WorldWideScience

Sample records for range-dependent acoustic properties

  1. Acoustic Properties of Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-08-01

    Cellulose is the oldest material for thermal insulation in construction field. Thomas Jefferson was the first architect that used the cellulose in his project of the Monticello house (1800). But only after 1945 that the cellulose from newsprint was used across America and northern Europe. In the 70s with the energy crisis it Austria, Czech Republic, Switzerland and Germany began the production of cellulose derived from paper newspapers. It used for both winter and summer thermal insulation, while respecting the environment. In this paper are reported acoustic measurements carried out with the tube of Kundt, with the cellulose melted and with glue with different thicknesses.

  2. Acoustic properties of biodegradable nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Nazire Deniz

    The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of acoustical properties of nonwovens, and to model the noise control behavior in terms of material and treatment parameters. A review of existing models on sound absorption of fibrous materials, coupled with experimental data will help in modeling sound absorption in multi-layer needle-punched nonwoven fabrics of different fibers: hemp, polylactide, polypropylene, and glassfiber. The effects of several treatments, which the materials may undergo during sound absorber manufacturing, namely alkalization, compression and heat treatments are investigated. The collected data is evaluated by experts. Expert evaluation further provides information about market demands for sound absorbers, and the perception of the designed nonwovens through the eyes of professionals. This research provides a contribution to the body of knowledge on the sound absorption properties of nonwovens, and provides a better understanding of the effects of some manufacturing processes on nonwovens' noise control performance and contributes to the wider adoption of nonwovens as sound absorbers.

  3. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  4. The Acoustical Properties of Indonesian Hardwood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisius Rio Mardikanto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The acoustical properties of four Indonesian tropical hardwood species were evaluated in this study. The objectives of this study were to determine acoustical parameters e.g. logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, sound velocity as well as density and wood stiffness; and to evaluate the potential of those species for acoustical purposes. Sonokeling (Dalbergia latifolia, Mahoni (Swietenia mahagony, Acacia (Acacia mangium and Manii wood (Maesopsis eminii were selected in this research. Three different cutting plane patterns of sawn timber (quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn were converted into small specimens. The methods for determining acoustical properties were longitudinal vibration testing and time of flight of ultrasonic wave method. The result showed no significant difference (α=0.05 of acoustical properties in logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, and ultrasonic velocity means on quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn for all wood species tested. We found that Mahoni and Sonokeling had good acoustical properties of logarithmic decrement, ultrasonic wave velocity, and ratio of wood stiffness to wood density; and is preferred for crafting musical instruments. Acacia and Manii woods are recommended for developing acoustic panels in building construction because those species possess higher sound absorption values.

  5. Acoustical Properties of Contemporary Mosques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaman Özgül Yılmaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Religious buildings are important for many communities because of their representation of different beliefs. In such structures, the sense of individuality or unity & togetherness are created according to variable worship activities; these different uses have also different acoustical requirements. In order to create the desired feeling in the space at the required time, rooms should be evaluated in terms of acoustical conditions.

  6. Depth- and range-dependent variation in the performance of aquatic telemetry systems: understanding and predicting the susceptibility of acoustic tag–receiver pairs to close proximity detection interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Scherrer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Passive acoustic telemetry using coded transmitter tags and stationary receivers is a popular method for tracking movements of aquatic animals. Understanding the performance of these systems is important in array design and in analysis. Close proximity detection interference (CPDI is a condition where receivers fail to reliably detect tag transmissions. CPDI generally occurs when the tag and receiver are near one another in acoustically reverberant settings. Here we confirm transmission multipaths reflected off the environment arriving at a receiver with sufficient delay relative to the direct signal cause CPDI. We propose a ray-propagation based model to estimate the arrival of energy via multipaths to predict CPDI occurrence, and we show how deeper deployments are particularly susceptible. Methods A series of experiments were designed to develop and validate our model. Deep (300 m and shallow (25 m ranging experiments were conducted using Vemco V13 acoustic tags and VR2-W receivers. Probabilistic modeling of hourly detections was used to estimate the average distance a tag could be detected. A mechanistic model for predicting the arrival time of multipaths was developed using parameters from these experiments to calculate the direct and multipath path lengths. This model was retroactively applied to the previous ranging experiments to validate CPDI observations. Two additional experiments were designed to validate predictions of CPDI with respect to combinations of deployment depth and distance. Playback of recorded tags in a tank environment was used to confirm multipaths arriving after the receiver’s blanking interval cause CPDI effects. Results Analysis of empirical data estimated the average maximum detection radius (AMDR, the farthest distance at which 95% of tag transmissions went undetected by receivers, was between 840 and 846 m for the deep ranging experiment across all factor permutations. From these results, CPDI was

  7. Acoustic Properties of Absorbent Asphalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-08-01

    Road traffic is one of the greater cause of noise pollution in urban centers; a prolonged exposure to this source of noise disturbs populations subjected to it. In this paper is reported a study on the absorbent coefficients of asphalt. The acoustic measurements are carried out with a impedance tube (tube of Kundt). The sample are measured in three conditions: with dry material (traditional), “wet” asphalt and “dirty” asphalt.

  8. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  9. Acoustic properties of reticulated plastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A.; Beadle, S. P.

    1994-08-01

    Some general aspects of sound propagation in rigid porous media are discussed, particularly with reference to the use of a single - dimensionless - frequency parameter and the role of this, in the light of the possibility of varying gas properties, is examined. Steady flow resistance coefficients of porous media are also considered, and simple scaling relationships between these coefficients and `system parameters' are derived. The results of a series of measurements of the bulk acoustic properties of 12 geometrically similar, fully reticulated, polyurethane foams are presented, and empirical curve-fitting coefficients are found; the curve-fitting formulae are valid within the experimental range of values of the frequency parameter. Comparison is made between the measured data and an alternative, fairly recently published, semi-empirical set of formulae. Measurements of the steady flow-resistive coefficients are also given and both the acoustical and flow-resistive data are shown to be consistent with theoretical ideas. The acoustical and flow-resistive data should be of use in predicting the acoustic bulk properties of open-celled foams of types similar to those used in the experimental tests.

  10. The structural acoustic properties of stiffened shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luan, Yu

    2008-01-01

    . This is important when a number of stiffened plates are combined in a complicated structure composed of many plates. However, whereas the equivalent plate theory is well established there is no similar established theory for stiffened shells. This paper investigates the mechanical and structural acoustic properties......Plates stiffened with ribs can be modeled as homogeneous isotropic or orthotropic plates, and modeling such an equivalent plate numerically with, say, the finite element method is, of course, far more economical in terms of computer resources than modelling the complete, stiffened plate...

  11. Stochastic processes and long range dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Samorodnitsky, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    This monograph is a gateway for researchers and graduate students to explore the profound, yet subtle, world of long-range dependence (also known as long memory). The text is organized around the probabilistic properties of stationary processes that are important for determining the presence or absence of long memory. The first few chapters serve as an overview of the general theory of stochastic processes which gives the reader sufficient background, language, and models for the subsequent discussion of long memory. The later chapters devoted to long memory begin with an introduction to the subject along with a brief history of its development, followed by a presentation of what is currently the best known approach, applicable to stationary processes with a finite second moment. The book concludes with a chapter devoted to the author’s own, less standard, point of view of long memory as a phase transition, and even includes some novel results. Most of the material in the book has not previously been publis...

  12. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  13. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  14. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  15. The electromagnetic and acoustic properties of smoke particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churches, David K.

    The research work explores the Electromagnetic and Acoustic Properties of Smoke Particulates from real fires, and the initial development of an alternative method of smoke detection based on the study work. The research was entirely self-funded including the purchase of the experimental apparatus, test equipment and calibration to international standards. The study includes the properties of solid and liquid post combustion particulates in air suspension forming smoke plumes, and the associated fluid flow dynamics. As part of the study the electromagnetic and acoustic properties of smoke particulates, a somewhat unique detection method described as the ``Double Matrix Board System'' was developed and used. It was initially developed to assist in the electromagnetic study work, and was later modified to examine the acoustic properties. The published results of the research on the ``Double Matrix Board System'' and the details of the patent application for the device are included in the Appendices to the Thesis document.

  16. Properties of underwater acoustic communication channels in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T C

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic channels are band-limited and reverberant, posing many obstacles to reliable, phase-coherent acoustic communications. While many high frequency communication experiments have been conducted in shallow water, few have carried out systematic studies on the channel properties at a time scale relevant for communications. To aid communication system design, this paper analyzes at-sea data collected in shallow water under various conditions to illustrate how the ocean environments (sea surface waves and random ocean medium) can affect the signal properties. Channel properties studied include amplitude and phase variations, and temporal coherence of individual paths as well as the temporal and spatial coherence of multipaths at different time scales. Reasons for the coherence loss are hypothesized. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  17. Acoustic Oscillation Properties of Active Region 12193

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa; Pesnell, William D.; Hill, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are dynamic objects occurring randomly and yet unannounced in nature. In order to find an efficient detection method, we require a greater breadth of knowledge of the system. One path to such a method is to observe the solar atmosphere in a region around a flare in different wavelengths of light and acoustic frequency bands. This provides information from different altitudes in the solar atmosphere and allows us to study the temporal evolution of each altitude through the flaring event. A more complete understanding of the time evolution may lead to yet undiscovered precursors of the flare. In this project, we study Active Region 12192 using acoustic observations near an X3 flare occurring on October 24, 2014 at 21:41UT. Our wavelet analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region, to study the frequency bands. In order to study the power distribution in regions around the flare and to search for any correlation we apply several methods. One method we partition sub-regions in our main flaring region and take a survey of the oscillations for each frequency band within power maps. Another method we average the FFT to take measurements within the p-modes (2-4 mHz) and chromospheric (4-6 mHz) frequencies. The application of these methods should be able to get us closer to tracking waveforms within power maps.

  18. Preliminary Quantification of the Acoustic Properties of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reverberation times of some selected lecture theatres in Federal University of Technology, Yola which are the major contributory factors to their acoustic properties have been studied. The selected halls chosen as representatives are LT I, SMIT LT I and LT III having room volumes of 1473.4, 2156.4 and 763.0 m3 ...

  19. Nucleation, growth and acoustic properties of thin film diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, M D

    1999-01-01

    emission spectroscopy has been used to study the influence of substrate bias on the microwave plasma during diamond nucleation. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have recently emerged as promising near term applications for currently available CVD diamond however little is known about the propagation of acoustic waves in this material; a detailed study of the influence of film characteristics on acoustic propagation in free standing CVD diamond films has been undertaken using the techniques of laser ultrasonic analysis. The unusual combination of extreme properties possessed by diamond could benefit a wide range of applications. Thus far practical utilisation of this material has remained difficult and consequently limited; natural and synthetic crystals are unsuitable forms for many uses; particularly electronic applications which ideally require large area, single crystal substrates. Emerging CVD methods for the growth of thin film diamond offer a practical alternative; although nucleation on non-diamond ...

  20. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  1. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  2. Acoustic properties of novel materials using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Kenneth A., II

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) is a relatively new acoustic method capable of determining an object's elastic tensor through observation of the object's normal modes of free vibration. This work describes the acoustic properties and characterization of five different novel materials using the RUS technique. The elastic constants of thin film magnesium diboride (MgB2), a Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer (BCS) type superconductor, were measured for the first time and are significantly different from theoretical bulk calculations indicating the presence of strain induced effects. The resonant spectra of arbitrarily shaped bulk magnesium diboride samples were measured and the subsequent investigation, which included Finite Element Analysis (FEA), demonstrated that the samples were not uniform single crystals. In addition to the superconductor MgB2, several other unusual materials were investigated; the elastic constants of thin film columnar silicon carbide were measured to assess changes in material elasticity due to thin film growth mechanisms, the elastic constants of the biological material human dentin were measured to assess variation in elastic constants due to age of the sample donor, the complete elastic tensor of bulk gadolinium scandate (GdScO 3) was measured and sound speeds determined to evaluate applications in acoustic cavity design, and the bulk acoustic sound speed of the colossal magnetoresistant material La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 was determined via RUS for comparison with recently available sound speed measurements obtained using optical pulse methods.

  3. The acoustic properties of Salpa thompsoni

    KAUST Repository

    Wiebe, Peter H.

    2009-12-01

    Aggregations of the salp Salpa thompsoni were encountered during the Antarctic krill and ecosystem-studies cruise on the RV "G.O. Sars" from 19 February to 27 March 2008. The salp\\'s in situ target strength (TS), size, number of individuals in aggregate chains, and chain angle of orientation were determined. Shipboard measurements were made of Salpa thompsoni\\'s material properties. Individual aggregates were mostly 45.5-60.6 mm in mean length; relatively rare solitaries were ∼100 mm. Chains ranged from 3 to at least 121 individuals, and in surface waters (<20 m), they showed no preferred angle of orientation. Sound-speed contrast (h) ranged from 1.0060 to 1.0201 and density contrast (g) estimates between 1.0000 and 1.0039. The in situ TS distributions peaked between-75 and - 76 dB at 38 kHz, with a secondary peak at approximately - 65 dB. TS ranged between-85 and - 65 dB at 120 and 200 kHz and peaked around-74 dB. The measured in situ TS of salps reasonably matched the theoretical scattering-model predictions based on multi-individual chains. The backscattering from aggregate salps gives rise to TS values that can be similar to krill and other zooplankton with higher density and sound-speed contrasts. © 2009 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

  4. Acoustics of fish shelters: frequency response and gain properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Many teleosts emit sounds from cavities beneath stones and other types of submerged objects, yet the acoustical properties of fish shelters are virtually unexplored. This study examines the gain properties of shelters commonly used by Mediterranean gobies as hiding places and/or nest sites in the field (flat stones, shells belonging to five bivalve species), or within aquarium tanks (tunnel-shaped plastic covers, concrete blocks, concrete cylinder pipe, halves of terracotta flower pots). All shelters were acoustically stimulated using a small underwater buzzer, placed inside or around the shelter to mimic a fish calling from the nest site, and different types of driving stimuli (white noise, pure tones, and artificial pulse trains). Results showed the presence of significant amplitude gain (3-18 dB) at frequencies in the range 100-150 Hz in all types of natural shelters but one (Mytilus), terracotta flower pots, and concrete blocks. Gain was higher for stones and artificial shelters than for shells. Gain peak amplitude increased with the weight of stones and shells. Conclusions were verified by performing analogous acoustical tests on flat stones in the stream. Results draw attention to the use of suitable shelters for proper recording of sounds produced by fishes kept within laboratory aquaria.

  5. The Voice of Emotion: Acoustic Properties of Six Emotional Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carol May

    Studies in the perceptual identification of emotional states suggested that listeners seemed to depend on a limited set of vocal cues to distinguish among emotions. Linguistics and speech science literatures have indicated that this small set of cues included intensity, fundamental frequency, and temporal properties such as speech rate and duration. Little research has been done, however, to validate these cues in the production of emotional speech, or to determine if specific dimensions of each cue are associated with the production of a particular emotion for a variety of speakers. This study addressed deficiencies in understanding of the acoustical properties of duration and intensity as components of emotional speech by means of speech science instrumentation. Acoustic data were conveyed in a brief sentence spoken by twelve English speaking adult male and female subjects, half with dramatic training, and half without such training. Simulated expressions included: happiness, surprise, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. The study demonstrated that the acoustic property of mean intensity served as an important cue for a vocal taxonomy. Overall duration was rejected as an element for a general taxonomy due to interactions involving gender and role. Findings suggested a gender-related taxonomy, however, based on differences in the ways in which men and women use the duration cue in their emotional expressions. Results also indicated that speaker training may influence greater use of the duration cue in expressions of emotion, particularly for male actors. Discussion of these results provided linkages to (1) practical management of emotional interactions in clinical and interpersonal environments, (2) implications for differences in the ways in which males and females may be socialized to express emotions, and (3) guidelines for future perceptual studies of emotional sensitivity.

  6. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear.A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not.The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  7. Composite Materials and Measurement of Their Acoustic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshio; Kitatuji, Mituyoshi

    2004-05-01

    A composite material consists of two or more materials and its optimum acoustic properties can be designed by selecting its constituents. Unidirectional composite materials have a very low transverse Poisson’s ratio of less than 0.1. By considering such composite material features, the applications of carbon fiber-epoxy and highly crystalline polyethylene fiber-polyurethane composite materials to a medical transducer array are proposed. The sound velocities and densities of the composite materials are measured and their transverse Poisson’s ratios are calculated from experimental data.

  8. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Preetha Mary, E-mail: preethageoti@gmail.com, E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Divya, P. [Department of Physics, Dr M.G.R Educational and Research Institute University Chennai- (India); Jayakumar, S., E-mail: preethageoti@gmail.com, E-mail: jayakumars030@gmail.com; Subhashree, N. S. [Department of Physics, RKM Vivekananda College, Chennai-600004 (India); Ahmed, M. Anees [Department of Physics, New College, Chennai (India)

    2015-06-24

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  9. Acoustical, morphological and optical properties of oral rehydration salts (ORS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Preetha Mary; Jayakumar, S.; Divya, P.; Subhashree, N. S.; Ahmed, M. Anees

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity were measured in different concentrations of oral rehydration salts (ORS) at room temperature 303 k. From the experimental data other related thermodynamic parameters, viz adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, acoustic impedence, relaxation time are calculated. The experimental data were discussed in the light of molecular interaction existing in the liquid mixtures. The results have been discussed in terms of solute-solvent interaction between the components. Structural characterization is important for development of new material. The morphology, structure and grain size of the samples are investigated by SEM. The optical properties of the sample have been studied using UV Visible spectroscopy.

  10. Mechanical Properties and Acoustic Emission Properties of Rocks with Different Transverse Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the stability of engineering rock masses has important practical significance to projects like mining, tunneling, and petroleum engineering, it is necessary to study mechanical properties and stability prediction methods for rocks, cementing materials that are composed of minerals in all shapes and sizes. Rocks will generate acoustic emission during damage failure processes, which is deemed as an effective means of monitoring the stability of coal rocks. In the meantime, actual mining and roadway surrounding rocks tend to have transverse effects; namely, the transverse scale is larger than the length scale. Therefore, it is important to explore mechanical properties and acoustic emission properties of rocks under transverse size effects. Considering the transverse scale effects of rocks, this paper employs the microparticle flow software PFC2D to explore the influence of different aspect ratios on damage mechanics and acoustic emission properties of rocks. The results show that (1 the transverse scale affects uniaxial compression strength of rocks. As the aspect ratio increases, uniaxial compression strength of rocks decreases initially and later increases, showing a V-shape structure and (2 although it affects the maximum hit rate and the strain range of acoustic emission, it has little influence on the period of occurrence. As the transverse scale increases, both damage degree and damage rate of rocks decrease initially and later increase.

  11. Frequency dependence of elastic properties of acoustic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchessahar, M.; Sahraoui, S.; Benyahia, L.; Tassin, J. F.

    2005-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) and other plastic foams are widely used as passive acoustic absorbers. For optimal design, it is often necessary to know the viscoelastic properties of these materials in the frequency range relevant to their application. A nonresonance technique (dynamic stiffness) based on a forced vibrations procedure is used to investigate the frequency dependent complex shear modulus of a PU foam. This modulus is first measured, in a quasistatic configuration, in the frequency range (0.016-16 Hz) at different temperatures between 0 and 20 °C. It is afterwards predicted over a wide frequency range (0.01-3000 Hz) using the frequency-temperature superposition principle. The validation of this principle is discussed through quasistatic experiments. Under the assumption that Poisson's ratio of polymeric foams is real and frequency independent on the frequency range used, the frequency dependence of the complex shear modulus obtained is used to predict the complex stiffness of the acoustic foam on a wide frequency range. .

  12. Robustness of Estimators of Long-Range Dependence and Self-Similarity under non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Franzke, Christian L E; Watkins, Nicholas W; Gramacy, Robert B; Hughes, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity are ubiquitous in many natural systems like ecosystems, biological systems and climate. However, it is not always appreciated that both phenomena usually occur together in natural systems and that the superposition of both phenomena constitute the self-similarity of a system. These features, which are common in complex systems, impact the attribution of trends and the occurrence and clustering of extremes. The risk assessment of systems with these properties will lead to different outcomes (e.g. return periods) than the more common assumption of independence of extremes. Two paradigmatic models are discussed which can simultaneously account for long-range dependence and non-Gaussianity: Autoregressive Fractional Integrated Moving Average (ARFIMA) and Linear Fractional Stable Motion (LFSM). Statistical properties of estimators for long-range dependence and self-similarity are critically assessed. It is found that the most popular estimators are not robust. In particula...

  13. Mechanical Properties and Acoustic Emission Properties of Rocks with Different Transverse Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xi; Jun, Li; Gonghui, Liu; Xueli, Guo

    2017-01-01

    Since the stability of engineering rock masses has important practical significance to projects like mining, tunneling, and petroleum engineering, it is necessary to study mechanical properties and stability prediction methods for rocks, cementing materials that are composed of minerals in all shapes and sizes. Rocks will generate acoustic emission during damage failure processes, which is deemed as an effective means of monitoring the stability of coal rocks. In the meantime, actual mining a...

  14. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  15. Investigating the acoustical properties of carbon fiber-, glass fiber-, and hemp fiber-reinforced polyester composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jalili, Mohammad Mehdi; Mousavi, Seyyed Yahya; Pirayeshfar, Amir Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Wood is one of the main materials used for making musical instruments due to its outstanding acoustical properties. Despite such unique properties, its inferior mechanical properties, moisture sensitivity, and time- and cost-consuming procedure for making instruments in comparison with other materials (e.g., composites) are always considered as its disadvantages in making musical instruments. In this study, the acoustic parameters of three different polyester composites separately reinforced ...

  16. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  17. Low frequency acoustic properties of bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial with magnetic oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansha Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial was proposed to overcome the influence of the mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure that can effectively isolate low frequency noise. The finite element analysis (FEA results agree well with the experimental results. It is proved that the sound transmission losses (STLs of the proposed structures are higher than those of same surface density acoustic materials. The introduction of the magnetic mass block is different from the traditional design method, in which only a passive mass block is fixed on the membrane. The magnetic force will cause tension in the membrane, increase membrane prestress, and improve overall structural stiffness. The effects of the geometry size on the STLs are discussed in detail. The kind of method presented in this paper can provide a new means for engineering noise control. Keywords: Bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial, Low frequency sound insulation, Sound transmission loss, Magnet oscillator

  18. Parametrization of acoustic boundary absorption and dispersion properties in time-domain source/receiver reflection measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Lam, C.H.; Kooij, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form analytic time-domain expressions are obtained for the acoustic pressure associated with the reflection of a monopole point-source excited impulsive acoustic wave by a planar boundary with absorptive and dispersive properties. The acoustic properties of the boundary are modeled as a local

  19. Low frequency acoustic properties of Posidonia oceanica seagrass leaf blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jay R.; Venegas, Gabriel R.; Wilson, Preston S.; Hermand, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The acoustics of seagrass meadows impacts naval and oceanographic sonar applications. To study this environment, a one-dimensional resonator was used to assess the low-frequency (1–5 kHz) acoustic response of the leaf blades of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica in water. Three separate collections of plants from Crete, Greece, and Sicily, Italy were investigated. A high consistency in effective sound speed was observed within each collection while a strong variability was observed between different collections. Average size, mass, and epiphytic coverage within each collection were quantified, and discoloration and stiffness are discussed qualitatively with respect to the observed acoustic variability. PMID:28618796

  20. Long-range dependence and sea level forecasting

    CERN Document Server

    Ercan, Ali; Abbasov, Rovshan K

    2013-01-01

    This study shows that the Caspian Sea level time series possess long range dependence even after removing linear trends, based on analyses of the Hurst statistic, the sample autocorrelation functions, and the periodogram of the series. Forecasting performance of ARMA, ARIMA, ARFIMA and Trend Line-ARFIMA (TL-ARFIMA) combination models are investigated. The forecast confidence bands and the forecast updating methodology, provided for ARIMA models in the literature, are modified for the ARFIMA models. Sample autocorrelation functions are utilized to estimate the differencing lengths of the ARFIMA

  1. Real-time reverberation inversion for acoustic seabed properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Colin, M.; Benders, F.; Ainslie, M.A.; Eidem, E.J.; Chalindar, B; Juhel, B.; Dybedal, J.; Olsen, G.K.; Ivansson, S.; Abrahamsson, L.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate environmental information is required for obtaining reliable predictions for the performance of low-frequency active sonar (LFAS) systems. This environmental information is, however, often unreliable or unavailable. For example, the acoustic seabed parameters relevant for the scattering and

  2. Acoustic properties and durability of liner materials at non-standard atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.; Hsu, J. S.

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of an experimental study on how acoustic properties of certain absorbing liner materials are affected by nonstandard atmospheric conditions. This study was motivated by the need to assess risks associated with incorporating acoustic testing capability in wind tunnels with semicryogenic high Reynolds number aerodynamic and/or low pressure capabilities. The study consisted of three phases: 1) measurement of acoustic properties of selected liner materials at subatmospheric pressure conditions, 2) periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure of liner materials for 250 cycles, and 3) determination of the effect of periodic cold soak on the acoustic properties of the liner materials at subatmospheric conditions and the effect on mechanical resiliency. The selected liner materials were Pyrell foam, Fiberglass, and Kevlar. A vacuum facility was used to create the subatmospheric environment in which an impedance tube was placed to measure acoustic properties of the test materials. An automated cryogenic cooling system was used to simulate periodic cold soak and high pressure exposure. It was found that lower ambient pressure reduced the absorption effectiveness of the liner materials to varying degrees. Also no significant change in the acoustic properties occurred after the periodic cold soak. Furthermore, mechanical resiliency tests indicated no noticeable change.

  3. Coherent reverberation model based on adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenglin; Zhang, Renhe; Li, Fenghua

    2010-09-01

    Ocean reverberation in shallow water is often the predominant background interference in active sonar applications. It is still an open problem in underwater acoustics. In recent years, an oscillation phenomenon of the reverberation intensity, due to the interference of the normal modes, has been observed in many experiments. A coherent reverberation theory has been developed and used to explain this oscillation phenomenon [F. Li et al., Journal of Sound and Vibration, 252(3), 457-468, 2002]. However, the published coherent reverberation theory is for the range independent environment. Following the derivations by F. Li and Ellis [D. D. Ellis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 97(5), 2804-2814, 1995], a general reverberation model based on the adiabatic normal mode theory in a range dependent shallow water environment is presented. From this theory the coherent or incoherent reverberation field caused by sediment inhomogeneity and surface roughness can be predicted. Observations of reverberation from the 2001 Asian Sea International Acoustic Experiment (ASIAEX) in the East China Sea are used to test the model. Model/data comparison shows that the coherent reverberation model can predict the experimental oscillation phenomenon of reverberation intensity and the vertical correlation of reverberation very well.

  4. Soft mode and acoustic mode ferroelectric properties of deuterated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All crystals show a second order phase transformation mechanism at different tempera- ..... 315. 365. 415. Aco ustic Attenua tio n. Temperature (K). 0 kV/cm. 1 kV/cm. 3 kV/cm. 5 kV/cm. Figure 8. Temperature and electric field dependent acoustic attenuation of deuterated triglycine sulphate crystal (experimentally proved).

  5. Piezoelectric, Mechanical and Acoustic Properties of KNaNbOF5 from First-Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Han

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a noncentrosymmetric crystal, KNaNbOF5, has attracted attention due to its potential to present piezoelectric properties. Although α- and β-KNaNbOF5 are similar in their stoichiometries, their structural frameworks, and their synthetic routes, the two phases exhibit very different properties. This paper presents, from first-principles calculations, comparative studies of the structural, electronic, piezoelectric, and elastic properties of the α and the β phase of the material. Based on the Christoffel equation, the slowness surface of the acoustic waves is obtained to describe its acoustic prosperities. These results may benefit further applications of KNaNbOF5.

  6. Autonomic imbalance induced breakdown of long-range dependence in healthy heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, N; Struzik, Z R; Kiyono, K; Yamamoto, Y

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of the relation between the long-range correlation property of heart rate and autonomic balance. An investigation of the fractal scaling properties of heart rate variability was carried out by using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Eleven healthy subjects were examined for two consecutive days, which included usual daily activity, strenuous prolonged experimental exercise, and sleep. We also considered two patient groups with autonomic dysfunction characterized by selective sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance. Robust long-range dependence in heart rate is observed only in the state of usual daily activity, characterized by normal heart rate typical of balanced autonomic sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation. This confirms the previously postulated behavioral independence of heart rate regulation, but reveals that the occurrence of 1/f, long-range dependence is restricted to only the state of autonomic balance. Both the sympathetic dominant high heart rate state, realized during strenuous experimental exercise, and the parasympathetic dominant low heart rate state, prevalent in (deep) sleep, are characterized by uncorrelated, near white-noise-like scaling, lacking long-range dependence. Remarkably, the breakdown of the long-range correlations observed in healthy heart rate in the states of sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance is in stark contrast to the increased correlations which have previously been observed in neurogenic parasympathetic and sympathetic dominance in patients suffering from primary autonomic failure and congestive heart failure, respectively. Our findings further reveal the diagnostic capabilities of heart rate dynamics, by differentiating physiological healthy states from pathology.

  7. Record length requirement of long-range dependent teletraffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming

    2017-04-01

    This article contributes the highlights mainly in two folds. On the one hand, it presents a formula to compute the upper bound of the variance of the correlation periodogram measurement of teletraffic (traffic for short) with long-range dependence (LRD) for a given record length T and a given value of the Hurst parameter H (Theorems 1 and 2). On the other hand, it proposes two formulas for the computation of the variance upper bound of the correlation periodogram measurement of traffic of fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) type and the generalized Cauchy (GC) type, respectively (Corollaries 1 and 2). They may constitute a reference guideline of record length requirement of traffic with LRD. In addition, record length requirement for the correlation periodogram measurement of traffic with either the Schuster type or the Bartlett one is studied and the present results about it show that both types of periodograms may be used for the correlation measurement of traffic with a pre-desired variance bound of correlation estimation. Moreover, real traffic in the Internet Archive by the Special Interest Group on Data Communication under the Association for Computing Machinery of US (ACM SIGCOMM) is analyzed in the case study in this topic.

  8. Acoustic Tonal and Vector Properties of Red Hind Grouper Vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Cameron Anthony

    Vertebrates are the most prodigious vocalizing animals in existence, and the most diverse methods of acoustic communication among vertebrates can be found in the ocean. Relatively many teleost fish are gifted with the ability to communicate acoustically, and the family of serranidae often performs this as a function of the swim bladder. Epinephelus Guttatus (E. guttatus), or more commonly the red hind grouper, is equipped with a drum shaped swim bladder acting as a monopole under typical ocean conditions. This configuration allows for what is understood to be omnidirectional projection of tones approximately centered between 40 and 440 Hz and spanning anywhere from 40 to 200 Hz of bandwidth and modulation effects based on observed data provided by researchers. Prior studies on many other fish show correlation in acoustic communication profile with length, size and sexual identity. In the red hind, sexual dimorphism leads to an inherent female identity in all juvenile fish which converts to male according to environmental factors, recommending at least consistent organs across both sexes be assumed even if not in use. Much research has been performed on male fish vocalization in terms of spectral content. Communication in fish is a complex multi-modal process, with acoustic communication being important for many of the species, particularly those in the littoral regions of the worlds' oceans. If identifying characteristics of the red hind vocalization can be isolated based on detection, classification, tracking and localizing methodologies, then these identifying characteristics may indeed lead to passive feature identification that allows for estimation of individual fish mass. Hypotheses based on vector, cyclostationary and classical tonal mechanics are presented for consideration. A battery of test data collection events, applying pre-recorded fish vocalizations to a geolocated undersea sound source were conducted. The results are supplied with the intent of

  9. Acoustic properties of double-porosity granular polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alevizaki, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P.; Morvan, B.; Stefanou, N.

    2017-06-01

    Using an extension of the full elastodynamic layer-multiple-scattering method to structures of fluid-saturated poroelastic spherical bodies, a comprehensive theoretical study of the acoustic response of double-porosity submerged liquid-saturated granular polymeric materials of specific morphology consisting of touching porous polymer spheres arranged in a fcc lattice, beyond the long-wavelength effective-medium description, is presented. Calculated transmission and absorption spectra of finite slabs of these materials are analyzed by reference to the acoustic modes of the constituent porous spherical grains as well as to relevant dispersion diagrams of corresponding infinite crystals, and a consistent interpretation of the results is provided. In particular, it is shown that resonant modes with very long lifetime, localized in the spheres in the form of slow longitudinal waves, which are peculiar to poroelastic materials, are formed when the viscous length is much shorter than the radius of the inner pores of the spheres. These modes, which can be easily tuned in frequency by adjusting the intrinsic porosity of the spheres, induce some remarkable features in the acoustic behavior of these double-porosity materials, such as narrow dispersionless absorption bands and directional transmission gaps.

  10. Range-Dependent Acoustic Propagation in Shallow Water with Elastic Bottom Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    water and sediments at the ocean bottom. The attenuation in near-bottom ocean sediments may be very high. It may be high enough that perturbation...for oceanic T-wave generation," Frank et al., has been published. This article documents the incorporation of seismic -like sources into the PE...contribution to this were supported by this grant. Finally the paper “Traveling wave modal attenuation and interaction with a transversely isotropic

  11. Characterization of acoustic and mechanical properties of common tropical woods used in classical guitars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproßmann, Robert; Zauer, Mario; Wagenführ, André

    There is a need of substitution woods for the use in musical instruments because of the limited availability of some commonly used tropical tonewoods. Before substitutions can be found, it is necessary to know about the required properties. Hence, in this paper acoustical, mechanical and physical properties of four common tropical hardwoods (Indian rosewood, ziricote, African blackwood and ebony) were determined because there are less literature values for some properties available, e.g. internal friction, hardness or swelling behaviour. The acoustic properties were determined by means of experimental modal analysis, the mechanical properties by means of static bending tests and tests of the Brinell hardness. For the swelling behaviour the volume swelling and also the differential swelling coefficients were determined. With the results it is possible to look for new 'tonewoods' or to specifically modified woods, e.g. thermally treated wood, to substitute tropical wood species.

  12. Invariance principle, multifractional Gaussian processes and long-range dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Serge; Marty, Renaud

    2008-01-01

    This paper is devoted to establish an invariance principle where the limit process is a multifractional Gaussian process with a multifractional function which takes its values in $(1/2,1)$. Some properties, such as regularity and local self-similarity of this process are studied. Moreover the limit process is compared to the multifractional Brownian motion.

  13. An improved instrumental characterization of mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Prada, E.M.; Luyten, J.M.J.G.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study was performed to simultaneously measure the mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid foods. Different critical aspects are discussed in order to assess optimal test conditions. These are primarily data sampling rate, microphone positioning, frequency spectrum of

  14. An improved instrumental characterization of mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Castro-Prada, E.M.; Luyten, H.; Lichtendonk, W.; Hamer, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study was performed to simultaneously measure the mechanical and acoustic properties of crispy cellular solid foods. Different critical aspects are discussed in order to assess optimal test conditions. These are primarily data sampling rate, microphone positioning, frequency spectrum of

  15. Acoustic properties of carbonates: Effects of rock texture and implications for fluid substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwer, K.; Braaksma, H.; Kenter, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    More than 250 plugs from outcrops and three nearby boreholes in an undisturbed reef of Miocene (Tortonian) age were quantitatively analyzed for texture, mineralogy, and acoustic properties. We measured the P- and S-waves of carbonate rocks under dry (humidified) and brine-saturated conditions at 10

  16. High Frequency Acoustic Sensor Dedicated to the High Resolution Measurement of Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meignen, Pierre-Antoine; Le Clézio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles

    Through acoustic signature, scanning acoustic microscopy can be used to quantify local mechanical properties of a medium thanks to the generation of surface waves, mostly Rayleigh waves. Despite being quite effective, this method requires to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single point the acquisition of many ultrasonic signals. This process is then time-consuming and is hardly adaptable to quantitative imaging. The solution considered in this paper to speed-up the method is to design a multi-element sensor allowing the extraction of information on Rayleigh waves with a reduced number of acquisitions. The work is conducted along two axes. As a first step, a model allowing the simulation of the acoustic wave behavior at a fluid/solid interface is developed. This model leads to a better understanding of the characterization of the mechanical properties and to the definition of an adapted sensor's design. As a second step, an experimental method for acoustic field reconstruction is used to characterize the multi-elements sensor and measurements of mechanical properties were done.

  17. The Acoustic Properties of Vowels: A Tool for Improving Articulation and Comprehension of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombs, Candalene J.

    2006-01-01

    Correct pronunciation is often a later step in the process of teaching English as a second language. However, a focus on the correct articulation of vowels can significantly improve listening and comprehension skills as well as articulatory skills. Vowels and consonants differ in their acoustic properties. Unlike consonants, vowel sounds are…

  18. Electro-magnetically controlled acoustic metamaterials with adaptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, Vladimir S; Donskoy, Dimitri M

    2012-10-01

    A design of actively controlled metamaterial is proposed and discussed. The metamaterial consists of layers of electrically charged nano or micro particles exposed to external magnetic field. The particles are also attached to compliant layers in a way that the designed structure exhibits two resonances: mechanical spring-mass resonance and electro-magnetic cyclotron resonance. It is shown that if the cyclotron frequency is greater than the mechanical resonance frequency, the designed structure could be highly attenuative (40-60 dB) for vibration and sound waves in very broad frequency range even for wavelength much greater than the thickness of the metamaterial. The approach opens up wide range of opportunities for design of adaptively controlled acoustic metamaterials by controlling magnetic field and/or electrical charges.

  19. Interaction Models for Common Long-Range Dependence in Asset Prices Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssière, G.

    We consider a class of microeconomic models with interacting agents which replicate the main properties of asset prices time series: non-linearities in levels and common degree of long-memory in the volatilities and co-volatilities of multivariate time series. For these models, long-range dependence in asset price volatility is the consequence of swings in opinions and herding behavior of market participants, which generate switches in the heteroskedastic structure of asset prices. Thus, the observed long-memory in asset prices volatility might be the outcome of a change-point in the conditional variance process, a conclusion supported by a wavelet anaysis of the volatility series. This explains why volatility processes share only the properties of the second moments of long-memory processes, but not the properties of the first moments.

  20. Multi-layer structures with thermal and acoustic properties for building rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, J.; Mota, C.; Cunha, F.; Merino, F.; Fangueiro, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work compares the use of different sustainable materials in the design of multilayer structures for the rehabilitation of buildings in terms of thermal and acoustic properties. These structures were obtained by compression moulding and thermal and acoustic tests were further carried out for the quantification of the respective insulation properties of composite materials obtained. The experimental results show that the use of polyurethane (PUR) foams and jute fabric reinforcing biocomposites promotes interesting properties of thermal and acoustic insulation. A multi-layer structure composed by PUR foam on the intermediate layer revealed thermal resistances until 0.272 m2 K W‑1. On the other hand, the use of jute fabric reinforcing biocomposites on exterior layer promoted a noise reduction at 500 Hz until 8.3 dB. These results allow to conclude that the use of PUR foams and jute fabric reinforcing biocomposites can be used successfully in rehabilitation of buildings, when the thermal and acoustic insulation is looked for.

  1. Long Range Dependence Prognostics for Bearing Vibration Intensity Chaotic Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the chaotic features and typical fractional order characteristics of the bearing vibration intensity time series, a forecasting approach based on long range dependence (LRD is proposed. In order to reveal the internal chaotic properties, vibration intensity time series are reconstructed based on chaos theory in phase-space, the delay time is computed with C-C method and the optimal embedding dimension and saturated correlation dimension are calculated via the Grassberger–Procaccia (G-P method, respectively, so that the chaotic characteristics of vibration intensity time series can be jointly determined by the largest Lyapunov exponent and phase plane trajectory of vibration intensity time series, meanwhile, the largest Lyapunov exponent is calculated by the Wolf method and phase plane trajectory is illustrated using Duffing-Holmes Oscillator (DHO. The Hurst exponent and long range dependence prediction method are proposed to verify the typical fractional order features and improve the prediction accuracy of bearing vibration intensity time series, respectively. Experience shows that the vibration intensity time series have chaotic properties and the LRD prediction method is better than the other prediction methods (largest Lyapunov, auto regressive moving average (ARMA and BP neural network (BPNN model in prediction accuracy and prediction performance, which provides a new approach for running tendency predictions for rotating machinery and provide some guidance value to the engineering practice.

  2. Mechanical, Thermal and Acoustic Properties of Open-pore Phenolic Multi-structured Cryogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhou, Jintang; Liu, Peijiang; Lei, Yiming

    2017-09-01

    Open-pore phenolic cryogel acoustic multi-structured plates (OCMPs) were prepared via modified sol gel polymerization and freeze-dried methods. The pore morphology, mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of the cryogels were investigated. From the experimental results, the cryogels exhibited a porous sandwich microstructure: A nano-micron double-pore structure was observed in the core layer of the plates, and nanosized pores were observed in the inner part of the micron pores. In addtion, compared with cryogel plates with uniform-pore (OCPs), the OCMPs had lower thermal conductivities. What’s more, the compressive and tensile strength of the OCMPs were much higher than those of OCPs. Finally, the OCMPs exhibited superior acoustic performances (20% solid content OCMPs performed the best) as compared with those of OCPs. Moreover, the sound insulation value and sound absorption bandwidth of OCMPs exhibited an improvement of approximately 3 and 2 times as compared with those of OCPs, respectively.

  3. 3D Acoustic Modelling of Dissipative Silencers with Nonhomogeneous Properties and Mean Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Sánchez-Orgaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A finite element approach is proposed for the acoustic analysis of automotive silencers including a perforated duct with uniform axial mean flow and an outer chamber with heterogeneous absorbent material. This material can be characterized by means of its equivalent acoustic properties, considered coordinate-dependent via the introduction of a heterogeneous bulk density, and the corresponding material airflow resistivity variations. An approach has been implemented to solve the pressure wave equation for a nonmoving heterogeneous medium, associated with the problem of sound propagation in the outer chamber. On the other hand, the governing equation in the central duct has been solved in terms of the acoustic velocity potential considering the presence of a moving medium. The coupling between both regions and the corresponding acoustic fields has been carried out by means of a perforated duct and its acoustic impedance, adapted here to include absorbent material heterogeneities and mean flow effects simultaneously. It has been found that bulk density heterogeneities have a considerable influence on the silencer transmission loss.

  4. Acoustic and Elastic Properties of Glycerol in Oil-Based Gel Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C; Grillo, Felipe W; Sampaio, Diego R T; Carneiro, Antonio A O; Pavan, Theo Z

    2017-09-01

    Phantoms are important tools for image quality control and medical training. Many phantom materials have been proposed for ultrasound; most of them use water as the solvent, but these materials have disadvantages such as dehydration and low temporal stability if not properly stored. To overcome these difficulties, copolymer-in-oil gel was proposed as an inert and stable material; however, speed of sound for these materials is still lower than what is described for most biological tissues. Here, we propose the glycerol dispersion in oil-based gels to modify the acoustic and elastic properties of copolymer-in-oil phantoms. We manufactured copolymer-in-oil gels using styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) in concentrations 8%-15%. We used 2 types of mineral oils with different viscosities. Glycerol was added in a volume fraction 0%-30% of the total amount of liquid. The acoustic (i.e., speed of sound, attenuation and backscattering) and the mechanical (i.e., density and Young's modulus) properties of the samples were within the range of values observed for soft tissues. The acoustic parameters of the samples were dependent on oil viscosity and glycerol concentration. The speed of sound ranged 1423 m/s - 1502 m/s, while the acoustic attenuation and the ultrasonic backscattering increased by adding glycerol. The density and the Young's moduli were less affected by the presence of glycerol. We conclude that glycerol can be used to control the acoustic parameters of copolymer-in-oil gels. Additionally, it opens the possibility of incorporating other oil-insoluble substances to control further properties of the phantom. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Underwater acoustic channel properties in the Gulf of Naples and their effects on digital data transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iannaccone

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the physical properties of the Gulf of Naples (Southern Italy for its use as a communication channel for the acoustic transmission of digital data acquired by seismic instruments on the seafloor to a moored buoy. The acoustic link will be assured by high frequency acoustic modems operating with a central frequency of 100 kHz and a band pass of 10 kHz. Since the maximum depth of the sea is about 300 m and the planned horizontal distance between the seismic instruments and the buoy is 2 km, the acoustic data transmission shall be near horizontal. In this study the signal-to-noise ratio is plotted against depth and distance from the source, thus defining the limit after which the transmitted information becomes unreliable. Using ray-theory, we compute the amplitudes of a transmitted signal at a grid of 21×12 receivers to calculate the transmission loss at each receiver. The signal-to-noise ratio is finally computed for each receiver knowing also the transmitter source level and the acoustic noise level in the Gulf of Naples. The results show that the multipath effects predominate over the effects produced by the sound velocity gradient in the sea in the summer period. In the case of omnidirectional transmitters with a Source Level (SL of 165 dB and a bit rate of 2.4 kbit/s, the results also show that distances of 1400-1600 m can be reached throughout the year for transmitter-receiver connections below 50 m depth in the underwater acoustic channel.

  6. Acoustics properties and applications, in Metallic Foams: Fundamentals and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Perrot, Camille; Chevillotte, F.; Jaouen, L.; Hoang, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This book offers the first full-scale technical treatment of an important class of engineered porous materials: metal foams. Written by a team of metal foam experts from around the world, the volume offers new, as well as fundamental, information on all aspects of metal foams, including their theory, manufacture, structure-property relationships and applications. The book explains microscopy and modeling tools that enhance the prediction and determination of metal foam...

  7. Acoustic and Physical Properties of Mud Deposit in the Southern Continental Shelf of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.; Kim, G.; Seo, Y.; Çifci, G.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and core sediment sampling have been conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics and physical properties of shelf mud deposit in the southern continental shelf of Korea. The major sediment source is the Seomjin River. The sediments are transported through the Yeosu Sound. Approximately 1000 line-km data of Chirp subbottom profiling and sparker were used. Along with seismic profiling, 40 piston core samples were collected. High-resolution seismic profiles show the Holocene mud deposits dominated in the study area, ranging from 10 to 40 m in thickness, and gas-related acoustic anomalies were also recorded in the Yeosu Sound and the south of Oenaro Island. The late Quaternary deposits on the study area can be divided into three sequences (Unit Ι, Unit ΙΙ, Unit ΙΙΙ). The seismic units ΙΙ and ΙΙΙ are interpreted as the inner-shelf transgressive sand sheet and the deltaic-estuarine complex, respectively. The highstand systems tract (unit Ι) overlying the maximum flooding surface is recent mud deposits formed during recent highstand of sea level. Core samples were analyzed for sediment texture (grain size, sand, silt and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, grain density and shear strength), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation). Thirty-nine piston core samples were employed for the measurement. The mud sediments in the study area is vertically homogenous in texture. The mean grain size decreases generally from the mouth of Yeosu Sound to seaward. The sound velocity decreases from 1505 to 1485 m/s then increases to 1520 m/s southeastward due to Pleistocene sand ridges. Kim et al. (1992) suggested the grading effect of the Seomjin River discharge transported through the Yeosu Peninsula and Namhae Island results in the physical and acoustic properties.

  8. Study of heating effect and acoustic properties of dextran stabilized magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozefczak, Arkadiusz [Faculty of Physics, Institute of Acoustics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)]. E-mail: aras@amu.edu.pl; Skumiel, Andrzej [Faculty of Physics, Institute of Acoustics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2007-04-15

    This paper presents acoustic properties of water-based biocompatible fluids in which magnetite particles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were coated with two layers of surfactants: sodium oleate and dextran. The attenuation coefficient of ultrasonic wave measurements shows good structural stability of the fluid under the influence of a magnetic field. Hyperthermic tests proved that the magnetic fluid is suitable for therapeutic use as an agent which can release thermal energy (hyperthermia)

  9. Acoustic properties of Indian Ocean manganese nodules in relation to physical constitution and chemical composition

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Ramana, Y.V.

    floor nodule densities. Geophysics, 48, 1450-1452. Ui3t~wrsEv G. B. (1975) Geological and geophysical atlas of the Indian Ocean. Inter Governmental Oceano- graphic Commission, UNESCO, Pergamon Press, New York, 151 pp. .... No. 2. pp. 337-342. 1990. 019g-,,O14~ $3.(X1 ÷ 0.(~ Printed tn Grtat Britain. ~) 19q() Pergamon Press plc Acoustic properties of Indian Ocean manganese nodules in relation to physical constitution and chemical composition RANADHIR MUKHOPADHYAY...

  10. Sensitivity of simulated transcranial ultrasound fields to acoustic medium property maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Martin, Eleanor; Cox, Ben; Treeby, Bradley E.

    2017-04-01

    High intensity transcranial focused ultrasound is an FDA approved treatment for essential tremor, while low-intensity applications such as neurostimulation and opening the blood brain barrier are under active research. Simulations of transcranial ultrasound propagation are used both for focusing through the skull, and predicting intracranial fields. Maps of the skull acoustic properties are necessary for accurate simulations, and can be derived from medical images using a variety of methods. The skull maps range from segmented, homogeneous models, to fully heterogeneous models derived from medical image intensity. In the present work, the impact of uncertainties in the skull properties is examined using a model of transcranial propagation from a single element focused transducer. The impact of changes in bone layer geometry and the sound speed, density, and acoustic absorption values is quantified through a numerical sensitivity analysis. Sound speed is shown to be the most influential acoustic property, and must be defined with less than 4% error to obtain acceptable accuracy in simulated focus pressure, position, and volume. Changes in the skull thickness of as little as 0.1 mm can cause an error in peak intracranial pressure of greater than 5%, while smoothing with a 1 \\text{m}{{\\text{m}}3} kernel to imitate the effect of obtaining skull maps from low resolution images causes an increase of over 50% in peak pressure. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally through comparison with sonications made through 3D printed and resin cast skull bone phantoms.

  11. Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    inversion testing. Due to time limitations and to facilitate the deployments of both sonars, the 7125s were deployed using a pole mount on the...FINAL REPORT Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs SERDP...2015 Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXO’s W912HQ-12-C-0049 MR

  12. Tuning acoustic and mechanical properties of materials for ultrasound phantoms and smart substrates for cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarelli, A; Verbeni, A; Poliziani, A; Dario, P; Menciassi, A; Ricotti, L

    2017-02-01

    Materials with tailored acoustic properties are of great interest for both the development of tissue-mimicking phantoms for ultrasound tests and smart scaffolds for ultrasound mediated tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we assessed the acoustic properties (speed of sound, acoustic impedance and attenuation coefficient) of three different materials (agarose, polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane) at different concentrations or cross-linking levels and doped with different concentrations of barium titanate ceramic nanoparticles. The selected materials, besides different mechanical features (stiffness from few kPa to 1.6MPa), showed a wide range of acoustic properties (speed of sound from 1022 to 1555m/s, acoustic impedance from 1.02 to 1.67MRayl and attenuation coefficient from 0.2 to 36.5dB/cm), corresponding to ranges in which natural soft tissues can fall. We demonstrated that this knowledge can be used to build tissue-mimicking phantoms for ultrasound-based medical procedures and that the mentioned measurements enable to stimulate cells with a highly controlled ultrasound dose, taking into account the attenuation due to the cell-supporting scaffold. Finally, we were able to correlate for the first time the bioeffect on human fibroblasts, triggered by piezoelectric barium titanate nanoparticles activated by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound, with a precise ultrasound dose delivered. These results may open new avenues for the development of both tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound phantoms and smart triggerable scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study reports for the first time the results of a systematic acoustic characterization of agarose, polyacrylamide and polydimethylsiloxane at different concentrations and cross-linking extents and doped with different concentrations of barium titanate nanoparticles. These results can be used to build tissue-mimicking phantoms, useful for many ultrasound

  13. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Józefczak, A., E-mail: aras@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Leszczyński, B. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency. - Highlights: • A biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. • A comparison between ultrasonic properties and heat effects is presented. • Magnetosomes and abiotic magnetite nanoparticles exhibit good heating efficiency.

  14. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  16. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A; Garra, Brian S; Joshua Pfefer, T

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  17. Multilayered tissue mimicking skin and vessel phantoms with tunable mechanical, optical, and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin I.; Balter, Max L.; Chen, Melanie I.; Gross, Daniel; Alam, Sheikh K.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of multilayered tissue mimicking skin and vessel phantoms with tunable mechanical, optical, and acoustic properties. The phantoms comprise epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis skin layers, blood vessels, and blood mimicking fluid. Each tissue component may be individually tailored to a range of physiological and demographic conditions. Methods: The skin layers were constructed from varying concentrations of gelatin and agar. Synthetic melanin, India ink, absorbing dyes, and Intralipid were added to provide optical absorption and scattering in the skin layers. Bovine serum albumin was used to increase acoustic attenuation, and 40 μm diameter silica microspheres were used to induce acoustic backscatter. Phantom vessels consisting of thin-walled polydimethylsiloxane tubing were embedded at depths of 2–6 mm beneath the skin, and blood mimicking fluid was passed through the vessels. The phantoms were characterized through uniaxial compression and tension experiments, rheological frequency sweep studies, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements. Results were then compared to in vivo and ex vivo literature data. Results: The elastic and dynamic shear behavior of the phantom skin layers and vessel wall closely approximated the behavior of porcine skin tissues and human vessels. Similarly, the optical properties of the phantom tissue components in the wavelength range of 400–1100 nm, as well as the acoustic properties in the frequency range of 2–9 MHz, were comparable to human tissue data. Normalized root mean square percent errors between the phantom results and the literature reference values ranged from 1.06% to 9.82%, which for many measurements were less than the sample variability. Finally, the mechanical and imaging characteristics of the phantoms were found to remain stable after 30 days of storage at 21 °C. Conclusions: The phantoms described in this

  18. Acoustic properties of La3Ga5.3Ta0.5Al0.2O14 crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Roshchupkin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Development and search for new advanced materials of the lanthanum gallium silicate group with unique thermal properties is of great importance for the development of acoustoelectronics based on volume and surface acoustic waves. The processes of surface acoustic wave excitation and propagation in the La3Ga5.3Ta0.5Al0.2O14 crystal was studied using a double-crystal X-ray diffractometer with a BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The X-ray diffraction spectra of acoustically modulated crystals were used to measure the surface acoustic wave velocity and power flow angles in different acoustic cuts of the La3Ga5.3Ta0.5Al0.2O14 crystal.

  19. Measurement of in-duct acoustic properties by using a single microphone with fixed position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Y S; Huang, Lixi

    2004-12-01

    Acoustic properties of sound absorption materials and other acoustic structures can be measured in an impedance tube using the well-established two-microphone method to resolve the two traveling wave components of a standing wave pattern. The accuracy of such measurements depends crucially on the calibration of the two microphones placed in close proximity. To eliminate such calibration, the one-microphone method [Chu, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 555-560 (1986)] uses the same microphone to probe at two positions sequentially using the voltage driving the loudspeaker as a reference signal. A variant of this method is introduced in this study in which the microphone is fixed at one position while a rigid end plate moves between two positions to resolve the standing wave. The sound source is installed as a side branch, and its driving signal is also used as a reference in the two-step measurement. Close agreement is found with the established two-microphone method, and factors which might affect the accuracy of the new technique are discussed. As a demonstration of the robustness of the method, a low-budget electret microphone is used and the result also matches well with those obtained by the two-microphone method with high-quality condenser type microphones.

  20. Acoustic tests of elastic and microplastic properties of V-Ti-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, V.M. [Fiziko-Ehnergeticheskij Institut, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Rezvoushkin, A.V. [Fiziko-Ehnergeticheskij Institut, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kardashev, B.K. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    The non-linear acoustic properties of V-10Ti-5Cr alloy before and after proton irradiation (dose 2.2 x 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}) were investigated using a composite oscillator technique at longitudinal vibration frequencies of about 100 kHz. Acoustic parameters (decrement and resonance frequency) of the samples demonstrated noticeable amplitude dependencies of hysteretic type both in undeformed and deformed states. An unusual influence of plastical pre-straining on irradiated sample was found which resulted in small decreases in damping and increases in resonance frequency, and hence, of the elastic modulus. Damping in an irradiated sample was higher and its resonant frequency was lower as compared with a non-irradiated sample. This acoustic effect correlated with the results of microhardness and yield strength measurements. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a model which predicts the creation by proton irradiation of defects which aid the motion of dislocations in V-alloys. (orig.).

  1. Acoustic property reconstruction of a neonate Yangtze finless porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) head based on CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W L; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise's head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise's head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier's beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise's melon.

  2. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  3. Development of fly ash boards with thermal, acoustic and fire insulation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, C; Arenas, C; Vilches, L F; Alonso-Fariñas, B; Rodriguez-Galán, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on a new board composed of gypsum and fly ashes from coal combustion, which are mutually compatible. Physical and mechanical properties, sound absorption coefficient, thermal properties and leaching test have been obtained. The mechanical properties showed similar values to other commercial products. As far as the acoustic insulation characteristics are concerned, sound absorption coefficients of 0.3 and 0.8 were found. The board presents a low thermal conductivity and a fire resistance higher than 50 min (for 4 cm of thickness). The leaching of trace elements was below the leaching limit values. These boards can be considered as suitable to be used in building applications as partitions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Comparison of the Single-sided (Gen II) and Double-sided (Gen I) Combat Arms Earplugs (CAE): Acoustic Properties, Human Performance, and User Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    A Comparison of the Single-sided (Gen II) and Double-sided (Gen I) Combat Arms Earplugs (CAE): Acoustic Properties, Human Performance, and...and Double-sided (Gen I) Combat Arms Earplugs (CAE): Acoustic Properties, Human Performance, and User Acceptance Mary Binseel, Kara Cave, Joel...Double-sided (Gen I) Combat Arms Earplugs (CAE): Acoustic Properties, Human Performance, and User Acceptance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  5. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Jose, J.; Willemink, Rene; Willemink, Rene G.H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, D.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a ‘hybrid’ imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  6. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Willemink, R.G.H.; Resink, S.; Piras, D.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, C.H.; van Steenbergen, W.; van Leeuwen, T.G.; Manohar, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  7. Acoustic properties of polymer foam composites blended with different percentage loadings of natural fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azahari, M. Shafiq M.; Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Kormin, Shaharuddin; Taufiq Zaliran, M.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the acoustic properties of polymer foam composites (FC) filled with natural fiber. The FC were produced based on crosslinking of polyol, with flexible isocyanates and wood filler. The percentages of wood filler loading are 10, 15, and 20 wt% ratio of polyol. The FC also has a thickness of 10, 20 and 30 mm. The acoustic properties of the FC were determined by using Impedance Tube test, Optical Microscope (OM) and Mettler Toledo Density Kit test. The results revealed that FC20 with 30 mm in thickness gives the highest sound absorption coefficient (α) with 0.970 and 0.999, at low and high frequency respectively. FC20 also shows smallest pores structures size with 134.86 μm and biggest density with 868.5 kg/m3 which helps in absorbing sound. In this study, FC with different percentage loading of wood filler and different foam thickness shows the ability to contribute the absorption coefficient of polymeric foam at different frequency levels. Lastly, this type of FC is suitable for any type of sound absorption applications material.

  8. Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W.; Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.N.; Lizon, D.C.

    1997-06-15

    A swept-frequency ultrasonic interferometry technique is used for noninvasively determining acoustic properties of fluids inside containers. Measurements over a frequency range 1-15 MHz on six liquid chemicals are presented. Measurements were made with the liquid inside standard rectangular optical glass cells and stainless steel cylindrical shells. A theoretical model based on one-dimensional planar acoustic wave propagation through multi-layered media is employed for the interpretation of the observed resonance (interference) spectrum. Two analytical methods, derived from the transmission model are used for determination of sound speed, sound attenuation coefficient, and density of liquids from the relative amplitude and half-power peak width of the observed resonance peaks. Effects of the container material and geometrical properties, path-length, wall thickness are also studied. This study shows that the interferometry technique and the experimental method developed are capable of accurate determination of sound speed, sound attenuation, and density in fluids completely noninvasively. It is a capable and versatile fluid characterization technique and has many potential NDE applications.

  9. Fractal analysis of acoustic emission parameter series of coal with different properties under uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiming

    2017-08-01

    In order to study acoustic emission (AE) evolution characteristics of coal with different mechanical properties in failure process, uniaxial compression experiments of coals from 4 mines were carried out to analyse fractal feature of AE time series by G-P algorithm. The results indicate that AE parameter series of all 4 different coals have fractal feature, and the fractal dimension value of coal with different properties go through a process of “first rise, then fall”. The change of AE fractal dimension value can reflect the cracking evolution in coal failure process, which is closely related with the failure phase. The continuous decline of AE fractal dimension can be viewed as a precursor of impending failure of coal, which could provide theoretical basis for the AE pre-warning model establishment of coal dynamic disaster.

  10. New data on histology and physico-mechanical properties of human tooth tissue obtained with acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, Roman Gr; Denisova, Lyudmila A; Maeva, Elena Yu; Denissov, Alexey A

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of human tooth structural elements, revealed in acoustic images, has been carried out. It has been shown that tissue elements with different acoustic impedances differed in acoustic images by intensity of grey color, and also feature with different longitudinal sound velocities (C(L)). In the layer of mantle dentin, C(L) is 7% to 8% lower than in bulk dentin, and in the layer of dentin around the pulp chamber, C(L) is 15% lower. In carious enamel and dentin, C(L) decreases up to 7% to 17%. In pathologic teeth, dentin areas with higher density can be revealed; they feature higher C(L); in transparent dentin C(L) can be 15% to 20% higher than in bulk dentin. Results of the present study show that acoustic images reflect internal biomechanical properties of tooth tissue microstructure that can be evaluated quantitatively by means of longitudinal sound velocity determination.

  11. System Estimation of Panel Data Models under Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre

    A general dynamic panel data model is considered that incorporates individual and interactive fixed effects allowing for contemporaneous correlation in model innovations. The model accommodates general stationary or nonstationary long-range dependence through interactive fixed effects and innovat...

  12. Improving Delay-Range-Dependent Stability Condition for Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the delay-range-dependent stability for systems with interval time-varying delay. Through defining the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and estimating the derivative of the LKF by introducing new vectors, using free matrices and reciprocally convex approach, the new delay-range-dependent stability conditions are obtained. Two well-known examples are given to illustrate the less conservatism of the proposed theoretical results.

  13. Non-Imaging Acoustical Properties in Monitoring Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Mohd Noor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The limitations of the gold standard angiography technique in arteriovenous access surveillance have opened a gap for researchers to find the best way to monitor this condition with low-cost, non-invasive and continuous bedside monitoring. The phonoangiography technique has been developed prior to these limits. This measurement and monitoring technique, associated with intelligence signal processing, promises better analysis for early detection of hemodialysis access problems, such as stenosis and thrombosis. Some research groups have shown that the phonoangiography technique could identify as many as 20% of vascular diameter changes and also its frequency characteristics due to hemodialysis access problems. The frequency characteristics of these acoustical signals are presented and discussed in detail to understand the association with the stenosis level, blood flows, sensor locations, fundamental frequency bands of normal and abnormal conditions, and also the spectral energy produced. This promising technique could be used in the near future as a tool for pre-diagnosis of arteriovenous access before any further access correction by surgical techniques is required. This paper provides an extensive review of various arteriovenous access monitoring techniques based on non-imaging acoustical properties.

  14. Effects of nasalance on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and the head voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Nicholas Kevin

    This study aims to measure the effect that nasality has on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and head voice. Not to be confused with forward resonance, nasality here will be defined as nasalance, the reading of a Nasometer, or the percentage of nasal and oral airflow during phonation. A previous study by Peer Birch et al. has shown that professional tenors used higher percentages of nasalance through their passaggio. They hypothesized that tenors used nasalance to make slight timbral adjustments as they ascended through passaggio. Other well respected authors including Richard Miller and William McIver have claimed that teaching registration issues is the most important component of training young tenors. It seemed logical to measure the acoustic effects of nasalance on the tenor passaggio and head voice. Eight professional operatic tenors participated as subjects performing numerous vocal exercises that demonstrated various registration events. These examples were recorded and analyzed using a Nasometer and Voce Vista Pro Software. Tenors did generally show an increase of nasalance during an ascending B-flat major scale on the vowels [i] and [u]. Perhaps the most revealing result was that six of seven tenors showed at least a 5-10% increase in nasalance on the note after their primary register transition on the vowel of [a]. It is suggested that this phenomenon receive further empirical scrutiny, because, if true, pedagogues could use nasalance as a tool for helping a young tenor ascend through his passaggio.

  15. Evaluation of the Acoustic Properties of Wood-Plastic-Chalk Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Daeipour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wood-plastic composites are a new group of materials that can be used in construction instead of wood and plastic. They are used in various industries due to features such as sound and water absorption, among others. This article aims to study the acoustic properties of wood-plastic composites made of wood flour, low-density polyethylene, and chalk. In this study, 6 combinations were made with different material percentages. Acoustic tests were performed for frequency ranges of 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. The results of this study showed that the maximum amount of sound absorption was observed at a frequency of 2000 onwards. At the frequency of 25 to 2000, no remarkable change in sound absorption was recorded. At the 2000 to upper frequencies, one of the samples displayed the maximum amount of sound absorption. In terms of water absorption, a significant variation was reported in three samples with passing time (2, 24, 48 and 72 hours.

  16. The effect of microstructural variation on the mechanical and acoustic properties of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusark, Douglas Michael

    Silicon carbide ceramic materials have many beneficial properties which have led to their adoption in various industrial uses, including its application as an armor material. This is due to the high hardness and stiffness of these materials, as well as a low relative density. The homogeneity of the final properties depends upon the processing history of the material. Factors which affect this include the need for high temperatures and sintering additives to achieve densification, as well as the presence of additive agglomerates and pressing artifacts within the green compact. This dissertation seeks to determine the effect which microstructural variability has on the acoustic and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide materials. Sample sets examined included commercially produced, pressurelessly sintered tiles, as well as additional, targeted tiles which were specifically produced for evaluation in this study. Production of these targeted samples was carried out such that particular aspects of the microstructure were emphasized. These included tiles which were fired with an excess of boron sintering aid as well as tiles which had been pressed to a reduced green body density and then fired. The sample evaluation procedure which was developed incorporated non destructive evaluation methods, mechanical testing, and both fractographic and image analysis of fractured and polished sections. Non destructive evaluation of the tiles was carried out by Archimedes density and ultrasound scanning at 20 MHz to determine the acoustic attenuation coefficient. Selected samples were chosen for machining into ASTM B-type bend bars on which 4-pt flexure testing was performed. Strength limiting features were designated for each sample set. The correlation between acoustic attenuation coefficient and quasi-static strength was examined both qualitatively and quantitatively. This was done by comparing the primary fracture location of flexure bars to features within the

  17. Extracting elastic properties of an atomically thin interfacial layer by time-domain analysis of femtosecond acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.-Y.; Huang, Y.-R.; Shih, H.-Y.; Chen, M.-J.; Sheu, J.-K.; Sun, C.-K.

    2017-11-01

    Modern devices adopting denser designs and complex 3D structures have created much more interfaces than before, where atomically thin interfacial layers could form. However, fundamental information such as the elastic property of the interfacial layers is hard to measure. The elastic property of the interfacial layer is of great importance in both thermal management and nano-engineering of modern devices. Appropriate techniques to probe the elastic properties of interfacial layers as thin as only several atoms are thus critically needed. In this work, we demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the time-resolved femtosecond acoustics technique to extract the elastic properties and mass density of a 1.85-nm-thick interfacial layer, with the aid of transmission electron microscopy. We believe that this femtosecond acoustics approach will provide a strategy to measure the absolute elastic properties of atomically thin interfacial layers.

  18. Effects of Perforation on Rigid PU Foam Plates: Acoustic and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Factories today are equipped with diverse mechanical equipment in response to rapid technological and industrial developments. Industrial areas located near residential neighborhoods cause massive environmental problems. In particular, noise pollution results in physical and psychological discomfort, and is a seen as invisible and inevitable problem. Thus, noise reduction is a critical and urgent matter. In this study, rigid polyurethane (PU foam plates undergo perforation using a tapping machine. The mechanical and acoustic properties of these perforated plates as related to perforation rate and perforation depth are evaluated in terms of compression strength, drop-weight impact strength, and sound absorption coefficient. Experimental results indicate that applying the perforation process endows the rigid PU foaming plates with greater load absorption and better sound absorption at medium and high frequencies.

  19. Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lombard’s effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author’s own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. Material and Methods: The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160–430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37–1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6–0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015. Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003. The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A-weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Results: Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B – 21%, and in group C – 60% of lectors were using raised voice. Conclusions: It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time exert their effect on lecturer’s vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice, which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard’s effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. Med Pr 2015;66(4:487–496

  20. [Assessment of vocal intensity in lecturers depending on acoustic properties of lecture rooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Lombard's effect increases the level of vocal intensity in the environment, in which noise occurs. This article presents the results of the author's own study of vocal intensity level and A-weighted sound pressure level of background noise during normal lectures. The aim of the study was to define whether above-mentioned parameters depend on acoustic properties of rooms (classrooms or lecture rooms) and to define how many lectors speak with raised voice. The study was performed in a group of 50 teachers and lecturers in 10 classrooms with cubature of 160-430 m3 and reverberation time of 0.37-1.3 s (group A consisted of 3 rooms which fulfilled, group B consisted of 3 rooms which almost fulfilled and group C consisted of 4 rooms which did not fulfill criteria based on reverberation time (maximum permissible value is 0.6-0.8 s according to PN-B-02151-4:2015). Criteria of raising voice were based on vocal intensity level (maximum value: 65 dB according to EN ISO 9921:2003). The values of above-mentioned parameters were determined from modes of A--weighted sound pressure level distributions during lectures. Great differentiation of vocal intensity level between lectors was found. In classrooms of group A lectors were not using raised voice, in group B--21%, and in group C--60% of lectors were using raised voice. It was observed that acoustic properties of classrooms (defined by reverberation time) exert their effect on lecturer's vocal intensity level (i.e., raising voice), which may contribute to the increased risk of vocal tract illnesses. The occurrence of Lombard's effect in groups of teachers and lecturers, conducting lectures in rooms, was evidenced. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  1. Acoustic properties of porous concrete made from arlite and vermiculite lightweight aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbajo, J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of sustainable materials is becoming a common practice for noise abatement in building and civil engineering industries. In this context, many applications have been found for porous concrete made from lightweight aggregates. This work investigates the acoustic properties of porous concrete made from arlite and vermiculite lightweight aggregates. These natural resources can still be regarded as sustainable since they can be recycled and do not generate environmentally hazardous waste. The experimental basis used consists of different type specimens whose acoustic performance is assessed in an impedance tube. Additionally, a simple theoretical model for granular porous media, based on parameters measurable with basic experimental procedures, is adopted to predict the acoustic properties of the prepared mixes. The theoretical predictions compare well with the absorption measurements. Preliminary results show the good absorption capability of these materials, making them a promising alternative to traditional porous concrete solutions.El uso de materiales sostenibles se está convirtiendo en una práctica común para la reducción de ruido en las industrias de la edificación e ingeniería civil. Este trabajo investiga las propiedades acústicas de hormigón poroso fabricado a partir de áridos ligeros de arlita y vermiculita. Estos recursos naturales todavía pueden considerarse sostenibles ya que pueden ser reciclados y no generan residuos peligrosos para el medio ambiente. La base experimental utilizada se compone de especímenes de diferente tipo cuyas prestaciones acústicas se evalúan en un tubo de impedancia. Adicionalmente, se ha adoptado un modelo teórico simple para medios porosos granulares, basado en parámetros medibles con procedimientos experimentales básicos, con objeto de predecir las propiedades acústicas de las mezclas preparadas. Las predicciones teóricas muestran una buena concordancia con las medidas de absorci

  2. The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of tissue-mimicking agar-gel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Józefczak, A., E-mail: aras@amu.edu.pl [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Kaczmarek, K. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Kubovčíková, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Košice (Slovakia); Rozynek, Z.; Hornowski, T. [Institute of Acoustics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    In ultrasonic hyperthermia, ultrasound-induced heating is achieved by the absorption of wave energy and its conversion into heat. The effectiveness of ultrasounds can be improved by using sonosensitisers that greatly attenuate ultrasonic waves and then dissipate the acquired energy in the form of heat. One possible candidate for such a sonosensitiser are superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar-gel matrix. Such tissue-mimicking phantoms possess acoustic properties similar to those of real tissues, and are used as a tool for performance testing and optimisation of medical ultrasound systems. In this work, we studied the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of agar-gel phantoms, including the attenuation of ultrasonic waves. - Highlights: • Ultrasonic insertion technique is used to study acoustic properties of agar-gel phantoms with and without magnetic particles. • The addition of magnetic nanoparticles improves effectiveness of ultrasound heating in agar phantoms. • Acoustics properties of a pure agar-gel phantom are altered by adding nanoparticles.

  3. Fractality Evidence and Long-Range Dependence on Capital Markets: a Hurst Exponent Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprean, Camelia; Tănăsescu, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Since the existence of market memory could implicate the rejection of the efficient market hypothesis, the aim of this paper is to find any evidence that selected emergent capital markets (eight European and BRIC markets, namely Hungary, Romania, Estonia, Czech Republic, Brazil, Russia, India and China) evince long-range dependence or the random walk hypothesis. In this paper, the Hurst exponent as calculated by R/S fractal analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is our measure of long-range dependence in the series. The results reinforce our previous findings and suggest that if stock returns present long-range dependence, the random walk hypothesis is not valid anymore and neither is the market efficiency hypothesis.

  4. Mechanic and Acoustic Properties of the Sound-Absorbing Material Made from Natural Fiber and Polyester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A sound-absorbing composite material made of wood fiber and polyester fiber was produced using polyester foam technology and wood-based composite technology. This study investigated the physical and mechanical properties and the effects of the airflow resistivity of the materials and the depth of the cavities behind on sound-absorbing performance of the composite material. The results showed that the composite of best physical and mechanical properties and sound absorption was made with a 150°C hot-pressing temperature, 10 min hot-press time, 3 : 1 the ratio of wood fiber to polyester fiber, foaming agent content of 8%, and the nominal density of 0.2 g/cm3; the composite material yielded superior sound absorption property with the airflow resistivity of 1.98 × 105 Pa·s/m2; the acoustic absorption peak moved to lower frequencies when length of the cavities was increased.

  5. Delay-range-dependent chaos synchronization approach under varying time-lags and delayed nonlinear coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Muhammad Hamad; Rehan, Muhammad; Mustafa, Ghulam; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel state feedback delay-range-dependent control approach for chaos synchronization in coupled nonlinear time-delay systems. The coupling between two systems is esteemed to be nonlinear subject to time-lags. Time-varying nature of both the intrinsic and the coupling delays is incorporated to broad scope of the present study for a better-quality synchronization controller synthesis. Lyapunov-Krasovskii (LK) functional is employed to derive delay-range-dependent conditions that can be solved by means of the conventional linear matrix inequality (LMI)-tools. The resultant control approach for chaos synchronization of the master-slave time-delay systems considers non-zero lower bound of the intrinsic as well as the coupling time-delays. Further, the delay-dependent synchronization condition has been established as a special case of the proposed LK functional treatment. Furthermore, a delay-range-dependent condition, independent of the delay-rate, has been provided to address the situation when upper bound of the delay-derivative is unknown. A robust state feedback control methodology is formulated for synchronization of the time-delay chaotic networks against the L2 norm bounded perturbations by minimizing the L2 gain from the disturbance to the synchronization error. Numerical simulation results are provided for the time-delay chaotic networks to show effectiveness of the proposed delay-range-dependent chaos synchronization methodologies. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of acoustic performance of five muffler configurations on a small helicopter. [acoustic properties of modified helicopter exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, R. J.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A field noise measurement program has been conducted on a standard Bell 47 series helicopter and on one that had been modified with specially designed, airframe-mounted mufflers to reduce the engine exhaust noise. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the acoustic performance of five experimental exhaust muffler configurations for a helicopter reciprocating engine in an operational environment. All muffler configurations produced beneficial engine exhaust noise reductions but some configurations were markedly better than others. Flyover noise results indicated that maximum overall noise reductions of approximately 8 db were obtained with the various mufflers. The rotor noise was judged to be the dominant noise component for the muffler-equipped helicopters whereas the engine noise was the dominant component for the basic configuration.

  7. Characterization of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) piezoelectric properties for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosydi Zakaria, Mohd; Johari, Shazlina; Hafiz Ismail, Mohd; Hashim, Uda

    2017-11-01

    In fabricating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) biosensors device, the substrate is one of important factors that affected to performance device. there are many types of piezoelectric substrate in the markets and the cheapest is zinc Oxide substrate. Zinc Oxide (ZnO) with its unique properties can be used as piezoelectric substrate along with SAW devices for detection of DNA in this research. In this project, ZnO thin film is deposited onto silicon oxide substrate using electron beam evaporation (E-beam) and Sol-Gel technique. Different material structure is used to compare the roughness and best piezoelectric substrate of ZnO thin film. Two different structures of ZnO target which are pellet and granular are used for e-beam deposition and one sol-gel liquid were synthesize and compared. Parameter for thickness of ZnO e-beam deposition is fixed to a 0.1kÅ for both materials structure and sol-gel was coat using spin coat technique. After the process is done, samples are annealed at temperature of 500°C for 2 hours. The structural properties of effect of post annealing using different material structure of ZnO are studied using Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) for surface morphology and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for phase structure.

  8. Characterization of Zinc Oxide (ZnO piezoelectric properties for Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Mohd Rosydi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In fabricating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW biosensors device, the substrate is one of important factors that affected to performance device. there are many types of piezoelectric substrate in the markets and the cheapest is zinc Oxide substrate. Zinc Oxide (ZnO with its unique properties can be used as piezoelectric substrate along with SAW devices for detection of DNA in this research. In this project, ZnO thin film is deposited onto silicon oxide substrate using electron beam evaporation (E-beam and Sol-Gel technique. Different material structure is used to compare the roughness and best piezoelectric substrate of ZnO thin film. Two different structures of ZnO target which are pellet and granular are used for e-beam deposition and one sol-gel liquid were synthesize and compared. Parameter for thickness of ZnO e-beam deposition is fixed to a 0.1kÅ for both materials structure and sol-gel was coat using spin coat technique. After the process is done, samples are annealed at temperature of 500°C for 2 hours. The structural properties of effect of post annealing using different material structure of ZnO are studied using Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM for surface morphology and X-ray Diffraction (XRD for phase structure.

  9. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-04-30

    's effective stress parameters, {alpha}{sub v} and {alpha}{sub h}, using the equations of Abousleiman et al. (1996). A series of experiments have been conducted, on an initially inherently isotropic Berea sandstone rock sample, to dynamically determine these anisotropic Biot's parameters during deformational pathway experiments. Data acquired during hydrostatic, triaxial, and uniaxial strain pathway experiments indicates that Biot's effective stress parameter changes significantly if the applied stresses are not hydrostatic. Variations, as large as 20% between the axial (vertical) and lateral (horizontal) Biot's effective stress parameters, were observed in some experiments. A series of triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated sand (Oil Creek sand) to determine the pressure/stress conditions which would be favorable for liquefaction. Liquefaction of geopressured sands is thought to be one of the major causative mechanisms of damaging shallow water flows. The experiments were developed to determine if: (1) liquefaction could be made to occur in this particular sand at high confining pressures, and (2) the state of liquefication had the same nature at high pressure conditions typical of shallow water flows as it does in low confining pressure soil mechanics tests. A series of undrained triaxial experiments were successfully used to document that the Oil Creek sand could undergo liquefaction. The nature (i.e., the shape of the deformational pathway in mean pressure/shear stress space) was very similar to those observed in soil mechanics experiments. The undrained triaxial experiments also indicated that this sand would strain soften at relatively high confining pressures--a necessary precursor to liquefaction. These experiments serve as a starting point for a series of acoustic experiments to determine the signature of compressional and shear wave properties as the sand packs approach the state of liquefaction (and shallow water flows).

  10. Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia, Emilie; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Kotz, Sonja A; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Pernet, Cyril R; Gross, Joachim; Belin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Magneto-encephalography (MEG) was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs) at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of non-verbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure). Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM) on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG). For each participant we estimated "simple" models [including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence)] as well as "combined" models (including acoustical regressors). Results from the "simple" models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset) of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the "combined" models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i) that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii) the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

  11. Single-subject analyses of magnetoencephalographic evoked responses to the acoustic properties of affective non-verbal vocalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie eSalvia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Magneto-encephalography (MEG was used to examine the cerebral response to affective non-verbal vocalizations (ANVs at the single-subject level. Stimuli consisted of nonverbal affect bursts from the Montreal Affective Voices morphed to parametrically vary acoustical structure and perceived emotional properties. Scalp magnetic fields were recorded in three participants while they performed a 3-alternative forced choice emotion categorization task (Anger, Fear, Pleasure. Each participant performed more than 6000 trials to allow single-subject level statistical analyses using a new toolbox which implements the general linear model (GLM on stimulus-specific responses (LIMO-EEG. For each participant we estimated ‘simple’ models (including just one affective regressor (Arousal or Valence as well as ‘combined’ models (including acoustical regressors. Results from the ‘simple’ models revealed in every participant the significant early effects (as early as ~100 ms after onset of Valence and Arousal already reported at the group-level in previous work. However, the ‘combined’ models showed that few effects of Arousal remained after removing the acoustically-explained variance, whereas significant effects of Valence remained especially at late stages. This study demonstrates (i that single-subject analyses replicate the results observed at early stages by group-level studies and (ii the feasibility of GLM-based analysis of MEG data. It also suggests that early modulation of MEG amplitude by affective stimuli partly reflects their acoustical properties.

  12. Evolutions of friction properties and acoustic emission source parameters associated with large sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Y.; Tsuda, H.; Iida, T.

    2015-12-01

    It was demonstrated by Yabe (2002) that friction properties and AE (acoustic emission) activities evolve with accumulation of sliding. However, large sliding distances of ~65 mm in his experiments were achieved by recurring ~10 mm sliding on the same fault. The evolution of friction coefficient was discontinuous, when rock samples were reset. Further, normal stress was not kept constant. To overcome these problems and to reexamine the evolutions of friction properties and AE activities with continuous large sliding under a constant normal stress, we developed a rotary shear apparatus. The evolutions of friction and AE up to ~80 mm sliding under a normal stress of 5 MPa were investigated. Rate dependence of friction was the velocity strengthening (a-b>0 in rate and state friction law) at the beginning. The value of a-b gradually decreased with sliding to negative (velocity weakening). Then, it took a constant negative value, when the sliding reached a critical distance. The m-value of Ishimoto-Iida's relation of AE activity increased with sliding at the beginning and converged to a constant value at the critical sliding distance. The m-value showed a negative rate dependence at the beginning, but became neutral after sliding of the critical distance. The sliding distances required to converge the a-b value, the m-value and the rate dependence of the m-value are almost identical to one another. These results are the same as those by Yabe (2002), suggesting the intermission of sliding little affected the evolutions. We, then, examined evolutions of AE source parameters such as source radii and stress drops. The average source radius was constant over the whole sliding distance, while the average stress drop decreased at the beginning of sliding, and converged to a constant value. The sliding distance required to the conversion was the same as that for the above mentioned evolutions of friction property or AE activity.

  13. A Sound Working Environment : Optimizing the Acoustic Properties of Open Plan Workspaces Using Parametric Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaun, N.J.V.; van Waart, A.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Turrin, M.; Attar, Ramtin; Chronis, Angelos; Hanna, Sean; Turrin, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing the acoustic environment of open plan offices is a complex task due to the large number of design parameters that must be considered. In current practice, acoustic analysis – even in a simplified form – is not naturally integrated into the design process of office spaces. Applying digital

  14. INFLUENCE OF FRICTION SURFACES PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS ON ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy Filonenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  The simulation of amplitude and energy of acoustic emission resulting signals at friction of composite materials surfaces layers was conducted. The regularities of changes in the amplitude and energy parameters of acoustic emission resulting signals which are depending from hardness of composite materials surfaces layers were determined. The description of regularities of changes with their statistical estimates was conducted.

  15. Microbial-Induced Heterogeneity in the Acoustic Properties of Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoustic wave data were acquired over a two-dimensional region of a microbial-stimulated sand column and an unstimulated sand column to assess the spatiotemporal changes in a porous medium caused by microbial growth and biofilm formation. The acoustic signals from the unstimulate...

  16. The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of tissue-mimicking agar-gel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefczak, A.; Kaczmarek, K.; Kubovčíková, M.; Rozynek, Z.; Hornowski, T.

    2017-06-01

    In ultrasonic hyperthermia, ultrasound-induced heating is achieved by the absorption of wave energy and its conversion into heat. The effectiveness of ultrasounds can be improved by using sonosensitisers that greatly attenuate ultrasonic waves and then dissipate the acquired energy in the form of heat. One possible candidate for such a sonosensitiser are superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar-gel matrix. Such tissue-mimicking phantoms possess acoustic properties similar to those of real tissues, and are used as a tool for performance testing and optimisation of medical ultrasound systems. In this work, we studied the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of agar-gel phantoms, including the attenuation of ultrasonic waves.

  17. Acoustical properties of air-saturated porous material with periodically distributed dead-end pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, P; Umnova, O; Dupont, T; Panneton, R

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical and numerical study of the sound propagation in air-saturated porous media with straight main pores bearing lateral cavities (dead-ends) is presented. The lateral cavities are located at "nodes" periodically spaced along each main pore. The effect of periodicity in the distribution of the lateral cavities is studied, and the low frequency limit valid for the closely spaced dead-ends is considered separately. It is shown that the absorption coefficient and transmission loss are influenced by the viscous and thermal losses in the main pores as well as their perforation rate. The presence of long or short dead-ends significantly alters the acoustical properties of the material and can increase significantly the absorption at low frequencies (a few hundred hertz). These depend strongly on the geometry (diameter and length) of the dead-ends, on their number per node, and on the periodicity along the propagation axis. These effects are primarily due to low sound speed in the main pores and to thermal losses in the dead-end pores. The model predictions are compared with experimental results. Possible designs of materials of a few cm thicknesses displaying enhanced low frequency absorption at a few hundred hertz are proposed.

  18. Effect of fatigue testing on the properties of Glass-Epoxy composites using the acoustic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menail Younès

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the experimental results of the influence of mechanical fatigue on composite material. The plates of Glass fiber with SR 1500 epoxy resin with SD 2505 composite were realized by vacuum molding. Experimental tests were carried out on a standard hydraulic machine INSTRON 8516. The machine is interfaced with a dedicated computer for controlling and data acquisition. The fatigue tests were performed using sinusoidal type of waveform at a displacement control with frequency of 10 Hz. The evolution of Young’s modulus and strain based on fatigue gives us an idea about the resistance of the material. Degradation of mechanical properties was observed, and the results have showed that the Young’s modulus of plates undergo only minor changes. In fact, the residual stiffness and residual strength decrease when the cycle number of fatigue increase (100 to 50000 cycles, indicating that the studied composites have experienced some forms of mechanical damage.The mechanical tests were backed by Acoustic Emission Monitoring (AEM during the load cycle, in order to understand the nature of the failure process in the composites such as fiber breakage, matrix crazing, matrix debonding and delamination etc.

  19. Association of Electrochemical Therapy With Optical, Mechanical, and Acoustic Impedance Properties of Porcine Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Wesley J; Su, Erica; Chen, Jason J; Oh, Connie; Jing, Joe C; Qu, Yueqiao; He, Youmin; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-12-01

    The classic management of burn scars and other injuries to the skin has largely relied on soft-tissue transfer to resurface damaged tissue with local tissue transfer or skin graft placement. In situ generation of electrochemical reactions using needle electrodes and an application of current may be a new approach to treat scars and skin. To examine the changes in optical, mechanical, and acoustic impedance properties in porcine skin after electrochemical therapy. This preclinical pilot study, performed from August 1, 2015, to November 1, 2016, investigated the effects of localized pH-driven electrochemical therapy of ex vivo porcine skin using 24 skin samples. Platinum-plated needle electrodes were inserted into fresh porcine skin samples. A DC power supply provided a voltage of 4 to 5 V with a 3-minute application time. Specimens were analyzed using optical coherence tomography, optical coherence elastography, and ultrasonography. Ultrasonography was performed under 3 conditions (n = 2 per condition), optical coherence tomography was performed under 2 conditions (n = 2 per condition), and optical coherence elastography was performed under 2 conditions (n = 2 per condition). The remaining samples were used for the positive and negative control groups (n = 10). Platinum-plated needle electrodes were inserted into fresh porcine skin samples. A DC power supply provided a voltage of 4 to 5 V with a 3-minute application. Tissue softening was observed at the anode and cathode sites as a result of electrochemical modification. Volumetric changes were noted using each optical and acoustic technique. A total of 24 ex vivo porcine skin samples were used for this pilot study. Optical coherence tomography measured spatial distribution of superficial tissue changes around each electrode site. At 4 V for 3 minutes, a total volumetric effect of 0.47 mm3 was found at the anode site and 0.51 mm3 at the cathode site. For 5 V for 3 minutes, a total volumetric effect

  20. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  1. Acoustic Imaging of Microstructure and Evaluation of the Adhesive's Physical, Mechanical and Chemical Properties Changes at Different Cure States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severina, I. A.; Fabre, A. J.; Maeva, E. Yu.

    Epoxy thermoset adhesives transform during cure from liquid state into the highly cross-linked solid. Cure state of the material depends on condition of the reaction (temperature, pressure, time etc.) and resin/hardener ratio. It is known that the cure degree of the adhesive correlates with adhesion strength, which is critical for structural adhesives used in automotive, aerospace and marine industries. In this work, characterization of cure process of the adhesive with acoustic methods is presented. Evolution of the acoustic and elastic properties (attenuation, sound velocity, density, elastic moduli) during cure reaction was monitored in relation to the substantial physical and chemical changes of the material. These macro parameters of the adhesive were compared with the material's microstructure obtained by high-resolution acoustic microscopy technique in frequencies range of 50-400 MHz. Development of the microstructure of the adhesive as it cures at different conditions has been investigated. Appearance and development of the granular structure on the adhesive interface during cure reaction has been demonstrated. Acoustic images were analyzed by mathematical method to quantitatively characterize distribution of the adhesive's components. Statistical analysis of such images provides an accurate quantitative measure of the degree of cure of such samples. Research results presented in this paper can be useful as a basis for non-destructive evaluation of the adhesive materials

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of acoustical and mechanical properties of bagasse fiber composites by flexural vibration method (Lohe Sabz & Karoon factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammadali saadatnia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the potential of flexural vibration method as nondestructive tool was studied in order to evaluate the acoustical and the mechanical properties of bagasse composites. For this purpose, more than 40 cubic samples (36×4×1.6 cm3 were taken from the given materials. The results showed that the acoustical behavior of particle board were better than that measured for medium density fiber board. In MDF samples, the resonance frequency, the sound velocity, the quality factor as well as the acoustic coefficients were significantly lower than those measured in PB samples. In contrast, the internal friction measured in MDF was greater than values of PB. But no significant difference was observed of ACE in both MDF and PB samples. The young's modulus of MDF and PB were obtained by conducting a flexural vibration method under the free- free condition based on Timoshenko's vibration theory. The results were also compared with the modulus of elasticity and rupture calculated by 3 point bending test. The modulus of elasticity values, measured by dynamic method were 15% and 6% higher than those achieved by static bending method for MDF and PB respectively. It was also illustrated that the modulus of elasticity and the sound velocity were significantly positively related to the density of MDF and PB while the other acoustical properties had negative relations with density. As good correlations were found between dynamic and static modulus of elasticity (0.71 and also static modulus of rupture and dynamic modulus of elasticity (0.44, it can be drawn that the flexural vibration is valuable tool in order to evaluate mechanical properties of MDF made by bagasse while the same results were not observed in PB composites.

  3. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for

  4. Generalized Efficient Inference on Factor Models with Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre

    . Short-memory dynamics are allowed in the common factor structure and possibly heteroskedastic error term. In the estimation, a generalized version of the principal components (PC) approach is proposed to achieve efficiency. Asymptotics for efficient common factor and factor loading as well as long......A dynamic factor model is considered that contains stochastic time trends allowing for stationary and nonstationary long-range dependence. The model nests standard I(0) and I(1) behaviour smoothly in common factors and residuals, removing the necessity of a priori unit-root and stationarity testing...

  5. Comparative acoustic performance and mechanical properties of silk membranes for the repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Xie, Zhigang; Campbell, Luke; Keating, Adrian; Atlas, Marcus D; von Unge, Magnus; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic and mechanical properties of silk membranes of different thicknesses were tested to determine their suitability as a repair material for tympanic membrane perforations. Membranes of different thickness (10-100μm) were tested to determine their frequency response and their resistance to pressure loads in a simulated ear canal model. Their mechanical rigidity to pressure loads was confirmed by tensile testing. These membranes were tested alongside animal cartilage, currently the strongest available myringoplasty graft as well as paper, which is commonly used for simpler procedures. Silk membranes showed resonant frequencies within the human hearing range and a higher vibrational amplitude than cartilage, suggesting that silk may offer good acoustic energy transfer characteristics. Silk membranes were also highly resistant to simulated pressure changes in the middle ear, suggesting they can resist retraction, a common cause of graft failure resulting from chronic negative pressures in the middle ear. Part of this strength can be explained by the substantially higher modulus of silk films compared with cartilage. This allows for the production of films that are much thinner than cartilage, with superior acoustic properties, but that still provide the same level of mechanical support as thicker cartilage. Together, these in vitro results suggest that silk membranes may provide good hearing outcomes while offering similar levels of mechanical support to the reconstructed middle ear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Piezoelectric Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 crystal: crystal growth, piezoelectric and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Plotitcyna, Olga; Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Vadilonga, Simone; Irzhak, Dmitry; Emelin, Evgenii; Buzanov, Oleg; Leitenberger, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 (CNGS), a five-component crystal of lanthanum-gallium silicate group, was grown by the Czochralski method. The parameters of the elementary unit cell of the crystal were measured by powder diffraction. The independent piezoelectric strain coefficients d{}_{11} and d_{14} were determined by the triple-axis X-ray diffraction in the Bragg and Laue geometries. Excitation and propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) were studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction at BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocity of SAW propagation and power flow angles in the Y-, X- and yxl/{+}36°-cuts of the CNGS crystal were determined from the analysis of the diffraction spectra. The CNGS crystal was found practically isotropic by its acoustic properties.

  7. Acoustical properties of materials and muffler configurations for the 80 by 120 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, T. D.; Sneddon, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for measuring the impedance of the muffler configurations and of porous plates with grazing flow were investigated and changes in the configuration parameters to enhance acoustic performance are explored. The feasibility of a pulse reflection technique for measuring the impedance of built-up structures in situ was demonstrated. A second technique involving the use of an open-end impedance tube with grazing flow was used to obtain detailed design data for the perforated plate configuration. Acoustic benefits associated with configuration changes such as curving the baffles, spacing and staggering baffle partitions, and techniques for alleviating baffle self-generated noise are described.

  8. Energy Properties of Ion Acoustic Waves in Stable and Unstable Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1979-01-01

    acoustic waves that are growing or damped in space the time average of the sum of the potential and the kinetic energy density is independent of position. Energy absorption spectra in particle velocity space are calculated; they are relatively broad and complicated functions. This shows that plasma ions......Energy exchange between potential energy and ion kinetic energy in an ion acoustic wave is considered. In order to investigate the linear Landau damping or growth, the energy is calculated by use of first‐order quantities only so that nonlinear effects are not involved. It is found that for ion...... of all velocities exchange energy with the wave....

  9. The Acoustical Properties of the Polyurethane Concrete Made of Oyster Shell Waste Comparing Other Concretes as Architectural Design Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, Erni; Hardiman, Gagoek; Purwanto

    2018-02-01

    This research aims to determine the acoustical properties of concrete material made of polyurethane and oyster shell waste as both fine aggregate and coarse aggregate comparing to other concrete mortar. Architecture needs aesthetics materials, so the innovation in architectural material should be driven through the efforts of research on materials for building designs. The DOE methods was used by mixing cement, oyster shell, sands, and polyurethane by composition of 160 ml:40 ml:100 ml: 120 ml respectively. Refer to the results of previous research, then cement consumption is reduced up to 20% to keep the concept of green material. This study compared three different compositions of mortars, namely portland cement concrete with gravel (PCG), polyurethane concrete of oyster shell (PCO) and concrete with plastics aggregate (PCP). The methods of acoustical tests were conducted refer to the ASTM E413-04 standard. The research results showed that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell waste aggregate has absorption coefficient 0.52 and STL 63 dB and has a more beautiful appearance when it was pressed into moulding. It can be concluded that polyurethane concrete with oyster shell aggregate (PCO) is well implemented in architectural acoustics-components.

  10. Common long-range dependence in a panel of hourly Nord Pool electricity prices and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Haldrup, Niels; Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir

    Equilibrium electricity spot prices and loads are often determined simultaneously in a day-ahead auction market for each hour of the subsequent day. Hence daily observations of hourly prices take the form of a periodic panel rather than a time series of hourly observations. We consider novel panel...... data approaches to analyse the time series and the cross-sectional dependence of hourly Nord Pool electricity spot prices and loads for the period 2000-2013. Hourly electricity prices and loads data are characterized by strong serial long-range dependence in the time series dimension in addition...... of the underlying production technology and because the demand is more volatile than the supply, equilibrium prices and loads are argued to identify the periodic power supply curve. The estimated supply elasticities are estimated from fractionally co-integrated relations and range between 0.5 and 1...

  11. A line array based near field imaging technique for characterising acoustical properties of elongated targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.P.G.

    1995-01-01

    With near field imaging techniques the acoustical pressure waves at distances other than the recorded can be calculated. Normally, acquisition on a two dimensional plane is necessary and extrapolation is performed by a Rayleigh integral. A near field single line instead of two dimensional plane

  12. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Long-range dependence in returns and volatility of global gold market amid financial crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omane-Adjepong, Maurice; Boako, Gideon

    2017-04-01

    Using sampled historical daily gold market data from 07-03-1985 to 06-01-2015, and building on a related work by Bentes (2016), this paper examines the presence of long-range dependence (LRD) in the world's gold market returns and volatility, accounting for structural breaks. The sampled gold market data was divided into subsamples based on four global crises: the September 1992 collapse of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), the Asian financial crisis of mid-1997, the Subprime meltdown of 2007, and the recent European sovereign debt crisis, which hit the world's market with varying effects. LRD test was carried-out on the full-sample and subsample periods using three semiparametric methods-before and after adjusting for structural breaks. The results show insignificant evidence of LRD in gold returns. However, very diminutive evidence is found for periods characterized by financial/economic shocks, with no significant detections for post-shock periods. Collectively, this is indicative that the gold market is less speculative, and hence could be somehow less risky for hedging and portfolio diversification.

  14. Evidence of Long Range Dependence and Self-similarity in Urban Traffic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Gautam S [ORNL; Helmy, Ahmed [University of Florida, Gainesville; Hui, Pan [Hong Kong University of Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Transportation simulation technologies should accurately model traffic demand, distribution, and assignment parame- ters for urban environment simulation. These three param- eters significantly impact transportation engineering bench- mark process, are also critical in realizing realistic traffic modeling situations. In this paper, we model and charac- terize traffic density distribution of thousands of locations around the world. The traffic densities are generated from millions of images collected over several years and processed using computer vision techniques. The resulting traffic den- sity distribution time series are then analyzed. It is found using the goodness-of-fit test that the traffic density dis- tributions follows heavy-tail models such as Log-gamma, Log-logistic, and Weibull in over 90% of analyzed locations. Moreover, a heavy-tail gives rise to long-range dependence and self-similarity, which we studied by estimating the Hurst exponent (H). Our analysis based on seven different Hurst estimators strongly indicate that the traffic distribution pat- terns are stochastically self-similar (0.5 H 1.0). We believe this is an important finding that will influence the design and development of the next generation traffic simu- lation techniques and also aid in accurately modeling traffic engineering of urban systems. In addition, it shall provide a much needed input for the development of smart cities.

  15. Determination of near-surface material properties by line-focus acoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achenbach, J.D.; Li, W. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A line-focus acoustic microscope is used in conjunction with a multiple wave-mode method to determine elastic constants from a single V(z) measurement. V(z) curves which include contributions from different wave modes, measured using the line-focus acoustic microscope at 225 MHz, have been compared with theoretical results predicted by a V(z) measurement model. The determination of elastic constants has been achieved numerically by seeking a set of elastic constants that leads to the best fit, in the least square sense, of the theoretical results to the experimental ones. The method has been applied to isotropic materials in bulk, and plate and thin-film configurations. Elastic constants for each of these cases have been determined. The consistency, convergence, sensitivity and accuracy of the procedure have been investigated.

  16. Nano-structured TiO2 film fabricated at room temperature and its acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Cao, Wenwu; Jiang, Bei; Zhang, D S; Zheng, H; Zhou, Q; Shung, K K

    2009-01-01

    Nano-structured TiO2 thin film has been successfully fabricated at room temperature. Using a quarter wavelength characterization method, we have measured the acoustic impedance of this porous film, which can be adjusted from 5.3 to 7.19 Mrayl by curing it at different temperatures. The uniform microstructure and easy fabrication at room temperature make this material an excellent candidate for matching layers of ultra-high frequency ultrasonic imaging transducers. PMID:19672322

  17. Acoustic properties of vowel production in prelingually deafened Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Brown, Emily; Fox, Robert A; Xu, Li

    2015-11-01

    The present study examined the acoustic features of vowel production in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). The subjects included 14 native Mandarin-speaking, prelingually deafened children with CIs (2.9-8.3 yr old) and 60 age-matched, normal-hearing (NH) children (3.1-9.0 years old). Each subject produced a list of monosyllables containing seven Mandarin vowels: [i, a, u, y, ɤ, ʅ, ɿ]. Midpoint F1 and F2 of each vowel token were extracted and normalized to eliminate the effects of different vocal tract sizes. Results showed that the CI children produced significantly longer vowels and less compact vowel categories than the NH children did. The CI children's acoustic vowel space was reduced due to a retracted production of the vowel [i]. The vowel space area showed a strong negative correlation with age at implantation (r = -0.80). The analysis of acoustic distance showed that the CI children produced corner vowels [a, u] similarly to the NH children, but other vowels (e.g., [ʅ, ɿ]) differently from the NH children, which suggests that CI children generally follow a similar developmental path of vowel acquisition as NH children. These findings highlight the importance of early implantation and have implications in clinical aural habilitation in young children with CIs.

  18. Acoustic properties in the low and middle atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi

    2016-08-01

    Generic predictions for acoustic dispersion and absorption in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus are presented. For Mars, Pathfinder and Mars Express ambient data and averaged thermophysical parameters are used as inputs to a preliminary model based on the continuum approximation for Mars' thin atmosphere-the need for Boltzmann-based treatment is discussed in the context of Knudsen numbers. Strong absorption constrains acoustic sensing within the Martian planetary boundary layer. For the dense atmosphere of Venus, the van der Waals equation of state is used. The thermophysical and transport parameters were interpolated at the ambient conditions. Acoustic sensing is discussed at 50 km above Venus' surface, a level where aerostats (e.g., European Space Agency's EVE) and manned airships (e.g., NASA's HAVOC) may be deployed in the future. The salient atmospheric characteristics are described in terms of temperature, pressure, and convective stability profiles, followed by wavenumber predictions, and discussions of low- and high-frequency sensing applications. At low frequencies, emphasis is placed on infrasound. A simple generation mechanism by Martian dust devils is presented, yielding fundamental frequencies between 0.1 and 10 Hz. High-frequency sensing is exemplified by ultrasonic anemometry. Of the two environments, Venus is notably more dispersive in the ultrasonic range.

  19. Automated estimation of seabed properties from acoustic recordings by an autonomous moving system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, Stan; Dettmer, Jan; Holland, Charles; Mandolesi, Eric

    2016-04-01

    This work develops an automated Bayesian method to infer fluid seabed properties as a function of depth along tracks that are surveyed by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The AUV tows an acoustic source and a 32-element array. The source bandwidth is from 950 to 3000 Hz and frequency-modulated signals are emitted at regular intervals ('pings') as the AUV moves along the track. The recordings of each ping are processed to account for source directionality and reflection coefficients as a function of frequency and grazing angle are extracted by taking the ratio of time-windowed direct and bottom-interacted paths. Each ping provides one data set. This process results in large data volumes with an information content that is much higher than for traditional seismic profiling. However, extracting interpretable results about the lateral and vertical spatial variability of the seabed requires sophisticated and efficient inversion methods. The seabed is approximated as a horizontally stratified, lossy fluid for each ping. Each layer is homogeneous and parametrized by a thickness, velocity, density and attenuation. Since both source and array are towed close to the seabed, a plane-wave approximation is not sufficient to model these data and spherical reflection coefficients must be computed to predict data. Therefore, for each specular angle at each frequency, the Sommerfeld integral is solved efficiently by massively parallel implementation of Levin integration on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The inverse problem is strongly non-linear and requires application of Bayesian sampling to quantify parameter uncertainties. To account for the unknown number of layers in the seabed at each ping, the seabed is parametrized by a trans-dimensional (trans-D) model which treats the number of layers as unknown. To constrain model complexity and improve efficiency, we apply a Poisson prior with even-numbered order statistics to the number of layers. The trans-D model is

  20. Estimation of liquid properties by inverse problem analysis based on shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kento; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    A shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor can detect liquid properties, such as viscosity, density, permittivity, and conductivity. The advantage of using the SH-SAW sensors is the simultaneous detection of the mechanical and electrical properties of liquids. In this paper, we proposed a method of estimating the density and viscosity of liquids based on the inverse problem analysis. Glycerol or ethanol aqueous solutions were measured. The estimated and literature values were compared. For glycerol aqueous solutions, when the concentration is low, those values agree well. However, when the concentration is high, those values did not agree because the bulk modulus of glycerin solutions cannot be assumed as constant. On the other hand, as the bulk modulus of ethanol aqueous solutions can be assumed to be the same as that of water, the deviations between those values were small. Therefore, the proposed method is effective when the bulk modulus is assumed as constant.

  1. Distribution, abundance and acoustic properties of Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) in the Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Richard L.; Macaulay, Gavin J.; Gauthier, Stéphane; Pinkerton, Matt; Hanchet, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Antarctic silverfish ( Pleuragramma antarcticum) is a key link between plankton and the community of top predators in the shelf waters of the Ross Sea. In spite of their abundance and important role in Antarctic food chains, very little is known of many ecological and biological aspects of this species. A combined trawl and acoustic survey of silverfish was carried out on the western Ross Sea shelf during the New Zealand International Polar Year Census of Antarctic Marine Life research voyage on R.V. Tangaroa in February-March 2008. Multi-frequency acoustic data (12, 38, 70, and 120 kHz) allowed discrimination of silverfish marks from those of krill and other associated species. Mark identification was achieved using targeted midwater trawls. Additional midwater and demersal trawls were carried out at randomly selected locations over the shelf as part of the core biodiversity survey. Silverfish were widely distributed over the Ross Sea shelf. Adult silverfish tended to form layers at 100-400 m depth and were sometimes present close to the bottom, where they were frequently caught in demersal trawls shallower than 500 m. A weak layer at about 80 m depth was associated with juvenile silverfish of 50-80 mm standard length. Acoustic backscatter strength from both silverfish and krill marks increased with increasing frequency (i.e., was highest at 120 kHz), which is characteristic of species without an air-filled swimbladder. Acoustic target strengths (TS) for silverfish at 12, 18, 38, 70, and 120 kHz were estimated from anatomically detailed scattering models based on computed tomography (CT) scans of frozen specimens. The relationship between TS and fish length at 38 kHz was sensitive to estimates of density and sound speed contrast within the fish, especially for small specimens (less than 110 mm SL). Our best estimate of the acoustic biomass of silverfish in the study area was 592 000 t (95% confidence interval 326 000-866 000 t). However, the biomass of juvenile

  2. Mapping dynamical mechanical properties of osteonal bone by scanning acoustic microscopy in time-of-flight mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Stéphane; Puchegger, Stephan; Roschger, Andreas; Berzlanovich, Andrea; Fratzl, Peter; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An important determinant of mechanical properties of bone is Young's modulus and its variation in individual osteons of cortical bone tissue. Its mechanical behavior also depends on deformation rate owing to its visco- or poroelastic properties. We developed a method to measure dynamical mechanical properties of bulk bone tissue at osteonal level based on scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) using time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in combination with quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI). SAM-TOF yields local sound velocities and qBEI corresponding material densities together providing elastic properties. Osteons (n=55) were measured in three human femoral diaphyseal ground bone sections (∼ 30 µm in thickness). In addition, subchondral bone and mineralized articular cartilage were investigated. The mean mineral contents, the mean sound velocities, and the mean elastic modulus of the osteons ranged from 20 to 26 wt%, from 3,819 to 5,260 m/s, and from 21 to 44 GPa, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between material density and sound velocity (Pearson's r=0.701; pSound velocities between cartilage and bone was similar, though material density was higher in cartilage (+4.46%, p<0.0001). These results demonstrate the power of SAM-TOF to estimate dynamic mechanical properties of the bone materials at the osteonal level.

  3. Thermo-Acoustic Properties of a Burner with Axial Temperature Gradient: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Kosztin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for thermo-acoustic effects in a gas turbine combustor. A quarter-wavelength burner with rectangular cross-section has been built and studied from an experimental and theoretical perspective. It has a premixed methane-air flame, which is held by a bluff body, and spans the width of the burner. The flame is compact, i.e. its length is much smaller than that of the burner. The fundamental mode of the burner is unstable; its frequency and pressure distribution have been measured. The complex pressure reflection coefficients at the upstream and downstream end of the burner were also measured. For the theoretical considerations, we divide the burner into three regions (the cold pre-combustion chamber, the flame region and the hot outlet region, and assume one-dimensional acoustic wave propagation in each region. The acoustic pressure and velocity are assumed continuous across the interface between the precombustion chamber and flame region, and across the interface between the flame region and outlet region. The burner ends are modelled by the measured pressure reflection coefficients. The mean temperature is assumed to have the following profile: uniformly cold and uniformly hot in the pre-combustion chamber and outlet region, respectively, and rising continuously from cold to hot in the flame region. For comparison, a discontinuous temperature profile, jumping directly from cold to hot, is also considered. The eigenfrequencies are calculated, and the pressure distribution of the fundamental mode is predicted. There is excellent agreement with the experimental results. The exact profile of the mean temperature in the flame region is found to be unimportant. This study gives us an experimentally validated Green's function, which is a very useful tool for further theoretical studies.

  4. The uncertainties calculation of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of heterogeneous non-metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaryna O. Golofeyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effective use of heterogeneous non-metallic materials and structures needs measurement of reliable values of dissipation characteristics, as well as common factors of their change during the loading process. Aim: The aim of this study is to prepare the budget for measurement uncertainty of dissipative properties of composite materials. Materials and Methods: The method used to study the vibrational energy dissipation characteristics based on coupling of vibrations damping decrement and acoustic velocity in a non-metallic heterogeneous material is reviewed. The proposed method allows finding the dependence of damping on vibrations amplitude and frequency of strain-stress state of material. Results: Research of the accuracy of measurement method during the definition of decrement attenuation of fluctuations in synthegran was performed. The international approach for evaluation of measurements quality is used. It includes the common practice international rules for uncertainty expression and their summation. These rules are used as internationally acknowledged confidence measure to the measurement results, which includes testing. The uncertainties budgeting of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of materials were compiled. Conclusions: It was defined that there are two groups of reasons resulting in errors during measurement of materials dissipative properties. The first group of errors contains of parameters changing of calibrated bump in tolerance limits, displacement of sensor in repeated placement to measurement point, layer thickness variation of contact agent because of irregular hold-down of resolvers to control surface, inaccuracy in reading and etc. The second group of errors is linked with density and Poisson’s ratio measurement errors, distance between sensors, time difference between signals of vibroacoustic sensors.

  5. Prediction of acoustic foam properties by numerical simulation of polyurethane foaming process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessalam Hichem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to model and to simulate the polyurethane foaming process. Models taking into account the two main chemical reactions of the formation of polyurethane, the exothermic effect of these reactions as well as the thermo-rheo-kinetic coupling characterizing this process are proposed and implemented in the software NOGRID-points based on a meshless method (Finite Pointset Method. A prediction of some acoustic foam characteristics is also proposed based on the results of the numerical simulation of the foaming process and semi-phenomenological models.

  6. Acoustic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U. [Drittes Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Akhatov, I. [Department of Continuous Media Mechanics, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450074 (Russia)

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. The effect of vowel inventory and acoustic properties in Salento Italian learners of Southern British English vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Paola; Sisinni, Bianca; Grimaldi, Mirko

    2014-03-01

    Salento Italian (SI) listeners' categorization and discrimination of standard Southern British English (SSBE) vowels were examined in order to establish their initial state in the acquisition of the SSBE vowel system. The results of the vowel categorization task revealed that SI listeners showed single-category assimilation for many SSBE vowels and multiple-category assimilation for others. Additionally, SI vowel discrimination accuracy varied across contrasts, in line with the categorization results. This differential level of difficulty is discussed on the basis of current L2 perception models. The SI categorization results were then compared to the previously reported data on Peruvian Spanish (PS) listeners. Both SI and PS have a five-vowel inventory and therefore both listener groups were expected to have similar problems when distinguishing SSBE vowel contrasts, but were predicted to have different mappings of SSBE vowels to native categories due to the differences in the acoustic properties of vowels across the two languages. As predicted by the hypothesis that acoustic differences in production lead to a different nonnative perception, the comparison showed that there was large variability in how SSBE vowels are initially mapped to the specific five-vowel inventory. Predictions for differential L2 development across languages are also provided.

  8. The Acoustic Properties of Water Submerged Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta and Spruce (Picea spp. Wood and Their Suitability for Use as Musical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Hilde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood is a common material used for the manufacture of many products, and submerged wood, in particular, has been used in niche markets and musical instruments. In order to examine if submerged wood in British Columbia, Canada, would be appropriate for use as musical instruments, a study was performed in 2007 on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, Canada. The results of that study showed the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. In this paper, the wood samples were allowed to age untouched in a laboratory setting and were then retested under the hypothesis that physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to dry over time. This article describes the density, speed of sound, acoustic constant and characteristic impedance properties for submerged wood and a comparison is made for different applications for musical instruments.

  9. Multi-Layer Phase Analysis: Quantifying the Elastic Properties of Soft Tissues and Live Cells with Ultra-High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuegen; Akhtar, Riaz; Nijenhuis, Nadja; Wilkinson, Steven J.; Murphy, Lilli; Ballestrem, Christoph; Sherratt, Michael. J.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy is potentially a powerful tool for characterising the elastic properties of soft biological tissues and cells. In this paper, we present a method, Multi-Layer Phase Analysis (MLPA), which can be used to extract local speed of sound values, for both thin tissue sections mounted on glass slides and cultured cells grown on cell culture plastic, with a resolution close to 1 μm. The method exploits the phase information that is preserved in the interference between the acoustic wave reflected from the substrate surface and internal reflections from the acoustic lens. In practice, a stack of acoustic images are captured beginning with the acoustic focal point 4 μm above the substrate surface and moving down in 0.1 μm increments. Scanning parameters, such as acoustic wave frequency and gate position, were adjusted to obtain optimal phase and lateral resolution. The data were processed offline to extract the phase information with the contribution of any inclination in the substrate removed prior to the calculation of sound speed. Here, we apply this approach to both skin sections and fibroblast cells, and compare our data with the V(f) (voltage vs frequency) method that has previously been used for characterisation of soft tissues and cells. Compared with the V(f) method, the MPLA method not only reduces signal noise but can be implemented without making a priori assumptions with regards to tissue or cell parameters. PMID:22547273

  10. Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Claudia; Cross, Ian; Moore, Brian C J; Woodhouse, Jim

    2007-12-01

    This study is the first step in the psychoacoustic exploration of perceptual differences between the sounds of different violins. A method was used which enabled the same performance to be replayed on different "virtual violins," so that the relationships between acoustical characteristics of violins and perceived qualities could be explored. Recordings of real performances were made using a bridge-mounted force transducer, giving an accurate representation of the signal from the violin string. These were then played through filters corresponding to the admittance curves of different violins. Initially, limits of listener performance in detecting changes in acoustical characteristics were characterized. These consisted of shifts in frequency or increases in amplitude of single modes or frequency bands that have been proposed previously to be significant in the perception of violin sound quality. Thresholds were significantly lower for musically trained than for nontrained subjects but were not significantly affected by the violin used as a baseline. Thresholds for the musicians typically ranged from 3 to 6 dB for amplitude changes and 1.5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing.

  11. DNA-duplexes containing abasic sites: correlation between thermostability and acoustic wave properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hianik, T; Wang, X; Andreev, S; Dolinnaya, N; Oretskaya, T; Thompson, M

    2006-10-01

    Aldehydic apurinic or apyrimidinic sites that lack a nucleobase moiety are one of the most common forms of toxic lesions in DNA. In the present study, a close structural analog of such a site, the 2-(hydroxymethyl) tetrahydrofuranyl residue, was synthesized in order to act as a model for damaged nucleic acid probes. Prepared oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing one, two or three abasic sites were hybridized to complementary sequences immobilized on a gold surface using the neutravidin-biotin interaction for study by thickness shear mode acoustic wave detector. Measurement of the complex electrical impedance of an AT-cut quartz device with immobilized biotinylated nucleotide allowed the detection of changes of series resonance frequency, Deltafs, and motional resistance, Rm, associated with duplex formation. The changes as detected by the acoustic wave method correlated well with the thermostability of DNA duplexes in solution. With respect to the latter, UV-monitored melting curves indicate that both the number of sites and their localization in the double-stranded structure influence the amount by which a 19 b.p. duplex is destabilized. The presence of 3 abasic sites completely destabilized the DNA duplex.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of stress-tailored piezoelectric AlN thin films for electro-acoustic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reusch, Markus, E-mail: markus.reusch@iaf.fraunhofer.de [Laboratory for Compound Semiconductor Microsystems, IMTEK - Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Cherneva, Sabina [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lu, Yuan; Žukauskaitė, Agnė; Kirste, Lutz; Holc, Katarzyna [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Datcheva, Maria [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoychev, Dimitar [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lebedev, Vadim [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Ambacher, Oliver [Laboratory for Compound Semiconductor Microsystems, IMTEK - Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtered AlN thin films with minimized intrinsic stress gradient. • Gradual increase of N{sub 2} concentration during film growth. • No degradation of AlN film properties by changing process conditions. • 2D Raman mapping of nanoindentation area. - Abstract: Nanoindentation measurements along with atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and residual stress analyses on the basis of Raman measurements have been performed to characterize stress-tailored AlN thin films grown using reactive RF magnetron sputtering. The intrinsic stress gradient caused by the growing in-plane grain size along film thickness was minimized by increasing the N{sub 2} concentration in the Ar/N{sub 2} gas mixture during the growth process. The increase of N{sub 2} concentration did not degrade the device-relevant material properties such as crystallographic orientation, surface morphology, piezoelectric response, or indentation modulus. Due to comparable crystallographic film properties for all investigated samples it was concluded that mainly the AlN crystallites contribute to the mechanical film properties such as indentation modulus and hardness, while the film stress or grain boundaries had only a minor influence. Therefore, by tailoring the stress gradient in the AlN films, device performance, fabrication yield, and the design flexibility of electro-acoustic devices can be greatly improved.

  13. Study of acoustical and mechanical properties of a model porous metallic material made of hollow nickel spheres; Etude des proprietes acoustiques et mecaniques d'un materiau metallique poreux modele a base de spheres creuses de nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasser, St.

    2003-07-15

    This thesis has focused on a model metallic cellular material, in order to provide a candidate material and design tools of an acoustic liner for turbo-engine exhausters. The acoustic absorption problem has lead to discuss an analytic, descriptive modelling that was available in the literature, and then to introduce a numerical technique allowing to predict the acoustical properties of a porous material. To answer the industrial need of structural strength, the elastic properties of the material have been computed, and a numerical approach of micro-plasticity was proposed. Finally, the implemented numerical tools were used in a simplified design and optimisation problem of an acoustic liner. (author)

  14. Thermodynamic properties of isomeric pentanols under elevated pressures determined by the acoustic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzida, M.

    2008-02-01

    Three isomeric pentanols were studied: pentan-1-ol, 2-methyl-1-buta- nol, and 2-methyl-2-butanol. Isobaric heat capacities and internal pressure at pressures up to 100 MPa and temperatures ranging from 293 K to 318 K were determined by the acoustic method. In calculations the measured speeds of sound as function of temperature and pressure together with densities as function of temperature under atmospheric pressure and the literature isobaric heat capacities for the atmospheric pressure were used. To this end, the method, based on the suggestion of Davis and Gordon [1] was applied. The results obtained show that the effect of pressure on and the values of isobaric heat capacity and internal presure of 2-methyl-2-butanol is higher than that of pentan-1-ol, 2-methyl-1-butanol over the whole pressure range. That facilitates telling 2-methyl-2-butanol from pentan-1-ol and 2-methyl-1-butanol.

  15. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  16. Evaluating elastic properties of heterogeneous soft tissue by surface acoustic waves detected by phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Li, Sinan; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2012-05-01

    The combined use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) is useful to evaluate the elasticity of layered biological tissues, such as normal skin. However, the pathological tissue is often originated locally, leading to the alternation of mechanical properties along both axial and lateral directions. We present a feasibility study on whether the SAW technique is sensitive to detect the alternation of mechanical property along the lateral direction within tissue, which is important for clinical utility of this technique to localize diseased tissue. Experiments are carried out on purposely designed tissue phantoms and ex vivo chicken breast samples, simulating the localized change of elasticity. A PhS-OCT system is employed not only to provide the ultra-high sensitive measurement of the generated surface waves on the tissue surface, but also to provide the real time imaging of the tissue to assist the elasticity evaluation of the heterogeneous tissue. The experimental results demonstrate that with PhS-OCT used as a pressure sensor, the SAW is highly sensitive to the elasticity change of the specimen in both vertical and lateral directions with a sensing depth of ˜5 mm with our current system setup, thus promising its useful clinical applications where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid in diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  18. A Dynamic Multi-Level Factor Model with Long-Range Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir

    A dynamic multi-level factor model with stationary or nonstationary global and regional factors is proposed. In the model, persistence in global and regional common factors as well as innovations allows for the study of fractional cointegrating relationships. Estimation of global and regional...... common factors is performed in two steps employing canonical correlation analysis and a sequential least-squares algorithm. Selection of the number of global and regional factors is discussed. The small sample properties of our methodology are investigated by some Monte Carlo simulations. The method...... is then applied to the Nord Pool power market for the analysis of price comovements among different regions within the power grid. We find that the global factor can be interpreted as the system price of the power grid as well as a fractional cointegration relationship between prices and the global factor....

  19. Determination of Shear Properties in the Upper Seafloor Using Seismo-acoustic Interface Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frivik, Svein Arne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis develops methods for recording and analysis of seismo-acoustic interface waves for determination of shear wave velocity as a function of depth and includes this in standard refraction seismic surveying. It investigates different techniques for estimation of dispersion characteristics of the interface waves and demonstrates that multi sensor spectral estimation techniques improve the dispersion estimates. The dispersion estimate of the fundamental interface wave mode is used as input to an object function for a model based linearized inversion. The inversion scheme provides an estimate of the shear wave velocity as a function of depth. Three field surveys were performed. Data were acquired with a standard bottom deployed refraction seismic hydrophone array containing 24 or 48 receivers, with a receiver spacing of 2.5 m. Explosive charges were used as sources. The recording time was increased from 0.5 to 8 s, compared to standard refraction seismic surveys. Shear wave velocity and shear modulus estimates were obtained from all the sites. At one of the sites, geotechnically obtained shear wave parameters were available, and a comparison between the two techniques were performed. the result of the comparison is promising and shows the potential of the technique. Although the result of applying the processing scheme to all three data sets is promising, it appears that survey parameters, like source-array spacing, receiver spacing and type of source might have been optimized for better performance. Based on this limitation, a new processing scheme and a new array configuration is proposed for surveys which integrates the recording and processing of both compressional waves and shear waves. 89 refs., 65 refs., 19 tabs.

  20. The correlation between acoustic and magnetic properties in the long working metal boiler drum with the parameters of the electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ababkov, Nikolai, E-mail: n.ababkov@rambler.ru; Smirnov, Alexander, E-mail: galvas.kem@gmail.com [T.F. Gorbachev Kuzbass State Technical University, Vesennjaja str 28, Kemerovo, 650000 Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The present paper presents comparative analysis of measurement results of acoustic and magnetic properties in long working metal of boiler drums and the results obtained by methods of electronic microscopy. The structure of the metal sample from the fracture zone to the base metal (metal working sample long) and the center of the base metal before welding (weld metal sample) was investigated by electron microscopy. Studies performed by spectral acoustic, magnetic noise and electron microscopic methods were conducted on the same plots and the same samples of long working and weld metal of high-pressure boiler drums. The analysis of research results showed high sensitivity of spectral-acoustic and magnetic-noise methods to definition changes of microstructure parameters. Practical application of spectral-acoustic and magnetic noise NDT method is possible for the detection of irregularities and changes in structural and phase state of the long working and weld metal of boiler drums, made of a special molybdenum steel (such as 20M). The above technique can be used to evaluate the structure and physical-mechanical properties of the long working metal of boiler drums in the energy sector.

  1. The influence of superficial properties of ceramic-metal layers on acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.П. Бабак

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available  The influence of idle time on operational properties of friction pairs with ceramic-metal superficial layers is investigated in this article. The application of AE information for the control and diagnostics of complex tribotechnical systems directly during their operation is offered.

  2. Non-invasive patient-specific acoustic property estimation for MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Urvi; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Parker, Dennis L.; Roemer, Robert B.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2012-10-01

    A technique that non-invasively estimates subject-specific tissue properties for MRgFUS is described and validated in homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and ex-vivo porcine muscle. Subsequently, the technique is used to estimate changes in tissue attenuation coefficient due to treatment in in-vivo rabbit muscle.

  3. Acoustic method of investigating the material properties and humidity sensing behavior of polymer coated piezoelectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2006-09-01

    The relative humidity (RH) sensing behavior of a polymeric film was investigated by means of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines implemented on single crystal piezoelectric substrates, such as quartz and LiNbO3, and on thin piezoelectric polycrystalline films, such as ZnO and AlN, on Si and GaAs. The same SAW delay line configuration was implemented on each substrate and the obtained devices' operating frequency was in the range of 105-156MHz, depending on the type of the substrate, on its crystallographic orientation, and on the SAW propagation direction. The surface of each SAW device was covered by the same type RH sensitive film of the same thickness and the RH sensitivity of each polymer coated substrate, i.e., the SAW relative phase velocity shift per RH unit changes, was investigated in the 0%—80% RH range. The perturbational approach was used to relate the SAW sensor velocity response to the RH induced changes in the physical parameters of the sensitive polymer film: the incremental change in the mass density and shear modulus of the polymer film per unit RH change were estimated. The shift of the bare SAW delay lines operating frequency induced by the presence of the polymer film, at RH =0% and at T =-10°C, allowed the experimental estimation of the mass sensitivity values of each substrate. These values were in good accordance with those reported in the literature and with those theoretically evaluated by exact numerical calculation. The shift of the bare SAW delay lines propagation loss induced by the polymer coating of the device surface, at RH =0% and at ambient temperature, allowed the experimental estimation of the elastic sensitivity of each substrate. These values were found in good accordance with those available from the literature. The temperature coefficient of delay and the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the bare substrates were also estimated. The membrane sensitivity to ethanol, methanol and isopropylic

  4. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  5. System and method for generating micro-seismic events and characterizing properties of a medium with non-linear acoustic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-12-29

    A method and system includes generating a first coded acoustic signal including pulses each having a modulated signal at a central frequency; and a second coded acoustic signal each pulse of which includes a modulated signal a central frequency of which is a fraction d of the central frequency of the modulated signal for the corresponding pulse in the first plurality of pulses. A receiver detects a third signal generated by a non-linear mixing process in the mixing zone and the signal is processed to extract the third signal to obtain an emulated micro-seismic event signal occurring at the mixing zone; and to characterize properties of the medium or creating a 3D image of the properties of the medium, or both, based on the emulated micro-seismic event signal.

  6. Impact of postharvest dehydration process of winegrapes on mechanical and acoustic properties of the seeds and their relationship with flavanol extraction during simulated maceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río Segade, Susana; Torchio, Fabrizio; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Quijada-Morín, Natalia; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Giacosa, Simone; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa; Rolle, Luca

    2016-05-15

    This study represents the first time that the extraction of phenolic compounds from the seeds is assessed from instrumental texture properties for dehydrated grapes. Nebbiolo winegrapes were postharvest dehydrated at 20°C and 41% relative humidity. During the dehydration process, sampling was performed at 15%, 30%, 45% and 60% weight loss. The extractable fraction and extractability of phenolic compounds from the seeds were determined after simulated maceration. The evolution of mechanical and acoustic attributes of intact seeds was also determined during grape dehydration to evaluate how these changes affected the extraction of phenolic compounds. The extractable content and extractability of monomeric flavanols and proanthocyanidins, as well as the galloylation percentage of flavanols, might be predicted easily and quickly from the mechanical and acoustic properties of intact seeds. This would help in decision-making on the optimal dehydration level of winegrapes and the best management of winemaking of dehydrated grapes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Formation and properties of proton-exchanged and annealed $LiNbO_{3}$ waveguides for surface acoustic wave

    CERN Document Server

    Chien Chuan Cheng; Ying Chung Chen

    2001-01-01

    The proton-exchanged (PE) and annealed PE (APE) z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ waveguides were fabricated using H/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The positive strain, c-axis lattice constant change ( Delta c/c), was calculated to be about +0.43%, which was almost independent of the exchanged conditions. The penetration depth of H measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) exhibited a step-like profile, which was assumed to be equal to the waveguide depth (d). The surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties of PE and APE z-cut LiNbO/sub 3/ samples were investigated. The phase velocity (V/sub p/) and electromechanical coupling coefficient (K/sup 2/) of PE samples were significantly decreased by the increase of kd, where k was the wavenumber (2 pi / lambda ). The insertion loss (IL) of PE samples was increased by the increase of kd and became nearly constant at kd >0.064. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of PE samples allowed an apparent increase with kd, reaching a maximum at kd=0.292, then slightly decreased at h...

  8. Effect of Granule Sizes on Acoustic Properties of Protein-Based Silica Aerogel Composites via Novel Inferential Transmission Loss Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Sachithanadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic properties of the silica aerogel (SA granules of various sizes from 0.50 to 3.35 mm, distributed into six groups of nominal sizes and measured via a two-microphone impedance tube, are presented. The absorption coefficients of the SA granules were evaluated at ultra- to super-low frequency range from 50–1600 Hz. It was observed that nominal SA granules with sizes of 1.2 mm (AG2 and 1.7 mm (AG3 displayed the best absorption coefficients. When tested with granules filled at 5 cm depth, AG2 and AG3 absorption coefficients peaked at 980 Hz with values of 0.86 and 0.81, respectively. A novel approach to measure transmission loss (TL by using “inferential” principle is presented. This novel method, named “Inferential Transmission Loss Method” (InTLM, revealed that the average TL, TLavg for both AG2 and AG3 SA granules was 14.83 dB and 15.35 dB, respectively. Gelatin silica aerogels doped with sodium dodecyl sulfate (GSA–SDS composites comprising of 1.2 mm (GSA–AG2 and 1.7 mm (GSA–AG3 granules of various configurations were fabricated and evaluated for absorption coefficients and TL with known traditional acoustic panels. The results showed that GSA–AG3 had a better absorption coefficient over other configurations for the same corresponding thickness reaching the peak of 0.6 from 1300 to 1450 Hz with TLavg between 10.7 and 20.3 decibels. The four-layered GSA–AG2 and GSA–AG3 composites showed exceptionally high absorption from 500 to 800 Hz suitable for narrow band applications. Lastly, the “InTLM” was matched with the sound meter measurements, with high accuracy between 0.3 and 3.2 dB for low-frequency testing (50–1600 Hz.

  9. Biomechanical properties of human corneas following low- and high-intensity collagen cross-linking determined with scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshtawi, Ithar M; Akhtar, Riaz; Hillarby, M Chantal; O'Donnell, Clare; Zhao, Xuegen; Brahma, Arun; Carley, Fiona; Derby, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2013-08-07

    To assess and compare changes in the biomechanical properties of the cornea following different corneal collagen cross-linking protocols using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Ten donor human corneal pairs were divided into two groups consisting of five corneal pairs in each group. In group A, five corneas were treated with low-fluence (370 nm, 3 mW/cm(2)) cross-linking (CXL) for 30 minutes. In group B, five corneas were treated with high-fluence (370 nm, 9 mW/cm(2)) CXL for 10 minutes. The contralateral control corneas in both groups had similar treatment but without ultraviolet A. The biomechanical properties of all corneas were tested using SAM. In group A, the mean speed of sound in the treated corneas was 1677.38 ± 10.70 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1603.90 ± 9.82 ms(-1) posteriorly, while it was 1595.23 ± 9.66 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1577.13 ± 8.16 ms(-1) posteriorly in the control corneas. In group B, the mean speed of sound of the treated corneas was 1665.06 ± 9.54 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1589.89 ± 9.73 ms(-1) posteriorly, while it was 1583.55 ± 8.22 ms(-1) anteriorly and 1565.46 ± 8.13 ms(-1) posteriorly in the untreated control corneas. The increase in stiffness between the cross-linked and control corneas in both groups was by a factor of 1.051×. SAM successfully detected changes in the corneal stiffness after application of collagen cross-linking. A higher speed-of-sound value was found in the treated corneas when compared with the controls. No significant difference was found in corneal stiffness between the corneas cross-linked with low- and high-intensity protocols.

  10. Biomechanical Properties of Human Corneas Following Low- and High-Intensity Collagen Cross-Linking Determined With Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshtawi, Ithar M.; Akhtar, Riaz; Hillarby, M. Chantal; O'Donnell, Clare; Zhao, Xuegen; Brahma, Arun; Carley, Fiona; Derby, Brian; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess and compare changes in the biomechanical properties of the cornea following different corneal collagen cross-linking protocols using scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). Methods. Ten donor human corneal pairs were divided into two groups consisting of five corneal pairs in each group. In group A, five corneas were treated with low-fluence (370 nm, 3 mW/cm2) cross-linking (CXL) for 30 minutes. In group B, five corneas were treated with high-fluence (370 nm, 9 mW/cm2) CXL for 10 minutes. The contralateral control corneas in both groups had similar treatment but without ultraviolet A. The biomechanical properties of all corneas were tested using SAM. Results. In group A, the mean speed of sound in the treated corneas was 1677.38 ± 10.70 ms−1 anteriorly and 1603.90 ± 9.82 ms−1 posteriorly, while it was 1595.23 ± 9.66 ms−1 anteriorly and 1577.13 ± 8.16 ms−1 posteriorly in the control corneas. In group B, the mean speed of sound of the treated corneas was 1665.06 ± 9.54 ms−1 anteriorly and 1589.89 ± 9.73 ms−1 posteriorly, while it was 1583.55 ± 8.22 ms−1 anteriorly and 1565.46 ± 8.13 ms−1 posteriorly in the untreated control corneas. The increase in stiffness between the cross-linked and control corneas in both groups was by a factor of 1.051×. Conclusions. SAM successfully detected changes in the corneal stiffness after application of collagen cross-linking. A higher speed-of-sound value was found in the treated corneas when compared with the controls. No significant difference was found in corneal stiffness between the corneas cross-linked with low- and high-intensity protocols. PMID:23847309

  11. Wave field characterization for non-destructive assessment of elastic properties using laser-acoustic sources in fluids and eye related tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windisch, T.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Spörl, E.

    2010-03-01

    The age-related changes in the visco-elastic properties of the human lens are discussed with respect to presbyopia for a long time. All known measurement techniques are based on extracted lenses or are damaging the tissue. Hence, in vivo studies of lens hardness are not possible at the moment. To close this gap in lens diagnostics this project deals with an approach for a non-contact laser-acoustic characterization technique. Laser-generated wave fronts are reflected by the tissue interfaces and are also affected by the visco-elastic properties of the lens tissue. After propagating through the eye, these waves are recorded as corneal vibrations by laser vibrometry. A systematic analysis of amplitude and phase of these signals and the wave generation process shall give information about the interface locations and the tissues viscoelastic properties. Our recent studies on extracted porcine eyes proved that laser-acoustic sources can be systematically used for non-contacting generation and recording of ultrasound inside the human eye. Furthermore, a specific numerical model provides important contributions to the understanding of the complex wave propagation process. Measurements of the acoustic sources support this approach. Future investigations are scheduled to answer the question, whether this novel technique can be directly used during a laser surgery for monitoring purposes and if a purely diagnostic approach, e.g. by excitation in the aqueous humor, is also possible. In both cases, this technique offers a promising approach for non-contact ultrasound based eye diagnostics.

  12. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...models and methods that explain observed material and acoustic properties of different physical types of shallow-ocean mud sediments. Other goals...are to assess prior data relating to the acoustic properties of mud and to provide guidance in the development and interpretation of experiments. A

  13. Acoustic and Thermodynamic Properties of the Binary Liquid Mixture n-Octane + n-Dodecane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanshin, T. S.; Golubeva, N. V.; Samuilov, V. S.; Shchemelev, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The velocity of sound in the binary liquid mixture n-octane + n-dodecane has been investigated by the method of direct measurement of the pulse-transmission time in the interval of temperatures 298-433 K and pressures 0.1-100.1 MPa. The maximum measurement error amounts to 0.1%. The density, isobaric expansion coefficient, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, and isothermal compressibility of a mixture of three compositions have been determined in the intervals of temperatures 298-393 K and pressures 0.1-100 MPa from the data on the velocity of sound. Also, the excess molar volume, the excess isothermal compressibility, and the deviation of the velocity of sound from its value for an ideal liquid have been determined. The coefficients of the Tate equation have been computed in the above temperature interval. A table of thermodynamic properties of the mixture has been presented.

  14. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book chapt......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology.......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  15. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  16. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  17. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  18. Geomechanical and anisotropic acoustic properties of Lower Jurassic Posidonia shales from Whitby (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Houben, Maartje; Smeulders, David; Barnhoorn, Auke

    2014-05-01

    The Posidonia Shale Formation (PSF) is one of the possible resource shales for unconventional gas in Northern Europe and currently is of great interest to hydrocarbon exploration and production. Due to low permeability of shales, economically viable production requires hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir. The design of hydrofractures requires an estimate of stress state within the reservoir and geomechanical properties such as Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Shales are often highly anisotropic and the models which neglect shale anisotropy may fail to predict the behaviour of hydrofractures. Seismic attenuation anisotropy, on the other hand, can play a key role in quantitative rock characterization. Where the attenuation anisotropy can potentially be linked to anisotropic permeability of shales, its fluid/gas saturation and preferred development of anisotropic fracture orientations. In this research, by utilizing the so-called Thomsen's notations, the elastic anisotropy of our (fractured and unfractured) shales has been investigated using a pulse transmission technique in the ultrasonic frequency range (0.3-1 MHz). Assuming transverse isotropy of the shales, and taking the axis x3 as the axis of rotational symmetry, directional Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios were obtained. The Young's modulus measured parallel to bedding (E1) is found to be larger than the Young's modulus measured orthogonal to bedding (E3). In case of the Poisson's ratios, we found that ν31 is larger than ν12, where νijrelates elastic strain in xj direction to stress applied in xi direction. Finally, attenuation anisotropy in dry and layer-parallel fractured Posidonia shale samples has been studied in the same frequency range. The attenuation of compressional (QP-1) and shear (QS-1) waves increases substantially with a macro (or wavelength) fracture introduction, especially for P and S waves propagating orthogonal to the bedding. In non-fractured and fractured dry shales, QP-1 is

  19. Piezoelectric Ca{sub 3}NbGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} crystal: crystal growth, piezoelectric and acoustic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Emelin, Evgenii [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ortega, Luc [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Orsay Cedex (France); Plotitcyna, Olga; Irzhak, Dmitry [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation); Erko, Alexei; Zizak, Ivo; Vadilonga, Simone [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Berlin (Germany); Buzanov, Oleg [FOMOS Materials Co., Moscow (Russian Federation); Leitenberger, Wolfram [Universitaet Potsdam Institut fuer Physik, Potsdam (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Ca{sub 3}NbGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} (CNGS), a five-component crystal of lanthanum-gallium silicate group, was grown by the Czochralski method. The parameters of the elementary unit cell of the crystal were measured by powder diffraction. The independent piezoelectric strain coefficients d{sub 11} and d{sub 14} were determined by the triple-axis X-ray diffraction in the Bragg and Laue geometries. Excitation and propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) were studied by high-resolution X-ray diffraction at BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The velocity of SAW propagation and power flow angles in the Y-, X- and yxl/+36 {sup circle} -cuts of the CNGS crystal were determined from the analysis of the diffraction spectra. The CNGS crystal was found practically isotropic by its acoustic properties. (orig.)

  20. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  1. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    -scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview......Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create...

  2. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  3. Acoustical Properties of Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-11

    SEDIMENT AS A FUNCTION OF GLYCERIN CONCENTRATION IN THE PORE FLUID AR LUT AS-S81430 DJS - GA 4-16-81 45 IWOo 6 I- 0 Ju w > 40 -- -OTHEORY oLEAST SQUARES...0024 Pot YrvtflU MSt4 INTO) LAIPY9 p 0639 62r4 96 ?4 LIIA A xflVrjl j 116 00639 62F6 25 0 E IIC) doP? )I- 17=1 W; T" [)1? 00640 62FS 20 1118 HWiA OIl ...TI1E’ 00IN iX? Oil A VGVSH 0)019 AV(’i rtj 0(1 A X70UI 0OJ1M XSCRCH l J (C *YSCRCH OnIlE X 3 0 1?2U NECF*LU b 1 ??) X K k’no Q ( 0 0 3. XOIlVM!) flj4

  4. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournane, S; Fagan, A J [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Cannon, L; Browne, J E [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin' s Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2010-10-07

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 3 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s{sup -1}, respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  5. Impact of Contrasted Diagenetic History on the Pore Type and Acoustic Properties Acquisition of Non-Tropical Carbonates (Cape Range, Western Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonti, C.; Bourget, J.; Fournier, F.; Riera, R.; Haig, D.; Håkansson, E.; Pellerin, M.; Hong, F.; Reijmer, J.

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic response of sedimentary rocks is related to their mineralogy, porosity amount and pore type. In carbonate rocks these properties are controlled by the initial deposition parameters but often even more by the diagenetic history, due to their sensitivity to chemical processes. Diagenesis, by multiple cementation and/or dissolution phases, strongly controls the pore type variations and the pore network acquisition. Besides the non-tropical carbonates often display heterogeneous mineralogy that can raise more complexity. Oligo-Miocene carbonates from the NW-Shelf of Australia present non-tropical facies deposited along a ramp which have underwent highly contrasted diagenetic processes. The uppermost sedimentary unit is characterized by completely different diagenetic processes compared to the lower ones. To decipher the links between the acoustic properties and the complexity of these rocks we performed 50 ultrasonic velocity measurements on plugs sampled from outcrops. Then thin section 2D analyses and 3D CT-scan models made from the same plugs were used to accurately characterize the dominant pore type of each sample. Their diagenetic history was reconstructed from field and cathodoluminescence observations. The acoustic data were analyzed in the light of the EPAR (Equivalent Pore Aspect Ratio) proxy that allowed us to deconvolve combined effects of mineralogy and pore types on ultrasonic velocity (Fournier et al., 2014). First we underline by comparing the computed EPAR values with the actual dominant pore type that (i) microporous samples always exhibit EPAR ≤ 0.2, (ii) intergranular samples show EPAR around 0.3 and (iii) moldic to vuggy samples mainly show EPAR > 0.3. Therefore, even in this complex sedimento diagenetic context, the EPAR proxy seems to be relevant to retrieve the dominant pore type information from acoustic data only. Second, we emphasize the importance of emersion events on the acoustic response acquisition of rocks. Here, a middle

  6. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  7. The Acoustic Properties of Low Intensity Vocalizations Match Hearing Sensitivity in the Webbed-Toed Gecko, Gekko subpalmatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Jono, Teppei; Cui, Jianguo; Yue, Xizi; Tang, Yezhong

    2016-01-01

    The design of acoustic signals and hearing sensitivity in socially communicating species would normally be expected to closely match in order to minimize signal degradation and attenuation during signal propagation. Nevertheless, other factors such as sensory biases as well as morphological and physiological constraints may affect strict correspondence between signal features and hearing sensitivity. Thus study of the relationships between sender and receiver characteristics in species utilizing acoustic communication can provide information about how acoustic communication systems evolve. The genus Gekko includes species emitting high-amplitude vocalizations for long-range communication (loud callers) as well as species producing only low-amplitude vocalizations when in close contact with conspecifics (quiet callers) which have rarely been investigated. In order to investigate relationships between auditory physiology and the frequency characteristics of acoustic signals in a quiet caller, Gekko subpalmatus we measured the subjects’ vocal signal characteristics as well as auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to assess auditory sensitivity. The results show that G. subpalmatus males emit low amplitude calls when encountering females, ranging in dominant frequency from 2.47 to 4.17 kHz with an average at 3.35 kHz. The auditory range with highest sensitivity closely matches the dominant frequency of the vocalizations. This correspondence is consistent with the notion that quiet and loud calling species are under similar selection pressures for matching auditory sensitivity with spectral characteristics of vocalizations. PMID:26752301

  8. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  9. In vitro assessment of the relationship between acoustic properties and bone mass density of the calcaneus by comparison of ultrasound parametric imaging and quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugier, P; Droin, P; Laval-Jeantet, A M; Berger, G

    1997-02-01

    This in vitro study aimed to add new experimental evidence to clarify the relation between acoustic properties of bone and bone mineral density (BMD) of the human calcaneus. Parametric images of normalized broadband ultrasonic attenuation (nBUA) and ultrasound bone velocity (UBV) were compared with quantitative computed tomography (QCT) images of the calcaneus. The experimental protocol was designed to control the different potential sources of error in acoustic measurements, including the shape and thickness of the samples, intervening soft tissues and cortical bone, boundary effects, and variation in location of the regions of interest (ROIs) analyzed by ultrasound and X-ray. The present study was based on bone specimens from calcaneus removed from 15 cadavers (six male and nine female donors ranging from 69 to 89 years of age). Immersion ultrasonic measurements were performed in the through-thickness direction at normal incidence using a pair of focused broad-band 0.5-MHz transducers. QCT of the specimens was performed using standard 10-mm-thick slices with the Cann-Genant calibration standard. Identical, site-matched ROIs were selected for quantitative analysis on the three images. The pattern of acoustic parameters was similar to that of BMD with QCT. The relationships between nBUA and BMD (r2 = 0.75), between UBV and BMD (r2 = 0.88) and between nBUA and UBV (r2 = 0.84) were highly significant (p < 10(-4). From this study, it appears that ultrasound parameters as measured with current transmission techniques reflect mainly bone quantity and only reflect microarchitecture to a small extent and that BUA and UBV reflect the same bone property.

  10. Acoustic Analog Experimental Studies of Effects of Anderson Localization in One Dimension and Physical Properties of Two-Dimensional Quasiperiodic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanjin

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis, experimental studies of the effects of Anderson localization in a one-dimensional random system and of physical properties of a two-dimensional quasiperiodic system by using acoustic analog techniques are reported. The acoustic simulation of Anderson localization involves a string/mass system. The wave field consists of transverse waves in the the string generated with an electromechanical actuator. The Bloch-wave behavior is verified with the masses spaced periodically. In the study of localization effects, the positions of the masses are varied. Several sets of measurements are made with the positions randomly varied within maximum displacements from lattice sites of 1%, 2%, and 5% of the lattice constant. Inelastic scattering effects in the localization problem are studied with 2% spacing disorder. In this investigation, a measured hopping probability of inelastic scattering as a function of the longitudinal drive amplitude is obtained. Some phase-correlation effects are evident. The acoustic simulation experiment used to investigate the physical properties of quasicrystals involved coupled oscillators in a two-dimensional Penrose lattice. By analogy with a tight-binding model, the tuning forks mounted at the centers of the rhombuses of the Penrose tile as local oscillators are nearest-neighbor-coupled together with arcs of steel wire connecting the tines of neighboring tuning forks. The oscillations of the system is driven by an electromagnet. The responses of the system are monitored by electrodynamic transducers. The eigenvalue spectrum shows a feature resulting from the quasiperiodic symmetry: the spectrum has gaps and bands whose widths are in the ratio of the Golden Mean (surd{5 + 1 })/2. The eigenfunctions of the system are obtained.

  11. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  12. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  13. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  14. Acoustic Properties of Sediments at Weapons Test Ranges of the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station, Keyport, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    INSTRUCTIONS REPORT__ DOCUMENTATIONPAGE_ BEFORE COMPLETING FORM I REPORT NUMBER 12. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER NPS-61-79-005 I _ 4 TITLE...consequences of the existence of gassy sediments is discussed. DD Form 1473 1 Jan 73 Unclassified<’N 0102-014-6601 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...jointly investigating the efficacy of acoustic imaging for the timely location of embedded torpedoes. Negatively buoyant too’ pedoes at end-of-run have

  15. Woods with physical, mechanical and acoustic properties similar to those of Caesalpinia echinata have high potential as alternative woods for bow makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Luiz Longui

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For nearly two hundred years, Caesalpinia echinata wood has been the standard for modern bows. However, the threat of extinction and the enforcement of trade bans have required bow makers to seek alternative woods. The hypothesis tested was that woods with physical, mechanical and acoustic properties similar to those of C. echinata would have high potential as alternative woods for bows. Accordingly, were investigated Handroanthus spp., Mezilaurus itauba, Hymenaea spp., Dipteryx spp., Diplotropis spp. and Astronium lecointei. Handroanthus and Diplotropis have the greatest number of similarities with C. echinata, but only Handroanthus spp. showed significant results in actual bow manufacture, suggesting the importance of such key properties as specific gravity, speed of sound propagation and modulus of elasticity. In practice, Handroanthus and Dipteryx produced bows of quality similar to that of C. echinata.

  16. Systematic inference of the long-range dependence and heavy-tail distribution parameters of ARFIMA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Nick; Graves, Timothy; Franzke, Christian; Gramacy, Robert; Tindale, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Long-Range Dependence (LRD) and heavy-tailed distributions are ubiquitous in natural and socio-economic data. Such data can be self-similar whereby both LRD and heavy-tailed distributions contribute to the self-similarity as measured by the Hurst exponent. Some methods widely used in the physical sciences separately estimate these two parameters, which can lead to estimation bias. Those which do simultaneous estimation are based on frequentist methods such as Whittle's approximate maximum likelihood estimator. Here we present a new and systematic Bayesian framework for the simultaneous inference of the LRD and heavy-tailed distribution parameters of a parametric ARFIMA model with non-Gaussian innovations. As innovations we use the alpha-stable and t-distributions which have power law tails. Our algorithm also provides parameter uncertainty estimates. We test our algorithm using synthetic data, and also data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) solar X-ray time series. These tests show that our algorithm is able to accurately and robustly estimate the LRD and heavy-tailed distribution parameters. See Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, (January 2017), DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2017.01.028

  17. Systematic inference of the long-range dependence and heavy-tail distribution parameters of ARFIMA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Timothy; Franzke, Christian L. E.; Watkins, Nicholas W.; Gramacy, Robert B.; Tindale, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    Long-Range Dependence (LRD) and heavy-tailed distributions are ubiquitous in natural and socio-economic data. Such data can be self-similar whereby both LRD and heavy-tailed distributions contribute to the self-similarity as measured by the Hurst exponent. Some methods widely used in the physical sciences separately estimate these two parameters, which can lead to estimation bias. Those which do simultaneous estimation are based on frequentist methods such as Whittle's approximate maximum likelihood estimator. Here we present a new and systematic Bayesian framework for the simultaneous inference of the LRD and heavy-tailed distribution parameters of a parametric ARFIMA model with non-Gaussian innovations. As innovations we use the α-stable and t-distributions which have power law tails. Our algorithm also provides parameter uncertainty estimates. We test our algorithm using synthetic data, and also data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) solar X-ray time series. These tests show that our algorithm is able to accurately and robustly estimate the LRD and heavy-tailed distribution parameters.

  18. Anisotropic and Negative Acoustic Index Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, Lee Ren

    2010-01-01

    Microstructured materials are used in material science and engineering to attain desired material properties. Acoustic metamaterials are a rapidly growing area in this field of engineered materials that use deep subwavelength microstructures to attain exotic acoustic properties unavailable in nature. These properties, such as negative acoustic index, allow unprecedented capabilities such as sub-diffraction limit resolution, which have the potential to greatly improve existing technologies l...

  19. Simple illustrations of range-dependence and 3-D effects by normal-mode sound propagation modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivansson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, the sound-speed profile has significant effects on underwater acoustic sound propagation. These effects can be quantified by normal-mode models, for example. The basic case is a laterally homogeneous medium, for which the sound speed and the density depend on depth only and not on horizontal position. Effects of horizontal medium-parameter variation can be quantified by coupled-mode models, with coupling between mode expansions for laterally homogeneous parts of the medium. In the present paper, these effects are illustrated for media with a particularly simple horizontal parameter variation such that mode shapes do not vary with horizontal position. The modal wavenumbers depend on horizontal position, however. At a vertical interface between regions with laterally homogeneous medium parameters, each mode is reflected as well as transmitted. For the media considered, reflection and transmission coefficients can be computed separately for each mode without mode coupling, and this is done recu...

  20. Musical Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  1. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  2. Effect of Al–5Ti–1B grain refiner on the microstructure, mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of Al5052 aluminium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Bihari Pattnaik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, the effect of Al–5Ti–1B grain refiner on the microstructure, mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of Al 5052 aluminium alloy have been studied. Microstructural analysis showed the presence of primary α solid solution. No Al–Mg phase was found to be formed due to the presence of magnesium in the solid solution. The results indicated that the addition of Al–5Ti–1B grain refiner into the alloy caused a significant improvement in ultimate tensile strength (UTS and elongation values from 114 MPa and 7.8% to 185 MPa and 18% respectively. The main mechanisms behind this improvement were found to be due to the grain refinement during solidification and segregation of Ti at primary α grain boundaries. Acoustic emission (AE results indicated that intensity of AE signals increased with increase in Al–5Ti–1B master alloy content, which had been attributed to the combined effect of dislocation motion and grain refinement. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis were used to study the microstructure and fracture surfaces of the samples.

  3. Site-matched assessment of structural and tissue properties of cortical bone using scanning acoustic microscopy and synchrotron radiation {mu}CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raum, K [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France); Q-BAM Group, Department of Orthopedics, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 22, 06097 Halle (Germany); Leguerney, I [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France); Chandelier, F [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France); Talmant, M [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France); Saied, A [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France); Peyrin, F [CREATIS, CNRS, UMR 5515, INSERM, U630, INSA, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Laugier, P [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS/Universite Paris 6, UMR 7623, 15, rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75006 Paris (France)

    2006-02-07

    200 MHz scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) and synchrotron radiation {mu}CT (SR-{mu}CT) were used to assess microstructural parameters and tissue properties in site-matched regions of interest in cortical bone. Anterior and postero-lateral regions of ten cross sections from human cortical radius were explored. Structural parameters, including diameter and number of Haversian canals per cortical area (Ca.Dm, N.Ca/Ar) and porosity Po were assessed with both methods using a custom-developed image fusion and analysis software. Acoustic impedance Z and degree of mineralization of bone DMB were extracted separately for osteonal and interstitial tissues from the fused images. Structural parameter estimations obtained from radiographic and acoustic images were almost identical. DMB and impedance values were in the range between 0.77 and 1.28 g cm{sup -3} and 5.13 and 12.1 Mrayl, respectively. Interindividual and regional variations were observed, whereas the strongest difference was found between osteonal and interstitial tissues (Z: 7.2 {+-} 1.1 Mrayl versus 9.3 {+-} 1.0 Mrayl, DMB: 1.06 {+-} 0.07 g cm{sup -3} versus 1.16 {+-} 0.05 g cm{sup -3}, paired t-test, p < 0.05). Weak, but significant correlations between DMB and Z were obtained for the osteonal (R{sup 2} = 0.174, p < 10{sup -4}) and for the pooled (osteonal and interstitial) data. The regression of the pooled osteonal and interstitial tissue data follows a second-order polynomial (R{sup 2} = 0.39, p < 10{sup -4}). Both modalities fulfil the requirement for a simultaneous evaluation of cortical bone microstructure and material properties at the tissue level. While SAM inspection is limited to the evaluation of carefully prepared sample surfaces, SR-{mu}CT provides volumetric information on the tissue without substantial preparation requirements. However, SAM provides a quantitative estimate of elastic properties at the tissue level that cannot be captured by SR-{mu}CT.

  4. Acoustic Replication in Smart Structures Using Active Structural/acoustic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Steven Fulton

    1995-01-01

    There has been a great deal of research on the use of active vibration control with the goal of changing the vibration characteristics of structures. These vibration characteristics may result in undesirable acoustic fields that radiate from the structure. Traditional active noise control approaches center around canceling the offensive acoustic field using loudspeakers to set up opposing fields. A more recent approach is to use active vibration control techniques to directly modify the vibration characteristics and thus the acoustically radiative properties of the structure. A very effective way of achieving this structural/acoustic control is through the use of smart structures in which sensors and actuators are integrated into the structure itself. The subject of this thesis is to explore the potential for the use of active structural/acoustic control and smart structures in acoustic replication. In acoustic replication, an offensive acoustic response of an acoustically radiative smart structure is modified to match a desired acoustic response using active structural/acoustic control. The desired goal, in this case, is not necessarily suppression but to match the acoustic response of a similar structure that has desired acoustic properties. The model that is developed in detail is an elastic plate with piezoceramic sensors and actuators backed by a rigid, vented cavity. One specific application explored is the acoustic guitar. Detailed information on desired acoustic response of guitars is readily available in the literature, and experimental specimens are relatively easy to obtain. The way such an instrument vibrates in response to excitation of the strings determines the acoustic field that results. The feasibility of changing these vibrational characteristics using active structural/acoustic control is examined in detail including analytical and experimental results. The feasibility of applying acoustic replication to an aircraft cockpit is also examined

  5. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    to the design of Bagsvaerd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper points towards the need to apply the acoustic simulation programmes...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...

  6. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  7. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  8. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in June 1969 at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Since then, more than 10,000 acoustic neuroma ... of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and a nursing staff. Specialists in neuroimaging join the team when ...

  10. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  11. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Han, Tao; Zhou, Liu; Tang, Gongbin; Liu, Boquan; Ji, Xiaojun

    2015-08-01

    The surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO3 (LN) film on SiO2/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH) SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K2 owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ) of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K2 achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  12. System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  13. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  14. The influence of hydrocarbons in changing the mechanical and acoustic properties of a carbonate reservoir: implications of laboratory results on larger scale processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippetta, Fabio; Ruggieri, Roberta; Geremia, Davide; Brandano, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Understanding hydraulic and mechanical processes that acted in reservoir rocks and their effect on the rock properties is of a great interest for both scientific and industry fields. In this work we investigate the role of hydrocarbons in changing the petrophysical properties of rock by merging laboratory, outcrops, and subsurface data focusing on the carbonate-bearing Majella reservoir (Bolognano formation). This reservoir represents an interesting analogue for subsurface carbonate reservoirs and is made of high porosity (8 to 28%) ramp calcarenites saturated by hydrocarbon in the state of bitumen at the surface. Within this lithology clean and bitumen bearing samples were investigated. For both groups, density, porosity, P and S wave velocity, at increasing confining pressure and deformation tests were conducted on cylindrical specimens with BRAVA apparatus at the HP-HT Laboratory of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in Rome, Italy. The performed petrophysical characterization, shows a very good correlation between Vp, Vs and porosity and a pressure independent Vp/Vs ratio while the presence of bitumen within samples increases both Vp and Vs. P-wave velocity hysteresis measured at ambient pressure after 100 MPa of applied confining pressure, suggests an almost pure elastic behaviour for bitumen-bearing samples and a more inelastic behaviour for cleaner samples. Calculated dynamic Young's modulus is larger for bitumen-bearing samples and these data are confirmed by cyclic deformation tests where the same samples generally record larger strength, larger Young's modulus and smaller permanent strain respect to clean samples. Starting from laboratory data, we also derived a synthetic acoustic model highlighting an increase in acoustic impedance for bitumen-bearing samples. Models have been also performed simulating a saturation with decreasing API° hydrocarbons, showing opposite effects on the seismic properties of the reservoir respect to

  15. Acoustic excitation of diffusion flames with coherent structure in a plane shear layer.; Effects of acoustic excitation on combustion properties; Soshiki kozo wo tomonau sendan kakusan kaen no onkyo reiki.; Onkyo reiki ni yoru nensho tokusei no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Y.; Kojima, T.; Oiwa, N.; Yamaguchi, S. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1993-10-25

    This paper reports on experiments for acoustic excitation of plane shear structured flame. Flows of air separated into the higher velocity side and the lower velocity side by a partition on the center of a flow path merge at the measuring point to form a mixed layer with coherent structure. Fuel is supplied to this mixed layer with the flows so adjusted that the generated flame will attach to the partition on the lower velocity side. Acoustic excitation (at a sound pressure level of 100 dB to 120 dB) is performed in a speaker fitted on a wall on the higher velocity side. The paper mentions the results of the experiments as follows: the acoustic excitation produces such changes to diffusion flame in the plane shear layer as shorter flame and blue flame combustion and clarification of flame structures; as seen from spectral characteristics of temperature change in the flames, a flame acoustically excited strongly presents remarkable improvements in periodicity of the structure; as seen from sound pressure distribution in the flow direction at the measuring point, the flame zone of the flame acoustically excited strongly is positioned at the middle of the node and loop of a standing wave. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Acoustic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    For many years 'Acoustic Microscopy' has been the definitive book on the subject. A key development since it was first published has been the development of ultrasonic force microscopy. This edition has a major new chapter on this technique and its applications.

  17. Isotropic transformation acoustics and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoshi; Norris, Andrew N.

    2017-04-01

    A novel class of acoustic metamaterial is proposed for directional collimation of a cylindrical source into a plane wave beam. The effect is based on transformation acoustics which retains the exact form of the wave equation under conformal mapping from a circular region to a triangular area. The transformation is adjustable, allowing the acoustic energy to be equally radiated in three directions, or preferentially in a single direction. Importantly, the material properties in the physical domain are isotropic and therefore practically realizable. Two example devices are proposed using cylindrical elastic shells in water as the metamaterial elements and demonstrated using full wave simulations. This approach has potential applications beyond acoustic antenna design in beam-steering and wavefront manipulation.

  18. A programmable nonlinear acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Song, Zhi-Guang; Clerkin, Eoin; Zhang, Ye-Wei; Sun, Jia-He; Su, Yi-Shu; Chen, Li-Qun; Hagedorn, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic metamaterials with specifically designed lattices can manipulate acoustic/elastic waves in unprecedented ways. Whereas there are many studies that focus on passive linear lattice, with non-reconfigurable structures. In this letter, we present the design, theory and experimental demonstration of an active nonlinear acoustic metamaterial, the dynamic properties of which can be modified instantaneously with reversibility. By incorporating active and nonlinear elements in a single unit cell, a real-time tunability and switchability of the band gap is achieved. In addition, we demonstrate a dynamic "editing" capability for shaping transmission spectra, which can be used to create the desired band gap and resonance. This feature is impossible to achieve in passive metamaterials. These advantages demonstrate the versatility of the proposed device, paving the way toward smart acoustic devices, such as logic elements, diode and transistor.

  19. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  20. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of ci...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  1. Perspective: Acoustic metamaterials in transition

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2017-12-15

    Acoustic metamaterials derive their novel characteristics from the interaction between acoustic waves with designed structures. Since its inception seventeen years ago, the field has been driven by fundamental geometric and physical principles that guide the structure design rules as well as provide the basis for wave functionalities. Recent examples include resonance-based acoustic metasurfaces that offer flexible control of acoustic wave propagation such as focusing and re-direction; parity-time (PT)-symmetric acoustics that utilizes the general concept of pairing loss and gain to achieve perfect absorption at a single frequency; and topological phononics that can provide one-way edge state propagation. However, such novel functionalities are not without constraints. Metasurface elements rely on resonances to enhance their coupling to the incident wave; hence, its functionality is limited to a narrow frequency band. Topological phononics is the result of the special lattice symmetry that must be fixed at the fabrication stage. Overcoming such constraints naturally forms the basis for further developments. We identify two emergent directions: Integration of acoustic metamaterial elements for achieving broadband characteristics as well as acoustic wave manipulation tasks more complex than the single demonstrative functionality; and active acoustic metamaterials that can adapt to environment as well as to go beyond the constraints on the passive acoustic metamaterials. Examples of a successful recent integration of multi-resonators in achieving broadband sound absorption can be found in optimal sound-absorbing structures, which utilize causality constraint as a design tool in realizing the target-set absorption spectrum with a minimal sample thickness. Active acoustic metamaterials have also demonstrated the capability to tune bandgaps as well as to alter property of resonances in real time through stiffening of the spring constants, in addition to the PT symmetric

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Brain Freeze ? READ MORE Read More What is acoustic neuroma? Identifying an AN Learn More Get Info ...

  3. Correlation between acoustical and structural properties of glasses: Extension of Abd El-Moneim model for bioactive silica based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Moneim, Amin, E-mail: aminabdelmoneim@hotmail.com

    2016-04-15

    Correlation between room temperature ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the most significant structural parameters has been studied in the bioactive silica based glasses, for the first time. The correlation has been carried out in the quaternary SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass system using the two semi-empirical formulas, which have been presented recently by the author. Changes in the elastic properties, related to the substitution of SiO{sub 2} by alkali Na{sub 2}O and alkaline earth CaO oxides, have also been deduced by evaluating the mean atomic volume, packing density, fractal bond connectivity and density of the analogous crystalline structure. Furthermore, values of the theoretical elastic moduli have been calculated on the basis of Makishima-Mackenzie theory and compared with the corresponding observed values. Results show that the correlation between ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the oxygen density, average atomic ring size, first-order stretching force constant and experimental bulk modulus was achieved at 5 MHz frequency. Values of the theoretically calculated shear modulus are in excellent correlation (C. R. ≻95%) with the corresponding experimental ones. The divergence between the theoretical and experimental values of bulk modulus has been discussed. - Highlights: • Abd El-Moneim model was extended for bioactive glasses. • Ultrasonic attenuation was correlated with structural parameters. • Correlation was carried out in Si–Na–Ca–P glasses. • The model is valid for all investigated glass samples. • Agreement between theoretical and experimental elastic moduli was studied.

  4. Prospectives to tractor cabin design with computational acoustics tools

    OpenAIRE

    Mönkölä, Sanna; Airaksinen, Tuomas; Makkonen, Pekka; Tuovinen, Tero; Neittaanmäki, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Computational acoustical models allow automated optimization of tractor design with respect to acoustic properties, which could speed up significantly the design process of tractor cabin prototypes. This article gives insightful prospectives to the tractor design process by considering modern computational acoustics technology. Mathematical formulation for a system consisting of vibrating elastic tractor structure and airfilled acoustic enclosure are given and a related numerical solution tec...

  5. Spatiotemporally resolved granular acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic techniques provide a non-invasive method of characterizing granular material properties; however, there are many challenges in formulating accurate models of sound propagation due to the inherently heterogeneous nature of granular materials. In order to quantify acoustic responses in space and time, we perform experiments in a photoelastic granular material in which the internal stress pattern (in the form of force chains) is visible. We utilize two complementary methods, high-speed imaging and piezoelectric transduction, to provide particle-scale measurements of the amplitude of the acoustic wave. We observe that the average wave amplitude is largest within particles experiencing the largest forces. The force-dependence of this amplitude is in qualitative agreement with a simple Hertzian-like model for contact area. In addition, we investigate the power spectrum of the propagating signal using the piezoelectric sensors. For a Gaussian wave packet input, we observe a broad spectrum of transmitted frequencies below the driving frequency, and we quantify the characteristic frequencies and corresponding length scales of our material as the system pressure is varied.

  6. Continued Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using Impedance Tube and Acoustic Resonator Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    additional measurements of the effective low frequency acoustic properties of three gulf-coast species, Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass ...Syringodium filiforme (manatee grass ), and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass ). These measurements are similar to those previously discussed [17] but have now been...9] R.D. Stoll and T.K. Kan , "Reflection of acoustic waves at a water–sediment interface," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 70, pp. 149–156 (1981). [10] K.L

  7. Topology optimization for acoustic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a method to control acoustic properties in a room with topology optimization is presented. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room can be minimized by distribution of material in a design domain along the ceiling in 2D and 3D. Nice 0-1 designs...

  8. KAJIAN SIFAT AKUSTIK BUAH MANGGIS(Gracinia mangostana L) DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN GELOMBANG ULTRASONIK [Acoustic Study Of Mangosteene (Gracinia mangostana L) By Using Ultrasonic Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Jajang juansah 1); I Wayan Budiastra 2); Suroso 2)

    2007-01-01

    The wave used to study the acoustic properties of mangosteen is ultrasonic wave. Ultrasonic wave with frequency of 50 KHz was used to determine acoustic properties of mangosteen. The main wave properties were the attenuation, impedance of acoustic and acoustic velocity at mangosteen. Others have been evaluated were the correlation of attenuation and acoustic velocity at parts of mangosteen with its intact mangosteen. The acoustic parameters were related to the physic-chemical parameters of th...

  9. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  10. Electromagnetically generated acoustic determination of delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaino, W.

    1991-04-01

    Previous work has demonstrated a technique for acoustically detecting localized delamination of metallized patterns on insulating substrates [W. Imaino, L. Crawforth, A. C. Munce, and A. Julaiana, in Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, edited by B. R. McAvoy (IEEE, New York, 1986), p. 1065]. Employing a high-spatial-resolution permeable electromagnetic acoustic transducer to preferentially excite the metallization, the acoustic coupling between the metal foil and substrate may be probed. Scanning, then, provides a map of delaminations. To extend and generalize these results, the detailed generation mechanism and acoustic response of the substrate has been studied. A computer program developed previously [W. Imaino, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 80, S7 (1986)] was used to model the acoustic source. In this investigation, a finite-element calculation is used to provide a more detailed description of the acoustic behavior of the delaminated plate. The effects of source size relative to defect dimensions and acoustic properties of the substrate have been studied. The determination of the localized coupling is complicated by structural resonances of the substrate, which make single frequency measurements unfavorable. However, the analysis shows that the spectral acoustic behavior provides an indication of metallization to substrate coupling. A signal-processing algorithm based on this analysis has been formulated and will be described.

  11. Monitoring microbe-induced physical property changes using high-frequency acoustic waveform data: Toward the development of a microbial megascope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Kenneth Hurst [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of microbe generated gas bubbles in controlled, saturated sediment columns utilizing a novel technique involving acoustic wave propagation. Specifically, the effect of denitrifying bacteria on saturated flow conditions was evaluated in light of the stimulated production of N2 gas and the resulting plugging of the pore throats. The propagation of high frequency acoustic waves through the sediment columns was used to locate those regions in the column where gas accumulation occurred. Over a period of six weeks, regions of gas accumulation resulted in the attenuation of acoustic wave energies with the decreases in amplitude typically greater than one order of magnitude.

  12. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  13. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  14. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  15. High frequency acoustic propagation under variable sea surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senne, Joseph

    This dissertation examines the effects of rough sea surfaces and sub-surface bubbles on high frequency acoustic transmissions. Owing to the strong attenuation of electromagnetic waves in seawater, acoustic waves are used in the underwater realm much in the same way that electromagnetic waves are used in the atmosphere. The transmission and reception of acoustic waves in the underwater environment is important for a variety of fields including navigation, ocean observation, and real-time communications. Rough sea surfaces and sub-surface bubbles alter the acoustic signals that are received not only in the near-surface water column, but also at depth. This dissertation demonstrates that surface roughness and sub-surface bubbles notably affect acoustic transmissions with frequency ranges typical of underwater communications systems (10-50 kHz). The influence of rough surfaces on acoustic transmissions is determined by modeling forward propagation subject to sea surface dynamics that vary with time scales of less than a second to tens of seconds. A time-evolving rough sea surface model is combined with a rough surface formulation of a parabolic equation model for predicting time-varying acoustic fields. Linear surface waves are generated from surface wave spectra, and evolved in time using a Runge-Kutta integration technique. This evolving, range-dependent surface information is combined with other environmental parameters and fed into the acoustic model, giving an approximation of the time-varying acoustic field. The wide-angle parabolic equation model manages the rough sea surfaces by molding them into the boundary conditions for calculations of the near-surface acoustic field. The influence of sub-surface bubbles on acoustic transmissions is determined by modeling the population of bubbles near the surface and using those populations to approximate the effective changes in sound speed and attenuation. Both range-dependent and range-independent bubble models are

  16. Acoustic properties of Salpa thompsoni.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebe, Peter H.; Chu, Dezhang; Kaartvedt, Stein; Hundt, Anna (Hölter); Melle, Webjørn; Ona, Egil; Batta-Lona, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Salps are common members of the world oceans planktonic community (Madin, et.al., 2006). In the southern ocean, both krill (Euphausia superba) and salps (Salpa thompsoni) can occur in dense aggregations (Loeb et al, 2009, Atkinson et al. 2004, Woodd-Walker et al., 2003). Krill, an important part of pelagic food webs, are prey of many Antarctic marine mammal, sea bird, penguin, and fish species. They are also subject to a significant fishery. Each year there are krill surveys using high freque...

  17. Finite-element modeling in ocean acoustics: Where are we heading?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, F.B.; Zampolli, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes 10 years of NURC experience with the application of a state-of-the-art FE code [Zampolli et al., JASA 122, 1472-85 (2007)] to propagation and scattering problems in ocean acoustics. We show benchmark results for low-frequency propagation in a range-dependent waveguide with an

  18. Acoustic propagation within a surface duct in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Murty, C.S.

    Sound speed structure forms a surface duct in the upper 50 m layer in the western Bay of Bengal during late July. A range-dependent acoustic ray computation shows that some rays emanating from a source within the upper 30 m, get trapped within...

  19. Improving the Navy’s Passive Underwater Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    modeling effort. The C version of the Range-dependent Acoustic Model (“ CRAM ”), a parabolic equation-based numerical model developed by Richard...bottom using Hamilton’s empirical equations (Hamilton, 1980). Although a few areas in the Southern California Bight have been well studied , and

  20. A sound future for acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven

    2017-05-01

    The field of acoustic metamaterials borrowed ideas from electromagnetics and optics to create engineered structures that exhibit desired fluid or fluid-like properties for the propagation of sound. These metamaterials offer the possibility of manipulating and controlling sound waves in ways that are challenging or impossible with conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. And active acoustic metamaterials use external control and power to create effective material properties that are fundamentally not possible with passive structures. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and, critically, converting exciting laboratory experiments into practically useful devices. In this presentation, I will outline the recent history of the field, describe some of the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters, discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound, and finally, provide a personal perspective on future directions in the field.

  1. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Elayouch, A.

    2017-01-05

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  2. Acoustic and Volumetric Properties of Mixture of (N,N-Dimethylacetamide + Ethyl Acrylate) with 1-Butanol or iso-Butanol or t-Butanol at 308.15 K

    OpenAIRE

    M. Kondaiah; Sreekanth, K.; D. Sravana Kumar; Krishna Rao, D.

    2014-01-01

    Densities, ρ, and ultrasonic speeds, u of mixtures of 1-butanol or iso-butanol or t-butanol with equimolar mixture of (N,N-dimethylacetamide + Ethyl acrylate) over the entire composition range have been measured at T=308.15 K. Using the experimental results, deviation in ultrasonic speed, Δu, deviation in isentropic compressibility, Δks, excess molar volume, VmE, excess intermolecular free length, LfE, and excess acoustic impedance, ZE, have been calculated. The variation of these properties ...

  3. On architectural acoustic design using computer simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    acoustic design process. The emphasis is put on the first three out of five phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference to the design of Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper...... discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper is that the application of acoustic simulation programs is most beneficial in the last of three phases but an application...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...

  4. On Architectural Acoustics Design using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2004-01-01

    room acoustic simulation programs it is now possible to subjectively analyze and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a facility. With the right tools applied, the acoustic design can become an integrated part of the architectural design process. The aim of the present paper...... is to investigate the field of application an acoustic simulation program can have during an architectural acoustics design process. A case study is carried out in order to represent the iterative working process of an architect. The working process is divided into five phases and represented by typical results...... in each phase ? exemplified by Bagsværd Church by Jørn Utzon - and a description of which information would be beneficial to progress in the work. Among other things the applicability as a tool giving inspiration for finding forms of structures and rooms for an architect compared with an architect without...

  5. A study of stepped acoustic resonator with transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Qi; He, Wan-Quan; Wang, Quan-Biao; Tian, Jia-Jin; Zhang, Qing-You

    2014-07-01

    Transfer matrix method was applied in the study of stepped acoustic resonators. Transfer matrix method was more competent in comparison with analytic method to investigate the acoustic properties of stepped acoustic resonator, especially multi-step acoustic resonator. With the help of the numerical solution, the resonance frequencies, the phase angles and the radiation impedances of stepped acoustic resonators which consisted of one to five sub-tubes were studied theoretically and experimentally. The numerical solutions were in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  7. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  8. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  9. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  10. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  11. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  12. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  13. PT-Symmetric Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce here the concept of acoustic parity-time (PT symmetry and demonstrate the extraordinary scattering characteristics of the acoustic PT medium. On the basis of exact calculations, we show how an acoustic PT-symmetric medium can become unidirectionally transparent at given frequencies. Combining such a PT-symmetric medium with transformation acoustics, we design two-dimensional symmetric acoustic cloaks that are unidirectionally invisible in a prescribed direction. Our results open new possibilities for designing functional acoustic devices with directional responses.

  14. Sediment Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-02

    approximately one grain size (0.35 mm) out of 600 grain size total. The experiment was repeated with a 2.54 cm thick layer of water filled polyurethane foam ...Kaolinite Clay for Shear Waves 70 it vi .- m -77- I. INTRODUCTION A determination of the viscoelastic properties of ocean sediments can be made by...temperature of these additional viscoelastic properties have not been studied in detail. This section contains shear wave and compressional wave data

  15. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  16. Experimental study of geo-acoustic inversion uncertainty due to ocean sound-speed fluctuations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siderius, M.; Nielsen, P.L.; Sellschopp, J.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic data measured in the ocean fluctuate due to the complex time-varying properties of the channel. When measured data are used for model-based, geo-acoustic inversion, how do acoustic fluctuations impact estimates for the seabed properties? In May 1999 SACLANT Undersea Research Center and

  17. Acoustically Driven Vibrations in Cylindrical Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, David H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-11

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore the interaction of acoustics and vibration in fluid-filled cylindrical structures. Our emphasis is on describing longitudinal (axial) propagation within the structure for acoustic signals that enter externally. This paper reviews the historical and theoretical treatments of the relevant phenomenon important to the propagation of these signals along pipe structures. Our specific contribution is a detailed analysis of how external acoustic signals are coupled to a free standing pipe. There have been numerous phenomena for which these analyses are applicable. They have ranged from physical property measurements, to indoor environmental noise abatement, and onto quite significant explorations of active and passive submerged structures.

  18. Mapping the sound field of an erupting submarine volcano using an acoustic glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Haru; Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R; Embley, Robert W

    2011-03-01

    An underwater glider with an acoustic data logger flew toward a recently discovered erupting submarine volcano in the northern Lau basin. With the volcano providing a wide-band sound source, recordings from the two-day survey produced a two-dimensional sound level map spanning 1 km (depth) × 40 km(distance). The observed sound field shows depth- and range-dependence, with the first-order spatial pattern being consistent with the predictions of a range-dependent propagation model. The results allow constraining the acoustic source level of the volcanic activity and suggest that the glider provides an effective platform for monitoring natural and anthropogenic ocean sounds. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  19. Acoustic metasurface for refracted wave manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Xiang; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fu-Gen; Dong, Hua-Feng; Mu, Zhong-Fei; Li, Jing-bo

    2018-02-01

    Here we present a design of a transmitted acoustic metasurface based on a single row of Helmholtz resonators with varying geometric parameters. The proposed metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law of refraction, but also exhibits various interesting properties and potential applications such as insulation of two quasi-intersecting transmitted sound waves, ultrasonic Bessel beam generator, frequency broadening effect of anomalous refraction and focusing.

  20. Diamond: a material for acoustic devices

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; WILLIAMS, Oliver; HAENEN, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Diamond has been foreseen to replace silicon for high power, high frequency electronic applications or for devices that operates in harsh environments. However, diamond electronic devices are still in the laboratory stage due to the lack of large substrates and the complexity of diamond doping. On another hand, surface acoustic wave filters based on diamond are commercially available. Diamond is especially suited for acoustic applications because of its exceptional mechanical properties. The ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic ... Stories Keywords Shop ANA Discussion Forum About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values ...

  2. Tethys Acoustic Metadata Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Tethys database houses the metadata associated with the acoustic data collection efforts by the Passive Acoustic Group. These metadata include dates, locations...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ... What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation ...

  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider ... Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation ...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resource Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... sponsors Become a Sponsor Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  6. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... a Sponsor Patient Events Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  8. Obtaining objective, content-specific room acoustical parameters using auditory modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.; De Vries, D.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustical properties of rooms are generally described using objective parameters as determined from measured – or simulated – roomimpulse responses. However, this method has some disadvantages. Forexample, room impulse responses are generally measured in empty rooms, while the acoustical

  9. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world's #1 acoustic ... Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 ...

  11. Acoustic Liner for Turbomachinery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Jones, Michael G.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to reduce aircraft noise in the communities surrounding airports by significantly attenuating the noise generated by the turbomachinery, and enhancing safety by providing a containment barrier for a blade failure. Acoustic liners are used in today's turbofan engines to reduce noise. The amount of noise reduction from an acoustic liner is a function of the treatment area, the liner design, and the material properties, and limited by the constraints of the nacelle or casement design. It is desirable to increase the effective area of the acoustic treatment to increase noise suppression. Modern turbofan engines use wide-chord rotor blades, which means there is considerable treatment area available over the rotor tip. Turbofan engines require containment over the rotors for protection from blade failure. Traditional methods use a material wrap such as Kevlar integrated with rub strips and sometimes metal layers (sandwiches). It is possible to substitute the soft rub-strip material with an open-cell metallic foam that provides noise-reduction benefits and a sacrificial material in the first layer of the containment system. An open-cell foam was evaluated that behaves like a bulk acoustic liner, serves as a tip rub strip, and can be integrated with a rotor containment system. Foams can be integrated with the fan-containment system to provide sufficient safety margins and increased noise attenuation. The major innovation is the integration of the foam with the containment.

  12. Piezoelectric Zinc Oxide Based MEMS Acoustic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Arora

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic sensors exhibiting good sensitivity was fabricated using MEMS technology having piezoelectric zinc oxide as a dielectric between two plates of capacitor. Thin film zinc oxide has structural, piezoelectric and optical properties for surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW devices. Oxygen effficient films are transparent and insulating having wide applications for sensors and transducers. A rf sputtered piezoelectric ZnO layer transforms the mechanical deflection of a thin etched silicon diaphragm into a piezoelectric charge. For 25-micron thin diaphragm Si was etched in tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution using bulk micromachining. This was followed by deposition of sandwiched structure composed of bottom aluminum electrode, sputtered 3 micron ZnO film and top aluminum electrode. A glass having 1 mm diameter hole was bonded on backside of device to compensate sound pressure in side the cavity. The measured value of central capacitance and dissipation factor of the fabricated MEMS acoustic sensor was found to be 82.4pF and 0.115 respectively, where as the value of ~176 pF was obtained for the rim capacitance with a dissipation factor of 0.138. The response of the acoustic sensors was reproducible for the devices prepared under similar processing conditions under different batches. The acoustic sensor was found to be working from 30Hz to 8KHz with a sensitivity of 139µV/Pa under varying acoustic pressure.

  13. Cyclones and attractive streaming generated by acoustical vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaud, Antoine; Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Acoustical and optical vortices have attracted great interest due to their ability to capture and manipulate particles with the use of radiation pressure. Here we show that acoustical vortices can also induce axial vortical flow reminiscent of cyclones, whose topology can be controlled by adjusting the properties of the acoustical beam. In confined geometry, the phase singularity enables generating "attractive streaming" with the flow directed toward the transducer. This opens perspectives for contactless vortical flow control.

  14. Ambient Noise Analysis of Acoustic Data from the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-26

    09-17 FROM: David P. Knobles TO: Ellen S. Livingston, ONR 321 SUBJECT: Final Report for N00014-07-1-0263, Task Description Title: Ambient Noise...Analysis of Acoustic Data from the Philippine Sea Ambient noise analysis of acoustic data from the Philippine Sea The objective of this research...was to use recovered acoustic data recorded on analog tapes in the late 1970s to early 1980s to assist in characterizing the ambient noise properties

  15. SPATS - an Acoustic Array at the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Bohm, C [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Descamps, F [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Fischer, J [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Hallgren, A [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Heller, R [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Hulth, P O [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Hundertmark, S [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Krieger, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Nahnhauer, R [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Pohl, M [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Price, B [University of California, Berkeley (United States); Sulanke, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Vandenbroucke, J [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2007-03-15

    The detection of extraterrestrial EHE neutrinos requires detection volumes at least one order of magnitude larger than currently constructed km3 optical neutrino detectors. In ice, it is anticipated that the absorption length for acoustic waves reaches up to to several kilometers. This makes ice an attractive host environment for a next generation acoustic neutrino detector. To measure the acoustic properties of ice at South Pole, a test setup has been developed, ready to be deployed in the 2006/07 summer season.

  16. Preface to Special Topic: Acoustic Metamaterials and Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouar, Badreddine

    2018-03-01

    The advent of acoustic metamaterials in the beginning of 2000s and very recently of acoustic metasurfaces has created tremendous excitement and efforts in the field of materials science and physics by introducing and building real transformative research and dealing with unprecedented physics and applications. The acoustic/elastic metamaterials and metasurfaces, which can simply be described as designed artificial materials with unusual physical properties, form the core of the present Special Topic published by the Journal of Applied Physics.

  17. Acoustic Modeling of Lightweight Structures: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shasha; Shen, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    This paper gives an overview of acoustic modeling for three kinds of typical lightweight structures including double-leaf plate system, stiffened single (or double) plate and porous material. Classical models are citied to provide frame work of theoretical modeling for acoustic property of lightweight structures; important research advances derived by our research group and other authors are introduced to describe the current state of art for acoustic research. Finally, remaining problems and future research directions are concluded and prospected briefly

  18. Design of a programmable active acoustics metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoker, Jason J.

    Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to provide properties which may not be readily available in nature. The development of such class of materials constitutes a new area of research that has grown significantly over the past decade. Acoustic metamaterials, specifically, are even more novel than their electromagnetic counterparts arising only in the latter half of the decade. Acoustic metamaterials provide a new tool in controlling the propagation of pressure waves. However, physical design and frequency tuning, is still a large obstacle when creating a new acoustic metamaterial. This dissertation describes active and programmable design for acoustic metamaterials which allows the same basic physical design principles to be used for a variety of application. With cloaking technology being of a great interest to the US Navy, the proposed design approach would enable the development of a metamaterial with spatially changing effective parameters while retaining a uniform physical design features. The effective parameters would be controlled by tuning smart actuators embedded inside the metamaterial structure. Since this design is based on dynamic effective parameters that can be electrically controlled, material property ranges of several orders of magnitude could potentially be achieved without changing any physical parameters. With such unique capabilities, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be achieved and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  19. Sustainable Acoustic Metasurfaces for Sound Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound attenuation with conventional acoustic materials is subject to the mass law and requires massive and bulky structures at low frequencies. A possible alternative solution is provided by the use of metamaterials, which are artificial materials properly engineered to obtain properties and characteristics that it is not possible to find in natural materials. Theory and applications of metamaterials, already consolidated in electromagnetism, can be extended to acoustics; in particular, they can be applied to improve the properties of acoustical panels. The design of acoustic metasurfaces that could effectively control transmitted sound in unconventional ways appears a significant subject to be investigated, given its wide-ranging possible applications. In this contribution, we investigate the application of a metasurface-inspired technique to achieve the acoustical insulation of an environment. The designed surface has subwavelength thickness and structuring and could be realized with cheap, lightweight and sustainable materials. We present a few examples of such structures and analyze their acoustical behavior by means of full-wave simulations.

  20. Topology optimization for enhancing the acoustical and thermal characteristics of acoustic devices simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kee Seung; Lee, Jin Woo

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an optimal design method was developed using topology optimization for an acoustic device in the presence of temperature gradient. Although acoustic properties were strongly affected by temperature distribution, many topology optimization problems for optimal acoustic devices were formulated under the assumption that temperature was uniformly distributed in the design domain or that heat transfer through boundaries was negligible. An acoustically optimized topology could negatively influence the heat transfer characteristics of a mechanical device. To figure out this issue, thermo-acoustical topology optimization problems were formulated for an optimal design of the acoustic device. A general form of a finite element equation was developed for acoustical and thermal analyses, and interpolation functions were carefully selected to obtain a black-and-white topology in the final step. Optimal design examples were solved for various acoustical and thermal design requirements, and the physical characteristics of an optimal muffler obtained using the proposed approach in the present study were compared with those of a well-known existing design.

  1. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  2. Two-dimensional structure-embedded acoustic lenses based on periodic acoustic black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies have introduced a new class of two-dimensional acoustic metamaterials whose dispersion and propagation properties result from the use of geometric inhomogeneities in the form of Acoustic Black Holes (ABH). The ABH is an element able to smoothly bend acoustic rays and slow down elastic bending waves, therefore providing a variety of unconventional dispersion and propagation properties that are typically observed in more complex multi-material and locally resonant designs. Our approach enables full integration of acoustic lenses in thin-walled structural elements while preserving the structural character. The lenses are capable of different high-level functionalities such as focusing, collimation, and negative refraction. Numerical and experimental results show that such structures exhibit broadband operating conditions that span both the metamaterial and the phononic range.

  3. Acoustic Coupler for the Acquisition of Coronary Artery Murmurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Niels Henrik; Schmidt, Samuel; Hansen, John

    in a broad frequency range. The coupler was designed to have a high cut off frequency at 1.0 kHz, while the low frequency behavior was determined by the properties of the microphone, electronic circuits and inadvertent leakages in the acoustical coupling. The performance of the acoustical coupler...

  4. Final evaluation of the acoustics of the APS conference center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restrepo, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    Along with a description of the changes that I prescribed on the original design, this report is an evaluation of the acoustical properties of the new Advanced Photon Source Auditorium at Argonne National Laboratory. Acoustical deficiencies in the hall are presented with several options for their expedient and economical solution.

  5. Improving the properties of zinc oxide thin-film surface acoustic wave device on glass substrate by introducing double alumina layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wen-Ching; Huang, Yi-Fan; Wu, Mu-Shiang

    2017-10-01

    ZnO films with c-axis (0002) orientation have been successfully grown by RF magnetron sputtering on Al2O3/glass substrates. The alumina films were firstly deposited on glass substrates, and then secondly deposited on interdigital transducer/ZnO film/alumina film/glass substrates by electron beam evaporation. The crystalline structure and surface roughness of the films were investigated by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The phase velocity and coupling coefficient of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) device were both increased when we deposited the double alumina layers. On the other hand, the temperature coefficient of frequency becomes better if we increase the thickness of the lower alumina film. The experimental result is beneficial for improving the performance of the ZnO thin-film SAW devices on inexpensive glass substrates.

  6. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  7. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  8. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  9. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Metwally, Khaled; Garci, Houssem; Riedinger, Christophe; Mensah, Serge; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for improving the localization and the quantification of the optical parameters in photoacoustic (PA) tomography of biological tissues that are intrinsically heterogeneous in both optical and acoustic properties. It is based on the exploitation of both the PA signal, generated by the heterogeneous optical structures, and the secondary acoustic echoes due to the interaction between a primary PA wave generated near the tissue surface and the heterogeneous acoustic structures. These secondary echoes can also be collected through proper measurements of the PA signals. The experimental procedure is presented along with the method to filter the signal and the reconstruction algorithm that includes the account of the acoustic information.

  10. Classifying acoustic signals into phoneme categories: average and dyslexic readers make use of complex dynamical patterns and multifractal scaling properties of the speech signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselman, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Several competing aetiologies of developmental dyslexia suggest that the problems with acquiring literacy skills are causally entailed by low-level auditory and/or speech perception processes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diverging claims about the specific deficient peceptual processes under conditions of strong inference. Theoretically relevant acoustic features were extracted from a set of artificial speech stimuli that lie on a /bAk/-/dAk/ continuum. The features were tested on their ability to enable a simple classifier (Quadratic Discriminant Analysis) to reproduce the observed classification performance of average and dyslexic readers in a speech perception experiment. The 'classical' features examined were based on component process accounts of developmental dyslexia such as the supposed deficit in Envelope Rise Time detection and the deficit in the detection of rapid changes in the distribution of energy in the frequency spectrum (formant transitions). Studies examining these temporal processing deficit hypotheses do not employ measures that quantify the temporal dynamics of stimuli. It is shown that measures based on quantification of the dynamics of complex, interaction-dominant systems (Recurrence Quantification Analysis and the multifractal spectrum) enable QDA to classify the stimuli almost identically as observed in dyslexic and average reading participants. It seems unlikely that participants used any of the features that are traditionally associated with accounts of (impaired) speech perception. The nature of the variables quantifying the temporal dynamics of the speech stimuli imply that the classification of speech stimuli cannot be regarded as a linear aggregate of component processes that each parse the acoustic signal independent of one another, as is assumed by the 'classical' aetiologies of developmental dyslexia. It is suggested that the results imply that the differences in speech perception performance between average and

  11. Classifying acoustic signals into phoneme categories: average and dyslexic readers make use of complex dynamical patterns and multifractal scaling properties of the speech signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Hasselman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several competing aetiologies of developmental dyslexia suggest that the problems with acquiring literacy skills are causally entailed by low-level auditory and/or speech perception processes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diverging claims about the specific deficient peceptual processes under conditions of strong inference. Theoretically relevant acoustic features were extracted from a set of artificial speech stimuli that lie on a /bAk/-/dAk/ continuum. The features were tested on their ability to enable a simple classifier (Quadratic Discriminant Analysis to reproduce the observed classification performance of average and dyslexic readers in a speech perception experiment. The ‘classical’ features examined were based on component process accounts of developmental dyslexia such as the supposed deficit in Envelope Rise Time detection and the deficit in the detection of rapid changes in the distribution of energy in the frequency spectrum (formant transitions. Studies examining these temporal processing deficit hypotheses do not employ measures that quantify the temporal dynamics of stimuli. It is shown that measures based on quantification of the dynamics of complex, interaction-dominant systems (Recurrence Quantification Analysis and the multifractal spectrum enable QDA to classify the stimuli almost identically as observed in dyslexic and average reading participants. It seems unlikely that participants used any of the features that are traditionally associated with accounts of (impaired speech perception. The nature of the variables quantifying the temporal dynamics of the speech stimuli imply that the classification of speech stimuli cannot be regarded as a linear aggregate of component processes that each parse the acoustic signal independent of one another, as is assumed by the ‘classical’ aetiologies of developmental dyslexia. It is suggested that the results imply that the differences in speech perception

  12. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    for including this in acoustic models . Experimental analysis is combined with model development to isolate specific physics and improve our...under- ice scattering, bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1: Basin...of Japan received at the CTBTO HA03 station in Juan Fernandez Chile , are a treasure trove of long-range low frequency acoustic propagation. In

  13. Acoustic and Volumetric Properties of Mixture of (N,N-Dimethylacetamide + Ethyl Acrylate with 1-Butanol or iso-Butanol or t-Butanol at 308.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kondaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Densities, ρ, and ultrasonic speeds, u of mixtures of 1-butanol or iso-butanol or t-butanol with equimolar mixture of (N,N-dimethylacetamide + Ethyl acrylate over the entire composition range have been measured at T=308.15 K. Using the experimental results, deviation in ultrasonic speed, Δu, deviation in isentropic compressibility, Δks, excess molar volume, VmE, excess intermolecular free length, LfE, and excess acoustic impedance, ZE, have been calculated. The variation of these properties with composition of the mixtures has been discussed in terms of molecular interactions in these mixtures. The deviation/excess properties have been fitted to Redlich-Kister type polynomial and the corresponding standard deviations have been calculated. Negative values of VmE, Δks, and LfE and positive values of Δu, and ZE are observed over the entire composition range. The observed negative and positive values of deviation/excess properties are attributed to the strong interactions between the unlike molecules of the mixtures. Further theoretical values of sound velocity in the mixtures have been evaluated using various theories and compared with experimental sound velocities to verify the applicability of such theories to the systems studied. Theoretical ultrasonic velocity data has been used to study molecular interactions in the systems investigated.

  14. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  15. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  16. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  17. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  18. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  19. Some fundamental acoustic observations in combusting turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented of the possibility of using the acoustic radiation emitted from turbulent combustion zones to characterize the structure, mechanics and properties of turbulent combustion. Theoretical consideration is given to the acoustic characteristics of a nonpremixed open turbulent jet flame and the response of the acoustic spectrum to changes in combustion conditions. Experimental observations made of the acoustic emissions from a laboratory burner that establishes turbulent flames at the exit of a fully developed pipe flow as well as two commercial burners using methane, ethane and propane fuels are then presented which reveal changes in the acoustic amplitudes in three high-frequency bands associated with changes in the air-fuel ratio. Results suggest a means for combustion diagnostics and demonstrate the possibility of using acoustic measurements in investigations of combustion zone processes.

  20. Acoustic cloaking in two dimensions: a feasible approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de vera s.n., E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2008-06-15

    This work proposes an acoustic structure feasible to engineer that accomplishes the requirements of acoustic cloaking design recently introduced by Cummer and Schurig (2007 New J. Phys. 9 45). The structure, which consists of a multilayered composite made of two types of isotropic acoustic metamaterials, exactly matches the conditions for the acoustic cloaking. It is also shown that the isotropic metamaterials needed can be made of sonic crystals containing two types of material cylinders, whose elastic parameters should be properly chosen in order to satisfy (in the homogenization limit) the acoustic properties under request. In contrast to electromagnetic cloaking, the structure here proposed verifies the acoustic cloaking in a wide range of wavelengths; its performance is guaranteed for any wavelength above a certain cutoff defined by the homogenization limit of the sonic crystal employed in its fabrication.

  1. Acoustic Goos-Hänchen effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Lin; Xue, Ling; Fa, YuXiao; Han, YongLan; Zhang, YanDong; Cheng, HongShen; Ding, PengFei; Li, GuoHui; Tang, ShaoJie; Bai, ChunLing; Xi, BingJie; Zhang, XiaoLin; Zhao, MeiShan

    2017-10-01

    We report two models of the lateral displacement of acoustic-wave scattering on a fluid-solid interface that reveal an acoustic analog of the Goos-Hänchen effect in optics. This acoustic analog is called the acoustic Goos-Hänchen effect. Using newly proposed models, we made numerical calculations for the system of a water-Perspex interface. Specifically, in the post-critical-angle region, we observed a lateral displacement (and transition time) of the reflected P-wave with respect to the incident P-wave. The first arrival of the acoustic signal from the interface is found to be a reflected P-wave rather than the sliding-refraction P-wave usually described in traditional acoustic-logging sliding P-wave theory. For both proposed models, the effective propagation speed of the reflected P-wave along the interface depends on not only the physical properties of the interfacial media but also the incident angle. These observations are intriguing and warrant further investigation.

  2. Advanced Concepts for Underwater Acoustic Channel Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, P. C.; Haas, C. H.; Ramani, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines nearshore underwater-acoustic channel modeling concepts and compares channel-state information requirements against existing modeling capabilities. This process defines a subset of candidate acoustic models suitable for simulating signal propagation in underwater communications. Underwater-acoustic communications find many practical applications in coastal oceanography, and networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Such networks can be formed by establishing two-way acoustic links between autonomous underwater vehicles and moored oceanographic sensors. These networks can be connected to a surface unit for further data transfer to ships, satellites, or shore stations via a radio-frequency link. This configuration establishes an interactive environment in which researchers can extract real-time data from multiple, but distant, underwater instruments. After evaluating the obtained data, control messages can be sent back to individual instruments to adapt the networks to changing situations. Underwater networks can also be used to increase the operating ranges of autonomous underwater vehicles by hopping the control and data messages through networks that cover large areas. A model of the ocean medium between acoustic sources and receivers is called a channel model. In an oceanic channel, characteristics of the acoustic signals change as they travel from transmitters to receivers. These characteristics depend upon the acoustic frequency, the distances between sources and receivers, the paths followed by the signals, and the prevailing ocean environment in the vicinity of the paths. Properties of the received signals can be derived from those of the transmitted signals using these channel models. This study concludes that ray-theory models are best suited to the simulation of acoustic signal propagation in oceanic channels and identifies 33 such models that are eligible candidates.

  3. Model-based passive acoustic tracking of sperm whale foraging behavior in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, Christopher; Thode, Aaron; Straley, Jan; Folkert, Kendall; O'Connell, Victoria

    2005-09-01

    In 2004, the Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale Avoidance Project (SEASWAP) introduced the use of passive acoustics to help monitor the behavior of sperm whales depredating longline fishing operations. Acoustic data from autonomous recorders mounted on longlines provide the opportunity to demonstrate a tracking algorithm based on acoustic propagation modeling while providing insight into whales' foraging behavior. With knowledge of azimuthally dependent bathymetry, a 3D track of whale motion can be obtained using data from just one hydrophone by exploiting multipath arrival information from recorded sperm whale clicks. The evolution of multipath arrival patterns is matched to range-, depth-, and azimuth-dependent modeled arrival patterns to generate an estimate of whale motion. This technique does not require acoustic ray identification (i.e., direct path, surface reflected, etc.) while still utilizing individual ray arrival information, and it can also account for all waveguide propagation physics such as interaction with range-dependent bathymetry and ray refraction.

  4. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  5. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses different room acoustics software and the opportunities they offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs. The first step consists in the testing and benchmarking of different tools on the basis of accuracy, speed...

  6. A review of the application Acoustic Emission (AE) incorporating mechanical approach to monitor Reinforced concrete (RC) strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) properties under fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Mazlan, S. M. S.; Abdullah, S. R.; Shahidan, S.; Noor, S. R. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Concrete durability may be affected by so many factors such as chemical attack and weathering action that reduce the performance and the service life of concrete structures. Low durability Reinforced concrete (RC) can be greatly improved by using Fiber Reinforce Polymer (FRP). FRP is a commonly used composite material for repairing and strengthening RC structures. A review on application of Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques of real time monitoring for various mechanical tests for RC strengthened with FRP involving four-point bending, three-point bending and cyclic loading was carried out and discussed in this paper. Correlations between each AE analyses namely b-value, sentry and intensity analysis on damage characterization also been critically reviewed. From the review, AE monitoring involving RC strengthened with FRP using b-value, sentry and intensity analysis are proven to be successful and efficient method in determining damage characterization. However, application of AE analysis using sentry analysis is still limited compared to b-value and intensity analysis in characterizing damages especially for RC strengthened with FRP specimen.

  7. Acoustic tomography. Laboratory technique Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvis, Jorge; Carvajal, Jenny

    2010-05-01

    From geomechanical tests carried out on rocks it is possible to determine its physico-mechanical properties, which relate the strain and applied stress; even so, conventional tests do not allow to identify how stress is distributed and how it has affected porous media. Today, techniques like acoustic tomography widely used in medicine, geophysics and others sciences, generates images by sections of the interior of a body. Acoustic tomography allows inferring the stress state within porous media; since wave velocities are closely related to media density, if a stress is applied to a rock, it will generate grains compaction and this will be showed by an increase of wave velocity. Implementation was conducted on rock plugs under diverse stress fields, simultaneously recording P-wave velocities (Compressional) on perpendicular planes to sample vertical axis. Transmission and reception of acoustic waves through porous media were done by piezoelectric crystals (PZT) used as sensors. A transmitting crystal excited by a voltage pulse causes a mechanical vibration, which travels across media; this is known as inverse piezoelectric effect. This vibration is recorded by a receiving crystal in which the direct piezoelectric effect appears; which dictates that if a piezoelectric is disturbed mechanically, an electrical signal between its terminals will appear. This electrical signal is used to obtain the wave velocity. Nevertheless, acoustic tomography corresponds to one of those called inverse Problems that arise when from observed data the model parameters must be obtained; in this way, tomography involves iterative reconstruction techniques (ART or SIRT) which are projections of observed data and its later inversion. Obtained results are cross-sectional images of velocity within the rock. In these images it is possible to identify where stress has a greater concentration observing the color map generated; thus, a greater velocity density area corresponding to a greater

  8. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration by acoustic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the acoustic properties of natural sediments vary and depend on many parameters such as particle size, shape, mineralogy and distribution of those parameters in sample. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the possibility of soil sediment concentration with the f and equations, which were obtained ...

  9. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  10. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  11. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  12. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  13. Acoustic transparency in two-dimensional sonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose; Torrent, Daniel [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de Vera s/n, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cai Liangwu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2009-01-15

    Acoustic transparency is studied in two-dimensional sonic crystals consisting of hexagonal distributions of cylinders with continuously varying properties. The transparency condition is achieved by selectively closing the acoustic bandgaps, which are governed by the structure factor of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown here that cylindrical scatterers with the proposed continuously varying properties are physically realizable by using metafluids based on sonic crystals. The feasibility of this proposal is analyzed by a numerical experiment based on multiple scattering theory.

  14. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems...

  15. Parametric Room Acoustic workflows with real-time acoustic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages......The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages...

  16. Acoustic confinement and Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in integrated optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Poulton, Christopher G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of acoustic mode confinement on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in optical waveguides that consist of a guiding core embedded in a solid substrate. We find that SBS can arise due to coupling to acoustic modes in three different regimes. First, the acoustic modes may be guided by total internal reflection; in this case the SBS gain depends directly on the degree of confinement of the acoustic mode in the core, which is in turn determined by the acoustic V-parameter. Second, the acoustic modes may be leaky, but may nevertheless have a sufficiently long lifetime to have a large effect on the SBS gain; the lifetime of acoustic modes in this regime depends not only on the contrast in acoustic properties between the core and the cladding, but is also highly dependent on the waveguide dimensions. Finally SBS may occur due to coupling to free modes, which exist even in the absence of acoustic confinement; we find that the cumulative effect of coupling to these non-confined modes results in signi...

  17. Enhanced sources of acoustic power surrounding AR 11429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donea, Alina; Hanson, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Multi-frequency power maps of the local acoustic oscillations show acoustic enhancements ("acoustic-power halos") at high frequencies surrounding large active region. Computational seismic holography reveals a high-frequency "acoustic-emission halo", or "seismic glory" surrounding large active regions. In this study, we have applied computational seismic holography to map the seismic seismic source density surrounding AR 11429. Studies of HMI/SDO Doppler data, shows that the "acoustic halos" and the "seismic glories" are prominent at high frequencies 5-8 mHz. We investigate morphological properties of acoustic-power and acoustic emission halos around an active region to see if they are spatially correlated. Details about the local magnetic field from vectormagnetograms of AR 11429 are included. We identify a 15" region of seismic deficit power (dark moat) shielding the white-light boundary of the active region. The size of the seismic moat is related to region of intermediate magnetic field strength. The acoustic moat is circled by the halo of enhanced seismic amplitude as well as enhanced seismic emission. Overall, the results suggest that features are related. However, if we narrow the frequency band to 5.5 - 6.5 mHz, we find that the seismic source density dominates over the local acoustic power, suggesting the existence of sources that emit more energy downward into the solar interior than upward toward the solar surface.

  18. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  19. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  20. Dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties of reduced graphene oxide-coated gold superparticles for light-triggered acoustic and thermal theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Sen; Yang, Xiangyu; Niu, Gang; Song, Jibin; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    A rational design of highly efficient photothermal agents that possess excellent light-to-heat conversion properties is a fascinating topic in nanotheranostics. Herein, we present a facile route to fabricate size-tunable reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated gold superparticles (rGO-GSPs) and demonstrate their dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. For the first time, graphene oxide (GO) was directly used as an emulsifying agent for the preparation of gold superparticles (GSPs) with near-infrared absorption by the emulsion method. Moreover, GO spontaneously deposited on the surface of GSPs could also act as the precursor of the rGO shell. Importantly, both the plasmonic coupling of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles and the interaction between GSPs and rGO endow rGO-GSPs with enhanced photothermal conversion properties, allowing rGO-GSPs to be used for sensitive photoacoustic detection and efficient photothermal ablation of tumours in vivo. This study provides a facile approach to prepare colloidal superparticles-graphene hybrid nanostructures and will pave the way toward the design and optimization of photothermal nanomaterials with improved properties for theranostic applications.A rational design of highly efficient photothermal agents that possess excellent light-to-heat conversion properties is a fascinating topic in nanotheranostics. Herein, we present a facile route to fabricate size-tunable reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated gold superparticles (rGO-GSPs) and demonstrate their dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. For the first time, graphene oxide (GO) was directly used as an emulsifying agent for the preparation of gold superparticles (GSPs) with near-infrared absorption by the emulsion method. Moreover, GO spontaneously deposited on the surface of GSPs could also act as the precursor of the rGO shell. Importantly, both the

  1. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...... oscillating plates. Furthermore, under general thermodynamic conditions, we derive the time-dependent first- and second-order equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The coupling from fluid equations to particle motion is achieved through the expressions for the streaming-induced drag...

  2. Acoustic Resonance Characteristics of Rock and Concrete Containing Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Seiji [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    In recent years, acoustic resonance has drawn great attention as a quantitative tool for characterizing properties of materials and detecting defects in both engineering and geological materials. In quasi-brittle materials such as rock and concrete, inherent fractures have a significant influence on their mechanical and hydraulic properties. Most of these fractures are partially open, providing internal boundaries that are visible to propagating seismic waves. Acoustic resonance occurs as a result of constructive and destructive interferences of propagating waves. Therefore the geometrical and mechanical properties of the fracture are also interrogated by the acoustic resonance characteristics of materials. The objective of this dissertation is to understand the acoustic resonance characteristics of fractured rock and concrete.

  3. Classical acoustic waves in damped media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, E L; Mauriz, P W

    2003-05-01

    A Green function technique is employed to investigate the propagation of classical damped acoustic waves in complex media. The calculations are based on the linear response function approach, which is very convenient to deal with this kind of problem. Both the displacement and the gradient displacement Green functions are determined. All deformations in the media are supposed to be negligible, so the motions considered here are purely acoustic waves. The damping term gamma is included in a phenomenological way into the wave vector expression. By using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the power spectrum of the acoustic waves is also derived and has interesting properties, the most important of them being a possible relation with the analysis of seismic reflection data.

  4. Dual, Hyperfast Spectral Decompositions for Sound Propagation on the Continental Shelf: Acoustic Lensing, Imaging, Communication and ’Seeing’ Inside Shadow Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-30

    wave equation (PE) [ Hardin and Tappert, 1970], well known as one of the most important wave-theoretic, range-dependent propagation models [ Jensen ...5- REFERENCES F. B. Jensen , W. A. Kuperman, M. B. Porter and H. Schmidt, Computation Ocean Acoustics, Springer, 2000. PUBLICATIONS A. R

  5. S wave propagation in acoustic anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovas, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    The acoustic anisotropic medium can be defined in two ways. The first one is known as a pseudo-acoustic approximation (Alkhalifah, 1998) that is based on the fact that in TI media, P wave propagation is weakly dependent on parameter known as "vertical S-wave velocity" (Thomsen, 1986). The standard way to define the pseudo-acoustic approximation is to set this parameter to zero. However, as it was shown later (Grechka et al., 2004), there is "S wave artifact" in such a medium. Another way is to define the stack of horizontal solid-fluid layers and perform an upscaling based on the Backus (1962) averaging. The stiffness coefficient that responds to "vertical S wave velocity" turns to zero if any of layers has zero vertical S wave velocity. In this abstract, I analyze the S wave propagation is acoustic anisotropic medium and define important kinematic properties such as the group velocity surface and Dix-type equations. The kinematic properties can easily be defined from the slowness surface. In elastic transversely isotropic medium, the equations for P and SV wave slowness surfaces are coupled. Setting "vertical S wave velocity" to zero, results in decoupling of equations. I show that the S wave group velocity surface is given by quasi-astroidal form with the reference astroid defined by vertical and horizontal projections of group velocity. I show that there are cusps attached to both vertical and horizontal symmetry axes. The new S wave parameters include vertical, horizontal and normal moveout velocities. With the help of new parameterization, suitable for S wave, I also derived the Dix-type of equations to define the effective kinematical properties of S waves in multi-layered acoustic anisotropic medium. I have shown that effective media defined from P and S waves have different parameters. I also show that there are certain symmetries between P and S waves parameters and equations. The proposed method can be used for analysis of S waves in acoustic anisotropic

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic ... 205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home ...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Provider List Member Portal Back Webinar Library Newsletter Library ... About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects ... To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit ...

  9. Diagnosing Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Diagnosing English English Arabic Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Danish French German Greek Haitian Creole Hebrew Hindi Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Romanian Spanish Diagnosing The diagnosis of an acoustic ...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Ronson and Kerri Albany Support ...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Howard of NJ Gloria hiking ...

  12. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a ...

  14. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 ... About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English ...

  15. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  16. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ... info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational ...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ... 8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn ...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Educational Video Scott at the Grand Canyon Proton Center load more hold SHIFT key to load all load all Stay Connected with ANA Newly Diagnosed Living with AN Healthcare Providers Acoustic Neuroma Association Donate Now Newly Diagnosed ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English Arabic Catalan Chinese ( ...

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Keck Medicine of USC ANWarriors ...

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Suite 108 Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world's #1 acoustic neuroma resource ... List Member Portal Webinar Library Newsletter Library Patient Info Booklets Member Login Research ANA Survey/Registry AN ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video Scott at the Grand Canyon ...

  4. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  5. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side ... Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient ...

  7. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  8. Acoustic MIMO signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yiteng; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    A timely and important book addressing a variety of acoustic signal processing problems under multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scenarios. It uniquely investigates these problems within a unified framework offering a novel and penetrating analysis.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA ... AN Healthcare Providers Acoustic Neuroma Association Donate Now Newly Diagnosed What is AN? Request a Patient Kit Treatment Options Get Support Find a Provider Discussion Forum Contact ANA Join ...

  11. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  12. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 7/1/15 to 12/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...shortening of the water column); 2.) Explicitly defined the geo-acoustics so that both models had the same sponge ; 3.) Output the complete computational...chosen because this VLA was spaced at /2 at 250Hz and is therefore beamforming capable, covering the conjugate depth. An ambient noise model was

  13. Acoustic signal characteristics during IR laser ablation and their consequences for acoustic tissue discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahen, Kester; Vogel, Alfred

    2000-06-01

    IR laser ablation of skin is accompanied by acoustic signals the characteristics of which are closely linked to the ablation dynamics. A discrimination between different tissue layers, for example necrotic and vital tissue during laser burn debridement, is therefore possible by an analysis of the acoustic signal. We were able to discriminate tissue layers by evaluating the acoustic energy. To get a better understanding of the tissue specificity of the ablation noise, we investigated the correlation between sample water content, ablation dynamics, and characteristics of the acoustic signal. A free running Er:YAG laser with a maximum pulse energy of 2 J and a spot diameter of 5 mm was used to ablate gelatin samples with different water content. The ablation noise in air was detected using a piezoelectric transducer with a bandwidth of 1 MHz, and the acoustic signal generated inside the ablated sample was measured simultaneously ba a piezoelectric transducer in contact with the sample. Laser flash Schlieren photography was used to investigate the expansion velocity of the vapor plume and the velocity of the ejected material. We observed large differences between the ablation dynamics and material ejection velocity for gelatin samples with 70% and 90% water content. These differences cannot be explained by the small change of the gelatin absorption coefficient, but are largely related to differences of the mechanical properties of the sample. The different ablation dynamics are responsible for an increase of the acoustic energy by a factor of 10 for the sample with the higher water content.

  14. Sound reduction by metamaterial-based acoustic enclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In many practical systems, acoustic radiation control on noise sources contained within a finite volume by an acoustic enclosure is of great importance, but difficult to be accomplished at low frequencies due to the enhanced acoustic-structure interaction. In this work, we propose to use acoustic metamaterials as the enclosure to efficiently reduce sound radiation at their negative-mass frequencies. Based on a circularly-shaped metamaterial model, sound radiation properties by either central or eccentric sources are analyzed by numerical simulations for structured metamaterials. The parametric analyses demonstrate that the barrier thickness, the cavity size, the source type, and the eccentricity of the source have a profound effect on the sound reduction. It is found that increasing the thickness of the metamaterial barrier is an efficient approach to achieve large sound reduction over the negative-mass frequencies. These results are helpful in designing highly efficient acoustic enclosures for blockage of sound in low frequencies.

  15. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  16. Temperature-dependent competition between adsorption and aggregation of a cellulose ether--simultaneous use of optical and acoustical techniques for investigating surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodvik, Rasmus; Macakova, Lubica; Karlson, Leif; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per

    2012-06-26

    Adsorption of the temperature-responsive polymer hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) from an aqueous solution onto hydrophobized silica was followed well above the bulk instability temperature (T(2)) in temperature cycle experiments. Two complementary techniques, QCM-D and ellipsometry, were utilized simultaneously to probe the same substrate immersed in polymer solution. The interfacial processes were correlated with changes in polymer aggregation and viscosity of polymer solutions, as monitored by light scattering and rheological measurements. The simultaneous use of ellipsometry and QCM-D, and the possibility to follow layer properties up to 80 °C, well above the T(2) temperature, are both novel developments. A moderate increase in adsorbed amount with temperature was found below T(2), whereas a significant increase in the adsorbed mass and changes in layer properties were observed around the T(2) temperature where the bulk viscosity increases significantly. Thus, there is a clear correlation between transition temperatures in the adsorbed layer and in bulk solution, and we discuss this in relation to a newly proposed model that considers competition between aggregation and adsorption/deposition. A much larger temperature response above the T(2) temperature was found for adsorbed layers of HPMC than for layers of methyl cellulose. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  17. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  18. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  19. Interactions in an acoustic world

    CERN Document Server

    Simaciu, Ion; Borsos, Zoltan; Bradac, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to complete an earlier paper where the acoustic world was introduced. This is accomplished by analyzing the interactions which occur between the inhomogeneities of the acoustic medium, which are induced by the acoustic vibrations traveling in the medium. When a wave packet travels in a medium, the medium becomes inhomogeneous. The spherical wave packet behaves like an acoustic spherical lens for the acoustic plane waves. According to the principle of causality, there is an interaction between the wave and plane wave packet. In specific conditions the wave packet behaves as an acoustic black hole.

  20. Metamaterial based embedded acoustic filters for structural applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Zhu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the use of acoustic metamaterials to design structural materials with frequency selective characteristics. By exploiting the properties of acoustic metamaterials, we tailor the propagation characteristics of the host structure to effectively filter the constitutive harmonics of an incoming broadband excitation. The design approach exploits the characteristics of acoustic waveguides coupled by cavity modes. By properly designing the cavity we can tune the corresponding resonant mode and, therefore, coupling the waveguide at a prescribed frequency. This structural design can open new directions to develop broadband passive vibrations and noise control systems fully integrated in structural components.

  1. Acoustic behavior of Negative Poisson’s Ratio Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    production of continuous or large sheets of the material. The fourth plot (Fig. 13) compares foams of various pore densities with a 4 mil polyethylene film...has nearly the same influence on acoustic properties as production of a negative Poisson’s ratio. Acoustic absorptions found for the different...converted to a voltage ratio by: n = 10exp(dB/20) Then n-I and n+l were calculated and subsituted into the formula for Alpha given above. ACOUSTIC

  2. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  3. Ab initio study of mechanical and thermo-acoustic properties of tough ceramics: applications to HfO{sub 2} in its cubic and orthorhombic phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponce, C A [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Campus Universitario, Avenida Libertad 5600, CP 3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Casali, R A [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, y Naturales y Agrimensura, UNNE, Campus Universitario, Avenida Libertad 5600, CP 3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Caravaca, M A [Departamento de Fisico, Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNNE, Avenida Las Heras 727, CP 3500, Resistencia (Argentina)

    2008-01-30

    By means of the ab initio all-electron new full-potential linear-muffin-tin orbitals method, calculations were made for elastic constants C{sub 11}, C{sub 12} and C{sub 44} for Si, ZrO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} in their cubic phase, and constants C{sub 11}, C{sub 22}, C{sub 33}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 13}, C{sub 23}, C{sub 44}, C{sub 55} and C{sub 66} for HfO{sub 2} in its orthorhombic phase. Using the Voigt and Reuss theory, estimations were made for polycrystals of their bulk, shear and Young moduli, and Poisson coefficients. The speed of elastic wave propagations and Debye temperatures were estimated for polycrystals built from Si and the above mentioned compounds. The semicore 4f{sup 14} electrons should be included in the valence set of Hf atom in this all-electron approach if accurate results for elastic properties under pressures are looked for.

  4. Acoustic transparency and opacity using Fano Interferences in Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Khelif, A.

    2015-08-04

    We investigate both experimentally and theoretically how to generate the acoustical analogue of the Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. This phenomenon arises from Fano resonances originating from constructive and destructive interferences of a narrow discrete resonance with a broad spectral line or continuum. Measurements were realized on a double-cavity structure by using a Kundt’s Tube. Transmission properties reveal an asymmetric lineshape of the transmission that leads to acoustic transparency.

  5. Analysis of Reverberation Time Field Measurement Results in Building Acoustics

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mašović; M. Öğüç

    2013-01-01

    Sound level difference between two rooms depends on both sound reduction between the rooms and their acoustical properties, such as the absorption in the receiving room. In order to abstract the influence of the rooms and assess only the sound reduction between them, relevant building acoustics standards offer two ways of normalizing a measured sound level difference – according to the reverberation time and the equivalent sound absorption area in the receiving room. In both cases measurement...

  6. Spatial filtering of audible sound with acoustic landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shuping; Tao, Jiancheng; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces manipulate waves with specially designed structures and achieve properties that natural materials cannot offer. Similar surfaces work in audio frequency range as well and lead to marvelous acoustic phenomena that can be perceived by human ears. Being intrigued by the famous Maoshan Bugle phenomenon, we investigate large scale metasurfaces consisting of periodic steps of sizes comparable to the wavelength of audio frequency in both time and space domains. We propose a the...

  7. Sea Turtle Acoustic Telemetry Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Acoustic transmitters attached to sea turtles captured in various fishing gear enable the animals to be passively tracked. Acoustic receivers set up in an array...

  8. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  9. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  10. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  11. Seamount acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  12. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  13. Acoustic evaluation of loblolly pine tree- and lumber-length logs allows for segregation of lumber modulus of elasticity, not for modulus of rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Alexander Butler; Joseph Dahlen; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Cristian Montes; Finto Antony; Richard F. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Key message Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) logs can be evaluated using acoustic velocity whereby threshold acoustic velocity values can be set to ensure lumber meets specified mechanical property design values for modulus of elasticity. Context...

  14. Thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic anisotropy examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsevich, S N

    2017-03-01

    Thallium bromide iodide crystal also known as KRS-5 is the well known material used in far infrared radiation applications for optical windows and lenses fabrication. The main advantage of this material is the transparency in wide band of wavelengths from 0.53 to 50μm. Despite such advantages as transparency and large acousto-optic figure of merit values, KRS-5 is rarely used in acousto-optics. Nevertheless this material seems to be promising for far infrared acousto-optic applications. The acoustic and acousto-optic properties of KRS-5 needed for the full use in optoelectronics are not well understood to date. In this paper the detailed examination of thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic properties is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  16. Good acoustics central to recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Good acoustic conditions in hospitals and other healthcare facilities are known not only to benefit patients by creating an environment that facilitates rest, sleeping, consultation and treatment, but also clinical and nursing staff. At the recent Healthcare Estates conference, Richard Budd of acoustic engineering and noise and vibration consultants Sound Research Laboratories, discussed the revised guidance on good acoustic design in a recently published Health Technical Memorandum, HTM 08-01-Acoustics.

  17. Quantitative Determination of Lateral Mode Dispersion in Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators through Laser Acoustic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Telschow; John D. Larson III

    2006-10-01

    Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators are useful for many signal processing applications. Detailed knowledge of their operation properties are needed to optimize their design for specific applications. The finite size of these resonators precludes their use in single acoustic modes; rather, multiple wave modes, such as, lateral wave modes are always excited concurrently. In order to determine the contributions of these modes, we have been using a newly developed full-field laser acoustic imaging approach to directly measure their amplitude and phase throughout the resonator. This paper describes new results comparing modeling of both elastic and piezoelectric effects in the active material with imaging measurement of all excited modes. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a quantitative determination of excited mode amplitude and wavenumber at any frequency. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode excitation and dispersion for the device under test allowing mode identification and comparison with predicted operational properties. Discussion and analysis are presented for modes near the first longitudinal thickness resonance (~900 MHz) in an AlN thin film resonator. Plate wave modeling, taking account of material crystalline orientation, elastic and piezoelectric properties and overlayer metallic films, will be discussed in relation to direct image measurements.

  18. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  19. Design, characterization and modeling of biobased acoustic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari Mosanenzadeh, Shahrzad

    Polymeric open cell foams are widely used as sound absorbers in sectors such as automobile, aerospace, transportation and building industries, yet there is a need to improve sound absorption of these foams through understanding the relation between cell morphology and acoustic properties of porous material. Due to complicated microscopic structure of open cell foams, investigating the relation between foam morphology and acoustic properties is rather intricate and still an open problem in the field. The focus of this research is to design and develop biobased open cell foams for acoustic applications to replace conventional petrochemical based foams as well as investigating the link between cell morphology and macroscopic properties of open cell porous structures. To achieve these objectives, two industrially produced biomaterials, polylactide (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and their composites were examined and highly porous biobased foams were fabricated by particulate leaching and compression molding. Acoustic absorption capability of these foams was enhanced utilizing the effect of co-continuous blends to form a bimodal porous structure. To tailor mechanical and acoustic properties of biobased foams, blends of PLA and PHA were studied to reach the desired mechanical and viscoelastic properties. To enhance acoustic properties of porous medium for having a broad band absorption effect, cell structure must be appropriately graded. Such porous structures with microstructural gradation are called Functionally Graded Materials (FGM). A novel graded foam structure was designed with superior sound absorption to demonstrate the effect of cell arrangement on performance of acoustic fixtures. Acoustic measurements were performed in a two microphone impedance tube and acoustic theory of Johnson-Champoux-Allard was applied to the fabricated foams to determine micro cellular properties such as tortuosity, viscous and thermal lengths from sound absorption impedance tube

  20. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...... of descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  1. A new acoustic lens material for large area detectors in photoacoustic breast tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Wenfeng; van Hespen, Johan C G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic lenses made of acrylic plastic (PMMA) have been used to enlarge the acceptance angle of sensitive large surface area detectors and improve lateral resolution. However, PMMA lenses introduce image artifacts due to ultrasound internal reflections within the lenses. In this work we investigated this issue proposing a new lens material Stycast 1090SI. We characterized the acoustic properties of the proposed material in comparison with PMMA. Detector performance using negative lenses with the two materials, was tested using finite element simulation and experiment. Further the image quality of a photoacoustic tomography system was studied using k-Wave simulation and experiment. Our acoustic characterization showed that Stycast 1090SI has tissue-like acoustic impedance, high speed of sound and low acoustic attenuation. Both acoustic lenses show significant enlargement of detector acceptance angle and lateral resolution improvement. However, image artifacts induced by acoustic lenses are reduced using the p...

  2. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    material (such as a piezoelectric ceramic , piezocomposite, or a magnetostrictive ferromagnetic compound). This electrical excitation creates a...Traditional acoustic transduction typically begins with the generation of electrical excitation pulsed through an amplifier into an electro-acoustic...mechanical vibration that is then converted into an acoustic wave to produce sound. The lower the preferred transmitting frequency (and hence a longer

  4. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  5. Acoustic and categorical dissimilarity of musical timbre: Evidence from asymmetriesbetween acoustic and chimeric sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eSiedenburg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Exp. 1. A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Exp. 2A. We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Exp. 2B and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R^2 = .88 was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception.

  6. Acoustic and Categorical Dissimilarity of Musical Timbre: Evidence from Asymmetries Between Acoustic and Chimeric Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Kai; Jones-Mollerup, Kiray; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Experiment 1). A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Experiment 2A). We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Experiment 2B) and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R2 = 0.88) was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception. PMID:26779086

  7. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  8. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-15

    conducted to set up and run specific range-dependent benchmark problems . During this period of performance Dr. Heaney successfully completed the...This inversion led to a compressional speed of 1560 m/s and an attenuation of a=0-10.0 dB/l). Peregrine has been submitted to OAML for inclusion...was stored on a 3 km x 3 km planar array of receivers, which was then beamformed to determine the arrival angle of the narrowband signal. During the

  9. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  10. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  11. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  12. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    Society of America 125 (4), 1394-1402 (2008). 2 J.W. Goodman , Introduction to Fourier Optics . (Roberts & Company, 2005). 3 George L Pickard and William...3 1. Introduction ...Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-063015 Technical Progress Report 1. Introduction The goal of this research is to increase our understanding

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects ... Groups Is a support group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer Support Program Community Connections Overview Find a Meeting ...

  14. Select Internet Resources on Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Davis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Merriam-Webster (2016 defines acoustics as, “a science that deals with the production, control, transmission, reception, and effects of sounds.” According to Rossing (2014, the study of acoustics began in ancient Greece with Pythagoras’ study of vibrating strings on musical instruments. Since those early beginnings, famous scientists including Rayleigh, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison, have helped expand the field of acoustics to include architectural, physical, engineering, structural, underwater, physiological and psychological, musical acoustics, and speech. Acoustics is a highly interdisciplinary field and researchers may need resources from physics, medicine, and engineering to understand all aspects of their research.

  15. Holograms for acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  16. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  17. Tunable cylindrical shell as an element in acoustic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Titovich, Alexey S

    2014-01-01

    Elastic cylindrical shells are fitted with an internal mechanism which is optimized so that, in the quasi-static regime, the combined system exhibits prescribed effective acoustic properties. The mechanism consists of a central mass supported by an axisymmetric distribution of elastic stiffeners. By appropriate selection of the mass and stiffness of the internal mechanism, the shell's effective acoustic properties (bulk modulus and density) can be tuned as desired. Subsonic flexural waves excited in the shell by the attachment of stiffeners are suppressed by including a sufficiently large number of such stiffeners. Effectiveness of the proposed metamaterial is demonstrated by matching the properties of a thin aluminum shell with a polymer insert to those of water. The scattering cross section in water is nearly zero over a broad range of frequencies at the lower end of the spectrum. By arranging the tuned shells in an array the resulting acoustic metamaterial is capable of steering waves. As an example, a cyl...

  18. THE EFFECT OF SINGING TRAINING ON ACOUSTIC PARAMETERS OF VOICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Sibel Jagoda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyze the impact of singing training on the acoustic properties of students’ voices. The participants of the stuy were 20 students between 19 and 32 without absenteeism ranging from the 1st to the 4th grade. The voices of 12 female and 8 male students, enrolled at Selcuk University Dilek Sabancı State Conservatory Opera Main-department, Sub-department of Vocal Arts were recorded throughout 2014-2015 academic year using Shure Sm 48 model microphone in order to determine their acoustic properties using CSL (Computerized Speech Laboratory 4500 to the computer with Kay Elemetrics MDVP (Multi Dimensional Voice Program. In order to determine changes in the acoustic parameters and evaluate the effectiveness of the singing training given, a single sample -pre and post-test research design was used. Hence, among the acoustic properties, F0, (Fundamental Frequency F1, F2, F3, F4, F5, formant frequencies, jitter (%, shimmer (%, NHR (Ratio of harmonic noise parameters were evaluated. The statistical analyses made for the comparison of MDVP parameters before and after the vocal training revealed no statistically significant difference in the students’ F0, Jitter, Shimmer, NHR, F1, F2, F3, and F4 acoustic parameters. However, the F5 formant value revealed statistically significant differences in all the students and a statistically significant difference was seen in the F0 parameter and F5 formant values of female students. Fundamental frequency (F0 is an important parameter changing throughout the singing training process among the female students’ acoustic characteristics. The increase in the F5 formant values of female students and the acoustic properties of all students within normal ranges could be considered as an indicator of the positive impact of the singing training received.

  19. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  20. Integrated assessment of thermal performance and room acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephane, C.; Iain, M. [Energy Systems Research Unit, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    The acoustical and thermal properties of materials have contradictory behaviour. Constructions, which provide good acoustic absorption usually, have a low thermal inertia and vice versa. It is therefore important to find a balance between acoustic absorption and thermal inertia in order to deliver well designed buildings. This paper presents an integrated solution, developed to assess the room acoustics performance of a building within the ESP-r environment. The approach used in this work applies the diffuse-sound field theory to calculate the reverberation time via three analytical equations: Sabine, Eyring and Millington approaches. The calculation includes the absorption of the space boundaries, the occupants and furniture. Also included is the air absorption, which takes into account the air temperature and humidity from the thermal simulation. Finally, a case study has been analysed. The simulation results have been compared with measurements from a monitored building to verify the validity of the approach. (author)

  1. Modeling structural acoustic properties of loudspeaker cabinets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luan, Yu

    In this dissertation, a theoretical/numerical methodology is presented for coarse and fast predictions of cabinet vibrations. The study is focused on vibrations of rib-stiffened panels by improving a smearing technique and employing it into finite element modeling. The computationally efficient s...

  2. Acoustic property measurements in a photoacoustic imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; van Leeuwen, Ton; Depeursinge, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    Photoacoustics is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the contrast available to optical imaging with the resolution that is possessed by ultrasound imaging. The technique is based on generating ultrasound from absorbing structures in tissue using pulsed light. In photoacoustic (PA) computerized

  3. Acoustic Properties of a Renovated Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Januševičius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the effects of partitions, ceilings and facades on noise insulation in the renovated different buildings. The conducted experiments were aimed at analyzing partitions of 120 mm brick mounted gypsum panels while other walls were 520 mm thick and plastered on both sides. Under natural conditions, sound insulation factors of facades were measured and compared according to comfort classes. The obtained results revealed that thick brick walls of 520 mm insulated the sound of 58 decibels (dB (class B. In contrast, 120 mm brick masonry partition reduced sound only to 48 dB which is class E and agrees with the lowest class of sound insulation. We also calculated the sound insulation factor applying three formulas considering the mass law of sound insulation and comparing it with other previous studies. The paper examines and discusses the findings of the performed calculations and measurements.Article in Lithuanian

  4. Acoustic levitation of an object larger than the acoustic wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Okina, Fábio T A; Bernassau, Anne L; Adamowski, Julio C

    2017-06-01

    Levitation and manipulation of objects by sound waves have a wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, material sciences, and engineering. However, the current acoustic levitation techniques are mainly restricted to particles that are much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this work, it is shown that acoustic standing waves can be employed to stably levitate an object much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The levitation of a large slightly curved object weighting 2.3 g is demonstrated by using a device formed by two 25 kHz ultrasonic Langevin transducers connected to an aluminum plate. The sound wave emitted by the device provides a vertical acoustic radiation force to counteract gravity and a lateral restoring force that ensure horizontal stability to the levitated object. In order to understand the levitation stability, a numerical model based on the finite element method is used to determine the acoustic radiation force that acts on the object.

  5. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  6. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Piezoelectric Ceramics by Coulomb Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Anowarul; Shelke, Amit; Pluta, Mieczyslaw; Kundu, Tribikram; Pietsch, Ullrich; Grill, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The transport properties of bulk and guided acoustic waves travelling in a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) disc, originally manufactured to serve as ultrasonic transducer, have been monitored by scanned Coulomb coupling. The images are recorded by excitation and detection of ultrasound with local electric field probes via piezoelectric coupling. A narrow pulse has been used for excitation. Broadband coupling is achieved since neither mechanical nor electrical resonances are involved. The velocities of the traveling acoustic waves determined from the images are compared with characteristic velocities calculated from material properties listed by the manufacturer of the PZT plate.

  7. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  8. Fundamentals of Physical Acoustics

    OpenAIRE

    Leclaire, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Book review: Fundamentals of Physical Acoustics D.T. Blackstock; Wiley & Sons Ltd, New York, 2000, 541 pages, ISBN 0-471-3197; This book is an excellent piece of work. The text is extremely clear and goes a long way towards meeting the declared pedagogical target. The author has written a comprehensive text. The proportions of equations and explanations/interpretations are particularly well balanced. Throughout the book, the context and the validity domain for any equation derived are clearly...

  9. Ion Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Murphy and L. C. Aamodt , "Signal Enhancement in Photothermal Imaging Produced by Three Dimensional Heat Flow", Appl. Phys. Lett. 39, 519 (1981); L. C... Aamodt and J. C. Murphy, "Photothermal Measurements Using a Localized Excitation Source", J. Appl. Phys. 52, 4903 (1981) (9) R. L. Thomas, L. D. Favro...25 (23) J. C. Murphy, F. G. Satkiewicz and L. C. Aamodt , "Ion Acoustic Imaging of Buried Flaws in Aluminum", Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE

  10. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  11. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient.

  12. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Purwar, Y.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Slump, Cornelis H.; van Leeuwen, Ton; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  13. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  14. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  15. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  16. Analytical modelling for predicting the sound field of planar acoustic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Xin; Fang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    An analytical model is built to predict the acoustic fields of acoustic metasurfaces. The acoustic fields are investigated for a Gaussian sound beam incident on the acoustic metasurfaces. The Gaussian sound beam is decomposed into a set of discrete elementary plane waves. The diffraction caused by the acoustic metasurfaces can be obtained using this analytical model, which is validated with the numerical simulations for the different incident angles of the Gaussian sound beam. This model overcomes the limitation of the method based on the generalised Snell's law which can only predict the direction of a specific diffracted order. Actually, this analytical model can be also used to predict the sound fields of acoustic metasurfaces under any incident sound if its Fourier transforms exist. This conclusion is demonstrated by studying the sound field for a point sound source incident on the acoustic metasurface. The acoustic admittances of acoustic metasurfaces are required in the calculation of the analytical model. Therefore, a numerical method for obtaining the effective acoustic admittances is proposed for the structurally complex metasurfaces without the analytical expressions of material properties, such as equivalent density and sound speed.

  17. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  18. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  19. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  20. Acoustic communication at the water's edge: evolutionary insights from a mudskipper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Polgar

    Full Text Available Coupled behavioural observations and acoustical recordings of aggressive dyadic contests showed that the mudskipper Periophthalmodon septemradiatus communicates acoustically while out of water. An analysis of intraspecific variability showed that specific acoustic components may act as tags for individual recognition, further supporting the sounds' communicative value. A correlative analysis amongst acoustical properties and video-acoustical recordings in slow-motion supported first hypotheses on the emission mechanism. Acoustic transmission through the wet exposed substrate was also discussed. These observations were used to support an "exaptation hypothesis", i.e. the maintenance of key adaptations during the first stages of water-to-land vertebrate eco-evolutionary transitions (based on eco-evolutionary and palaeontological considerations, through a comparative bioacoustic analysis of aquatic and semiterrestrial gobiid taxa. In fact, a remarkable similarity was found between mudskipper vocalisations and those emitted by gobioids and other soniferous benthonic fishes.

  1. Acoustic characterization of Thiel liver for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsios, Ioannis; Joy, Joyce; Mihcin, Senay; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure the essential acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient, attenuation coefficient, of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver. The Thiel embalmed tissue can be a promising, pre-clinical model to study liver treatment with Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS). Using a single-element transducer and the contact pulse-echo method, the acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient and attenuation coefficient of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver were measured. The Thiel embalmed livers had higher impedance, similar reflection and lower attenuation compared to the fresh tissue. Embalming liver with Thiel fluid affects its acoustic properties. During MRgFUS sonication of a Thiel organ, more focused ultrasound (FUS) will be backscattered by the organ, and higher acoustic powers are required to reach coagulation levels (temperatures >56 °C).

  2. Acoustic Communication at the Water's Edge: Evolutionary Insights from a Mudskipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgar, Gianluca; Malavasi, Stefano; Cipolato, Giacomo; Georgalas, Vyron; Clack, Jennifer A.; Torricelli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    Coupled behavioural observations and acoustical recordings of aggressive dyadic contests showed that the mudskipper Periophthalmodon septemradiatus communicates acoustically while out of water. An analysis of intraspecific variability showed that specific acoustic components may act as tags for individual recognition, further supporting the sounds' communicative value. A correlative analysis amongst acoustical properties and video-acoustical recordings in slow-motion supported first hypotheses on the emission mechanism. Acoustic transmission through the wet exposed substrate was also discussed. These observations were used to support an “exaptation hypothesis”, i.e. the maintenance of key adaptations during the first stages of water-to-land vertebrate eco-evolutionary transitions (based on eco-evolutionary and palaeontological considerations), through a comparative bioacoustic analysis of aquatic and semiterrestrial gobiid taxa. In fact, a remarkable similarity was found between mudskipper vocalisations and those emitted by gobioids and other soniferous benthonic fishes. PMID:21738663

  3. Design of an acoustic metamaterial lens using genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dennis; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2012-10-01

    The present work demonstrates a genetic algorithm approach to optimizing the effective material parameters of an acoustic metamaterial. The target device is an acoustic gradient index (GRIN) lens in air, which ideally possesses a maximized index of refraction, minimized frequency dependence of the material properties, and minimized acoustic impedance mismatch. Applying this algorithm results in complex designs with certain common features, and effective material properties that are better than those present in previous designs. After modifying the optimized unit cell designs to make them suitable for fabrication, a two-dimensional lens was built and experimentally tested. Its performance was in good agreement with simulations. Overall, the optimization approach was able to improve the refractive index but at the cost of increased frequency dependence. The optimal solutions found by the algorithm provide a numerical description of how the material parameters compete with one another and thus describes the level of performance achievable in the GRIN lens.

  4. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  5. Observation of terahertz radiation coherently generated by acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Reed, Evan J.; Kim, Ki-Yong; Glownia, James H.; Howard, William M.; Piner, Edwin L.; Roberts, John C.

    2009-04-01

    Over the past decade, pioneering and innovative experiments using subpicosecond lasers have demonstrated the generation and detection of acoustic and shock waves in materials with terahertz frequencies, the highest possible frequency acoustic waves. In addition to groundbreaking demonstrations of acoustic solitons, these experiments have led to new techniques for probing the structure of thin films. Terahertz-frequency electromagnetic radiation has been used in applications as diverse as molecular and material excitations, charge transfer, imaging and plasma dynamics. However, at present, existing approaches to detect and measure the time dependence of terahertz-frequency strain waves in materials use direct optical probes-time-resolved interferometry or reflectrometry. Piezoelectric-based strain gauges have been used in acoustic shock and strain wave experiments for decades, but the time resolution of such devices is limited to ~100ps and slower, the timescale of electronic recording technology. We have recently predicted that terahertz-frequency acoustic waves can be detected by observing terahertz radiation emitted when the acoustic wave propagates past an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric coefficients. Here, we report the first experimental observation of this fundamentally new phenomenon and demonstrate that it can be used to probe structural properties of thin films.

  6. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  7. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Lift-Off Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janie D.

    2011-01-01

    The lift-off acoustic (LOA) environment is an important design factor for any launch vehicle. For the Ares I vehicle, the LOA environments were derived by scaling flight data from other launch vehicles. The Ares I LOA predicted environments are compared to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) preliminary results.

  8. Acoustic Transducers as Passive Cooperative Targets for Wireless Sensing of the Sub-Surface World: Challenges of Probing with Ground Penetrating RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, Jean-Michel; Martin, Gilles; Goavec-Mérou, Gwenhael; Rabus, David; Alzuaga, Sébastien; Arapan, Lilia; Sagnard, Marianne; Carry, Émile

    2018-01-16

    Passive wireless transducers are used as sensors, probed by a RADAR system. A simple way to separate the returning signal from the clutter is to delay the response, so that the clutter decays before the echoes are received. This can be achieved by introducing a fixed delay in the sensor design. Acoustic wave transducers are ideally suited as cooperative targets for passive, wireless sensing. The incoming electromagnetic pulse is converted into an acoustic wave, propagated on the sensor substrate surface, and reflected as an electromagnetic echo. According to a known law, the acoustic wave propagation velocity depends on the physical quantity under investigation, which is then measured as an echo delay. Both conversions between electromagnetic and acoustic waves are based on the piezoelectric property of the substrate of which the sensor is made. Investigating underground sensing, we address the problems of using GPR (Ground-Penetrating RADAR) for probing cooperative targets. The GPR is a good candidate for this application because it provides an electromagnetic source and receiver, as well as echo recording tools. Instead of designing dedicated electronics, we choose a commercially available, reliable and rugged instrument. The measurement range depends on parameters like antenna radiation pattern, radio spectrum matching between GPR and the target, antenna-sensor impedance matching and the transfer function of the target. We demonstrate measurements at depths ranging from centimeters to circa 1 m in a sandbox. In our application, clutter rejection requires delays between the emitted pulse and echoes to be longer than in the regular use of the GPR for geophysical measurements. This delay, and the accuracy needed for sensing, challenge the GPR internal time base. In the GPR units we used, the drift turns out to be incompatible with the targeted application. The available documentation of other models and brands suggests that this is a rather general limitation. We

  9. Biodiversity sampling using a global acoustic approach: contrasting sites with microendemics in New Caledonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Gasc

    Full Text Available New Caledonia is a Pacific island with a unique biodiversity showing an extreme microendemism. Many species distributions observed on this island are extremely restricted, localized to mountains or rivers making biodiversity evaluation and conservation a difficult task. A rapid biodiversity assessment method based on acoustics was recently proposed. This method could help to document the unique spatial structure observed in New Caledonia. Here, this method was applied in an attempt to reveal differences among three mountain sites (Mandjélia, Koghis and Aoupinié with similar ecological features and species richness level, but with high beta diversity according to different microendemic assemblages. In each site, several local acoustic communities were sampled with audio recorders. An automatic acoustic sampling was run on these three sites for a period of 82 successive days. Acoustic properties of animal communities were analysed without any species identification. A frequency spectral complexity index (NP was used as an estimate of the level of acoustic activity and a frequency spectral dissimilarity index (Df assessed acoustic differences between pairs of recordings. As expected, the index NP did not reveal significant differences in the acoustic activity level between the three sites. However, the acoustic variability estimated by the index Df , could first be explained by changes in the acoustic communities along the 24-hour cycle and second by acoustic dissimilarities between the three sites. The results support the hypothesis that global acoustic analyses can detect acoustic differences between sites with similar species richness and similar ecological context, but with different species assemblages. This study also demonstrates that global acoustic methods applied at broad spatial and temporal scales could help to assess local biodiversity in the challenging context of microendemism. The method could be deployed over large areas, and

  10. Biodiversity sampling using a global acoustic approach: contrasting sites with microendemics in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, Amandine; Sueur, Jérôme; Pavoine, Sandrine; Pellens, Roseli; Grandcolas, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    New Caledonia is a Pacific island with a unique biodiversity showing an extreme microendemism. Many species distributions observed on this island are extremely restricted, localized to mountains or rivers making biodiversity evaluation and conservation a difficult task. A rapid biodiversity assessment method based on acoustics was recently proposed. This method could help to document the unique spatial structure observed in New Caledonia. Here, this method was applied in an attempt to reveal differences among three mountain sites (Mandjélia, Koghis and Aoupinié) with similar ecological features and species richness level, but with high beta diversity according to different microendemic assemblages. In each site, several local acoustic communities were sampled with audio recorders. An automatic acoustic sampling was run on these three sites for a period of 82 successive days. Acoustic properties of animal communities were analysed without any species identification. A frequency spectral complexity index (NP) was used as an estimate of the level of acoustic activity and a frequency spectral dissimilarity index (Df ) assessed acoustic differences between pairs of recordings. As expected, the index NP did not reveal significant differences in the acoustic activity level between the three sites. However, the acoustic variability estimated by the index Df , could first be explained by changes in the acoustic communities along the 24-hour cycle and second by acoustic dissimilarities between the three sites. The results support the hypothesis that global acoustic analyses can detect acoustic differences between sites with similar species richness and similar ecological context, but with different species assemblages. This study also demonstrates that global acoustic methods applied at broad spatial and temporal scales could help to assess local biodiversity in the challenging context of microendemism. The method could be deployed over large areas, and could help to

  11. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  12. Frequency steerable acoustic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, Matteo

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an active research area devoted to the assessment of the structural integrity of critical components of aerospace, civil and mechanical systems. Guided wave methods have been proposed for SHM of plate-like structures using permanently attached piezoelectric transducers, which generate and sense waves to evaluate the presence of damage. Effective interrogation of structural health is often facilitated by sensors and actuators with the ability to perform electronic, i.e. phased array, scanning. The objective of this research is to design an innovative directional piezoelectric transducer to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health. The proposed Frequency Steerable Acoustic Transducers (FSATs) are characterized by a spatial arrangement of active material which leads to directional characteristics varying with frequency. Thus FSATs can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the FSATs is obtained through a theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. The FSAT configurations analyzed in this work are a quadrilateral array and a geometry which corresponds to a spiral in the wavenumber domain. The quadrilateral array is experimentally validated, confirming the concept of frequency-dependent directionality. Its limited directivity is improved by the Wavenumber Spiral FSAT (WS-FSAT), which, instead, is characterized by a continuous frequency dependent directionality. Preliminary validations of the WS-FSAT, using a laser doppler vibrometer, are followed by the implementation of the WS-FSAT as a properly shaped piezo transducer. The prototype is first used for localization of acoustic broadband sources. Signal processing

  13. Acoustics in Halls for Speech and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Anders C.

    This chapter deals specifically with concepts, tools, and architectural variables of importance when designing auditoria for speech and music. The focus will be on cultivating the useful components of the sound in the room rather than on avoiding noise from outside or from installations, which is dealt with in Chap. 11. The chapter starts by presenting the subjective aspects of the room acoustic experience according to consensus at the time of writing. Then follows a description of their objective counterparts, the objective room acoustic parameters, among which the classical reverberation time measure is only one of many, but still of fundamental value. After explanations on how these parameters can be measured and predicted during the design phase, the remainder of the chapter deals with how the acoustic properties can be controlled by the architectural design of auditoria. This is done by presenting the influence of individual design elements as well as brief descriptions of halls designed for specific purposes, such as drama, opera, and symphonic concerts. Finally, some important aspects of loudspeaker installations in auditoria are briefly touched upon.

  14. Acoustic bandpass filters employing shaped resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, M.; Bednařík, M.

    2016-11-01

    This work deals with acoustic bandpass filters realized by shaped waveguide-elements inserted between two parts of an acoustic transmission line with generally different characteristic impedance. It is shown that the formation of a wide passband is connected with the eigenfrequency spectrum of the filter element which acts as an acoustic resonator and that the required filter shape substantially depends on whether the filter characteristic impedance is higher or lower than the characteristic impedance of the waveguide. It is further shown that this class of filters can be realized even without the need of different characteristic impedance. A heuristic technique is proposed to design filter shapes with required transmission properties; it is employed for optimization of low-frequency bandpass filters as well as for design of bandpass filters with wide passband surrounded by wide stopbands as it is typical for phononic crystals, however, in this case the arrangement is much simpler as it consists of only one simple-shaped homogeneous element.

  15. Acoustic and perceptual correlates of syllable weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Matthew; Jany, Carmen; Nash, Carlos

    2005-09-01

    Differences between languages in the stress-attracting properties of various syllable types (syllable weight) are associated with phonetic differences. Certain languages that preferentially stress CVC syllables (i.e., treat CVC as heavy) fail to display substantial vowel shortening in CVC, unlike languages that treat CVC as non-stress-attracting or light [Broselow et al. (1997)]. Furthermore, CVC has greater energy (intensity integrated over time) in languages in which it is heavy relative to languages with light CVC [Gordon (2002)]. This paper compares multiple potential acoustic and perceptual correlates of syllable weight. A representative cross section of syllable types in words uttered by speakers of four languages was recorded. In two languages (Arabic, Hindi), CVC is heavy; in two languages (Mongolian, Malayalam), CVC is light. Three measurements were taken: duration of the syllable rime, acoustic intensity integrated over the rime, and a measure of perceptual energy of the rime incorporating various factors (e.g., temporal integration and adaptation, bandpass filtering). Results thus far indicate that a measure of prominence factoring in both intensity and duration better distinguishes languages on the basis of weight criterion than a simple measure of duration. The perceptual energy measure provides a slightly better fit than acoustic energy. [Work supported by NSF.

  16. Acoustic Model Testing Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesman, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Scale models have been used for decades to replicate liftoff environments and in particular acoustics for launch vehicles. It is assumed, and analyses supports, that the key characteristics of noise generation, propagation, and measurement can be scaled. Over time significant insight was gained not just towards understanding the effects of thruster details, pad geometry, and sound mitigation but also to the physical processes involved. An overview of a selected set of scale model tests are compiled here to illustrate the variety of configurations that have been tested and the fundamental knowledge gained. The selected scale model tests are presented chronologically.

  17. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  18. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  19. Acoustic Classification and Optimization for Multi-Modal Rendering of Real-World Scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissler, Carl; Loftin, Christian; Manocha, Dinesh

    2018-03-01

    We present a novel algorithm to generate virtual acoustic effects in captured 3D models of real-world scenes for multimodal augmented reality. We leverage recent advances in 3D scene reconstruction in order to automatically compute acoustic material properties. Our technique consists of a two-step procedure that first applies a convolutional neural network (CNN) to estimate the acoustic material properties, including frequency-dependent absorption coefficients, that are used for interactive sound propagation. In the second step, an iterative optimization algorithm is used to adjust the materials determined by the CNN until a virtual acoustic simulation converges to measured acoustic impulse responses. We have applied our algorithm to many reconstructed real-world indoor scenes and evaluated its fidelity for augmented reality applications.

  20. Studying materials using acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1988-03-01

    This final report summarizes the activity of the contractor in meeting the objectives of the contract. A comprehensive bibliography and list of participants on the contract work are included along with a discussion including: microcavitation, microparticle characterization, interfacial characterization using acoustic levitation, measurements of the acoustic nonlinear parameter for determining the composition of mixtures.

  1. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  2. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  3. Giving acoustics a fairer hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Ken Marriott, an independent acoustics consultant with Industrial Commercial & Technical Consultants (ICTC), outlines some of the key acoustics considerations for those planning new hospital build or refurbishment schemes, cautioning that, all too often, this important area is not properly considered at a sufficiently early project stage.

  4. Nonlinear Acoustic Characterization of Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    lack of advanced measurement equipment such as piezoelectric microphones and transducers, nonlinear ul- trasonic acoustics has mostly remained a...the poor coupling between solids and air, and could be more easily measured with equipment such as a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Acoustic

  5. Prospects of Passive Element enRiched PhotoAcoustic Computed Tomography (PER-PACT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of a hybrid photoacoustic-ultrasound transmission tomographic imager optimised for small animal imaging (mice). The system allows imaging of ultrasound transmission properties (speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic attenuation (AA) ) simultaneously with

  6. Vegetation effects on impulsive events in the acoustic signature of fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedinak, Kara M; Anderson, Michael J; Apostol, Kent G; Smith, Alistair M S

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic impulse events have long been used as diagnostics for discrete phenomena in the natural world, including the detection of meteor impacts and volcanic eruptions. Wildland fires display an array of such acoustic impulse events in the form of crackling noises. Exploratory research into the properties of these impulse events revealed information regarding the specific properties of plant material. Unique acoustic frequency bands in the upper end of the sonic spectrum correlated to changes in vegetation properties. The signature of acoustic impulse events as they relate to plant species and plant water stress, were investigated in controlled laboratory combustion experiments. Correlation in the frequency range of 6.0-15.0 kHz was found for both species and water stress, indicating the possibility that a digital filter may be capable of identifying vegetation properties during wildland fire events.

  7. Convective Heat Transfer in Acoustic Streaming Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming has been studied in the absence of an imposed mean flow. The work is motivated by the need to design and control the thermal features of a suitable experimental rig for the containerless processing of materials by heat treatment of acoustically levitated alloy samples at near zero-gravity. First the problem of heat transfer from an isolated sphere (in a standing sound field) is explored in detail. The streaming Reynolds number, Rs, which characterizes the resulting steady flows, is determined from the acoustic signal. A scale analysis is used to ascertain the importance of buoyancy and viscous dissipation. The steady velocity and temperature fields are determined using asymptotic techniques and numerical methods for the limiting cases of RsKundt tube (supporting a plane axial standing sound wave) with insulated side-wall and isothermal end-walls. Analytical solution techniques are used to determine the steady fields close to the tube walls. For the steady recirculatory transport in the core, the numerical solver PHOENICS is adopted for the solution of the complete elliptic form of the governing equations. A study of the effects of a range of acoustic and geometric parameters on the flow and heat transfer is performed and Nusselt number correlations are obtained for air. PHOENICS is also used to study the effects of variable fluid properties and axial side-wall conduction (coupled with radiation). The role of normal/reduced gravity is assessed and suggestions made for terrestrial testing of the levitation apparatus. Finally, with the sample located at a node in the levitation chamber, the effect of the interaction of the streaming flows (on the sphere and the tube walls) is estimated. Representative calculations for the sample heating/cooling rates are presented and compared with existing data in the literature.

  8. Modified electron acoustic field and energy applied to observation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@yahoo.com, E-mail: hgomaa-eg@mans.edu.eg [College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul Aziz University, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Improved electrostatic acoustic field and energy have been debated in vortex trapped hot electrons and fluid of cold electrons with pressure term plasmas. The perturbed higher-order modified-Korteweg-de Vries equation (PhomKdV) has been worked out. The effect of trapping and electron temperatures on the electro-field and energy properties in auroral plasmas has been inspected.

  9. Lathe stability charts via acoustic emission monitoring | Keraita ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Signal parameters characterizing acoustic emission (AE) detected during metal cutting have been theoretically correlated in a simple manner, to the work material properties, cutting conditions, and tool geometry. During chatter, the cutting conditions and the tool geometry change considerably. Self-exited chatter, an ...

  10. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A linear dispersion relation is also obtained taking into account the relativistic effect. The properties of quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves, obtained from the deformed KdV equation, are studied taking into account the quantum mechanical effects in the weak relativistic limit. It is found that relativistic effects significantly ...

  11. Wastewater treatment with acoustic separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Takuya; Saeki, Tomonori; Buchanan, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic separation is a filter-free wastewater treatment method based on the forces generated in ultrasonic standing waves. In this report, a batch-system separator based on acoustic separation was demonstrated using a small-scale prototype acoustic separator to remove suspended solids from oil sand process-affected water (OSPW). By applying an acoustic separator to the batch use OSPW treatment, the required settling time, which was the time that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased to the environmental criterion (<200 mg/L), could be shortened from 10 to 1 min. Moreover, for a 10 min settling time, the acoustic separator could reduce the FeCl3 dose as coagulant in OSPW treatment from 500 to 160 mg/L.

  12. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  13. Review of Progress in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic levitation uses acoustic radiation forces to counteract gravity and suspend objects in mid-air. Although acoustic levitation was first demonstrated almost a century ago, for a long time, it was limited to objects much smaller than the acoustic wavelength levitating at fixed positions in space. Recent advances in acoustic levitation now allow not only suspending but also rotating and translating objects in three dimensions. Acoustic levitation is also no longer restricted to small objects and can now be employed to levitate objects larger than the acoustic wavelength. This article reviews the progress of acoustic levitation, focusing on the working mechanism of different types of acoustic levitation devices developed to date. We start with a brief review of the theory. Then, we review the acoustic levitation methods to suspend objects at fixed positions, followed by the techniques that allow the manipulation of objects. Finally, we present a brief summary and offer some future perspectives for acoustic levitation.

  14. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry, E-mail: rochtch@iptm.ru; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Ortega, Luc [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei [Institute for Nanometre Optics and Technology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula [Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, 53 Kabanbay Batyr St., Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  15. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  16. Acoustic shock injury (ASI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Myriam

    2006-12-01

    The potential severity and persistence of ASI symptoms has significant clinical and medico-legal implications. With the rapid growth of call centres around the world, professionals providing tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy are increasingly likely to encounter some or all of the cluster of ASI symptoms in their clients. Acoustic shock injury (ASI), occurring as a result of exposure to a sudden unexpected loud sound, has been observed to cause a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms. These include aural pain, tinnitus, hyperacusis/phonophobia, vertigo and other unusual symptoms such as numbness or burning sensations around the ear. A range of emotional reactions including trauma, anxiety and depression can develop. Call centre staff using a telephone headset or handset are vulnerable to ASI because of the increased likelihood of exposure, close to their ear(s), of sudden unexpected loud sounds randomly transmitted via the telephone line. This paper presents an overview of a study of 103 people exposed to 123 acoustic incidents, and of the proposed neurophysiological mechanism of ASI, in particular tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS). An understanding of TTTS has the potential to provide insight into the neurophysiological and psychological development of tinnitus and hyperacusis and the association with high levels of emotional trauma and anxiety. ASI rehabilitation is discussed.

  17. Acoustic metamaterials with synergetic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Huang, Meng; Wu, Jiu Hui

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a general design concept for acoustic metamaterials that introduces a ubiquitous synergetic behavior into the design procedure, in which the structure of the design is driven by its functional requirements. Since the physical properties of the widely used, resonant-type metamaterials are mainly determined by the eigenmodes of the structure, we first introduce the design concept through the modal displacement distributions on two typical plate-type structures. Next, by employing broadband sound attenuations that involve both the insulation and absorption as the typical targets, two synergetic coupling behaviors are systematically revealed among the dense resonant modes and multi-cell. Furthermore, through plate-type multiple-cell structures assembled from nine oscillators, the design is shown to realize strong broadband attenuations with either the average sound transmission loss (STL) below 2000 Hz higher than 40 dB or the absorption approximately 0.99 in the range of 400-700 Hz wherein the average absorption below 800 Hz remains higher than 0.8. Finally, two multi-cell plate-type samples are fabricated and then used experimentally to measure the STLs in support of the proposed synergetic coupling design method. Both the computational and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed synergetic design concept could effectively initiate a design for metamaterials that offer a new degree of freedom for broadband sound attenuations.

  18. Joint Acoustic and Modulation Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Atlas

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a considerable evidence that our perception of sound uses important features which is related to underlying signal modulations. This topic has been studied extensively via perceptual experiments, yet there are few, if any, well-developed signal processing methods which capitalize on or model these effects. We begin by summarizing evidence of the importance of modulation representations from psychophysical, physiological, and other sources. The concept of a two-dimensional joint acoustic and modulation frequency representation is proposed. A simple single sinusoidal amplitude modulator of a sinusoidal carrier is then used to illustrate properties of an unconstrained and ideal joint representation. Added constraints are required to remove or reduce undesired interference terms and to provide invertibility. It is then noted that the constraints would also apply to more general and complex cases of broader modulation and carriers. Applications in single-channel speaker separation and in audio coding are used to illustrate the applicability of this joint representation. Other applications in signal analysis and filtering are suggested.

  19. Strength, acoustic evaluation and metallurgy of diffusion bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, O.; Ojard, G.C.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses our efforts on two model systems to determine the bond strength, its correlation to acoustic NDE and the metallurgy involved in the process. Results indicate that the total acoustic energy, reflected from the original interface, can differentiate between the various bond strengths achieved. However, depending on types of materials to be joined, the atomistic processes, leading to a variety of microstructures in the bond planes, can become quite complex and strongly dominate the mechanical properties of such bonds. Origin of failure initiating defects is discussed.

  20. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    and O. Sigmund, “Systematic design of photonic crystal structures using topology optimization: low-loss waveguide bends”, Applied Physics Letters, 84(12), 2022-2024 (2004) [3] M. B. Dühring, “Topology optimization for acoustic problems”, IUTAM Symposium on Topological Design Optimization of Structures......The work of this PhD-project is concerned with the method of topology optimization1, which has been developed and used since the late eighties to optimize the material distribution of structures in order to minimize static compliance. Since then it has successfully been applied to a range...... of engineering fields such as mechanism design, fluid problems and photonic and phononic band-gap materials and structures [1,2]. In this project topology optimization is first applied to control acoustic properties in a room [3]. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room...

  1. Coupled Acoustic-Mechanical Bandgaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Kook, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the existence of coupled bandgaps for corrugated plate structures and acoustic channels. The study is motivated by the observation that the performance of traditional bandgap structures, such as periodic plates, may be compromised due to the coupling to a surrounding acoust...... domains into account. Additionally, the coupling is shown to introduce extra gaps in the band structure due to modal interaction and the appearance of a cut-on frequency for the fundamental acoustic mode.......In this work, we study the existence of coupled bandgaps for corrugated plate structures and acoustic channels. The study is motivated by the observation that the performance of traditional bandgap structures, such as periodic plates, may be compromised due to the coupling to a surrounding acoustic...... medium and the presence of acoustic resonances. It is demonstrated that corrugation of the plate structure can introduce bending wave bandgaps and bandgaps in the acoustic domain in overlapping and audible frequency ranges. This effect is preserved also when taking the physical coupling between the two...

  2. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  3. An asymptotic model in acoustics: acoustic drift equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, Vladimir A; Ilin, Konstantin

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous asymptotic procedure with the Mach number as a small parameter is used to derive the equations of mean flows which coexist and are affected by the background acoustic waves in the limit of very high Reynolds number.

  4. KAJIAN SIFAT AKUSTIK BUAH MANGGIS(Gracinia mangostana L DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN GELOMBANG ULTRASONIK [Acoustic Study Of Mangosteene (Gracinia mangostana L By Using Ultrasonic Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jajang juansah 1

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The wave used to study the acoustic properties of mangosteen is ultrasonic wave. Ultrasonic wave with frequency of 50 KHz was used to determine acoustic properties of mangosteen. The main wave properties were the attenuation, impedance of acoustic and acoustic velocity at mangosteen. Others have been evaluated were the correlation of attenuation and acoustic velocity at parts of mangosteen with its intact mangosteen. The acoustic parameters were related to the physic-chemical parameters of the fruit (TDS and hardness. This relationship was used to study mangosteen properties and quality. Because of mangosteen structure and it’s pores (saw with low density, acoustic wave in manggosteen have low amplitude signal. It was saw with spectrum and FFT signal mangosteen and reference medium / air (1.4:2.3.The fruit with increasing maturity mount (from color index 2 to 5 will experience hardness degradation, improvement of TDS, which are related to degradation of acoustic attenuation, improvement of acoustic speed and impedance. Multiple regression method was used to get empiric equation of wave in mixture of flesh-seed, husk and mangosteen (parts of mangosteen with its intact mangosteen. That saw in equation 1 and 2. the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic wave in mixture of flesh – seed have higher effect equation on mangosteen than husk. It means that acoustic properties of mixture of flesh – seed has more contribution than husk.

  5. Enhancement of acoustic tomography using spatial and frequency diversities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ali

    2012-12-01

    This article introduces several contributions to enhance an important application such as acoustic tomography (AT), using mainly the spatial and spectral diversities of underwater acoustic signals. Due to their inherited properties, (i.e. spareness, non-stationarity or cyclostationarity, wide-band frequency range, wide range of power, etc.), the process of underwater acoustic signals becomes a real challenge for many scientists and engineers who are involved in studies related to the ocean. For various applications, these studies require huge and daily information. AT techniques remain fast and cheap ways to obtain such data. Nowadays, active acoustic tomography (AAT), is communally used to generate powerful and repetitive acoustic sources. Recently, researchers have been attracted by an alternative way, called passive acoustic tomography (PAT), which uses acoustic opportune signals of their environment. PAT techniques are mainly used for ecological, economical and other reasons such as military applications. With PAT, no signal is emitted; therefore, problems become more challenging. The number and positions of existent sources are unknown, and sensors measure mixtures of available sources. Algorithms based on time or frequency domains are widely deployed to classify, identify, and study received signals in AAT applications. For PAT, researchers employ multiple sensors in order to add an extra dimension, (such as space). This article focuses on approaches used in space along with time or frequency to extract information, improve performances, and simplify the overall architecture. This article explains the use of signal processing and statistical approaches to solve problems raised using PAT and discusses the experimental results. The review of the literature offers a big variety of algorithms to deal with classic AAT problems. Therefore, only problems related to PAT have been considered herein.

  6. In-ice acoustic positioning system for the Enceladus Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Ruth; EnEx Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    The IceMole, a combination of melting and drilling probe, which is able to move and steer through ice and take samples while doing so, can be used to install instruments in ice. In addition to the inertial navigation system, the ice-craft will be equipped with an acoustic positioning system, composed of receivers in the probe itself and several emitters (pinger) on the glacier surface. It will determine the position of the IceMole by measuring the signal propagation time and trilateration, which requires a solid knowledge of the propagation of acoustic signals in ice. A method to determine these properties during the operation of the IceMole will be developed. Here we will give an overview over the goals of the project and the design of the IceMole. We will present the status of the development of the acoustic positioning system and show the results of simulations on the positioning accuracy.

  7. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup: calibrations and lake test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Bohm, C [University Stockholm, Fysikum, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Descamps, F [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Fischer, J [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hallgren, A [University Uppsala, Department of Radiation Sciences, Box 535, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Heller, R [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hundertmark, S [University Stockholm, Fysikum, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Krieger, K [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Nahnhauer, R [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Pohl, M [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Price, P B [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sulanke, K [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Vandenbroucke, J [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    In order to detect the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies, large volumes of materials have to be instrumented with inexpensive but sensitive acoustic sensors. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) will be installed in the Antarctic ice during the polar season 2006/2007 after which the collected data will be used to reveal the acoustic properties of the South Polar ice cap. The developed piezoceramic based ultrasound sensors and transmitters that are part of this system have been extensively studied during calibration measurements in water, using a commercial hydrophone as reference. Also, a SPATS system test was accomplished in Lake Tornetraesk, Abisko (Sweden). This allowed verification of the DAQ system, transmitter range and sensor performance. Here the results of the calibrations and the Abisko lake measurements are reported.

  8. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup: calibrations and lake test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böser, S.; Bohm, C.; Descamps, F.; Fischer, J.; Hallgren, A.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Krieger, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pohl, M.; Price, P. B.; Sulanke, K.; Vandenbroucke, J.

    2007-09-01

    In order to detect the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies, large volumes of materials have to be instrumented with inexpensive but sensitive acoustic sensors. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) will be installed in the Antarctic ice during the polar season 2006/2007 after which the collected data will be used to reveal the acoustic properties of the South Polar ice cap. The developed piezoceramic based ultrasound sensors and transmitters that are part of this system have been extensively studied during calibration measurements in water, using a commercial hydrophone as reference. Also, a SPATS system test was accomplished in Lake Torneträsk, Abisko (Sweden). This allowed verification of the DAQ system, transmitter range and sensor performance. Here the results of the calibrations and the Abisko lake measurements are reported.

  9. Spatial filtering of audible sound with acoustic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Tao, Jiancheng; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces manipulate waves with specially designed structures and achieve properties that natural materials cannot offer. Similar surfaces work in audio frequency range as well and lead to marvelous acoustic phenomena that can be perceived by human ears. Being intrigued by the famous Maoshan Bugle phenomenon, we investigate large scale metasurfaces consisting of periodic steps of sizes comparable to the wavelength of audio frequency in both time and space domains. We propose a theoretical method to calculate the scattered sound field and find that periodic corrugated surfaces work as spatial filters and the frequency selective character can only be observed at the same side as the incident wave. The Maoshan Bugle phenomenon can be well explained with the method. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to design acoustical landscapes, which transform impulsive sound into famous trumpet solos or other melodious sound.

  10. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species.

  11. Simulation of Acoustics for Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Gabriel; Strutzenberg, Louise L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity acoustic measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in both held down and elevated configurations, as well as with and without water suppression have been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure.

  12. The acoustic effects of guitar components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inta, Ra; Gilet, Gerard; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2002-11-01

    The guitar is a complex oscillatory system made up of many vibrating components. Because of the variable mechanical properties of wood, it is not easy for makers to reproduce good instruments. Reproducibility can be improved if we know how the mechanical properties of the components interact to produce the sound of the completed instrument. Three steel-string acoustic guitars were constructed, in parallel and as similarly as possible, the only design difference being the timber used for the top-plates. Prior to construction, the Young's moduli, densities, and moisture contents of a selection of top-plate brace, neck, and bridge materials were measured and the most similar were retained for creating the three instruments. Transfer functions and Chladni modes of the top-plates were measured at seven stages of construction, and the radiation patterns and acoustic efficiencies of the finished instruments measured. The effects of brace scalloping and neck attachment systems are reported. These results, and the behavior of some simple systems, are compared with finite element simulations that include scalloped bracing and glue bonding. [Work supported by the Australian Research Council and Gilet Guitars, Australia.

  13. [Particle size reduction using acoustic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Csilla; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné, Révész Piroska

    2014-01-01

    Different pharmaceutical technological processes have been used for modification of the physico-chemical and biopharmaceutical properties of drugs. Changes of crystal size, distribution and morphology can open up new, alternative administration routes, e.g. intranasally and the pulmonary route, where the particle size is a determining factor. A wet grinding method based on acoustic cavitation (the collapse of bubbles or voids formed by sound waves) is a novel possibility for modification of the properties of particles. During our work this wet grinding technique was studied. The effect of this method was investigated on particle size reduction. The samples were treated with extreme sonication parameters. The effect of the concentration of the polymer was examined on the particle size reduction. Meloxicam was chosen as a model crystalline drug because of its poor aqueous solubility. The structural characterization and the morphological analysis of the dried products were carried out by DSC, XRPD and SEM. It was found that the acoustic cavitation resulted in crystalline micronized product.

  14. Application of cochlear analysis techniques to percussion in electro-acoustic music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John

    2005-04-01

    This presentation is focused upon the audio analysis involved in the creation of a ``pseudo-score'' for electro-acoustic music. This research was undertaken because the lack of an objective visual representation prevents music theorists from being able to easily discuss electro-acoustic music in written form. The ``holy grail'' of automatic computer music analysis has most often been the translation of a continuous pressure variation into traditional Western musical notation. Since electro-acoustic music is rarely able to be transcribed into this type of notation, the automatic analysis of electro-acoustic music confounds many previous algorithms. A top-down approach is suggested in order to extract acoustic and musical information from recordings of electro-acoustic music. Because humans are the best known system for translating a continuous pressure variation into useful acoustic information, a cochlear model, Patterson's Auditory Image Model (AIM), is used as a front end. The audio property of self-similarity of percussion has been chosen for initial study. This self-similarity property requires first that the audio property of percussion is quantified. The nuances of using AIM to determine percussion will be discussed. Models of self-similarity of percussion for varying time-scales will then be discussed.

  15. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  16. Effective medium theory of thin-plate acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Yao, Shanshan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Huang, Guoliang; Hu, Gengkai

    2014-04-01

    Effective dynamic properties of acoustic metamaterials made of multilayered flexible thin-plates with periodically attached mass-spring resonators are studied. By using the transfer matrix method, the thin-plate acoustic metamaterial under the plane wave incidence is characterized by a homogeneous effective medium with anisotropic mass density. An approximate analytic expression of effective mass density is derived for a single-layer metamaterial in the normally incident case, and it is shown that the effective mass density can follow either Lorentz or Drude medium models. For the obliquely incident case, it is found that effective mass density is dependent on the lateral wave number of incident waves. Such spatial dispersion comes from the coincidence effect between the incident acoustic wave and flexural wave in the thin plate, and it occurs at much lower frequencies than that for a uniform plate without resonators. Based on the observed spatial dispersion, an acoustic device made of thin-plate metamaterials is designed for frequency-controlled acoustic directive radiation in the low-frequency regime.

  17. Dimensions Underlying the Perceived Similarity of Acoustic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Aletta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Scientific research on how people perceive or experience and/or understand the acoustic environment as a whole (i.e., soundscape is still in development. In order to predict how people would perceive an acoustic environment, it is central to identify its underlying acoustic properties. This was the purpose of the present study. Three successive experiments were conducted. With the aid of 30 university students, the first experiment mapped the underlying dimensions of perceived similarity among 50 acoustic environments, using a visual sorting task of their spectrograms. Three dimensions were identified: (1 Distinguishable–Indistinguishable sound sources, (2 Background–Foreground sounds, and (3 Intrusive–Smooth sound sources. The second experiment was aimed to validate the results from Experiment 1 by a listening experiment. However, a majority of the 10 expert listeners involved in Experiment 2 used a qualitatively different approach than the 30 university students in Experiment 1. A third experiment was conducted in which 10 more expert listeners performed the same task as per Experiment 2, with spliced audio signals. Nevertheless, Experiment 3 provided a statistically significantly worse result than Experiment 2. These results suggest that information about the meaning of the recorded sounds could be retrieved in the spectrograms, and that the meaning of the sounds may be captured with the aid of holistic features of the acoustic environment, but such features are still unexplored and further in-depth research is needed in this field.

  18. Experimental Studies of Acoustics in a Spherical Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, Savannah; Adams, Matthew; Stone, Douglas; Lathrop, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The Earth, like many other astrophysical bodies, contains turbulent flows of conducting fluid which are able to sustain magnetic field. To investigate the hydromagnetic flow in the Earth's outer core, we have created an experiment which generates flows in liquid sodium. However, measuring these flows remains a challenge because liquid sodium is opaque. One possible solution is the use of acoustic waves. Our group has previously used acoustic wave measurements in air to infer azimuthal velocity profiles, but measurements attempted in liquid sodium remain challenging. In the current experiments we measure acoustic modes and their mode splittings in both air and water in a spherical Couette device. The device is comprised of a hollow 30-cm outer sphere which contains a smaller 10-cm rotating inner sphere to drive flow in the fluid in between. We use water because it has material properties that are similar to those of sodium, but is more convenient and less hazardous. Modes are excited and measured using a speaker and microphones. Measured acoustic modes and their mode splittings correspond well with the predicted frequencies in air. However, water modes are more challenging. Further investigation is needed to understand acoustic measurements in the higher density media.

  19. An Experimental Introduction to Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Andy Nicholas; Magruder, Robert H.

    2017-11-01

    Learning and understanding physics requires more than studying physics texts. It requires doing physics. Doing research is a key opportunity for students to connect physical principles with their everyday experience. A powerful way to introduce students to research and technique is through subjects in which they might find interest. Presented is an experiment that serves to introduce an advanced undergraduate or high school student to conducting research in acoustics via an experiment involving a standard dreadnought acoustic guitar, recording industry-related equipment, and relevant industrial analysis software. This experimental process is applicable to a wide range of acoustical topics including both acoustic and electric instruments. Also, the student has a hands-on experience with relevant audio engineering technology to study physical principles.

  20. PC and PVC Acoustics Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzader, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    Described are four musical instruments constructed from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe. The use of computerized synthesizers to play scales and chords is discussed. Suggestions for other illustrations of acoustics are included. (CW)

  1. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic transducer...

  2. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  3. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  4. PVT Degradation Studies: Acoustic Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. This document reports on a study of acoustic techniques to determine whether they can provide a diagnostic for the fogging of PVT. Different ultrasound techniques were employed for detecting the level of internal fogging in PVT, including wave velocity measurements, attenuation, nonlinear acoustics, and acoustic microscopy. The results indicate that there are linear relations between the wave velocity and wave attenuation with the level of internal fogging. The effects of fogging on ultrasound wave attenuation is further verified by acoustic microscopy imaging, where regions with fog in the specimen demonstration higher levels of attenuation compared to clear regions. Results from the nonlinear ultrasound measurements were inconclusive due to high sensitivities to transducer coupling and fixture variabilities.

  5. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  6. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  7. Magnetic recording with acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi, E-mail: dhagat@eecs.oregonstate.edu

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate acoustically assisted magnetic recording (AAMR), a new paradigm in magnetic data storage. In this concept, otherwise unwriteable high-coercivity media, requisite for thermally stable high-density data storage, are made amenable to recording by lowering their coercivity via strain induced by surface acoustic waves. The basic principles of AAMR are proven using galfenol, a low-coercivity magnetostrictive material, as the recording medium. It is shown that the writing field needed to record data in the presence of acoustic strain is lower than the coercivity of the unstrained galfenol film. Further, it is demonstrated that interference between acoustic waves can be tailored to selectively address a bit on the recording medium.

  8. Acoustic Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccus, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) are designed to be the same external volume as a regular cargo transfer bag, the common logistics carrier for the International Space Station. After use as a cargo bag, the MCTB can be unzipped and unfolded to be reused. This Acoustic MCTBs transform into acoustic blankets after the initial logistics carrying objective is complete.

  9. Automated Acoustic Identification of Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    signals. Other signal sources contribute to the overall acoustic soundscape and interfere with discerning the bat calls from the background signals. In...noises, and the changing soundscape from moving can all exceed at least parts of the signal amplitude of bat calls. The ability to track the trend...results, full-spectrum data also provides an effective voucher for interpretation of the full acoustic soundscape at the time of the recording. Figure

  10. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  11. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  12. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  13. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  14. Incorporating Realistic Acoustic Propagation Models in Simulation of Underwater Acoustic Networks: A Statistical Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Geoffrey; Gibson, John; Diaz-Gonzalez, Leopoldo

    2006-01-01

    .... The validity of the simulation results becomes questionable. There are, though, very high fidelity models developed by acoustic engineers and physicists for predicting acoustic propagation characteristics...

  15. Acoustic Issues in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is concerned about acute effect of sound on crew performance on International Space Station (ISS), and is developing strategies to assess and reduce acute, chronic, and delayed effects of sound. High noise levels can cause headaches, irritation, fatigue, impaired sleep, headache, and tinnitus and have resulted in an inability to hear alarms. Speech intelligibility may be more impaired for crew understanding non-native language in a noisy environment. No hearing loss occurred, but significant effects on crew performance and communication occurred. Permanent Threshold Shifts (PTS) have not been observed in the US shuttle program. Russian specification for noise in spacecraft is 60 dBA (awake) and 50 dBA (asleep) while the U.S. noise specification on ISS is NC 50 (awake) and NC 40 (asleep) with a 85 dBA hazard limit. Background noise levels of ISS modules have measured 56-69 dBA. Treadmill exercise operations measure 77 dBA. Alarms are required to be 20 dBA above ambient. Hearing protection is recommended when noise exceeds 60 dB 24 hour Leq. Countermeasures include hearing protection and design/ engineering controls. Advanced composite materials with excellent low frequency attenuation properties could be applied as a barrier protection around noisy equipment, or used on personal protective equipment worn by the crew. Hearing protection countermeasures include foam ear inserts, passive muff headsets, and active noise reduction headsets. Oto-acoustic emissions (OAE) could be used to monitor effectiveness of hearing protection countermeasures and tailor hearing protection countermeasures to individual crewmembers. Micro-gravity, vibration, toxic fumes, air quality/composition, stress, temperature, physical exertion or some combination of the above factors may have interacted with moderate long-term noise exposure to cause significant hearing loss. Longitudinal studies will need to address what co-morbidity factors, such as radiation, toxicology, microgravity

  16. Quantum acoustics with superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiwen

    2017-04-01

    The ability to engineer and manipulate different types of quantum mechanical objects allows us to take advantage of their unique properties and create useful hybrid technologies. Thus far, complex quantum states and exquisite quantum control have been demonstrated in systems ranging from trapped ions to superconducting resonators. Recently, there have been many efforts to extend these demonstrations to the motion of complex, macroscopic objects. These mechanical objects have important applications as quantum memories or transducers for measuring and connecting different types of quantum systems. In particular, there have been a few experiments that couple motion to nonlinear quantum objects such as superconducting qubits. This opens up the possibility of creating, storing, and manipulating non-Gaussian quantum states in mechanical degrees of freedom. However, before sophisticated quantum control of mechanical motion can be achieved, we must realize systems with long coherence times while maintaining a sufficient interaction strength. These systems should be implemented in a simple and robust manner that allows for increasing complexity and scalability in the future. In this talk, I will describe our recent experiments demonstrating a high frequency bulk acoustic wave resonator that is strongly coupled to a superconducting qubit using piezoelectric transduction. In contrast to previous experiments with qubit-mechanical systems, our device requires only simple fabrication methods, extends coherence times to many microseconds, and provides controllable access to a multitude of phonon modes. We use this system to demonstrate basic quantum operations on the coupled qubit-phonon system. Straightforward improvements to the current device will allow for advanced protocols analogous to what has been shown in optical and microwave resonators, resulting in a novel resource for implementing hybrid quantum technologies.

  17. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    signal propagation. It is determined that on a time scale of seconds, corresponding to typical periods of surface water waves, the arrival time of reflected acoustic signals from surface waves appear as striation patterns in measured data and can be accurately modelled by ray tracing. Second, changes in acoustic beam arrival angle and acoustic ray path influenced by isotherm depth oscillations are analyzed using an 8-element delay-sum beamformer. The results are compared with outputs from a two-dimensional (2-D) parabolic equation (PE) model using measured sound speed profiles (SSPs) in the water column. Using the method of beamforming on the received signal, the arrival time and angle of an acoustic beam was obtained for measured acoustic signals. It is determined that the acoustic ray path, acoustic beam intensity and angular spread are a function of vertical isotherm oscillations on a time scale of minutes and can be modeled accurately by a 2-D PE model. Third, a forward problem is introduced which uses acoustic wavefronts received on a vertical line array, 1.48 km from the source, in the lower part of the water column to infer range dependence or independence in the SSP. The matched filtering results of received acoustic wavefronts at all hydrophone depths are compared with a ray tracing routine augmented to calculate only direct path and bottom reflected signals. It is determined that the SSP range dependence can be inferred on a time scale of hours using an array of hydrophones spanning the water column. Sound speed profiles in the acoustic field were found to be range independent for 11 of the 23 hours in the measurements. A SSP cumulative reconstruction process, conducted from the seafloor to the sea surface, layer-by-layer, identifies critical segments in the SSP that define the ray path, arrival time and boundary interactions. Data-model comparison between matched filtered arrival time spread and arrival time output from the ray tracing was robust when the SSP

  18. At-sea Real-time Coupled Four-dimensional Oceanographic and Acoustic Forecasts during Battlespace Preparation 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, F.P.A.; Haley Jr., P.J.; Janmaat, J.; Lermusiaux, P.F.J.; Leslie, W.G.; Schouten, M.W.; Raa, L.A. te; Rixen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Systems capable of forecasting ocean properties and acoustic performance in the littoral ocean are becoming a useful capability for scientific and operational exercises. The coupling of a data-assimilative nested ocean modeling system with an acoustic propagation modeling syste was carried out at

  19. A Numerical Model of an Acoustic Metamaterial Using the Boundary Element Method Including Viscous and Thermal Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente; Andersen, Peter Risby; Jensen, Jacob Søndergaard

    2017-01-01

    to an acoustic metamaterial. Metamaterials are structures formed by smaller, usually periodic, units showing remarkable physical properties when observed as a whole. Acoustic losses are relevant in metamaterials in the millimeter scale. In addition, their geometry is intricate and challenging for numerical...

  20. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H [Albuquerque, NM; Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Tuck, Melanie R [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.