by using Boundary Element Methods (BEM), the direction Lembang fault has a dominant displacement in east direction. The eastward displacement at the nothern fault block is smaller than the eastward displacement at the southern fault block which indicates that each fault block move in left direction relative to each other. From this study we know that Lembang fault in this area has left lateral strike slip component. The western part of the Lembang fault move in west direction different from the eastern part that moves in east direction. Stress distribution map of Lembang fault shows difference between the eastern and western segments of Lembang fault. Displacement distribution map along x-direction and y-direction of Lembang fault shows a linement oriented in northeast-southwest direction right on Tangkuban Perahu Mountain. Displacement pattern of Cimandiri fault indicates that the Cimandiri fault is devided into two segment. Eastern segment has left lateral strike slip component while the western segment has right lateral strike slip component. Based on the displacement distribution map along y-direction, a linement oriented in northwest-southeast direction is observed at the western segment of the Cimandiri fault. The displacement along x-direction and y-direction between the Lembang and Cimandiri fault is nearly equal to zero indicating that the Lembang fault and Cimandiri Fault are not connected to each others. Based on refraction seismic tomography that we know the characteristic of Cimandiri fault as normal fault. Based on CSAMT method th e lembang fault is normal fault that different of dip which formed as

  10. The use of outcrop data in fault prediction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, Oeystein

    1997-12-31

    This thesis begins by describing deformation structures formed by gravitational sliding in partially lithified sediments by studying the spatial variation in frequency of deformation structures, as well as their geometries and kinematics, the sequential development of an ancient slide is outlined. This study brings to light a complex deformation history which was associated with block gliding, involving folding, listric faulting, small-scale boudinage and clastic dyke injection. The collapse deformation which is documented in the basal part of a gliding sheet is described for the first time. Further, rift-related normal faults formed in a continental sequence of normal beds are described and there is a focus on the scaling behaviour of faults in variably cemented sandstones. It is shown that the displacement population coefficients of faults are influenced by the local lithology and hence scaling of faults is not uniform on all scales and is variable in different parts of a rock volume. The scaling behaviour of small faults is linked to mechanical heterogeneities in the rock and to the deformation style. It is shown that small faults occur in an aureole around larger faults. Strain and scaling of the small faults were measured in different structural positions relative to the major faults. The local strain field is found to be variable and can be correlated with drag folding along the master faults. A modeling approach is presented for prediction of small faults in a hydrocarbon reservoir. By modeling an outcrop bedding surface on a seismic workstation, outcrop data could be compared with seismic data. Further, well data were used to test the relationships inferred from the analogue outcrops. The study shows that seismic ductile strain can be correlated with the distribution of small faults. Moreover, the use of horizontal structural well data is shown to calibrate the structural interpretation of faulted seismic horizons. 133 refs., 64 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The northwest trending north Boquerón Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone; A through going active fault system in southwestern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig‐Silva, Coral Marie; Asencio, Eugenio; Joyce, James

    2013-01-01

    The North Boquerón Bay–Punta Montalva fault zone has been mapped crossing the Lajas Valley in southwest Puerto Rico. Identification of the fault was based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images, and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (local magnitude greater than 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east–west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults striking mostly toward the northeast. Northeast-trending fractures and normal faults can be found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, an east–west-trending 30-km-long fault-controlled depression. Areas of preferred erosion within the alluvial fan trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the onland projection of the North Boquerón Bay fault. The North Boquerón Bay fault aligns with the Punta Montalva fault southeast of the Lajas Valley. Both faults show strong southward tilting of Miocene strata. On the western end, the Northern Boquerón Bay fault is covered with flat-lying Holocene sediments, whereas at the southern end the Punta Montalva fault shows left-lateral displacement of stream drainage on the order of a few hundred meters.

  12. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleis...

  13. Deploying correct fault loop in distance protection of multiple-circuit shared tower transmission lines with different voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2018-01-01

    Combined faults occurring between different voltage levels in overhead lines present a challenge for distance protection. Previous work has shown that such faults most often appears as single phase to ground (SPTG) faults in a normal type of overhead line. However, it is not obvious that distance...... relays will identify and select the correct fault loop according to being similar to SPTG, as all six fault loops get excited when combined faults occur. This paper presents a study where two distance relays of different manufactures are tested using transient replay and secondary test equipment......, in order to reveal which fault loops are activated and whether a safe trip for combined faults happens...

  14. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  15. Integration of Fault Detection and Isolation with Control Using Neuro-fuzzy Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asokan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an algorithms is developed for fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control strategy for nonlinear systems subjected to an unknown time-varying fault. At first, the design of fault diagnosis scheme is performed using model based fault detection technique. The neuro-fuzzy chi-square scheme is applied for fault detection and isolation. The fault magnitude and time of occurrence of fault is obtained through neuro-fuzzy chi-square scheme. The estimated magnitude of the fault magnitude is normalized and used by the feed-forward control algorithm to make appropriate changes in the manipulated variable to keep the controlled variable near its set value. The feed-forward controller acts along with feed-back controller to control the multivariable system. The performance of the proposed scheme is applied to a three- tank process for various types of fault inputs to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Fault creep rates of the Chaman fault (Afghanistan and Pakistan) inferred from InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Chaman fault is the major strike-slip structural boundary between the India and Eurasia plates. Despite sinistral slip rates similar to the North America-Pacific plate boundary, no major (>M7) earthquakes have been documented along the Chaman fault, indicating that the fault either creeps aseismically or is at a late stage in its seismic cycle. Recent work with remotely sensed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series documented a heterogeneous distribution of fault creep and interseismic coupling along the entire length of the Chaman fault, including an 125 km long creeping segment and an 95 km long locked segment within the region documented in this study. Here I present additional InSAR time series results from the Envisat and ALOS radar missions spanning the southern and central Chaman fault in an effort to constrain the locking depth, dip, and slip direction of the Chaman fault. I find that the fault deviates little from a vertical geometry and accommodates little to no fault-normal displacements. Peak-documented creep rates on the fault are 9-12 mm/yr, accounting for 25-33% of the total motion between India and Eurasia, and locking depths in creeping segments are commonly shallower than 500 m. The magnitude of the 1892 Chaman earthquake is well predicted by the total area of the 95 km long coupled segment. To a first order, the heterogeneous distribution of aseismic creep combined with consistently shallow locking depths suggests that the southern and central Chaman fault may only produce small to moderate earthquakes (

  17. New active faults on Eurasian-Arabian collision zone: Tectonic activity of Özyurt and Gülsünler faults (Eastern Anatolian Plateau, Van-Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicle, S.; Üner, S.

    2017-11-01

    The Eastern Anatolian Plateau emerges from the continental collision between Arabian and Eurasian plates where intense seismicity related to the ongoing convergence characterizes the southern part of the plateau. Active deformation in this zone is shared by mainly thrust and strike-slip faults. The Özyurt thrust fault and the Gülsünler sinistral strike-slip fault are newly determined fault zones, located to the north of Van city centre. Different types of faults such as thrust, normal and strike-slip faults are observed on the quarry wall excavated in Quaternary lacustrine deposits at the intersection zone of these two faults. Kinematic analysis of fault-slip data has revealed coeval activities of transtensional and compressional structures for the Lake Van Basin. Seismological and geomorphological characteristics of these faults demonstrate the capability of devastating earthquakes for the area.

  18. Underground power line fault locating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, L.D.; Flath, R.K.

    1993-08-24

    A method is described of locating a fault in a polyphase power distribution system power distributing power from a bulk power source to power consumers, the power distribution system having a substation feeding a fused switch gear unit, a first vault, and at least one subsequent vault receiving power from the first vault, the first vault distributing power from the fused switch gear unit among plural outgoing underground power lines, each underground outgoing power line supplying power to at least one power consumer, the method comprising the steps of: checking fusing within the fused switch gear unit to determine in which phase the fault has occurred; checking the continuity of a power line interconnecting the fused switch gear unit and the first vault; identifying the fused switch gear unit and the first vault which normally supply power to a line having the fault; installing a fault indicator on each underground outgoing power line of the faulted phase in the first vault and in each subsequent vault; inserting a current limiting fuse in series with and between the fused switch gear unit and the first vault; reenergizing the first vault plural outgoing underground power lines through the current limiting fuse and causing the current limiting fuse to blow; and reading each fault indicator after the reenergizing step to determine the location of the fault. A method according to claim 7 for an underground power distribution system wherein at least one underground outgoing power line delivers power to at least one distribution transformer, wherein the step of installing the fault indicators further comprises installing a fault indicator on each distribution transformer.

  19. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  20. The relationship of near-surface active faulting to megathrust splay fault geometry in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Northrup, C.; Pratt, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    We interpret regionally extensive, active faults beneath Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, to be structurally linked to deeper megathrust splay faults, such as the one that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Western PWS in particular is unique; the locations of active faulting offer insights into the transition at the southern terminus of the previously subducted Yakutat slab to Pacific plate subduction. Newly acquired high-resolution, marine seismic data show three seismic facies related to Holocene and older Quaternary to Tertiary strata. These sediments are cut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of megathrust splay. Crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A distinct boundary coinciding beneath the Hinchinbrook Entrance causes a systematic fault trend change from N30E in southwestern PWS to N70E in northeastern PWS. The fault trend change underneath Hinchinbrook Entrance may occur gradually or abruptly and there is evidence for similar deformation near the Montague Strait Entrance. Landward of surface expressions of the splay fault, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes. Surface exposures of Tertiary rocks throughout PWS along with new apatite-helium dates suggest long-term and regional uplift with localized, fault-controlled subsidence.

  1. Fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on fault mode for ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel fault tolerant control with torque limitation based on the fault mode for the ten-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM under various open-circuit and short-circuit fault conditions, which includes the optimal torque control and the torque limitation control based on the fault mode. The optimal torque control is adopted to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque operation for the ten-phase motor system under the post-fault condition. Furthermore, we systematically analyze the load capacity of the ten-phase motor system under different fault modes. And a torque limitation control approach based on the fault mode is proposed, which was not available earlier. This approach is able to ensure the safety operation of the faulted motor system in long operating time without causing the overheat fault. The simulation result confirms that the proposed fault tolerant control for the ten-phase motor system is able to guarantee the ripple-free electromagnetic torque and the safety operation in long operating time under the normal and fault conditions.

  2. Fault control on patterns of Quaternary monogenetic vents in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cone populations reveal that monogenetic vent alignments and the long axes of elongate cones are parallel to and spatially linked with mapped normal faults. This is consistent with the overall sub- latitudinal extension direction in the Quaternary deduced from fault slip analysis and earthquake focal mechanism solutions.

  3. Transpressional inversion in an extensional transfer zone (the Saltacaballos fault, northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Luís; Alonso, Juan Luís; Pulgar, Javier A.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Luís Roberto

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with an extensional transfer zone and its main structure, the Saltacaballos fault, developed during Early Cretaceous times, and obliquely inverted during the Alpine shortening. Geological mapping and structural analysis were carried out to determine the kinematic history of the deformation. The Saltacaballos ridge is the relay zone between two major and conjugate normal fault systems: the Bilbao and the La Granja-Samano fault systems. Three distinct phases in the structural evolution of this transfer zone can be identified. (1) During the initial stages of extensional deformation, shallow-water marine limestones were deposited on the relay ridge and deep-water marls on the flanking depocenters. At the same time, submarine landslides developed on paleoslope generated either by normal drag or by a fault-propagation fold related to the Saltacaballos normal fault. (2) With increasing displacement, normal faults antithetic to the Saltacaballos fault were developed probably in response to the collapse of its hanging-wall. (3) During the subsequent Alpine compressional stage, these normal faults were reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults as a result of transpressional inversion, whereas previous extensional fault-related folds were tightened. At the same time, some normal faults were overturned as a consequence of passive rotation in fold limbs.

  4. Managing systems faults on the commercial flight deck: Analysis of pilots' organization and prioritization of fault management information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William H.

    1993-01-01

    In rare instances, flight crews of commercial aircraft must manage complex systems faults in addition to all their normal flight tasks. Pilot errors in fault management have been attributed, at least in part, to an incomplete or inaccurate awareness of the fault situation. The current study is part of a program aimed at assuring that the types of information potentially available from an intelligent fault management aiding concept developed at NASA Langley called 'Faultfinde' (see Abbott, Schutte, Palmer, and Ricks, 1987) are an asset rather than a liability: additional information should improve pilot performance and aircraft safety, but it should not confuse, distract, overload, mislead, or generally exacerbate already difficult circumstances.

  5. Fault zone architecture within Miocene–Pliocene syn-rift sediments ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study focusses on field description of small normal fault zones in Upper Miocene–Pliocene sedimentary rocks on the northwestern side of the Red Sea, Egypt. The trend of these fault zones is mainly NW–SE. Paleostress analysis of 17 fault planes and slickenlines indicate that the tension direction is NE–SW.

  6. Complex Paleotopography and Faulting near the Elsinore Fault, Coyote Mountains, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, M. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Coyote Mountains of southern California are bounded on the southwest by the Elsinore Fault, an active dextral fault within the San Andreas Fault zone. According to Axen and Fletcher (1998) and Dorsey and others (2011), rocks exposed in these mountains comprise a portion of the hanging wall of the east-vergent Salton Detachment Fault, which was active from the late Miocene-early Pliocene to Ca. 1.1-1.3 Ma. Detachment faulting was accompanied by subsidence, resulting in deposition of a thick sequence of marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks. Regional detachment faulting and subsidence ceased with the inception of the Elsinore Fault, which has induced uplift of the Coyote Mountains. Detailed geologic mapping in the central Coyote Mountains supports the above interpretation and adds some intriguing details. New discoveries include a buttress unconformity at the base of the Miocene/Pliocene section that locally cuts across strata at an angle so high that it could be misinterpreted as a fault. We thus conclude that the syn-extension strata were deposited on a surface with very rugged topography. We also discovered that locally-derived nonmarine gravel deposits exposed near the crest of the range, previously interpreted as part of the Miocene Split Mountain Group by Winker and Kidwell (1996), unconformably overlie units of the marine Miocene/Pliocene Imperial Group and must therefore be Pliocene or younger. The presence of such young gravel deposits on the crest of the range provides evidence for its rapid uplift. Additional new discoveries flesh out details of the structural history of the range. We mapped just two normal faults, both of which were relatively minor, thus supporting Axen and Fletcher's assertion that the hanging wall block of the Salton Detachment Fault had not undergone significant internal deformation during extension. We found abundant complex synthetic and antithetic strike-slip faults throughout the area, some of which offset Quaternary alluvial

  7. Uncovering dynamic fault trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junges, Sebastian; Guck, Dennis; Katoen, Joost P.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    Fault tree analysis is a widespread industry standard for assessing system reliability. Standard (static) fault trees model the failure behaviour of systems in dependence of their component failures. To overcome their limited expressive power, common dependability patterns, such as spare management,

  8. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  9. Fault Tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, S.A.

    failures. It is often feasible to increase availability for these control loops by designing the control system to perform on-line detection and reconfiguration in case of faults before the safety system makes a close-down of the process. A general development methodology is given in the thesis......This thesis considered the development of fault tolerant control systems. The focus was on the category of automated processes that do not necessarily comprise a high number of identical sensors and actuators to maintain safe operation, but still have a potential for improving immunity to component...... that carried the control system designer through the steps necessary to consider fault handling in an early design phase. It was shown how an existing control loop with interface to the plant wide control system could be extended with three additional modules to obtain fault tolerance: Fault detection...

  10. Solar system fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  11. Systematic Fault Tolerant Control Based on Adaptive Thau Observer Estimation for Quadrotor Uavs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cen Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A systematic fault tolerant control (FTC scheme based on fault estimation for a quadrotor actuator, which integrates normal control, active and passive FTC and fault parking is proposed in this paper. Firstly, an adaptive Thau observer (ATO is presented to estimate the quadrotor rotor fault magnitudes, and then faults with different magnitudes and time-varying natures are rated into corresponding fault severity levels based on the pre-defined fault-tolerant boundaries. Secondly, a systematic FTC strategy which can coordinate various FTC methods is designed to compensate for failures depending on the fault types and severity levels. Unlike former stand-alone passive FTC or active FTC, our proposed FTC scheme can compensate for faults in a way of condition-based maintenance (CBM, and especially consider the fatal failures that traditional FTC techniques cannot accommodate to avoid the crashing of UAVs. Finally, various simulations are carried out to show the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Detection and treatment of faults in manufacturing systems based on Petri Nets

    OpenAIRE

    Riascos, L. A. M.; Moscato, L. A.; Miyagi, P. E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces a methodology for modeling and analyzing fault-tolerant manufacturing systems that not only optimizes normal productive processes, but also performs detection and treatment of faults. This approach is based on the hierarchical and modular integration of Petri Nets. The modularity provides the integration of three types of processes: those representing the productive process, fault detection, and fault treatment. The hierarchical aspect of the approach permits us to consi...

  13. Fault Management Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  14. Fault-tolerant design

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This textbook serves as an introduction to fault-tolerance, intended for upper-division undergraduate students, graduate-level students and practicing engineers in need of an overview of the field.  Readers will develop skills in modeling and evaluating fault-tolerant architectures in terms of reliability, availability and safety.  They will gain a thorough understanding of fault tolerant computers, including both the theory of how to design and evaluate them and the practical knowledge of achieving fault-tolerance in electronic, communication and software systems.  Coverage includes fault-tolerance techniques through hardware, software, information and time redundancy.  The content is designed to be highly accessible, including numerous examples and exercises.  Solutions and powerpoint slides are available for instructors.   ·         Provides textbook coverage of the fundamental concepts of fault-tolerance; ·         Describes a variety of basic techniques for achieving fault-toleran...

  15. Fault tolerant control for uncertain systems with parametric faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2006-01-01

    A fault tolerant control (FTC) architecture based on active fault diagnosis (AFD) and the YJBK (Youla, Jarb, Bongiorno and Kucera)parameterization is applied in this paper. Based on the FTC architecture, fault tolerant control of uncertain systems with slowly varying parametric faults...

  16. High resolution reflection seismic profiling over the Tjellefonna fault in the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lundberg

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex (MTFC is one of the most prominent fault zones of Norway, both onshore and offshore. In spite of its importance, very little is known of the deeper structure of the individual fault segments comprising the fault complex. Most seismic lines have been recorded offshore or focused on deeper structures. This paper presents results from two reflection seismic profiles, located on each side of the Tingvollfjord, acquired over the Tjellefonna fault in the southeastern part of the MTFC. Possible kilometer scale vertical offsets, reflecting large scale northwest-dipping normal faulting, separating the high topography to the southeast from lower topography to the northwest have been proposed for the Tjellefonna fault or the Baeverdalen lineament. In this study, however, the Tjellefonna fault is interpreted to dip approximately 50–60° towards the southeast to depths of at least 1.3 km. Travel-time modeling of reflections associated with the fault was used to establish the geometry of the fault structure at depth, while detailed analysis of first P-wave arrivals in shot gathers, together with resistivity profiles, were used to define the near surface geometry of the fault zone. A continuation of the structure on the northeastern side of the Tingvollfjord is suggested by correlation of an in strike direction P-S converted reflection (generated by a fracture zone seen on the reflection data from that side of the Tingvollfjord. The reflection seismic data correlate well with resistivity profiles and recently published near surface geophysical data. A highly reflective package forming a gentle antiform structure was also identified on both seismic profiles. This structure could be related to the folded amphibolite lenses seen on the surface or possibly by an important boundary within the gneissic basement rocks of the Western Gneiss Region. The fold hinge line of the structure is parallel with the Tjellefonna fault trace

  17. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers with Unknown Fault Type Using Hybrid Classifier Based on LMD and Time Segmentation Energy Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the identification accuracy of the high voltage circuit breakers’ (HVCBs mechanical fault types without training samples, a novel mechanical fault diagnosis method of HVCBs using a hybrid classifier constructed with Support Vector Data Description (SVDD and fuzzy c-means (FCM clustering method based on Local Mean Decomposition (LMD and time segmentation energy entropy (TSEE is proposed. Firstly, LMD is used to decompose nonlinear and non-stationary vibration signals of HVCBs into a series of product functions (PFs. Secondly, TSEE is chosen as feature vectors with the superiority of energy entropy and characteristics of time-delay faults of HVCBs. Then, SVDD trained with normal samples is applied to judge mechanical faults of HVCBs. If the mechanical fault is confirmed, the new fault sample and all known fault samples are clustered by FCM with the cluster number of known fault types. Finally, another SVDD trained by the specific fault samples is used to judge whether the fault sample belongs to an unknown type or not. The results of experiments carried on a real SF6 HVCB validate that the proposed fault-detection method is effective for the known faults with training samples and unknown faults without training samples.

  18. Fault Analysis in Cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Joye, Marc

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s researchers noticed that radioactive particles produced by elements naturally present in packaging material could cause bits to flip in sensitive areas of electronic chips. Research into the effect of cosmic rays on semiconductors, an area of particular interest in the aerospace industry, led to methods of hardening electronic devices designed for harsh environments. Ultimately various mechanisms for fault creation and propagation were discovered, and in particular it was noted that many cryptographic algorithms succumb to so-called fault attacks. Preventing fault attacks without

  19. Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone (SW Turkey): a myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Langereis, Cornelis; Özkaptan, Murat; Özacar, Arda A.; Gülyüz, Erhan; Uzel, Bora; Sözbilir, Hasan

    2017-04-01

    Fethiye Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) is first proposed by Dumont et al. (1979) as a sinistral strike-slip fault zone as the NE continuation of Pliny-Strabo trench in to the Anatolian Block. The fault zone supposed to accommodate at least 100 km sinistral displacement between the Menderes Massif and the Beydaǧları platform during the exhumation of the Menderes Massif, mainly during the late Miocene. Based on GPS velocities Barka and Reilinger (1997) proposed that the fault zone is still active and accommodates sinistral displacement. In order to test the presence and to unravel its kinematics we have conducted a rigorous paleomagnetic study containing more than 3000 paleomagnetic samples collected from 88 locations and 11700 fault slip data collected from 198 locations distributed evenly all over SW Anatolia spanning from Middle Miocene to Late Pliocene. The obtained rotation senses and amounts indicate slight (around 20°) counter-clockwise rotations distributed uniformly almost whole SW Anatolia and there is no change in the rotation senses and amounts on either side of the FBFZ implying no differential rotation within the zone. Additionally, the slickenside pitches and constructed paleostress configurations, along the so called FBFZ and also within the 300 km diameter of the proposed fault zone, indicated that almost all the faults, oriented parallel to subparallel to the zone, are normal in character. The fault slip measurements are also consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms suggesting active extension in the region. We have not encountered any significant strike-slip motion in the region to support presence and transcurrent nature of the FBFZ. On the contrary, the region is dominated by extensional deformation and strike-slip components are observed only on the NW-SE striking faults which are transfer faults that accommodated extension and normal motion. Therefore, we claim that the sinistral Fethiye Burdur Fault (Zone) is a myth and there is no tangible

  20. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be

  1. Earthquake Hazard and Segmented Fault Evolution, Hat Creek Fault, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, M. W.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Precise insight into surface rupture and the evolution and mechanical interaction of segmented normal fault systems is critical for assessing the potential seismic hazard. The Hat Creek fault is a ~35 km long, NNW trending segmented normal fault system located on the western boundary of the Modoc Plateau and within the extending backarc basin of the Cascadia subduction zone in northern California. The Hat Creek fault has a prominent surface rupture showing evidence of multiple events in the past 15 ka, although there have been no historic earthquakes. In response to interactions with volcanic activity, the fault system has progressively migrated several km westward, causing older scarps to become seemingly inactive, and producing three distinct, semi-parallel scarps with different ages. The oldest scarp, designated the “Rim”, is the farthest west and has up to 352 m of throw. The relatively younger “Pali” scarp has up to 174 m of throw. The young “Active” scarp has a maximum throw of 65 m in the 24±6 ka Hat Creek basalt, with 20 m of throw in ~15 ka glacial gravels (i.e., a Holocene slip rate of ~1.3 mm/yr). Changes in the geometry and kinematics of the separate scarps during the faulting history imply the orientation of the stress field has rotated clockwise, now inducing oblique right-lateral motion. Previous studies suggested that the Active scarp consists of 7 left-stepping segments with a cumulative length of 23.5 km. We advocate that the Active scarp is actually composed of 8 or 9 segments and extends 4 km longer than previous estimates. This addition to the active portion of the fault is based on detailed mapping of a young surface rupture in the northern portion of the fault system. This ~30 m high young scarp offsets lavas that erupted from Cinder Butte, a low shield volcano, but has a similar geometry and properties as the Active scarp in the Hat Creek basalt. At its northern end, the Active scarp terminates at Cinder Butte. Our mapping

  2. Quaternary Fault Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This data set contains locations and information on faults and associated folds in the United States that are believed to be sources of M>6 earthquakes during the...

  3. Inferring earthquake mechanics from exhumed faults (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Toro, G.; Griffith, A.; Nielsen, S. B.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Bistacchi, A.; Mittempergher, S.

    2009-12-01

    Destructive earthquakes nucleate at 7-15 km depth; therefore monitoring active faults at the Earth's surface or interpretation of seismic waves yields limited information regarding earthquake mechanics. A complementary approach involves the integration of field studies of fossil seismic sources now exhumed at the Earth's surface with laboratory friction experiments that reproduce deformation conditions typical of seismic slip. Microstructural and geochemical comparison of the natural and experimental fault rock materials can be used to constrain boundary conditions for theoretical earthquake models. Here we will discuss the preliminary results of a project that takes such an integrated approach. In particular, rock friction experiments, including experiments in a cutting-edge high-velocity-rock-friction apparatus recently installed in Italy, suggest coseismic fault lubrication at seismogenic depths for a variety of host lithologies and tectonic settings. This result is consistent with estimates from field observations and theoretical analysis of rock friction at seismic slip rates. Moreover, experimental and natural fault products have strikingly similar microstructural and geochemical features, suggesting that experiments reproduce natural deformation processes. High velocity friction experiments were performed on smooth surfaces and under low normal stress, so direct extrapolation to seismogenic depths should be performed with caution. For instance, the presence of bumps along natural faults might impede the smooth sliding observed in the experiments. To resolve this scaling issue we measured the fault surface roughness of natural seismogenic faults exposed in large glacially polished outcrops over a range of scales (from 102 to 10-5 m) using (1) terrestrial laser-scanning (LIDAR), (2) orthorectified mosaics of high-resolution digital photographs and, (3) scans of thin sections from cores of the slipping zones. LIDAR scans and photomosaics were georeferenced in 3

  4. Integrated Near-Surface Seismic and Geoelectrical Mapping of the Concealed Carlsberg Fault zone, Copenhagen, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; Thybo, H.; Jorgensen, M. I.

    2004-12-01

    The Carlsberg Fault is located in a NNW-SSE striking fault system in the border zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. Recent earthquakes indicate that this area is tectonically active. We locate the concealed Carlsberg Fault zone along a 12 km long trace in the Copenhagen city center by seismic refraction, reflection and fan profiling. We supplement our seismic investigations with multi-electrode geoelectrical profiling. The seismic refraction study shows that the Carlsberg Fault zone is a low-velocity zone and marks a change in seismic velocity structure. A normal-incidence reflection seismic section shows a coincident flower structure. We have recorded seismic signals in a fan geometry from shots detonated both inside the low-velocity fault zone and up to about 500 m away from the fault zone. The seismic energy was recorded on three receiver arrays (1.5-2.4 km long arcs) across the expected location of the 400-700 m wide fault zone at distances of up to 7 km from the shots. Shots detonated inside the fault zone result in: 1) weak and delayed first arrivals on the receivers located inside the fault zone compared to earlier and stronger first arrivals outside the fault zone; 2) strong guided P- and S-waves as well as surface waves inside the fault zone. The fault zone is a shadow zone to shots detonated outside the fault zone. Finite-difference wavefield modeling supports the interpretations of the fan recordings. Our fan recording approach facilitates cost-efficient mapping of fault zones in densely urbanized areas where seismic normal-incidence and refraction profiling are not feasible. The geoelectrical measurements show that the fault zone is characterized by low resistivities (lower than 5 ohmm), indicating that the fault zone is fractured and water-filled. This interpretation is supported by hydrological measurements conducted by others, which show that the Carlsberg Fault zone is highly permeable.

  5. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved.

  6. Analysis of the fault geometry of a Cenozoic salt-related fault close to the D-1 well, Danish North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenoe Clausen, O.; Petersen, K.; Korstgaard, A.

    1995-12-31

    A normal detaching fault in the Norwegian-Danish Basin around the D-1 well (the D-1 faults) has been mapped using seismic sections. The fault has been analysed in detail by constructing backstripped-decompacted sections across the fault, contoured displacement diagrams along the fault, and vertical displacement maps. The result shows that the listric D-1 fault follows the displacement patterns for blind normal faults. Deviations from the ideal displacement pattern is suggested to be caused by salt-movements, which is the main driving mechanisms for the faulting. Zechstein salt moves primarily from the hanging wall to the footwall and is superposed by later minor lateral flow beneath the footwall. Back-stripping of depth-converted and decompacted sections results in an estimation of the salt-surface and the shape of the fault through time. This procedure then enables a simple modelling of the hanging wall deformation using a Chevron model with hanging wall collapse along dipping surfaces. The modelling indicates that the fault follows the salt surface until the Middle Miocene after which the offset on the fault also may be accommodated along the Top Chalk surface. (au) 16 refs.

  7. Geophysical Imaging of Fault Structures Over the Qadimah Fault, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    AlTawash, Feras

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to use geophysical imaging methods to identify the conjectured location of the ‘Qadimah fault’ near the ‘King Abdullah Economic City’, Saudi Arabia. Towards this goal, 2-D resistivity and seismic surveys were conducted at two different locations, site 1 and site 2, along the proposed trace of the ‘Qadimah fault’. Three processing techniques were used to validate the fault (i) 2-D travel time tomography, (ii) resistivity imaging, and (iii) reflection trim stacking. The refraction traveltime tomograms at site 1 and site 2 both show low-velocity zones (LVZ’s) next to the conjectured fault trace. These LVZ’s are interpreted as colluvial wedges that are often observed on the downthrown side of normal faults. The resistivity tomograms are consistent with this interpretation in that there is a significant change in resistivity values along the conjectured fault trace. Processing the reflection data did not clearly reveal the existence of a fault, and is partly due to the sub-optimal design of the reflection experiment. Overall, the results of this study strongly, but not definitively, suggest the existence of the Qadimah fault in the ‘King Abdullah Economic City’ region of Saudi Arabia.

  8. Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferebee, C.D.; Tapp, J.B. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40 mi, with vertical displacement on the order of 10,000 ft. Samples collected from traverses across the Washita Valley fault have been analyzed. The traverses cross the fault at different stratigraphic levels from Proterozoic igneous basement, through the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Ordovician Simpson and Viola Groups, to the Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group. Several types of fracture systems are documented that reflect mechanical stratigraphy, burial depth during deformation, and episodic movement on the fault. The fractures in the study area include open fracture systems, calcite-filled fractures, tension gashes, and fractures related to pressure solution. The samples were cut parallel to the strike of the fault, vertical-normal to the fault, and horizontal-normal to the fault. These cuts allow examination of the total fracture strain, characterization of the fractures, and statistical analysis of fracture density. From these data, fracture density is shown to decrease exponentially moving away from the primary fault zone. The increased understanding of fracture patterns and characteristics will assist future exploration and development programs involving carbonate reservoirs associated with strike-slip systems.

  9. Structural setting and kinematics of Nubian fault system, SE Western Desert, Egypt: An example of multi-reactivated intraplate strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakran, Shawky; Said, Said Mohamed

    2018-02-01

    Detailed surface geological mapping and subsurface seismic interpretation have been integrated to unravel the structural style and kinematic history of the Nubian Fault System (NFS). The NFS consists of several E-W Principal Deformation Zones (PDZs) (e.g. Kalabsha fault). Each PDZ is defined by spectacular E-W, WNW and ENE dextral strike-slip faults, NNE sinistral strike-slip faults, NE to ENE folds, and NNW normal faults. Each fault zone has typical self-similar strike-slip architecture comprising multi-scale fault segments. Several multi-scale uplifts and basins were developed at the step-over zones between parallel strike-slip fault segments as a result of local extension or contraction. The NNE faults consist of right-stepping sinistral strike-slip fault segments (e.g. Sin El Kiddab fault). The NNE sinistral faults extend for long distances ranging from 30 to 100 kms and cut one or two E-W PDZs. Two nearly perpendicular strike-slip tectonic regimes are recognized in the NFS; an inactive E-W Late Cretaceous - Early Cenozoic dextral transpression and an active NNE sinistral shear.

  10. Fault zone architecture of a major oblique-slip fault in the Rawil depression, Western Helvetic nappes, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, D.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    The Helvetic nappes in the Swiss Alps form a classic fold-and-thrust belt related to overall NNW-directed transport. In western Switzerland, the plunge of nappe fold axes and the regional distribution of units define a broad depression, the Rawil depression, between the culminations of Aiguilles Rouge massif to the SW and Aar massif to the NE. A compilation of data from the literature establishes that, in addition to thrusts related to nappe stacking, the Rawil depression is cross-cut by four sets of brittle faults: (1) SW-NE striking normal faults that strike parallel to the regional fold axis trend, (2) NW-SE striking normal faults and joints that strike perpendicular to the regional fold axis trend, and (3) WNW-ESE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults as well as (4) WSW-ENE striking normal plus dextral oblique-slip faults that both strike oblique to the regional fold axis trend. We studied in detail a beautifully exposed fault from set 3, the Rezli fault zone (RFZ) in the central Wildhorn nappe. The RFZ is a shallow to moderately-dipping (ca. 30-60˚) fault zone with an oblique-slip displacement vector, combining both dextral and normal components. It must have formed in approximately this orientation, because the local orientation of fold axes corresponds to the regional one, as does the generally vertical orientation of extensional joints and veins associated with the regional fault set 2. The fault zone crosscuts four different lithologies: limestone, intercalated marl and limestone, marl and sandstone, and it has a maximum horizontal dextral offset component of ~300 m and a maximum vertical normal offset component of ~200 m. Its internal architecture strongly depends on the lithology in which it developed. In the limestone, it consists of veins, stylolites, cataclasites and cemented gouge, in the intercalated marls and limestones of anastomosing shear zones, brittle fractures, veins and folds, in the marls of anastomosing shear zones, pressure

  11. Fault-tolerant building-block computer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennels, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Ultra-reliable core computers are required for improving the reliability of complex military systems. Such computers can provide reliable fault diagnosis, failure circumvention, and, in some cases serve as an automated repairman for their host systems. A small set of building-block circuits which can be implemented as single very large integration devices, and which can be used with off-the-shelf microprocessors and memories to build self checking computer modules (SCCM) is described. Each SCCM is a microcomputer which is capable of detecting its own faults during normal operation and is described to communicate with other identical modules over one or more Mil Standard 1553A buses. Several SCCMs can be connected into a network with backup spares to provide fault-tolerant operation, i.e. automated recovery from faults. Alternative fault-tolerant SCCM configurations are discussed along with the cost and reliability associated with their implementation.

  12. Quaternary faulting in the Tatra Mountains, evidence from cave morphology and fault-slip analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczygieł Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tectonically deformed cave passages in the Tatra Mts (Central Western Carpathians indicate some fault activity during the Quaternary. Displacements occur in the youngest passages of the caves indicating (based on previous U-series dating of speleothems an Eemian or younger age for those faults, and so one tectonic stage. On the basis of stress analysis and geomorphological observations, two different mechanisms are proposed as responsible for the development of these displacements. The first mechanism concerns faults that are located above the valley bottom and at a short distance from the surface, with fault planes oriented sub-parallel to the slopes. The radial, horizontal extension and vertical σ1 which is identical with gravity, indicate that these faults are the result of gravity sliding probably caused by relaxation after incision of valleys, and not directly from tectonic activity. The second mechanism is tilting of the Tatra Mts. The faults operated under WNW-ESE oriented extension with σ1 plunging steeply toward the west. Such a stress field led to normal dip-slip or oblique-slip displacements. The faults are located under the valley bottom and/or opposite or oblique to the slopes. The process involved the pre-existing weakest planes in the rock complex: (i in massive limestone mostly faults and fractures, (ii in thin-bedded limestone mostly inter-bedding planes. Thin-bedded limestones dipping steeply to the south are of particular interest. Tilting toward the N caused the hanging walls to move under the massif and not toward the valley, proving that the cause of these movements was tectonic activity and not gravity.

  13. Active Fault Isolation in MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    isolation is based directly on the input/output s ignals applied for the fault detection. It is guaranteed that the fault group includes the fault that had occurred in the system. The second step is individual fault isolation in the fault group . Both types of isolation are obtained by applying dedicated......Active fault isolation of parametric faults in closed-loop MIMO system s are considered in this paper. The fault isolation consists of two steps. T he first step is group- wise fault isolation. Here, a group of faults is isolated from other pos sible faults in the system. The group-wise fault...

  14. Faulting and hydration of the Juan de Fuca plate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedimović, Mladen R.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Pablo Canales, J.; Dziak, Robert P.

    2009-06-01

    Multichannel seismic observations provide the first direct images of crustal scale normal faults within the Juan de Fuca plate system and indicate that brittle deformation extends up to ~ 200 km seaward of the Cascadia trench. Within the sedimentary layering steeply dipping faults are identified by stratigraphic offsets, with maximum throws of 110 ± 10 m found near the trench. Fault throws diminish both upsection and seaward from the trench. Long-term throw rates are estimated to be 13 ± 2 mm/kyr. Faulted offsets within the sedimentary layering are typically linked to larger offset scarps in the basement topography, suggesting reactivation of the normal fault systems formed at the spreading center. Imaged reflections within the gabbroic igneous crust indicate swallowing fault dips at depth. These reflections require local alteration to produce an impedance contrast, indicating that the imaged fault structures provide pathways for fluid transport and hydration. As the depth extent of imaged faulting within this young and sediment insulated oceanic plate is primarily limited to approximately Moho depths, fault-controlled hydration appears to be largely restricted to crustal levels. If dehydration embrittlement is an important mechanism for triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes within the subducting slab, then the limited occurrence rate and magnitude of intraslab seismicity at the Cascadia margin may in part be explained by the limited amount of water imbedded into the uppermost oceanic mantle prior to subduction. The distribution of submarine earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca plate system indicates that propagator wake areas are likely to be more faulted and therefore more hydrated than other parts of this plate system. However, being largely restricted to crustal levels, this localized increase in hydration generally does not appear to have a measurable effect on the intraslab seismicity along most of the subducted propagator wakes at the Cascadia margin.

  15. Deformation History And Paleoseismic Importance Of The Eupcheon Fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Kihm, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Korean Peninsula was widely regarded as being located at the relatively stable platform of the Asian continent. However, recently over 20 Quaternary faults have been discovered and reported in SE Korea. The concern on the activities of the faults is increasing, because new unclear power plants and low and medium nuclear waste disposal sites are decided to be located around this area. Especially, the Eupcheon Fault, one of the Quaternary faults, is very close to a nuclear power plant. We carried out tracing and trench surveys to know the characteristics and evolution of the fault. Our research is mainly focused on the fault contacts between Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and Tertiary volcanic rocks, and faulting events inferred from the trench sections. The fault is interpreted as a reactivated reverse fault (N20¢®¨¡E/40¢®¨¡SE) with ~ 6 m displacement. The fault may be developed as a normal fault in the Tertiary period under extensional regime, and it was repeatedly reactivated as a reverse fault at least three times during the Quaternary period under compressional regime, indicating inversion tectonics. Based on the data and interpretation, we suggested an evolution model for the area around the fault.

  16. Faults in Linux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palix, Nicolas Jean-Michel; Thomas, Gaël; Saha, Suman

    2011-01-01

    a major problem? To answer these questions, we have transported the experiments of Chou et al. to Linux versions 2.6.0 to 2.6.33, released between late 2003 and early 2010. We find that Linux has more than doubled in size during this period, but that the number of faults per line of code has been......In 2001, Chou et al. published a study of faults found by applying a static analyzer to Linux versions 1.0 through 2.4.1. A major result of their work was that the drivers directory contained up to 7 times more of certain kinds of faults than other directories. This result inspired a number...... decreasing. And, even though drivers still accounts for a large part of the kernel code and contains the most faults, its fault rate is now below that of other directories, such as arch (HAL) and fs (file systems). These results can guide further development and research efforts. To enable others...

  17. Observations and modeling of shallow fault creep along the San Andreas Fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Meng

    This dissertation focuses on observations and modeling of fault creep in California aiming to understand the relationship between creep and earthquakes and assess the earthquake hazards in California. Chapter 1 gives an introduction of fault creep research in California, geodetic methods used to measure fault creep, and mechanism of fault creep. Chapter 2 documents an investigate on a creep event on the Supersitition Hills Fault in Southern California and the spatial and temporal variations in slip history between 1992 and 2008 using ERS, and Envisat Satellite data confirming that the fault creep is confined within the sediments layer and is probably due to the low normal stress in unconsolidated sediments. Chapter 3 presents a study on triggered slip on faults in the Salton Trough by the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Mw 7.2 earthquake. Chapter 4 compiles geodetic data and investigates the relationship between shallow stress accumulating rate and creep rate. Chapter 5 and 6 explores two technical projects related to fault creep observations in California. Chapter 5 analyzes decorrelation of L-band and C-band interferograms in California with implications for future fault creep study. Chapter 6 proposes an optimal way to combine GPS and InSAR to measure interseismic deformation, including fault creep. The proposed method is compared with other method and the improvements are observed. Chapter 7 presents the conclusions of the previous six chapters. Chapter 8 presents my work in the first two years in graduate school, which is not related to fault creep. We compute global maps of surface minus basal heat flow that show qualitative agreement with heat flow based on the inverse square root of age relation. In the beginning of each chapter, I provide you an earthquake safety tip. I borrowed them from an interesting website for your safety and interests. Hopefully it could be one more motivation to read through my thesis. I didn't bother to invent them, as Ralph Waldo Emerson

  18. Fault Detection for Industrial Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fault-relevant KPCA algorithm is proposed. Then the fault detection approach is proposed based on the fault-relevant KPCA algorithm. The proposed method further decomposes both the KPCA principal space and residual space into two subspaces. Compared with traditional statistical techniques, the fault subspace is separated based on the fault-relevant influence. This method can find fault-relevant principal directions and principal components of systematic subspace and residual subspace for process monitoring. The proposed monitoring approach is applied to Tennessee Eastman process and penicillin fermentation process. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. What is Fault Tolerant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Frei, C. W.; Kraus, K.

    2000-01-01

    availability and reduce the risk of safety hazards. Its aim is to prevent that simple faults develop into serious failure. Fault-tolerant control merges several disciplines to achieve this goal, including on-line fault diagnosis, automatic condition assessment and calculation of remedial actions when a fault......Faults in automated processes will often cause undesired reactions and shut-down of a controlled plant, and the consequences could be damage to the plant, to personnel or the environment. Fault-tolerant control is the synonym for a set of recent techniques that were developed to increase plant...

  20. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr−1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr−1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr−1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting. PMID:28290529

  1. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Niemi, N A

    2017-03-14

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr-1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr-1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr-1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  2. Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Piping Fragility due to Earthquake Fault Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Seog Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifeline system, serving as an energy-supply system, is an essential component of urban infrastructure. In a hospital, for example, the piping system supplies elements essential for hospital operations, such as water and fire-suppression foam. Such nonstructural components, especially piping systems and their subcomponents, must remain operational and functional during earthquake-induced fires. But the behavior of piping systems as subjected to seismic ground motions is very complex, owing particularly to the nonlinearity affected by the existence of many connections such as T-joints and elbows. The present study carried out a probabilistic risk assessment on a hospital fire-protection piping system’s acceleration-sensitive 2-inch T-joint sprinkler components under seismic ground motions. Specifically, the system’s seismic capacity, using an experimental-test-based nonlinear finite element (FE model, was evaluated for the probability of failure under different earthquake-fault mechanisms including normal fault, reverse fault, strike-slip fault, and near-source ground motions. It was observed that the probabilistic failure of the T-joint of the fire-protection piping system varied significantly according to the fault mechanisms. The normal-fault mechanism led to a higher probability of system failure at locations 1 and 2. The strike-slip fault mechanism, contrastingly, affected the lowest fragility of the piping system at a higher PGA.

  3. Late Quaternary faulting in the Sevier Desert driven by magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Niemi, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    Seismic hazard in continental rifts varies as a function of strain accommodation by tectonic or magmatic processes. The nature of faulting in the Sevier Desert, located in eastern Basin and Range of central Utah, and how this faulting relates to the Sevier Desert Detachment low-angle normal fault, have been debated for nearly four decades. Here, we show that the geodetic signal of extension across the eastern Sevier Desert is best explained by magma-assisted rifting associated with Plio-Pleistocene volcanism. GPS velocities from 14 continuous sites across the region are best-fit by interseismic strain accumulation on the southern Wasatch Fault at c. 3.4 mm yr-1 with a c. 0.5 mm yr-1 tensile dislocation opening in the eastern Sevier Desert. The characteristics of surface deformation from field surveys are consistent with dike-induced faulting and not with faults soling into an active detachment. Geologic extension rates of c. 0.6 mm yr-1 over the last c. 50 kyr in the eastern Sevier Desert are consistent with the rates estimated from the geodetic model. Together, these findings suggest that Plio-Pleistocene extension is not likely to have been accommodated by low-angle normal faulting on the Sevier Desert Detachment and is instead accomplished by strain localization in a zone of narrow, magma-assisted rifting.

  4. Wind turbine fault detection and fault tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Johnson, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    In this updated edition of a previous wind turbine fault detection and fault tolerant control challenge, we present a more sophisticated wind turbine model and updated fault scenarios to enhance the realism of the challenge and therefore the value of the solutions. This paper describes...... the challenge model and the requirements for challenge participants. In addition, it motivates many of the faults by citing publications that give field data from wind turbine control tests....

  5. Constraining fault growth rates and fault evolution in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarche, G.; Bull, J. M.; Barnes, P.M.; Taylor, S.K.; Horgan, H.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how faults propagate, grow and interact in fault systems is important because they are primarily responsible for the distribution of strain in the upper crust. They localise deformation and stress release, often producing surface displacements that control sedimentation and fluid flow either by acting as conduits or barriers. Identifying fault spatial distribution, quantifying activity, evaluating linkage mechanism, and estimating fault growth rates are key components in seismic...

  6. Computer hardware fault administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  7. Fault Tolerant Computer Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Sorin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    For many years, most computer architects have pursued one primary goal: performance. Architects have translated the ever-increasing abundance of ever-faster transistors provided by Moore's law into remarkable increases in performance. Recently, however, the bounty provided by Moore's law has been accompanied by several challenges that have arisen as devices have become smaller, including a decrease in dependability due to physical faults. In this book, we focus on the dependability challenge and the fault tolerance solutions that architects are developing to overcome it. The two main purposes

  8. Fault and graben growth along active magmatic divergent plate boundaries in Iceland and Ethiopia

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, D.

    2015-10-08

    Recent studies highlight the importance of annual-scale dike-induced rifting episodes in developing normal faults and graben along the active axis of magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB). However, the longer-term (102-105 years) role of diking on the cumulative surface deformation and evolution of MDPB is not yet well understood. To better understand the longer-term normal faults and graben along the axis of MDPB, we analyze fissure swarms in Iceland and Ethiopia. We first focus on the simplest case of immature fissure swarms, with single dike-fed eruptive fissures; these consist of a <1 km wide graben bordered by normal faults with displacement up to a few meters, consistent with theoretical models and geodetic data. A similar structural pattern is found, with asymmetric and multiple graben, within wider mature fissure swarms, formed by several dike-fed eruptive fissures. We then consider the lateral termination of normal faults along these graben, to detect their upward or downward propagation. Most faults terminate as open fractures on flat surface, suggesting downward fault propagation; this is consistent with recent experiments showing dike-induced normal faults propagating downward from the surface. However, some normal faults also terminate as open fractures on monoclines, which resemble fault propagation folds; this suggests upward propagation of reactivated buried faults, promoted by diking. These results suggest that fault growth and graben development, as well as the longer-term evolution of the axis of MDPB, may be explained only through dike emplacement and that any amagmatic faulting is not necessary.

  9. Fault tolerant control based on active fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2005-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis (AFD) method will be considered in this paper in connection with a Fault Tolerant Control (FTC) architecture based on the YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing controllers. The architecture consists of a fault diagnosis (FD) part and a controller reconfiguration (CR) ...

  10. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30

    installation. Because of some testing problems with the Zenergy fault current limiter, installation was delayed until early 2009 with it being put into operation on March 6, 2009. A malfunction of the FCL controller caused the DC power supply to the superconducting magnet to be turned off. This inserted the FCL impedance into the circuit while it was in normal operation causing a voltage resonance condition. While these voltages never reached a point where damage would occur on customer equipment, steps were taken to insure this would not happen again. The FCL was reenergized with load on December 18, 2009. A fault was experienced on the circuit with the FCL in operation on January 14, 2010. The FCL operated properly and reduced the fault current by about 8%, what was expected from tests and modeling. As of the end of the project, the FCL was still in operation on the circuit. The third phase of the project involved the exploration of several advanced protection ideas that might be at a state where they could be applied to the Circuit of the Future and elsewhere in the SCE electrical system. Based on the work done as part of the literature review and survey, as well as a number of internal meetings with engineering staff at SCE, a number of ideas were compiled. These ideas were then evaluated for applicability and ability to be applied on the Circuit of the Future in the time remaining for the project. Some of these basic ideas were implemented on the circuit including measurement of power quality before and after the FCL. It was also decided that we would take what was learned as part of the Circuit of the Future work and extend it to the next generation circuit protection for SCE. Also at this time, SCE put in a proposal to the DOE for the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration using ARRA funding. SCE was successful in obtaining funding for this proposal, so it was felt that exploration of new protection schemes for this Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration would be a good use of the

  11. The effect of mechanical discontinuities on the growth of faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Bonanno, Emanuele; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The growth of natural faults is controlled by several factors, including the nature of host rocks, the strain rate, the temperature, and the presence of fluids. In this work we focus on the mechanical characteristics of host rocks, and in particular on the role played by thin mechanical discontinuities on the upward propagation of faults and on associated secondary effects such as folding and fracturing. Our approach uses scaled, analogue models where natural rocks are simulated by wet clay (kaolin). A clay cake is placed above two rigid blocks in a hanging wall/footwall configuration on either side of a planar fault. Fault activity is simulated by motor-controlled movements of the hanging wall. We reproduce three types of faults: a 45°-dipping normal fault, a 45°-dipping reverse fault and a 30°-dipping reverse fault. These angles are selected as representative of most natural dip-slip faults. The analogues of the mechanical discontinuities are obtained by precutting the wet clay cake before starting the hanging wall movement. We monitor the experiments with high-resolution cameras and then obtain most of the data through the Digital Image Correlation method (D.I.C.). This technique accurately tracks the trajectories of the particles of the analogue material during the deformation process: this allows us to extract displacement field vectors plus the strain and shear rate distributions on the lateral side of the clay block, where the growth of new faults is best seen. Initially we run a series of isotropic experiments, i.e. experiments without discontinuities, to generate a reference model: then we introduce the discontinuities. For the extensional models they are cut at different dip angles, from horizontal to 45°-dipping, both synthetic and antithetic with respect to the master fault, whereas only horizontal discontinuities are introduced in the contractional models. Our experiments show that such discontinuities control: 1) the propagation rate of faults

  12. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then trow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected from the Yangsan fault system. ESR dates from the this fault system range from 870 to 240 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity continued into the pleistocene.

  13. Fault diagnosis of induction motors

    CERN Document Server

    Faiz, Jawad; Joksimović, Gojko

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, structural approach to fault diagnosis strategy. The different fault types, signal processing techniques, and loss characterisation are addressed in the book. This is essential reading for work with induction motors for transportation and energy.

  14. Fault management and systems knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Pilots are asked to manage faults during flight operations. This leads to the training question of the type and depth of system knowledge required to respond to these faults. Based on discussions with multiple airline operators, there is agreement th...

  15. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can...

  16. Rock friction under variable normal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Lozos, Julian C.; Oglesby, David

    2017-01-01

    This study is to determine the detailed response of shear strength and other fault properties to changes in normal stress at room temperature using dry initially bare rock surfaces of granite at normal stresses between 5 and 7 MPa. Rapid normal stress changes result in gradual, approximately exponential changes in shear resistance with fault slip. The characteristic length of the exponential change is similar for both increases and decreases in normal stress. In contrast, changes in fault normal displacement and the amplitude of small high-frequency elastic waves transmitted across the surface follow a two stage response consisting of a large immediate and a smaller gradual response with slip. The characteristic slip distance of the small gradual response is significantly smaller than that of shear resistance. The stability of sliding in response to large step decreases in normal stress is well predicted using the shear resistance slip length observed in step increases. Analysis of the shear resistance and slip-time histories suggest nearly immediate changes in strength occur in response to rapid changes in normal stress; these are manifested as an immediate change in slip speed. These changes in slip speed can be qualitatively accounted for using a rate-independent strength model. Collectively, the observations and model show that acceleration or deceleration in response to normal stress change depends on the size of the change, the frictional characteristics of the fault surface, and the elastic properties of the loading system.

  17. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  18. The block up fault diagnosis and monitoring method of the 3-product heavy-medium cyclone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Bing; Xiong Shi-bo; Ma Wei-jin [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Research Institute of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering

    2008-02-15

    After monitoring two 3-product heavy medium cyclones with three acceleration sensors at the respective feed gate, the normal state and fault state signals were collected. Two kinds of signals were processed by root mean square (RMS) and kurtosis. The results show that the RMS change is more than 2 to 20 times between fault and normal signals. But the kurtosis change is unnoticeable. Based on these results, a fault monitoring method was proposed with supervising the change of RMS. It can be implemented for real-time alarming and shortened the period of fault eliminated. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Latest extension of the Laujar fault in a convergence setting (Sierra Nevada, Betic Cordillera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martos, Manuel; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesus; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; García-Tortosa, Francisco Juan; Martínez-Moreno, Francisco José; Ruano, Patricia; González-Castillo, Lourdes; Azañón, José Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The present-day relief of the Betic Cordillera formed since the Late Miocene through the regional N-S to NW-SE Africa-Eurasia convergence that developed large folds. The Laujar Fault Zone is a south-dipping E-W oriented structure located at the northern boundary of the Alpujarran Corridor Neogene intramontane basin, which separates Sierra Nevada and Sierra de Gador antiforms, in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera. The fault zone acted in a first stage as a dextral strike-slip fault. Currently it moves as a normal fault evidenced by striated calcretes, also in agreement with regional continuous GPS (CGPS) data that support the hypothesis of an active N-S extension in the fault area. In order to analyse the deep geometry of the Laujar Fault Zone, we combined several geophysical techniques (gravity, magnetic, electric resistivity tomography and audio-magnetotelluric data) with field geological observations. Fault surfaces seem to join at a southward-dipping shallow detachment level, including faults covered by the sedimentary infill. The fault zone was developed in a previously weakened area by wrench faults parallel to the Alpujarran Corridor. The recent normal activity of this fault zone may be a consequence of a change in the Africa-Eurasia convergence orientation, which implies a decrease in the N-S compression component. This structure along the southern limb of Sierra Nevada antiform evidences the gravitational collapse of previously thickened crust in a regional compressional context simultaneous to metamorphic core uplift.

  20. Fault Tolerant Wind Farm Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years the wind turbine industry has focused on optimizing the cost of energy. One of the important factors in this is to increase reliability of the wind turbines. Advanced fault detection, isolation and accommodation are important tools in this process. Clearly most faults are deal...... scenarios. This benchmark model is used in an international competition dealing with Wind Farm fault detection and isolation and fault tolerant control....

  1. A Controllable Earthquake Rupture Experiment on the Homestake Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.; Garagash, D.; Reches, Z.; Martel, S. J.; Gwaba, D.; Elsworth, D.; Lowell, R. P.; Onstott, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Fault-slip is typically simulated in the laboratory at the cm-to-dm scale. Laboratory results are then up-scaled by orders of magnitude to understand faulting and earthquakes processes. We suggest an experimental approach to reactivate faults in-situ at scales ~10-100 m using thermal techniques and fluid injection to modify in situ stresses and the fault strength to the point where the rock fails. Mines where the modified in-situ stresses are sufficient to drive faulting, present an opportunity to conduct such experiments. During our recent field work in the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, we found a large fault present on multiple mine levels. The fault is subparallel to the local foliation in the Poorman formation, a Proterozoic metamorphic rock deformed into regional-scale folds with axes plunging ~40° to the SSE. The fault extends at least 1.5 km along strike and dip, with a center ~1.5 km deep. It strikes ~320-340° N, dips ~45-70° NE, and is recognized by a ~0.3-0.5 m thick distinct gouge that contains crushed host rock and black material that appears to be graphite. Although we could not find clear evidence for fault displacement, secondary features suggest that it is a normal fault. The size and distinct structure of this fault make it a promising target for in-situ experimentation of fault strength, hydrological properties, and slip nucleation processes. Most earthquakes are thought to be the result of unstable slip on existing faults, Activation of the Homestake fault in response to the controlled fluid injection and thermally changing background stresses is likely to be localized on a crack-like patch. Slow patch propagation, moderated by the injection rate and the rate of change of the background stresses, may become unstable, leading to the nucleation of a small earthquake (dynamic) rupture. This controlled instability is intimately related to the dependence of the fault strength on the slip process and has been

  2. Fault-Related Controls on Upward Hydrothermal Flow: An Integrated Geological Study of the Têt Fault System, Eastern Pyrénées (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Taillefer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The way faults control upward fluid flow in nonmagmatic hydrothermal systems in extensional context is still unclear. In the Eastern Pyrénées, an alignment of twenty-nine hot springs (29°C to 73°C, along the normal Têt fault, offers the opportunity to study this process. Using an integrated multiscale geological approach including mapping, remote sensing, and macro- and microscopic analyses of fault zones, we show that emergence is always located in crystalline rocks at gneiss-metasediments contacts, mostly in the Têt fault footwall. The hot springs distribution is related to high topographic reliefs, which are associated with fault throw and segmentation. In more detail, emergence localizes either (1 in brittle fault damage zones at the intersection between the Têt fault and subsidiary faults or (2 in ductile faults where dissolution cavities are observed along foliations, allowing juxtaposition of metasediments. Using these observations and 2D simple numerical simulation, we propose a hydrogeological model of upward hydrothermal flow. Meteoric fluids, infiltrated at high elevation in the fault footwall relief, get warmer at depth because of the geothermal gradient. Topography-related hydraulic gradient and buoyancy forces cause hot fluid rise along permeability anisotropies associated with lithological juxtapositions, fracture, and fault zone compositions.

  3. The engine fuel system fault analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Song, Hanqiang; Yang, Changsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    For improving the reliability of the engine fuel system, the typical fault factor of the engine fuel system was analyzed from the point view of structure and functional. The fault character was gotten by building the fuel system fault tree. According the utilizing of fault mode effect analysis method (FMEA), several factors of key component fuel regulator was obtained, which include the fault mode, the fault cause, and the fault influences. All of this made foundation for next development of fault diagnosis system.

  4. Monocline formation during growth of segmented faults in the Taranaki Basin, offshore New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conneally, John; Childs, Conrad; Nicol, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Precursor monoclines or fault propagation folds are commonly associated with normal faults. Many previous studies have analysed these structures at outcrop or in analogue models but there are few natural examples which have been studied in detail in 3D. Here we present the results of analysis of two monoclines imaged in a 3D seismic reflection survey in the Taranaki Basin, offshore New Zealand. The monoclines formed in response to Miocene-Recent extensional reactivation of underlying basement normal faults of Cretaceous age. The Miocene structures have associated growth strata that allows their geometrical evolution to be established. The two monoclines initiated at the same time ( 3.4 Ma). The smaller of the two monoclines has only limited associated faulting while the larger structure was cross-cut by upward propagation of the basement fault as a segmented array of normal faults. Variations in fold amplitudes and fault displacements within the growth strata associated with the larger structure record the progressive transition from folding to faulting, with folding limited to the relay zones between fault segments in the later stages of growth. This structure demonstrates spatial and temporal complementary relationships between folding and faulting so that together they define a single kinematically coherent structure. Although the monoclines widen upwards with geometries consistent with the trishear model of forced folding, there is also a positive correlation between monocline amplitude and wavelength measured along the length of the structure which suggests that the wavelengths of these structures increased as they grew.

  5. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes are one of the few accepted indicators of seismic slip along ancient faults. Low-angle normal faults have produced few large earthquakes in historic times and low-angle normal faults (detachment faults) are typically severely misoriented relative to a vertical maximum compressive stress. As a result many geoscientists question whether low-angle normal faults produce earthquakes at low angles. Relationships in southern California show that a major low-angle normal-oblique fault slipped at low angles and produced large earthquakes. The exhumed Late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault preserves spectacular fault- related pseudotachylytes along its fault plane and injected into its hanging wall and footwall. Composite pseudotachylyte zones are up to 1.25 m thick and persists over lateral distances of at least 10's of meters. Pseudotachylyte is common in most thin sections of damaged fault rocks with more than 20% (by volume) of cataclasite. We recognized the presence of original melt using numerous criteria: abundant spherulites in thin sections, injection structures at both the thin-section and outcrop scale, black aphanitic textures, quenched vein margins, variations in microcrystallite textures and/or size with respect to the vein margin, and glassy textures in hand sample. Multiple earthquakes are inferred to produce the layered "stratigraphy" in some exposures of pseudotachylytes. We infer that the West Salton detachment fault formed and slipped at low angles because it nearly perfectly reactivates a Cretaceous ductile thrust system at the half km scale and dips between 10 and 45 degrees. The about 30 degree NNE dip of the detachment fault on the north side of Yaqui Ridge is likely steeper than its dip during detachment slip because there is local steepening on the flanks of the Yaqui Ridge antiform in a contractional stepover of a crosscutting Quaternary San Felipe dextral fault zone. These relationships indicate a low dip on the detachment

  6. Formal fault tree semantics

    OpenAIRE

    Schellhorn, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    Formal fault tree semantics / G. Schellhorn, A. Thums, and W. Reif. - In: IDPT : Proceedings of the Sixth World Conference on Integrated Design and Process Technology : June 23 - 27, 2003, Pasadena, California / SDPS, Society for Design & Process Science. - 2002. - 1CD-ROM

  7. Diagnosing Intermittent Faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gemund, A.J.C.; Abreu, R.F.; Zoeteweij, P.

    2008-01-01

    In this working report we outline how to determine the intermittency parameters gj from the activity matrix A (context: DX’08 paper Abreu, Zoeteweij, Van Gemund). We start with the single fault (SF) case and show that averaging over the error vector e is the exact way. We also show that in this way

  8. Network Power Fault Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Siviero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Network power fault detection. At least one first network device is instructed to temporarily disconnect from a power supply path of a network, and at least one characteristic of the power supply path of the network is measured at a second network device connected to the network while the at least one first network device is temporarily disconnected from the network

  9. Detecting Faults from Encoded Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of fault detection for linear continuous-time systems via encoded information is considered. The encoded information is received at a remote location by the monitoring deiice and assessed to infer the occurrence of the fault. A class of faults is considered which allows to use a simple

  10. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  11. Fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency in presence of sub-patch geometric complexity

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that faults are not planar surfaces. Instead they exhibit self-similar or self-affine properties that span a wide range of spatial (sub-micrometer to tens-of-kilometer). This geometric fault roughness has a distinct impact on amount and distribution of stresses/strains induced in the medium and on other portions of the fault. However, when numerically simulated (for example in multi-cycle EQ rupture simulations or Coulomb failure stress calculations) this roughness is largely ignored: individual fault patches --the incremental elements that build the fault surface in the respective computer models-- are planar and fault roughness at this and lower spatial scales is not considered. As a result, the fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency may be systematically too large in those numerical simulations with respect to the "actual" efficiency level. Here, we investigate the effect of sub-patch geometric complexity on fault-patch stress-transfer efficiency. For that, we sub-divide a fault patch (e.g., 1x1km) into a large number of sub-patches (e.g., 20x20m) and determine amount of induced stresses at selected positions around that patch for different levels and realizations of fault roughness. For each fault roughness level, we compute mean and standard deviation of the induced stresses, enabling us to compute the coefficient of variation. We normalize those values with stresses from the corresponding single (planar) fault patch, providing scaling factors and their variability for stress transfer efficiency. Given a certain fault roughness that is assumed for a fault, this work provides the means to implement the sub-patch fault roughness into investigations based on fault-patch interaction schemes.

  12. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  13. Fault Zone Architecture and Mineralogy: Implications in Fluid Flow and Permeability in Crustal Scale Fault Zones in the Southern Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, T.; Terrón, E.; Perez-Flores, P.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in the upper crust is controlled by the permeability and interconnection of fractures in the fault zones. The permeability within the fault zone is determined by its activity, architecture and, in particular, by the mineralogy of the core and the damage zone. Whereas the permeability structure of a fault zone can be defined by the volume proportion of the core with respect to the damage zone, the relationship between the mineralogy and permeability along fault zones still remains obscure. This work examines structural and mineralogical data to show the relationship between the mineral composition of the fault zone with its permeability in the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems (ALFS), Southern Chile. The LOFS is an active ca. 1200 km long strike-slip Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE in its master traces and NE in its subsidiary traces, with dextral and dextral-normal movement mostly developed in the last 6 My. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement fault system where seismic and field evidences record sinistral, sinistral-normal and sinistral-reverse movements. One 22-m-long NE transect was mapped orthogonal to a segment of the ALFS, where host rocks are Miocene andesitic rocks. Structural and XRD sampling were conducted in the core and damage zone. Structural mapping shows a multiple core, NW-striking fault zone with foliated gouge and an asymmetric damage zone, where the hanging wall has significantly higher mesoscopic fracture density than the footwall. The hanging wall is characterized by NW-striking, steeply dipping veins. Preliminary XRD results indicate the presence of homogenously distributed Ca-rich zeolite (mainly laumontite) in the core and the veins of the damage zone, which could indicate that the core acted as a conduit for low-temperature (ca. 220°C) fluids.

  14. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the

  15. Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator to Ride-Through Recurring Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Xu, Dehong; Zhu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The wind turbine system (WTS) is required to ride-through recurring grid faults by the new grid codes. Under single grid faults, the fault ride-through (FRT) strategy with rotor-side crowbar is normally used for the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) WTS. However, under recurring faults, larger...... system will be influenced. In this paper, an FRT strategy for the DFIG WTS to ride-through recurring symmetrical grid faults is investigated. An improved control strategy is introduced and it is applied during the voltage recovery of the grid faults. The decay of the stator natural flux can...... transient current and voltage may be produced, and the DFIG may fail to ride-through the second fault even with the rotor-side crowbar. The crowbar can be active again during the voltage recovery, but large electromagnetic torque (EM-torque) fluctuations will be introduced. The reliability of the mechanical...

  16. Fault geometry, rupture dynamics and ground motion from potential earthquakes on the North Anatolian Fault under the Sea of Marmara

    KAUST Repository

    Oglesby, David D.

    2012-03-01

    Using the 3-D finite-element method, we develop dynamic spontaneous rupture models of earthquakes on the North Anatolian Fault system in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey, considering the geometrical complexity of the fault system in this region. We find that the earthquake size, rupture propagation pattern and ground motion all strongly depend on the interplay between the initial (static) regional pre-stress field and the dynamic stress field radiated by the propagating rupture. By testing several nucleation locations, we observe that those far from an oblique normal fault stepover segment (near Istanbul) lead to large through-going rupture on the entire fault system, whereas nucleation locations closer to the stepover segment tend to produce ruptures that die out in the stepover. However, this pattern can change drastically with only a 10° rotation of the regional stress field. Our simulations also reveal that while dynamic unclamping near fault bends can produce a new mode of supershear rupture propagation, this unclamping has a much smaller effect on the speed of the peak in slip velocity along the fault. Finally, we find that the complex fault geometry leads to a very complex and asymmetric pattern of near-fault ground motion, including greatly amplified ground motion on the insides of fault bends. The ground-motion pattern can change significantly with different hypocentres, even beyond the typical effects of directivity. The results of this study may have implications for seismic hazard in this region, for the dynamics and ground motion of geometrically complex faults, and for the interpretation of kinematic inverse rupture models.

  17. Direct observation of fault zone structure and mechanics in three-dimensions: A study of the SEMP fault system, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Erik Karl

    Outcrops of the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system exhumed from depths of ˜4--17 km allow for the direct observation of fault zone structures throughout the crust, and provide insights into the way this fault, and perhaps others, distributes strain in three dimensions. At Gstatterboden, exhumed from ˜4--8 km, grain size distributions and small fault data reveal the presence of a 10-m-wide high-strain core towards which strain localized during fault evolution. Brittle fracture was accommodated via constrained comminution, which only occurs in strain-weakening rheologies and favors localization. Exposures of the SEMP at Lichtensteinklamm and Kitzlochklamm, exhumed from ˜12 km depth, bracket the brittle ductile transition. At these outcrops, the SEMP is characterized by a ˜70-m-wide, cataclastic fault core that has been altered to clays that transitions downward into a wide, ductile shear zone that has accommodated only minor amounts of strain, placing the majority of displacement on the razor-sharp fault contact. Deformation mechanisms transition from cataclasis and minor amounts of dislocation creep in calcite, to dislocation creep in quartz and calcite occurring against a background of fault-normal solution mass transfer. The ductile/ductile-brittle Rinderkarsee shear zone, exhumed from ˜17 km, marks the SEMP's continuation into the Tauern Window and is composed of three distinct shear zones. The southern, 100-m-wide shear zone has accommodated the most strain, and shows evidence for creep-accommodated grain boundary sliding in feldspar and quartz, while incipient shear zones contain ductile quartz and brittle-feldspars that undergo dislocation creep as fluids alter Kspar to muscovite, which localizes strain along felspar grain boundaries, encouraging ductility. These findings are compared to results from other faults exhumed from similar depth ranges, highlighting fundamental fault zone structures and characteristics.

  18. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  19. The 2015 M w 6.0 Mt. Kinabalu earthquake: an infrequent fault rupture within the Crocker fault system of East Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wei, Shengji; Wang, Xin; Lindsey, Eric O.; Tongkul, Felix; Tapponnier, Paul; Bradley, Kyle; Chan, Chung-Han; Hill, Emma M.; Sieh, Kerry

    2017-12-01

    The M w 6.0 Mt. Kinabalu earthquake of 2015 was a complete (and deadly) surprise, because it occurred well away from the nearest plate boundary in a region of very low historical seismicity. Our seismological, space geodetic, geomorphological, and field investigations show that the earthquake resulted from rupture of a northwest-dipping normal fault that did not reach the surface. Its unilateral rupture was almost directly beneath 4000-m-high Mt. Kinabalu and triggered widespread slope failures on steep mountainous slopes, which included rockfalls that killed 18 hikers. Our seismological and morphotectonic analyses suggest that the rupture occurred on a normal fault that splays upwards off of the previously identified normal Marakau fault. Our mapping of tectonic landforms reveals that these faults are part of a 200-km-long system of normal faults that traverse the eastern side of the Crocker Range, parallel to Sabah's northwestern coastline. Although the tectonic reason for this active normal fault system remains unclear, the lengths of the longest fault segments suggest that they are capable of generating magnitude 7 earthquakes. Such large earthquakes must occur very rarely, though, given the hitherto undetectable geodetic rates of active tectonic deformation across the region.

  20. Middle Miocene E-W tectonic horst structure of Crete through extensional detachment faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, D.; Vassilakis, E.

    2008-07-01

    Two east-west trending extensional detachment faults have been recognized in Crete, one with top-to-the-north motion of the hanging wall toward the Cretan Sea and one with top-to-the-south motion of the hanging wall toward the Libyan Sea. The east-west trending zone between these two detachment faults, which forms their common footwall, comprises a tectonic horst formed during Middle Miocene slip on the detachment faults. The detachment faults disrupt the overall tectono-stratigraphic succession of Crete and are localized along pre-existing thrust faults and along particular portions of the stratigraphic sequence, including the transition between the Permo-Triassic Tyros Beds and the base of the Upper Triassic-Eocene carbonate platform of the Tripolis nappe. By recognizing several different tectono-stratigraphic formations within what is generally termed the 'phyllite-quartzite', it is possible to distinguish these extensional detachment faults from thrust faults and minor discontinuities in the sequence. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary extensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  1. Middle Miocene E-W tectonic horst structure of Crete through extensional detachment faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanikolaou, D [Professor of Dynamics and Tectonics, School of Geology and Geoenvironment, Department of Dynamics, Tectonics and Applied Geology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, 15784 (Greece); Vassilakis, E [Research Scientist, School of Geology and Geoenvironment, Department of Dynamics, Tectonics and Applied Geology, National and Kapodestrian University of Athens, 15784 (Greece)], E-mail: dpapan@geol.uoa.gr, E-mail: evasilak@geol.uoa.gr

    2008-07-01

    Two east-west trending extensional detachment faults have been recognized in Crete, one with top-to-the-north motion of the hanging wall toward the Cretan Sea and one with top-to-the-south motion of the hanging wall toward the Libyan Sea. The east-west trending zone between these two detachment faults, which forms their common footwall, comprises a tectonic horst formed during Middle Miocene slip on the detachment faults. The detachment faults disrupt the overall tectono-stratigraphic succession of Crete and are localized along pre-existing thrust faults and along particular portions of the stratigraphic sequence, including the transition between the Permo-Triassic Tyros Beds and the base of the Upper Triassic-Eocene carbonate platform of the Tripolis nappe. By recognizing several different tectono-stratigraphic formations within what is generally termed the 'phyllite-quartzite', it is possible to distinguish these extensional detachment faults from thrust faults and minor discontinuities in the sequence. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary extensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  2. PCA Fault Feature Extraction in Complex Electric Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG, J.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric power system is one of the most complex artificial systems in the world. The complexity is determined by its characteristics about constitution, configuration, operation, organization, etc. The fault in electric power system cannot be completely avoided. When electric power system operates from normal state to failure or abnormal, its electric quantities (current, voltage and angles, etc. may change significantly. Our researches indicate that the variable with the biggest coefficient in principal component usually corresponds to the fault. Therefore, utilizing real-time measurements of phasor measurement unit, based on principal components analysis technology, we have extracted successfully the distinct features of fault component. Of course, because of the complexity of different types of faults in electric power system, there still exists enormous problems need a close and intensive study.

  3. Experimental tests of truncated diffusion in fault damage zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Anna; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, Kewen; Horne, Roland N.

    2016-11-01

    Fault zones affect the flow paths of fluids in groundwater aquifers and geological reservoirs. Fault-related fracture damage decreases to background levels with increasing distance from the fault core according to a power law. This study investigated mass transport in such a fault-related structure using nonlocal models. A column flow experiment is conducted to create a permeability distribution that varies with distance from a main conduit. The experimental tracer response curve is preasymptotic and implies subdiffusive transport, which is slower than the normal Fickian diffusion. If the surrounding area is a finite domain, an upper truncated behavior in tracer response (i.e., exponential decline at late times) is observed. The tempered anomalous diffusion (TAD) model captures the transition from subdiffusive to Fickian transport, which is characterized by a smooth transition from power-law to an exponential decline in the late-time breakthrough curves.

  4. Fault detection of gearbox using time-frequency method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, A.; Satrijo, Dj.; Prahasto, T.; Haryanto, I.

    2017-04-01

    This research deals with fault detection and diagnosis of gearbox by using vibration signature. In this work, fault detection and diagnosis are approached by employing time-frequency method, and then the results are compared with cepstrum analysis. Experimental work has been conducted for data acquisition of vibration signal thru self-designed gearbox test rig. This test-rig is able to demonstrate normal and faulty gearbox i.e., wears and tooth breakage. Three accelerometers were used for vibration signal acquisition from gearbox, and optical tachometer was used for shaft rotation speed measurement. The results show that frequency domain analysis using fast-fourier transform was less sensitive to wears and tooth breakage condition. However, the method of short-time fourier transform was able to monitor the faults in gearbox. Wavelet Transform (WT) method also showed good performance in gearbox fault detection using vibration signal after employing time synchronous averaging (TSA).

  5. Deep rock damage in the San Andreas Fault revealed by P- and S-type fault-zone-guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L.; Malin, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Damage to fault-zone rocks during fault slip results in the formation of a channel of low seismic-wave velocities. Within such channels guided seismic waves, denoted by Fg, can propagate. Here we show with core samples, well logs and Fg-waves that such a channel is crossed by the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at a depth of 2.7 km near Parkfield, California, USA. This laterally extensive channel extends downwards to at least half way through the seismogenic crust, more than about 7 km. The channel supports not only the previously recognized Love-type- (FL) and Rayleigh-type- (FR) guided waves, but also a new fault-guided wave, which we name FF. As recorded 2.7 km underground, FF is normally dispersed, ends in an Airy phase, and arrives between the P- and S-waves. Modelling shows that FF travels as a leaky mode within the core of the fault zone. Combined with the drill core samples, well logs and the two other types of guided waves, FF at SAFOD reveals a zone of profound, deep, rock damage. Originating from damage accumulated over the recent history of fault movement, we suggest it is maintained either by fracturing near the slip surface of earthquakes, such as the 1857 Fort Tejon M 7.9, or is an unexplained part of the fault-creep process known to be active at this site.

  6. Fault structure, damage and acoustic emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresen, G. H.; Göbel, T.; Stanchits, S.; Kwiatek, G.; Charalampidou, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of faulting-related damage and acoustic emission activity in experiments performed on granite, quartzite and sandstone samples with 40-50 mm diameter and 100-125 mm length. Experiments were performed in a servo-controlled MTS loading frame in triaxial compression at confining pressures ranging from 20-140 MPa. We performed a series of fracture and stick-slip sliding experiments on prefractured samples. Acoustic emissions (AE) and ultrasonic velocities were monitored using up to 14 P-wave sensors glued to the cylindrical surface of the rock. Full waveforms were stored in a 16 channel transient recording system (Daxbox, PRÖKEL, Germany). Full moment tensor analysis and polarity of AE first motions were used to discriminate source types associated with tensile, shear and pore-collapse cracking. To monitor strain, two pairs of orthogonally oriented strain-gages were glued onto the specimen surface. Fracture nucleation and growth occurred from a nucleation patch mostly located at the specimen surface or at the tip of prefabricated notches inside the specimens. Irrespective of the rock type, fracture propagation is associated with formation of a damage zone surrounding the fracture surface as revealed by distribution of cracks and AE hypocenters displaying a logarithmic decay in microcrack damage with distance normal to the fault trace. The width of the damage zone varies along the fault. After fracturing, faults were locked by increasing confining pressure. Subsequent sliding was mostly induced by driving the piston at a constant displacement rate producing large single events or multiple stick-slips. With increasing sliding distance a corrugated and rough fault surface formed displaying displacement-parallel lineations. Microstructural analysis of fault surfaces and cross-sections revealed formation of multiple secondary shears progressively merging into an anastomosing 3D-network controlling damage evolution and AE activity in the fault

  7. ESR dating of fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs. grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size; these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Gori nuclear reactor. Most of the ESR signals of fault rocks collected from the basement are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of the faults had occurred before the Quaternary period. However, ESR dates from the Oyong fault zone range from 370 to 310 ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity of the Oyong fault zone continued into the Pleistocene.

  8. Real-time fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiwei; Ding, Steven X.; Cecati, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This "Special Section on Real-Time Fault Diagnosis and Fault-Tolerant Control" of the IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics is motivated to provide a forum for academic and industrial communities to report recent theoretic/application results in real-time monitoring, diagnosis, and fault-tolerant design, and exchange the ideas about the emerging research direction in this field. Twenty-three papers were eventually selected through a strict peer-reviewed procedure, which represent the mo...

  9. Fault-related controls on hydrothermal flows in Eastern Pyrénées (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, Audrey; Soliva, Roger; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Le Goff, Elisabeth; Martin, Guillaume

    2017-04-01

    The way faults control upward fluid flow in extensive hydrothermal systems without an abnormal heat source such as volcanic or plutonic activity is still unclear. In the Eastern Pyrénées, an alignment of 29 hot springs (from 29°C to 73°C) along the Têt normal Fault offers the opportunity to study this process. Using an integrated multi-scale geological approach including mapping, remote sensing, macro and microscopic analyses of fault zones, we show that hot springs locate close to high topographic reliefs related to fault throw and segmentation. Emergences are always in crystalline rocks at gneiss-metasediments contacts, mostly in the Têt Fault footwall. In more details, they localize either (1) in brittle fault damage zones at the intersection between the Têt Fault and subsidiary faults, and (2) into hercynian ductile faults where dissolution cavities run along shear zones. Using these observations and 2D preliminary numerical simulations, we propose a hydrogeological model of upward hydrothermal flow. Meteoric fluids infiltrate at high altitude in the fault footwall relief where they acquire temperature because of the geothermal gradient. Hydraulic gradient and buoyancy forces allow them to upflow along fault-related permeability anisotropies. The identification and prioritization of the features controlling this kind of system have important implications for geothermal exploration and for the understanding of fluid-flow into the brittle Earth's crust in general.

  10. The evolution of faults formed by shearing across joint zones in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rodrick; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    The evolution of strike-slip and normal faults formed by slip along joint zones is documented by detailed field studies in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA. Zones of closely spaced planar sub-parallel joints arranged en échelon are sheared, forming faults. Fracturing occurs as a result of shearing, forming new joints. Later shearing along these joints leads to successively formed small faults and newer joints. This process is repeated through many generations of fracturing with increasing fault slip producing a hierarchical array of structures. Strain localization produced by shearing of joint zones at irregularities in joint traces, fracture intersections, and in the span between adjacent sheared joints results in progressive fragmentation of the weakened sandstone, which leads to the formation of gouge along the fault zone. The length and continuity of the gouge and associated slip surfaces is related to the slip magnitude and fault geometry with slip ranging from several millimeters to about 150 m. Distributed damage in a zone surrounding the gouge core is related to the original joint zone configuration (step sense, individual sheared joint overlaps and separation), shear sense, and slip magnitude. Our evolutionary model of fault development helps to explain some outstanding issues concerning complexities in faulting such as, the variability in development of fault rock and fault related fractures, and the failure processes in faults.

  11. Holocene deposition and megathrust splay fault geometries within Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, S.; Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Pratt, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    New high resolution sparker seismic reflection data, in conjunction with reprocessed legacy seismic data, provide the basis for a new fault, fold, and Holocene sediment thickness database for Prince William Sound, Alaska. Additionally, legacy airgun seismic data in Prince William Sound and the Gulf of Alaska tie features on these new sparker data to deeper portions of megathrust splay faults. We correlate regionally extensive bathymetric lineaments within Prince William Sound to megathrust splay faults, such as the ones that ruptured in the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Lastly, we estimate Holocene sediment thickness within Prince William Sound to better constrain the Holocene fault history throughout the region. We identify three seismic facies related to Holocene, Quaternary, and Tertiary strata that are crosscut by numerous high angle normal faults in the hanging wall of the megathrust splay faults. The crustal-scale seismic reflection profiles show splay faults emerging from 20 km depth between the Yakutat block and North American crust and surfacing as the Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults. A change in exhumation rates, slip rates, and fault orientation appears near Hinchinbrook that we attribute to differences in subducted slab geometry. Based on our slip rate analysis, we calculate average Holocene displacements of 20 m and 100 m in eastern and western Prince William Sound, respectively. Landward of two splay faults exposed on Montague Island, we observe subsidence, faulting, and landslides that record deformation associated with the 1964 and older megathrust earthquakes.

  12. Imaging of Subsurface Faults using Refraction Migration with Fault Flooding

    KAUST Repository

    Metwally, Ahmed Mohsen Hassan

    2017-05-31

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  13. A Systematic Methodology for Gearbox Health Assessment and Fault Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic methodology for gearbox health assessment and fault classification is developed and evaluated for 560 data sets of gearbox vibration data provided by the Prognostics and Health Management Society for the 2009 data challenge competition. A comprehensive set of signal processing and feature extraction methods are used to extract over 200 features, including features extracted from the raw time signal, time synchronous signal, wavelet decomposition signal, frequency domain spectrum, envelope spectrum, among others. A regime segmentation approach using the tachometer signal, a spectrum similarity metric, and gear mesh frequency peak information are used to segment the data by gear type, input shaft speed, and braking torque load. A health assessment method that finds the minimum feature vector sum in each regime is used to classify and find the 80 baseline healthy data sets. A fault diagnosis method based on a distance calculation from normal along with specific features correlated to different fault signatures is used to diagnosis specific faults. The fault diagnosis method is evaluated for the diagnosis of a gear tooth breakage, input shaft imbalance, bent shaft, bearing inner race defect, and bad key, and the method could be further extended for other faults as long as a set of features can be correlated with a known fault signature. Future work looks to further refine the distance calculation algorithm for fault diagnosis, as well as further evaluate other signal processing method such as the empirical mode decomposition to see if an improved set of features can be used to improve the fault diagnosis accuracy.

  14. Evidence for propagating, active tensional faulting in Upper Kåfjord valley, Troms County, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, T. F.; Osmundsen, P. T.; Henderson, I. H. C.; Hermanns, R. L.

    2010-05-01

    New concepts governing margin extension and post-rift passive margin evolution are appearing from onshore and offshore studies. In Norway topographic escarpments, creation, preservation and destruction of landforms, and drainage patterns are related to structural templates created during the Jurassic rift phase. Contradicting the notion that post-rift isostatic compensation, thermal subsidence, and topographic degradation mark a passive margin's final evolutionary phases, we present geological evidence for currently-active tensional deformation, accommodated by release faulting, in uppermost Kåfjordalen and Signaldalen. In Signaldalen, propagation of the deformation tip has introduced active normal faulting to Finland. Ground observations indicate a large normal fault defines the eastern border of the Lyngen 'Alps' peninsula. There, a series of exceptionally well-preserved triangular facets adorn a sharp, elevated escarpment. To the east a swarm of small NE-trending normal faults are exposed in roadside outcrops near the mouth of Kåfjord, dipping both to the NW and SE. Displacement across the fault swarm is asymmetric, the greatest component of motion being down-to-the-NW in the direction of the Lyngen Fault. Another set of NE trending, NW dipping faults crop out at Revsdalfjellet. We interpret these faults to reflect splays to the Lyngen Fault. The hanging wall of the Lyngen Fault is characterized by numerous clusters of fault-controlled rockslides. We interpret the valleys of Signaldalen, Skibotndalen, and Kåfjordalen, located in the hanging wall of the Lyngen Fault, to have formed at least partly under the influence of release faults that accommodated hanging wall flexure and failure. Other fault scarps, trending more NW-SE, crop out at two Kåfjord rockslide sites, Nomandalstinden and Litledalen. Mineralized surfaces exhibiting dip-slip slickenlines indicate most of these faults are true tectonic features, not simply gravitationally-driven 'sackung' planes

  15. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for

  16. Geometry and kinematics of the eastern Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains, Nevada and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Campagna, David J.; Anderson, R. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    The Lake Mead fault system is a northeast-striking, 130-km-long zone of left-slip in the southeast Great Basin, active from before 16 Ma to Quaternary time. The northeast end of the Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains of southeast Nevada and northwest Arizona forms a partitioned strain field comprising kinematically linked northeast-striking left-lateral faults, north-striking normal faults, and northwest-striking right-lateral faults. Major faults bound large structural blocks whose internal strain reflects their position within a left step-over of the left-lateral faults. Two north-striking large-displacement normal faults, the Lakeside Mine segment of the South Virgin–White Hills detachment fault and the Piedmont fault, intersect the left step-over from the southwest and northeast, respectively. The left step-over in the Lake Mead fault system therefore corresponds to a right-step in the regional normal fault system.Within the left step-over, displacement transfer between the left-lateral faults and linked normal faults occurs near their junctions, where the left-lateral faults become oblique and normal fault displacement decreases away from the junction. Southward from the center of the step-over in the Virgin Mountains, down-to-the-west normal faults splay northward from left-lateral faults, whereas north and east of the center, down-to-the-east normal faults splay southward from left-lateral faults. Minimum slip is thus in the central part of the left step-over, between east-directed slip to the north and west-directed slip to the south. Attenuation faults parallel or subparallel to bedding cut Lower Paleozoic rocks and are inferred to be early structures that accommodated footwall uplift during the initial stages of extension.Fault-slip data indicate oblique extensional strain within the left step-over in the South Virgin Mountains, manifested as east-west extension; shortening is partitioned between vertical for extension-dominated structural

  17. Slip behaviour of carbonate-bearing faults subjected to fluid pressure stimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Earthquakes caused by fluid injection within reservoir have become an important topic of political and social discussion as new drilling and improved technologies enable the extraction of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. During reservoir stimulation, the coupled interactions of frictional and fluid flow properties together with the stress state control both the onset of fault slip and fault slip behaviour. However, currently, there are no studies under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the effect of fluid pressure on fault slip behaviour can be deduced. To cover this gap, we have developed laboratory experiments where we monitor fault slip evolution at constant shear stress but with increasing fluid pressure, i.e. reducing the effective normal stress. Experiments have been conducted in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel on carbonate fault gouge, characterized by a slightly velocity strengthening friction that is indicative of stable aseismic creep. In our experiments fault slip history can be divided in three main stages: 1) for high effective normal stress the fault is locked and undergoes compaction; 2) when the shear and effective normal stress reach the failure condition, accelerated creep is associated to fault dilation; 3) further pressurization leads to an exponential acceleration during fault compaction and slip localization. Our results indicate that fault weakening induced by fluid pressurization overcomes the velocity strengthening behaviour of calcite gouge, resulting in fast acceleration and earthquake slip. As applied to tectonic faults our results suggest that a larger number of crustal faults, including those slightly velocity strengthening, can experience earthquake slip due to fluid pressurization.

  18. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Variational Mode Decomposition and Multi-Layer Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nantian; Chen, Huaijin; Cai, Guowei; Fang, Lihua; Wang, Yuqiang

    2016-11-10

    Mechanical fault diagnosis of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs) based on vibration signal analysis is one of the most significant issues in improving the reliability and reducing the outage cost for power systems. The limitation of training samples and types of machine faults in HVCBs causes the existing mechanical fault diagnostic methods to recognize new types of machine faults easily without training samples as either a normal condition or a wrong fault type. A new mechanical fault diagnosis method for HVCBs based on variational mode decomposition (VMD) and multi-layer classifier (MLC) is proposed to improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis. First, HVCB vibration signals during operation are measured using an acceleration sensor. Second, a VMD algorithm is used to decompose the vibration signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The IMF matrix is divided into submatrices to compute the local singular values (LSV). The maximum singular values of each submatrix are selected as the feature vectors for fault diagnosis. Finally, a MLC composed of two one-class support vector machines (OCSVMs) and a support vector machine (SVM) is constructed to identify the fault type. Two layers of independent OCSVM are adopted to distinguish normal or fault conditions with known or unknown fault types, respectively. On this basis, SVM recognizes the specific fault type. Real diagnostic experiments are conducted with a real SF₆ HVCB with normal and fault states. Three different faults (i.e., jam fault of the iron core, looseness of the base screw, and poor lubrication of the connecting lever) are simulated in a field experiment on a real HVCB to test the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the classification accuracy of the new method is superior to other traditional methods.

  19. Mechanical Fault Diagnosis of High Voltage Circuit Breakers Based on Variational Mode Decomposition and Multi-Layer Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantian Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical fault diagnosis of high-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs based on vibration signal analysis is one of the most significant issues in improving the reliability and reducing the outage cost for power systems. The limitation of training samples and types of machine faults in HVCBs causes the existing mechanical fault diagnostic methods to recognize new types of machine faults easily without training samples as either a normal condition or a wrong fault type. A new mechanical fault diagnosis method for HVCBs based on variational mode decomposition (VMD and multi-layer classifier (MLC is proposed to improve the accuracy of fault diagnosis. First, HVCB vibration signals during operation are measured using an acceleration sensor. Second, a VMD algorithm is used to decompose the vibration signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The IMF matrix is divided into submatrices to compute the local singular values (LSV. The maximum singular values of each submatrix are selected as the feature vectors for fault diagnosis. Finally, a MLC composed of two one-class support vector machines (OCSVMs and a support vector machine (SVM is constructed to identify the fault type. Two layers of independent OCSVM are adopted to distinguish normal or fault conditions with known or unknown fault types, respectively. On this basis, SVM recognizes the specific fault type. Real diagnostic experiments are conducted with a real SF6 HVCB with normal and fault states. Three different faults (i.e., jam fault of the iron core, looseness of the base screw, and poor lubrication of the connecting lever are simulated in a field experiment on a real HVCB to test the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the classification accuracy of the new method is superior to other traditional methods.

  20. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  1. SEISMOLOGY: Watching the Hayward Fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R W

    2000-08-18

    The Hayward fault, located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, represents a natural laboratory for seismologists, because it does not sleep silently between major earthquakes. In his Perspective, Simpson discusses the study by Bürgmann et al., who have used powerful new techniques to study the fault. The results indicate that major earthquakes cannot originate in the northern part of the fault. However, surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in the area, suggesting that they originated to the north or south of the segment studied by Bürgmann et al. Fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanism by which plate tectonic stresses are transferred to the Hayward fault.

  2. Advanced cloud fault tolerance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumangali, K.; Benny, Niketa

    2017-11-01

    Cloud computing has become a prevalent on-demand service on the internet to store, manage and process data. A pitfall that accompanies cloud computing is the failures that can be encountered in the cloud. To overcome these failures, we require a fault tolerance mechanism to abstract faults from users. We have proposed a fault tolerant architecture, which is a combination of proactive and reactive fault tolerance. This architecture essentially increases the reliability and the availability of the cloud. In the future, we would like to compare evaluations of our proposed architecture with existing architectures and further improve it.

  3. Physical fault tolerance of nanoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani P; Antoniadis, Dimitri A; Damoulakis, John N

    2011-04-29

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of gates into the most efficient known fault-tolerant architecture is characterized by a subexponential suppression of error rate with electron number, and incurs significant overhead in wiring and complexity. We conclude that it is more efficient to prevent logical errors with physical fault tolerance than to correct logical errors with fault-tolerant architecture.

  4. An Overview of Transmission Line Protection by Artificial Neural Network: Fault Detection, Fault Classification, Fault Location, and Fault Direction Discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary power systems are associated with serious issues of faults on high voltage transmission lines. Instant isolation of fault is necessary to maintain the system stability. Protective relay utilizes current and voltage signals to detect, classify, and locate the fault in transmission line. A trip signal will be sent by the relay to a circuit breaker with the purpose of disconnecting the faulted line from the rest of the system in case of a disturbance for maintaining the stability of the remaining healthy system. This paper focuses on the studies of fault detection, fault classification, fault location, fault phase selection, and fault direction discrimination by using artificial neural networks approach. Artificial neural networks are valuable for power system applications as they can be trained with offline data. Efforts have been made in this study to incorporate and review approximately all important techniques and philosophies of transmission line protection reported in the literature till June 2014. This comprehensive and exhaustive survey will reduce the difficulty of new researchers to evaluate different ANN based techniques with a set of references of all concerned contributions.

  5. The role of thin, mechanical discontinuities on the propagation of reverse faults: insights from analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Emanuele; Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Seno, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Fault-related folding kinematic models are widely used to explain accommodation of crustal shortening. These models, however, include simplifications, such as the assumption of constant growth rate of faults. This value sometimes is not constant in isotropic materials, and even more variable if one considers naturally anisotropic geological systems. , This means that these simplifications could lead to incorrect interpretations of the reality. In this study, we use analogue models to evaluate how thin, mechanical discontinuities, such as beddings or thin weak layers, influence the propagation of reverse faults and related folds. The experiments are performed with two different settings to simulate initially-blind master faults dipping at 30° and 45°. The 30° dip represents one of the Andersonian conjugate fault, and 45° dip is very frequent in positive reactivation of normal faults. The experimental apparatus consists of a clay layer placed above two plates: one plate, the footwall, is fixed; the other one, the hanging wall, is mobile. Motor-controlled sliding of the hanging wall plate along an inclined plane reproduces the reverse fault movement. We run thirty-six experiments: eighteen with dip of 30° and eighteen with dip of 45°. For each dip-angle setting, we initially run isotropic experiments that serve as a reference. Then, we run the other experiments with one or two discontinuities (horizontal precuts performed into the clay layer). We monitored the experiments collecting side photographs every 1.0 mm of displacement of the master fault. These images have been analyzed through PIVlab software, a tool based on the Digital Image Correlation method. With the "displacement field analysis" (one of the PIVlab tools) we evaluated, the variation of the trishear zone shape and how the master-fault tip and newly-formed faults propagate into the clay medium. With the "strain distribution analysis", we observed the amount of the on-fault and off-fault deformation

  6. Late Cenozoic extensional faulting in Central-Western Peloponnesus, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtsos, E.; Fountoulis, I.; Mavroulis, S.; Kranis, H.

    2012-04-01

    A series of forearc-dipping, orogen-parallel extensional faults are found in the central-western Peloponnesus, (south-western Aegean) which control the western margin of Mt Mainalon. The latter comprises HP/LT rocks of the Phyllites-Quartzites Unit (PQ), overlain by the carbonates and flysch of the Tripolis Unit while the uppermost nappe is the Pindos Unit, a sequence of Mesozoic pelagic sequence, topped by a Paleocene flysch. Most of the extensional structures were previously thought of as the original thrust between the Pindos and Tripolis Units. However, the cross-cutting relationships among these structures indicate that these are forearc (SW-dipping) extensional faults, downthrowing the Pindos thrust by a few tens or hundreds of meters each, rooting onto different levels of the nappe pile. In SW Mainalon the lowermost of the extensional faults is a low-angle normal fault dipping SW juxtaposing the metamorphic rocks of the PQ Unit against the non-metamorphic sequence of the Tripolis Unit. High-angle normal faults, found further to the west, have truncated or even sole onto the low-angle ones and control the eastern margin of the Quaternary Megalopolis basin. All these extensional structures form the eastern boundary of a series of Neogene-Quaternary tectonic depressions, which in turn are separated by E-W horsts. In the NW, these faults are truncated by NE to NNE-striking, NW-dipping faults, which relay the whole fault activity to the eastern margin of the Pyrgos graben. The whole extensional fault architecture has resulted (i) in the Pindos thrust stepping down from altitudes higher than 1000 m in Mainalon in the east, to negative heights in North Messinia and Southern Ilia in the west; and (ii) the gradual disappearance of the Phyllite-Quartzite metamorphics of Mainalon towards the west. The combination of these extensional faults (which may reach down to the Ionian décollement) with the low-angle floor thrusts of the Pindos, Tripolis and Ionian Units leads

  7. Fault Tolerant Distributive Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnell, Harris

    1982-12-01

    A fault tolerant design used to enhanced the survivability of a distributive processing system is described. Based on physical limitations, mission duration and maintenance support, the approach has emphasized functional redundancy in place of the traditional hardware or software level redundancy. A top down architecture within the system's hierarchy allows sharing of common resources. Various techniques used to enhance the survivability of the hardware at the equipment, module and component level were analyzed. The intent of the on going work is to demonstrate the ability of a distributive processing system to maintain itself for a long period of time.

  8. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed

  9. A universal, fault-tolerant, non-linear analytic network for modeling and fault detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, J.E. [Advanced Modeling Techniques Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, R.W.; Monson, L.R.; Olson, D.L.; Staffon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-03-06

    The similarities and differences of a universal network to normal neural networks are outlined. The description and application of a universal network is discussed by showing how a simple linear system is modeled by normal techniques and by universal network techniques. A full implementation of the universal network as universal process modeling software on a dedicated computer system at EBR-II is described and example results are presented. It is concluded that the universal network provides different feature recognition capabilities than a neural network and that the universal network can provide extremely fast, accurate, and fault-tolerant estimation, validation, and replacement of signals in a real system.

  10. Statistical Feature Extraction for Fault Locations in Nonintrusive Fault Detection of Low Voltage Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Hsien Chang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes statistical feature extraction methods combined with artificial intelligence (AI approaches for fault locations in non-intrusive single-line-to-ground fault (SLGF detection of low voltage distribution systems. The input features of the AI algorithms are extracted using statistical moment transformation for reducing the dimensions of the power signature inputs measured by using non-intrusive fault monitoring (NIFM techniques. The data required to develop the network are generated by simulating SLGF using the Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP in a test system. To enhance the identification accuracy, these features after normalization are given to AI algorithms for presenting and evaluating in this paper. Different AI techniques are then utilized to compare which identification algorithms are suitable to diagnose the SLGF for various power signatures in a NIFM system. The simulation results show that the proposed method is effective and can identify the fault locations by using non-intrusive monitoring techniques for low voltage distribution systems.

  11. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  12. Fault Monitooring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to line breakage...... and risky abortion of an oil-loading operation. With signicant drift forces from waves, non-Gaussian elements dominate in residuals and fault diagnosis need be designed using dedicated change detection for the type of distribution encountered. In addition to dedicated diagnosis, an optimal position...... algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Detection properties and fault-tolerant control are demonstrated by high delity simulations...

  13. Transformer fault diagnosis using continuous sparse autoencoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lukun; Zhao, Xiaoying; Pei, Jiangnan; Tang, Gongyou

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel continuous sparse autoencoder (CSAE) which can be used in unsupervised feature learning. The CSAE adds Gaussian stochastic unit into activation function to extract features of nonlinear data. In this paper, CSAE is applied to solve the problem of transformer fault recognition. Firstly, based on dissolved gas analysis method, IEC three ratios are calculated by the concentrations of dissolved gases. Then IEC three ratios data is normalized to reduce data singularity and improve training speed. Secondly, deep belief network is established by two layers of CSAE and one layer of back propagation (BP) network. Thirdly, CSAE is adopted to unsupervised training and getting features. Then BP network is used for supervised training and getting transformer fault. Finally, the experimental data from IEC TC 10 dataset aims to illustrate the effectiveness of the presented approach. Comparative experiments clearly show that CSAE can extract features from the original data, and achieve a superior correct differentiation rate on transformer fault diagnosis.

  14. Faults characteristics and evolution history based on seismic data in Hangjinqi area Ordos basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guiping

    2017-04-01

    Hangjinqi area structurally located in Yimeng uplift in the northern Ordos basin, is one of the major area of natural gas exploration. Nearly one hundred faults with different size, different properties and different strikes were developed in Hangjinqi area, of which Boerjianghaizi Fault, Wulanjilinmiao Fault and Sanyanjing Fault were in larger scale, regarded as the main faults. Boerjianghaizi Fault is a reverse fault dipping north, the displacement of fault in the plane gradually becoming smaller from bottom to top. Seismic section interpretation results show the following features: Boerjianghaizi Fault dipping north, cutting all the layers below T3 horizon; fault plane is steep in upper part and gentle in lower part. The line 639.5 statistical results display that the dip of the lower part is small, the dip angle of Shihezi Formation and below is about 35°, the fault plane above Shihezi Formation is steep, about 65°. Seismic sections display that Wulanjilinmiao Fault dislocated all horizons from T3 to T9, and this fault plane showed steep dip of more than 80 ° with little change in sedimentary succession. The displacement of fault is small, the largest displacement occurred in Zhidan Group with the displacement of 55m at bottom. Its salient features are that different layers show different fault properties, there are both normal fault and reverse fault, reflecting this region has experienced many times of stress field changes and multiple phase of fault activities. Seismic profile interpretation results reveal that the Sanyanjing Fault broke the T3 horizons and below, The dip of lower part of this fault is about 39°, up to the Sanxi Formation-lower Shihezi Formation, the dip becomes to 62°, and up again to upper Shihezi-Quaternary strata, the dip increases to 78°. In general, Sanyanjing Fault is characterized by smaller displacement in lower and larger displacement in upper. The statistical results of fault displacement in Line523 show that the lower part

  15. Structure and flow properties of syn-rift border faults: The interplay between fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration (Dombjerg Fault, Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Rotevatn, Atle; Peacock, David C. P.; Henstra, Gijs A.; Midtkandal, Ivar; Grundvåg, Sten-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Structurally controlled, syn-rift, clastic depocentres are of economic interest as hydrocarbon reservoirs; understanding the structure of their bounding faults is of great relevance, e.g. in the assessment of fault-controlled hydrocarbon retention potential. Here we investigate the structure of the Dombjerg Fault Zone (Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland), a syn-rift border fault that juxtaposes syn-rift deep-water hanging-wall clastics against a footwall of crystalline basement. A series of discrete fault strands characterize the central fault zone, where discrete slip surfaces, fault rock assemblages and extreme fracturing are common. A chemical alteration zone (CAZ) of fault-related calcite cementation envelops the fault and places strong controls on the style of deformation, particularly in the hanging-wall. The hanging-wall damage zone includes faults, joints, veins and, outside the CAZ, disaggregation deformation bands. Footwall deformation includes faults, joints and veins. Our observations suggest that the CAZ formed during early-stage fault slip and imparted a mechanical control on later fault-related deformation. This study thus gives new insights to the structure of an exposed basin-bounding fault and highlights a spatiotemporal interplay between fault damage and chemical alteration, the latter of which is often underreported in fault studies. To better elucidate the structure, evolution and flow properties of faults (outcrop or subsurface), both fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration must be considered.

  16. Induced Voltages Ratio-Based Algorithm for Fault Detection, and Faulted Phase and Winding Identification of a Three-Winding Power Transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Eun Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an algorithm for fault detection, faulted phase and winding identification of a three-winding power transformer based on the induced voltages in the electrical power system. The ratio of the induced voltages of the primary-secondary, primary-tertiary and secondary-tertiary windings is the same as the corresponding turns ratio during normal operating conditions, magnetic inrush, and over-excitation. It differs from the turns ratio during an internal fault. For a single phase and a three-phase power transformer with wye-connected windings, the induced voltages of each pair of windings are estimated. For a three-phase power transformer with delta-connected windings, the induced voltage differences are estimated to use the line currents, because the delta winding currents are practically unavailable. Six detectors are suggested for fault detection. An additional three detectors and a rule for faulted phase and winding identification are presented as well. The proposed algorithm can not only detect an internal fault, but also identify the faulted phase and winding of a three-winding power transformer. The various test results with Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP-generated data show that the proposed algorithm successfully discriminates internal faults from normal operating conditions including magnetic inrush and over-excitation. This paper concludes by implementing the algorithm into a prototype relay based on a digital signal processor.

  17. Fault Management Design Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  18. Optimal fault-tolerant control strategy of a solid oxide fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Danhui

    2017-10-01

    For solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development, load tracking, heat management, air excess ratio constraint, high efficiency, low cost and fault diagnosis are six key issues. However, no literature studies the control techniques combining optimization and fault diagnosis for the SOFC system. An optimal fault-tolerant control strategy is presented in this paper, which involves four parts: a fault diagnosis module, a switching module, two backup optimizers and a controller loop. The fault diagnosis part is presented to identify the SOFC current fault type, and the switching module is used to select the appropriate backup optimizer based on the diagnosis result. NSGA-II and TOPSIS are employed to design the two backup optimizers under normal and air compressor fault states. PID algorithm is proposed to design the control loop, which includes a power tracking controller, an anode inlet temperature controller, a cathode inlet temperature controller and an air excess ratio controller. The simulation results show the proposed optimal fault-tolerant control method can track the power, temperature and air excess ratio at the desired values, simultaneously achieving the maximum efficiency and the minimum unit cost in the case of SOFC normal and even in the air compressor fault.

  19. Geomorphic evidence of Quaternary tectonics within an underlap fault zone of southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giano, Salvatore Ivo; Pescatore, Eva; Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo

    2018-02-01

    A composite seismic source, the Irpinia - Agri Valley Fault zone, located in the axial sector of the fold-and-thrust belt of southern Apennines, Italy, is investigated. This composite source is made up of a series of nearly parallel, NW-striking normal fault segments which caused many historical earthquakes. Two of these fault segments, known as the San Gregorio Magno and Pergola-Melandro, and the fault-related mountain fronts, form a wedge-shaped, right-stepping, underlap fault zone. This work is aimed at documenting tectonic geomorphology and geology of this underlap fault zone. The goal is to decipher the evidence of surface topographic interaction between two bounding fault segments and their related mountain fronts. In particular, computation of geomorphic indices such as mountain front sinuosity (Smf), water divide sinuosity (Swd), asymmetry factor (AF), drainage basin elongation (Bs), relief ratio (Rh), Hypsometry (HI), normalized steepness (Ksn), and concavity (θ) is integrated with geomorphological analysis, the geological mapping, and structural analysis in order to assess the recent activity of the fault scarp sets recognized within the underlap zone. Results are consistent with the NW-striking faults as those showing the most recent tectonic activity, as also suggested by presence of related slope deposits younger than 38 ka. The results of this work therefore show how the integration of a multidisciplinary approach that combines geomorphology, morphometry, and structural analyses may be key to solving tectonic geomorphology issues in a complex, fold-and-thrust belt configuration.

  20. Fault Diagnosis of Batch Reactor Using Machine Learning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fault diagnosis of a batch reactor gives the early detection of fault and minimizes the risk of thermal runaway. It provides superior performance and helps to improve safety and consistency. It has become more vital in this technical era. In this paper, support vector machine (SVM is used to estimate the heat release (Qr of the batch reactor both normal and faulty conditions. The signature of the residual, which is obtained from the difference between nominal and estimated faulty Qr values, characterizes the different natures of faults occurring in the batch reactor. Appropriate statistical and geometric features are extracted from the residual signature and the total numbers of features are reduced using SVM attribute selection filter and principle component analysis (PCA techniques. artificial neural network (ANN classifiers like multilayer perceptron (MLP, radial basis function (RBF, and Bayes net are used to classify the different types of faults from the reduced features. It is observed from the result of the comparative study that the proposed method for fault diagnosis with limited number of features extracted from only one estimated parameter (Qr shows that it is more efficient and fast for diagnosing the typical faults.

  1. Optimal input design for fault detection and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Madsen, Henrik; Holst, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the paper, the design of optimal input signals for detection and diagnosis in a stochastic dynamical system is investigated. The design is based on maximization of Kullback measure between the model under fault and the model under normal operation conditions. It is established that the optimal...

  2. Rolling bearing fault diagnostics using artificial neural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The time domain vibration signals of a rotating machine with normal and defective bearings are preprocessed using Lapalce wavelet analysis technique for feature extraction. The extracted features are used as inputs to all three ANN classifiers: MLP, RBF, and PNN for four-class: Healthy, outer, inner and roller faults ...

  3. Fault tolerance in "multiprocessor systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    puter architecture; [multiprocessor systems; reconfiguration; system- level diagnosis; VLSI processor arrays. 1. Introduction. Fault-tolerant computing can be defined as the ability to execute specified algorithms correctly inspite of the presence of faults. The complexity of supersystems and the increasing use of such computer ...

  4. Tolerance Towards Sensor Faults: An Application to a Flexible Arm Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Pin Tan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available As more engineering operations become automatic, the need for robustness towards faults increases. Hence, a fault tolerant control (FTC scheme is a valuable asset. This paper presents a robust sensor fault FTC scheme implemented on a flexible arm manipulator, which has many applications in automation. Sensor faults affect the system's performance in the closed loop when the faulty sensor readings are used to generate the control input. In this paper, the non-faulty sensors are used to reconstruct the faults on the potentially faulty sensors. The reconstruction is subtracted from the faulty sensors to form a compensated ‘virtual sensor’ and this signal (instead of the normally used faulty sensor output is then used to generate the control input. A design method is also presented in which the FTC scheme is made insensitive to any system uncertainties. Two fault conditions are tested; total failure and incipient faults. Then the scheme robustness is tested by implementing the flexible joint's FTC scheme on a flexible link, which has different parameters. Excellent results have been obtained for both cases (joint and link; the FTC scheme caused the system performance is almost identical to the fault-free scenario, whilst providing an indication that a fault is present, even for simultaneous faults.

  5. Effect of fluid viscosity on fault frictional behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio, Chiara; Violay, Marie; Spagnuolo, Elena; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Fluids play an important role in fault zone and in earthquakes generation. Fluid pressure reduces the normal effective stress, lowering the frictional strength of the fault, potentially triggering earthquake ruptures. Fluid injection induced earthquakes, such as in geothermal reservoir, are direct evidence of the effect of fluid pressure on the fault strength. However, the frictional fault strength may also vary due to the chemical and physical characteristics of the fluid as discussed here. Here we performed two series of experiments on precut samples of Westerly granite to investigate the role of fluid viscosity on fault frictional behavior. In the first series, we performed 20 rotary shear experiments with the machine SHIVA (INGV, Rome) on cylindrical (50 mm external diameter), at slip rate (V) ranging from 10 μ m/s to 1 m/s effective normal stress (P) of 10 MPa and pore pressure varying from 0 ( i.e., dry conditions) to 2 MPa. Three different fluid viscosities were tested using pure distilled water (η=1 mPa\\cdot s), 40{%}water/60{%}glycerol (η =10.5 mPa\\cdot s) and 15{%}water/85{%}glycerol (η=109 mPa\\cdot s) mixtures (all reported viscosities at 20 rC). In agreement with theoretical argumentations (Stribeck curve) we distinguished three lubrication regimes. At low product of slip-rate per fluid viscosity (S= η\\cdot V/P

  6. Fault Tolerant Controller Design for a Faulty UAV Using Fuzzy Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshu Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a fault tolerant control (FTC issue about an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV under possible simultaneous actuator saturation and faults occurrence. Firstly, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models representing nonlinear flight control systems (FCS for an UAV with unknown disturbances and actuator saturation are established. Then, a normal H-infinity tracking controller is presented using an online estimator, which is introduced to weaken the saturation effect. Based on the normal tracking controller, we propose an adaptive fault tolerant tracking controller (FTTC to solve actuator loss of effectiveness (LOE fault problem. Compared with previous work, this approach developed in our research need not rely on any fault diagnosis unit and is easily applied in engineering. Finally, these results in simulation indicate the efficiency of our presented FTC scheme.

  7. Fault tolerant control for switched linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Dongsheng; Shi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This book presents up-to-date research and novel methodologies on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for switched linear systems. It provides a unified yet neat framework of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control of switched systems. It can therefore serve as a useful textbook for senior and/or graduate students who are interested in knowing the state-of-the-art of filtering, fault detection, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control areas, as well as recent advances in switched linear systems.  

  8. Thrust geometries in unconsolidated Quaternary sediments around the Eupchon fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, J. H.; Shin, H. C.

    2003-04-01

    It had been considered that Korean Peninsula is located in a relatively stable continental platform. Over ten Quaternary faults have recently been discovered, however, in the south-eastern part of the Korean Peninsula. The Eupchon Fault was discovered at the construction site of a primary school, close to a nuclear power plant. In order to understand the characteristics of the Eupchon fault, we carried out two trench surveys near the first finding site. The orientations of trench sites are 150o and 170o, the widths are 1.3 m and 1.5 m, and the maximum depths are 2.8 m and 5.5 m, respectively. The trenches are in Quaternary unconsolidated marine terrace sediments, which have horizontal bedding planes, are well sorted, and range from pebbles to muds The fault system includes one main reverse fault (N20o E/40o SE) with about 4m displacement and a series of branches. Structures in the fault system include synthetic and antithetic faults, hanging wall anticlines, drag folds, back thrusts, pop-up structures, flat-ramp geometries and duplexes, i.e. very similar to thrust systems in consolidated rocks. In the upper part of the fault system, several tip damage zone patterns are observed, indicating that the fault system terminates in the upper part of the section. Pebbles along the main fault plane show preferred orientation of long axes indicating the fault trace. The orientation of the slickenside striea is E-W, indicating the movement direction. The unconformity between the Quaternary deposits and the underlying Tertiary andesites and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks is displaced in a reverse sense. A normal displacement was reported lower in the section, indicating the fault had a normal displacement and was reverse reactivated during the Quaternary.

  9. Paleoseismicity on the Dense Network of Holocene Submarine Faults in Beppu Bay, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, K.; Matsuoka, H.; Okamura, M.; Chida, N.

    2003-12-01

    Beppu Bay, approximately 30 km by 15 km in size, contains a complex network of Holocene submarine faults whose total length amounts to 230km. They are normal dip-slip fault with left-lateral strike-slip component. The maximum vertical offset accumulated in the past 7,300 years exceeds 20 m. A detailed study on paleoseismicity on one of the faults shows a feature of the time-predictable recurrence, i.e., the larger the vertical offset, the longer the following inter-event time. Branching features can be often recognized near the end of fault and the consistency in branching direction of neighboring faults suggest repeated rupture propagation in the same direction. A detailed examination of high-resolution seismic profiling of branch indicates a repeat of branching and a slow transition of rupture from an old branch to a new one. The central Beppu-Bay fault running WNW to ESE in the center of the bay forms the northern boundary of the major graben structure of the bay. The Asamigawa fault in the west of the bay, running parallel to the central Beppu-Bay fault, has been considered as the southern boundary, but its eastern continuation was not clear. Recent seismic profiling carried out by Chida et al. (2003) showed an existence of Holocene normal fault beneath the city of Oita whose population is 440,000 and interpreted it as a part of the southern boundary. Our high-resolution shallow-water profiling survey revealed the submarine portion of the southern boundary fault, filling a gap between two subaerial faults. We continuously sample marine sediments down to a subbottom depth of 20m by piston coring and correlate specific features of sediment, 20 volcanic ash layers, a few features of magnetic susceptibility and coarse fraction together with C-14 ages of echinoids, pelecypods, and plant remains on the both sides of a targe fault to estimate the date and vertical offset of paleoearthquakes.

  10. The 2009MW 6.1 L'Aquila fault system imaged by 64k earthquake locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoroso, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    On April 6 2009, a MW 6.1 normal-faulting earthquake struck the axial area of the Abruzzo region in central Italy. We investigate the complex architecture and mechanics of the activated fault system by using 64k high-resolution foreshock and aftershock locations. The fault system is composed by two major SW dipping segments forming an en-echelon NW trending system about 50km long: the high-angle L'Aquila fault and the listric Campotosto fault, located in the first 10km depth. From the beginning of 2009, foreshocks activated the deepest portion of the mainshock fault. A week before the MW 6.1 event, the largest (MW 4.0) foreshock triggered seismicity migration along a minor off-fault segment. Seismicity jumped back to the main plane a few hours before the mainshock. High-precision locations allowed us to peer into the fault zone showing complex geological structures from the metre to the kilometre scale, analogous to those observed by field studies and seismic profiles. Also, we were able to investigate important aspects of earthquakes nucleation and propagation through the upper crust in carbonate-bearing rocks such as: the role of fluids in normal-faulting earthquakes; how crustal faults terminate at depths; the key role of fault zone structure in the earthquake rupture evolution processes.

  11. Geology of the Elephanta Island fault zone, western Indian rifted margin, and its significance for understanding the Panvel flexure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Hrishikesh; Pundalik, Ashwin; D'souza, Joseph; Sheth, Hetu; Lobo, Keegan Carmo; D'souza, Kyle; Patel, Vanit

    2017-02-01

    The Panvel flexure is a 150-km long tectonic structure, comprising prominently seaward-dipping Deccan flood basalts, on the western Indian rifted margin. Given the active tectonic faulting beneath the Panvel flexure zone inferred from microseismicity, better structural understanding of the region is needed. The geology of Elephanta Island in the Mumbai harbour, famous for the ca. mid-6th century A.D. Hindu rock-cut caves in Deccan basalt (a UNESCO World Heritage site) is poorly known. We describe a previously unreported but well-exposed fault zone on Elephanta Island, consisting of two large faults dipping steeply east-southeast and producing easterly downthrows. Well-developed slickensides and structural measurements indicate oblique slip on both faults. The Elephanta Island fault zone may be the northern extension of the Alibag-Uran fault zone previously described. This and two other known regional faults (Nhava-Sheva and Belpada faults) indicate a progressively eastward step-faulted structure of the Panvel flexure, with the important result that the individual movements were not simply downdip but also oblique-slip and locally even rotational (as at Uran). An interesting problem is the normal faulting, block tectonics and rifting of this region of the crust for which seismological data indicate a normal thickness (up to 41.3 km). A model of asymmetric rifting by simple shear may explain this observation and the consistently landward dips of the rifted margin faults.

  12. Frictional stability and earthquake triggering during fluid pressure stimulation of an experimental fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, M. M.; Collettini, C.; Marone, C.

    2017-11-01

    It is widely recognized that the significant increase of M > 3.0 earthquakes in Western Canada and the Central United States is related to underground fluid injection. Following injection, fluid overpressure lubricates the fault and reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place, promoting slip. Although, this basic physical mechanism for earthquake triggering and fault slip is well understood, there are many open questions related to induced seismicity. Models of earthquake nucleation based on rate- and state-friction predict that fluid overpressure should stabilize fault slip rather than trigger earthquakes. To address this controversy, we conducted laboratory creep experiments to monitor fault slip evolution at constant shear stress while the effective normal stress was systematically reduced via increasing fluid pressure. We sheared layers of carbonate-bearing fault gouge in a double direct shear configuration within a true-triaxial pressure vessel. We show that fault slip evolution is controlled by the stress state acting on the fault and that fluid pressurization can trigger dynamic instability even in cases of rate strengthening friction, which should favor aseismic creep. During fluid pressurization, when shear and effective normal stresses reach the failure condition, accelerated creep occurs in association with fault dilation; further pressurization leads to an exponential acceleration with fault compaction and slip localization. Our work indicates that fault weakening induced by fluid pressurization can overcome rate strengthening friction resulting in fast acceleration and earthquake slip. Our work points to modifications of the standard model for earthquake nucleation to account for the effect of fluid overpressure and to accurately predict the seismic risk associated with fluid injection.

  13. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois; implications for New Madrid tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-01-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  14. Multiple Generations of Faulting: A Kinematic Analysis of the Lagarfljót Region, Northeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, K.; Karson, J. A.; Fiorentino, A. J., II

    2014-12-01

    The North American/Eurasian plate boundary in Iceland is structurally diverse with oblique rifts, volcanic fissure swarms, and transform zones. Lagarfljót is a lake located in the Tertiary flood basalts of East Iceland that range in age from ~7 to 3 Ma. The lake is approximately 50 km E of the actively spreading, NS-trending, Northern Rift Zone (NVZ), and occupies a northeast-trending depression in an area of strong NS lineaments. A flexure zone runs N-S across the southern part of the lake, and predates an angular unconformity in the regional lava pile. Exposures in cliffs along the lakeshore and stream cuts above unveil a series of dikes and faults that can be correlated with the lineaments, and indicate a complicated tectonic history. Fault zones are characterized by fault breccia, cataclasite and gouge with well-developed slickenlines and clear shear-sense indicators. Fault gouge in individual shear zones ranges from centimeters to meters in thickness. Cross cutting relationships define the relative ages of 2 families of structures, with both post-dating the flexure. The older generation of faults are NS-striking, dextral, strike-slip faults. These are cut by NE-striking, normal faults. The normal faults are almost exclusively located along or near the margins of large dikes or swarms of dikes ranging from 1 - 5 m wide. Displacements along individual normal faults range from centimeters up to 8 m. Some faults cut the lavas above the unconformity and locally rotated structures suggest that limited tilting of the lava pile occurred during faulting. These findings may be related to larger scale processes of propagation and relocation of the NVZ.

  15. Fault Current Characteristics of the DFIG under Asymmetrical Fault Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During non-severe fault conditions, crowbar protection is not activated and the rotor windings of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG are excited by the AC/DC/AC converter. Meanwhile, under asymmetrical fault conditions, the electrical variables oscillate at twice the grid frequency in synchronous dq frame. In the engineering practice, notch filters are usually used to extract the positive and negative sequence components. In these cases, the dynamic response of a rotor-side converter (RSC and the notch filters have a large influence on the fault current characteristics of the DFIG. In this paper, the influence of the notch filters on the proportional integral (PI parameters is discussed and the simplified calculation models of the rotor current are established. Then, the dynamic performance of the stator flux linkage under asymmetrical fault conditions is also analyzed. Based on this, the fault characteristics of the stator current under asymmetrical fault conditions are studied and the corresponding analytical expressions of the stator fault current are obtained. Finally, digital simulation results validate the analytical results. The research results are helpful to meet the requirements of a practical short-circuit calculation and the construction of a relaying protection system for the power grid with penetration of DFIGs.

  16. Constraining fault growth rates and fault evolution in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Bull, Jonathan M.; Barnes, Phil M.; Taylor, Susanna K.; Horgan, Huw

    2000-10-01

    Understanding how faults propagate, grow, and interact in fault systems is important because they are primarily responsible for distributing strain in the upper crust. They localize deformation and stress release, often producing surface displacements that control sedimentation and fluid flow, either by acting as conduits or barriers. Identifying fault spatial distribution, quantifying activity, evaluating linkage mechanisms, and estimating fault growth rates are key components in seismic risk evaluation. Scientists from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand, and the Southampton Oceanography Centre, United Kingdom, are working on a collaborative project that aims to improve understanding of faulting processes in the Earth's crust.The program comprises two research cruises to survey the Whakatane Graben, New Zealand, which is a zone of intense seismicity active extensional faulting, and rapid subsidence within the back-arc region of the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone (Figure 1). Few places in the world offer the same opportunity to study the mechanisms by which major crustal faults have grown from small- to large-scale structures capable of generating moderate to large-magnitude earthquakes.

  17. Active fault traces along Bhuj Fault and Katrol Hill Fault, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    observed on the left bank of a stream cutting the terrace. Faulting is well revealed by 10–30 cm thick gouge. Lack of any corroborating evidence show- ing displacement of Quaternary deposits makes it difficult to decipher the active nature of the fault. However, the probability cannot be ruled- out. In the outlet of the small ...

  18. Dynamics of Earthquake Faults

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J M; Shaw, B E

    1993-01-01

    We present an overview of our ongoing studies of the rich dynamical behavior of the uniform, deterministic Burridge--Knopoff model of an earthquake fault. We discuss the behavior of the model in the context of current questions in seismology. Some of the topics considered include: (1) basic properties of the model, such as the magnitude vs. frequency distribution and the distinction between small and large events; (2) dynamics of individual events, including dynamical selection of rupture propagation speeds; (3) generalizations of the model to more realistic, higher dimensional models; (4) studies of predictability, in which artificial catalogs generated by the model are used to test and determine the limitations of pattern recognition algorithms used in seismology.

  19. Infinitary normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Klop (Jan Willem); R. de Vrijer

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn infinitary orthogonal first-order term rewriting the properties confluence (CR), Uniqueness of Normal forms (UN), Parallel Moves Lemma (PML) have been generalized to their infinitary versions CR-inf, UN-inf, PML-inf, and so on. Several relations between these properties have been

  20. Weak fault detection and health degradation monitoring using customized standard multiwavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yizhen; Wei, Chenjun

    2017-09-01

    Due to the nonobvious symptoms contaminated by a large amount of background noise, it is challenging to beforehand detect and predictively monitor the weak faults for machinery security assurance. Multiwavelets can act as adaptive non-stationary signal processing tools, potentially viable for weak fault diagnosis. However, the signal-based multiwavelets suffer from such problems as the imperfect properties missing the crucial orthogonality, the decomposition distortion impossibly reflecting the relationships between the faults and signatures, the single objective optimization and independence for fault prognostic. Thus, customized standard multiwavelets are proposed for weak fault detection and health degradation monitoring, especially the weak fault signature quantitative identification. First, the flexible standard multiwavelets are designed using the construction method derived from scalar wavelets, seizing the desired properties for accurate detection of weak faults and avoiding the distortion issue for feature quantitative identification. Second, the multi-objective optimization combined three dimensionless indicators of the normalized energy entropy, normalized singular entropy and kurtosis index is introduced to the evaluation criterions, and benefits for selecting the potential best basis functions for weak faults without the influence of the variable working condition. Third, an ensemble health indicator fused by the kurtosis index, impulse index and clearance index of the original signal along with the normalized energy entropy and normalized singular entropy by the customized standard multiwavelets is achieved using Mahalanobis distance to continuously monitor the health condition and track the performance degradation. Finally, three experimental case studies are implemented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method can quantitatively identify the fault signature of a slight rub on

  1. Active Fault Detection and Isolation for Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Mehdi; Schiøler, Henrik; Bak, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for active fault detection and isolation is proposed. In order to observe the failure hidden due to the normal operation of the controllers or the systems, an optimization problem based on minimization of test signal is used. The optimization based method imposes the normal and faulty...... models predicted outputs such that their discrepancies are observable by passive fault diagnosis technique. Isolation of different faults is done by implementation a bank of Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) where the convergence criterion for EKF is confirmed by Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method is applied...

  2. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  3. Fusion information entropy method of rolling bearing fault diagnosis based on n-dimensional characteristic parameter distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yan-Ting; Guan, Jiao-Yue; Fei, Cheng-Wei; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Ling

    2017-05-01

    To monitor rolling bearing operating status with casings in real time efficiently and accurately, a fusion method based on n-dimensional characteristic parameters distance (n-DCPD) was proposed for rolling bearing fault diagnosis with two types of signals including vibration signal and acoustic emission signals. The n-DCPD was investigated based on four information entropies (singular spectrum entropy in time domain, power spectrum entropy in frequency domain, wavelet space characteristic spectrum entropy and wavelet energy spectrum entropy in time-frequency domain) and the basic thought of fusion information entropy fault diagnosis method with n-DCPD was given. Through rotor simulation test rig, the vibration and acoustic emission signals of six rolling bearing faults (ball fault, inner race fault, outer race fault, inner-ball faults, inner-outer faults and normal) are collected under different operation conditions with the emphasis on the rotation speed from 800 rpm to 2000 rpm. In the light of the proposed fusion information entropy method with n-DCPD, the diagnosis of rolling bearing faults was completed. The fault diagnosis results show that the fusion entropy method holds high precision in the recognition of rolling bearing faults. The efforts of this study provide a novel and useful methodology for the fault diagnosis of an aeroengine rolling bearing.

  4. Absolute age determination of quaternary faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Chang Sik; Lee, Seok Hoon; Choi, Man Sik [Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-03-15

    To constrain the age of neotectonic fault movement, Rb-Sr, K-Ar, U-series disequilibrium, C-14 and Be-10 methods were applied to the fault gouges, fracture infillings and sediments from the Malbang, Ipsil, Wonwonsa faults faults in the Ulsan fault zone, Yangsan fault in the Yeongdeog area and southeastern coastal area. Rb-Sr and K-Ar data imply that the fault movement of the Ulan fault zone initiated at around 30 Ma and preliminary dating result for the Yang san fault is around 70 Ma in the Yeongdeog area. K-Ar and U-series disequilibrium dating results for fracture infillings in the Ipsil fault are consistent with reported ESR ages. Radiocarbon ages of quaternary sediments from the Jeongjari area are discordant with stratigraphic sequence. Carbon isotope data indicate a difference of sedimentry environment for those samples. Be-10 dating results for the Suryum fault area are consistent with reported OSL results.

  5. Detection of Interphase Fault Zone in Overhead Power Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kalentionok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parametric methods have been recommended on the basis of current and voltage value recording in normal and emergency modes at a sub-transmission substation in order to detect two- and three-phase short circuits in overhead power distribution networks. The paper proposes to detect an inspection zone in order to locate an interphase fault with the help of analytical calculation of distance up to the fault point using 3–4 expressions on the basis of data obtained as a result of multiple metering pertaining to emergency mode parameters  with their subsequent statistical processing.

  6. Architecture of thrust faults with alongstrike variations in fault-plane dip: anatomy of the Lusatian Fault, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coubal, Miroslav; Adamovič, Jiří; Málek, Jiří; Prouza, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2014), s. 183-208 ISSN 1802-6222 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : fault architecture * fault plane geometry * drag structures * thrust fault * sandstone * Lusatian Fault Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  7. Nuclear Power Plant Thermocouple Sensor-Fault Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning and Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shyamapada; Santhi, B.; Sridhar, S.; Vinolia, K.; Swaminathan, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, an online fault detection and classification method is proposed for thermocouples used in nuclear power plants. In the proposed method, the fault data are detected by the classification method, which classifies the fault data from the normal data. Deep belief network (DBN), a technique for deep learning, is applied to classify the fault data. The DBN has a multilayer feature extraction scheme, which is highly sensitive to a small variation of data. Since the classification method is unable to detect the faulty sensor; therefore, a technique is proposed to identify the faulty sensor from the fault data. Finally, the composite statistical hypothesis test, namely generalized likelihood ratio test, is applied to compute the fault pattern of the faulty sensor signal based on the magnitude of the fault. The performance of the proposed method is validated by field data obtained from thermocouple sensors of the fast breeder test reactor.

  8. Deep Fault Drilling Project—Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Sutherland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, constitutes a globally significant natural laboratory for research into how active plate-bounding continental faults work and, in particular, how rocks exposed at the surface today relate to deep-seated processes of tectonic deformation, seismogenesis, and mineralization. The along-strike homogeneity of the hanging wall, rapid rate of dextral-reverse slip on an inclined fault plane, and relatively shallow depths to mechanical and chemical transitions make the Alpine Fault and the broader South Island plate boundary an important international site for multi-disciplinary research and a realistic target for an ambitious long-term program of scientific drilling investigations.

  9. Fault Monitoring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to mooring line...... breakage and a high-risk abortion of an oil-loading operation. With significant drift forces from waves, non-Gaussian elements dominate forces and the residuals designed for fault diagnosis. Hypothesis testing need be designed using dedicated change detection for the type of distribution encountered....... In addition to dedicated diagnosis, an optimal position algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Furthermore, even in the case of line breakage, this optimal position strategy could be utilised to avoid breakage of a second mooring line...

  10. Malware Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Christodorescu, Mihai; Kinder, Johannes; Jha, Somesh; Katzenbeisser, Stefan; Veith, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Malware is code designed for a malicious purpose, such as obtaining root privilege on a host. A malware detector identifies malware and thus prevents it from adversely affecting a host. In order to evade detection by malware detectors, malware writers use various obfuscation techniques to transform their malware. There is strong evidence that commercial malware detectors are susceptible to these evasion tactics. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a malware normalizer ...

  11. Method of locating ground faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L. (Inventor); Rose, Allen H. (Inventor); Cull, Ronald C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  12. Map and Database of Probable and Possible Quaternary Faults in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruleman, C.A.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Haller, K.M.; Rukstales, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) mission in Afghanistan, has prepared a digital map showing the distribution of probable and suspected Quaternary faults in Afghanistan. This map is a key component of a broader effort to assess and map the country's seismic hazards. Our analyses of remote-sensing imagery reveal a complex array of tectonic features that we interpret to be probable and possible active faults within the country and in the surrounding border region. In our compilation, we have mapped previously recognized active faults in greater detail, and have categorized individual features based on their geomorphic expression. We assigned mapped features to eight newly defined domains, each of which contains features that appear to have similar styles of deformation. The styles of deformation associated with each domain provide insight into the kinematics of the modern tectonism, and define a tectonic framework that helps constrain deformational models of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The modern fault movements, deformation, and earthquakes in Afghanistan are driven by the collision between the northward-moving Indian subcontinent and Eurasia. The patterns of probable and possible Quaternary faults generally show that much of the modern tectonic activity is related to transfer of plate-boundary deformation across the country. The left-lateral, strike-slip Chaman fault in southeastern Afghanistan probably has the highest slip rate of any fault in the country; to the north, this slip is distributed onto several fault systems. At the southern margin of the Kabul block, the style of faulting changes from mainly strike-slip motion associated with the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates, to transpressional and transtensional faulting. North and northeast of the Kabul block, we recognized a complex pattern of potentially active strike-slip, thrust, and normal faults that form a

  13. Experimental challenges to reproduce seismic fault motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, T.

    2011-12-01

    difficulty was how to absorb hydrodynamic shock due to abrupt fault motion in the vessel, and this was overcome by pressurizing water in the vessel, acting as pore fluid, using pressurized gas (in other words using gas as a cushion). I will report preliminary experimental results on high-velocity rock-on-rock friction under pore-water pressure. Other technical challenges are (i) how to produce step-change in velocity to see if the framework of rate-and-state friction law holds in high-velocity regime, (ii) how to conduct high-velocity friction experiments in hydrothermal conditions to study frictional properties relevant to slow slip and low-frequency tremors, and (iii) how to conduct high-velocity friction experiments at high normal stresses. The first task became possible with a low to high-velocity apparatus in Beijing and a few other machines, and I will show some preliminary results. There is no fundamental difficulty in (ii) since O-ring is enough to seal piston rotating at a high speed. However, (iii) will be the hardest because of severe thermal fracturing of host rocks that limits the axial stress. Use of aluminum sleeve made it possible to apply the normal stress to about 30 MPa, but new device and a high motor power is needed to go higher normal stress.

  14. Fault Features Extraction and Identification based Rolling Bearing Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, B.; SUN, G. D.; ZHANG, L. Y.; WANG, J. G.; HU, J.

    2017-05-01

    For the fault classification model based on extreme learning machine (ELM), the diagnosis accuracy and stability of rolling bearing is greatly influenced by a critical parameter, which is the number of nodes in hidden layer of ELM. An adaptive adjustment strategy is proposed based on vibrational mode decomposition, permutation entropy, and nuclear kernel extreme learning machine to determine the tunable parameter. First, the vibration signals are measured and then decomposed into different fault feature models based on variation mode decomposition. Then, fault feature of each model is formed to a high dimensional feature vector set based on permutation entropy. Second, the ELM output function is expressed by the inner product of Gauss kernel function to adaptively determine the number of hidden layer nodes. Finally, the high dimension feature vector set is used as the input to establish the kernel ELM rolling bearing fault classification model, and the classification and identification of different fault states of rolling bearings are carried out. In comparison with the fault classification methods based on support vector machine and ELM, the experimental results show that the proposed method has higher classification accuracy and better generalization ability.

  15. Active fault diagnosis by temporary destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis method for parametric or multiplicative faults is proposed. The method periodically adds a term to the controller that for a short period of time renders the system unstable if a fault has occurred, which facilitates rapid fault detection. An illustrative example is given....

  16. Fault isolatability conditions for linear systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we shall show that an unlimited number of additive single faults can be isolated under mild conditions if a general isolation scheme is applied. Multiple faults are also covered. The approach is algebraic and is based on a set representation of faults, where all faults within a set...

  17. Active Fault Diagnosis by Temporary Destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    An active fault diagnosis method for parametric or multiplicative faults is proposed. The method periodically adds a term to the controller that for a short period of time renders the system unstable if a fault has occurred, which facilitates rapid fault detection. An illustrative example is given....

  18. Fault Detection for Diesel Engine Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Bøgh, S.A.; Jørgensen, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    Feedback control systems are vulnerable to faults in control loop sensors and actuators, because feedback actions may cause abrupt responses and process damage when faults occur.......Feedback control systems are vulnerable to faults in control loop sensors and actuators, because feedback actions may cause abrupt responses and process damage when faults occur....

  19. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data were obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA/Lewis. Time-synchronous-averaged vibration data were recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Wigner-Ville distribution was used to examine the time-averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques that include time-domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  20. Fault Diagnosis of Power Systems Using Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Oliver, Walter E. , Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The power system operator's need for a reliable power delivery system calls for a real-time or near-real-time Al-based fault diagnosis tool. Such a tool will allow NASA ground controllers to re-establish a normal or near-normal degraded operating state of the EPS (a DC power system) for Space Station Alpha by isolating the faulted branches and loads of the system. And after isolation, re-energizing those branches and loads that have been found not to have any faults in them. A proposed solution involves using the Fault Diagnosis Intelligent System (FDIS) to perform near-real time fault diagnosis of Alpha's EPS by downloading power transient telemetry at fault-time from onboard data loggers. The FDIS uses an ANN clustering algorithm augmented with a wavelet transform feature extractor. This combination enables this system to perform pattern recognition of the power transient signatures to diagnose the fault type and its location down to the orbital replaceable unit. FDIS has been tested using a simulation of the LeRC Testbed Space Station Freedom configuration including the topology from the DDCU's to the electrical loads attached to the TPDU's. FDIS will work in conjunction with the Power Management Load Scheduler to determine what the state of the system was at the time of the fault condition. This information is used to activate the appropriate diagnostic section, and to refine if necessary the solution obtained. In the latter case, if the FDIS reports back that it is equally likely that the faulty device as 'start tracker #1' and 'time generation unit,' then based on a priori knowledge of the system's state, the refined solution would be 'star tracker #1' located in cabinet ITAS2. It is concluded from the present studies that artificial intelligence diagnostic abilities are improved with the addition of the wavelet transform, and that when such a system such as FDIS is coupled to the Power Management Load Scheduler, a faulty device can be located and isolated

  1. Fault Tolerant External Memory Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Mølhave, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    bound on the number of I/Os required for any deterministic dictionary that is resilient to memory faults. We design a static and a dynamic deterministic dictionary with optimal query performance as well as an optimal sorting algorithm and an optimal priority queue. Finally, we consider scenarios where......Algorithms dealing with massive data sets are usually designed for I/O-efficiency, often captured by the I/O model by Aggarwal and Vitter. Another aspect of dealing with massive data is how to deal with memory faults, e.g. captured by the adversary based faulty memory RAM by Finocchi and Italiano....... However, current fault tolerant algorithms do not scale beyond the internal memory. In this paper we investigate for the first time the connection between I/O-efficiency in the I/O model and fault tolerance in the faulty memory RAM, and we assume that both memory and disk are unreliable. We show a lower...

  2. Static Decoupling in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    An algebraic approach is given for a design of a static residual weighting factor in connection with fault detection. A complete parameterization is given of the weighting factor which will minimize a given performance index...

  3. Detection of arc fault based on frequency constrained independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Rencheng; Xu, Renhao; Chen, Yongzhi; Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Shouhong

    2015-02-01

    Arc fault is one of the main reasons of electrical fires. As a result of weakness, randomness and cross talk of arc faults, very few of methods have been successfully used to protect loads from all arc faults in low-voltage circuits. Therefore, a novel detection method is developed for detection of arc faults. The method is based on frequency constrained independent component analysis. In the process of the method derivation, a band-pass filter was introduced as a constraint condition to separate independent components of mixed signals. In the process of the independent component separations, although the fault mixed signals were under the conditions of the strong background noise and the frequency aliasing, the effective high frequency components of arc faults could be separated by frequency constrained independent component analysis. Based on the separated components, the power spectrums of them were calculated to classify the normal and the arc fault conditions. The validity of the developed method was verified by using an arc fault experimental platform set up. The results show that arc faults of nine typical electrical loads are successfully detected based on frequency constrained independent component analysis.

  4. Spatio-temporal evolution of fault networks: implications for deep radioactive waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardacre, K.; Scotti, O. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is to provide estimates of both vertical and lateral propagation rates, on time scales of 100 000 years, for the faults systems known to be present today in the region of Bure, the site of an underground rock laboratory. The project is divided into three parts: 1) literature review (fault growth processes and data), 2) benchmarking against data a numerical code that allows for spontaneous development and growth of faults and 3) application to the Bure site. A brief overview of fault growth processes and observed fault propagation rates shows that non-negligible values (20-50 mm/yrs or roughly 5 km in 100 000 years) can be reached. Preliminary results obtained from two numerical simulations 1) fault growth of a pre-existing weaknesses and 2) fault growth of a spontaneously generated fault system, provide encouraging results with values that are comparable with those observed in nature for the growth of normal fault systems. The application to strike-slip system that characterizes the Bure site is still underway. (authors)

  5. Lembang fault plane identification using electrical resistivity method for disaster mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulinadya, S.; Ramadhan, M. Lutfi; N. Wening, F.; Pinehas, D.; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Lembang Fault is an active fault lies from West to East located 10 kilometers in north of Bandung. It is a normal fault that its foot wall raises 40-450 meters above the ground. Its location that is not so far from Bandung, which is densely populated and frequently visited by tourists, makes Lembang Fault a threat if it becomes suddenly active. Its movement can cause earthquakes that can result in fatalities. Therefore, act of mitigation is necessary, such as educating people about Lembang Fault and its potential to cause disaster. The objective of this study is to find Lembang Fault plane below the surface with geo electrical mapping method and vertical elect rical sounding method around Ciwarega and The Peak, Lembang (west side of Lembang Fault). Both of these methods are using electricity current to measure rock resistivity. Currents are injected to the ground and potential differences are measured. According to Ohm's Law, resistivity can be calculated so that resistivity distribution can be obtained. In this study, high resistivity contrast is obtained; it is about 1400-5000 Ohm.m. This resistivity contrast can be caused by lateral lithology difference resulted by fault existence. This proves that there is actually a fault in Lembang that potentially cause disasters like earthquakes.

  6. Normalizing Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Diagnosis and fault-tolerant control

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Mogens; Lunze, Jan; Staroswiecki, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Fault-tolerant control aims at a gradual shutdown response in automated systems when faults occur. It satisfies the industrial demand for enhanced availability and safety, in contrast to traditional reactions to faults, which bring about sudden shutdowns and loss of availability. The book presents effective model-based analysis and design methods for fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control. Architectural and structural models are used to analyse the propagation of the fault through the process, to test the fault detectability and to find the redundancies in the process that can be used to ensure fault tolerance. It also introduces design methods suitable for diagnostic systems and fault-tolerant controllers for continuous processes that are described by analytical models of discrete-event systems represented by automata. The book is suitable for engineering students, engineers in industry and researchers who wish to get an overview of the variety of approaches to process diagnosis and fault-tolerant contro...

  8. Spine growth and seismogenic faulting at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Hirose, Takehiro; De Angelis, Silvio; von Aulock, Felix W.; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The concluding episode of activity during the recent eruption of Mt. Unzen (October 1994 to February 1995) was characterized by incremental spine extrusion, accompanied by seismicity. Analysis of the seismic record reveals the occurrence of two dominant long-period event families associated with a repeating, nondestructive source mechanism, which we attribute to magma failure and fault-controlled ascent. We obtain constraints on the slip rate and distance of faulting events within these families. That analysis is complemented by an experimental thermomechanical investigation of fault friction in Mt. Unzen dacitic dome rock using a rotary-shear apparatus at variable slip rates and normal stresses. A power density threshold is found at 0.3 MW m-2, above which frictional melt forms and controls the shear resistance to slip, inducing a deviation from Byerlee's frictional law. Homogenized experimentally generated pseudotachylytes have a similar final chemistry, thickness, and crystal content, facilitating the construction of a rheological model for particle suspensions. This is compared to the viscosity constrained from the experimental data, to assess the viscous control on fault dynamics. The onset of frictional melt formation during spine growth is constrained to depths below 300 m for an average slip event. This combination of experimental data, viscosity modeling, and seismic analysis offers a new description of material response during conduit plug flow and spine growth, showing that volcanic pseudotachylyte may commonly form and modify fault friction during faulting of dome rock. This model furthers our understanding of faulting and seismicity during lava dome formation and is applicable to other eruption modes.

  9. Generic, scalable and decentralized fault detection for robot swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anders Lyhne; Timmis, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Robot swarms are large-scale multirobot systems with decentralized control which means that each robot acts based only on local perception and on local coordination with neighboring robots. The decentralized approach to control confers number of potential benefits. In particular, inherent scalability and robustness are often highlighted as key distinguishing features of robot swarms compared with systems that rely on traditional approaches to multirobot coordination. It has, however, been shown that swarm robotics systems are not always fault tolerant. To realize the robustness potential of robot swarms, it is thus essential to give systems the capacity to actively detect and accommodate faults. In this paper, we present a generic fault-detection system for robot swarms. We show how robots with limited and imperfect sensing capabilities are able to observe and classify the behavior of one another. In order to achieve this, the underlying classifier is an immune system-inspired algorithm that learns to distinguish between normal behavior and abnormal behavior online. Through a series of experiments, we systematically assess the performance of our approach in a detailed simulation environment. In particular, we analyze our system’s capacity to correctly detect robots with faults, false positive rates, performance in a foraging task in which each robot exhibits a composite behavior, and performance under perturbations of the task environment. Results show that our generic fault-detection system is robust, that it is able to detect faults in a timely manner, and that it achieves a low false positive rate. The developed fault-detection system has the potential to enable long-term autonomy for robust multirobot systems, thus increasing the usefulness of robots for a diverse repertoire of upcoming applications in the area of distributed intelligent automation. PMID:28806756

  10. Fault on–off versus coseismic fluids reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Doglioni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The fault activation (fault on interrupts the enduring fault locking (fault off and marks the end of a seismic cycle in which the brittle-ductile transition (BDT acts as a sort of switch. We suggest that the fluid flow rates differ during the different periods of the seismic cycle (interseismic, pre-seismic, coseismic and post-seismic and in particular as a function of the tectonic style. Regional examples indicate that tectonic-related fluids anomalies depend on the stage of the tectonic cycle and the tectonic style. Although it is difficult to model an increasing permeability with depth and several BDT transitions plus independent acquicludes may occur in the crust, we devised the simplest numerical model of a fault constantly shearing in the ductile deeper crust while being locked in the brittle shallow layer, with variable homogeneous permeabilities. The results indicate different behaviors in the three main tectonic settings. In tensional tectonics, a stretched band antithetic to the normal fault forms above the BDT during the interseismic period. Fractures close and fluids are expelled during the coseismic stage. The mechanism reverses in compressional tectonics. During the interseismic stage, an over-compressed band forms above the BDT. The band dilates while rebounding in the coseismic stage and attracts fluids locally. At the tip lines along strike-slip faults, two couples of subvertical bands show different behavior, one in dilation/compression and one in compression/dilation. This deformation pattern inverts during the coseismic stage. Sometimes a pre-seismic stage in which fluids start moving may be observed and could potentially become a precursor.

  11. Generic, scalable and decentralized fault detection for robot swarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarapore, Danesh; Christensen, Anders Lyhne; Timmis, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Robot swarms are large-scale multirobot systems with decentralized control which means that each robot acts based only on local perception and on local coordination with neighboring robots. The decentralized approach to control confers number of potential benefits. In particular, inherent scalability and robustness are often highlighted as key distinguishing features of robot swarms compared with systems that rely on traditional approaches to multirobot coordination. It has, however, been shown that swarm robotics systems are not always fault tolerant. To realize the robustness potential of robot swarms, it is thus essential to give systems the capacity to actively detect and accommodate faults. In this paper, we present a generic fault-detection system for robot swarms. We show how robots with limited and imperfect sensing capabilities are able to observe and classify the behavior of one another. In order to achieve this, the underlying classifier is an immune system-inspired algorithm that learns to distinguish between normal behavior and abnormal behavior online. Through a series of experiments, we systematically assess the performance of our approach in a detailed simulation environment. In particular, we analyze our system's capacity to correctly detect robots with faults, false positive rates, performance in a foraging task in which each robot exhibits a composite behavior, and performance under perturbations of the task environment. Results show that our generic fault-detection system is robust, that it is able to detect faults in a timely manner, and that it achieves a low false positive rate. The developed fault-detection system has the potential to enable long-term autonomy for robust multirobot systems, thus increasing the usefulness of robots for a diverse repertoire of upcoming applications in the area of distributed intelligent automation.

  12. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  13. From experiment to design -- Fault characterization and detection in parallel computer systems using computational accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Keun Soo

    This dissertation summarizes experimental validation and co-design studies conducted to optimize the fault detection capabilities and overheads in hybrid computer systems (e.g., using CPUs and Graphics Processing Units, or GPUs), and consequently to improve the scalability of parallel computer systems using computational accelerators. The experimental validation studies were conducted to help us understand the failure characteristics of CPU-GPU hybrid computer systems under various types of hardware faults. The main characterization targets were faults that are difficult to detect and/or recover from, e.g., faults that cause long latency failures (Ch. 3), faults in dynamically allocated resources (Ch. 4), faults in GPUs (Ch. 5), faults in MPI programs (Ch. 6), and microarchitecture-level faults with specific timing features (Ch. 7). The co-design studies were based on the characterization results. One of the co-designed systems has a set of source-to-source translators that customize and strategically place error detectors in the source code of target GPU programs (Ch. 5). Another co-designed system uses an extension card to learn the normal behavioral and semantic execution patterns of message-passing processes executing on CPUs, and to detect abnormal behaviors of those parallel processes (Ch. 6). The third co-designed system is a co-processor that has a set of new instructions in order to support software-implemented fault detection techniques (Ch. 7). The work described in this dissertation gains more importance because heterogeneous processors have become an essential component of state-of-the-art supercomputers. GPUs were used in three of the five fastest supercomputers that were operating in 2011. Our work included comprehensive fault characterization studies in CPU-GPU hybrid computers. In CPUs, we monitored the target systems for a long period of time after injecting faults (a temporally comprehensive experiment), and injected faults into various types of

  14. Insights in Fault Flow Behaviour from Onshore Nigeria Petroleum System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woillez Marie-Noëlle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Faults are complex geological features acting either as permeability barrier, baffle or drain to fluid flow in sedimentary basins. Their role can be crucial for over-pressure building and hydrocarbon migration, therefore they have to be properly integrated in basin modelling. The ArcTem basin simulator included in the TemisFlow software has been specifically designed to improve the modelling of faulted geological settings and to get a numerical representation of fault zones closer to the geological description. Here we present new developments in the simulator to compute fault properties through time as a function of available geological parameters, for single-phase 2D simulations. We have used this new prototype to model pressure evolution on a siliciclastic 2D section located onshore in the Niger Delta. The section is crossed by several normal growth faults which subdivide the basin into several sedimentary units and appear to be lateral limits of strong over-pressured zones. Faults are also thought to play a crucial role in hydrocarbons migration from the deep source rocks to shallow reservoirs. We automatically compute the Shale Gouge Ratio (SGR along the fault planes through time, as well as the fault displacement velocity. The fault core permeability is then computed as a function of the SGR, including threshold values to account for shale smear formation. Longitudinal fault fluid flow is enhanced during periods of high fault slip velocity. The method allows us to simulate both along-fault drainages during the basin history as well as overpressure building at present-day. The simulated pressures are at first order within the range of observed pressures we had at our disposal.

  15. Salt movements and faulting of the overburden - can numerical modeling predict the fault patterns above salt structures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Wesenberg, Rasmus

    the rheology of the deforming overburden, the mechanical coupling between the overburden and the underlying salt, as well as the kinematics of the moving salt structure. In this presentation, we demonstrate how the horizontal component on the salt motion influences the fracture patterns within the overburden....... The modeling shows that purely vertical movement of the salt introduces a mesh of concentric normal faults in the overburden, and that the frequency of radiating faults increases with the amount of lateral movements across the salt-overburden interface. The two end-member fault patterns (concentric vs....... radiating) can thus be linked to two different styles of salt movement: i) the vertical rising of a salt indenter and ii) the inflation of a ‘salt-balloon’ beneath the deformed strata. The results are in accordance with published analogue and theoretical models, as well as natural systems, and the model may...

  16. Evolution of wear and friction along experimental faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Yeval; Chang, Jefferson C.; Lockner, David A.; Reches, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of wear and friction along experimental faults composed of solid rock blocks. This evolution is analyzed through shear experiments along five rock types, and the experiments were conducted in a rotary apparatus at slip velocities of 0.002–0.97 m/s, slip distances from a few millimeters to tens of meters, and normal stress of 0.25–6.9 MPa. The wear and friction measurements and fault surface observations revealed three evolution phases: A) An initial stage (slip distances surface; B) a running-in stage of slip distances of 1–3 m with intense wear-rate, failure of many asperities, and simultaneous reduction of the friction coefficient and wear-rate; and C) a steady-state stage that initiates when the fault surface is covered by a gouge layer, and during which both wear-rate and friction coefficient maintain quasi-constant, low levels. While these evolution stages are clearly recognizable for experimental faults made from bare rock blocks, our analysis suggests that natural faults “bypass” the first two stages and slip at gouge-controlled steady-state conditions.

  17. From coseismic offsets to fault-block mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Tom

    2017-09-01

    In the Basin and Range extensional province of the western United States, coseismic offsets, under the influence of gravity, display predominantly subsidence of the basin side (fault hanging wall), with comparatively little or no uplift of the mountainside (fault footwall). A few decades later, geodetic measurements [GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)] show broad (˜100 km) aseismic uplift symmetrically spanning the fault zone. Finally, after millions of years and hundreds of fault offsets, the mountain blocks display large uplift and tilting over a breadth of only about 10 km. These sparse but robust observations pose a problem in that the coesismic uplifts of the footwall are small and inadequate to raise the mountain blocks. To address this paradox we develop finite-element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift, which is predicted to take place within one to two decades after each large earthquake. Thus, the best-preserved topographic signature of earthquakes is expected to occur early in the postseismic period.

  18. Control switching in high performance and fault tolerant control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2010-01-01

    The problem of reliability in high performance control and in fault tolerant control is considered in this paper. A feedback controller architecture for high performance and fault tolerance is considered. The architecture is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. By usi....... The architecture will also allow changing the applied sensors and/or actuators when switching between different controllers. This switchingget particular simple for open-loop stable systems.......The problem of reliability in high performance control and in fault tolerant control is considered in this paper. A feedback controller architecture for high performance and fault tolerance is considered. The architecture is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. By using...... the nominal controller in the architecture as a simple and robust controller, it is possible to use the YJBK transfer function for optimization of the closed-loop performance. This can be done both in connections with normal operation of the system as well as in connection with faults in the system...

  19. From coseismic offsets to fault-block mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, George A.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    In the Basin and Range extensional province of the western United States, coseismic offsets, under the influence of gravity, display predominantly subsidence of the basin side (fault hanging wall), with comparatively little or no uplift of the mountainside (fault footwall). A few decades later, geodetic measurements [GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)] show broad (∼100 km) aseismic uplift symmetrically spanning the fault zone. Finally, after millions of years and hundreds of fault offsets, the mountain blocks display large uplift and tilting over a breadth of only about 10 km. These sparse but robust observations pose a problem in that the coesismic uplifts of the footwall are small and inadequate to raise the mountain blocks. To address this paradox we develop finite-element models subjected to extensional and gravitational forces to study time-varying deformation associated with normal faulting. Stretching the model under gravity demonstrates that asymmetric slip via collapse of the hanging wall is a natural consequence of coseismic deformation. Focused flow in the upper mantle imposed by deformation of the lower crust localizes uplift, which is predicted to take place within one to two decades after each large earthquake. Thus, the best-preserved topographic signature of earthquakes is expected to occur early in the postseismic period.

  20. Investigating the possible effects of salt in the fault zones on rates of seismicity - insights from analogue and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urai, Janos; Kettermann, Michael; Abe, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    The presence of salt in dilatant normal faults may have a strong influence on fault mechanics and related seismicity. However, we lack a detailed understanding of these processes. This study is based on the geological setting of the Groningen area. During tectonic faulting in the Groningen area, rock salt may have flown downwards into dilatant faults, which thus may contain lenses of rock salt at present. Because of its viscous properties, the presence of salt lenses in a fault may introduce a strain-rate dependency to the faulting and affect the distribution of magnitudes of seismic events. We present a "proof of concept" showing that the above processes can be investigated using a combination of analogue and numerical modeling. Full scaling and discussion of the importance of these processes to induced seismicity in Groningen require further, more detailed study. The analogue experiments are based on a simplified stratigraphy of the Groningen area, where it is generally thought that most of the Rotliegend faulting has taken place in the Jurassic, after deposition of the Zechstein. This is interpreted to mean that at the time of faulting the sulphates were brittle anhydrite. If these layers were sufficiently brittle to fault in a dilatant fashion, rock salt could flow downwards into the dilatant fractures. To test this hypothesis, we use sandbox experiments where we combine cohesive powder as analog for brittle anhydrites and carbonates with viscous salt analogs to explore the developing fault geometry and the resulting distribution of salt in the faults. In the numerical models we investigate the stick-slip behavior of fault zones containing ductile material using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Results show that the DEM approach is in principle suitable for the modeling of the seismicity of faults containing salt: the stick-slip motion of the fault becomes dependent on shear loading rate with a modification of the frequency magnitude distribution of the

  1. Large‐displacement, hydrothermal frictional properties of DFDP‐1 fault rocks, Alpine Fault, New Zealand: Implications for deep rupture propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, C.; Toy, V. G.; Townend, J.; Sutherland, R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is a major plate‐bounding fault that accommodates 65–75% of the total relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates. Here we present data on the hydrothermal frictional properties of Alpine Fault rocks that surround the principal slip zones (PSZ) of the Alpine Fault and those comprising the PSZ itself. The samples were retrieved from relatively shallow depths during phase 1 of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP‐1) at Gaunt Creek. Simulated fault gouges were sheared at temperatures of 25, 150, 300, 450, and 600°C in order to determine the friction coefficient as well as the velocity dependence of friction. Friction remains more or less constant with changes in temperature, but a transition from velocity‐strengthening behavior to velocity‐weakening behavior occurs at a temperature of T = 150°C. The transition depends on the absolute value of sliding velocity as well as temperature, with the velocity‐weakening region restricted to higher velocity for higher temperatures. Friction was substantially lower for low‐velocity shearing (V < 0.3 µm/s) at 600°C, but no transition to normal stress independence was observed. In the framework of rate‐and‐state friction, earthquake nucleation is most likely at an intermediate temperature of T = 300°C. The velocity‐strengthening nature of the Alpine Fault rocks at higher temperatures may pose a barrier for rupture propagation to deeper levels, limiting the possible depth extent of large earthquakes. Our results highlight the importance of strain rate in controlling frictional behavior under conditions spanning the classical brittle‐plastic transition for quartzofeldspathic compositions. PMID:27610290

  2. Pursuing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. RESULTS: "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both......BACKGROUND: The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...... was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. METHODS: Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46...

  3. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  4. Integrated Seismic Imaging of the Carlsberg Fault in the Copenhagen City Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; Thybo, H.; Jorgensen, M. I.

    2003-12-01

    Images of the Carlsberg Fault in the area of the Copenhagen city center, Denmark, are obtained from normal incidence and refraction seismic data collected along a 3 km long E-W trending profile, which is oriented approximately perpendicular to the strike of the fault. The integrated seismic data set provides the most detailed images to 500 m depth so far obtained of this fault. The fault zone appears as a flower structure in the normal incidence section, and an abrupt change in the P-wave velocity structure across the fault zone further indicates that significant lateral movements have taken place along the fault. Vertical movements of up to 90 m are evident in the fault zone. Even the shallowest layers that can be imaged by the seismic data (approximately 30 m depth) are clearly vertically offset by the fault. In order to constrain the strike of the fault zone through the Copenhagen area we use shots detonated inside the fault zone, which are recorded by geophones distributed along arcs of circles situated up to 7 km away from the shots. Ground penetrating radar measurements are conducted to image the fault structures in the topmost 10 m. Geodetic measurements conducted in the Copenhagen area during the last 165 years indicate that the fault may still be active with horizontal displacements of about 5 cm over a 73-year period. Small cracks in walls and displacements of buildings may further indicate that the fault is still playing an active role in forming the Copenhagen area. However, no earthquakes are detected along the fault, and the seismicity of the study area is very weak. The formation of the Carlsberg Fault may be related to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system associated with the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist zone, which is situated only 40 km east of the study area. The Sorgenfrei-Tornquist zone is a major tectonic element in southern Scandinavia where it is situated close to the boarder between the Danish Basin to the southwest and the Baltic Shield to

  5. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  6. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  7. Thrust faults and extensional detachment faults in Cretan tectono-stratigraphy: Implications for Middle Miocene extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Vassilakis, Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    dipping E-W-trending zones; one dipping north, related to the opening of the Cretan basin, and the other dipping south, related to the formation of the Messara supra-detachment basin. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west-trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time; (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west-trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; and (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary transtensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  8. The role of fault zone fabric and lithification state on frictional strength, constitutive behavior, and deformation microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikari, M.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Marone, C.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the frictional behavior of a range of lithified rocks used as analogs for fault rocks, cataclasites and ultracataclasites at seismogenic depths and compare them with gouge powders commonly used in experimental studies of faults. At normal stresses of ∼50 MPa, the frictional strength of

  9. Rectifier Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerance of a Doubly Fed Brushless Starter Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Liwei Shi; Zhou Bo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rectifier fault diagnosis method with wavelet packet analysis to improve the fault tolerant four-phase doubly fed brushless starter generator (DFBLSG) system reliability. The system components and fault tolerant principle of the high reliable DFBLSG are given. And the common fault of the rectifier is analyzed. The process of wavelet packet transforms fault detection/identification algorithm is introduced in detail. The fault tolerant performance and output voltage experi...

  10. Fault segmentation: New concepts from the Wasatch Fault Zone, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, Christopher; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Olig, Susan S.; Hylland, Michael D.; Lund, William R.; Schwartz, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The question of whether structural segment boundaries along multisegment normal faults such as the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) act as persistent barriers to rupture is critical to seismic hazard analyses. We synthesized late Holocene paleoseismic data from 20 trench sites along the central WFZ to evaluate earthquake rupture length and fault segmentation. For the youngest (segment boundaries, especially for the most recent earthquakes on the north-central WFZ, are consistent with segment-controlled ruptures. However, broadly constrained earthquake times, dissimilar event times along the segments, the presence of smaller-scale (subsegment) boundaries, and areas of complex faulting permit partial-segment and multisegment (e.g., spillover) ruptures that are shorter (~20–40 km) or longer (~60–100 km) than the primary segment lengths (35–59 km). We report a segmented WFZ model that includes 24 earthquakes since ~7 ka and yields mean estimates of recurrence (1.1–1.3 kyr) and vertical slip rate (1.3–2.0 mm/yr) for the segments. However, additional rupture scenarios that include segment boundary spatial uncertainties, floating earthquakes, and multisegment ruptures are necessary to fully address epistemic uncertainties in rupture length. We compare the central WFZ to paleoseismic and historical surface ruptures in the Basin and Range Province and central Italian Apennines and conclude that displacement profiles have limited value for assessing the persistence of segment boundaries but can aid in interpreting prehistoric spillover ruptures. Our comparison also suggests that the probabilities of shorter and longer ruptures on the WFZ need to be investigated.

  11. Simulation of a flexible wind turbine response to a grid fault

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca D.; Cutululis, A. Nicolaos; Sørensen, Poul

    2007-01-01

    in power system simulation tools applying simplified mechanical models of the drive train. This paper presents simulations of the wind turbine load response to grid faults with an advanced aeroelastic computer code (HAWC2). The core of this code is an advanced model for the flexible structure of the wind......The purpose of this work is to illustrate the impact of a grid fault on the mechanical loads of a wind turbine. Grid faults generate transients in the generator electromagnetic torque, which are propagated in the wind turbine, stressing its mechanical components. Grid faults are normally simulated...... turbines, taking the flexibility of the tower, blades and other components of the wind turbines into account. The effect of a grid fault on the wind turbine flexible structure is assessed for a typical fixed speed wind turbine, equipped with an induction generator....

  12. Coordination between Fault-Ride-Through Capability and Overcurrent Protection of DFIG Generatorsfor Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Kawady, Tamer A.; Abdel-Rahman, Mansour H.

    2009-01-01

    -Through (FRT) mainly aims to delay a disconnecting of the DFIG units during grid faults for a possible time to restore the system stability if the fault is cleared within a permissible time. This strategy may, however, affect the performance of related protective elements during fault periods. In this paper......, the Coor-dination between Fault Ride-Through Capability and Overcur-rent Protection of DFIG Wind Generators in MV Networks is in-vestigated. Simulation test cases using MATLAB-Simulink are implemented on a 345-MW wind farm in AL-Zaafarana, Egypt. The simulation results show the influence of FRT capability......Due to the increasing penetration of wind farms in power systems, stability issues arise strongly for power system operation. Doubly-Fed Induction Generators (DFIG) are charac-terized with some unique features during normal/abnormal op-erating conditions as compared with singly-fed ones. Fault ride...

  13. Systematic assessment of fault stability in the Northern Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects and increased seismicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, E. O.; Healy, D.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate information on fault networks, the full stress tensor, and pore fluid pressures are required for quantifying the stability of structure-bound hydrocarbon prospects, carbon dioxide sequestration, and drilling prolific and safe wells, particularly fluid injections wells. Such information also provides essential data for a proper understanding of superinduced seismicities associated with areas of intensive hydrocarbon exploration and solid minerals mining activities. Pressure and stress data constrained from wells and seismic data in the Northern Niger Delta Basin (NNDB), Nigeria, have been analysed in the framework of fault stability indices by varying the maximum horizontal stress direction from 0° to 90°, evaluated at depths of 2 km, 3.5 km and 4 km. We have used fault dips and azimuths interpreted from high resolution 3D seismic data to calculate the predisposition of faults to failures in three faulting regimes (normal, pseudo-strike-slip and pseudo-thrust). The weighty decrease in the fault stability at 3.5 km depth from 1.2 MPa to 0.55 MPa demonstrates a reduction of the fault strength by high magnitude overpressures. Pore fluid pressures > 50 MPa have tendencies to increase the risk of faults to failure in the study area. Statistical analysis of stability indices (SI) indicates faults dipping 50°-60°, 80°-90°, and azimuths ranging 100°-110° are most favourably oriented for failure to take place, and thus likely to favour migrations of fluids given appropriate pressure and stress conditions in the dominant normal faulting regime of the NNDB. A few of the locally assessed stability of faults show varying results across faulting regimes. However, the near similarities of some model-based results in the faulting regimes explain the stability of subsurface structures are greatly influenced by the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) direction and magnitude of pore fluid pressures.

  14. Fault detection and isolation for complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Shi; Bayuaji, Luhur; Samad, R.; Mustafa, M.; Abdullah, N. R. H.; Zain, Z. M.; Pebrianti, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) is a method to monitor, identify, and pinpoint the type and location of system fault in a complex multiple input multiple output (MIMO) non-linear system. A two wheel robot is used as a complex system in this study. The aim of the research is to construct and design a Fault Detection and Isolation algorithm. The proposed method for the fault identification is using hybrid technique that combines Kalman filter and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The Kalman filter is able to recognize the data from the sensors of the system and indicate the fault of the system in the sensor reading. Error prediction is based on the fault magnitude and the time occurrence of fault. Additionally, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is another algorithm used to determine the type of fault and isolate the fault in the system.

  15. Constraining deformation history and recent activity along the Tuz Gölü fault zone, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystopowicz, N. J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Cosca, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 200 km long, dextral, transtensive Tuz Gölü fault zone is a prominent northwest-striking feature in Central Anatolia. It is one of the most significant structures in Central Anatolia in that it lies within the transition zone between the Western Anatolian Extensional Province and the Eastern Anatolian Contractional Province; its study therefore offers valuable insight into how Central Anatolia is affected by lateral extrusion related to collision in the east, and gravitational pull forces associated with subduction in the west. Proposals for the initiation of the Tuz Gölü fault zone range from Cretaceous to Neogene times, and the amount of recent activity along this fault system remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, potential basinward migration of deformation into the Tuz Gölü basin poses the question as to whether or not this fault system is active in the Holocene. Previous work suggests that migration of deformation towards the basin interior may be related to lithospheric-scale processes such as plateau development, microplate extrusion, or the onset of crustal thinning associated with slab-tear propagation in subducting African lithosphere. In this study, we use a combination of paleostress and morpho-tectonic analysis to further delineate the segmentation and present activity of the Tuz Gölü fault zone. Paleostress analysis offers insight into the deformation history of the region as well as the modern-day stress regime. We conducted a morphometric analysis of over 300 drainage basins along the range-front, which reveal variations that characterize the unique development of numerous fault strands in the region. Statistical analysis of hypsometric curves, systematic variation in basin morphology and orientation, as well as changes in mountain-front sinuosity reveal fault segmentation. Additionally, field mapping and Ar-Ar dating of offset lava flows from the Hasan Dag Volcano quantitatively constrain slip-rates in the southeastern portion of the

  16. Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting in the East Alborz, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Walker, R.; Jackson, J.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Eshraghi, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    The East Alborz mountains of NE Iran are actively deforming as a result of Arabia-Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made using high resolution satellite, topographic and field data, with historical and recent seismicity to map major active faults in this poorly studied region. Deformation on the north side of the range occurs by range-normal shortening on the Khazar thrust fault, which separates Central Iran from the South Caspian. South of the range, deformation involves both left-lateral slip on the previously undocumented Shahrud fault system, which comprises several range-bounding fault segments, and shortening on (probably minor) thrust faults. Faulting south of the range is responsible for major historical earthquakes at Damghan (856AD) and Shahrud (1890). Deformation accommodated across the East Alborz is estimated from the difference in GPS velocities north and south of the range. South of the Alborz, northward GPS velocities across Central Iran decrease eastwards and the strike of the deforming belt changes to become more sub-parallel to the direction of South Caspian- Iran relative motion. This reduces the shortening component across the East Alborz, resulting in lower elevations between 54--57°E. West of 55.5°E, the more arc-normal shortening is achieved by partitioning of deformation onto the Khazar thrust (~1 mm/yr) and the Astaneh and Firuzkuh strike-slip faults (~3 mm/yr). East of 55.5°E, the Khazar fault ends and East Alborz deformation is accommodated primarily on the left-lateral Shahrud fault system, which may slip up to 3~mm/yr. Due to the long gap in seismicity along the eastern Shahrud fault system, the city of Jajarm (15,000 pop.) is considered at high risk from future earthquakes.

  17. Where's the Hayward Fault? A Green Guide to the Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes self-guided field trips to one of North America?s most dangerous earthquake faults?the Hayward Fault. Locations were chosen because of their easy access using mass transit and/or their significance relating to the natural and cultural history of the East Bay landscape. This field-trip guidebook was compiled to help commemorate the 140th anniversary of an estimated M 7.0 earthquake that occurred on the Hayward Fault at approximately 7:50 AM, October 21st, 1868. Although many reports and on-line resources have been compiled about the science and engineering associated with earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, this report has been prepared to serve as an outdoor guide to the fault for the interested public and for educators. The first chapter is a general overview of the geologic setting of the fault. This is followed by ten chapters of field trips to selected areas along the fault, or in the vicinity, where landscape, geologic, and man-made features that have relevance to understanding the nature of the fault and its earthquake history can be found. A glossary is provided to define and illustrate scientific term used throughout this guide. A ?green? theme helps conserve resources and promotes use of public transportation, where possible. Although access to all locations described in this guide is possible by car, alternative suggestions are provided. To help conserve paper, this guidebook is available on-line only; however, select pages or chapters (field trips) within this guide can be printed separately to take along on an excursion. The discussions in this paper highlight transportation alternatives to visit selected field trip locations. In some cases, combinations, such as a ride on BART and a bus, can be used instead of automobile transportation. For other locales, bicycles can be an alternative means of transportation. Transportation descriptions on selected pages are intended to help guide fieldtrip planners or participants choose trip

  18. Fault Recoverability Analysis via Cross-Gramian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    with feedback control. Fault recoverability provides important and useful information which could be used in analysis and design. However, computing fault recoverability is numerically expensive. In this paper, a new approach for computation of fault recoverability for bilinear systems is proposed......Engineering systems are vulnerable to different kinds of faults. Faults may compromise safety, cause sub-optimal operation and decline in performance if not preventing the whole system from functioning. Fault tolerant control (FTC) methods ensure that the system performance maintains within...

  19. An architecture for fault tolerant controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    A general architecture for fault tolerant control is proposed. The architecture is based on the (primary) YJBK parameterization of all stabilizing compensators and uses the dual YJBK parameterization to quantify the performance of the fault tolerant system. The approach suggested can be applied...... for additive faults, parametric faults, and for system structural changes. The modeling for each of these fault classes is described. The method allows to design for passive as well as for active fault handling. Also, the related design method can be fitted either to guarantee stability or to achieve graceful...

  20. Fault Isolation for Shipboard Decision Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran; Blanke, Mogens; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2010-01-01

    Fault detection and fault isolation for in-service decision support systems for marine surface vehicles will be presented in this paper. The stochastic wave elevation and the associated ship responses are modeled in the frequency domain. The paper takes as an example fault isolation of a containe......Fault detection and fault isolation for in-service decision support systems for marine surface vehicles will be presented in this paper. The stochastic wave elevation and the associated ship responses are modeled in the frequency domain. The paper takes as an example fault isolation...

  1. Temporal evolution of fault systems in the Upper Jurassic of the Central German Molasse Basin: case study Unterhaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budach, Ingmar; Moeck, Inga; Lüschen, Ewald; Wolfgramm, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of faults in foreland basins is linked to a complex basin history ranging from extension to contraction and inversion tectonics. Faults in the Upper Jurassic of the German Molasse Basin, a Cenozoic Alpine foreland basin, play a significant role for geothermal exploration and are therefore imaged, interpreted and studied by 3D seismic reflection data. Beyond this applied aspect, the analysis of these seismic data help to better understand the temporal evolution of faults and respective stress fields. In 2009, a 27 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was conducted around the Unterhaching Gt 2 well, south of Munich. The main focus of this study is an in-depth analysis of a prominent v-shaped fault block structure located at the center of the 3D seismic survey. Two methods were used to study the periodic fault activity and its relative age of the detected faults: (1) horizon flattening and (2) analysis of incremental fault throws. Slip and dilation tendency analyses were conducted afterwards to determine the stresses resolved on the faults in the current stress field. Two possible kinematic models explain the structural evolution: One model assumes a left-lateral strike slip fault in a transpressional regime resulting in a positive flower structure. The other model incorporates crossing conjugate normal faults within a transtensional regime. The interpreted successive fault formation prefers the latter model. The episodic fault activity may enhance fault zone permeability hence reservoir productivity implying that the analysis of periodically active faults represents an important part in successfully targeting geothermal wells.

  2. A Thermal Technique of Fault Nucleation, Growth, and Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagash, D.; Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L. C.; Martel, S. J.; Reches, Z.; Elsworth, D.; Onstott, T. C.

    2009-12-01

    Fractures and fluids influence virtually all mechanical processes in the crust, but many aspects of these processes remain poorly understood largely because of a lack of controlled field experiments at appropriate scale. We have developed an in-situ experimental approach to create carefully controlled faults at scale of ~10 meters using thermal techniques to modify in situ stresses to the point where the rock fails in shear. This approach extends experiments on fault nucleation and growth to length scales 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than are currently possible in the laboratory. The experiments could be done at depths where the modified in situ stresses are sufficient to drive faulting, obviating the need for unrealistically large loading frames. Such experiments require an access to large rock volumes in the deep subsurface in a controlled setting. The Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL), which is a research facility planned to occupy the workings of the former Homestake gold mine in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota, presents an opportunity for accessing locations with vertical stresses as large as 60 MPa (down to 2400 m depth), which is sufficient to create faults. One of the most promising methods for manipulating stresses to create faults that we have evaluated involves drilling two parallel planar arrays of boreholes and circulating cold fluid (e.g., liquid nitrogen) to chill the region in the vicinity of the boreholes. Cooling a relatively small region around each borehole causes the rock to contract, reducing the normal compressive stress throughout much larger region between the arrays of boreholes. This scheme was evaluated using both scaling analysis and a finite element code. Our results show that if the boreholes are spaced by ~1 m, in several days to weeks, the normal compressive stress can be reduced by 10 MPa or more, and it is even possible to create net tension between the borehole arrays. According to the Mohr

  3. Stress and Strength of Seismogenic and Creeping Subduction Faults (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Bilek, S. L.; Wada, I.; Gao, X.; Brown, L.

    2013-12-01

    Force balance studies of subduction zone forearcs constrained by earthquake focal mechanisms, active faulting, and topography suggest very weak subduction megathrusts. If represented by an effective coefficient of friction μ', the ratio of shear to normal stress at failure, the average μ' value of most megathrusts is about 0.03, seldom exceeding 0.06, an order of magnitude lower than fault strengths predicted by the Byerlee's law with hydrostatic pore fluid pressure. The μ' value required to explain heat flow observations using megathrust frictional heating modeling is usually also about 0.03, regardless of whether the megathrust is seismogenic or creeping. The mechanism for the weakness is not fully understood, although it must be a combined consequence of fault zone material, fault zone fabric, and pore fluid pressure. Prior to March 11, 2011, the Japan Trench was a rare exception where pervasive margin-normal compression of the upper plate made it difficult to infer megathrust strength. But wholesale stress reversal in much of the forearc due to the M 9 Tohoku earthquake dramatically verified the low-strength (μ' = 0.03) prediction of Wang and Suyehiro (1999, GRL 26(35), 2307-2310). This value translates to depth-dependant shear strength of roughly 10 MPa at 10 km and 30 MPa at 30 km. With regard to how fault strength and stress affect earthquake processes, several issues deserve special attention. (1) There is little doubt that no megathrust is 'strongly' locked, but creeping megathrusts can be either weaker or stronger than locked faults. In fact, subduction of extremely rugged seafloor causes creeping, despite strong resistance caused by geometrical incompatibilities. Physical meanings of regarding locked and creeping faults as 'strongly coupled' and 'weakly coupled', respectively, are in serious question. (2) A μ' value of 0.03-0.05 is a spatial average. For a smooth fault, even small changes in pore fluid pressure alone can cause local deviations from

  4. Integrated near-surface refraction and reflection profiling across the Carlsberg Fault, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, M. I.; Nielsen, L.; Thybo, H.; Fallesen, J.

    2003-04-01

    An integrated refraction and normal-incidence reflection seismic experiment has been conducted in order to resolve the near-surface part of the Carlsberg Fault in the easternmost part of the Danish basin. The primary objectives of the seismic experiment are to: 1) determine the fault structure; 2) image possible velocity contrasts across the fault; and 3) estimate how much the fault offsets the individual sedimentary layers at the different depth levels. The upper sedimentary strata in the study area consist of Cretaceous and Danian chalk and younger sediments dominated by sand and clay. The Carlsberg Fault is a NNW-SSE striking fault, which offsets the different sedimentary lithologies. It was probably created due to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, which is situated approximately 50 km east of the study area. Geodetic measurements indicate that the Carlsberg Fault may have been active during the last 100 years. The 1100 m long seismic reflection section, which was collected in 1995, shows a pronounced flower structure across the Carlsberg Fault, indicative of lateral movements along the fault plane. The seismic experiments were conducted in the SE part of Copenhagen, and urban noise was a major obstacle during collection of the refraction data in 2002. Nevertheless, both first arrivals and wide-angle reflections are prominent along the 3000 m long refraction line. From seismic travel time modelling we find that the P-wave velocity structure changes across the fault zone. The P-wave velocities in the chalk layers are relatively high (typically more than 3.0 km/s) compared to velocities from well log data of similar rock types elsewhere in the Danish area. The estimated velocity structure allows us to depth convert the reflection seismic sections. Vertical offsets of up to 90 m are observed for layers across the fault zone.

  5. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigam, S.; Aneesh, K.; Navathe, C. P.; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2011-02-15

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is {approx}4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  6. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, S; Aneesh, K; Navathe, C P; Gupta, P D

    2011-02-01

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is ∼4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  7. A diagnostic system for electrical faults in a high current discharge plasma setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, S.; Aneesh, K.; Navathe, C. P.; Gupta, P. D.

    2011-02-01

    A diagnostic system to detect electrical faults inside a coaxial high current discharge device is presented here. This technique utilizes two biconical antennas picking up electromagnetic radiation from the discharge device, a voltage divider sensing input voltage, and a Rogowski coil measuring the main discharge current. A computer program then analyses frequency components in these signals and provides information as to whether the discharge event was normal or any breakdown fault occurred inside the coaxial device. The diagnostic system is developed for a 450 kV and 50 kA capillary discharge plasma setup. For the setup various possible faults are analyzed by electrical simulation, followed by experimental results. In the case of normal discharge through the capillary load the dominant frequency is ˜4 MHz. Under faulty conditions, the peak in magnitude versus frequency plot of the antenna signal changes according to the fault position which involves different paths causing variation in the equivalent circuit elements.

  8. Paleoseismology of the 1966 Varto Earthquake (Ms 6.8) and Structure of the Varto Fault Zone, Eastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.; Saber, R.; Yesilyurt, N.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey is a region of active faulting and contains several strike-slip fault zones, which have generated both historical and recent large earthquakes. Two active fault zones in Turkey, the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), divide the area into the Anatolian micro-plate accommodating WSW-directed movement. The southeastern continuation of the NAFZ is often referred to the Varto Fault Zone (VFZ). The VFZ cuts mainly Pliocene volcano-sedimentary units and/or Quaternary deposits and is characterized by multiple fault strands and multiple, closely spaced, active seismogenic zones. Fault motions in the zone are primarily right-lateral, with a subordinate component of NNW-SSE shortening. Study area is Varto region in which indications of active faulting are very well preserved. We recognized three coseismic ruptures from five trench exposures. It is referred to these as events 1 (youngest) through 3 (oldest). The best evidence of event 3 comes from fault traces and its upward terminations. The major components of this fault are fault core and damage zone. The fault is not just one plane of discontinuity and bifurcates and creates additional slip surfaces, which propagate out of the plane of the original fault. Event 2 and event 1, referring to 1946 and 1966 earthquakes, are characterized primarily by discrete, regularly spaced normal faults with and 55-80 cm and 105-270 cm throws, respectively and geometry of growth strata. The VFZ in the study area include typical structures of strike-slip fault zone. It forms a number of parallel and slightly sub-parallel strands striking N50°-72°W including contractional and extensional brittle structures. Several meters to tens of meters wavelength active folds with ENE-WSW and WNW-ESE trending fold axis. These folds deform the Plio-Quaternary units and show classic asymmetry associated with both a south- and north-vergent fault propagation fold. Meso-scale normal faults are also well

  9. Geared induction motor fault diagnosis by current, noise and vibration considering measurement environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Seok Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lots of motors have been being used in industry. Therefore many studies have been carried out about the failure diagnosis of motors. In this paper, a diagnosis of gear fault connected to a motor shaft is studied. The fault diagnosis is executed through the comparison of normal gear and abnormal gear. In the abnormal gearbox, a tooth of the intermediate gear is damaged. The measured FFT data are compared with the normal data and analyzed for q-axis current, noise and vibration. Fault gear was found by comparing the FFT with normal FFT. From these, the difference between the normal and abnormal states can be seen by the frequency characteristic analysis for the current as well as noise and vibration.

  10. Orientations of faults determined by premonitory shear zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arvid M.

    1995-07-01

    to fault is known to be positive. According to the postulate, the shear zones should be oriented at angles less than 45° to the compression direction, and it is well known that faults in rock specimens have such orientations. The postulate also predicts the strikingly different orientations of kink bands in foliated materials. Unlike faults in granite specimens, kink bands and the faults that form along them are commonly oriented at angles greater than 45° to the maximum compression. Analysis of kink-band formation indicates that the coefficient of dilatancy is typically negative if the contact strength between layers is frictional, and the postulate affirms that the negative dilatancy will result in the observed orientations. Associations of faults with well-defined shear zones consisting of numerous deformation bands in the Entrada Sandstone in Utah's San Rafael Desert illustrate clearly the control that premonitory shear zones have over the orientations of faults in these rocks. The orientations of conjugate shear zones, both in normal and strike-slip systems, indicate that the angle of dilatancy of the sandstone was about 60°, indicating that the dilatancy was positive at the time the orientations of the shear zones were determined, in spite of microscopic evidence that the volume decreased at some time during the formation of the shear zones. The faults that Gerhard Oertel produced in claycake experiments are amazing, but their orientations can be understood in terms of the postulate of premonitory shear zones: These experiments emphasize, perhaps more strongly than any of the other examples we have considered, the importance of understanding the mechanisms of deformation in the material under study. In compression experiments, the angle between the maximum compression and the faults is a highly obtuse angle of 83° whereas, in extension experiments, the angle is a highly acute angle of 7°! The postulate indicates that, in compression experiments, the clay

  11. Holocene tectonics and fault reactivation in the foothills of the north Cascade Mountains, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brian L.; Barnett, Elizabeth; Schermer, Elizabeth; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Hughes, Jonathan; Foit, Franklin F.; Weaver, Craig S.; Haugerud, Ralph; Hyatt, Tim

    2013-01-01

    We use LiDAR imagery to identify two fault scarps on latest Pleistocene glacial outwash deposits along the North Fork Nooksack River in Whatcom County, Washington (United States). Mapping and paleoseismic investigation of these previously unknown scarps provide constraints on the earthquake history and seismic hazard in the northern Puget Lowland. The Kendall scarp lies along the mapped trace of the Boulder Creek fault, a south-dipping Tertiary normal fault, and the Canyon Creek scarp lies in close proximity to the south-dipping Canyon Creek fault and the south-dipping Glacier Extensional fault. Both scarps are south-side-up, opposite the sense of displacement observed on the nearby bedrock faults. Trenches excavated across these scarps exposed folded and faulted late Quaternary glacial outwash, locally dated between ca. 12 and 13 ka, and Holocene buried soils and scarp colluvium. Reverse and oblique faulting of the soils and colluvial deposits indicates at least two late Holocene earthquakes, while folding of the glacial outwash prior to formation of the post-glacial soil suggests an earlier Holocene earthquake. Abrupt changes in bed thickness across faults in the Canyon Creek excavation suggest a lateral component of slip. Sediments in a wetland adjacent to the Kendall scarp record three pond-forming episodes during the Holocene—we infer that surface ruptures on the Boulder Creek fault during past earthquakes temporarily blocked the stream channel and created an ephemeral lake. The Boulder Creek and Canyon Creek faults formed in the early to mid-Tertiary as normal faults and likely lay dormant until reactivated as reverse faults in a new stress regime. The most recent earthquakes—each likely Mw > 6.3 and dating to ca. 8050–7250 calendar years B.P. (cal yr B.P.), 3190–2980 cal. yr B.P., and 910–740 cal. yr B.P.—demonstrate that reverse faulting in the northern Puget Lowland poses a hazard to urban areas between Seattle (Washington) and Vancouver

  12. Fault-tolerant Supervisory Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    of this work has been to develop and employ concepts and methods that are suitable for use in different automation processes, with applicability in various industrial fields. The requirements for high productivity and quality has resulted in employing additional instrumentation and use of more sophisticated...... control algorithms. The drawback is, however, that these control systems have become more vulnerable to even simple faults in instrumentation. On the other hand, due to cost-optimality requirements, an extensive use of hardware redundancy has been prohibited. Nevertheless, the dependency and availability...... could be increased through enhancing control systems' ability to on-line perform fault detection and reconfiguration when a fault occurs and before a safety system shuts-down the entire process. The main contributions of this research effort are development and experimentation with methodologies...

  13. Slip triggered on southern California faults by the 1992 Joshua Tree, Landers, and big bear earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Paul; Bilham, Roger; Behr, Jeff; Gomberg, Joan; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    1994-01-01

    Five out of six functioning creepmeters on southern California faults recorded slip triggered at the time of some or all of the three largest events of the 1992 Landers earthquake sequence. Digital creep data indicate that dextral slip was triggered within 1 min of each mainshock and that maximum slip velocities occurred 2 to 3 min later. The duration of triggered slip events ranged from a few hours to several weeks. We note that triggered slip occurs commonly on faults that exhibit fault creep. To account for the observation that slip can be triggered repeatedly on a fault, we propose that the amplitude of triggered slip may be proportional to the depth of slip in the creep event and to the available near-surface tectonic strain that would otherwise eventually be released as fault creep. We advance the notion that seismic surface waves, perhaps amplified by sediments, generate transient local conditions that favor the release of tectonic strain to varying depths. Synthetic strain seismograms are presented that suggest increased pore pressure during periods of fault-normal contraction may be responsible for triggered slip, since maximum dextral shear strain transients correspond to times of maximum fault-normal contraction.

  14. Transient stability of DFIG wind turbines at an external short-circuit fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-07-01

    The fast development of wind power generation brings new requirements for wind turbine integration into the network. After clearance of an external short-circuit fault, grid-connected wind turbines should restore their normal operation without power loss caused by disconnections. This article concentrates on the transient stability of variable speed wind turbines with doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs) at an external short-circuit fault. A simulation model of a MW-level variable speed wind turbine with a DFIG developed in PSCAD/EMTDC is presented and the control and protection schemes are described in detail. The transient process of grid-connected wind turbines with DFIGs at an external short-circuit fault is analysed, and in critical post-fault situations a measure is proposed for the voltage recovery of DFIG wind turbines after fault clearance. Simulation results demonstrate that in uncritical post-fault situations the control schemes are able to restore the wind turbine's normal operation without disconnections. It is also proved that the proposed measure is effective in re-establishing the voltage at the wind turbine terminal in critical post-fault situations. Copyright

  15. Communication Characteristics of Faulted Overhead High Voltage Power Lines at Low Radio Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Suljanović

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives a model of high-voltage overhead power line under fault conditions at low radio frequencies. The derived model is essential for design of communication systems to reliably transfer information over high voltage power lines. In addition, the model can also benefit advanced systems for power-line fault detection and classification exploiting the phenomenon of changed conditions on faulted power line, resulting in change of low radio frequency signal propagation. The methodology used in the paper is based on the multiconductor system analysis and propagation of electromagnetic waves over the power lines. The model for the high voltage power line under normal operation is validated using actual measurements obtained on 400 kV power line. The proposed model of faulted power lines extends the validated power-line model under normal operation. Simulation results are provided for typical power line faults and typical fault locations. Results clearly indicate sensitivity of power-line frequency response on different fault types.

  16. Fault population investigation and estimating magnitude of extension in Guma Graben, Central Afar, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Samson

    2005-06-01

    Extension in the Afar depression occurs on steeply dipping normal faults of many scales. An estimate for cumulative extension can be derived by summing the heave of these faults using digital topographic data, supplemented by field observations of fault dip. If it can be established that the distribution of faults exhibits self-similarity, an estimate of the contribution from faults too small to appear on the digital imagery can be incorporated into the integrated estimate for cumulative extension. A field study of faulting was undertaken within the Dobe and Guma grabens of Central Afar. A fractal dimension of 0.48 was obtained for the measured population of fault throws ( n = 92) in 3 traverses totaling 42 km, a value interpreted to represent the dominant contribution to extension from faults with large throw. The local extension rate across Guma graben is estimated to be between 0.06 and 0.24 mm/year. The higher topographic position of the floor of Guma graben, relative to the sediment filled, adjacent floors of Dobe and Immino grabens is perhaps an indication of a slower rate of extension across Guma graben as compared to Dobe and Immino grabens, assuming they all initiated at the same time.

  17. Simulations of tremor-related creep reveal a weak crustal root of the San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Bradley, Andrew M.; Johnson, Kaj M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep aseismic roots of faults play a critical role in transferring tectonic loads to shallower, brittle crustal faults that rupture in large earthquakes. Yet, until the recent discovery of deep tremor and creep, direct inference of the physical properties of lower-crustal fault roots has remained elusive. Observations of tremor near Parkfield, CA provide the first evidence for present-day localized slip on the deep extension of the San Andreas Fault and triggered transient creep events. We develop numerical simulations of fault slip to show that the spatiotemporal evolution of triggered tremor near Parkfield is consistent with triggered fault creep governed by laboratory-derived friction laws between depths of 20–35 km on the fault. Simulated creep and observed tremor northwest of Parkfield nearly ceased for 20–30 days in response to small coseismic stress changes of order 104 Pa from the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon Earthquake. Simulated afterslip and observed tremor following the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake show a coseismically induced pulse of rapid creep and tremor lasting for 1 day followed by a longer 30 day period of sustained accelerated rates due to propagation of shallow afterslip into the lower crust. These creep responses require very low effective normal stress of ~1 MPa on the deep San Andreas Fault and near-neutral-stability frictional properties expected for gabbroic lower-crustal rock.

  18. Research on Diagnosing the Gearbox Faults Based on Near Field Acoustic Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W K; Hou, J J [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xing, J T, E-mail: wkjiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Ship Science, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-19

    The gearbox fault diagnosis was developed for some decades. The current diagnosis techniques were mostly based on analyzing the shell vibration signals especially close to the bearing seat of gearbox. In order to utilize the spatial distribution information of fault signal, the near field acoustic holography (NAH) is employed for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of the gearbox in this presentation. The distribution images of sound pressure on the surface of gearbox are reconstructed by NAH, and the feature extraction and pattern recognition can be made by image processing techniques. A gearbox is studied in a semi-anechoic chamber to verify the fault diagnosis technique based on NAH. The pitting and partial broken tooth faults of gears are artificially made on one gear as the fault statuses, and the differences of acoustic images among normal and fault working states under the idling condition are analyzed. It can be found that the acoustic images of gearbox in the three different situations change regularly, and the main sound sources can be recognized from the acoustic images which also contain rich diagnosis information. After feature extraction of the acoustic images, the pattern reorganization technique is employed for diagnosis. The results indicate that this diagnosis procedure based on acoustic images is available and feasible for the gearbox fault diagnosis.

  19. Detection and Quantization of Bearing Fault in Direct Drive Wind Turbine via Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Teng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing fault is usually buried by intensive noise because of the low speed and heavy load in direct drive wind turbine (DDWT. Furthermore, varying wind speed and alternating loads make it difficult to quantize bearing fault feature that indicates the degree of deterioration. This paper presents the application of multiscale enveloping spectrogram (MuSEnS and cepstrum to detect and quantize bearing fault in DDWT. MuSEnS can manifest fault modulation information adaptively based on the capacity of complex wavelet transform, which enables the weak bearing fault in DDWT to be detected. Cepstrum can calculate the average interval of periodic components in frequency domain and is suitable for quantizing bearing fault feature under varying operation conditions due to the logarithm weight on the power spectrum. Through comparing a faulty DDWT with a normal one, the bearing fault feature is evidenced and the quantization index is calculated, which show a good application prospect for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis in real DDWT.

  20. Coordination between Fault-Ride-Through Capability and Overcurrent Protection of DFIG Generatorsfor Wind Farms

    OpenAIRE

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Kawady, Tamer A.; Abdel-Rahman, Mansour H.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind farms in power systems, stability issues arise strongly for power system operation. Doubly-Fed Induction Generators (DFIG) are charac-terized with some unique features during normal/abnormal op-erating conditions as compared with singly-fed ones. Fault ride-Through (FRT) mainly aims to delay a disconnecting of the DFIG units during grid faults for a possible time to restore the system stability if the fault is cleared within a permissible time. This s...

  1. Observer and data-driven model based fault detection in Power Plant Coal Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh Odgaard, Peter; Lin, Bao; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2008-01-01

    model with motor power as the controlled variable, data-driven methods for fault detection are also investigated. Regression models that represent normal operating conditions (NOCs) are developed with both static and dynamic principal component analysis and partial least squares methods. The residual...... between process measurement and the NOC model prediction is used for fault detection. A hybrid approach, where a data-driven model is employed to derive an optimal unknown input observer, is also implemented. The three methods are evaluated with case studies on coal mill data, which includes a fault...

  2. The Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory (northern Apennines, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Chiaraluce

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of multidisciplinary and high-resolution data is a fundamental requirement to understand the physics of earthquakes and faulting. We present the Alto Tiberina Near Fault Observatory (TABOO, a research infrastructure devoted to studying preparatory processes, slow and fast deformation along a fault system located in the upper Tiber Valley (northern Apennines, dominated by a 60 km long low-angle normal fault (Alto Tiberina, ATF active since the Quaternary. TABOO consists of 50 permanent seismic stations covering an area of 120 × 120 km2. The surface seismic stations are equipped with 3-components seismometers, one third of them hosting accelerometers. We instrumented three shallow (250 m boreholes with seismometers, creating a 3-dimensional antenna for studying micro-earthquakes sources (detection threshold is ML 0.5 and detecting transient signals. 24 of these sites are equipped with continuous geodetic GPS, forming two transects across the fault system. Geochemical and electromagnetic stations have been also deployed in the study area. In 36 months TABOO recorded 19,422 events with ML ≤ 3.8 corresponding to 23.36e-04 events per day per squared kilometres; one of the highest seismicity rate value observed in Italy. Seismicity distribution images the geometry of the ATF and its antithetic/synthetic structures located in the hanging-wall. TABOO can allow us to understand the seismogenic potential of the ATF and therefore contribute to the seismic hazard assessment of the area. The collected information on the geometry and deformation style of the fault will be used to elaborate ground shaking scenarios adopting diverse slip distributions and rupture directivity models.

  3. An investigation on automatic systems for fault diagnosis in chemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Monroy Chora, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Plant safety is the most important concern of chemical industries. Process faults can cause economic loses as well as human and environmental damages. Most of the operational faults are normally considered in the process design phase by applying methodologies such as Hazard and Operability Analysis (HAZOP). However, it should be expected that failures may occur in an operating plant. For this reason, it is of paramount importance that plant operators can promptly detect and diagnose such faul...

  4. Enhanced detection of rolling element bearing fault based on stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Hu, Niaoqing; Cheng, Zhe; Hu, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Early bearing faults can generate a series of weak impacts. All the influence factors in measurement may degrade the vibration signal. Currently, bearing fault enhanced detection method based on stochastic resonance(SR) is implemented by expensive computation and demands high sampling rate, which requires high quality software and hardware for fault diagnosis. In order to extract bearing characteristic frequencies component, SR normalized scale transform procedures are presented and a circuit module is designed based on parameter-tuning bistable SR. In the simulation test, discrete and analog sinusoidal signals under heavy noise are enhanced by SR normalized scale transform and circuit module respectively. Two bearing fault enhanced detection strategies are proposed. One is realized by pure computation with normalized scale transform for sampled vibration signal, and the other is carried out by designed SR hardware with circuit module for analog vibration signal directly. The first strategy is flexible for discrete signal processing, and the second strategy demands much lower sampling frequency and less computational cost. The application results of the two strategies on bearing inner race fault detection of a test rig show that the local signal to noise ratio of the characteristic components obtained by the proposed methods are enhanced by about 50% compared with the band pass envelope analysis for the bearing with weaker fault. In addition, helicopter transmission bearing fault detection validates the effectiveness of the enhanced detection strategy with hardware. The combination of SR normalized scale transform and circuit module can meet the need of different application fields or conditions, thus providing a practical scheme for enhanced detection of bearing fault.

  5. Diagnosis and Tolerant Strategy of an Open-Switch Fault for T-type Three-Level Inverter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Lee, Kyo Beum; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new diagnosis method of an open-switch fault and fault-tolerant control strategy for T-type three-level inverter systems. The location of faulty switch can be identified by the average of normalized phase current and the change of the neutral-point voltage. The proposed fault...... components and complex calculations. Simulation and experimental results verify the feasibility of the proposed fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategy.......-tolerant strategy is explained by dividing into two cases: the faulty condition of half-bridge switches and the neutral-point switches. The performance of the T-type inverter system improves considerably by the proposed fault tolerant algorithm when a switch fails. The roposed method does not require additional...

  6. Fault-tolerant system for catastrophic faults in AMR sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano Constantini, A.C.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    Anisotropic Magnetoresistance angle sensors are widely used in automotive applications considered to be safety-critical applications. Therefore dependability is an important requirement and fault-tolerant strategies must be used to guarantee the correct operation of the sensors even in case of

  7. 3D seismic analysis of the AK Fault, Orange Basin, South Africa: Implications for hydrocarbon leakage and offshore neotectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiaka, Ahmed I.; Durrheim, Raymond J.; Manzi, Musa S. D.; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2017-11-01

    A high-resolution 3D reflection seismic dataset was used to achieve a detailed description of the half-graben bounded AK Fault in the Ibhubesi gas field of the offshore Orange Basin. Seismic analysis of the fault involved the combination of both the conventional seismic interpretation and seismic attributes. The main objective of the study was to provide insights into hydrocarbon leakage and neotectonic activity along the west coast shelf of South Africa. The AK Fault is among the several half-graben bounded faults that formed in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous during the separation of the South American and the African continents. The AK Fault consists of five seismically detectable segments, whose evolution reflects characteristics of both the ;coherent; and the ;isolated; end-members model of segmented fault origin. Diapiric structures that are direct indicators of vertical fluid movement were also observed along the AK Fault system, providing evidence of significant roles that the fault plays in promoting the vertical migration of hydrocarbon in the Orange Basin. Recent reactivation of the fault has also occurred along an oblique extensional regime that is dominated by normal dip-slip faulting, with minor shear components along the tips.

  8. Multiple resolution chirp reflectometry for fault localization and diagnosis in a high voltage cable in automotive electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seung Jin; Lee, Chun Ku; Shin, Yong-June; Park, Jin Bae

    2016-12-01

    A multiple chirp reflectometry system with a fault estimation process is proposed to obtain multiple resolution and to measure the degree of fault in a target cable. A multiple resolution algorithm has the ability to localize faults, regardless of fault location. The time delay information, which is derived from the normalized cross-correlation between the incident signal and bandpass filtered reflected signals, is converted to a fault location and cable length. The in-phase and quadrature components are obtained by lowpass filtering of the mixed signal of the incident signal and the reflected signal. Based on in-phase and quadrature components, the reflection coefficient is estimated by the proposed fault estimation process including the mixing and filtering procedure. Also, the measurement uncertainty for this experiment is analyzed according to the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we conduct comparative experiments to detect and measure faults under different conditions. Considering the installation environment of the high voltage cable used in an actual vehicle, target cable length and fault position are designed. To simulate the degree of fault, the variety of termination impedance (10 Ω , 30 Ω , 50 Ω , and 1 \\text{k} Ω ) are used and estimated by the proposed method in this experiment. The proposed method demonstrates advantages in that it has multiple resolution to overcome the blind spot problem, and can assess the state of the fault.

  9. Structural Inversion of the Palos Verdes Fault, Southern California, and its Implications for Seismic Hazards Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankman, C. M.; Shaw, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) defines the western margin of the Los Angeles basin, and is regarded as a likely source of moderate to large earthquakes that would affect the coastal metropolitan regions of southern California. In most hazard compilations, the PVF is generally considered to be a vertical, predominantly right-lateral, strike-slip fault system that extends continuously from the Santa Monica thrust southward across Santa Monica Bay, crossing the Palos Verdes Peninsula and continuing southeast across the Inner Borderlands to the area of Coronado Banks. A restraining bend where the fault dips steeply to the southwest generates uplift and folding of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. However, previous studies documenting the activity, slip rate, and slip sense of the PVF have used shallow subsurface excavations and high-frequency seismic data, which have generally limited observations to the upper kilometer of the crust. We use an extensive grid of petroleum industry seismic reflection data and well logs to define the three-dimensional subsurface geometry of the PVF in the region south of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Our seismic data cover the complete offshore extent of the fault, from Santa Monica Bay to the Coronado Banks, and provide direct constraints on the fault geometry extending down to about 5km depth. We use the shapes of folded strata imaged in the seismic data and penetrated by wells to invert for permissible geometries of the fault as it extends to the base of the seismogenic crust. Our data and structural analyses indicate that the PVF developed by Pliocene inversion of a Miocene normal fault system. The fault has a significant component of reverse slip and southwesterly dip at depth along its extent. Oblique displacement on the fault appears to be partitioned at shallow levels into nearly pure right-lateral strike slip on near-vertical faults and contractional folding above gently to moderately dipping blind-thrust fault splays. These observations

  10. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  11. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  12. Finite Fault Database (ANSS ComCat)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A Finite Fault is a modeled representation of the spatial extent, amplitude and duration of fault rupture (slip) of an earthquake, and is generated via the inversion...

  13. Quantifying Fault Networks on Alba Patera, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, D. Y.; Ferrill, D. A.; Morris, A. P.; Sims, D. W.; Franklin, N. M.

    2005-03-01

    Newly developed terrestrial approaches were applied to martian fault networks to quantify the extent and degree of fault network connectivity. These techniques will provide key constraints for martian hydrological models.

  14. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we

  15. Stability of stacking faults in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dranova, Z.I.; Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul' ko, V.B.; Mikhailovskii, I.M.

    1979-12-01

    The atomic configuration of planar lattice defects in tungsten was investigated by field-ion microscopy and thermal etching. Stable stacking faults were observed throughout the investigated temperature range 78--1700/sup 0/K. These faults were studied by field-ion microscopy and mathematical modeling methods. It was found that the existence of stacking faults in bcc crystals was not associated with the action of strong omnidirectional tensile stresses. The crystallographic characteristics of the faults were determined.

  16. Investigation of the Qadimah Fault in Western Saudi Arabia using Satellite Radar Interferometry and Geomorphology Analysis Techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, Robert

    2012-07-01

    The Qadimah Fault has been mapped as a normal fault running through the middle of a planned $50 billion city. For this reason, there is an urgent need to evaluate the seismic hazard that the fault poses to the new development. Although several geophysical studies have supported the existence of a fault, the driving mechanism remains unclear. While a fault controlled by gravity gliding of the overburden on a mobile salt layer is unlikely to be of concern to the city, one caused by the continued extension of a normal rotational fault due to Red Sea rifting could result in a major earthquake. A number of geomorphology and geodetic techniques were used to better understand the fault. An analysis of topographic data revealed a sharp discontinuity in slope aspect and hanging wall tilting which strongly supports the existence of a normal fault. A GPS survey of an emergent reef platform which revealed a tilted coral surface also indicates that deformation has occurred in the region. An interferometric synthetic aperture radar investigation has also been performed to establish whether active deformation is occurring on the fault. Ground movements that could be consistent with inter-seismic strain accumulation have been observed, although the analysis is restricted by the limited data available. However, a simple fault model suggests that the deformation is unlikely due to continued crustal stretching. This, in addition to the lack of footwall uplift in the topography data, suggests that the fault is more likely controlled by a shallow salt layer. However, more work will need to be done in the future to confirm these findings.

  17. Methodology for earthquake rupture rate estimates of fault networks: example for the western Corinth rift, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Thomas; Scotti, Oona; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Boiselet, Aurélien

    2017-10-01

    Modeling the seismic potential of active faults is a fundamental step of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA). An accurate estimation of the rate of earthquakes on the faults is necessary in order to obtain the probability of exceedance of a given ground motion. Most PSHA studies consider faults as independent structures and neglect the possibility of multiple faults or fault segments rupturing simultaneously (fault-to-fault, FtF, ruptures). The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast version 3 (UCERF-3) model takes into account this possibility by considering a system-level approach rather than an individual-fault-level approach using the geological, seismological and geodetical information to invert the earthquake rates. In many places of the world seismological and geodetical information along fault networks is often not well constrained. There is therefore a need to propose a methodology relying on geological information alone to compute earthquake rates of the faults in the network. In the proposed methodology, a simple distance criteria is used to define FtF ruptures and consider single faults or FtF ruptures as an aleatory uncertainty, similarly to UCERF-3. Rates of earthquakes on faults are then computed following two constraints: the magnitude frequency distribution (MFD) of earthquakes in the fault system as a whole must follow an a priori chosen shape and the rate of earthquakes on each fault is determined by the specific slip rate of each segment depending on the possible FtF ruptures. The modeled earthquake rates are then compared to the available independent data (geodetical, seismological and paleoseismological data) in order to weight different hypothesis explored in a logic tree.The methodology is tested on the western Corinth rift (WCR), Greece, where recent advancements have been made in the understanding of the geological slip rates of the complex network of normal faults which are accommodating the ˜ 15 mm yr-1 north

  18. Cenozoic faults and faulting phases in the western Tarim Basin (NW China): Effects of the collisions on the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guang-Ya; Tian, Zuo-Ji; Peng, Geng-Xin; Qiu, Bin; Huang, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Jun-Cheng; Wen, Lei; Zhao, Yan; Jia, Tie-Gan

    2016-12-01

    The Bachu Rise in the western Tarim Basin is the fore-bulge of the Kunlun late Cenozoic intra-continental foreland basin system formed under the far-field effect of India-Asia collision. Cenozoic faults and faulting are abnormally developed in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area. Taking the Niaoshan-Gudongshan area on the southern boundary of the Bachu Rise as the key study area, 5 Cenozoic faulting phases were identified in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area after careful seismic interpretation. They are end Cretaceous ∼ beginning Paleogene (ca. 65 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Paleogene ∼ beginning Neogene (ca. 23 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Miocene ∼ beginning Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma) basement-involved thrusting, late Pliocene ∼ early Pleistocene (ca. 3-2 Ma) normal faulting, middle Pleistocene ∼ Holocene (ca. <1.5 Ma) décollement-thrusting and strike-slip faulting. The Middle Cambrian and Paleogene gypsum-salt layers serve as the two main décollement layers in the study area. Thrusting of ca. 65 Ma was under the far-field effect of the collision between Lhasa (part of the Cimmerian Continent) and Asia; and the other 4 Cenozoic faulting phases were all under the far-field effect of the India-Asia collision. The late Cenozoic faulting is characterized by pulse thrust. There is one tectonic pause between each two successive thrust pulses. The compressive tectonic stress is weaker and even evolved into a slight tensional tectonic stress and forms normal fault in the tectonic pauses.

  19. Fault Detection for Nonlinear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a general method for designing fault detection and isolation (FDI) systems for nonlinear processes. For a rich class of nonlinear systems, a nonlinear FDI system can be designed using convex optimization procedures. The proposed method is a natural extension of methods based...

  20. Fault Tolerance Using Group Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaashoek, M.F.; Tanenbaum, A.S.

    We propose group communication as an efficient mechanism to support fault tolerance. Our approach is based on an efficient reliable broadcast protocol that requires on average only two messages per broadcast. To illustrate our approach we will describe how the task bag model can be made

  1. Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Fault detection using (PI) observers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, J.; Shafai, B.

    The fault detection and isolation (FDI) problem in connection with Proportional Integral (PI) Observers is considered in this paper. A compact formulation of the FDI design problem using PI observers is given. An analysis of the FDI design problem is derived with respectt to the time domain...... properties. A method for design of PI observers applied to FDI is given....

  3. Actuator Fault Detection and Diagnosis for Quadrotors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, P.; Van Kampen, E.J.; Yu, B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fault detection and diagnosis of actuator loss of effectiveness for a quadrotor helicopter. This paper not only considers the detection of the actuator loss of effectiveness faults, but also addresses the diagnosis of the faults. The detection and estimation of the

  4. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  5. Engine gearbox fault diagnosis using empirical mode ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kiran Vernekar

    A LabVIEW software Virtual Instrument (VI) program was developed to ... study. Artificial faults were generated at different locations of the bearing and they are bearing outer race, inner race, inner and outer race together fault and rolling element (ball) fault. ... validation information of original signal were decom- posed using ...

  6. On the "stacking fault" in copper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransens, J.R.; Pleiter, F

    2003-01-01

    The results of a perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlations experiment on In-111 implanted into a properly cut single crystal of copper show that the defect known in the literature as "stacking fault" is not a planar faulted loop but a stacking fault tetrahedron with a size of 10-50 Angstrom.

  7. Active fault detection in MIMO systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on active fault detection (AFD) for MIMO systems with parametric faults. The problem of design of auxiliary inputs with respect to detection of parametric faults is investigated. An analysis of the design of auxiliary inputs is given based on analytic transfer functions...

  8. Fault estimation - A standard problem approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, J.; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis problems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem set-up introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  9. The minimum scale of grooving on faults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candela, T.; Brodsky, E.E.

    2016-01-01

    At the field scale, nearly all fault surfaces contain grooves generated as one side of the fault slips past the other. Grooves are so common that they are one of the key indicators of principal slip surfaces. Here, we show that at sufficiently small scales, grooves do not exist on fault surfaces. A

  10. Fundamental problems in fault detection and identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saberi, A.; Stoorvogel, A. A.; Sannuti, P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of different fundamental problems in fault detection and fault identification are formulated in this paper. The fundamental problems include exact, almost, generic and class-wise fault detection and identification. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the solvability of the fundamental...

  11. Exact, almost and delayed fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Saberi, Ali; Stoorvogel, Anton A.

    1999-01-01

    Considers the problem of fault detection and isolation while using zero or almost zero threshold. A number of different fault detection and isolation problems using exact or almost exact disturbance decoupling are formulated. Solvability conditions are given for the formulated design problems....... The l-step delayed fault detection problem is also considered for discrete-time systems....

  12. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control based on adaptive control approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Qikun; Shi, Peng

    2017-01-01

    This book provides recent theoretical developments in and practical applications of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for complex dynamical systems, including uncertain systems, linear and nonlinear systems. Combining adaptive control technique with other control methodologies, it investigates the problems of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control for uncertain dynamic systems with or without time delay. As such, the book provides readers a solid understanding of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control based on adaptive control technology. Given its depth and breadth, it is well suited for undergraduate and graduate courses on linear system theory, nonlinear system theory, fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control techniques. Further, it can be used as a reference source for academic research on fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control, and for postgraduates in the field of control theory and engineering. .

  13. Structure of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Sills, D. W.; Heron, B.; Almeida, R. V.; Guillemette, R. N.

    2010-12-01

    clay- and serpentinite, 2) microscale particle fracture, inter-particle slip, and abrasive wear are important deformation processes in the gouge layer at this depth, and 3) the contrast in cohesion between the incohesive foliated gouge of the SDZ and the bounding foliated cataclasite reflects a marked contrast in strain-rate and strain. All spot-core taken during Phases 1 and 3, except that capturing the CDZ, have been oriented in the geographic reference frame by aligning fractures and layering observed in the spot-core with that imaged in geophysical logs. Kinematic indicators in the SDZ gouge, including the shape preferred orientation of mesoscopic clasts and striated slip-surfaces, are consistent with almost pure strike-slip movement. Fabrics in the foliated cataclasite and damaged arkosic sandstone host rocks indicate nearly fault-normal contraction with strike- and dip-parallel extension. The contacts of the gouge with bounding units display variable orientations consistent with a mesoscopic and macroscopic corrugated fault surface morphology. Compared to exhumed traces of the SAF and other drilled seismic faults, the structure at SAFOD is unique in that it contains thick layers of incohesive foliated gouge that record distributed flow at the mesoscopic scale.

  14. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  15. Robust Fault Diagnosis Design for Linear Multiagent Systems with Incipient Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a robust fault estimation observer is studied for linear multiagent systems subject to incipient faults. By considering the fact that incipient faults are in low-frequency domain, the fault estimation of such faults is proposed for discrete-time multiagent systems based on finite-frequency technique. Moreover, using the decomposition design, an equivalent conclusion is given. Simulation results of a numerical example are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  16. Reading a 400,000-year record of earthquake frequency for an intraplate fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randolph T.; Goodwin, Laurel B.; Sharp, Warren D.; Mozley, Peter S.

    2017-05-01

    Our understanding of the frequency of large earthquakes at timescales longer than instrumental and historical records is based mostly on paleoseismic studies of fast-moving plate-boundary faults. Similar study of intraplate faults has been limited until now, because intraplate earthquake recurrence intervals are generally long (10s to 100s of thousands of years) relative to conventional paleoseismic records determined by trenching. Long-term variations in the earthquake recurrence intervals of intraplate faults therefore are poorly understood. Longer paleoseismic records for intraplate faults are required both to better quantify their earthquake recurrence intervals and to test competing models of earthquake frequency (e.g., time-dependent, time-independent, and clustered). We present the results of U-Th dating of calcite veins in the Loma Blanca normal fault zone, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico, United States, that constrain earthquake recurrence intervals over much of the past ˜550 ka—the longest direct record of seismic frequency documented for any fault to date. The 13 distinct seismic events delineated by this effort demonstrate that for >400 ka, the Loma Blanca fault produced periodic large earthquakes, consistent with a time-dependent model of earthquake recurrence. However, this time-dependent series was interrupted by a cluster of earthquakes at ˜430 ka. The carbon isotope composition of calcite formed during this seismic cluster records rapid degassing of CO2, suggesting an interval of anomalous fluid source. In concert with U-Th dates recording decreased recurrence intervals, we infer seismicity during this interval records fault-valve behavior. These data provide insight into the long-term seismic behavior of the Loma Blanca fault and, by inference, other intraplate faults.

  17. Diagnosis of combined faults in Rotary Machinery by Non-Naive Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asr, Mahsa Yazdanian; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad; Hassannejad, Reza; Razavi, Seyed Naser

    2017-02-01

    When combined faults happen in different parts of the rotating machines, their features are profoundly dependent. Experts are completely familiar with individuals faults characteristics and enough data are available from single faults but the problem arises, when the faults combined and the separation of characteristics becomes complex. Therefore, the experts cannot declare exact information about the symptoms of combined fault and its quality. In this paper to overcome this drawback, a novel method is proposed. The core idea of the method is about declaring combined fault without using combined fault features as training data set and just individual fault features are applied in training step. For this purpose, after data acquisition and resampling the obtained vibration signals, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) is utilized to decompose multi component signals to Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). With the use of correlation coefficient, proper IMFs for feature extraction are selected. In feature extraction step, Shannon energy entropy of IMFs was extracted as well as statistical features. It is obvious that most of extracted features are strongly dependent. To consider this matter, Non-Naive Bayesian Classifier (NNBC) is appointed, which release the fundamental assumption of Naive Bayesian, i.e., the independence among features. To demonstrate the superiority of NNBC, other counterpart methods, include Normal Naive Bayesian classifier, Kernel Naive Bayesian classifier and Back Propagation Neural Networks were applied and the classification results are compared. An experimental vibration signals, collected from automobile gearbox, were used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. During the classification process, only the features, related individually to healthy state, bearing failure and gear failures, were assigned for training the classifier. But, combined fault features (combined gear and bearing failures) were examined as test data. The achieved

  18. Carlsbad, San Onofre, and San Mateo Fault Zones: Possible Right-Lateral Offset Along the Slope-Basin Transition, Offshore Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.; Maier, K. L.; Brothers, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Several poorly understood faults are exposed along the mid- and lower slope offshore southern California from Encinitas to San Clemente. From south to north, these faults have been referred to as the Carlsbad, San Onofre, and San Mateo fault zones, which are generally characterized as nearly vertical to steeply east-dipping faults with a reverse slip component. The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetric data from 2009-2012 to better characterize these faults. From offshore Encinitas to Oceanside, these data reveal a complex and variable fault zone that structurally controls the slope-basin transition. In this area, the faults show both reverse as well as normal offset, but may also include an unknown amount of strike-slip offset. North of Oceanside, however, faulting shows clear evidence of right-lateral slip, offsetting submarine channels near the base of the slope by approximately 60 m. North of these offset channels, the base of the slope bends about 30° to the west, following the trend of the San Mateo fault zone, but fault strands on strike with those that offset the channels trend obliquely up slope, appearing to merge with the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ) on the shelf. These fault strands consist of several en echelon left-stepping segments separated by "pop-up" structures, which imply a significant component of right-lateral offset along this fault zone, and thus may serve to transfer right-lateral slip from faults along the base of the slope to the NIFZ. This fault zone also separates structures associated with the San Mateo fold and thrust belt to the west from undeformed slope sediments to the east. The existence of significant right-lateral slip on faults along the slope and slope-basin transition has implications for assessing seismic hazards associated with the NIFZ, and also provides constraints on possible reverse motion on the hypothesized Oceanside Thrust.

  19. The history of late holocene surface-faulting earthquakes on the central segments of the Wasatch fault zone, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, Christopher; Personius, Stephen; Olig, Susan S; Crone, Anthony J.; Hylland, Michael D.; Lund, William R; Schwartz, David P.

    2017-01-01

    The Wasatch fault (WFZ)—Utah’s longest and most active normal fault—forms a prominent eastern boundary to the Basin and Range Province in northern Utah. To provide paleoseismic data for a Wasatch Front regional earthquake forecast, we synthesized paleoseismic data to define the timing and displacements of late Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes on the central five segments of the WFZ. Our analysis yields revised histories of large (M ~7) surface-faulting earthquakes on the segments, as well as estimates of earthquake recurrence and vertical slip rate. We constrain the timing of four to six earthquakes on each of the central segments, which together yields a history of at least 24 surface-faulting earthquakes since ~6 ka. Using earthquake data for each segment, inter-event recurrence intervals range from about 0.6 to 2.5 kyr, and have a mean of 1.2 kyr. Mean recurrence, based on closed seismic intervals, is ~1.1–1.3 kyr per segment, and when combined with mean vertical displacements per segment of 1.7–2.6 m, yield mean vertical slip rates of 1.3–2.0 mm/yr per segment. These data refine the late Holocene behavior of the central WFZ; however, a significant source of uncertainty is whether structural complexities that define the segments of the WFZ act as hard barriers to ruptures propagating along the fault. Thus, we evaluate fault rupture models including both single-segment and multi-segment ruptures, and define 3–17-km-wide spatial uncertainties in the segment boundaries. These alternative rupture models and segment-boundary zones honor the WFZ paleoseismic data, take into account the spatial and temporal limitations of paleoseismic data, and allow for complex ruptures such as partial-segment and spillover ruptures. Our data and analyses improve our understanding of the complexities in normal-faulting earthquake behavior and provide geological inputs for regional earthquake-probability and seismic hazard assessments.

  20. Mesoscopic Structural Observations of Cores from the Chelungpu Fault System, Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling Project Hole-A, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sone

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural characteristics of fault rocks distributed within major fault zones provide basic information in understanding the physical aspects of faulting. Mesoscopic structural observations of the drilledcores from Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Hole-A are reported in this article to describe and reveal the distribution of fault rocks within the Chelungpu Fault System.

  1. Numerical modelling of the mechanical and fluid flow properties of fault zones - Implications for fault seal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.; Giger, S.B.; Clennell, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Existing fault seal algorithms are based on fault zone composition and fault slip (e.g., shale gouge ratio), or on fault orientations within the contemporary stress field (e.g., slip tendency). In this study, we aim to develop improved fault seal algorithms that account for differences in fault zone

  2. Synthesis of Fault-Tolerant Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eles, Petru; Izosimov, Viacheslav; Pop, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This work addresses the issue of design optimization for fault- tolerant hard real-time systems. In particular, our focus is on the handling of transient faults using both checkpointing with rollback recovery and active replication. Fault tolerant schedules are generated based on a conditional...... process graph representation. The formulated system synthesis approaches decide the assignment of fault-tolerance policies to processes, the optimal placement of checkpoints and the mapping of processes to processors, such that multiple transient faults are tolerated, transparency requirements...

  3. Quaternary basin formation along the Dien Bien Phu fault zone and its neotectonic implication of northwestern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Chung, L.; Li, P.; Lam, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Dien Bien Phu (DBP) fault zone is one of the most conspicuous fault systems in the Indochina, extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through the NW Vietnam into Laos. Recent Global Positioning system (GPS) data in China yielded that the present clockwise rotation of the southeastern Tibet block geologically corresponds to a region of left-lateral strike-slip faults, such as the Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault and Dien Bien Phu fault, which appear to have accommodated clockwise rotation; whereas other GPS data from the network of Southeast Asia proposed that Indochina constitutes a stable tectonic block moving approximately east with respect to Eurasia. Although above GPS data show insignificant differential motion along DBP fault, active sinistral slip can be identified by clear geomorphic features, focal solutions and seismicity distribution in a NNE-striking zone parallel to the fault zone. Mapping of surface fault traces along the DBP fault zone using field outcrops, geophysical data, and geomorphologic features recognized by the aerial photos, SRTM, ASTER imageries and derived digital elevation models shows that virtually all active faults are reactivated structures sub-parallel to chronostratigraphic boundary. Along the DBF fault, three larger basins have been developed by different kinematics from north to south. The northern one at Chan Nua is rhomboidal in shape with a dimension of 2.5 km?.5 km, which can be defined as a pull-apart basin resulted by the strike-slip motion of the DBP fault. The fault configuration associated with the central one changes to two parallel sinistral and sinistral-normal faults forming a narrow subsiding weak zone (10 km?.5 km) filled with Quaternary deposits. The southern one is, however, created by that the main DBP fault bends the strike from NNE to NE where branches out a sinistral- normal fault with N-striking controlling a half-graben basin (17 km? km) filled with Quaternary deposits about 200 m in depth above

  4. ESR dating of the fault rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hee Kwon [Kangwon National Univ., Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Past movement on faults can be dated by measurement of the intensity of ESR signals in quartz. These signals are reset by local lattice deformation and local frictional heating on grain contacts at the time of fault movement. The ESR signals then grow back as a result of bombardment by ionizing radiation from surrounding rocks. The age is obtained from the ratio of the equivalent dose, needed to produce the observed signal, to the dose rate. Fine grains are more completely reset during faulting, and a plot of age vs, grain size shows a plateau for grains below critical size : these grains are presumed to have been completely zeroed by the last fault activity. We carried out ESR dating of fault rocks collected near the Ulzin nuclear reactor. ESR signals of quartz grains separated from fault rocks collected from the E-W trend fault are saturated. This indicates that the last movement of these faults had occurred before the quaternary period. ESR dates from the NW trend faults range from 300ka to 700ka. On the other hand, ESR date of the NS trend fault is about 50ka. Results of this research suggest that long-term cyclic fault activity near the Ulzin nuclear reactor continued into the pleistocene.

  5. A Quaternary fault database for central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd Alan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stübner, Konstanze; Strube, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic, and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments, and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault traces and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 123 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. All data are accessible for viewing and download via http://www.geo.uni-tuebingen.de/faults/. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  6. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  7. Active fault diagnosis by controller modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Two active fault diagnosis methods for additive or parametric faults are proposed. Both methods are based on controller reconfiguration rather than on requiring an exogenous excitation signal, as it is otherwise common in active fault diagnosis. For the first method, it is assumed that the system...... in a way that guarantees the continuity of transition and global stability using a recent result on observer parameterization. An illustrative example inspired by a field study of a drag racing vehicle is given. For the second method, an active fault diagnosis method for parametric faults is proposed...... considered is controlled by an observer-based controller. The method is then based on a number of alternate observers, each designed to be sensitive to one or more additive faults. Periodically, the observer part of the controller is changed into the sequence of fault sensitive observers. This is done...

  8. Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Kinnaert, Michel; Lunze, Jan

    The book presents effective model-based analysis and design methods for fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control. Architectural and structural models are used to analyse the propagation of the fault through the process, to test the fault detectability and to find the redundancies in the process...... the applicability of the presented methods. The theoretical results are illustrated by two running examples which are used throughout the book. The book addresses engineering students, engineers in industry and researchers who wish to get a survey over the variety of approaches to process diagnosis and fault...... that can be used to ensure fault tolerance. Design methods for diagnostic systems and fault-tolerant controllers are presented for processes that are described by analytical models, by discrete-event models or that can be dealt with as quantised systems. Four case studies on pilot processes show...

  9. Width of surface rupture zone for thrust earthquakes: implications for earthquake fault zoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Boncio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The criteria for zoning the surface fault rupture hazard (SFRH along thrust faults are defined by analysing the characteristics of the areas of coseismic surface faulting in thrust earthquakes. Normal and strike–slip faults have been deeply studied by other authors concerning the SFRH, while thrust faults have not been studied with comparable attention. Surface faulting data were compiled for 11 well-studied historic thrust earthquakes occurred globally (5.4 ≤ M ≤ 7.9. Several different types of coseismic fault scarps characterize the analysed earthquakes, depending on the topography, fault geometry and near-surface materials (simple and hanging wall collapse scarps, pressure ridges, fold scarps and thrust or pressure ridges with bending-moment or flexural-slip fault ruptures due to large-scale folding. For all the earthquakes, the distance of distributed ruptures from the principal fault rupture (r and the width of the rupture zone (WRZ were compiled directly from the literature or measured systematically in GIS-georeferenced published maps. Overall, surface ruptures can occur up to large distances from the main fault ( ∼ 2150 m on the footwall and  ∼  3100 m on the hanging wall. Most of the ruptures occur on the hanging wall, preferentially in the vicinity of the principal fault trace ( >   ∼  50 % at distances  <   ∼  250 m. The widest WRZ are recorded where sympathetic slip (Sy on distant faults occurs, and/or where bending-moment (B-M or flexural-slip (F-S fault ruptures, associated with large-scale folds (hundreds of metres to kilometres in wavelength, are present. A positive relation between the earthquake magnitude and the total WRZ is evident, while a clear correlation between the vertical displacement on the principal fault and the total WRZ is not found. The distribution of surface ruptures is fitted with probability density functions, in order to define a criterion to

  10. INTERPRETATION OF BOUGUER ANOMALY TO DETERMINE FAULT AND SUBSURFACE STRUCTURE AT BLAWAN-IJEN GEOTHERMAL AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjar Pranggawan Azhari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravity survey has been acquired by Gravimeter Lacoste & Romberg G-1035 at Blawan-Ijen geothermal area. It was a focusing study from previous research. The residual Bouguer anomaly data was obtain after applying gravity data reduction, reduction to horizontal plane, and upward continuation. Result of Bouguer anomaly interpretation shows occurrence of new faults and their relative movement. Blawan fault (F1, F2, F3, and F6 are normal fault. Blawan fault is main fault controlling hot springs at Blawan-Ijen geothermal area. F4 and F5 are oblique fault and forming a graben at Banyupahit River. F7 is reverse fault. Subsurface model shows that Blawan-Ijen geothermal area was dominated by the Ijen caldera forming ignimbrite (ρ1=2.670 g/cm3, embedded shale and sand (ρ2=2.644 g/cm3 as Blawan lake sediments, magma intrusion (ρ3=2.814 g/cm3 & ρ7=2.821 g/cm3, andesite rock (ρ4=2.448 g/cm3 as geothermal reservoir, pyroclastic air fall deposits (ρ5=2.613 g/cm3 from Mt. Blau, and lava flow (ρ6=2.890 g/cm3.

  11. Neogene folding and faulting in southern Monterey Bay, Central California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Taggart, J. M.; Greene, H. Gary; Ledbetter, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the Neogene structural history of southern Monterey Bay by mapping and correlating the shallow tectonic structures with previously identified deeper occurring structures. Side scan sonographs and Uniboom seismic reflection profiles collected in the region suggest that deformation associated with both compressional and transcurrent movement is occurring. Strike-slip movement between the North American and Pacific plates started as subduction ceased 21 Ma, creating the San Andreas fault system. Clockwise rotation of the Pacific plate occurred between 3.4 and 3.9 Ma causing orthogonal convergence between the two plates. This plate rotation is responsible for compressional Neogene structures along the central California coast. Structures exhibit transpressional tectonic characteristics such as thrust faulting, reverse faulting and asymmetrical folding. Folding and faulting are confined to middle Miocene and younger strata. Shallow Mesozoic granitic basement rocks either crop out or lie near the surface in most of the region and form a possible de??collement along which the Miocene Monterey Formation has decoupled and been folded. Over 50% of the shallow faults strike normal (NE-SW) to the previously identified faults. Wrench fault tectonics complicated by compression, gradual uplift of the basement rocks, and a change in plate convergence direction are responsible for the observed structures in southern Monterey Bay. ?? 1993.

  12. Fault complexity associated with the 14 August 2003 Mw6.2 Lefkada, Greece, aftershock sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria

    2010-10-01

    The M w6.2 Lefkada earthquake occurred on 14 August 2003 beneath the western coastline of Lefkada Island. The main shock was followed by an intense aftershock activity, which formed a narrow band extending over the western coast of the Island and the submarine area between Lefkada and Kefalonia Islands, whereas additional off fault aftershocks formed spatial clusters on the central and northwestern part of the Island. The aftershock spatial distribution revealed the activation of along-strike adjacent fault segment as well as of secondary faults close to the main rupture. The properties of the activated segments were illuminated by the precisely located aftershocks, fault plane solutions determination and the cross sections performed parallel and normal to their strike. The aftershock focal mechanisms exhibited mainly strike slip faulting throughout the activated area, although deviation of the dominant stress pattern is also observed. The results help to emphasize the importance of the identification of activated nearby fault segments possibly triggered by the main rupture. Because such segments are capable to produce moderate events causing appreciable damage, they should be viewed with caution in seismic hazard assessment in addition to the major regional faults.

  13. Dislocation model for aseismic fault slip in the transverse ranges of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A.; Jackson, D. D.; Matsuura, M.

    1985-01-01

    Geodetic data at a plate boundary can reveal the pattern of subsurface displacements that accompany plate motion. These displacements are modelled as the sum of rigid block motion and the elastic effects of frictional interaction between blocks. The frictional interactions are represented by uniform dislocation on each of several rectangular fault patches. The block velocities and fault parameters are then estimated from geodetic data. Bayesian inversion procedure employs prior estimates based on geological and seismological data. The method is applied to the Transverse Ranges, using prior geological and seismological data and geodetic data from the USGS trilateration networks. Geodetic data imply a displacement rate of about 20 mm/yr across the San Andreas Fault, while the geologic estimates exceed 30 mm/yr. The prior model and the final estimates both imply about 10 mm/yr crustal shortening normal to the trend of the San Andreas Fault. Aseismic fault motion is a major contributor to plate motion. The geodetic data can help to identify faults that are suffering rapid stress accumulation; in the Transverse Ranges those faults are the San Andreas and the Santa Susana.

  14. A New Fault Diagnosis Algorithm for PMSG Wind Turbine Power Converters under Variable Wind Speed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingning Qiu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Although Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG wind turbines (WTs mitigate gearbox impacts, they requires high reliability of generators and converters. Statistical analysis shows that the failure rate of direct-drive PMSG wind turbines’ generators and inverters are high. Intelligent fault diagnosis algorithms to detect inverters faults is a premise for the condition monitoring system aimed at improving wind turbines’ reliability and availability. The influences of random wind speed and diversified control strategies lead to challenges for developing intelligent fault diagnosis algorithms for converters. This paper studies open-circuit fault features of wind turbine converters in variable wind speed situations through systematic simulation and experiment. A new fault diagnosis algorithm named Wind Speed Based Normalized Current Trajectory is proposed and used to accurately detect and locate faulted IGBT in the circuit arms. It is compared to direct current monitoring and current vector trajectory pattern approaches. The results show that the proposed method has advantages in the accuracy of fault diagnosis and has superior anti-noise capability in variable wind speed situations. The impact of the control strategy is also identified. Experimental results demonstrate its applicability on practical WT condition monitoring system which is used to improve wind turbine reliability and reduce their maintenance cost.

  15. Compound faults detection of rotating machinery using improved adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia; Yuan, Jing

    2013-07-01

    Due to the character of diversity and complexity, the compound faults detection of rotating machinery under non-stationary operation turns into a challenging task. Multiwavelet with two or more base functions and many excellent properties provides a possibility to detect and extract all the features of compound faults at one time. However, the fixed basis functions independent of the vibration signal may decrease the accuracy of fault detection. Moreover, the decomposition result of discrete multiwavelet transform does not possess time invariance, which is harmful to extract the feature of periodical impulses. To overcome these deficiencies, based on the Hermite splines interpolation, taking the minimum envelope spectrum entropy as the optimization objective, adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet is developed. Additionally, in order to eliminate error propagation of decomposition results, adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet is improved by adding the normalization factors. As an effective method, Hilbert transform demodulation analysis is used to extract the fault feature from the high frequency modulation signal. The proposed method incorporating improved adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet (IARLM) with Hilbert transform demodulation analysis is applied to compound faults detection for the simulation experiment, rolling element bearing test bench and traveling unit of electric locomotive. Compared with some other fault detection methods, the results show the superior effectiveness and reliability on the compound faults detection.

  16. Support vector machine based fault classification and location of a long transmission line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Ray

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates support vector machine based fault type and distance estimation scheme in a long transmission line. The planned technique uses post fault single cycle current waveform and pre-processing of the samples is done by wavelet packet transform. Energy and entropy are obtained from the decomposed coefficients and feature matrix is prepared. Then the redundant features from the matrix are taken out by the forward feature selection method and normalized. Test and train data are developed by taking into consideration variables of a simulation situation like fault type, resistance path, inception angle, and distance. In this paper 10 different types of short circuit fault are analyzed. The test data are examined by support vector machine whose parameters are optimized by particle swarm optimization method. The anticipated method is checked on a 400 kV, 300 km long transmission line with voltage source at both the ends. Two cases were examined with the proposed method. The first one is fault very near to both the source end (front and rear and the second one is support vector machine with and without optimized parameter. Simulation result indicates that the anticipated method for fault classification gives high accuracy (99.21% and least fault distance estimation error (0.29%.

  17. Online Diagnosis for the Capacity Fade Fault of a Parallel-Connected Lithium Ion Battery Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a parallel-connected battery group (PCBG, capacity degradation is usually caused by the inconsistency between a faulty cell and other normal cells, and the inconsistency occurs due to two potential causes: an aging inconsistency fault or a loose contacting fault. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to perform online and real-time capacity fault diagnosis for PCBGs. Firstly, based on the analysis of parameter variation characteristics of a PCBG with different fault causes, it is found that PCBG resistance can be taken as an indicator for both seeking the faulty PCBG and distinguishing the fault causes. On one hand, the faulty PCBG can be identified by comparing the PCBG resistance among PCBGs; on the other hand, two fault causes can be distinguished by comparing the variance of the PCBG resistances. Furthermore, for online applications, a novel recursive-least-squares algorithm with restricted memory and constraint (RLSRMC, in which the constraint is added to eliminate the “imaginary number” phenomena of parameters, is developed and used in PCBG resistance identification. Lastly, fault simulation and validation results demonstrate that the proposed methods have good accuracy and reliability.

  18. Online sequential prediction of bearings imbalanced fault diagnosis by extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wentao; He, Ling; Yan, Yunju; Wang, Jinwan

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of bearings generally plays an important role in fault diagnosis of mechanical system, and machine learning has been a promising tool in this field. In many real applications of bearings fault diagnosis, the data tend to be online imbalanced, which means, the number of fault data is much less than the normal data while they are all collected in online sequential way. Suffering from this problem, many traditional diagnosis methods will get low accuracy of fault data which acts as the minority class in the collected bearing data. To address this problem, an online sequential prediction method for imbalanced fault diagnosis problem is proposed based on extreme learning machine. This method introduces the principal curve and granulation division to simulate the flow distribution and overall distribution characteristics of fault data, respectively. Then a confident over-sampling and under-sampling process is proposed to establish the initial offline diagnosis model. In online stage, the obtained granules and principal curves are rebuilt on the bearing data which are arrived in sequence, and after the over-sampling and under-sampling process, the balanced sample set is formed to update the diagnosis model dynamically. A theoretical analysis is provided and proves that, even existing information loss, the proposed method has lower bound of the model reliability. Simulation experiments are conducted on IMS bearing data and CWRU bearing data. The comparative results demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the fault diagnosis accuracy with better effectiveness and robustness than other algorithms.

  19. Sensor fault-tolerant control for gear-shifting engaging process of automated manual transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; He, Kai; Wang, Xiangyu; Liu, Yahui

    2018-01-01

    Angular displacement sensor on the actuator of automated manual transmission (AMT) is sensitive to fault, and the sensor fault will disturb its normal control, which affects the entire gear-shifting process of AMT and results in awful riding comfort. In order to solve this problem, this paper proposes a method of fault-tolerant control for AMT gear-shifting engaging process. By using the measured current of actuator motor and angular displacement of actuator, the gear-shifting engaging load torque table is built and updated before the occurrence of the sensor fault. Meanwhile, residual between estimated and measured angular displacements is used to detect the sensor fault. Once the residual exceeds a determined fault threshold, the sensor fault is detected. Then, switch control is triggered, and the current observer and load torque table estimates an actual gear-shifting position to replace the measured one to continue controlling the gear-shifting process. Numerical and experiment tests are carried out to evaluate the reliability and feasibility of proposed methods, and the results show that the performance of estimation and control is satisfactory.

  20. The East Anatolian Fault Zone: Seismotectonic setting and spatiotemporal characteristics of seismicity based on precise earthquake locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, F.; Bohnhoff, M.; Eken, T.; Janssen, C.; Kilic, T.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    The East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ) represents a plate boundary extending over approx. 500 km between the Arabian and Anatolian plates. Relative plate motion occurs with slip rates ranging from 6 to 10 mm/yr and has resulted in destructive earthquakes in eastern Turkey as documented by historical records. In this study, we investigate the seismic activity along the EAFZ and fault kinematics based on recordings from a densified regional seismic network providing the best possible azimuthal coverage for the target region. We optimize a reference 1-D velocity model using a grid-search approach and re-locate hypocenters using the Double-Difference earthquake relocation technique. The refined hypocenter catalog provides insights into the kinematics and internal deformation of the fault zone down to a resolution ranging typically between 100 and 200 m. The distribution of hypocenters suggests that the EAFZ is characterized by NE-SW and E-W oriented sub-segments that are sub-parallel to the overall trend of the fault zone. Faulting mechanisms are predominantly left-lateral strike-slip and thus in good correlation with the deformation pattern derived from regional GPS data. However, we also observe local clusters of thrust and normal faulting events, respectively. While normal faulting events typically occur on NS-trending subsidiary faults, thrust faulting is restricted to EW-trending structures. This observation is in good accordance with kinematic models proposed for evolving shear zones. The observed spatiotemporal evolution of hypocenters indicates a systematic migration of micro- and moderate-sized earthquakes from the main fault into adjacent fault segments within several days documenting progressive interaction between the major branch of the EAFZ and its secondary structures. Analyzing the pre versus post-seismic phase for M > 5 events we find that aftershock activities are initially spread to the entire source region for several months but start to cluster at

  1. High-resolution seismic profiling reveals faulting associated with the 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley earthquake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Duross, Christopher; Kokkalas, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    The 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley, Utah, earthquake produced an 8-km-long by 3-km-wide zone of north-south−trending surface deformation in an extensional basin within the easternmost Basin and Range Province. Less than 0.5 m of purely vertical displacement was measured at the surface, although seismologic data suggest mostly strike-slip faulting at depth. Characterization of the origin and kinematics of faulting in the Hansel Valley earthquake is important to understand how complex fault ruptures accommodate regions of continental extension and transtension. Here, we address three questions: (1) How does the 1934 surface rupture compare with faults in the subsurface? (2) Are the 1934 fault scarps tectonic or secondary features? (3) Did the 1934 earthquake have components of both strike-slip and dip-slip motion? To address these questions, we acquired a 6.6-km-long, high-resolution seismic profile across Hansel Valley, including the 1934 ruptures. We observed numerous east- and west-dipping normal faults that dip 40°−70° and offset late Quaternary strata from within a few tens of meters of the surface down to a depth of ∼1 km. Spatial correspondence between the 1934 surface ruptures and subsurface faults suggests that ruptures associated with the earthquake are of tectonic origin. Our data clearly show complex basin faulting that is most consistent with transtensional tectonics. Although the kinematics of the 1934 earthquake remain underconstrained, we interpret the disagreement between surface (normal) and subsurface (strike-slip) kinematics as due to slip partitioning during fault propagation and to the effect of preexisting structural complexities. We infer that the 1934 earthquake occurred along an ∼3-km wide, off-fault damage zone characterized by distributed deformation along small-displacement faults that may be alternatively activated during different earthquake episodes.

  2. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  3. Late Quaternary activity of the Grote Brogel fault, NE Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, Kris; Deckers, Jef; Van Noten, Koen; Schiltz, Marco; Lecocq, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Grote Brogel fault (GBF) is a WNW-ESE striking normal fault that is part of the western border fault system of the Roer Valley Graben in NE Belgium. It is one of three faults branching NW-ward from the main border fault (Geleen fault) near Bree, but its orientation diverges 22° from the general NW-SE orientation of the graben, causing a wide left step. Unlike the Geleen fault, the surface expression of the GBF has not been investigated in detail so far. We studied the Quaternary activity of the GBF and its effects on the local hydrology based on a high-resolution LiDAR digital terrain model (DTM), and geophysical and geological surveying at two sites, combining Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Cone Penetration Tests (CPTs) and boreholes. The GBF defines the northern edge of the Campine Plateau, an elevated area covered by the late Early to Middle Pleistocene Main Terrace of the Meuse River. Cumulative vertical offset since deposition of this terrace has resulted in a distinct 10-km-long fault scarp, the height of which decreases from 11 m near Bree in the east to less than 5 m near Grote Brogel in the west. The along-strike evolution of offset suggests that the GBF does not define an individual rupture segment, but is likely contiguous with the Geleen fault. DTM analysis indicates that scarps are only preserved in a few isolated places, and that the surface trace is rather complex, consisting of a series of short, relatively straight sections with strikes varying between 255° and 310°, arranged in a generally left-stepping pattern. At both investigated sites, ERT profiles clearly demonstrate the presence of fault splays in the shallow subsurface (< 50 m) underneath the identified scarps evidenced by a sudden increase in depth and thickness of a high-resistivity unit on top of a lower-resistivity unit. Boreholes and CPTs allow correlating the high-resistivity unit with the medium to coarse gravel-bearing sands of the Meuse Group, and the lower

  4. Thermal regimes in the detachment fault environment as deduced from fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, R. E.; Wilkins, J., Jr.; Heidrick, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    Extensional tectonism, which dominates middle- and late-Tertiary geology in western Arizona, southeastern California, and southern Nevada, is characterized by normal regionally extensive, low-angle detachment faults. The decollement movement of Fupper plate rocks relative to lower plate assemblages created extensive zones of dilatency, including synthetic and antithetic listric normal faults, tear faults, tectonic crush breccias, shatter breccias, and gash veins in lithologic units above and below the detachment. The tectonically enhanced permeability above and below the detachment fault permitted mass migration of large volumes of hydrothermal solutions along the fault zone during and following upper plate movement. Major quantities of MgO, CaO, K2O, FeO/Fe2O3, SiO2 and CO2 were added to rocks in and near the detachment and related structures. Also introduced were varying amounts of trace elements including Mn, Cu, S, Mo, Ba, Au, Pb, Zn, U and/or Ag. Minerals containing fluid incusions were collected from all of these loci at locations in detachment faulted terranes in western Arizona and southeastern California.

  5. Fault detection of a spur gear using vibration signal with multivariable statistical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songpon Klinchaeam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a condition monitoring technique of a spur gear fault detection using vibration signal analysis based on time domain. Vibration signals were acquired from gearboxes and used to simulate various faults on spur gear tooth. In this study, vibration signals were applied to monitor a normal and various fault conditions of a spur gear such as normal, scuffing defect, crack defect and broken tooth. The statistical parameters of vibration signal were used to compare and evaluate the value of fault condition. This technique can be applied to set alarm limit of the signal condition based on statistical parameter such as variance, kurtosis, rms and crest factor. These parameters can be used to set as a boundary decision of signal condition. From the results, the vibration signal analysis with single statistical parameter is unclear to predict fault of the spur gears. The using at least two statistical parameters can be clearly used to separate in every case of fault detection. The boundary decision of statistical parameter with the 99.7% certainty ( 3   from 300 referenced dataset and detected the testing condition with 99.7% ( 3   accuracy and had an error of less than 0.3 % using 50 testing dataset.

  6. Insights into earthquake rupture and recovery from paleoseismic faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. D.; Griffith, W. A.; Ross, C.; Melosh, B. L.; Young, E.

    2016-12-01

    There are two key factors distinguishing earthquake slip from creep that have the potential to be preserved in rocks from ancient fault zones. First, slip velocity is sufficiently high that the frictional heat production on the slip surface outpaces conductive heat dissipation, resulting in a net temperature rise. If the slip is sufficiently localized and the normal stress is high enough, this temperature rise can dissociate hydrous minerals, cause rapid maturation of organic compounds, and melt fault rock. These reactions are recorded in fault rock mineralogy and composition and can be used to estimate coseismic temperatures from 250 C to greater than 1400 C. Second, seismic slip is *dynamic*, that is, that the slipping area expands in size at rates comparable to the shear wave velocity in the rocks ( 3 km/s), which results in extreme stress gradients in the wall rock at the rupture tip. The stressing rate exceeds the speed at which fractures can propagate through the wall rock, resulting in distinctive patterns of very tightly spaced and branching fractures, and sometimes pulverization. These fractures can be the dominant form of off-fault damage and may cause permeability spikes through the fresh fracture networks. Using both types of fossil earthquake signatures, we can identify ancient seismic rupture planes and use these to map out the geometry of earthquake rupture networks at the outcrop scale (10^-3 - 10^3 meters), which is below the resolution and location uncertainty of earthquake seismology in most active faults. Using examples from the Pofadder and Norumbega Shear Zones, I will show that earthquakes can rupture multiple parallel and non-parallel surfaces simultaneously, and that healing during afterslip can affect damage zones as well as the rupture surface. Outcrop studies may be able to elucidate the consequences for slip distribution and help explain spatial variations in fracture energy and stress drop that are barely resolvable in seismic data.

  7. Displacement rates on the Toroweap and Hurricane faults: Implications for Quaternary downcutting in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Cassandra R.; Webb, Robert H.; Pearthree, Philip A.; Cerling, Thure E.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2001-11-01

    The Toroweap and Hurricane faults, considered to be the most active in Arizona, cross the Uinkaret volcanic field in the western Grand Canyon. These normal faults are downthrown to the west, and the Colorado River crosses these faults as it flows west in the Grand Canyon. Cosmogenic 3He (3Hec) dates on basalt flows and related landforms are used to calculate vertical displacement rates for these faults. The two faults cross unruptured alluvial fans dated as 3 ka (Toroweap) and 8 ka (Hurricane), and 10 other landforms that range in age from 30 to 400 ka are displaced. Middle and late Quaternary displacement rates of the Toroweap and Hurricane faults are 70 180 and 70 170 m/m.y., respectively. On the basis of these rates, the combined displacement of 580 m on these faults could have occurred in the past 3 to 5 m.y. All 3Hec dates are younger than existing K- Ar dates and are consistent with new 40Ar/39Ar dates and existing thermoluminescence (TL) dates on basalt flows. These different dating techniques may be combined in an analysis of displacement rates. Downcutting rates for the Colorado River in the eastern Grand Canyon (400 m/m.y.) are at least double the downcutting rates west of the faults (70 160 m/m.y.). Faulting probably increased downcutting in the eastern Grand Canyon relative to downcutting in the western Grand Canyon during the late Quaternary.

  8. A critical evaluation of crustal dehydration as the cause of an overpressured and weak San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, P.M.; Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many plate boundary faults, including the San Andreas Fault, appear to slip at unexpectedly low shear stress. One long-standing explanation for a "weak" San Andreas Fault is that fluid release by dehydration reactions during regional metamorphism generates elevated fluid pressures that are localized within the fault, reducing the effective normal stress. We evaluate this hypothesis by calculating realistic fluid production rates for the San Andreas Fault system, and incorporating them into 2-D fluid flow models. Our results show that for a wide range of permeability distributions, fluid sources from crustal dehydration are too small and short-lived to generate, sustain, or localize fluid pressures in the fault sufficient to explain its apparent mechanical weakness. This suggests that alternative mechanisms, possibly acting locally within the fault zone, such as shear compaction or thermal pressurization, may be necessary to explain a weak San Andreas Fault. More generally, our results demonstrate the difficulty of localizing large fluid pressures generated by regional processes within near-vertical fault zones. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Final Project Report: Self-Correcting Controls for VAV System Faults Filter/Fan/Coil and VAV Box Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Cort, Katherine A.; Cho, Heejin; Ngo, Hung; Goddard, James K.

    2011-05-01

    This report addresses original research by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the California Institute for Energy and Environment on self-correcting controls for variable-air-volume (VAV) heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems and focuses specifically on air handling and VAV box components of the air side of the system. A complete set of faults for these components was compiled and a fault mode analysis performed to understand the detectable symptoms of the faults and the chain of causation. A set of 26 algorithms was developed to facilitate the automatic correction of these faults in typical commercial VAV systems. These algorithms include training tests that are used during commissioning to develop models of normal system operation, passive diagnostics used to detect the symptoms of faults, proactive diagnostics used to diagnose the cause of a fault, and finally fault correction algorithms. Ten of the twenty six algorithms were implemented in a prototype software package that interfaces with a test bed facility at PNNL's Richland, WA, laboratory. Measurement bias faults were instigated in the supply-air temperature sensor and the supply-air flow meter to test the algorithms developed. The algorithms as implemented in the laboratory software correctly detected, diagnosed and corrected these faults. Finally, an economic and impact assessment was performed for the State of California for deployment of self-correcting controls. Assuming 15% HVAC energy savings and a modeled deployment profile, 3.1-5.8 TBu of energy savings are possible by year 15.

  10. Frictional properties of exhumed fault gouges in DFDP-1 cores, Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Carolyn; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Toy, Virginia G.; Townend, John; Southerland, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Principal slip zone gouges recovered during the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1), Alpine Fault, New Zealand, were deformed in triaxial friction experiments at temperatures, T, of up to 350°C, effective normal stresses, σn′, of up to 156 MPa, and velocities between 0.01 and 3 µm/s. Chlorite/white mica-bearing DFDP-1A blue gouge, 90.62 m sample depth, is frictionally strong (friction coefficient, μ, 0.61–0.76) across all experimental conditions tested (T = 70–350°C, σn′ = 31.2–156 MPa); it undergoes a transition from positive to negative rate dependence as T increases past 210°C. The friction coefficient of smectite-bearing DFDP-1B brown gouge, 128.42 m sample depth, increases from 0.49 to 0.74 with increasing temperature and pressure (T = 70–210°C, σn′ = 31.2–93.6 MPa); the positive to negative rate dependence transition occurs as T increases past 140°C. These measurements indicate that, in the absence of elevated pore fluid pressures, DFDP-1 gouges are frictionally strong under conditions representative of the seismogenic crust.

  11. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoke, Andy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nelson, Austin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chakraborty, Sudipta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chebahtah, Justin [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); Wang, Trudie [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States); McCarty, Michael [SolarCity Corporation, San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  12. Near-Surface Seismic Profiling Across the Active Carlsberg Fault, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, M. I.; Nielsen, L.; Fallesen, J.; Thybo, H.

    2002-12-01

    An integrated near-surface normal-incidence and wide-angle seismic experiment has been conducted across the active Carlsberg Fault in the easternmost part of the Danish basin, just east of Copenhagen. The purpose of the seismic experiment is to: 1) determine the fault structure; 2) image possible seismic velocity contrasts across the fault; and 3) estimate how much the fault offsets the individual sedimentary layers at the different depth levels. The origin of the Carlsberg Fault is probably related to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system caused by movements in the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, which is a 20-50 km wide fault zone located approximately 50 km east of Copenhagen. In the study area, the upper sedimentary strata consist of Cretaceous and Danian chalk layers as well as younger sediments, which predominantly consist of sand and clay. The fault runs in an overall NNW-SSE direction, and it penetrates the various sedimentary strata. Geodetic measurements show that the fault has been active within the last 100 years. The normal-incidence data were collected along an 1100 m long line perpendicular to the strike of the fault with a shot spacing of 12 m and a receiver spacing of 6 m. The reflection image reveals a clear flower structure in the upper 400 ms of the section indicating that substantial horizontal movement has taken place along the Carlsberg Fault. This flower structure is relatively narrow at 350 ms depth, whereas it unfolds to a width of about 300 m in the uppermost layers. The wide-angle data were collected along a 2000 m long line with shot and receiver spacings of 100 m and 10 m, respectively. They provide good velocity control of the sedimentary layers and allow for depth conversion of the reflection seismic image. Furthermore the wide-angle data have the potential of providing back-scattered reflections from the fault planes. GPR measurements have been planned in order to constrain the very shallow and recent movements along the fault.

  13. Modelling roughness evolution and debris production in faults using discrete particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Karen; Abe, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    The frictional strength and stability (hence seismic potential) of faults in the brittle part of the crust is closely linked to fault roughness evolution and debris production during accumulated slip. The relevant processes may also control the dynamics of rock-slides, avalanches and sub glacial slip thus are of general interest in several fields. The quantitative characterisation of fault surfaces in the field (e.g. Candela et al. JGR, 2012) has helped build a picture of fault roughness across many orders of magnitude, however, since fault zones are generally not exposed during slip and gouge zones rarely preserved, the mechanical implications of evolving roughness and the important role of debris or gouge in fault zone evolution remain elusive. Here we investigate the interplay between fault roughness evolution and gouge production using 3D Discrete Element Method (DEM) Boundary Erosion Models. Our fault walls are composed of many particles or clusters stuck together with breakable bonds. When bond strength is exceeded, the walls fracture to produce erodible boundaries and a debris filled fault zone that evolves with accumulated slip. We slide two initially bare surfaces past each other under a range of normal stresses, tracking the evolving topography of eroded fault walls, the granular debris generated and the associated mechanical behaviour. The development of slip parallel striations, reminiscent of those found in natural faults, are commonly observed, however often as transient rather than persistent features. At the higher normal stresses studied, we observe a two stage wear-like gouge production where an initial 'running-in' high production rate saturates as debris accumulates and separates the walls. As shear, and hence granular debris, accumulates, we see evidence of grain size based sorting in the granular layers. Wall roughness and friction mimic this stabilisation, highlighting a direct link between gouge processes, wall roughness evolution and

  14. New fault tolerant matrix converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Edorta; Andreu, Jon; Kortabarria, Inigo; Ormaetxea, Enekoitz; Alegria, Inigo Martinez de; Martin, Jose Luis [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain); Ibanez, Pedro [TECNALIA, Energy Unit, Parque Tecnologico de Zamudio, E-48170 Bizkaia (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    The matrix converter (MC) presents a promising topology that will have to overcome certain barriers (protection systems, durability, the development of converters for real applications, etc.) in order to gain a foothold in the industry. In some applications, where continuous operation must be insured in the case of a system failure, improved reliability of the converter is of particular importance. In this sense, this article focuses on the study of a fault tolerant MC. The fault tolerance of a converter is characterized by its total or partial response in the case of a breakage of any of its components. Taking into consideration that virtually no work has been done on fault tolerant MCs, this paper describes the most important studies in this area. Moreover, a new method is proposed for detecting the breakage of MC semiconductors. Likewise, a new variation of SVM modulation with failure tolerance capacity is presented. This guarantees the continuous operation of the converter and the pseudo-optimum control of a PMSM. This paper also proposes a novel MC topology, which allows the flexible reconfiguration of this converter, when one or several of its semiconductors are damaged. In this way, the MC can continue operating at 100% of its performance without having to double its resources. In this way, it can be said that the solution described in this article represents a step forward towards the development of reliable matrix converters for real applications. (author)

  15. Analytical Model for High Impedance Fault Analysis in Transmission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maximov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high impedance fault (HIF normally occurs when an overhead power line physically breaks and falls to the ground. Such faults are difficult to detect because they often draw small currents which cannot be detected by conventional overcurrent protection. Furthermore, an electric arc accompanies HIFs, resulting in fire hazard, damage to electrical devices, and risk with human life. This paper presents an analytical model to analyze the interaction between the electric arc associated to HIFs and a transmission line. A joint analytical solution to the wave equation for a transmission line and a nonlinear equation for the arc model is presented. The analytical model is validated by means of comparisons between measured and calculated results. Several cases of study are presented which support the foundation and accuracy of the proposed model.

  16. A Fault Diagnosis Method for Rotating Machinery Based on PCA and Morlet Kernel SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojiang Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method to solve the rotating machinery fault diagnosis problem is proposed, which is based on principal components analysis (PCA to extract the characteristic features and the Morlet kernel support vector machine (MSVM to achieve the fault classification. Firstly, the gathered vibration signals were decomposed by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD to obtain the corresponding intrinsic mode function (IMF. The EMD energy entropy that includes dominant fault information is defined as the characteristic features. However, the extracted features remained high-dimensional, and excessive redundant information still existed. So, the PCA is introduced to extract the characteristic features and reduce the dimension. The characteristic features are input into the MSVM to train and construct the running state identification model; the rotating machinery running state identification is realized. The running states of a bearing normal inner race and several inner races with different degree of fault were recognized; the results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Sensor fault diagnosis of aero-engine based on divided flight status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Yigang; Liu, Zhexu

    2017-11-01

    Fault diagnosis and safety analysis of an aero-engine have attracted more and more attention in modern society, whose safety directly affects the flight safety of an aircraft. In this paper, the problem concerning sensor fault diagnosis is investigated for an aero-engine during the whole flight process. Considering that the aero-engine is always working in different status through the whole flight process, a flight status division-based sensor fault diagnosis method is presented to improve fault diagnosis precision for the aero-engine. First, aero-engine status is partitioned according to normal sensor data during the whole flight process through the clustering algorithm. Based on that, a diagnosis model is built for each status using the principal component analysis algorithm. Finally, the sensors are monitored using the built diagnosis models by identifying the aero-engine status. The simulation result illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Sensor fault diagnosis of aero-engine based on divided flight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Yigang; Liu, Zhexu

    2017-11-01

    Fault diagnosis and safety analysis of an aero-engine have attracted more and more attention in modern society, whose safety directly affects the flight safety of an aircraft. In this paper, the problem concerning sensor fault diagnosis is investigated for an aero-engine during the whole flight process. Considering that the aero-engine is always working in different status through the whole flight process, a flight status division-based sensor fault diagnosis method is presented to improve fault diagnosis precision for the aero-engine. First, aero-engine status is partitioned according to normal sensor data during the whole flight process through the clustering algorithm. Based on that, a diagnosis model is built for each status using the principal component analysis algorithm. Finally, the sensors are monitored using the built diagnosis models by identifying the aero-engine status. The simulation result illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Fault Detection of Aircraft Cable via Spread Spectrum Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong SHI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the airplane cable fault detection based on TDR (time domain reflectometry is affected easily by various noise signals, which makes the reflected signal attenuate and distort heavily, failing to locate the fault. In order to solve these problems, a method of spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR is introduced in this paper, taking the advantage of the sharp peak of correlation function. The test signal is generated from ML sequence (MLS modulated by sine wave in the same frequency. Theoretically, the test signal has the very high immunity of noise, which can be applied with excellent precision to fault location on the aircraft cable. In this paper, the method of SSTDR was normally simulated in MATLAB. Then, an experimental setup, based on LabVIEW, was organized to detect and locate the fault on the aircraft cable. It has been demonstrated that SSTDR has the high immunity of noise, reducing some detection errors effectively.

  20. Role of N-S strike-slip faulting in structuring of north-eastern Tunisia; geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Aymen; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Delvaux, Damien; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Kadri, Ali; Zargouni, Fouad

    2017-05-01

    Three major compressional events characterized by folding, thrusting and strike-slip faulting occurred in the Eocene, Late Miocene and Quaternary along the NE Tunisian domain between Bou Kornine-Ressas-Msella and Cap Bon Peninsula. During the Plio-Quaternary, the Grombalia and Mornag grabens show a maximum of collapse in parallelism with the NNW-SSE SHmax direction and developed as 3rd order distensives zones within a global compressional regime. Using existing tectonic and geophysical data supplemented by new fault-kinematic observations, we show that Cenozoic deformation of the Mesozoic sedimentary sequences is dominated by first order N-S faults reactivation, this sinistral wrench system is responsible for the formation of strike-slip duplexes, thrusts, folds and grabens. Following our new structural interpretation, the major faults of N-S Axis, Bou Kornine-Ressas-Messella (MRB) and Hammamet-Korbous (HK) form an N-S first order compressive relay within a left lateral strike-slip duplex. The N-S master MRB fault is dominated by contractional imbricate fans, while the parallel HK fault is characterized by a trailing of extensional imbricate fans. The Eocene and Miocene compression phases in the study area caused sinistral strike-slip reactivation of pre-existing N-S faults, reverse reactivation of NE-SW trending faults and normal-oblique reactivation of NW-SE faults, creating a NE-SW to N-S trending system of east-verging folds and overlaps. Existing seismic tomography images suggest a key role for the lithospheric subvertical tear or STEP fault (Slab Transfer Edge Propagator) evidenced below this region on the development of the MRB and the HK relay zone. The presence of extensive syntectonic Pliocene on top of this crustal scale fault may be the result of a recent lithospheric vertical kinematic of this STEP fault, due to the rollback and lateral migration of the Calabrian slab eastward.

  1. Novel scheme for enhancement of fault ride-through capability of doubly fed induction generator based wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinothkumar, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu 620015 (India); Selvan, M.P., E-mail: selvanmp@nitt.ed [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu 620015 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Proposed Fault ride-through (FRT) scheme for DFIG is aimed at energy conservation. {yields} The input mechanical energy is stored during fault and utilized at fault clearance. {yields} Enhanced Rotor speed stability of DFIG. {yields} Reduced Reactive power requirement and rapid voltage recovery at fault clearance. {yields} Improved post fault performance of DFIG at fault clearance. -- Abstract: Enhancement of fault ride-through (FRT) capability and subsequent improvement of rotor speed stability of wind farms equipped with doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) is the objective of this paper. The objective is achieved by employing a novel FRT scheme with suitable control strategy. The proposed FRT scheme, which is connected between the rotor circuit and dc link capacitor in parallel with Rotor Side Converter, consists of an uncontrolled rectifier, two sets of IGBT switches, a diode and an inductor. In this scheme, the input mechanical energy of the wind turbine during grid fault is stored and utilized at the moment of fault clearance, instead of being dissipated in the resistors of the crowbar circuit as in the existing FRT schemes. Consequently, torque balance between the electrical and mechanical quantities is achieved and hence the rotor speed deviation and electromagnetic torque fluctuations are reduced. This results in reduced reactive power requirement and rapid reestablishment of terminal voltage on fault clearance. Furthermore, the stored electromagnetic energy in the inductor is transferred into the dc link capacitor on fault clearance and hence the grid side converter is relieved from charging the dc link capacitor, which is very crucial at this moment, and this converter can be utilized to its full capacity for rapid restoration of terminal voltage and normal operation of DFIG. Extensive simulation study carried out employing PSCAD/EMTDC software vividly demonstrates the potential capabilities of the proposed scheme in

  2. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and

  3. Cataclastic faults along the SEMP fault system (Eastern Alps, Austria) — A contribution to fault zone evolution, internal structure and paleo-stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, Stefan; Kurz, Walter

    2013-11-01

    In this study three different sites along the ENE-trending, sinistral Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone were investigated with respect to brittle fault zone evolution and fault re-activation. All sites crop out in Triassic carbonates (Ladinian Wetterstein limestone/-dolomite). Simultaneously (re-) activated faults were investigated with focus on fault-slip data and structural inventory of each individual fault zone. Configuration of (internal) structural elements, fault core thickness, strike direction and slip sense in addition to particle analysis of fault core cataclasites add up to three different fault types (Fault Types I, II and III). Fault Type I is classified by a complex internal fault core structure with thicknesses up to several 10s of meters and generally evolve in a strike direction of maximum shear stress (τmax). Type II faults, characterized by cataclastic fault cores with thicknesses up to 1 m, as well as Type III faults (thin solitary cataclastic layers) evolve sub-parallel to the main fault direction and in orientation according to R, R' or X shear fractures with variable (σn/τ) ratio. Progressive development from Type III to Type II and Type I faults is consistent with increasing displacement and increasing fault core width. Fault type classification and related paleostress analysis provide evidence from field observation compared to theoretical and analog models of Mohr-Coulomb fracture evolution.

  4. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerant Control with Application on a Wind Turbine Low Speed Shaft Encoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Sardi, Hector Eloy Sanchez; Escobet, Teressa

    2015-01-01

    . This sensor has to be correct as blade pitch actions should be different at different azimuth angle as the wind speed varies within the rotor field due to different phenomena. A scheme detecting faults in this sensor has previously been designed for the application of a high end fault diagnosis and fault...... tolerant control of wind turbines using a benchmark model. In this paper, the fault diagnosis scheme is improved and integrated with a fault accommodation scheme which enables and disables the individual pitch algorithm based on the fault detection. In this way, the blade and tower loads are not increased...

  5. Dynamic rupture simulations on complex fault zone structures with off-fault plasticity using the ADER-DG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Igel, Heiner

    2015-04-01

    In dynamic rupture models, high stress concentrations at rupture fronts have to to be accommodated by off-fault inelastic processes such as plastic deformation. As presented in (Roten et al., 2014), incorporating plastic yielding can significantly reduce earlier predictions of ground motions in the Los Angeles Basin. Further, an inelastic response of materials surrounding a fault potentially has a strong impact on surface displacement and is therefore a key aspect in understanding the triggering of tsunamis through floor uplifting. We present an implementation of off-fault-plasticity and its verification for the software package SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method. The software recently reached multi-petaflop/s performance on some of the largest supercomputers worldwide and was a Gordon Bell prize finalist application in 2014 (Heinecke et al., 2014). For the nonelastic calculations we impose a Drucker-Prager yield criterion in shear stress with a viscous regularization following (Andrews, 2005). It permits the smooth relaxation of high stress concentrations induced in the dynamic rupture process. We verify the implementation by comparison to the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Benchmarks. The results of test problem TPV13 with a 60-degree dipping normal fault show that SeisSol is in good accordance with other codes. Additionally we aim to explore the numerical characteristics of the off-fault plasticity implementation by performing convergence tests for the 2D code. The ADER-DG method is especially suited for complex geometries by using unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Local adaptation of the mesh resolution enables a fine sampling of the cohesive zone on the fault while simultaneously satisfying the dispersion requirements of wave propagation away from the fault. In this context we will investigate the influence of off-fault-plasticity on geometrically complex fault zone structures like subduction

  6. Neotectonic fault structures in the Lake Thun area (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Stefano C.; Herwegh, Marco; Schlunegger, Fritz; Hübscher, Christian; Weiss, Benedikt J.; Schmelzbach, Cédric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Merz, Kaspar; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2016-04-01

    Strong historic earthquakes (i.e. intensities I0 ≥ V) in Switzerland are well documented by the earthquake catalogue of Switzerland ECOS-09 (e.g. Frutigen, 1729 AD, Mw=5.2, I0=VI). Many of these strong events can be recognized paleoseismically by large subaquatic, earthquake-triggered mass movements that occur frequently in Swiss Lakes. Some of these represent the occasional occurrence of even stronger earthquakes (i.e. Mw ˜6.5) in the Alpine region (Strasser et al., 2013), which are expected to produce noticeable surface ruptures. However, convincing evidence for Quaternary displacements with offset surface expressions have scarcely been found (e.g., Wiemer et al., 2009). Applying a multi-disciplinary approach, this study presents potential candidates for such faults in the larger Lake Thun area at the edge of the Alps. The overdeepened basin of Lake Thun is situated at the northern Alpine front, which extends orthogonally to the general strike direction of the Alpine nappe front. The northern shoreline is predominantly shaped by the front of the Subalpine Molasse, which is in strong contrast to the south western shore built by the structurally higher units of the Middle and Lower Penninic nappes. This pattern with obvious differences of both lake sides suggests a major fault along the lake axis and high tectonic activity during nappe emplacement, i.e. from Eocene times throughout the Late Miocene. The area is dominated today by a strike-slip stress regime with a slight normal faulting component (Kastrup et al., 2004). As part of a multi-disciplinary study, attempting to find potential neotectonically active fault structures in the Lake Thun area, a 2D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey was conducted. The aim of the GPR survey was to link observations from a multichannel reflection seismic survey and a multibeam bathymetric survey carried out in Lake Thun with findings in a nearby gravel quarry revealing suspicious deformation features such as rotated gravel

  7. Fault Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control of Modular Multi-level Converter High-voltage DC System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    device fault, DC line faults as well as AC grid faults. Special attention is given to the comparison of the corresponding fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control approaches. Further, focus is dedicated to control/protection strategies and topologies with fault ride-though capability for MMC...... of failures and lower the reliability of the MMC-HVDC system. Therefore, research on the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of MMC-HVDC system is of great significance in order to enhance the reliability of the system. This paper provides a comprehensive review of fault diagnosis and fault handling...... strategies of MMC-HVDC systems for the most common faults happened in MMC-HVDC systems covering MMC faults, DC side faults as well as AC side faults. An important part of this paper is devoted to a discussion of the vulnerable spots as well as failure mechanism of the MMC-HVDC system covering switching...

  8. Contributory fault and level of personal injury to drivers involved in head-on collisions: Application of copula-based bivariate ordinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Behram; Khattak, Asad J; Xu, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to simultaneously investigate the degree of injury severity sustained by drivers involved in head-on collisions with respect to fault status designation. This is complicated to answer due to many issues, one of which is the potential presence of correlation between injury outcomes of drivers involved in the same head-on collision. To address this concern, we present seemingly unrelated bivariate ordered response models by analyzing the joint injury severity probability distribution of at-fault and not-at-fault drivers. Moreover, the assumption of bivariate normality of residuals and the linear form of stochastic dependence implied by such models may be unduly restrictive. To test this, Archimedean copula structures and normal mixture marginals are integrated into the joint estimation framework, which can characterize complex forms of stochastic dependencies and non-normality in residual terms. The models are estimated using 2013 Virginia police reported two-vehicle head-on collision data, where exactly one driver is at-fault. The results suggest that both at-fault and not-at-fault drivers sustained serious/fatal injuries in 8% of crashes, whereas, in 4% of the cases, the not-at-fault driver sustained a serious/fatal injury with no injury to the at-fault driver at all. Furthermore, if the at-fault driver is fatigued, apparently asleep, or has been drinking the not-at-fault driver is more likely to sustain a severe/fatal injury, controlling for other factors and potential correlations between the injury outcomes. While not-at-fault vehicle speed affects injury severity of at-fault driver, the effect is smaller than the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on at-fault injury outcome. Contrarily, and importantly, the effect of at-fault vehicle speed on injury severity of not-at-fault driver is almost equal to the effect of not-at-fault vehicle speed on injury outcome of not-at-fault driver. Compared to traditional ordered probability

  9. Low footwall accelerations and variable surface rupture behavior on the Fort Sage Mountains fault, northeast California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Richard W.; Wesnousky, Steven G.; Brune, James N.; Purvance, Matthew D.; Mahan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The Fort Sage Mountains fault zone is a normal fault in the Walker Lane of the western Basin and Range that produced a small surface rupture (L 5.6 earthquake in 1950. We investigate the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault and find evidence for two paleoearthquakes with surface displacements much larger than those observed in 1950. Rupture of the Fort Sage fault ∼5.6  ka resulted in surface displacements of at least 0.8–1.5 m, implying earthquake moment magnitudes (Mw) of 6.7–7.1. An older rupture at ∼20.5  ka displaced the ground at least 1.5 m, implying an earthquake of Mw 6.8–7.1. A field of precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) is located less than 1 km from the surface‐rupture trace of this Holocene‐active normal fault. Ground‐motion prediction equations (GMPEs) predict peak ground accelerations (PGAs) of 0.2–0.3g for the 1950 rupture and 0.3–0.5g for the ∼5.6  ka paleoearthquake one kilometer from the fault‐surface trace, yet field tests indicate that the Fort Sage PBRs will be toppled by PGAs between 0.1–0.3g. We discuss the paleoseismic history of the Fort Sage fault in the context of the nearby PBRs, GMPEs, and probabilistic seismic hazard maps for extensional regimes. If the Fort Sage PBRs are older than the mid‐Holocene rupture on the Fort Sage fault zone, this implies that current GMPEs may overestimate near‐fault footwall ground motions at this site.

  10. Automatic Channel Fault Detection on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Cadorette, Jules; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2014-10-01

    Avalanche photodiode (APD) based positron emission tomography (PET) scanners show enhanced imaging capabilities in terms of spatial resolution and contrast due to the one to one coupling and size of individual crystal-APD detectors. However, to ensure the maximal performance, these PET scanners require proper calibration by qualified scanner operators, which can become a cumbersome task because of the huge number of channels they are made of. An intelligent system (IS) intends to alleviate this workload by enabling a diagnosis of the observational errors of the scanner. The IS can be broken down into four hierarchical blocks: parameter extraction, channel fault detection, prioritization and diagnosis. One of the main activities of the IS consists in analyzing available channel data such as: normalization coincidence counts and single count rates, crystal identification classification data, energy histograms, APD bias and noise thresholds to establish the channel health status that will be used to detect channel faults. This paper focuses on the first two blocks of the IS: parameter extraction and channel fault detection. The purpose of the parameter extraction block is to process available data on individual channels into parameters that are subsequently used by the fault detection block to generate the channel health status. To ensure extensibility, the channel fault detection block is divided into indicators representing different aspects of PET scanner performance: sensitivity, timing, crystal identification and energy. Some experiments on a 8 cm axial length LabPET scanner located at the Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Center demonstrated an erroneous channel fault detection rate of 10% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [9, 11]) which is considered tolerable. Globally, the IS achieves a channel fault detection efficiency of 96% (CI: [95, 97]), which proves that many faults can be detected automatically. Increased fault detection efficiency would be

  11. Explaining the current geodetic field with geological models: A case study of the Haiyuan fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daout, S.; Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.; Barbot, S.; Peltzer, G.; Tapponnier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique convergence across Tibet leads to slip partitioning with the co-existence of strike-slip, normal and thrust motion in major fault systems. While such complexity has been shown at the surface, the question is to understand how faults interact and accumulate strain at depth. Here, we process InSAR data across the central Haiyuan restraining bend, at the north-eastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and show that the surface complexity can be explained by partitioning of a uniform deep-seated convergence rate. We construct a time series of ground deformation, from Envisat radar data spanning from 2001-2011 period, across a challenging area because of the high jump in topography between the desert environment and the plateau. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we used the latest Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry methodology, such as Global Atmospheric Models (ERA Interim) and Digital Elevation Model errors corrections before unwrapping. We then developed a new Bayesian approach, jointly inverting our InSAR time series together with published GPS displacements. We explore fault system geometry at depth and associated slip rates and determine a uniform N86±7E° convergence rate of 8.45±1.4 mm/yr across the whole fault system with a variable partitioning west and east of a major extensional fault-jog. Our 2D model gives a quantitative understanding of how crustal deformation is accumulated by the various branches of this thrust/strike-slip fault system and demonstrate the importance of the geometry of the Haiyuan Fault, controlling the partitioning or the extrusion of the block motion. The approach we have developed would allow constraining the low strain accumulation along deep faults, like for example for the blind thrust faults or possible detachment in the San Andreas "big bend", which are often associated to a poorly understood seismic hazard.

  12. Fault detection of helicopter gearboxes using the multi-valued influence matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Hsinyung; Danai, Kourosh; Lewicki, David G.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of a pattern classifying fault detection system that is designed to cope with the variability of fault signatures inherent in helicopter gearboxes. For detection, the measurements are monitored on-line and flagged upon the detection of abnormalities, so that they can be attributed to a faulty or normal case. As such, the detection system is composed of two components, a quantization matrix to flag the measurements, and a multi-valued influence matrix (MVIM) that represents the behavior of measurements during normal operation and at fault instances. Both the quantization matrix and influence matrix are tuned during a training session so as to minimize the error in detection. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection system, it was applied to vibration measurements collected from a helicopter gearbox during normal operation and at various fault instances. The results indicate that the MVIM method provides excellent results when the full range of faults effects on the measurements are included in the training set.

  13. Fault Diagnosis and Fault Handling for Autonomous Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren

    Unmanned Aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones are used increasingly for missions where piloted aircraft are unsuitable. The unmanned aircraft has a number of advantages with respect to size, weight and manoeuvrability that makes it possible for them to solve tasks that an aircraft previously has been...... to another type of aircraft with different parameters. Amongst the main findings of this research project is a method to handle faults on the UAV’s pitot tube, which measures the aircraft speed. A set of software redundancies based on GPS velocity information and engine thrust are used to detect abnormal...

  14. Applying wavelet entropy principle in fault classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Safty, S.; El-Zonkoly, A. [Arab Academy for Science and Technology, Miami, Alexandria, P.O.1029 (Egypt)

    2009-11-15

    The ability to detect and classify the type of fault plays a great role in the protection of power system. This procedure is required to be precise with no time consumption. In this paper detection of fault type has been implemented using wavelet analysis together with wavelet entropy principle. The simulation of power system is carried out using PSCAD/EMTDC. Different types of faults were studied obtaining various current waveforms. These current waveforms were decomposed using wavelet analysis into different approximation and details. The wavelet entropies of such decompositions are analyzed reaching a successful methodology for fault classification. The suggested approach is tested using different fault types and proven successful identification for the type of fault. (author)

  15. Finite-frequency wave propagation through outer rise fault zones and seismic measurements of upper mantle hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathaniel; Lizarralde, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Effects of serpentine-filled fault zones on seismic wave propagation in the upper mantle at the outer rise of subduction zones are evaluated using acoustic wave propagation models. Modeled wave speeds depend on azimuth, with slowest speeds in the fault-normal direction. Propagation is fastest along faults, but, for fault widths on the order of the seismic wavelength, apparent wave speeds in this direction depend on frequency. For the 5–12 Hz Pn arrivals used in tomographic studies, joint-parallel wavefronts are slowed by joints. This delay can account for the slowing seen in tomographic images of the outer rise upper mantle. At the Middle America Trench, confining serpentine to fault zones, as opposed to a uniform distribution, reduces estimates of bulk upper mantle hydration from ~3.5 wt % to as low as 0.33 wt % H2O.

  16. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    Active fault diagnosis (AFD) of parametric faults is considered in connection with closed loop feedback systems. AFD involves auxiliary signals applied on the closed loop system. A fault signature matrix is introduced in connection with AFD and it is shown that if a limited number of faults can...... occur in the system, a fault separation in the fault signature matrix can be obtained. Then the single elements in the matrix only depend of a reduced number of parametric faults. This can directly be applied for fault isolation. If it is not possible to obtain this separation, it is shown how the fault...... signature matrix can be applied for a dynamical fault isolation, i.e. fault isolation based on the dynamic characteristic of the fault signature matrix as function of the different parametric faults....

  17. Strike-slip and extensional tectonics of the Tan-Lu fault zone (eastern China) from the Cretaceous to Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Shi, W.; Dong, S. W.

    2003-04-01

    The Tan-Lu fault zone which extends NNE-SSW more than 3000 km forms conspicuous geological feature along the northeastern margin of the Asia continent. Since its recognition by air-magnetic anomaly in 1957, this fault zone has become the subject of live debate. Most studies were mainly focused on the amount and age of the sinistral offsets along its middle and southern segments. It has been generally thought that the Tan-Lu fault zone was initiated as a transform fault during the Triassic collision between the South and North China Blocks and that it was strongly activated during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic time period. Some authors proposed that the Tan-Lu fault is part of a wide wrench fault system along the north-eastern Asia continent and that sinistral movement along this fault system accommodated oblique convergence between the Pacific oceanic plate and the Asia continent. Some others considered that the Tan-Lu fault belongs to the rifting system of eastern China. Based on field analysis of slip vector data from different rock units of the Cretaceous basins along the middle Tan-Lu fault zone (Shandong Province, eastern China), we document polyphase tectonic stress fields and address the changes in the sense of motion of the Tan-Lu fault zone during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic. The Cretaceous deformation history of the Tan-Lu fault zone can be divided into four main stages. The first stage during the lowermost Cretaceous was dominated by N-S extension, which is responsible for the formation of the Jiaolai basin. We interpret this extension to be related to dextral strike-slip pull-apart opening guided by the Tan-Lu fault zone. The second stage during the middle Early Cretaceous was overwhelmingly rift-dominated, and characterized by widespread intermediate volcanism, normal faulting and basin subsidence. It was at this stage that the Tan-Lu-parallel Yi-Shu Rift was initiated by E-W to WNW-ESE extension. The tectonic regime changed during the late Early

  18. An Active Fault-Tolerant Control Method Ofunmanned Underwater Vehicles with Continuous and Uncertain Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Zhu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel thruster fault diagnosis and accommodation system for open-frame underwater vehicles with abrupt faults. The proposed system consists of two subsystems: a fault diagnosis subsystem and a fault accommodation sub-system. In the fault diagnosis subsystem a ICMAC(Improved Credit Assignment Cerebellar Model Articulation Controllers neural network is used to realize the on-line fault identification and the weighting matrix computation. The fault accommodation subsystem uses a control algorithm based on weighted pseudo-inverse to find the solution of the control allocation problem. To illustrate the proposed method effective, simulation example, under multi-uncertain abrupt faults, is given in the paper.

  19. Fault Diagnosis in Deaerator Using Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Srinivasan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a fuzzy logic based fault diagnosis system for a deaerator in a power plant unit is presented. The system parameters are obtained using the linearised state space deaerator model. The fuzzy inference system is created and rule base are evaluated relating the parameters to the type and severity of the faults. These rules are fired for specific changes in system parameters and the faults are diagnosed.

  20. Stability of fault during fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passelegue, Francois; Brantut, Nicolas; Mitchell, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Elevated pore pressure can lead to slip reactivation on pre-existing fractures and faults when the coulomb failure point is reached. From a static point of view, the reactivation of fault submitted to a background stress (τ0) is a function of the peak strength of the fault, i.e. the quasi-static effective friction coefficient (µeff). In this study, we present new results about the influence of the injection rate on the stability of faults. Experiments were conducted on a saw-cut sample of westerly granite. The experimental fault was 8 cm length. Injections were conducted through a 2 mm diameter hole reaching the fault surface. Experiments were conducted at four different order magnitudes fluid pressure injection rates (from 1 MPa/minute to 1 GPa/minute), in a fault system submitted to 50 and 100 MPa confining pressure. Our results show that the peak fluid pressure leading to slip depends on injection rate. The faster the injection rate, the larger the peak fluid pressure leading to instability. Our result suggest that the stability of the fault is not only a function of the fluid pressure required to reach the failure criterion, but is mainly a function of the ratio between the length of the fault affected by fluid pressure and the total fault length. In addition, we show that the slip rate increases with the background effective stress and with the intensity of the fluid pressure pertubation, i.e. with the excess shear stress acting on the part of the fault pertubated by fluid injection. Our results suggest that crustal fault can be reactivated by fluid pressures that are locally much higher than expected from a static Coulomb stress analysis. These results could explain the "large" magnitude human-induced earthquakes recently observed in Basel (Mw 3.6, 2006) and in Oklahoma (Mw 5.6, 2016).

  1. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2015-04-01

    normal block faults and one reverse block fault showing the complexity of the fault zone. The observed faults appear to affect both the Danian as well as the Quaternary successions. We conclude that such investigations are critical for judgment regarding whether or not faults in the study area affect recently deposited strata and if the zone is tectonically active.

  2. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop uncertain systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of parametric faults in closed-loop uncertain systems by using an auxiliary input vector is considered in this paper, i.e. active fault diagnosis (AFD). The active fault diagnosis is based directly on the socalled fault signature matrix, related to the YJBK (Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno...

  3. Faults and Diagnosis Systems in Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Kyo-Beum; Choi, Uimin

    2014-01-01

    frequently. Therefore, it is important to monitor the power device and capacitor fault to increase the reliability of power electronics. In this chapter, the diagnosis methods for power device fault will be discussed by dividing into open- and short-circuit faults. Then, the condition monitoring methods...... efforts have been put into making these systems better in terms of reliability in order to achieve high power source availability, reduce the cost of energy and also increase the reliability of overall systems. Among the components used in power converters, a power device and a capacitor fault occurs most...

  4. Soil radon levels across the Amer fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, Ll. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: lluis.font@uab.cat; Baixeras, C.; Moreno, V. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bach, J. [Unitat de Geodinamica externa, Departament de Geologia, Edifici Cs, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    Soil radon levels have been measured across the Amer fault, which is located near the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain. Both passive (LR-115, time-integrating) and active (Clipperton II, time-resolved) detectors have been used in a survey in which 27 measurement points were selected in five lines perpendicular to the Amer fault in the village area of Amer. The averaged results show an influence of the distance to the fault on the mean soil radon values. The dynamic results show a very clear seasonal effect on the soil radon levels. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the fault is still active.

  5. Fault tolerant filtering and fault detection for quantum systems driven by fields in single photon states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qing, E-mail: qing.gao.chance@gmail.com; Dong, Daoyi, E-mail: daoyidong@gmail.com; Petersen, Ian R., E-mail: i.r.petersen@gmai.com [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Rabitz, Herschel, E-mail: hrabitz@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.

  6. Fault detection and fault-tolerant control for nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Linlin Li addresses the analysis and design issues of observer-based FD and FTC for nonlinear systems. The author analyses the existence conditions for the nonlinear observer-based FD systems to gain a deeper insight into the construction of FD systems. Aided by the T-S fuzzy technique, she recommends different design schemes, among them the L_inf/L_2 type of FD systems. The derived FD and FTC approaches are verified by two benchmark processes. Contents Overview of FD and FTC Technology Configuration of Nonlinear Observer-Based FD Systems Design of L2 nonlinear Observer-Based FD Systems Design of Weighted Fuzzy Observer-Based FD Systems FTC Configurations for Nonlinear Systems< Application to Benchmark Processes Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of engineering with a focus on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control fields The Author Dr. Linlin Li completed her dissertation under the supervision of Prof. Steven X. Ding at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany...

  7. Rectifier Fault Diagnosis and Fault Tolerance of a Doubly Fed Brushless Starter Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rectifier fault diagnosis method with wavelet packet analysis to improve the fault tolerant four-phase doubly fed brushless starter generator (DFBLSG system reliability. The system components and fault tolerant principle of the high reliable DFBLSG are given. And the common fault of the rectifier is analyzed. The process of wavelet packet transforms fault detection/identification algorithm is introduced in detail. The fault tolerant performance and output voltage experiments were done to gather the energy characteristics wit