WorldWideScience

Sample records for range wilderness study

  1. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  2. Wilderness Study Report : Volume VI : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In order to conform to the Wilderness Act of 1964, a study was conducted by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife personnel to ascertain which of the Kenai...

  3. Changing conditions on wilderness campsites: Seven case studies of trends over 13 to 32 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2013-01-01

    This report brings together seven case studies of trends in the number and condition of wilderness campsites over periods ranging from 13 to 32 years. Case examples come from five mountainous wilderness areas in the western United States: Sequoia-Kings Canyon Wilderness in California, the Eagle Cap Wilderness in Oregon, the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness in...

  4. Cognitive dimensions of recreational user experiences in wilderness: an exploratory study in Adirondack wilderness areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson; Peter Newman; Alan Watson

    1998-01-01

    This exploratory study involved identifying the dimensions of a wilderness experience sought by users based on the available literature and on input from wilderness users. Input was collected using focus group interviews with members of four groups that were primarily involved in wilderness use and preservation in recent years. Positive and negative dimensions are...

  5. Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset is meant to depict Wilderness Study Areas (WSA's), within the state of New Mexico, identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as having...

  6. SANGRE DE CRISTO WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce R.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys were undertaken of a wilderness study area which includes most of the Sangre de Cristo Range of south-central Colorado. Four areas of probable mineral-resource potential for gold, silver, and base metals lie along a northwest structural trend which follows the western margin of the range north of the Great Sand Dunes National Monument and crosses the range south of the monument. An area of probable mineral-resource potential for similar minerals plus tungsten has been identified east of Blanca Peak at the extreme southern end of the study area. Another area of probable mineral-resource potential includes molybdenum mineralization associated with the Rito Alto stock. A small area of probable geothermal resource potential exists on the west side of the area around the Valley View Hot Springs. There is little promise for the occurrence of oil and gas resources.

  7. Assateague Island Wilderness Study Area Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study report is presented in partial fulfillment of the review requirements of Section 3(c) of the Wilderness Act (P.L. 88-577. The entire Chincoteague National...

  8. 75 FR 33573 - Information Collection; Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor... organizations on the new information collection: Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor...: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to Alan Watson, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research...

  9. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  10. GRANITE CHIEF WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, David S.; Federspiel, Francis E.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Chief Wilderness study area encompasses 57 sq mi near the crest of the Sierra Nevada 6 mi west of Tahoe City, California. Geologic, geochemical, and mines and prospect studies were carried out to assess the mineral-resource potential of the area. On the basis of the mineral-resource survey, it is concluded that the area has little promise for the occurrence of precious or base metals, oil, gas, coal, or geothermal resources. Sand, gravel, and glacial till suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but inaccessability and remoteness from available markets preclude their being shown on the map as a potential resource.

  11. Adolescents in Wilderness Therapy: A Qualitative Study of Attachment Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettmann, Joanna E.; Olson-Morrison, Debra; Jasperson, Rachael A.

    2011-01-01

    Characterized by acute changes in attachment relationships, adolescence is a time of balancing autonomy and attachment needs. For adolescents in wilderness therapy programs, the setting often challenges their understanding of their own attachment relationships. The current study evaluates the narratives of 13 adolescents in a wilderness therapy…

  12. Mineral resources of the Fort Piute Wilderness Study Area, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Jane E.; Frisken, James G.; Jachens, Robert C.; McDonnell, John R.

    1987-01-01

    The Fort Piute Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-267) is in northeastern San Bernardino County, California, near the boundary between California and Nevada. Mineral surveys were requested for 31,371 acres of the Fort Piute Wilderness Study Area. In this report the area studied is referred to as "the study area". Examination of mines and prospects in the area was accomplished by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1981 and 1982. Field investigations of the area were carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1983 and 1985. No mines or prospects, few mining claims, and no identified resources are located within the wilderness study area. Moderate and low potential for gold resources appears limited to outcrops of gneiss and granite exposed along the eastern side of the Piute Range. Available information indicates that there is no potential for energy resources, including oil and gas, uranium, or geothermal, in the study area.

  13. Where the wild things are: A research agenda for studying the wildlife-wilderness relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz; Beth A. Hahn; Blake R. Hossack

    2016-01-01

    We explore the connection between US designated wilderness areas and wildlife with the goal of establishing a research agenda for better understanding this complex relationship. Our research agenda has two components. The first, "wildlife for wilderness," considers the impact of wildlife on wilderness character. Whereas studies show that wildlife is...

  14. Mineral Resources of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, David A.; Nash, J. Thomas; Plouff, Donald; McDonnell, John R.

    1987-01-01

    The Morey (NV-060-191) and Fandango (NV-060-190) Wilderness Study Areas are located in the northern Hot Creek Range about 25 mi north of Warm Springs, Nev. At the request of the Bureau of Land Management, 46,300 acres of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas were studied. In this report, the area studied is referred to as 'the wilderness study area', or simply 'the study area'. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys were conducted by the USGS and the USBM in 1984 to appraise the identified mineral resources and to assess the mineral resource potential of the study areas. These studies indicate that there are small identified resources of zinc, lead, and silver at the Lead Pipe property in the Fandango Wilderness Study Area, several areas of high potential for the occurrence of gold resources in the Fandango study area, small areas of low and moderate potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Fandango study area, areas of moderate and high potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Morey study area, and an area of low potential for copper, molybdenum, and tin in the Morey study area. Both study areas have low resource potential for petroleum, natural gas, uranium, and geothermal energy.

  15. Geochemistry of altered and mineralized rocks from the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J.T.; John, D.A.; Malcolm, M.J.; Briggs, P.H.; Crock, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the St. Johns River Water Management District are investigating the hydrogeology of the Floridan aquifer system. An essential element of this investigation is the design and construction of a monitor well network in the lower saline water-bearing zone which occurs at about 2,000 ft below land surface. During 1985, a well near Ponte Vedra in northeast St. Johns County was completed into the lower saline water-bearing zone at a depth of 1,980 to 2,035 ft below land surface. This well and other wells drilled under this or other programs will be used to monitor water levels and water chemistry of the lower saline zone. Chloride concentrations in water above the lower saline zone ranged from 14 to 270 mg/L and specific conductance ranged from 450 to 1,440 micromhos/cm c. In the lower zone, chloride concentrations were as much as 16,210 mg/L and specific conductance as much as 46,000 micromhos per centimeter. Aquifer head and artesian flow from the well generally increased with depth. Water temperatures also increased from 23 C in the upper part of the aquifer to more than 28 C in the lower saline zone. (USGS)

  16. SALMO-PRIEST WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F.K.; Schmauch, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, geophysical and mines and prospects evaluation of the Salmo-Priest Wilderness study area in Washington has yielded no evidence of significant mineral-resource potential. Although gold was detected in trace amounts to moderate anomalies in scattered stream-sediment concentrates it has probably been derived from small and localized occurrences and does not constitute a resource. As a result of this study the area appears to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources, energy minerals, fossil fuels, and geothermal resources. Nonmetallic mineral resources, notably shale, are abundant, but adequate supplies exist outside the study area.

  17. Reconnaissance geologic map of the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness Study Area, south-central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce R.; Lindsey, David A.; Bruce, R.M.; Soulliere, Sandra J.

    1987-01-01

    The Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and related acts require the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to survey certain areas on Federal lands to determine the mineral values, if any, that may be present. Results must be made available to the public and to be submitted to the President and Congress. This report presents the results of geologic studies in the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness Study Area in the Rio Grande and San Isabel National Forests, south-central Colorado. The area was designated as a wilderness study area under Public Lay 96-560 in 1980. 

  18. A pilot study of solar water disinfection in the wilderness setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Christopher M; Barsi, Christopher; Peterson, Shane E; Carey, Kevin M

    2014-09-01

    Solar disinfection of water has been shown to be an effective treatment method in the developing world, but not specifically in a wilderness or survival setting. The current study sought to evaluate the technique using materials typically available in a wilderness or backcountry environment. Untreated surface water from a stream in rural Costa Rica was disinfected using the solar disinfection (SODIS) method, using both standard containers as well as containers and materials more readily available to a wilderness traveler. Posttreatment samples using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, as well as Nalgene and Platypus water containers, showed similarly decreased levels of Escherichia coli and total coliforms. The SODIS technique may be applicable in the wilderness setting using tools commonly available in the backcountry. In this limited trial, specific types of containers common in wilderness settings demonstrated similar performance to the standard containers. With further study, solar disinfection in appropriate conditions may be included as a viable treatment option for wilderness water disinfection. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trends in wilderness recreation use characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; David N. Cole; Joseph W. Roggenbuck

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies at the Leopold Institute have included analysis of use and user trends at the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Desolation Wilderness, Shining Rock Wilderness, the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex, Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Eagle Cap Wilderness. Some sociodemographics, like age, education, and the proportion of female visitors, have...

  20. Mineral Resources of the Mill Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Grand County, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Geological Survey

    1990-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, approximately 9,780 acres of the Mill Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area (UT-060-139A) was evaluated for identified mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). In this report, the area studied is referred to as the "wilderness study area" or "the study area." Field work was conducted in 1988 to assess the mineral resources and resource potential of the area. No mineral resources were identified in the Mill C...

  1. From research to policy: The White Cap Wilderness Fire Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane Smith

    2014-01-01

    On August 18, 1972, an aerial patrol reported a snag burning deep in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness in Idaho. Bob Mutch, then a young research forester, traveled to the site the following day for an on-the-ground assessment. It was, Mutch later recalled, a little "nothing fire" that posed no threat. And he was right. Growing to only 24 feet by 24...

  2. Recommended Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Recommended wilderness is an Arcview shapefile representing the porposed wilderness areas throughout the park. The boundaries for this data set were digitized by...

  3. Shifts in Attachment Relationships: A Study of Adolescents in Wilderness Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettmann, Joanna E.; Tucker, Anita R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined shifts in adolescents' attachment relationships with parents and peers during a 7-week wilderness therapy program. Ninety-six adolescents, aged 14-17, completed three quantitative measurements evaluating attachment relationships with mother, father and peers pre and post treatment. Adolescents reported improved attachment…

  4. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  5. Visitor's knowledge of federal wilderness: implications for wilderness user research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen S. Hockett; Troy E. Hall

    2000-01-01

    Earlier research using interviews of backcountry hikers in Shenandoah National Park raised concerns that visitors may not know much about federal wilderness. This lack of knowledge has implications for research on wilderness experience and for support for wilderness management policies. In this study, self-assessed knowledge of wilderness, researcher-assessed knowledge...

  6. Mineral resources of the Mount Tipton Wilderness Study Area, Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Robert C.; Turner, Robert L.; Jachens, Robert C.; Lawson, William A.; Almquist, Carl L.

    1989-01-01

    The Mount Tipton Wilderness Study Area (AZ-020-012/ 042) comprises 33,950 acres in Mohave County, Ariz. At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, this area was evaluated for identified mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). This work was carried out by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey in 1984-87. In this report, the area studied is referred to as the "wilderness study area" or simply "the study area." There are no identified mineral resources in the study area. The southernmost part of the study area is adjacent to the Wallapai (Chloride) mining district and has low mineral resource potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, and molybdenum in hydrothermal veins. This area also has a low mineral resource potential for tungsten in vein deposits and for uranium in vein deposits or pegmatites. In the central part of the wilderness study area, one small area has low mineral resource potential for uranium in vein deposits or pegmatites and another small area has low resource potential for thorium in vein deposits. The entire study area has low resource potential for geothermal energy but no potential for oil or gas resources.

  7. Mineral resources of the Elkhorn Wilderness Study Area, Broadwater and Jefferson Counties, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, William R.; Ludington, Steve; Miller, William R.; Hanna, William F.; Wenrich, Karen J.; Suits, Vivian J.; McHugh, John B.

    1990-01-01

    The Elkhorn Wilderness Study Area in west-central Montana has a moderate to high potential for resources of porphyry-type copper and molybdenum in the western part of the area, and a moderate to high potential for resources of gold, silver, lead, and zinc in replacement and vein deposits in the eastern part of the area. No evidence of potential oil, gas, and geothermal resources was identified in this study.

  8. Mineral resources of the Whipple Mountains and Whipple Mountains Addition Wilderness Study Areas, San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Sherman P.; Raines, Gary L.; Diggles, Michael F.; Howard, Keith A.; Simpson, Robert W.; Hoover, Donald B.; Ridenour, James; Moyle, Phillip R.; Willett, Spencee L.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, approximately 85,100 acres of the Whipple Mountains Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-312) and 1,380 acres of the Whipple Mountains Addition Wilderness Study Area (AZ-050-010) were evaluated for identified mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). In this report, the Whipple Mountains and Whipple Mountains Addition Wilderness Study Areas are referred to as simply "the study area." Most of the mines and prospects with identified resources in the Whipple Mountains Wilderness Study Area are within areas designated as having mineral resource potential. The area in and around the Turk Silver mine and the Lucky Green group and the area near the northwest boundary of the study area have high mineral resource potential for copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver. An area along the west boundary of the study area has moderate resource potential for copper lead, zinc, gold, and silver. An area in the east adjacent to the Whipple Mountains Addition Wilderness Study Area has moderate resource potential for copper, gold, and silver resources. One area on the north boundary and one on the southeast boundary of the study area have low mineral resource potential for copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver. Two areas, one on the north boundary and one inside the east boundary of the study area, have moderate resource potential for manganese. A small area inside the south boundary of the study area has high resource potential for decorative building stone, and the entire study area has low resource potential for sand and gravel and other rock products suitable for construction. Two areas in the eastern part of the study area have low resource potential for uranium. There is no resource potential for oil and gas or geothermal resources in the Whipple Mountains Wilderness Study Area. Sites within the Whipple Mountains Wilderness Study Area with identified resources of copper, gold, silver, manganese and (or

  9. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  10. NORTH ABSAROKA WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Willis H.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The North Absaroka Wilderness in Wyoming was studied to evaluate the resource potential of the area. The results of geologic field mapping, field inspection of claims and prospects, analyses of bedrock and stream-sediment samples, and an aeromagnetic survey indicate that a small area of geologic terrane with probable mineral-resource potential for silver, lead, and zinc is present on the northern edge of the wilderness. Bentonite, low-quality coal, and localized deposits of uranium and chromite have been produced from surrounding areas; but such deposits, if present in the wilderness, are probably too deeply buried, too small, or too sporadically distributed to be classed as resources. Copper and gold mines and prospects are present on the fringes of the wilderness, but otherwise the area seems to be devoid of concentrations of metallic minerals. No surface evidence of geothermal energy resources was found.

  11. Our wilderness heritage: a study of the compatibility of cultural and natural resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl Roenke; David Lacy

    1998-01-01

    The Wilderness Act of 1964 recognizes the value of Cultural Resources yet we often struggle with how to address these values in the management of specific Wilderness Areas. This paper will discuss how Heritage Resource Values compliment and enhance the wilderness experience. It strives to provide a broader understanding and appreciation of the role of land use history...

  12. Mineral resources of the East Fork High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Washoe and Humboldt counties, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ach, Jay A.; Plouff, Donald; Turner, R.L.; Schmauch, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    The part of the East Fork High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area (CA-020-914/NV-020-006A) included in this study encompasses 33,460 acres in the northwestern part of Nevada. Throughout this report, "wilderness study area" and "study area" refertothe 33,460 acres for which mineral surveys were requested. The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted geological, geophysical, and geochemical surveys to assess the mineral resources (known) and the mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the study area. Fieldwork for this report was carried out in 1985 and 1986. No mines, significant prospects, or mining claims are located inside the study area, and no identified resources were found. The wilderness study area has moderate mineral resource potential for gold, silver, and mercury and for zeolite minerals. A low potential also exists for geothermal energy resources, and potential for oil and gas is unknown.

  13. Wildland fire and the wilderness visitor experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra L. Schroeder; Ingrid E. Schneider

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand wilderness visitors' perceptions of wildland fire and describe visitors' wilderness recreational experience following wildland fire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). Qualitative interviews revealed visitors' perceptions of burned areas as well as if and how activities and behaviors were...

  14. Effect of power plant emission reductions on a nearby wilderness area: a case study in northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M. Alisa; Ely, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of emission reductions at two coal-fired power plants in northwestern Colorado on a nearby wilderness area. Control equipment was installed at both plants during 1999–2004 to reduce SO2 and NOx emissions. One challenge was separating the effects of local from regional emissions, which also declined during the study period. The long-term datasets examined confirm that emission reductions had a beneficial effect on air and water quality in the wilderness. Despite a 75 % reduction in SO2 emissions, sulfate aerosols measured in the wilderness decreased by only 20 %. Because the site is relatively close to the power plants (2 to sulfate, particularly under conditions of low relative humidity, might account for this less than one-to-one response. On the clearest days, emissions controls appeared to improve visibility by about 1 deciview, which is a small but perceptible improvement. On the haziest days, however, there was little improvement perhaps reflecting the dominance of regional haze and other components of visibility degradation particularly organic carbon and dust. Sulfate and acidity in atmospheric deposition decreased by 50 % near the southern end of the wilderness of which 60 % was attributed to power plant controls and the remainder to reductions in regional sources. Lake water sulfate responded rapidly to trends in deposition declining at 28 lakes monitored in and near the wilderness. Although no change in the acid–base status was observed, few of the lakes appear to be at risk from chronic or episodic acidification.

  15. Wilderness: An unexpected second chance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry Magee; Dave Harmon

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Land Policy & Management Act of 1976 directed the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to inventory its lands for wilderness characteristics and to protect identified areas as "wilderness study areas" (WSAs) until acted upon by Congress. BLM conducted these inventories and studies between 1976 and 1991, finding nearly 800 areas totaling 9.6 million...

  16. Imagining wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Dustin; Jeff Rose; Adrienne Cachelin; Wynn Shooter; Scott Schumann

    2012-01-01

    The future of wilderness is open for discussion and debate. In this paper we invite readers to consider four wilderness scenarios, any one of which, or combination of which, seems possible based on current demographic, social, and cultural trends. The purpose of the paper is not so much to try to predict the future as it is to prod readers into pondering the future—a...

  17. How wilderness therapy works: an examination of the wilderness therapy process to treat adolescents with behavioral problems and addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith C. Russell; John C. Hendee; Dianne Phillips-Miller

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes findings from a detailed study of the processes employed by four leading wilderness therapy programs focusing on how wilderness therapy works, the kinds of behavioral problems to which it is commonly applied, expected outcomes and the role of wilderness in the intervention and treatment process (Russell, 1999). Wilderness therapy is an emerging...

  18. Wilderness Record: Valentine Wilderness Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference is an assemblage of documents related to the Valentine Wilderness Proposal that were bound together into a single record in January, 1972. The...

  19. Quantitative estimation of undiscovered mineral resources - a case study of US Forest Service Wilderness tracts in the Pacific Mountain system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    The need by land managers and planners for more quantitative measures of mineral values has prompted scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey to test a probabilistic method of mineral resource assessment on a portion of the wilderness lands that have been studied during the past 20 years. A quantitative estimate of undiscovered mineral resources is made by linking the techniques of subjective estimation, geologic mineral deposit models, and Monte Carlo simulation. The study considers 91 U.S. Forest Service wilderness tracts in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington. -from Authors

  20. Wilderness in the 21st Century: A framework for testing assumptions about ecological intervention in wilderness using a case study of fire ecology in the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron E. Naficy; Eric G. Keeling; Peter Landres; Paul F. Hessburg; Thomas T. Veblen; Anna. Sala

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the climate and in key ecological processes are prompting increased debate about ecological restoration and other interventions in wilderness. The prospect of intervention in wilderness raises legal, scientific, and values-based questions about the appropriateness of possible actions. In this article, we focus on the role of science to elucidate the...

  1. IDAHO WILDERNESS, IDAHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Fred W.; Weldin, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral surveys conducted in the Idaho Wilderness identified 28 areas with probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential, and 5 mines with demonstrated or inferred resources. Metals including gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, and tungsten, have been extracted from deposits inside the wilderness. Current studies indicate additional areas of probable mineral-resource potential for gold, tungsten, mercury, rare-earth elements, and base metals related to intrusive rocks that follow structures formed by cauldron subsidence. These on-going studies also indicate that there is probable and substantiated resource potential for cobalt with copper, silver, and gold in the Precambrian rocks in the northeastern part of the wilderness in a geologic environment similar to that of the Blackbird mine that lies outside the area. The nature of the geologic terrane precludes the potential for organic fuels.

  2. Studies in the wilderness areas of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: fire, bark beetles, human development, and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward E. Berg

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness areas comprise 65% of the 1.92 million acre Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Fire history studies indicate that fire frequency increased substantially in both white and black spruce forests after European settlement. Dendrochronolgy studies indicate that regional-scale spruce bark beetle outbreaks occurred in the 1820s, 1880s, and 1970s. None of these...

  3. A case study of communication with Anglo and Hispanic wilderness visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia Dawn Parker; Patricia L. Winter

    1998-01-01

    Educating, interpreting for, and communicating with wilderness visitors is necessary to promote appropriate low-impact wilderness recreation. The Angeles National Forest is located northeast of Los Angeles and is surrounded by a large and ethnically diverse population that provided a potentially ethnically diverse sample ofwilderness visitors for the purpose of this...

  4. Wilderness study summary : Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This summary describes the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge which has been studied by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife at the direction of the...

  5. Bryophytes from Tuxedni Wilderness area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The bryoflora of two small maritime islands, Chisik and Duck Island (2,302 ha), comprising Tuxedni Wilderness in western lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, was examined to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. The field study was conducted from sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation within Tuxedni Wilderness. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare the bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 286 bryophytes were identified: 230 mosses and 56 liverworts. Bryum miniatum, Dichodontium olympicum, and Orthotrichum pollens are new to Alaska. The annotated list of species for Tuxedni Wilderness expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Central Pacific Coast district. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Tuxedni Wilderness primarily includes taxa of boreal (61%), montane (13%), temperate (11%), arctic-alpine (7%), cosmopolitan (7%), distribution; 4% of the total moss flora are North America endemics. A brief summary of the botanical exploration of the general area is provided, as is a description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types of Chisik and Duck Islands.

  6. Stream-sediment and panned-concentrate geochemical maps of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Lake, Park, and Chaffee counties, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlan, G.A.; Gerstel, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Under provisions of the Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964), the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been conducting mineral surveys of areas selected for possible inclusion in the National Wilderness Preservation System. This report presents results of geochemical studies carried out in June and July, 1982, as part of the investigation of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colo. Stream-sediment and panned-concentrate samples were collected from about 80 sites on streams draining the study area. Analytical results and a sample locality map were published by Domenico and others (1984).

  7. Mineral resource potential map of the Muddy Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Clark County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.; Leszcykowski, Andrew M.; Esparza, Leon E.; Rumsey, Clayton M.

    1982-01-01

    The Muddy Mountains Wilderness Study Area (WSA 050-0229), Clark County, Nevada, has a high potential for mineral deposits of calcium borates and lithium. The known and potential mineral deposits are concentrated in the east-central and south-central parts of the study area (see map). Zeolites (in particular clinoptilolite) are present in some tuff beds throughout much of the study area, and this resource potential is probably moderate to high. Stream-sediment sampling suggests that the Muddy Mountains area has little potential for mineral deposits of metals (other than lithium). Clay minerals are mined at one locality in the (!rea (see map). Building stone and silica sand have moderate to low potential in some places. Oil and gas potential within the study area is low, but complete evaluation of its potential is not possible without drilling.

  8. LAPALALA WILDERNESS SCHOOL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    private lands and to press for the increase and establishment of further such areas. • To provide all people, especially the youth of Southern Africa regardless of race, culture or priviledge, with a knowledge and appreciation of the environment in which we live by means of Wilderness Schools, Field. Study Centres, trails ...

  9. Addressing “Nature-Deficit Disorder”: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study of Young Adults Attending a Wilderness Camp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Warber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Rapid urbanization raises concern about chronic human health issues along with less frequent interaction with the natural world. “Nature-deficit disorder,” a nonclinical term, describes this potential impact on the well-being of youth. We conducted a mixed methods pilot study of young adults attending a four-week wilderness camp to investigate whether nature-based camp experiences would increase connection to nature and promote multiple dimensions of well-being. Methods. Participants completed precamp (n = 46 and postcamp (n = 36 online questionnaires including nature-related and holistic well-being measures. Differences were investigated using paired t-tests. Interviews (n = 16 explored camp experiences and social relations. Results. All nature-related measures—exposure, knowledge, skills, willingness to lead, perceived safety, sense of place, and nature connection—significantly increased. Well-being outcomes also significantly improved, including perceived stress, relaxation, positive and negative emotions, sense of wholeness, and transcendence. Physical activity and psychological measures showed no change. Interviews described how the wilderness environment facilitated social connections. Conclusion. Findings illustrate the change in nature relations and well-being that wilderness camp experiences can provide. Results can guide future research agendas and suggest that nature immersion experiences could address the risk of “nature-deficit disorder,” improve health, and prepare future environmental leaders.

  10. Collecting Research-Grade Data With Volunteers: A Case Study from Montana's Wilderness to the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Collecting Research-Grade Data With Volunteers: A Case Study from Montana's Wilderness Waterways to the SeaKautz, M (1), Barrows, A (2)(1) Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation. Bozeman, Montana, United States - mike@adventureandscience.org(2) College of the Atlantic. Bar Harbor, Maine, United States - abby.barrows@coa.eduSince World War II, global plastic production and consumption has increased dramatically. Plastics released into the environment may break down into smaller pieces through physical, biological and chemical processes. These small particles, referred to as microplastics, are less than 5mm in size and are a pollutant of emerging concern in both marine and freshwater environments. Since 2013, researcher Abigail Barrows and ASC have been conducting a global survey of microplastic distribution by utilizing the outdoor skills of adventurers. ASC recruits, trains and manages volunteers with specialized skills (surfers, long-distance open-ocean rowers, sailors, hikers, mountaineers, kayakers and others) to collect marine and freshwater samples from remote environments. Of the nearly 1500 samples collected worldwide to date (from areas as remote as the edge of Antarctica and the wilderness of Alaska) 90% contain microplastic, with an average of 8 pieces/1L of water. Samples are also in preparation for micro-Raman spectroscopy to determine source materials. In 2016 and 2017 the survey is focusing on freshwater around the globe. In the United States samples are being collected from the length of the 4th longest river system in the world, the Missouri-Mississippi. ASC has adventurous citizen scientists sampling in the mountain headwaters near Yellowstone National Park to the delta of the Mississippi River near New Orleans. This citizen-driven observation allows research at a geographic scale simply not possible through traditional methods. ASC works closely with Barrows and other researchers to develop water sampling protocols that allow volunteers to

  11. Information collection styles of wilderness users: a market segmentation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Ramthun; Lynda Kersey; Jim Rogers

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to influence the behavior of wilderness visitors through the use of information are limited by the visitors’ reception of that information. This study examined the information gathering behavior of wilderness visitors and the effect of different information collection styles on visitors’ knowledge of low-impact behavior and attitudes toward wilderness...

  12. Core Content for Wilderness Medicine Training: Development of a Wilderness Medicine Track Within an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, Walter A; Battaglioli, Nicole; Drew, Jonathan; McClure, Sarah Frances

    2018-01-16

    Wilderness medicine training has become increasingly popular among medical professionals with numerous educational opportunities nationwide. Curricula for fellowship programs and for medical student education have previously been developed and published, but a specific curriculum for wilderness medicine education during emergency medicine (EM) residency has not. The objective of this study is to create a longitudinal wilderness medicine curriculum that can be incorporated into an EM residency program. Interest-specific tracks are becoming increasingly common in EM training. We chose this model to develop our curriculum specific to wilderness medicine. Outlined in the article is a 3-year longitudinal course of study that includes a core didactic curriculum and a plan for graduated level of responsibility. The core content is specifically related to the required EM core content for residency training with additions specific to wilderness medicine for the residents who pursue the track. The wilderness medicine curriculum would give residencies a framework that can be used to foster learning for residents interested in wilderness medicine. It would enhance the coverage of wilderness and environmental core content education for all EM residents in the program. It would provide wilderness-specific education and experience for interested residents, allowing them to align their residency program requirements through a focused area of study and enhancing their curriculum vitae at graduation. Finally, given the popularity of wilderness medicine, the presence of a wilderness medicine track may improve recruitment for the residency program. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Men's wilderness experience and spirituality: further explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Heintzman

    2008-01-01

    Most previous research on wilderness experience and spirituality focuses on women only or mixed male and female groups. This qualitative research study investigated the spiritual impact of participation in a men-only wilderness canoe trip. In-depth interviews were conducted after the trip with six participants. Interpretive analysis identified five themes: spiritual...

  14. Valentine Wilderness Proposal Package

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Collection of documents for the Valentine Wilderness Proposal that includes the Valentine Wilderness Proposal Summary, Publich Hearing Announcement and procedures,...

  15. 76 FR 75557 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan/Wilderness Study, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ..., Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent... is being prepared for updating the General Management Plan (GMP) for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park... effects associated with possible designation of additional wilderness within Hawaii Volcanoes National...

  16. Wilderness and Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstetler, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    In this article I examine the theme of wilderness through the lens of American philosopher Henry Bugbee. His conception of wilderness goes beyond the literal sense of the word to what Mooney (1999) terms "a generous space of listening, mutuality of address and presence" (p. ix). I contend that Bugbee's metaphorical expression of wilderness has…

  17. Perceived effects of setting attributes on visitor experiences in wilderness: variation with situational context and visitor characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David N; Hall, Troy E

    2009-07-01

    Understanding how setting attributes influence the nature of the visitor experience is crucial to effective recreation management. Highly influential attributes are useful indicators to monitor within a planning framework, such as Limits of Acceptable Change. This study sought to identify the setting attributes perceived to have the most profound effect on the ability to have "a real wilderness experience" and to assess the degree to which attribute importance varied with situational context and visitor characteristics. To this end, exiting hikers were surveyed at moderate and very high use trailheads in Alpine Lakes Wilderness, WA (USA), and Three Sisters Wilderness, OR (USA). They were asked about the degree to which encountering varying levels of different setting attributes would add to or detract from their experience. Attributes with the largest range of effect on experience, based on evaluations of different levels, were considered most important. The most influential attributes were litter and several types of campsite interaction--people walking through camp and number of other groups camping close by. The perceived importance of setting attributes did not vary much between wilderness locations with substantially different use levels, suggesting that conclusions are robust and generalizable across wilderness areas. There also was little difference in the perceptions of day and overnight visitors. In contrast, we found substantial variation in the perceived importance of setting attributes with variation in wilderness experience, knowledge, attachment, and motivation. Our results validate the emphasis of many wilderness management plans on indicators of social interaction, such as number of encounters.

  18. The verification of wilderness area boundaries as part of a buffer zone demarcation process: A case study from the uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park World Heritage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja C. Kruger; Ian A. Rusworth; Kirsten Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Wilderness areas are by definition free from the sights and sounds of modern man. The boundaries of wilderness areas have traditionally been defined based on the management authorities' perceptions of which areas have wilderness quality. Experience shows that many areas classified as wilderness do not actually have wilderness qualities and do not provide a true...

  19. Proposed additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 35 : Deferred Areas : Kofa Game Range - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range - Lake Mead National Recreation Area - Nunivak National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  20. Magazines as wilderness information sources: assessing users' general wilderness knowledge and specific leave no trace knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Confer; Andrew J. Mowen; Alan K. Graefe; James D. Absher

    2000-01-01

    The Leave No Trace (LNT) educational program has the potential to provide wilderness users with useful minimum impact information. For LNT to be effective, managers need to understand who is most/least aware of minimum impact practices and how to expose users to LNT messages. This study examined LNT knowledge among various user groups at an Eastern wilderness area and...

  1. "Completely empowering": A qualitative study of the impact of technology on the wilderness experience in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Shultis

    2015-01-01

    Recent academic literature has expressed concern over the potential impact of the increasing types and levels of electronic (largely communication-related) technology brought by visitors into the wilderness. A key issue has been perceived changes in risktaking behavior by wilderness and backcountry users. Despite these concerns, extremely limited empirical assessment...

  2. Wilderness managers, wilderness scientists, and universities: A partnership to protect wilderness experiences in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Ann Schwaller; Robert Dvorak; Neal Christensen; William T. Borrie

    2013-01-01

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in northern Minnesota has a rich history of advocacy for protection as wilderness. In the 1950s, Sigurd Olsen best described the song of the wilderness in Minnesota's north country: "I have heard the singing in many places, but I seem to hear it best in the wilderness lake country of the Quetico-Superior,...

  3. Wilderness science: A historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2014-01-01

    Wilderness is a relatively new and powerful idea that is still finding its footing in the world of science. Although the intellectual history of wilderness can be traced farther back in time (Nash 2001), as a land classification wilderness is less than a century old, and it was just 50 years ago that wilderness was codified in legislation in the United States. While...

  4. Visitors' conceptualizations of wilderness experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Seekamp; Troy Hall; David Cole

    2012-01-01

    Despite 50 years of wilderness visitor experience research, it is not well understood how visitors conceptualize a wilderness experience. Diverging from etic approaches to wilderness visitor experience research, the research presented in this paper applied an emic approach to identify wilderness experience attributes. Specifically, qualitative data from 173 on-site...

  5. The impact of wilderness and other wildlands on local economies and regional development trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundars Rudzitis; Rebecca Johnson

    2000-01-01

    There have been few economic studies of the impact of wilderness on nearby communities. The few studies that have been carried out find relatively modest economic impacts on the surrounding communities by people who come to recreate in federally wilderness areas. However, studies find that people are moving to areas near federally designated wilderness and other...

  6. Medical acupuncture enhances standard wilderness medical care: a case study from the Inca Trail, Machu Picchu, Peru, April 2, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B L

    1997-08-01

    This case report shows the integration of medical acupuncture into the standard medical care of a wilderness emergency situation. Despite conventional medical attention, a trekker suffering from an extremely painful conjunctivitis continued to suffer severe eye pain. The addition of medical acupuncture to his care resolved his eye pain promptly, enabling him to continue his trekking activities without further distress. Acupuncture has many potential applications to enhance the effects of standard medical care in wilderness and third world travel settings.

  7. The wilderness record, Chamisso wilderness proposal, Chamisso National Wildlife Refuge, Second Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report; Federal Register notice; materials sent to news media; public hearing package, mailing list, handout materials, attendance list, and...

  8. Where's the Wilderness in Wilderness Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutko, Ebony A.; Gillespie, Judy

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a review of the theoretical and empirical literature in the field of wilderness therapy, the intent of which is to gain a greater conceptual understanding of the importance of the physical environment in therapeutic intervention. A review and consolidation of the existing literature reveal that the theories used to…

  9. The influence of wilderness restoration programs on visitor experience and visitor opinions of managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Flood; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness campsites heavily damaged by recreational use pose a significant management challenge that threatens the integrity of the wilderness resource and the quality of the visitors’ experience. This study, conducted in the Mission Mountains Wilderness of northwestern Montana, surveyed 293 visitors to determine what influence heavily damaged campsites and site...

  10. The Indicator Performance Estimate (IPE) Approach to Defining Acceptable Conditions in Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Hollenhorst; Lisa Stull-Gardner

    1992-01-01

    Using data from a study conducted in the Cranberry Wilderness area, this paper describes how the Importance-Performance approach can be used to prioritize wilderness indicators and determine how much change from the pristine is acceptable. The approach uses two key types of information: (1) indicator importance, or visitor opinion as to which wilderness indicators have...

  11. Intergroup conflict in wilderness: balancing opportunities for experience with preservation responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Liisa Kajala

    1995-01-01

    In contrast with the days of the early explorers, when wilderness travel in America was predominantly a solitary activity, the wilderness resource is now shared among many interests. Interaction among these various interests leads to varied amounts of conflict. Studies in the United States, conducted in multiple National Wilderness Preservation System units, across...

  12. A wilderness medicine course for pediatric residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R D; Shubkin, C D; Chapman, S H; Diekema, D S

    1998-02-01

    To design a structured curriculum to teach pediatric residents about wilderness medicine. An increasing number of children are involved in more rigorous and potentially risky outdoor activities. Despite the breadth of exposure characteristic of most pediatric residences, we are aware of no formalized syllabus that prepares residents to both treat injuries sustained in outdoor pursuits, and help parents and children to prepare safely for such activities. The first half of the course was designed to teach a broad range of topics in wilderness medicine through a series of readings, lectures, and field trips. The second half of the course involved a six-day course in wilderness skills. Over a three-week period, the major topics of wilderness medicine were thoroughly covered. The three residents involved in the planning and execution of the course felt that the course succeeded in filling an important gap in their pediatric residency training. The addition of a structured wilderness medicine elective to pediatric residencies, with or without a field component, may provide a valuable opportunity for pediatric residents to broaden their skills and knowledge base to include these increasingly important topics.

  13. Wilderness Management Plan : Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge : Agassiz Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Wilderness Plan for Agassiz NWR provides background information on the Refuge and its objectives as well as a description of the Agassiz Wilderness Area....

  14. Human relationships with wilderness: The fundamental definition of wilderness character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson

    2004-01-01

    The science that has guided wilderness management thus far is not really very old. It couldn’t be. Wilderness legislation has guided U.S. federal agency managers since 1964. My own introduction to wilderness research was when I stumbled onto a series of debate articles by some of the few people engaged in early wilderness research during my freshman year of college in...

  15. Attitudes toward roles in a wilderness education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Hendricks

    2000-01-01

    This study examined students’ attitudes toward the impact monster and the good guy roles in the impact monster skit and determined if attitudes differed by gender and grade level. In addition, differences in high- and low-involvement with the skit were analyzed. The impact monster skit is a popular wilderness education program designed to teach appropriate wilderness...

  16. Changing human relationships with nature: making and remaking wilderness science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill M. Belsky

    2000-01-01

    The paper identifies and discusses two major themes in wilderness social science. First, that wilderness studies (and its advocates) have been limited by an ontological tension between those who mainly approach the relationship between humans and nature on the basis of material factors and constraints and those who approach it through an examination of shifting...

  17. The virtues of localism and arctic wilderness politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Gladden

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of co-managing structures and land use issues in three case studies of arctic wilderness politics shows that more formal and informal power sharing by government officials with local people results in less conflict. Greater input and control by nearby communities may also help to protect wilderness ecosystems and traditional values of northern cultures....

  18. Visitor attitudes towards fire and wind disturbances in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; Erin D. Small

    2011-01-01

    This study examines visitor attitudes across the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness regarding the effects of natural disturbances on visitor planning and wilderness conditions. Visitors were intercepted at entry points and permit distribution locations during 2007. Results suggest that respondents were aware of recent wind and fire disturbances. Few respondents...

  19. Origin of political conflict in Arctic wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Gladden

    2002-01-01

    There are several important factors related to political conflict associated with arctic wilderness areas: scientific studies, economic interests, ethnic identities, geographic differences, and national histories. How groups with an interest in these wilderness areas inject their values into these factors stimulates political debate with each other and with stewarding...

  20. A framework to evaluate proposals for scientific activities in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres

    2010-01-01

    Every year, the four Federal wilderness management agencies - U.S. DOI Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and the USDA Forest Service - receive hundreds of proposals to conduct scientific studies within wilderness. There is no consistent and comprehensive framework for evaluating such proposals that accounts for the unique...

  1. Wistful wilderness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Peter; Stoep, van der Jan; Keulartz, Jozef; Jochemsen, Henk

    2017-01-01

    Based on in-depth interviews, this article presents findings of a study centred on public communication regarding Tiengemeten, a Dutch island previously occupied by farmers. An answer is sought to the question of how visitors to Tiengemeten evaluate, according to their own experiences, the discourse

  2. Wilderness education: The ultimate commitment to quality wilderness stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory F. Hansen; Tom Carlson

    2007-01-01

    The effective planning, implementation, and monitoring of a wilderness education program will ultimately produce measurable results that can be instrumental in achieving wilderness management goals and objectives. This paper will provide a simple step-by-step overview of how to develop and maintain a successful wilderness education program through planning,...

  3. Ecological wilderness restoration: Attitudes toward restoring the Mount Logan Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy A. DeMillion; Martha E. Lee

    2001-01-01

    By law, wilderness areas are intended to be unmarred landscapes where evidence of modern civilization is generally absent. This presents a problem, since ecological wilderness conditions have been impaired by human activities. For example, some forest wilderness ecosystems have been altered by livestock grazing, logging, fire exclusion, and through other environmental...

  4. Humans apart from nature? Wilderness experience and the Wilderness Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Fincher

    2012-01-01

    Wilderness managers are faced with making judgments about the appropriateness of different types of recreational activities. One of the criteria they use is wilderness dependence-the notion that an activity should be allowed, or privileged if rationing is required, if it depends on a wilderness setting for much of its value. Inherent in this concept is the idea that...

  5. Monitoring air quality in class I wilderness areas of the northeastern United States using lichens and bryophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison C. Dibble; James W. Hinds; Ralph Perron; Natalie Cleavitt; Richard L. Poirot; Linda H. Pardo

    2016-01-01

    To address a need for air quality and lichen monitoring information for the Northeast, we compared bulk chemistry data from 2011-2013 to baseline surveys from 1988 and 1993 in three Class I Wilderness areas of New Hampshire and Vermont. Plots were within the White Mountain National Forest (Presidential Range—Dry River Wilderness and Great Gulf Wilderness, New Hampshire...

  6. MAZATZAL WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey has shown that the Mazatzal Wilderness, Arizona has demonstrated resources of silver, gold, lead and mercury, small areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential for silver and copper, and areas of probable resource potential for resources of silver, copper, lead, mercury, and molybdenum. Gold, silver, and copper resources occur in small deposits in the north-central, eastern, and southern parts of the wilderness. A small demonstrated mercury resource is located at the Sunflower mine near the southeastern corner of the wilderness adjacent to the well-known Sunflower mining district. Molybdenum mineralization found during this study in the Tangle Creek area west of the Verde River may extend eastward into the roadless area and the wilderness. Tin occurrences not previously known in the Mazatzal region were found in the central part of the wilderness, and uranium was found near Horseshoe Reservoir, but there is little promise for the occurrence of tin and uranium resources. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in this study.

  7. Values of the urban wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paticia L. Winter

    2013-01-01

    Wilderness is widely supported by the American public (Campaign for America’s Wilderness 2003) and provides myriad ecosystem services and other benefits (Schuster and others 2005, Williams and Watson 2007). Wilderness services and benefits deemed important to the public include use (such as recreation) and non-usevalues (such as scenery appreciation) (Brown...

  8. Integrating cultural resources and wilderness character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill Cowley; Peter Landres; Melissa Memory; Doug Scott; Adrienne Lindholm

    2012-01-01

    Cultural resources are an integral part of wilderness and wilderness character, and all wilderness areas have a human history. This article develops a foundation for wilderness and cultural resource staffs to continue communicating with one another in order to make better decisions for wilderness stewardship. Following a discussion of relevant legislative history, we...

  9. Mapping wilderness character in Olympic National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Tricker; Peter Landres; Jennifer Chenoweth; Roger Hoffman; Scott Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The Olympic Wilderness was established November 16, 1988 when President Ronald Reagan signed the Washington Park Wilderness Act. A total of 876,447 acres or 95% of Olympic National Park (OLYM) was designated as wilderness and became a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, wherein wilderness character would be preserved. The purpose of this project was to...

  10. Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Stephen F. McCool

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management. Wilderness areas are managed to protect their wilderness character, but they also provide opportunities for recreation use. Decades ago, relatively few people sought wilderness experiences, and...

  11. Cyst acquisition rate for Giardia lamblia in backcountry travelers to Desolation Wilderness, Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, S.C.; Sorenson, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of Giardia lamblia acquisition in back-country travelers to a wilderness area, provide longitudinal follow-up on the incidence of symptomatic gastrointestinal illness and relate such information to concentrations of Giardia cysts in water samples from a high-use area. A prospective cohort non-interventional study of 41 healthy adult backcountry travelers from age 19 to 71 years in Desolation Wilderness, Lake Tahoe Basin was carried out. The incidence of Giardia cyst acquisition in backcountry travelers was only 5.7% (95% CI 0.17–20.2%). Mild, self-limiting gastrointestinal illness occurred in 16.7% of subjects (95% CI 4.9%–34.50%), none of whom demonstrated G. lamblia infection. Water sampling from three popular stream sites revealed cyst contamination to be generally at low levels with cyst concentrations in the single digit range for every 100 gallons filtered. G. lamblia contamination of water occurs, but at low levels. Acquisition of this parasite may be infrequent in backcountry recreationalists. Symptomatic gastrointestinal illness following wilderness travel can be due to other etiologies. Our findings may not be representative of all wilderness areas, but suggest that in the absence of documented G. lamblia infection, persons symptomatic following travel may suffer a self-limiting gastrointestinal illness. In such circumstances, empiric therapy for giardiasis is tempting but difficult to justify.

  12. Aeromagnetic, Bouguer gravity, and interpretation maps of the Sheep Hole-Cadiz Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-305), San Bernardino County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R.W.; Bracken, R.E.; Stierman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Federal Land Policy and Management Act (Public Law 94-579, October 21, 1976) requires the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to conduct mineral surveys on certain areas to determine their mineral resource potential. Results must be made available to the public and be submitted to the President and the Congress. These maps presents the results of a mineral survey of the Sheep Hole-Cadiz Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-305), California Desert Conservation Area, San Bernardino County, California.

  13. (wilderness) adventure experiential learning regarding group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a centre-based adventure program with an expedition-based wilderness program with regard to group effectiveness. For comparisons, this study made use of a crossover experimental design combined with a mixed-method approach. Participants were 28 ...

  14. Leave no trace practices: behaviors and preferences of wilderness visitors regarding use of cookstoves and camping away from lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal A. Christensen; David N. Cole

    2000-01-01

    This research used descriptive information collected in visitor studies conducted between 1990 and 1992 in eight different wildernesses around the United States to evaluate behaviors and preferences of wilderness visitors regarding cookstoves and camping away from lakes. The majority of visitors used stoves for cooking. However, in all but the Desolation Wilderness, at...

  15. Chicago Wilderness region urban forest vulnerability assessment and synthesis: a report from the Urban Forestry Climate Change Response Framework Chicago Wilderness pilot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie A. Brandt; Abigail Derby Lewis; Lydia Scott; Lindsay Darling; Robert T. Fahey; Louis Iverson; David J. Nowak; Allison R. Bodine; Andrew Bell; Shannon Still; Patricia R. Butler; Andrea Dierich; Stephen D. Handler; Maria K. Janowiak; Stephen N. Matthews; Jason W. Miesbauer; Matthew Peters; Anantha Prasad; P. Danielle Shannon; Douglas Stotz; Christopher W. Swanston

    2017-01-01

    The urban forest of the Chicago Wilderness region, a 7-million-acre area covering portions of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, will face direct and indirect impacts from a changing climate over the 21st century. This assessment evaluates the vulnerability of urban trees and natural and developed landscapes within the Chicago Wilderness region to a range of...

  16. The pelagic birds of Tuxedni wilderness, Alaska: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study of seabird colonies on Chisik and Duck Islands comprising the Tuxedni Wilderness in lower Cook Inlet. A description of the study area,...

  17. The symbolic uniqueness of wilderness participation | Greffrath ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through restoration, physical self, primitiveness, humility, timelessness, solitude, privacy, freedom of choice, personal self and spiritual upliftment, this study aims at determining whether wilderness can be experienced as symbolically unique and whether this natural world can be considered a necessity for achieving ...

  18. Monitoring inter-group encounters in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Rich Cronn; Neal A. Christensen

    1998-01-01

    Many managers face the challenge of monitoring rates of visitor encounters in wilderness. This study (1) provides estimates of encounter rates through use of several monitoring methods, (2) determines the relationship between the various measures of encounter rates, and (3) determines the relationship between various indirect predictors of encounter rates and actual...

  19. Landscape development, forest fires, and wilderness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H E

    1974-11-08

    fire. Major fires occur so often that the vegetation pattern is a record of fire history. All elements in the forest mosaic are in various stages of postfire succession, with only a few approaching climax. Fire interrupts the successful sequence toward climax. Geomorphic and edaphic factors in vegetational distribution are largely submerged by the fire regime, except for bog and other lowland vegetation. Fire recycles nutrients and renews succession. Nevertheless, despite the fire regime, the resulting long-term equilibrium of the forest mosaic, characterized by severe and irregular fluctuations of individual elements, reflects regional climate. In the BWCA and the western mountains, large virgin forests can be preserved for study and wilderness recreation. These wilderness areas must be managed to return them to the natural equilibrium which has been disturbed by 50 to 70 years of fire suppression. The goal should be to maintain virgin forests as primeval wilderness. This can be done by management that permits fire and other natural processes to determine the forest mosaic. Mechanized tree-felling and other human disturbances should be kept to an absolute minimum. Natural landforms also should be preserved for study and for certain nondestructive recreational activities. It is somewhat late for the Colorado River and other rivers of the West, because natural balances are upset by drainagebasin disturbances. Modification of plant cover on hillslopes changes infiltration and erosion rates and thus the stream discharge and sediment load, so the stream balance is altered from primeval conditions. Scenic Rivers legislation should thus be used to restore certain river systems and their drainage basins. Mountain meadows, badlands, desert plains, and patterned permafrost terrain are extremely fragile and sensitive. Intricate stream and weathering processes leave patterns easily obliterated by mechanized vehicles. Tire tracks can last for decades or centuries. The mineral

  20. Final wilderness proposal : Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife announcing the completion of the wilderness study concerning the Cedar Island National...

  1. Final Environmental Statement for the Proposed Missisquoi Wilderness Area 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Missisquoi Wilderness Study concluded that nearly the entire wildlife refuge is, or will be, needed for intensive waterfowl habitat management. The Fish and...

  2. Wilderness record, Nunivak National Wildlife Refuge, Second Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report; mineral appraisal; master plan; Federal Register notice; materials sent to news media; public hearing package, mailing list, handout...

  3. Naturalness and wilderness: the dilemma and irony of managing wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter B. Landres; Mark W. Brunson; Linda Merigliano; Charisse Sydoriak; Steve Morton

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes a dialogue session that focused on two concepts that strongly influence nearly all wilderness management: wildness and naturalness. The origin and value of these concepts are discussed, as well as the dilemma and irony that arises when wilderness managers contemplate manipulating the environment to restore naturalness at the risk of reducing...

  4. Sanitation in wilderness: Balancing minimum tool policies and wilderness values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul R. Lachapelle

    2000-01-01

    Officials with the four wilderness managing agencies are faced with balancing wilderness preservation values and the minimum tool policies of their respective agencies. One example is the management of sanitation, particularly human waste and the often intrusive infrastructure that accompanies its treatment and disposal. Because the treatment and disposal of human...

  5. Wilderness medicine race for preclinical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feazel, Leah; Block, Jason; Jayawardena, Asitha; Wehr, Peter; House, Hans; Buresh, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Introducing medical students to wilderness medicine provides skills in leadership, teamwork, improvisation, and managing medical emergencies; however, wilderness medicine (WM) education is typically reserved for senior medical students and often requires expensive travel. Here, we describe the Winter Wilderness Medicine Race (WWMR). The race was held at a large allopathic medical school and targeted towards preclinical medical students. Race planning was performed by senior medical students with the supervision of doctors from the Department of Emergency Medicine. We hypothesized that this intervention in medical education would enhance students' WM knowledge, and build teamwork and improvisational skills. The research involved a one day WM race that required teams of first- and second-year medical students to navigate a 5-km course and complete medical scenarios. Races that were held annually between 2011 and 2014 are included in the study. The educational effectiveness of the race was evaluated by pre- and post-race knowledge assessments of the medical students participating in a WWMR. Qualitative data regarding student perceptions of the skills learned were obtained by focus group interviews. Wilderness medicine provides skills in leadership, teamwork, improvisation and managing medical emergencies Between 2011 and 2014, 122 preclinical medical students from a Midwestern US allopathic medical school participated in the study. Overall, the mean scores for pre- and post-race knowledge assessments were 48 and 85 per cent, respectively, a 37 per cent increase in scores (p Medicine Race (WWMR) enhanced preclinical medical students' wilderness medicine knowledge, teamwork skills and improvisational abilities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. National and community market contributions of Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan Hjerpe; Tom Holmes; Eric White

    2017-01-01

    Wilderness attracts tourists and generates visitor spending in proximate communities as people enjoy Wilderness for outdoor recreation. Wilderness also attracts amenity migrants and out-of-region investments into surrounding regional economies. To investigate the amount and types of employment and income generated by Wilderness visitation, we conducted an economic...

  7. Perspectives on wilderness in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Klein

    2002-01-01

    In the American lexicon, the concept of wilderness has become formalized through the Wilderness Act of 1964, and thus it has been defined in legal terms as a land designation. Yet wilderness, just as beauty, remains in the eye of the beholder, and how individuals experience wilderness varies both within cultures, as well as between cultures. As pressures for resource...

  8. A database application for wilderness character monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley Adams; Peter Landres; Simon Kingston

    2012-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Wilderness Stewardship Division, in collaboration with the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute and the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program, developed a database application to facilitate tracking and trend reporting in wilderness character. The Wilderness Character Monitoring Database allows consistent, scientifically based...

  9. Research to create public memory of wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Stewart

    2012-01-01

    If wilderness experiences are distinct from general outdoor recreation experiences, then wilderness visitor research needs to reflect the distinction. If there are distinguishing characteristics, they would be linked to social and cultural meanings embedded in the Wilderness Act of 1964 and contemporary interpretations of it. Most research on wilderness visitor...

  10. LOWER SAN FRANCISCO WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, James C.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The Lower San Francisco study area consists of about 40 sq mi, in a strip between 1 and 6 mi wide, along a 20-30 mi stretch of the San Francisco River in Arizona and New Mexico. The study area and contiguous roadless areas were examined for mineral potential and found to have an area of probable mineral-resource potential for base- or precious-metal deposits in middle to upper Tertiary volcanic rocks. The entire area has a largely unassessable potential for base-metal deposits related to igneous intrusives of Laramide age, like those in the nearby Morenci mining district, Arizona. The contiguous roadless area has an area of probable mineral-resource potential for molybdenum or copper deposits related to intrusive igneous rocks in the core of a dacitic volcano of Oligocene age. An area in the west part of the study area has a probable geothermal-resource potential.

  11. The Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: a national wilderness research program in support of wilderness management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita Wright

    2000-01-01

    The Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute strives to provide scientific leadership in developing and applying the knowledge necessary to sustain wilderness ecosystems and values. Since its 1993 dedication, researchers at this federal, interagency Institute have collaborated with researchers and managers from other federal, academic and private institutions to...

  12. Wilderness and woodland ranchers in California: A total income case study of public grazing permits and their impacts on conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo Pro, J. L.; Huntsinger, L.; Campos, P.; Caparros, A.

    2009-04-01

    Mediterranean woodlands in California are managed as agro-silvo-pastoral systems producing a number of commercial products as well as a huge variety of environmental services, including private amenities for the landowner. In many parts of the woodlands, grazing on government owned (public) lands has traditionally had an important role in private ranching. In recent decades the risk of conversion to alternative uses (such as urban development or vineyards) has threatened these woodlands due to the increasing opportunity costs of capital. Understanding the economy of these woodlands and the potential effects of public grazing policies on the total income perceived by the landowner is crucial when considering strategies attempting to slow or stop land use change. However, traditional cash-flow analyses are lacking crucial information needed to understand all the elements that have an important role in the economic decisions that landowners make about their woodlands. For more than half a century, the use of public lands by private ranchers has been one of the most controversial debates in the American west. Wilderness conservationist groups have denounced grazing as destructive and argue for the removal of any kind of livestock. Ranchers have fought for their right to hold public grazing leases, arguing that they are crucial for the continuity of private ranching and consequently for the conservation of extensive rangeland habitat that otherwise could be converted to alternative uses. In this study, we apply the Agroforestry Accounting System (AAS) methodology to a California oak woodland case study to estimate the total private income generated in an accounting period. The presented case study is characterized by a household economy with self-employed labour and with part of the grazing dependent on public land leases. The AAS methodology extends traditional cash-flow analysis in order to estimate the total private income that would accurately explain the woodland

  13. Technical guide for monitoring selected conditions related to wilderness character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres; Steve Boutcher; Liese Dean; Troy Hall; Tamara Blett; Terry Carlson; Ann Mebane; Carol Hardy; Susan Rinehart; Linda Merigliano; David N. Cole; Andy Leach; Pam Wright; Deb Bumpus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of monitoring wilderness character is to improve wilderness stewardship by providing managers a tool to assess how selected actions and conditions related to wilderness character are changing over time. Wilderness character monitoring provides information to help answer two key questions about wilderness character and wilderness stewardship: 1. How is...

  14. Wilderness Emergency Medical Services Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-05-01

    Wilderness emergency medical services (WEMS) are designed to provide high quality health care in wilderness environments. A WEMS program should have oversight by a qualified physician responsible for protocol development, education, and quality improvement. The director is also ideally fully trained as a member of that wilderness rescue program, supporting the team with real-time patient care. WEMS providers function with scopes of practice approved by the local medical director and regulatory authority. With a focus on providing quality patient care, it is time for the evolution of WEMS as an integrated element of a local emergency response system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chase Lake Wilderness: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  16. Water chemistry of Rocky Mountain Front Range aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Musselman; Laura Hudnell; Mark W. Williams; Richard A. Sommerfeld

    1996-01-01

    A study of the water chemistry of Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range alpine/subalpine lakes and streams in wilderness ecosystems was conducted during the summer of 1995 by the USDA Forest Service Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, and the University of Colorado Institute of Alpine and Arctic Research. Data...

  17. Economic values of wilderness recreation and passive use: what we think we know at the beginning of the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Loomis

    2000-01-01

    Two techniques are used to estimate the economic value of recreation and off-site passive use values of wilderness. Using an average value per recreation day ($39), the economic value of wilderness recreation is estimated to be $574 million annually. Generalizing the two Western passive use values studies we estimate values of Western wilderness in the lower 48 states...

  18. Hawaiian Islands Wilderness proposal announcement

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife stating that documents pertaining to the Hawaiian Islands Wilderness proposal have been...

  19. Injuries to individuals participating in mountain and wilderness sports: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Alasdair; Godden, David

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize evidence on injuries occurring in individuals participating in mountain and wilderness sports. Scopus, ISI Web of Knowledge, SPORTDiscus, Ovid Safety and Health, Index to Theses, COPAC, and sportscotland e-library. The search terms were (mountain* or wilderness or adventure or climb* or (hill walk*)) and (accident* or injur* or rescue*) and (epidemiolog* or statistic* or pattern* or survey*). The search period was from 1987 to 2010. A total of 2034 articles were identified. The full text of 137 articles was retrieved. Fifty articles met inclusion criteria-mountain and wilderness; nonmotorized, leisure time, outdoor activities; and nonfatal injury. Skiing and snowboarding articles were excluded. Study design was classified using the "STOX" hierarchy of evidence. Study quality was rated independently by 2 reviewers. All studies were observational. Twenty-one (42%) were longitudinal, 20 (40%) were cross-sectional surveys, and 9 were cohort studies. A majority of casualties were aged 20 to 39 years. There was a clear male majority, 70% to 89% in most studies. The percentage of casualties who sustained severe injuries ranged from 5% to 10%--less than 10% were admitted to hospital. Casualties sustained an average of 1.2 to 2.8 injuries (most >1.6), which mainly affected the soft tissues; between 2% and 38% were fractures. Up to 90% of injuries were to the extremities. The majority of mountain and wilderness sports injuries are minor to moderate. However, some casualties have life-threatening medical problems, which may have long-term implications for return to sport and general well-being.

  20. An on-line narrative of Colorado wilderness: Self-in-"cybernetic space"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph G. Champ; Daniel R. Williams; Catherine M. Lundy

    2013-01-01

    The authors consider a new frontier for the study of wilderness recreation experience, an increasingly common form of blog known as online trip reports. Analysis and discussion in this article is the result of collecting and reflecting upon more than 300 trip reports focused on wilderness areas in the state of Colorado. The authors present a case study of one trip...

  1. Wilderness mineral potential: Assessment of mineral-resource potential in U.S. Forest Service lands studied in 1964-1984: Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, S.P.; Kropschot, S.J.; Dickinson, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and subsequent related legislation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) have been conducting mineral surveys of wilderness and primitive areas, and of other national forest lands being considered for wilderness designation. The Wilderness Act directs that the results of these surveys are to be made available to the public and are to be submitted to the President and the Congress. This professional paper is a synopsis of the mineral surveys made from 1965 to 1983. It summarizes our current knowledge of mineral and energy resources and of the potential for the occurrence of undiscovered mineral and energy resources in 45 million acres of Federal lands, chiefly in national forests.

  2. The multiple values of wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom; J. Michael Bowker

    2005-01-01

    Gone are those of the 1950s and early 1960s who championed preserving wild lands and who influenced and saw through the birth of the National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS). Gone too are myriad eager managers and proponents of wild land protection of the late 1960s and 1970s who helped rear the fledgling Wilderness1 system and bring it into adolescence by adding...

  3. Wilderness for science: pros and cons of using wilderness areas for biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana L. Six; Paul Alaback; Robert A. Winfree; Delia Snyder; Anne Hagele

    2000-01-01

    Research is one of the intended purposes of wilderness. The Wilderness Act states that “wilderness may contain ecological, geological, or other features of scientific, educational, scenic, or historical value.” This session specifically focuses on the pros and cons of conducting research in wilderness.

  4. Preventing Family and Educational Disconnection through Wilderness-Based Therapy Targeting Youth at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronalds, Lisa; Allen-Craig, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to address the issue of youth homelessness in Australia, Regional Extended Family Services (REFS) have developed a wilderness-based therapeutic intervention. REFS aim to provide early intervention services for young people at risk of homelessness, and their families. This study examined the outcomes of the REFS wilderness program by…

  5. Wilderness campsite conditions under an unregulated camping policy: An eastern example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Fai Leung; Jeffrey L. Marion

    2000-01-01

    This study identified and assessed 110 campsites in seven designated wilderness areas in the Jefferson National Forest of Virginia. The campsites were unevenly distributed within each wilderness, concentrating along trail corridors and near popular destination areas. With a few exceptions, most campsites surveyed were in good condition. The findings indicate that...

  6. Recreation impacts and management in wilderness : A state-of-knowldege review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Fai Leung; Jeffrey L. Marion

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the body of literature on recreation resource impacts and their management in the United States, with a primary focus on research within designated wildernesses during the past 15 years since the previous review (Cole 1987b). Recreation impacts have become a salient issue among wilderness scientists, managers and advocates alike. Studies of...

  7. 76 FR 78309 - Hawaiian and Pacific Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Wilderness Review and Legislative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... Forest, Hanalei, Hawaiian Islands, Howland Island, Hul `ia, James Campbell, Jarvis Island, Johnston... completed wilderness inventories and subsequent WSA studies for the Baker Island, Howland Island, and Jarvis.... possible wilderness proposal submitted to recommendation. Congress. Howland Island\\1\\ September 2008, WSA...

  8. The effect of use density and length of stay on visitor experience in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Troy E. Hall

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the degree to which visitor experiences vary between (1) very high use and moderate use places and (2) day users and overnight users. The study was conducted at 10 trailheads in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, WA, and the Three Sisters Wilderness, OR. Some visitors were asked about trip motivations as they started their trip; others were asked what they...

  9. Understanding place meanings for wilderness: Personal and community values at risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Gunderson

    2006-01-01

    Information about human relationships with wilderness is important for wilderness management decisions, including decisions pertaining to the use of wildland fire. In a study about meanings attached to a national forest, local residents were asked to identify places they valued on the forest, why they valued them, and how fuel treatments affected those values. Local...

  10. Privacy functions and wilderness recreation: Use density and length of stay effects on experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Troy E. Hall

    2010-01-01

    Privacy and its functions are desirable attributes of the human experience in wilderness areas, where outstanding opportunities for solitude is legally mandated. Privacy, the ability to choose how and when to interact and exchange information with other people, enhances opportunities for both personal growth and interaction with the wilderness environment. This study...

  11. Deliberating the experiential qualities of wilderness: Similar meanings, but divergent standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Seekamp; David N. Cole

    2009-01-01

    Debate continues about how to best provide and protect outstanding opportunities for wilderness experiences (i.e., solitude, primitive recreation, and unconfined recreation), particularly in high-use destinations. This study explores what these experiences mean to wilderness stakeholders attending facilitated deliberations about the management of a high-use destination...

  12. Visitor satisfactions: backcountry and wilderness users in the White Mountain National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson; Rebecca Oreskes; Frederick Kacprzynski; Tom More

    2002-01-01

    The opportunities and conditions sought by visitors in national forest backcountry and wilderness areas can affect the satisfaction they have with the experience. This study measured the recreation satisfaction ratings of hikers and backpackers during their trips to backcountry and wilderness areas in the White Mountain National Forest. Field interviews were conducted...

  13. Wilderness visitors, experiences, and management preferences: How they vary with use level and length of stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Troy E. Hall

    2008-01-01

    We explore the extent to which visitor experiences and management preferences vary between the most heavily used places in wilderness and places that are less popular. We also contrast day and overnight users. The study was conducted in Forest Service administered wildernesses in Oregon and Washington using both on-site and mailback questionnaires. The on-site...

  14. Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset is meant to depict wilderness areas within the state of New Mexico managed by the Bureau of Land Management These wilderness areas are officially...

  15. Benefits of nonfacilitated uses of wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Roggenbuck; B. L. Driver

    2000-01-01

    Using the taxonomy of personal benefits attributed to wilderness and developed for the 1985 national wilderness conference, this paper summarizes the research since published on the benefits of nonfacilitated uses of wilderness. It describes recent developments in theory and methods regarding leisure experiences and discusses the implications of these developments for...

  16. 76 FR 55211 - National Wilderness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... century, the importance of maintaining our wilderness has only grown. Protecting our wilderness areas and... us to roam, hunt, fish, and find solitude. They are also strong engines of local economies, providing... heritage and other landscapes. And in recognition of the importance of our wilderness, my Administration...

  17. The triumph of politics over wilderness science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig W. Allin

    2000-01-01

    The National Wilderness Preservation System reflects the triumph of politics over science. The history of wilderness allocation has reflected political rather than scientific sensibilities. The preeminence of politics over science extends to wilderness management as well and is illustrated here by representative examples from the modern history of Yellowstone National...

  18. Wilderness - between the promise of hell and paradise: A cultural-historical exploration of a Dutch National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen Arts; Anke Fischer; Rene van der Wal

    2011-01-01

    ‘Wilderness' is often seen as an ideal state in contemporary debates on ecological restoration. This paper asks what is left of ‘wilderness' in present-day Western Europe and explores this question by drawing on a case study of the Hoge Veluwe National Park in the Netherlands. An overview of intellectual histories of wilderness ideas is used as a backdrop to...

  19. Mapping wilderness character in Death Valley National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Tricker; Peter Landres; Sandee Dingman; Charlie Callagan; John Stark; Leah Bonstead; Kelly Fuhrmann; Steve Carver

    2012-01-01

    The 1964 Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577) established the National Wilderness Preservation System "for the protection of these areas, the preservation of their wilderness character" (Section 2a). In congressional testimony clarifying the intent of wilderness designation, Zahniser (1962) said, "The purpose of the Wilderness Act is to preserve the...

  20. Case Study for the ARRA-funded Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) Demonstration at Wilders Grove Solid Waste Service Center in Raleigh, NC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Malhotra, Mini [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Xiong, Zeyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a distributed GSHP system for providing all the space conditioning, outdoor air ventilation, and 100% domestic hot water to the Wilders Grove Solid Waste Service Center of City of Raleigh, North Carolina. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning and outdoor air ventilation as the demonstrated GSHP system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GSHP system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation and improving the operational efficiency of the demonstrated GSHP system.

  1. Design Based Wilderness Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Saulnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT has been collaborating since 2010 with the Singapore Ministry of Education to help develop the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD. One element of this collaboration, the Global Leadership Program (GLP, aims to provide SUTD students with the opportunity to interact with the MIT community and experience MIT’s academic culture. During GLP students participate in a program designed to develop leadership ability while also increasing their understanding of engineering science and design thinking. This paper introduces a curriculum combining the pedagogies of design-based learning and wilderness education that was implemented in the summer of 2014 to holistically address the development of these three competencies. Through design-based learning activities, both for and in a natural environment, students were encouraged to develop competencies in engineering science and engineering design while exploring the diverse attributes essential for success as an engineer. This paper examines the results of a retrospective post-then-pre survey administered to the participants upon completion of the program to explore the effects of the program on the development of professional engineering competencies. We find a statistically significant increase in items associated with Individual Leadership Skill, Group Leadership Skill and the role of Society and the Economy. These results are triangulated with student exit interviews and instructor observations.

  2. WHITE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. If mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significanlty, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  3. Wilderness record, Semidi wilderness proposal involving Semidi Island (256,422) acres in the Semidi National Wildlife Refuge, Third Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report; mineral appraisal; refuge objective statement; Federal Register notice; materials sent to news media; and public hearing package, mailing...

  4. Wilderness record, Unimak Island wilderness proposal, involving Unimak Island (965,000 acres) in the Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, Third Judicial District, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness study report, mineral appraisal, master plan, Federal Register notice, materials sent to news media, and public hearing package, mailing list, handout...

  5. Wilderness, biodiversity, and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Dustin; Keri A. Schwab; Kelly S. Bricker

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates how wilderness, biodiversity, and human health are intertwined. Proceeding from the assumption that humankind is part of, rather than apart from, nature, health is re-imagined as a dynamic relationship that can best be conceived in broad ecological terms. Health, from an ecological perspective, is a measure of the wellness of the individual and...

  6. Funding strategies for wilderness management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Alkire

    2000-01-01

    Funding wilderness protection will continue to be a challenge for public land managers. With continuing competition for federal funds and balanced budget goals, other sources of funds may be necessary to supplement annual federal appropriations. This paper identifies and evaluates five potential funding strategies and provides examples of each that are currently in use...

  7. FWS National Wildlife Refuge System Wilderness Fellows Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wilderness character monitoring occurred at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge between the dates of 27 June 2011 and 20 August 2011. Wilderness character monitoring...

  8. Public values of the Antarctic wilderness: A comparison of university students in Spain and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Peden; Tina Tin; Javier Benayas; Luis Pertierra; Pablo Tejedo; Jessica O' Reilly; Kees Bastmeijer; Pat Maher

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes preliminary results of a research study that investigated university students' perceptions of Antarctic wilderness and reports on discussions of these results at a workshop held at the 10th World Wilderness Congress. The purpose of the research study was to determine whether nationality and cultural differences were associated with beliefs...

  9. Do recreation motivations and wilderness involvement relate to support for wilderness management? A segmentation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy E. Hall; Erin Seekamp; David Cole

    2010-01-01

    Surveys show relatively little support for use restrictions to protect wilderness experiences. However, such conclusions based on aggregate data could hide important differences among visitors. Visitors with more wilderness-dependent trip motives were hypothesized to be more supportive of use restrictions. Using survey data from visitors to 13 wildernesses, cluster...

  10. Defining wilderness quality: the role of standards in wilderness management—a workshop proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. Shelby; G. Stankey; B. Shindler

    1992-01-01

    Integral to maintaining wilderness quality is the implementation of ecological, social, and management standards. A substantial body of wilderness research management experience exists nationwide as a common-pool resource for professionals with a specialized interest in incorporating standards into planning processes. In a 2-day interactive workshop, wilderness...

  11. Book review: The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres

    2009-01-01

    The Wilderness Debate Rages On is a collection of mostly previously published papers about the meaning, value, and role of wilderness and continues the discussion that was propelled by the editors' previous book The Great New Wilderness Debate (also a collection of papers) published in 1998. The editors state that this sequel to their previous book is mandated...

  12. Wilderness at arm's length: On the outside looking in at special provisions in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson

    2012-01-01

    While there is a long history of research on factors influencing wilderness recreation visitor experiences, there has been little focused research to understand the experiences of users visiting wilderness under legislative special provisions or the impact of these special provisions on wilderness recreation visitors. There are some exceptions. For example, contrasting...

  13. Immediate conscious experience in wilderness: A phenomenological investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy E. Hall; David N. Cole

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the immediate conscious experience (ICE) in outdoor recreation has been the focus of recent research. This paper reports a study of the ICE in three different wilderness settings in the Pacific Northwest. In-depth qualitative interviews (n = 126) and structured questionnaires (n = 252) with visitors contacted along trails, in camp, and at destinations...

  14. Wilderness event medicine: planning for mass gatherings in remote areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Timothy E

    2005-11-01

    An increasing number of large recreational events are taking place in remote environments where medical care is far away. Such events include adventure races and large outdoor trips. Wilderness event medicine (WEM) has been previously defined as the healthcare response at any discrete event with more than 200 persons located more than 1h from hospital treatment. However, there is little literature describing the steps for providing medical care at such events. This article provides a framework for planning and executing WEM. It reviews the published data on wilderness injury and illness rates and describes the nature of injuries as they relate to specific activities. The article then discusses the three stages of WEM: pre-event planning, medical treatment at the event, and post-event tasks. Wilderness events include myriad activities, including orienteering, mountain biking, mountaineering, and whitewater paddling. The injury and illness rates are in the range of 1-10 per 1000 person-days of exposure, with rates one order of magnitude greater for events which last many days, include extremes of environment (heat, altitude), or are competitive in nature. Professional adventure racers may present for medical evaluation at rates as high as 1000 encounters per 1000 racer-days. Injuries depend largely on activity. Illnesses are mostly gastrointestinal, 'flu-like' malaise, or related to the event environment, such as humidity or altitude. Providing medical care requires the proper staff, equipment, and contingency plans. The remoteness of these events mandates different protocols than would be used at an urban mass gathering. WEM will likely continue to grow and evolve as a specialty. Additional reports from wilderness events, perhaps facilitated through a web-based incident reporting system, will allow medical providers to improve the quality of care given at remote events. Research into wilderness activity physiology will also be useful in understanding the prevention

  15. Wilderness Recreation Demand: A Comparison of Travel Cost and On-Site Cost Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; A. Askew; L. Seymour; J.P. Zhu; D. English; C.M. Starbuck

    2009-01-01

    This study used travel cost and on-site day cost models, coupled with the Forest Service’s National Visitor Use Monitoring data, to examine the demand for and value of recreation access to designated Wilderness.

  16. ANACONDA-PINTLAR WILDERNESS, MONTANA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J.E.; Close, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Anaconda-Pintlar Wilderness, an area of about 250 sq mi in southwestern Montana, was conducted. Results of this survey indicate that parts of the area have probable and (or) substantiated resource potential for silver, copper, molybdenum, lead, tungsten, tin, gold, and zinc. Based on the nature of the geologic terrain, there is little likelihood of the occurrence of geothermal, coal, oil, or gas resources.

  17. Legislative interpretation as a guiding tool for wilderness management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon S. Meyer

    2000-01-01

    The Wilderness Act of 1964, which established the National Wilderness Preservation System, contains both a clear definition of wilderness and multiple “nonconforming” exceptions to this definition. Managers are given discretion to manage these nonconforming uses but must do so within the framework of wilderness the Act sought to preserve. This paper presents a process...

  18. Wilderness visitor experiences: Lessons from 50 years of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Daniel R. Williams

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews 50 years of research on the experiences of wilderness visitors. Research on the nature of experiences began with an emphasis on motivations for taking wilderness trips and a focus on the experiential outcomes of wilderness visits. This perspective has been complemented by recent work that more deeply explores the lived experience in wilderness, its...

  19. Mapping wilderness character in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Tricker; Peter Landres; Gregg Fauth; Paul Hardwick; Alex Eddy

    2014-01-01

    The Sequoia-Kings Canyon Wilderness was established in September of 1984 when President Ronald Reagan signed the California Wilderness Act (PL 98-425). In March 2009, President Barack Obama signed the Omnibus Public Land Management Act (PL 111-11) designating the John Krebs Wilderness and the Sequoia-Kings Canyon Wilderness Addition (all wholly contained within SEKI)....

  20. Mapping wilderness character in Denali National Park and Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob Burrows; James Tricker; Dan Abbe; Peter Landres; Jon Paynter; David Schirokauer; Philip Hooge

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of an interagency strategy to monitor wilderness character allows on-the-ground managers and decision-makers to assess whether stewardship actions for an individual wilderness are fulfilling the legislative mandate to "preserve wilderness character." By using credible data that are consistently collected, one can assess how wilderness...

  1. Economic growth, ecological economics, and wilderness preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Czech

    2000-01-01

    Economic growth is a perennial national goal. Perpetual economic growth and wilderness preservation are mutually exclusive. Wilderness scholarship has not addressed this conflict. The economics profession is unlikely to contribute to resolution, because the neoclassical paradigm holds that there is no limit to economic growth. A corollary of the paradigm is that...

  2. Challenges in protecting the wilderness of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tina Tin; Alan Hemmings

    2011-01-01

    Since 1998, the wilderness values of Antarctica have been among those given legal recognition under the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Despite the legal obligation, on-the-ground implementation has attracted little interest. The term "wilderness" and its consequential operational implication, including the designation of...

  3. Response to conflict among wilderness visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid Schneider

    2000-01-01

    Previous conceptual efforts suggest that response to recreational conflict should be framed within an adapted stresscoping response model. An important element in understanding response to conflict is the context of the experience. A basic underlying component of the wilderness experience is privacy, which indicates wilderness visitors are interested in releasing—...

  4. Using GIS to promote Skyline Wilderness Park in Rapid City, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, A.; Mannel, S.

    2005-12-01

    Skyline Drive Wilderness Park is a 150-acre open space in Rapid City, South Dakota. The Wilderness Park is located along a sandstone ridge or hogback, which bisects the urban sprawl. Skyline Drive Wilderness Park is a natural meeting place of the Ponderosa Pine forests of the Black Hills and the mixed-grass prairie of western South Dakota. A campaign to save Skyline Drive Wilderness Park began in 1994, when members of the Skyline Drive Preservation Committee grew concerned about the number of new homes being built on Skyline Drive. There are concerns about the long-term ecologic sustainability of Skyline Drive Wilderness Park, which is why this and other monitoring projects are proposed for 2005 and 2006. Development of a GIS database will allow us to collect and analyze data in a meaningful way. This GIS database is needed to begin a series of interrelated research projects, proposed for 2005-2006 that will address questions about the ecologic changes resulting from the urbanization of Skyline Drive. These projects include: a 1: 1,000 topographic survey of the Wilderness Park to identify microhabitat features, creation and maintenance of a herbarium, a breeding bird fidelity study, and establishment of bat-habitat through the installation of bat-houses.

  5. Would ecological landscape restoration make the Bandelier Wilderness more or less of a wilderness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charisse A. Sydoriak; Craig D. Allen; Brian F. Jacobs

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion on the basic issue of whether it is appropriate or not to intervene in designated wilderness areas that have been “trammeled by man” and, as a result, no longer retain their “primeval character and influence.” We explore this wilderness management dilemma (whether we can or should actively manage wilderness conditions...

  6. Freshwater fish of the Wilderness National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Russell

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the distribution and relative abundance of freshwater fish in the Wilderness National Park. Fish assemblages in the Touw and Duiwe rivers were sampled in 1997 and 1998, with a total of 327 fish from nine species recorded. Indigenous species included two freshwater species (Pseudobarbus afer, Sandelia capensis, two catadromous species (Anguilla mossambicus, Myxus capensis, and two estuarine species (Monodactylusfalciformis, Caffrogobius multifasciatus. Three of the nine recorded species were alien (Micropterus dolomieu, Micropterus salmoides, Gambusia affinis, with the Micropterus spp., in particular, likely to have a substantial negative influence on indigenous species. A further one indigenous species, two translocated indigenous species, and five estuarine species could potentially be recorded in these rivers. River catchment management actions to restore perennial flow to the Duiwe River, to prevent the attenuation of floods, and to prevent further establishment and spread of alien and translocated biota are required to conserve indigenous fish assemblages.

  7. National Wilderness Preservation System database: key attributes and trends, 1964 through 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres; Shannon Meyer

    2000-01-01

    The Wilderness Act of 1964 established a National Wilderness Preservation System, and this publication is a compilation of selected information about every wilderness within this System. For each wilderness, the following information is given: legally correct wilderness name; public law that established the wilderness; date the enabling law was signed by the President...

  8. An expanded perspective on displacement: A longitudinal study of visitors to two wildernesses in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy Hall; David N. Cole

    2000-01-01

    Displacement has traditionally been defined as a process in which visitors cease using a recreation site because of sensitivity to crowding or other impacts. This study argues that such a definition is overly narrow: Displacement may also occur when those sensitive to regulation cease using a resource. Evidence for the two types of displacement was collected through...

  9. MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  10. Final wilderness recommendation : Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter to the legislative counsel containing a final recommendation of wilderness designation for part of the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.

  11. Arctic National Wildlife Range, Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Arctic National Wildlife Range (ANWR) was established by executive order in 1960 for the purpose of preserving unique wildlife, wilderness and recreational...

  12. Mapping tradeoffs in values at risk at the interface between wilderness and non-wilderness lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Roian Matt; Tim Waters; Kari Gunderson; Steve Carver; Brett Davis

    2009-01-01

    On the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, U.S., the Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness is bordered by a buffer zone. To successfully improve forest health within that buffer zone and restore fire in the wilderness, the managing agency and the public need to work together to find solutions to increasingly threatening fuel buildups. A combination of qualitative,...

  13. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Eighth World Wilderness Congress symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Janet Sproull; Liese Dean

    2007-01-01

    The Eighth World Wilderness Congress met in Anchorage, Alaska, in 2005. The symposium on science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values was the largest of multiple symposia held in conjunction with the Congress. The papers contained in this proceedings were generated at this symposium, submitted by the author or authors for consideration for inclusion...

  14. A special issue of the Journal of Forestry - Wilderness science and its role in wilderness stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan F. Fox

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Forestry provides an overview of America’s National Wilderness Preservation System and highlights the important role that science serves in informing wilderness stewardship. The lead authors of the articles in this volume selected the Journal because it is highly respected and widely circulated among foresters and federal...

  15. Patterns of streamwater acidity in Lye Brook Wilderness, Vermont, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John L; Eagar, Christopher; McDowell, William H

    2002-08-01

    Under the United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, a class I designation safeguards wilderness areas from the negative effects of new sources of air pollution. We monitored streamwater chemistry in the class I Lye Brook Wilderness in southwestern Vermont from May 1994 through August 1995. Stream samples were collected biweekly at nine sampling locations throughout the wilderness and were analyzed for major cations and anions, dissolved organic carbon, pH, and acid-neutralizing capacity. Eight of nine sites sampled had mean annual acid neutralizing capacity values below zero. During the study period, decreases in streamwater acid neutralizing capacity values were caused primarily by SO(4)(2-). At some sites, however, NO(3) (-) and naturally occurring, weak organic acids were seasonally important. During high discharge, the low pH and high concentrations of inorganic monomeric Al were at levels that are toxic to acid-sensitive aquatic species. Watershed mass balances were calculated to determine annual gains or losses for measured ions. These budgets indicate that S inputs and outputs were nearly equal, there was a net loss of base cations, and a net gain in N. How long these watersheds can continue to assimilate additional N inputs is unknown.

  16. An analysis of the outdoor recreation and wilderness situation in the United States, 1989-2040: A technical document supporting the 1989 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom; Lawrence A. Hartmann; Donald B. K. English

    1990-01-01

    The Analysis of the Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness Situation in the United States is intended to build upon past studies and to establish a new and better information base on outdoor recreation and wilderness demand and supply. Also, this assessment answers several key questions which will help identify ways to meet demand through the year 2040. Specifically, it is...

  17. Department of the Interior : Draft Environmental Statement : Blackwater Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Blackwater Wilderness Area. Topics covered include...

  18. Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a detailed summary of the baseline wilderness character assessment completed for the Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness, located in...

  19. Characteristics of wilderness users in outdoor recreation assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; H. Ken Cordell; Lawrence A. Hartmann

    1989-01-01

    Wilderness use is often subsumed under outdoor recreation participation in large-scale assessments. Participation monitoring has indicated, however, that wilderness use has been increasing faster than outdoor recreation use in general. In a sample of Forest Service wilderness and nonwildemess users during the summer of 1985, detailed expenditure, activity, and travel...

  20. Frameworks for defining and managing the wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning

    2012-01-01

    A large and growing body of research on outdoor recreation and the wilderness experience has been conducted over the nearly 50 years since passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964. A number of conceptual and empirical frameworks have emerged from this body of knowledge that can be used to help define and manage the wilderness experience.

  1. Paleontological excavations in designated wilderness: theory and practic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher V. Barns

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness is widely recognized as a valuable environment for scientific research, and it is generally assumed that this research will benefit the wilderness resource. But what if the research is of value only in understanding an ecosystem that has been extinct for 65 million years? What if thousands of pounds of material must be removed from the wilderness to conduct...

  2. The matrix: A comparison of international wilderness laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres; Brad Barr; Cyril F. Kormos

    2008-01-01

    The following matrix provides a comparison of wilderness laws around the world. This matrix is divided into four parts, each focusing on a key area of wilderness legislation: the definition of wilderness; the overall legislative purpose; uses allowed by the legislation; and administration and management requirements under law. A more thorough analysis of individual...

  3. Wilderness management principles: science, logical thinking or personal opinion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1995-01-01

    Recreational use adversely affects the ecological integrity of wilderness. Wilderness managers face the challenge of keeping this loss of ecological integrity to minimal levels, a task that must be accomplished primarily through management of wilderness visitors. For the past 30 years, researchers have assisted managers by assessing problems associated with...

  4. Wilderness in Australia: what's happening in a world context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralf Buckley

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness in Australia has no formal legal designation at a national level as it does in the United States. In addition, new federal environmental legislation abdicates responsibility almost entirely to the States. A national wilderness inventory has recently been completed, but abandoned by the current federal government. Almost all wilderness recreation in Australia...

  5. The contribution of natural fire management to wilderness fire science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol Miller

    2014-01-01

    When the federal agencies established policies in the late 1960s and early 1970s to allow the use of natural fires in wilderness, they launched a natural fire management experiment in a handful of wilderness areas. As a result, wildland fire has played more of its natural role in wilderness than anywhere else. Much of what we understand about fire ecology comes from...

  6. The challenges and related strategies of planning for wilderness experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerri Cahill

    2012-01-01

    Planning is where science, public interests and management of wilderness areas come together. Unfortunately, science and information specifically supporting wilderness experiences, if any exists, is often perceived by managers as subjective, value laden, and hard to defend. This can sometimes lead to the tough decisions about providing high quality wilderness...

  7. Social and institutional influences on wilderness fire stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Knotek

    2005-01-01

    One of the priority research areas at the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute addresses the “need for improved information to guide the stewardship of fire as a natural process in wilderness while protecting social and ecological values inside and outside wilderness.” This research topic area was developed with the knowledge that wildland fire, as a natural...

  8. Threats to wilderness ecosystems: impacts and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Peter B. Landres

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary purposes of designated wilderness areas is protection of natural ecosystems. However, the ecological integrity of these most protected of public lands is threatened by direct and indirect effects of human activities both internal and external to wilderness. Accelerated research programs on threats to wilderness are needed to realize the purposes for...

  9. The political economy of wilderness designation in Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyn Bissix; Leah Levac; Peter Horvath

    2002-01-01

    This paper traces the various policy stimuli shaping the development of the Nova Scotia Wilderness Areas Protection Act (December, 1998). It does so by examining international, national, provincial, and local influences on wilderness designation, legislative structure, and implementation issues that influenced, or are likely to influence, wilderness area management. By...

  10. Wilderness: An international community knocking on Asia's door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Vance Martin; Chau Chin Lin

    2009-01-01

    The concept of wilderness may trace its roots to the U.S., but a worldwide wilderness community has developed and is growing in strength, though with limited representation from Asia. With the primary purpose of protecting nature, wilderness designation can occur through legislation or policy development, but with similar outcomes of providing long-term protection and...

  11. Research needs for a better understanding of wilderness visitor experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; Chad P. Dawson

    2012-01-01

    What information is needed to facilitate enhanced management of visitor experiences in wilderness? The final session of the workshop comprised a facilitated process with the 20 participants to identify research and information needs to support wilderness visitor experience management. The Wilderness Act and the previous presentations and discussions not only provided a...

  12. Wilderness experience programs: A state-of-the-knowledge summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad P. Dawson; Keith C. Russell

    2012-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of Wilderness Experience Programs (WEPs) is the centrality of wilderness - settings, conditions, and characteristics - to the delivery of the program and the client or visitor experience. Wilderness Experience Programs have been classified into three types based on their primary program aim: education, personal growth, and therapy...

  13. Defining and managing the quality of wilderness recreation experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning; David W. Lime

    2000-01-01

    There is a substantial body of scientific literature on defining and managing the quality of wilderness experiences. Two conceptual frameworks derived from this literature—carrying capacity and the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS)—suggest that wilderness recreation experiences can be defined through indicators and standards of quality, and that wilderness...

  14. Significant wilderness qualities: can they be identified and monitored?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Robert C. Lucas

    1989-01-01

    The third Research Colloquium, sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), convened the week of August 10-15 in the Popo Agie Wilderness, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming. The purpose of these colloquia is to facilitate interaction and discussion between wilderness managers, researchers, and NOLS personnel in a wilderness setting. At each colloquium,...

  15. Structural constraints to wilderness: Impacts on visitation and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrid E. Schneider; Sierra L. Schroeder; Ann. Schwaller

    2011-01-01

    A significant research body on recreation constraints exists, but wilderness constraints research is limited. Like other recreationists, wilderness visitors likely experience a number of constraints, factors that limit leisure preference formation or participation and enjoyment. This project explored how visitors' experiences with and in wilderness are constrained...

  16. Structural equation modeling of users' response to wilderness recreation fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams; Christine A. Vogt; Joar Vitterso

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines wilderness users' response to recently established overnight camping fees at the Desolation Wilderness in California. Fee program evaluations have typically focused on economic or revenue issues, distributional or equity impacts of various pricing strategies, and questions of price fairness. In the case of wilderness recreation fees, it is also...

  17. Shared wilderness, shared responsibility, shared vision: Protecting migratory wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will Meeks; Jimmy Fox; Nancy Roeper

    2011-01-01

    Wilderness plays a vital role in global and landscape-level conservation of wildlife. Millions of migratory birds and mammals rely on wilderness lands and waters during critical parts of their life. As large, ecologically intact landscapes, wilderness areas also play a vital role in addressing global climate change by increasing carbon sequestration, reducing...

  18. Population growth, economic security, and cultural change in wilderness counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Lorah

    2000-01-01

    A familiar version of the “jobs versus the environment” argument asserts that wilderness areas limit economic growth by locking up potentially productive natural resources. Analysis of the development paths of rural Western counties shows that this is unlikely: the presence of Wilderness is correlated with income, employment and population growth. Similarly, Wilderness...

  19. How do visitor density and anthropogenic change in frontcountry wilderness settings affect recreation benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey R. Behan; Merton T. Richards; Martha E. Lee

    2000-01-01

    Effects on recreation benefits were assessed using questionnaires and image sets depicting visitor density ranges and anthropogenic setting changes at two heavily-visited wilderness sites. Visitor benefits were less affected by high visitor densities at the more accessible of the two sites. New age medicine wheels had a positive effect on visitor benefits, as did trail...

  20. Developing additional capacity for wilderness management: An international exchange program between South Africa and United States wilderness rangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre van den Berg; Ralph Swain

    2007-01-01

    Wilderness managers have limited time to initiate international exchanges. Additionally, the benefits to developing capacity for wilderness management around the globe are not significant enough to make the effort cost-effective. International assistance, including wilderness management exchange programs, is critical to protecting wild areas around the globe. Former...

  1. The evolution of wilderness social science and future research to protect experiences, resources, and societal benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; H. Ken Cordell; Robert Manning; Steven Martin

    2016-01-01

    The historic Wilderness Act celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2014, and wilderness social science shared a similar legacy. As paradoxical as it might seem, humans are an important part of wilderness, helping to define the very concept and representing an important component of wilderness use and management. Much of the past five decades of wilderness-related...

  2. Improving wilderness stewardship through searchable databases of U.S. legislative history and legislated special provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Craig; Peter Landres; Laurie Yung

    2010-01-01

    The online resource Wilderness.net currently provides quick access to the text of every public law designating wilderness in the U.S. National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS). This article describes two new searchable databases recently completed and added to the information available on Wilderness.net to help wilderness managers and others understand and...

  3. Proposed additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 2 : Kenai Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  4. Additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 16 : Blackbeard Island Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  5. Proposed additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 20 : J. N. "Ding" Darling Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  6. Togiak National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  7. Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  8. Innoko National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  9. Proposed additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 12 : Big Lake Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  10. Botanical studies in the Arctic National Wildlife Range: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a botanical study in the Arctic National Wildlife Range during 1970. Cooperative studies on flora and fauna were done on selected sites. Sites include...

  11. Wilderness biology and conservation: future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed F. Noss

    2000-01-01

    The new conservation movement—uniting scientists and activists—seeks to relook at the role of protected land. The result is a redefining of terms, the encompassing of the concept of ecosystems, incorporating both scientific and nonscientific approaches to conservation, and reconsidering management. This philosophical essay speculates on the future of wilderness and...

  12. Some principles to guide wilderness campsite management

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1990-01-01

    Seven principles, derived from research on wilderness campsites, are proposed: (1) campsite impacts are complex; (2) impact is inevitable with repetitive use of campsites; (3) impact occurs rapidly, recovery occurs slowly; (4) the relationship between use and impact is asymptotic; (5) certain sites are more durable than others; (6) certain users cause less impact than...

  13. Why Save Wilderness?--Fruits and Veggies!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, David

    2015-01-01

    Why save wilderness? Environmental educators usually offer ecosystemic and aesthetic reasons, yet clearly this abstract approach has failed to resonate with the wider public. In this article I adopt a nutritional strategy based on a broad array of sources. Wild plant food, in terms of economics, ubiquity, and other measures, performs very well…

  14. Wilderness Experience Program. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Richard Owen

    The Wilderness Experience is an innovative, experiential program under New Mexico's Statewide Forensic Treatment System for mentally disordered first offenders and those soon to be released on parole or probation. Developed from the concepts of Outward Bound, criminal offenders undergo an intensive 17-21 day confrontation with their physical,…

  15. Women's Fear of Violence in the Wilderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Tobin; Potter, Tom G.

    1999-01-01

    Seven female students in an outdoor-recreation program were interviewed to determine how fear of violence affects experienced female wilderness travelers. The themes that emerged were stereotypes about sexual assaults, situation and trip location, and alcohol consumption. The difference between real fear and false perceptions is discussed, along…

  16. Valuing values: A history of wilderness economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; H. K. Cordell; N. C. Poudyal

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the U.S. Wilderness Act of 1964, economics as a science was hardly considered applicable to the types of human values set forth in this pathbreaking legislation. Economics was largely confined to the purchasing and labor decisions of households and firms as well the functioning of markets and economies. However, around this time, John Krutilla (1967) in his...

  17. Wilderness Orientation Programs. AEE White Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Experiential Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Wilderness orientation programs (sometimes referred to as outdoor orientation programs) use adventure programming for incoming college/university students to aid students' adjustment to college. These experiences usually occur in the days or weeks immediately prior to the first semester of the students' college coursework. They are typically…

  18. Modeling the Impact of Wilderness Orientation Programs on First-Year Academic Success and Life Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Andrew W.; Kang, Hyoung-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness orientation programs (WOPs) are becoming a popular method of encouraging college student retention and success. Previous studies have identified outcomes and correlates of participation in these programs, but a cohesive model of impact is lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of WOPs on first-year student success…

  19. Exploring Post-Program Psychological Adjustment for Adult Staff Facilitating a Wilderness Adventure Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence-Wood, Ellie; Raymond, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a pilot study of the post-program psychological adjustment outcomes of adult staff facilitating an Australian-based wilderness adventure program for youth at risk. The descriptive and correlational survey study (N = 62) examined the psychological adjustment processes staff underwent following program completion, and the factors…

  20. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 4: Wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management; 1999 May 23-27; Missoula, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Stephen F. McCool; William T. Borrie; Jennifer O' Loughlin

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers are presented on wilderness visitors, experiences, and visitor management. Three overview papers synthesize knowledge and research about wilderness visitors, management of visitor experiences, and wilderness recreation planning. Other papers contain the results of specific research projects on wilderness visitors, information and education, and...

  1. Degeneracy and long-range correlation: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmelat Vivien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper a simulation study that aimed at evidencing a causal relationship between degeneracy and long-range correlations. Long-range correlations represent a very specific form of fluctuations that have been evidenced in the outcomes time series produced by a number of natural systems. Long-range correlations are supposed to sign the complexity, adaptability and flexibility of the system. Degeneracy is defined as the ability of elements that are structurally different to perform the same function, and is presented as a key feature for explaining the robustness of complex systems. We propose a model able to generate long-range correlated series, and including a parameter that account for degeneracy. Results show that a decrease in degeneracy tends to reduce the strength of long-range correlation in the series produced by the model.

  2. Fish communities of the Wilderness Lakes System in the southern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis A. Olds

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Wilderness Lakes System, a temporarily open and closed estuary with three associated lakes situated in the southern Cape region of South Africa, was sampled using a range of sampling gears to assess the fish community. A total of 25 species were sampled throughout the system, with the highest diversity in the Touw Estuary (23 species and the lowest in Langvlei (11 species. Estuary-associated marine species (13 species dominated species richness with smaller proportions of estuarine resident (7 species, freshwater (3 species and catadromous species (2 species. Estuarine resident species dominated the catch numerically. The size–class distribution of euryhaline marine species indicated that upon entering the Touw Estuary as juveniles, the fish move up the system towards Rondevlei where they appear to remain. Three freshwater species were recorded in the system, all of which are alien to the Wilderness Lakes System. Decreasing salinity in the upper lakes appears to be a driving factor in the distribution and increasing abundance of the freshwater fishes. Sampling followed a drought, with the system experiencing substantially increased levels of mouth closure compared to a similar study conducted in the 1980s. The timing of mouth opening and the degree of connectivity between the lakes influence the nursery function of the system as a whole. Management actions need to focus on improving ecological functioning of this system, in particular how mouth opening is managed, to facilitate nursery function and limit the establishment of invasive species.Conservation implications: Key management actions are required to improve fish recruitment potential into and within the system. These include maintenance of adequate marine inflow through adherence to artificial mouth breaching protocols and improving connectivity between the lakes through sediment removal from localised deposition points within the connecting channels.

  3. Analysis of nitrogen dynamics in the Lye Brook Wilderness Area, Vermont, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Christopher Eagar; William H. McDowell; James W. Hornbeck

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition and its impact on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is a concern facing federal land managers at the Lye Brook Wilderness in Vermont and other protected areas throughout the northeastern United States. In this study, we compared N production in soils with N concentrations and outputs in leachates to determine how forest cover types differ in...

  4. Long-term effectiveness of restoration treatments on closed wilderness campsites

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed long-term recovery of vegetation on six wilderness campsites in subalpine forests in Oregon that were closed to use and that received common restoration treatments (scarification, soil amendments, mulch, transplanting, and seeding). Vegetation cover was assessed every year for the first 7 years following treatment, as well as 10 and 15 years after...

  5. The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness: Examining changes in use, users, and management challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; Alan E. Watson; Neal Christensen; William T. Borrie; Ann Schwaller

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine trends in use and user characteristics at the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Based on data from 1969, 1991, and 2007, the average age of visitors has increased significantly, education levels have increased, and visitors remain predominantly male. Visitors in 2007 report seeing twice as many groups since 1961 and 1991...

  6. Monitoring recreational impacts in wilderness of Kamchatka (on example of Kronotsky State Natural Biosphere Preserve)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anya V. Zavadskaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an assessment and monitoring program that was designed and initiated for monitoring recreational impacts in a wilderness in Kamchatka. The framework of the recreational assessment was tested through its application to a case study conducted during the summers of 2008 and 2009 in the Kronotsky State Natural Biosphere Preserve (Kamchatka peninsula,...

  7. Fifty years of wilderness science: An international perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Carver; Steve McCool; Zdenka Krenova; Mark Fisher; Stephen. Woodley

    2014-01-01

    The 50th Anniversary of the U.S. Wilderness Act is a cause for celebration, not least of which is the scientific use recognized in Section 4(b) of the act. This year also marks the 20th anniversary of publication of the International Journal of Wilderness (IJW). IJW plays a unique role in wilderness stewardship, science, and advocacy, providing a forum for presentation...

  8. Netherlands Army Long Range Anti Armour Study - Status Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, P.A.B. van

    1989-01-01

    At the end of the nineties the munition for the TOW weapon system in use at The Netherlands army, has to be replaced. The Life of Type of The Tow carrier ends in 2005. The long range anti armour study is to gain insight into the possibilities and limitations for the Netherlands army to deploy future

  9. Study of beam-beam long range compensation with octupoles

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068329; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Tambasco, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Long range beam-beam effects are responsible for particle losses and define fundamental operational parameters of colliders (i.e. crossing angles, intensities, emittances, ${\\beta}$${^∗}$). In this study we propose octuple magnets as a possible scheme to efficiently compensate long-range beam-beam interactions with a global correction scheme. The impact and improvements on the dynamic aperture of colliding beams together with estimates of the luminosity potentials are dis- cussed for the HL-LHC upgrade and extrapolations made for the FCC project.

  10. Front Range Forest Health Partnership Phase 1 feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkin, P

    1998-09-01

    The Front Range Forest Health Partnership is an alliance of individuals, citizen groups, federal, state, private, and nonprofit organizations that formed to promote forest health restoration and reduce fire risks on Colorado's Front Range. The partnership promotes selective thinning to restore forest health and supports economically feasible end uses for wood waste materials. The Phase I study was initiated to determine the environmental and economic feasibility of using wood wastes from forested and urban areas for the production of fuel-grade ethanol.

  11. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  12. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen, flow, and shade measurements in the three stream sections of the Golden Trout Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen R. Matthews

    2016-01-01

    To determine the current range of water temperatures in the streams inhabited by California golden trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita, I deployed and monitored water temperature recording probes from 2008 through 2013 in three meadows in the Golden Trout Wilderness (GTW). Ninety probes were placed in three meadow streams: Mulkey Creek in Mulkey...

  13. Perspectives from the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: Amphibians and wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Paul Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The decline of amphibian species has emerged as a major global conservation issue in the last decade. Last year, the Department of the Interior (DOI) initiated a major national initiative to detect trends in amphibian populations and research the causes of declines. The program, conducted principally by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), emphasizes lands managed by DOI, but collaboration with the Forest Service is encouraged to increase the scope of inference about population trends. Although amphibians are not usually the first group of animals that comes to mind when one thinks of wilderness, conservation of amphibian populations is clearly a wilderness issue.

  14. A study of the sensitivity of long-range passive ranging techniques to atmospheric scintillation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available of the sensitivity of long-range passive ranging techniques to atmospheric scintillation Jason de Villiersa,b, Fintan Wilsona and Fred Nicollsb aCouncil for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa; bUniversity of Cape Town, Cape Town, South... and not scintillation and remove it from the list. 6. Interpolate between identified matches to create a complete de-warping mesh for the image. 7. Use de-warping mesh to create stabilised image. 6. RESULTS The resultant depth images in this paper are small in order...

  15. Wilderness education: an updated review of the literature and new directions for research and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Gunderson; Christopher V. Barns; William W. Hendricks; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    Many scientists, managers and advocates for wilderness consider education key to promoting appreciation and understanding of the cultural, environmental and experiential values of wilderness. Despite the large variety and diversity of wilderness information and education techniques, little research exists on the design and application of wilderness education programs...

  16. Wildlife scientists and wilderness managers finding common ground with noninvasive and nonintrusive sampling of wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz; Peter B. Landres; David J. Parsons

    2011-01-01

    Iconic wildlife species such as grizzly bears, wolves, lynx, and wolverines are often associated with wilderness. Wilderness may provide some of the last, and best, remaining places for such species because wilderness can offer long-term legislated protection, relatively large areas, and remoteness (Mattson 1997). Indeed, the word wilderness in its original form...

  17. Wilderness social science responding to change in society, policy, and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; H. Ken Cordell

    2014-01-01

    Wilderness social science has changed over the 50 years since passage of the Wilderness Act. This research was initially heavily influenced by the need to operationalize definitions contained in the Wilderness Act, the desire to report use levels, and the need for better understanding of the important values American people attached to wilderness. Over the past three...

  18. Wilderness restoration: Bureau of Land Management and the Student Conservation Association in the California Desert District

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Dan Abbe

    2007-01-01

    The California Desert Protection Act of 1994 was the largest park and wilderness legislation passed in the Lower 48 States since the Wilderness Act of 1964. It designated three national parks and 69 Bureau of Land Management wilderness areas. The California Desert and Wilderness Restoration Project is working to restore and revitalize these lands through a public/...

  19. The role of science in wilderness planning: a state-of-knowledge review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin E. Krumpe

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness planning has evolved since the Wilderness Act of 1964 in an atmosphere of intense debate and public scrutiny. Wilderness planning and the role science has played in developing the planning process has been influenced by many complex legal mandates, by thorny social issues, and by emerging planning paradigms. Wilderness planning has at times been inspired by...

  20. Perceptions of stakeholders regarding wilderness and best management practices in an Alaska recreation area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily F. Pomeranz; Mark D. Needham; Linda E. Kruger

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the collaborative and voluntary Wilderness Best Management Practices (WBMP) for managing recreation in Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness in Alaska. Stakeholder definitions of wilderness, opinions about the WBMP, and whether these opinions are reflective of their perceptions of wilderness are examined. Interviews with tour operators, agency...

  1. Patterns of streamwater acidity in Lye Brook Wilderness, Vermont, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Christopher Eagar; William H. McDowell

    2002-01-01

    Under the United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, a class I designation safeguards wilderness areas from the negative effects of new sources of air pollution. We monitored streamwater chemistry in the class I Lye Brook Wilderness in southwestern Vermont from May 1994 through August 1995. Stream samples were collected biweekly at nine sampling locations...

  2. Human factors: Predictors of avoidable wilderness accidents? | De ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A common misconception is that wilderness adventure travel is risky owing to the nature of the objective dangers that are encountered, such as avalanches, rock falls, flash floods, failure of technical equipment and so forth. However, when one critically examines the proximal causes of wilderness accidents, even those ...

  3. Understanding social influences on wilderness fire stewardship decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Knotek

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers and the public engage in many decisions about stewardship of wilderness in the United States, including decisions about stewardship of fire. To date, social science research lacks a holistic examination of the decision-making context of managers and the public about stewardship of fire inside wilderness and across its boundaries. A conceptual...

  4. Social psychological benefits of a wilderness adventure program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd Paxton; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    Wilderness-based outdoor adventure programs are intended to produce positive change in participants. There are a significant number of these programs, with Hattie and others (1997) reporting that in 1994 alone, there were over 40,000 students participating in Outward Bound programs. Not all of these programs occur in wilderness, but significant portions of them do. A...

  5. Research on the relationship between humans and wilderness in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson

    2005-01-01

    At the 2005 Biennial George Wright Society Conference on Parks, Protected Areas, and Cultural Sites in Philadelphia, March 14 to 18, there were many sessions relevant to wilderness. One session provided focus on a priority research area of the Leopold Institute: understanding the effects of management actions on relationships between people and wilderness. A great...

  6. Living waters: Linking cultural knowledge, ecosystem services, and wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Moon Stumpff

    2013-01-01

    American Indian tribes value pristine water sources that often originate in wilderness areas to support provisioning and cultural benefits. Based on interviews with four traditional leaders, this article focuses on the concept of living waters in ways that connect ecosystem service benefits to wilderness. Cultural knowledge connects indigenous water stewardship and...

  7. Wilderness educators' evaluation of the Impact Monster Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Hendricks; Alan E. Watson

    1999-01-01

    Since its development by Jim Bradley in the late 1970s, the Impact Monster, a wilderness education skit designed to teach minimum impact techniques, has been used as a wilderness education tool by federal land management agencies. This paper reports on an evaluation of the perceived effectiveness of the Impact Monster program and its content. Results indicate that the...

  8. Managing Human Activities in Antarctica : Should Wilderness Protection Count?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Antarctica is often described as one of the world's last wildernesses. In harmony with this general perception, the wilderness values of Antarctica received legal status with the adoption of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty. Article 3(1) of the Protocol obliges each

  9. Characteristics of stewardship in the Chicago Wilderness Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne M. Westphal; Amelie Y. Davis; Cindy Copp; Laurel M. Ross; Mark J. Bouman; Cherie L. Fisher; Mark K. Johnston

    2014-01-01

    We report on the early results of a survey-based assessment of stewardship activities within the Chicago Wilderness region, work conducted as a part of the Chicago ULTRA-Ex project. Chicago Wilderness is a 270 member alliance focused on preserving and enhancing biodiversity throughout northern Illinois and parts of Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan (USA). The results...

  10. Traditional wisdom: Protecting relationships with wilderness as a cultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Roian Matt; Katie Knotek; Daniel R. Williams; Laurie Yung

    2011-01-01

    Interviews of tribal and nontribal residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, U.S., were conducted to contrast the meanings that different cultures attach to the Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness. Legislation that created a national system of wilderness areas (in 1964 and still growing) was conceived, supported, and enacted by a fairly distinct social...

  11. Wilderness recreation use estimation: a handbook of methods and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; David N. Cole; David L. Turner; Penny S. Reynolds

    2000-01-01

    Documented evidence shows that managers of units within the U.S. National Wilderness Preservation System are making decisions without reliable information on the amount, types, and distribution of recreation use occurring at these areas. There are clear legislative mandates and agency policies that direct managers to monitor trends in use and conditions in wilderness....

  12. Personal wilderness relationships: Building on a transactional approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; William T. Borrie; Alan E. Watson

    2013-01-01

    Wilderness managers are charged with the challenging goal of balancing resource protection and experience quality across a broad, value-laden landscape. While research has provided insight into visitors' motivations and their meanings for wilderness, a struggle exists to implement experiential concepts within current management frameworks. This research posits the...

  13. A Synthesis of the Economic Values of Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Holmes; Michael Bowker; Jeffrey Englin; Evan Hjerpe; John B. Loomis; Spencer Phillips; Robert Richardson

    2015-01-01

    Early applications of wilderness economic research demonstrated that the values of natural amenities and commodities produced from natural areas could be measured in commensurate terms. To the surprise of many, the economic values of wilderness protection often exceeded the potential commercial values that might result from resource extraction. Here, the concepts and...

  14. Local economic importance of designated wilderness: Evidence in the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal Christensen

    2011-01-01

    As we approach the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Wilderness Act, the public and federal land management agencies continue to search for a better understanding of the benefits and costs of inclusion of new areas within the National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS). There are numerous U.S. federal lands considered suitable for inclusion in the NWPS....

  15. Direct and mediated experiences of wilderness spirituality: Implications for wilderness managers and advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Ashley; Roger Kaye; Tina Tin

    2015-01-01

    As a result of its elevated level of consciousness, the human species has been engaged in the quest for an ultimate meaning of life and what lies beyond life and death for millennia. Many of these spiritual or religious perspectives have been closely linked to each society's relationship with wild nature. This paper explores the topic of wilderness spirituality...

  16. Coastal bathymetry data collected in May 2015 from Fire Island, New York—Wilderness breach and shoreface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Timothy R.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wilson, Kathleen E.

    2017-05-12

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, conducted a bathymetric survey of Fire Island from May 6-20, 2015. The USGS is involved in a post-Hurricane Sandy effort to map and monitor the morphologic evolution of the wilderness breach as a part of the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. During this study, bathymetry data were collected with single-beam echo sounders and Global Positioning Systems, which were mounted to personal watercraft, along the Fire Island shoreface and within the wilderness breach. Additional bathymetry and elevation data were collected using backpack Global Positioning Systems on flood shoals and in shallow channels within the wilderness breach.

  17. Bathymetry data collected in October 2014 from Fire Island, New York—The wilderness breach, shoreface, and bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Timothy R.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wilson, Kathleen E.

    2017-03-24

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, conducted a bathymetric survey of Fire Island, New York, from October 5 to 10, 2014. The U.S. Geological Survey is involved in a post-Hurricane Sandy effort to map and monitor the morphologic evolution of the wilderness breach, which formed in October 2012 during Hurricane Sandy, as part of the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. During this study, bathymetry data were collected, using single-beam echo sounders and global positioning systems mounted to personal watercraft, along the Fire Island shoreface and within the wilderness breach, Fire Island Inlet, Narrow Bay, and Great South Bay east of Nicoll Bay. Additional bathymetry and elevation data were collected using backpack and wheel-mounted global positioning systems along the subaerial beach (foreshore and backshore), flood shoals, and shallow channels within the wilderness breach and adjacent shoreface.

  18. The narrow range of perceived predation: a 19 group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mesly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper rests largely on the works of Mesly (1999 to 2012. It argues that the phenomenon of perceived predation as a functional behavioural phenomenon is subjected to certain limits, a finding based on studies performed on 19 different groups spread over a four-year span. It also finds a constant of k = 1.3 which reflects the invariant nature of perceived predation. These findings add to the theory of financial predation which stipulates that financial predators operate below the limits of detection pertaining to their customers (and market regulators. They are experts at minimizing the perception that clients could have that they are after their money, causing them financial harm, by surprise (perceived predation. Understanding the narrow range in which financial predators operate is setting the grounds to offer better protection to investors and to implementing better control and punitive measures.

  19. Dimensions of flow during an experiential wilderness science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Robert

    Over the past twenty-five years, there has been an alarming decline in academic performance among American students. This trend is seen in failing test scores, poor attendance, and low first-year retention rates at post-secondary institutions. There have been numerous studies that have examined this issue but few to offer solutions. Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, the originator of flow theory, suggests that poor academic performance might be best explained in terms of lack of student motivation and engagement (flow) rather than a lack of cognitive abilities. This study was designed to examine a series of activities conducted during an Experiential Wilderness Science Program at a college located in the Rocky Mountain region. Specifically, this study measured student engagement for each activity and described the dimensions (phenomenological, instructional, etc.) that were present when there was a high frequency of engagement among program participants. A combined quantitative and qualitative research methodology was utilized. The Experience Sampling Form (ESF) was administered to 41 freshman students participating in a 3-day wilderness science program to measure the frequency of engagement (flow) for nine different activities. A qualitative investigation using journals, participant interviews, and focus groups was used to describe the dimensions that were present when a high frequency of engagement among program participants was observed. Results revealed that engagement (flow) was highest during two challenge education activities and during a river sampling activity. Dimensions common among these activities included: an environment dimension, a motivation dimension, and an instruction dimension. The environment dimension included: incorporating novel learning activities, creating student interests, and introducing an element of perceived risk. The motivation dimension included: developing internal loci of control, facilitating high levels of self-efficacy, and

  20. Conservation planning for biodiversity and wilderness: a real-world example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceauşu, Silvia; Gomes, Inês; Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Several of the most important conservation prioritization approaches select markedly different areas at global and regional scales. They are designed to maximize a certain biodiversity dimension such as coverage of species in the case of hotspots and complementarity, or composite properties of ecosystems in the case of wilderness. Most comparisons between approaches have ignored the multidimensionality of biodiversity. We analyze here the results of two species-based methodologies-hotspots and complementarity-and an ecosystem-based methodology-wilderness-at local scale. As zoning of protected areas can increase the effectiveness of conservation, we use the data employed for the management plan of the Peneda-Gerês National Park in Portugal. We compare the approaches against four criteria: species representativeness, wilderness coverage, coverage of important areas for megafauna, and for regulating ecosystem services. Our results suggest that species- and ecosystem-based approaches select significantly different areas at local scale. Our results also show that no approach covers well all biodiversity dimensions. Species-based approaches cover species distribution better, while the ecosystem-based approach favors wilderness, areas important for megafauna, and for ecosystem services. Management actions addressing different dimensions of biodiversity have a potential for contradictory effects, social conflict, and ecosystem services trade-offs, especially in the context of current European biodiversity policies. However, biodiversity is multidimensional, and management and zoning at local level should reflect this aspect. The consideration of both species- and ecosystem-based approaches at local scale is necessary to achieve a wider range of conservation goals.

  1. Proposed Wilderness Areas of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (Generated in 2003 by the Intermountain Region GIS Support Office)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile contains boundaries for Proposed Recommended Wilderness, Proposed Potential Wilderness, and Non-Wilderness in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona....

  2. 43 CFR 19.6 - Regulations respecting administration and uses of wilderness areas under jurisdiction of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... areas and preserving their wilderness character for the use and enjoyment of the American people in such... Office of the Secretary of the Interior WILDERNESS PRESERVATION National Wilderness Preservation System...

  3. Prescribed fire as the minimum tool for wilderness forest and fire regime restoration: a case study from the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaryBeth Keifer; Nathan L. Stephenson; Jeff Manley

    2000-01-01

    Changes in forest structure were monitored in areas treated with prescribed fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Five years after the initial prescribed fires, tree density was reduced by 61% in the giant sequoia-mixed conifer forest, with the greatest reduction in the smaller trees. This post-burn forest structure falls within the range that may have been...

  4. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Tenth World Wilderness Congress symposium; 2013, 4-10 October, Salamanca, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Stephen Carver; Zdenka Krenova; Brooke McBride

    2015-01-01

    The Tenth World Wilderness Congress (WILD10) met in Salamanca, Spain in 2013. The symposium on science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values was the largest of multiple symposia held in conjunction with the Congress. This symposium was organized and sponsored by the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, the Wildland Research Institute of the...

  5. Studying of tritium content in snowpack of Degelen mountain range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchenko, D V; Lukashenko, S N; Aidarkhanov, A O; Lyakhova, O N

    2014-06-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of tritium content in the layers of snow located in the streambeds of the "Degelen" massif contaminated with tritium. The objects of investigation were selected watercourses Karabulak, Uzynbulak, Aktybai located beyond the "Degelen" site. We studied the spatial distribution of tritium relative to the streambed of watercourses and defined the borders of the snow cover contamination. In the centre of the creek watercourses the snow contamination in the surface layer is as high as 40 000 Bq/L. The values of the background levels of tritium in areas not related to the streambed, which range from 40 to 50 Bq/L. The results of snow cover measurements in different seasonal periods were compared. The main mechanisms causing tritium transfer in snow were examined and identified. The most important mechanism of tritium transfer in the streams is tritium emanation from ice or soil surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-range eye tracking: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaweera, S.K.; Lu, Shin-yee

    1994-08-24

    The design considerations for a long-range Purkinje effects based video tracking system using current technology is presented. Past work, current experiments, and future directions are thoroughly discussed, with an emphasis on digital signal processing techniques and obstacles. It has been determined that while a robust, efficient, long-range, and non-invasive eye tracking system will be difficult to develop, such as a project is indeed feasible.

  7. Lyndon Baines Johnson signs the Wilderness Act into law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan A. Fox

    2016-01-01

    President Lyndon Baines Johnson signed the Wilderness Act into law on Sept. 3, 1964. In this photo, LBJ hands the pen he used to Alice Zahniser while naturalist, author, adventurer, and conservationist Mardy Murie (standing behind her) looks on.

  8. Kofa National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  9. Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  10. Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  11. Selawik National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  12. Becharof National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  13. Fort Niobrara National Wildlife: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  14. Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  15. Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  16. Imperial National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  17. Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  18. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  19. Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  20. Breton National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  1. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  2. Seney National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  3. Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  4. Izembek National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  5. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  6. Santee National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  7. Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  8. Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  9. National Wilderness Preservation System of the United States For Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage is the Alaska subset derived from the map layer described in the following: This map layer consists of National Wilderness Preservation System areas of...

  10. National Wilderness Preservation System of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer consists of National Wilderness Preservation System areas of 640 acres or more, in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The...

  11. Draft Environmental Statement : Proposed Mingo Wilderness area, Missouri

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Mingo National Wildlife Refuge. Topics covered include...

  12. Great Swamp Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Great Swamp Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  13. Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The table and the report that follow are part of a national initiative to establish a baseline wilderness character assessment for all of the National Wildlife...

  14. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The table and the report that follow are part of a national initiative to establish a baseline wilderness character assessment for all of the National Wildlife...

  15. Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The table and the report that follow are part of a national initiative to establish a baseline wilderness character assessment for all of the National Wildlife...

  16. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The table and the report that follow are part of a national initiative to establish a baseline wilderness character assessment for all of the National Wildlife...

  17. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The table and the report that follow are part of a national initiative to establish a baseline wilderness character assessment for all of the National Wildlife...

  18. Island Bay Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Island Bay Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  19. The Role of Transport Use in Adolescent Wilderness Treatment: Its Relationship to Readiness to Change and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Anita R.; Bettmann, Joanna E.; Norton, Christine L.; Comart, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the sensitive ethical issues related to involuntary treatment of adolescents, research investigating youth transport practices and treatment outcomes is clearly needed. Youth transport is common practice in many private pay programs, including wilderness therapy programs. Objective: This study of 350 adolescents in…

  20. MAROON BELLS-SNOWMASS WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, COLORADO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Val L.; Weisner, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    The Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness and Additions, located in western Colorado, was examined for mineral potential. Evidence of mineralization is widespread and numerous areas have either probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential for one or more of the following metals: gold, silver, lead, zinc, copper, and molybdenum. In addition, part of the wilderness has substantiated coal resource potential. There is little promise for the occurrence of oil and gas or geothermal resources.

  1. Why is it important to monitor social conditions in wilderness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson

    1990-01-01

    “Social conditions in wilderness” refers to all aspects of human use of the wilderness that pose the possibility of impact to the resource and visitor experiences. The reasons for monitoring (1) use levels and use trends (including characteristics of use and users) and (2) the quality of the recreation experiences provided (ability to provide naturalness, privacy, and...

  2. El Toro Wilderness, Luqillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter L. Weaver

    2011-01-01

    The El Toro Wilderness, designated by Congress in 2005, occupies about 36 percent of the 11,300 ha Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in northeastern Puerto Rico. It is the only tropical forest in the wilderness system managed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. El Toro extends from 370 to 1,074 m in elevation, and is occupied by four forest types found in the...

  3. Wilderness Preparticipation Evaluation and Considerations for Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Elizabeth; Van Baak, Karin; Dec, Katherine L; Semakula, Barbara; Cardin, Ashlea D; Lemery, Jay; Wortley, George C; Yaron, Michael; Madden, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Children, older adults, disabled and special needs athletes, and female athletes who participate in outdoor and wilderness sports and activities each face unique risks. For children and adolescents traveling to high altitude, the preparticipation physical evaluation should focus on risk assessment, prevention strategies, early recognition of altitude-related symptoms, management plans, and appropriate follow-up. As the risk and prevalence of chronic disease increases with age, both older patients and providers need to be aware of disease and medication-specific risks relative to wilderness sport and activity participation. Disabled and special needs athletes benefit from careful pre-event planning for the potential medical issues and equipment modifications that may affect their health in wilderness environments. Issues that demand special consideration for female adventurers include pregnancy, contraceptive use, menses, and ferritin levels at altitude. A careful preparticipation evaluation that factors in unique, population- specific risks will help special populations stay healthy and safe on wilderness adventures. The PubMed and SportDiscus databases were searched in 2014 using both MeSH terms and text words and include peer-reviewed English language articles from 1977 to 2014. Additional information was accessed from Web-based sources to produce this narrative review on preparticipation evaluation for special populations undertaking wilderness adventures. Key words include children, adolescent, pediatric, seniors, elderly, disabled, special needs, female, athlete, preparticipiation examination, wilderness medicine, and sports. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Traditional Wisdom: Protecting Relationships with Wilderness as a Cultural Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Watson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interviews of tribal and nontribal residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, U.S., were conducted to contrast the meanings that different cultures attach to the Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness. Legislation that created a national system of wilderness areas (in 1964 and still growing was conceived, supported, and enacted by a fairly distinct social group generally residing in urban areas and schooled in modern civilization's scientific model and relationship with nature. The places this legislation protects, however, provide many other poorly recognized and little understood meanings to other parts of society. There is a link between indigenous people and nature that is not described well in this legislation or management policy in most places. The Wilderness Act suggests that these protected areas should be "untrammeled," or unmanipulated, unfettered, when in fact it is common knowledge that, for most areas in North America, indigenous people have intervened, with respect, for generations. The Mission Mountains Tribal Wilderness in Montana, though not part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, was designated to protect many of these same values but also extend to protect important cultural meanings assigned to this wild landscape. Protecting the relationship between indigenous people and relatively intact, complex systems, which we commonly refer to as wilderness in North America, can be an important contributor to sustainability of the landscape and cultural heritage.

  5. Demonstrator study for micro-ranging-laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Hartmut; Bernhardt, Bodo; Pereira do Carmo, J.

    2017-11-01

    Within ESA's Innovation Triangle Initiative (ITI) a demonstrator breadboard for a micro-ranging-laser device "MYLRAD" has been developed. Its working principle is the measurement of the round-trip delay time of a laser beam as a phase shift. The demonstrator consists of the laser diode (30 mW, square wave AM), optics, APD detector, narrowband preamplifier, limiter, and a phase digitiser based on a novel noise-shaping synchroniser (NSS) circuit; this works without ADCs and can be built from rad-hard components for space. The system timing and the digitiser algorithm are performed by an FPGA. The demonstrator has been tested at ranges from 1 m to 30 m. With a static non-cooperative target an RMS noise of 1 mm at a result rate of 60 Hz was reached. The demonstrator needs less than 2.5 W power.

  6. Long Range Microimage Transmission Techniques Study for AFMPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    of MIT Cambridge, Massa- chusetts, and EPSCO Laboratories ( now defunct) in Wilton, Connecticut. Their results indicate that the long range... EPSCO Laboratories (now defunrt) in Wilton, Connecticut. The NOSC effort was sponsored by the Bureau of Naval Personnel, the ESL effort was conducted...in support of the Library of Congress and the EPSCO Laboratory effort was sponsored by RADC in support of the Foreign Technology Division at Wright

  7. Organic geochemical study of lignite coal from Salt Range Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazeelat, T.; Asif, M. [University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    Coal sample from Salt Range-Pakistan has been analyzed to investigate its rank, hydrocarbon composition and most likely source of hydrocarbons. The rank of coal has been determined by general and chemical parameters. High percentage of volatile matter and sulfur content, low thermal characteristics and carbon and hydrogen content 62 and 5 respectively reveal that Salt Range coal is lignite in rank. In order to determine hydrocarbon composition, bitumen was extracted from the coal and was fractionated into saturated, aromatic and NSO (nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen containing compounds) fractions by liquid chromatography employing silica gel. Further fractionation of aromatic fraction by TLC yielded two sub fractions called aromatic fraction No. 1 and aromatic fraction No. 2 respectively. Analysis of these fractions by capillary GC-FID showed a profile with high abundance of peaks that were characterized as thiophenic compounds. The identifications were based on the comparison of GC retention data with the literature. Dibenzothiophenes are the most abundant compounds in the Salt Range coal. Their methyl- and dimethyl substituted derivatives are also present in high concentration. Naphthalene and phenanthrene are present in minor amount but their alkyl-substituted derivatives have relatively high concentration. The most likely source of aromatic hydrocarbons could be terpenoid precursors; however polynuclear aromatic thiophenes, could be formed from sulfur containing aromatic moieties of macromolecules during later stage of diagenesis of the sediments. The incorporation of hydrogen sulfide into the precursor molecules could not be ruled out which is abundant in reducing environment.

  8. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Unimak Island: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to evaluate the status of the Unimak Wilderness of the Unimak...

  9. Department of the Interior : Draft Environmental Statement : DES 74-34 : Proposed Lacassine Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Lacassine Wilderness Area. Topics covered include where...

  10. Department of the Interior : Final Environmental Statement : FES 75-4 : Proposed Cape Romain Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a final analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Cape Romain Wilderness Area. Topics covered include where the...

  11. Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Wilderness Name Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  12. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Wilderness Name Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  13. Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Wilderness Name Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  14. Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogie, Keith; Crisuolo, Ed; Parise, Ron

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will describe the design, development, and testing of a system to collect telemetry, format it into UDP/IP packets, and deliver it to a ground test range using standard IP technologies over a TDRSS link. This presentation will discuss the goal of the STARS IP Formatter along with the overall design. It will also present performance results of the current version of the IP formatter. Finally, it will discuss key issues for supporting constant rate telemetry data delivery when using standard components such as PCI/104 processors, the Linux operating system, Internet Protocols, and synchronous serial interfaces.

  15. Catastrophic Declines in Wilderness Areas Undermine Global Environment Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James E M; Shanahan, Danielle F; Di Marco, Moreno; Allan, James; Laurance, William F; Sanderson, Eric W; Mackey, Brendan; Venter, Oscar

    2016-11-07

    Humans have altered terrestrial ecosystems for millennia [1], yet wilderness areas still remain as vital refugia where natural ecological and evolutionary processes operate with minimal human disturbance [2-4], underpinning key regional- and planetary-scale functions [5, 6]. Despite the myriad values of wilderness areas-as critical strongholds for endangered biodiversity [7], for carbon storage and sequestration [8], for buffering and regulating local climates [9], and for supporting many of the world's most politically and economically marginalized communities [10]-they are almost entirely ignored in multilateral environmental agreements. This is because they are assumed to be relatively free from threatening processes and therefore are not a priority for conservation efforts [11, 12]. Here we challenge this assertion using new comparable maps of global wilderness following methods established in the original "last of the wild" analysis [13] to examine the change in extent since the early 1990s. We demonstrate alarming losses comprising one-tenth (3.3 million km2) of global wilderness areas over the last two decades, particularly in the Amazon (30%) and central Africa (14%). We assess increases in the protection of wilderness over the same time frame and show that these efforts are failing to keep pace with the rate of wilderness loss, which is nearly double the rate of protection. Our findings underscore an immediate need for international policies to recognize the vital values of wilderness and the unprecedented threats they face and to underscore urgent large-scale, multifaceted actions needed to maintain them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Knowledge of and attitudes toward wilderness in the southern Appalachian ecoregion

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Mark Fly; Robert Emmet Jones; H. Ken Cordell

    2000-01-01

    Using two measures of knowledge of wilderness management practices, the general public does not appear to be very knowledgeable about activities allowed in federally designated wilderness areas. This lack of knowledge was found across all of the basic socio-demographic groups. Although two out of three people support setting aside more public lands as wilderness, only...

  17. Wilderness stewardship challenges in the uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park World Heritage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonja Krüger

    2007-01-01

    The location of the uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park wilderness areas along an international border and within a World Heritage Site and Transfrontier Conservation Area, provides unique opportunities and challenges for the stewardship of these areas. Although the wilderness areas were proclaimed more than 30 years ago, wilderness-specific planning, management and monitoring...

  18. The Wilderness Act and fish stocking: an overview of legislation, judicial interpretation, and agency implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres; Shannon Meyer; Sue Matthews

    2001-01-01

    Many high-elevation lakes in designated wilderness are stocked with native and nonnative fish by state fish and game agencies to provide recreational fishing opportunities. In several areas, this practice has become controversial with state wildlife managers who support historical recreational use of wilderness, federal wilderness managers who assert that stocking...

  19. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness - A long history of management guided by science

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cole

    2016-01-01

    The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in northern Minnesota is one of the most iconic and cherished wilderness areas in the United States. One of the original wilderness areas established in 1964, the BWCAW protects a glaciated landscape of about 1,175 lakes, connected by several hundred miles of streams. Located adjacent to Canada's Quetico Provincial...

  20. Wilderness visitor experiences: A selective review of 50 years of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2012-01-01

    Two of the foremost conclusions from 50 years of research on wilderness visitors are that experiences are highly idiosyncratic and visitors are highly adaptable. The reasons people visit wilderness, their experiential aspirations, and their experiences in wilderness vary greatly among people and within people from visit to visit. Along with people's adaptability...

  1. Traditional wisdom and climate change: Contribution of wilderness stories to adaptation and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Linda Moon Stumpff; Jennifer Meidinger

    2012-01-01

    Our Wilderness Act in the United States, passed in 1964, provides a fairly distinct definition of wilderness for the part of society that was successful in parlaying their values, recreation motivations, and political influence into an extremely effective, world-recognized conservation program. But relationships with our National Wilderness Preservation System extend...

  2. Using risk analysis to reveal opportunities for the management of unplanned ignitions in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Barnett; Carol Miller; Tyron J. Venn

    2016-01-01

    A goal of fire management in wilderness is to allow fire to play its natural ecological role without intervention. Unfortunately, most unplanned ignitions in wilderness are suppressed, in part because of the risk they might pose to values outside of the wilderness. We capitalize on recent advances in fire risk analysis to demonstrate a risk-based approach for revealing...

  3. Threats and changes affecting human relationships with wilderness: Implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Dvorak; William T. Borrie; Alan E. Watson

    2011-01-01

    For wilderness managers, the ability to recognize threats and changing conditions is vital. While these threats are typically associated with resource and social conditions, they can also be investigated relative to wilderness relationships. This paper explores how threats and changes may be affecting human relationships with wilderness and the possible implications...

  4. Wilderness stewardship in America today and what we can do to improve it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken Cordell; Chris Barns; David Brownlie; Tom Carlson; Chad Dawson; William Koch; Garry Oye; Chris Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The authors of this article are recently retired wilderness professionals from universities or federal agencies. We were asked to share our observations about how wilderness stewardship is being managed in America today. We based our observations on our many years of combined professional wilderness career experience as managers, trainers, scientists, educators, and...

  5. Campsite impact in the wilderness of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks: Thirty years of change

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; David J. Parsons

    2013-01-01

    Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks are among the premier destinations in the world for wilderness travel and camping. Over 93% of the spectacular mountain country that make up these parks has been designated as wilderness, with another 4% managed as wilderness. The parks are home to the highest peak in the lower 48 states, Mt. Whitney (14,495 feet), a 97-mile...

  6. Wilderness visitor experiences: Progress in research and management; 2011 April 4-7; Missoula, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2012-01-01

    The workshop was convened to celebrate and review 50 years of research on wilderness visitor experience and its influence on wilderness stewardship. These proceedings are organized in three sections. The first section contains 12 papers that review literature or describe empirical research about wilderness visitor experiences. The second section provides three papers...

  7. Radar Cross Section Studies/Compact Range Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, W. D.; Dominek, A. K.; Gupta, I. J.; Newman, E. H.; Pathak, P. H.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is given of the achievements of NASA Grant NsG-1613 by Ohio State University from May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1988. The major topics covered are as follows: (1) electromagnetic scattering analysis; (2) indoor scattering measurement systems; (3) RCS control; (4) waveform processing techniques; (5) material scattering and design studies; (6) design and evaluation of design studies; and (7) antenna studies. Major progress has been made in each of these areas as verified by the numerous publications produced.

  8. Palynological studies in tribe Chlorideae (Poaceae) from salt range ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-15

    , 2011. Pollen morphology of five species belonging to three genera of tribe Chlorideae (Poaceae) was examined by light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy. The studies showed that pollen in all species were ...

  9. Pad A Treatability Study long-range project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Pad A Treatability Study Project is to identify and demonstrate through lab- and pilot-scale testing, technologies for treating plutonium-contaminated salt waste. This document presents proposed objectives and schedules, scope of work and breakdown structure, cost elements, deployment, benefits, and change controls for the project.

  10. Reverse design and characteristic study of multi-range HMCVT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen; Chen, Long; Zeng, Falin

    2017-09-01

    The reduction of fuel consumption and increase of transmission efficiency is one of the key problems of the agricultural machinery. Many promising technologies such as hydromechanical continuously variable transmissions (HMCVT) are the focus of research and investments, but there is little technical documentation that describes the design principle and presents the design parameters. This paper presents the design idea and characteristic study of HMCVT, in order to find out the suitable scheme for the big horsepower tractors. Analyzed the kinematics and dynamics of a large horsepower tractor, according to the characteristic parameters, a hydro-mechanical continuously variable transmission has been designed. Compared with the experimental curves and theoretical curves of the stepless speed regulation of transmission, the experimental result illustrates the rationality of the design scheme.

  11. Wilderness science in a time of change conference-Volume 1: Changing perspectives and future directions; 1999 May 23-27; Missoula, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole; Stephen F. McCool; Wayne A. Freimund; Jennifer O' Loughlin

    2000-01-01

    Ten papers presented as plenary talks at the conference, "Wilderness Science in a Time of Change," are included. Topics include: the influence of global change on wilderness and its management; contemporary criticisms and celebrations of the wilderness idea; the capacity of science to meet the challenges and opportunities wilderness presents; wilderness in...

  12. Organizational Characteristics that Contribute to Success in Engaging the Public to Accomplish Fuels Management at the Wilderness/Non-Wilderness Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Knotek; Alan E. Watson

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, the Rocky Mountain Ranger District of the Lewis and Clark National Forest initiated a multi-year, large-scale prescribed burn in the Scapegoat Wilderness. The objectives of this burn were to make the non-wilderness side of the wilderness boundary more defensible from wildfire and to establish conditions that will allow fire to play a more natural...

  13. The Relationship Between Perceptions of Wilderness Character and Attitudes Toward Management Intervention to Adapt Biophysical Resources to a Changing Climate and Nature Restoration at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan; Martin, Steve; Christensen, Neal; Fauth, Gregg; Williams, Dan

    2015-09-01

    In a recent national survey of federal wilderness managers, respondents identified the high priority need for scientific information about public attitudes toward biophysical intervention to adapt to climate change and attitudes of the public toward restoration of natural conditions. In a survey of visitors to one National Park wilderness in California, visitors revealed that they largely do not support biophysical intervention in wilderness to mitigate the effects of climate change, but broad support for activities that restore natural conditions exists. In an attempt to understand how these attitudes vary among visitors, it was found that those visitors who most value naturalness aspects of wilderness character also most positively support restoration and are most negative toward climate change intervention practices. More information about visitor-defined wilderness character attributes is needed and strategic planning to guide intervention decisions and restoration should be a priority. In this study, it was found that wilderness character is largely defined by visitors based on its wildness attributes, which include natural sounds, low density of people, pure water, clean air, and the presence of humans substantially unnoticeable.

  14. Wilderness adventure therapy effects on the mental health of youth participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Daniel J; Neill, James T; Crisp, Simon J R

    2016-10-01

    Adventure therapy offers a prevention, early intervention, and treatment modality for people with behavioural, psychological, and psychosocial issues. It can appeal to youth-at-risk who are often less responsive to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. This study evaluated Wilderness Adventure Therapy (WAT) outcomes based on participants' pre-program, post-program, and follow-up responses to self-report questionnaires. The sample consisted of 36 adolescent out-patients with mixed mental health issues who completed a 10-week, manualised WAT intervention. The overall short-term standardised mean effect size was small, positive, and statistically significant (0.26), with moderate, statistically significant improvements in psychological resilience and social self-esteem. Total short-term effects were within age-based adventure therapy meta-analytic benchmark 90% confidence intervals, except for the change in suicidality which was lower than the comparable benchmark. The short-term changes were retained at the three-month follow-up, except for family functioning (significant reduction) and suicidality (significant improvement). For participants in clinical ranges pre-program, there was a large, statistically significant reduction in depressive symptomology, and large to very large, statistically significant improvements in behavioural and emotional functioning. These changes were retained at the three-month follow-up. These findings indicate that WAT is as effective as traditional psychotherapy techniques for clinically symptomatic people. Future research utilising a comparison or wait-list control group, multiple sources of data, and a larger sample, could help to qualify and extend these findings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The science of trail surveys: Recreation ecology provides new tools for managing wilderness trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Wimpey, Jeremy F.; Park, Logan O.

    2011-01-01

    Recreation ecology examines the effects of recreation on protected area ecosystems. One core focus of recreation ecology research is trail science, including the development of efficient protocols to assess and monitor the type and severity of resource impacts, analyses to improve knowledge of factors that influence trail conditions, and studies to assist land managers in improving trail design, maintenance, and visitor management. This article reviews alternative trail survey methodologies most useful for the management of wilderness and backcountry trail networks. Illustrations and implications from survey data for trail planning, design, and management are included.

  16. The Impact of Wilderness Therapy: Utilizing an Integrated Care Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Anita; Norton, Christine Lynn; DeMille, Steven M.; Hobson, Jessalyn

    2016-01-01

    With roots in experiential education and Outward Bound, wilderness therapy (WT) is a growing field of mental health care for youth. WT uses outdoor modalities combined with therapeutic interventions to assist youth to promote clinical changes. Previous research has shown it to be effective in improving the mental health of clients; however, little…

  17. Operationalization of the wilderness targets of the German NSBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert Reif

    2015-01-01

    The German government's National Strategy on Biological Diversity (NSBD) aims at protecting its biodiversity in a broad sense. The NSBD calls for 5% of Germany's forest land area to be permanently set aside for natural forest protection, i.e., natural processes taking place, and as a second target, for 2% of Germany's land area to become "wilderness...

  18. Wilderness Management... A Computerized System for Summarizing Permit Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary H. Elsner

    1972-01-01

    Permits were first needed for visits to wilderness areas in California during summer 1971. A computerized system for analyzing these permits and summarizing information from them has been developed. It produces four types of summary tables: point-of-origin of visitors; daily variation in total number of persons present; variations in group size; and variations in...

  19. Wilderness stewardship in an era of global changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Parsons

    2006-01-01

    It seems increasingly clear that the primary challenge to the future preservation of wild landscapes will be adapting to the rapidly changing social and biophysical environments within which such areas exist. Established in large part as islands of naturalness, where human influences are minimized, wilderness ecosystems are now threatened by myriad changes, many of...

  20. Comparing manager and visitor perceptions of llama use in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Neal A. Christensen; Dale J. Blahna; Kari S. Archibald

    1998-01-01

    Llama use in wilderness is projected to increase over the next 5 years. While the greatest concerns about this increase in use are unexpected impacts to native flora, impacts to native fauna, and conflicts with other user types, there is also concern about how prepared managers are to deal with this increasing recreation demand. This research compares manager attitudes...

  1. GIS applications to wilderness management: potential uses and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Landres; David R. Spildie; Lloyd P. Queen

    2001-01-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are increasingly being used in all areas of natural resource management. This paper first presents a brief primer on GIS, and then discusses potential applications of GIS to wilderness management in the areas of inventorying, monitoring, analysis, planning, and communication. Outlined are the limitations and pitfalls that could...

  2. Three Rivers: Protecting the Yukon's Great Boreal Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juri Peepre

    2007-01-01

    The Three Rivers Project in the Yukon, Canada, aims to protect a magnificent but little known 30,000 km2 (11,583 miles2) wilderness in the Peel watershed, using the tools of science, visual art, literature, and community engagement. After completing ecological inventories, conservation values maps, and community trips on the Wind, Snake, and Bonnet Plume rivers, the...

  3. The socio-cultural value of New Zealand wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry Wray

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand's wilderness resource has become iconic on both a national and international scale, and provides an important source of cultural identity for many Kiwis (a colloquial term for a New Zealander). Now, in the early 21st Century, however, social changes such as urbanization, globalization, increasing consumerism, and growing international tourism may be...

  4. Low-impact recreational practices for wilderness and backcountry

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1989-01-01

    Describes low-impact practices that can contribute to minimizing problems resulting from recreational use of wilderness and backcountry. Each practice is described and information is provided on such subjects as rationale for the practice, importance, and costs to visitors. Practices that may be counter-productive are described, as are important research gaps.

  5. 36 CFR 261.57 - National Forest wilderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-burnable food or beverage containers, including deposit bottles, except for non-burnable containers... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Forest wilderness. 261.57 Section 261.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  6. Group-Integrated Reality Therapy in a Wilderness Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clagett, Arthur F.

    1992-01-01

    Abridges Glasser's (1975) theory of United States as identity society to explicate causative characteristics of "identity achievers" versus "failures" in U.S. society. Discusses Reality Therapy and therapeutic treatment programs developed by Hope Center Wilderness Camp. Presents evidence to suggest that group-integrated reality…

  7. Heat-related illness in the African wilderness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite reduced temperatures at high altitudes, the increased solar radiation and physical exertion can .... Clothing should provide skin protection, reflection of solar radiation, and encourage evaporative cooling. Loose-fitting, light-coloured, ..... Wilderness Medical Society Expert Panel. Heat-related illnesses. In: Forgey WW ...

  8. Preserving nature in forested wilderness areas and national parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron L. Heinselman

    1971-01-01

    The natural forest ecosystems of some of our national parks and wilderness areas are endangered by subtle ecological changes primarily because we have failed to understand the dynamic nature of these ecosystems and because protection programs frequently have excluded the very factors that produce natural plant and animal communities. Maintaining natural ecosystems...

  9. Wishlist: Wilderness Endgame in the Black Hills National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert Wellman

    2010-01-01

    RARE II (Roadless Area Review and Evaluation) was meant to settle the political contest that had been fought over wilderness since 1964, as the endgame to decide once and for all the winners and losers among federal lands. RARE II was a modified version of the process dictated by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, which by the time of…

  10. Visitor preferences for managing wilderness recreation after wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan N.K. Brown; Randall S. Rosenberger; Jeffrey D. Kline; Troy E. Hall; Mark D. Needham

    2008-01-01

    The 2003 Bear Butte and Booth (B&B) Fires burned much of the Mount Jefferson Wilderness in the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests, Oregon. A question for managers is how best to manage recreation in fire-affected areas in ways that minimize adverse impacts on visitor experiences and the recovering landscape. To help address this question, we used onsite...

  11. Outdoor Adventure. Wilderness Programs for the Physically Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Diana

    1986-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of wilderness activities which are enjoyed by people with disabling conditions. With this increase comes the need to identify and deal with risks. Potential problems are discussed, and tips to minimize risk are offered. (MT)

  12. Shared principles of restoration practice in the Chicago wilderness region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy Watkins; Lynne M. Westphal; Paul H. Gobster; Joanne Vining; Alaka Wali; Madeleine. Tudor

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rules, norms, and strategies (institutional statements) that characterize ecological restoration across 10 organizations in the Chicago Wilderness region. Our use of Ostrom's IAD ADICO grammar tool is novel in both context (non-extractive resource management) and data type (qualitative interviews). Results suggest that, in contrast to a focus on...

  13. Wilderness and well-being: Complexity, time, and psychological growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joar Vitterso

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the argument for interdisciplinary wilderness research. The idea of interdisciplinarity is grounded in theories of emotion and psychological growth that are compatible with basic knowledge in other scientific disciplines, and in particular with concepts related to evolution. Considering humans as biological knowledge systems, designed by natural...

  14. Science informs stewardship: Committing to a national wilderness science agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan A. Fox; Beth A. Hahn

    2016-01-01

    The National Wilderness Preservation System (NWPS) is a vital component of the national and international infrastructure for science, education, and information. The NWPS serves as an important resource for advancing research, from discovering new dinosaurs (Arbour et al. 2014, Landon 2016) to understanding human history on the American landscape (Rasic 2003). The NWPS...

  15. Heat-related illness in the African wilderness | Hofmeyr | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilderness heat-related illnesses span a variety of conditions caused by excessive or prolonged heat exposure, and/or the inability to compensate adequately for increased endogenous production during strenuous outdoor activities. Despite management of well-known risk factors, such as lack of fitness or acclimatisation, ...

  16. Science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values: Ninth World Wilderness Congress symposium; November 6-13, 2009; Merida, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Joaquin Murrieta-Saldivar; Brooke McBride

    2011-01-01

    The Ninth World Wilderness Congress (WILD9) met in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico in 2009. The symposium on science and stewardship to protect and sustain wilderness values was the largest of multiple symposia held in conjunction with the Congress. The papers contained in this proceedings were generated at this symposium or submitted by the author or authors for consideration...

  17. Linking wilderness research and management-volume 2. Defining, managing, and monitoring wilderness visitor experiences: an annotated reading list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette Puttkammer; Vita Wright

    2001-01-01

    Opportunities for unique visitor experiences are among the defining attributes of wilderness. In order to understand and protect these experiences, natural and social scientists have pursued an ever-expanding program of wildland recreation research. While much of the early research sought to identify simple relationships between setting attributes and visitor...

  18. The complexity of managing fire-dependent ecosystems in wilderness: relict ponderosa pine in the Bob Marshall Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Stephen Arno; Laura J. Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    Isolated wilderness ecosystems with a history of frequent, low-severity fires have been altered due to many decades of fire exclusion and, as a result, are difficult to restore for philosophical and logistical reasons. In this paper, we describe the successional conditions of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) communities along the South Fork of the...

  19. Personal, societal, and ecological values of wilderness: Sixth World Wilderness Congress proceedings on research, management, and allocation, Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; Greg H. Aplet; John C. Hendee

    2000-01-01

    The papers contained in Volume II of these Proceedings represent a combination of papers originally scheduled for the delayed 1997 meeting of the World Wilderness Congress and those submitted in response to a second call for papers when the Congress was rescheduled for October 24-29, 1998, in Bangalore, India. Just as in Volume I, the papers are divided into seven...

  20. Linking wilderness research and management-volume 3. Recreation fees in wilderness and other public lands: an annotated reading list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette Puttkammer; Vita Wright

    2001-01-01

    This annotated reading list provides an introduction to the issue of recreation fees on public lands. With an emphasis on wilderness recreation fees, this compilation of historical and recent publications is divided into the following sections: historical context, arguments for and against fees, pricing mechanisms and the effects of price, public attitudes toward fees...

  1. Effects of stock use and backpackers on water quality in wilderness in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Forrester, Harrison; Miller, Benjamin; Roop, Heidi; Sickman, James O.; Ryu, Hodon; Santo Domingo, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    During 2010-2011, a study was conducted in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI) to evaluate the influence of pack animals (stock) and backpackers on water quality in wilderness lakes and streams. The study had three main components: (1) a synoptic survey of water quality in wilderness areas of the parks, (2) paired water-quality sampling above and below several areas with differing types and amounts of visitor use, and (3) intensive monitoring at six sites to document temporal variations in water quality. Data from the synoptic water-quality survey indicated that wilderness lakes and streams are dilute and have low nutrient and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations. The synoptic survey sites were categorized as minimal use, backpacker use, or mixed use (stock and backpackers), depending on the most prevalent type of use upstream from the sampling locations. Sites with mixed use tended to have higher concentrations of most constituents (including E.coli) than those categorized as minimal-use (p≤0.05); concentrations at backpacker-use sites were intermediate. Data from paired-site sampling indicated that E.coli, total coliform, and particulate phosphorus concentrations were greater in streams downstream from mixed-use areas than upstream from those areas (p≤0.05). Paired-site data also indicated few statistically significant differences in nutrient, E. coli, or total coliform concentrations in streams upstream and downstream from backpacker-use areas. The intensive-monitoring data indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations normally were low, except during storms, when notable increases in concentrations of E.coli, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and turbidity occurred. In summary, results from this study indicate that water quality in SEKI wilderness generally is good, except during storms; and visitor use appears to have a small, but statistically significant influence on stream water quality.

  2. Effects of stock use and backpackers on water quality in wilderness in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W; Forrester, Harrison; Miller, Benjamin; Roop, Heidi; Sickman, James O; Ryu, Hodon; Domingo, Jorge Santo

    2013-12-01

    During 2010-2011, a study was conducted in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI) to evaluate the influence of pack animals (stock) and backpackers on water quality in wilderness lakes and streams. The study had three main components: (1) a synoptic survey of water quality in wilderness areas of the parks, (2) paired water quality sampling above and below several areas with differing types and amounts of visitor use, and (3) intensive monitoring at six sites to document temporal variations in water quality. Data from the synoptic water quality survey indicated that wilderness lakes and streams are dilute and have low nutrient and Escherichia coli concentrations. The synoptic survey sites were categorized as minimal use, backpacker-use, or mixed use (stock and backpackers), depending on the most prevalent type of use upstream from the sampling locations. Sites with mixed use tended to have higher concentrations of most constituents (including E. coli) than those categorized as minimal-use (P ≤ 0.05); concentrations at backpacker-use sites were intermediate. Data from paired-site sampling indicated that E. coli, total coliform, and particulate phosphorus concentrations were greater in streams downstream from mixed-use areas than upstream from those areas (P ≤ 0.05). Paired-site data also indicated few statistically significant differences in nutrient, E. coli, or total coliform concentrations in streams upstream and downstream from backpacker-use areas. The intensive-monitoring data indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations normally were low, except during storms, when notable increases in concentrations of E. coli, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and turbidity occurred. In summary, results from this study indicate that water quality in SEKI wilderness generally is good, except during storms; and visitor use appears to have a small, but statistically significant influence on stream water quality.

  3. Medical Oversight, Educational Core Content, and Proposed Scopes of Practice of Wilderness EMS Providers: A Joint Project Developed by Wilderness EMS Educators, Medical Directors, and Regulators Using a Delphi Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Johnson, David E; Schimelpfenig, Tod; Conover, Keith; Sholl, Matthew; Busko, Jonnathan; Alter, Rachael; Smith, Will; Symonds, Jennifer; Taillac, Peter; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-01-01

    A disparity exists between the skills needed to manage patients in wilderness EMS environments and the scopes of practice that are traditionally approved by state EMS regulators. In response, the National Association of EMS Physicians Wilderness EMS Committee led a project to define the educational core content supporting scopes of practice of wilderness EMS providers and the conditions when wilderness EMS providers should be required to have medical oversight. Using a Delphi process, a group of experts in wilderness EMS, representing educators, medical directors, and regulators, developed model educational core content. This core content is a foundation for wilderness EMS provider scopes of practice and builds on both the National EMS Education Standards and the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. These experts also identified the conditions when oversight is needed for wilderness EMS providers. By consensus, this group of experts identified the educational core content for four unique levels of wilderness EMS providers: Wilderness Emergency Medical Responder (WEMR), Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (WEMT), Wilderness Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (WAEMT), and Wilderness Paramedic (WParamedic). These levels include specialized skills and techniques pertinent to the operational environment. The skills and techniques increase in complexity with more advanced certification levels, and address the unique circumstances of providing care to patients in the wilderness environment. Furthermore, this group identified that providers having a defined duty to act should be functioning with medical oversight. This group of experts defined the educational core content supporting the specific scopes of practice that each certification level of wilderness EMS provider should have when providing patient care in the wilderness setting. Wilderness EMS providers are, indeed, providing health care and should thus function within defined scopes of practice and with

  4. Letters urgently needed for hearing record in support of proposals for wilderness areas in Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a general letter from The Wilderness Society to its members calling for letters in support of the Malheur Wilderness proposal.

  5. Morphologic evolution of the wilderness area breach at Fire Island, New York—2012–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Nelson, Timothy R.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Brenner, Owen T.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2017-09-18

    IntroductionHurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, near Atlantic City, New Jersey, had a significant impact on the coastal system along the south shore of Long Island, New York. A record significant wave height of 9.6 meters (m) was measured at wave buoy 44025, approximately 48 kilometers offshore of Fire Island, New York. Surge and runup during the storm resulted in extensive beach and dune erosion and breaching of the Fire Island barrier island system at two locations, including a breach that formed within the Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness area on the eastern side of Fire Island.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long history of conducting morphologic change and processes research at Fire Island. One of the primary objectives of the current research effort is to understand the morphologic evolution of the barrier system on a variety of time scales (from storm scale to decade(s) to century). A number of studies that support the project objectives have been published. Prior to Hurricane Sandy, however, little information was available on specific storm-driven change in this region. The USGS received Hurricane Sandy supplemental funding (project GS2–2B: Linking Coastal Processes and Vulnerability, Fire Island, New York, Regional Study) to enhance existing research efforts at Fire Island. The existing research was greatly expanded to include inner continental shelf mapping and investigations of processes of inner shelf sediment transport; beach and dune response and recovery; and observation, analysis, and modeling of the newly formed breach in the Otis Pike High Dune Wilderness area, herein referred to as the wilderness breach. The breach formed at the site of Old Inlet, which was open from 1763 to 1825. The location of the initial island breaching does not directly correspond with topographic lows of the dunes, but instead the breach formed in the location of a cross-island boardwalk that was destroyed during Hurricane Sandy

  6. Girls on Ice: An Inquiry-Based Wilderness Science Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, E. C.; Koppes, M. N.

    2001-12-01

    We developed a wilderness science education program for high school girls. The program offers opportunities for students to explore and learn about mountain glaciers and the alpine landscape through scientific field studies with geologists and glaciologists. Our purpose is to give students a feeling for the natural processes that create the alpine world and provide an environment that fosters the critical thinking necessary to all scientific inquiry. The program is currently being offered through the North Cascades Institute, a non-profit organization offering outdoor education programs for the general public. We lead eight girls for a weeklong expedition to the remote USGS South Cascade Glacier Research Station in Washington's North Cascades. For four days, we explore the glacier and the nearby alpine valleys. We encourage the girls to observe and think like scientists through making observations and inferences. They develop their own experiments to test ideas about glacier dynamics and geomorphology. In addition to scientific exploration, we engage the students in discussions about the philosophy of science and its role in our everyday lives. Our program exemplifies the success of hands-on, inquiry-based teaching in small groups for science education in the outdoors. The wilderness setting and single gender field team inspires young women's interest in science and provides a challenging environment that increases their physical and intellectual self-confidence.

  7. Le mythe de la Wilderness dans The Scarlet Letter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauric Guillaud

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilderness... Un mot-piège qui résume l’Amérique dans la complexité de son espace-temps, un mot-pieuvre dont la polysémie tentaculaire renvoie au tabou ultime : l’ensauvagement du corps et de l’âme. Au bout du chemin gît le bewilderment, mélange d’ahurissement, de perplexité, de confusion qui s’empare du civilisé désorienté. Menace de contagion, d’indianisation, de plongée régressive dans les abîmes des sylves obscures. La wilderness, écrit J. R. Rougé, est « la réalité concrète d’une terre n...

  8. Lyme Disease: What the Wilderness Provider Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Vakkalanka, J Priyanka; Holstege, Christopher P; Mead, Paul S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is the most common vectorborne disease in the United States. Prognosis after initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy is typically good if treated early. Wilderness providers caring for patients who live in or travel to high-incidence Lyme disease areas should be aware of the basic biology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of Lyme disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Potential roles of research in enhancing the performance of management in securing high quality visitor experiences in wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool

    2012-01-01

    Does research help managers provide opportunities for visitors to have high quality experiences in wilderness? Difficulties in applying visitor experience research result from several factors: the nature of wilderness itself, the character of the wilderness visitor experience challenge as a research and management topic, and the paradigm of research applications...

  10. 75 FR 54296 - Information Collection; Trends in Use and Users in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... addressed to Alan E. Watson, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain...: [email protected] . The public may inspect comments received at the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan E. Watson, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute at (406...

  11. Cervical isometric strength and range of motion of elite rugby union players: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, David F.; Gatherer, Don

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Head and neck injury is relatively common in Rugby Union. Despite this, strength and range-of-motion characteristics of the cervical spine are poorly characterised. The aim of this study was to provide data on the strength and range-of-motion of the cervical spine of professional rugby players to guide clinical rehabilitation.METHODS: A cohort study was performed evaluating 27 players from a single UK professional rugby club. Cervical isometric strength and range-of-motion were as...

  12. The largest reference range study for hematological parameters from Turkey: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Tekkeşin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Accurate, reliable laboratory reference ranges are essential for effective clinical evaluation and monitoring. We present robust reference ranges established for hematology parameters using the Sysmex XT2000i analyzer. Methods: Blood samples were taken from 17409 healthy adults (19 to 49 years, 51.4% men and 48.6% women and routine hematology analysis performed. Patients were assessed as healthy on the basis of a medical history and routine medical examinations. Serum hematinic assays (vitamin B12, folate, iron and ferritin were also analyzed in order to exclude the potential anemia existence. Results: There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001 between men and women, with the former showing higher CBC values, except WBC, neutrophil and platelet counts compared to females. Several differences were observed when compared to previously established values from Turkey, most notably in leucocytes and platelets. Our findings for CBC parameters, except leucocyte count and MCV are in general agreement with previously published data from more limited trials undertaken in other countries. Conclusions: In spite of the uncontrolled factors influencing hematological values, this study permitted to establish the new hematological reference values in Turkey, especially living near sea level. In the absence of previously detailed investigated hematological reference values in Turkey, we offered to use these results for clinical management of Turkish patients and interpretations of laboratory data for research purpose. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (4: 548-552

  13. Air quality management in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen M. Porter

    2000-01-01

    Proper management of air resources is vital to maintaining the wilderness character of an area. Air pollution can affect natural resources and has caused injury to vegetation, bioaccumulation of mercury in fish, eutrophication of coastal ecosystems and visibility impairment in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) wilderness areas. Sources of air pollution include power...

  14. Use density, visitor experience, and limiting recreational use in wilderness: progress to date and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne A. Freimund; David N. Cole

    2001-01-01

    Recent increases in demand have revitalized interest and controversy surrounding use limits and the effect of visitor density on wilderness experiences. A workshop held in Missoula, Montana, in June of 2000 addressed the potential for social science to contribute to understanding and managing increasingly populated wilderness conditions. Scientists identified progress...

  15. The global wilderness seminar for government agencies: a meeting at the crossroads of wildlands stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy Roeper; Peter Landres; Don Fisher

    2006-01-01

    Two days before the 8th World Wilderness Congress began in Alaska, nearly 200 government wildlands managers from 17 countries met to share ideas about common challenges and to explore ways to improve wildland stewardship globally. The goal for this Global Wilderness Seminar for Government Agencies was to lay the foundation for an operating peer network of government...

  16. Personal and social meanings of wilderness: Constructing and contesting places in a global village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2000-01-01

    Description: This paper takes a social constructionist approach to examine the nature and dynamics of personal and social meanings of wilderness. The paper builds on geographic and social theory to discuss the ways in which conflicts over the meaning and value of wilderness are significant consequences of modernization and globalization. The process of modernization...

  17. The role of wilderness experiences in leaders’ development toward authentic leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droffelaar, van Boy; Jacobs, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of leaders’ wilderness experiences on intentions to transform leadership behaviors toward authentic leadership. Design/methodology/approach – Content analysis was used on trail reports made by participants of a wilderness-based

  18. Twenty-eight years of wilderness campsite monitoring in Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurel Boyers; Mark Fincher; Jan van Wagtendonk

    2000-01-01

    The research, resource management and wilderness staffs in Yosemite National Park recently completed the third 10-year cycle of a wilderness campsite impact monitoring program. Initial results indicate an overall improvement in conditions due to a strong restoration program, decreased use and increased visitor education. Lessons learned point to the necessity for ample...

  19. A screening procedure to evaluate air pollution effects on Class I wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Fox; Ann M. Bartuska; James G. Byrne; Ellis Cowling; Richard Fisher; Gene E. Likens; Steven E. Lindberg; Rick A. Linthurst; Jay Messer; Dale S. Nichols

    1989-01-01

    This screening procedure is intended to help wilderness managers conduct "adverse impact determinations" as part of Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) applications for sources that emit air pollutants that might impact Class I wildernesses. The process provides an initial estimate of susceptibility to critical loadings for sulfur, nitrogen, and...

  20. Perspectives from the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: The Wildland Research institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; H. Ken Cordell; Neelam C. Poudyal

    2014-01-01

    The Wildland Research Institute (WRi) at the University of Leeds (UK) came into being in October 2009. Its origins go back to a United Kingdom research councilfunded seminar series called Wilderness Britain? which ran between 1998 and 2000 and was coordinated from the University of Leeds. This opened up the wider debate on wilderness and rewilding in the UK and later...

  1. Citizen monitoring and restoration: Volunteers and community involvement in wilderness stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie Yung

    2007-01-01

    Citizen monitoring and restoration is increasingly viewed as a means to involve local communities in wilderness stewardship. This paper examines research on volunteers participating in five monitoring and restoration programs in Western Montana. Volunteers reported that they gained valuable skills, felt more connected with local wilderness areas, and made an important...

  2. Visitor use density and wilderness experience: proceedings; 2000 June 13; Missoula, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne A. Freimund; David N. Cole

    2001-01-01

    The workshop was convened to assess progress and offer further ideas regarding scientific contributions to (1) understanding relationships between visitor use density and wilderness experiences and (2) applying such knowledge to decisions about use limitation in wilderness and parks. The first paper provides an overview of the topic and the papers presented at the...

  3. Continued wilderness participation: Experience and identity as long-term relational phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Brooks; Daniel R. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between wilderness outings and the resulting experience has been a central theme in resource-based, outdoor recreation research for nearly 50 years. The authors provide a review and synthesis of literature that examines how people, over time, build relationships with wilderness places and express their identities as consequences of...

  4. The evolving role of science in wilderness to our understanding of ecosystems and landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman L. Christensen

    2000-01-01

    Research in wilderness areas (areas with minimal human activity and of large spatial extent) formed the foundation for ecological models and theories that continue to shape our understanding how ecosystems change through time, how ecological communities are structured and how ecosystems function. By the middle of this century, large expanses of wilderness had become...

  5. Protection of the wilderness and aesthetic values of Antarctica: Geographical Information Systems (GIS) as a tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert Summerson; Tina Tin

    2011-01-01

    Antarctica is designated by the Antarctic Treaty System as a "natural reserve devoted to peace and science" (http://www.ats.aq/index_e.htm). Multiple, and sometimes conflicting, values are protected. In a place where wilderness protection and certain forms of human activity are both prized, a discussion of the protection of the Antarctic wilderness...

  6. The National Outdoor Leadership School's Wilderness Guide: The Classic Handbook. Revised and Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Mark

    The National Outdoor Leadership School, located in Lander, Wyoming, is considered a leader in wilderness education. In addition to teaching the skills needed in various outdoor sports and activities, equal importance is given to teaching what to do in emergencies, how to communicate, and how to lead. This updated wilderness guide covers technical…

  7. Gaps and opportunities for the World Heritage Convention to contribute to global wilderness conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, James R; Kormos, Cyril; Jaeger, Tilman; Venter, Oscar; Bertzky, Bastian; Shi, Yichuan; Mackey, Brendan; van Merm, Remco; Osipova, Elena; Watson, James E M

    2018-02-01

    Wilderness areas are ecologically intact landscapes predominantly free of human uses, especially industrial-scale activities that result in substantial biophysical disturbance. This definition does not exclude land and resource use by local communities who depend on such areas for subsistence and bio-cultural connections. Wilderness areas are important for biodiversity conservation and sustain key ecological processes and ecosystem services that underpin planetary life-support systems. Despite these widely recognized benefits and values of wilderness, they are insufficiently protected and are consequently being rapidly eroded. There are increasing calls for multilateral environmental agreements to make a greater and more systematic contribution to wilderness conservation before it is too late. We created a global map of remaining terrestrial wilderness following the established last-of-the-wild method, which identifies the 10% of areas with the lowest human pressure within each of Earth's 62 biogeographic realms and identifies the 10 largest contiguous areas and all contiguous areas >10,000 km 2 . We used our map to assess wilderness coverage by the World Heritage Convention and to identify gaps in coverage. We then identified large nationally designated protected areas with good wilderness coverage within these gaps. One-quarter of natural and mixed (i.e., sites of both natural and cultural value) World Heritage Sites (WHS) contained wilderness (total of 545,307 km 2 ), which is approximately 1.8% of the world's wilderness extent. Many WHS had excellent wilderness coverage, for example, the Okavango Delta in Botswana (11,914 km 2 ) and the Central Suriname Nature Reserve (16,029 km 2 ). However, 22 (35%) of the world's terrestrial biorealms had no wilderness representation within WHS. We identified 840 protected areas of >500 km 2 that were predominantly wilderness (>50% of their area) and represented 18 of the 22 missing biorealms. These areas offer a starting

  8. National Key Deer, Key West, and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges, Florida Keys: A Wilderness Fellows Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  9. Report on the 2011 Wilderness Fellow Initiative : Implementing wilderness character monitoring in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuge System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the background, process, results, lessons learned, and recommendations from the 2011 Wilderness Fellows Initiative. This initiative was a new...

  10. [Record of Decision for 1985 Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Statement and Wilderness Review: Supporting Documents For Wilderness Proposal Package

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains the record of decision for the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan/Environmental Impact Statement/ Wilderness...

  11. Report of findings: Contaminant study of the environment surrounding the Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site (Cape Romanzof) contains many petroleum-related spills and hazardous substances. Therefore, in 1987 and 1988 a field study...

  12. Waterfowl population and habitat study, Kenai National Moose Range, Kenai, Alaska: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During the period between May 27 and August 28, 1961, a waterfowl population and habitat study was conducted on the Kenai National Moose Range by personnel of the...

  13. The largest reference range study for hematological parameters from Turkey: A case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Nilgün Tekkeşin; Hüseyin Bekoz; Faruk Tükenmez

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Accurate, reliable laboratory reference ranges are essential for effective clinical evaluation and monitoring. We present robust reference ranges established for hematology parameters using the Sysmex XT2000i analyzer. Methods: Blood samples were taken from 17409 healthy adults (19 to 49 years, 51.4% men and 48.6% women) and routine hematology analysis performed. Patients were assessed as healthy on the basis of a medical history and routine medical examinations. Serum hematini...

  14. Wilderness experience in Rocky Mountain National Park 2002; report to respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Elke; Johnson, S. Shea; Taylor, Jonathan G.

    2003-01-01

    A substantial amount of backcountry (about 250,000 acres) in Rocky Mountain National Park [RMNP of the Park] may be designated as wilderness areas in the coming years. Currently, over 3 million visitors drives through the park on Trail Ridge Road, camp in designated campgrounds, day hike, etc. each year. Many of those visitors also report using the backcountry-wilderness areas that are not easily accessible by roads or trails. Use of the backcountry is growing at RMNP and is accompanied by changing visitor expectations and preferences for wilderness management. For these reasons it is of great importance for the Park to periodically assess what types of environments and conditions wilderness users seek to facilitate a quality experience. To assist in this effort, the Political Analysis and Science Assistance [PSAS] program / Fort Collins Center / U.S. Geological Survey, in close collaboration with personnel and volunteers from RMNP, as well as the Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism [NRRT] Department at Colorado State University, launched a research effort in the summer of 2002 to investigate visitorsa?? wilderness experiences in the Park. Specifically, the purpose of this research was: (1) To determine what constitutes a wilderness experience; (2) To identify important places, visual features, and sounds essential to a quality wilderness experience and; (3) To determine what aspects may detract from wilderness experience. Thus, answers to these questions should provide insight for Park managers about visitorsa?? expectation for wilderness recreation and the conditions they seek for quality wilderness experiences. Ultimately, this information can be used to support wilderness management decisions within RMNP. The social science technique of Visitor Employed Photography [VEP] was used to obtain information from visitors about wilderness experiences. Visitors were selected at random from Park-designated wilderness trails, in proportion to their use, and asked to

  15. The Effect of Protected Wilderness Spaces on Local Human Population

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Drew; Duda, Kaylyn; Brosch, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to analyze the effect that protected wilderness areas have on local human populations through the use of GIS. Using data from Northern Tanzania and from Virginia we hope to discover the degree and kind of difference between these two very different areas. Our current theory based on accounts by people who have traveled in the respective regions is that in Tanzania the protected areas have forced people to move and change their habits and home places whereas in Virg...

  16. Normal range of facial asymmetry in spherical coordinates: a CBCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Suk-Ja; Wang, Rui-Feng; Na, Hee Ja; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to measure the bilateral differences of facial lines in spherical coordinates from faces within a normal range of asymmetry utilizing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT scans from 22 females with normal symmetric-looking faces (mean age 24 years and 8 months) were selected for the study. The average menton deviation was 1.01±0.66 mm. The spherical coordinates, length, and midsagittal and coronal inclination angles of the ramal and mandibular lines were calculated from CBCT. The bilateral differences in the facial lines were determined. All of the study subjects had minimal bilateral differences of facial lines. The normal range of facial asymmetry of the ramal and mandibular lines was obtained in spherical coordinates. The normal range of facial asymmetry in the spherical coordinate system in this study should be useful as a reference for diagnosing facial asymmetry.

  17. Normal range of facial asymmetry in spherical coordinates: a CBCT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Rui Feng [Research Laboratory Specialist Intermediate, Department of Biologic and Material Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Na, Hee Ja [Dept. ofDental Hygiene, Honam University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Palomo, Juan Matin [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2013-03-15

    This study aimed to measure the bilateral differences of facial lines in spherical coordinates from faces within a normal range of asymmetry utilizing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT scans from 22 females with normal symmetric-looking faces (mean age 24 years and 8 months) were selected for the study. The average menton deviation was 1.01{+-}0.66 mm. The spherical coordinates, length, and midsagittal and coronal inclination angles of the ramal and mandibular lines were calculated from CBCT. The bilateral differences in the facial lines were determined. All of the study subjects had minimal bilateral differences of facial lines. The normal range of facial asymmetry of the ramal and mandibular lines was obtained in spherical coordinates. The normal range of facial asymmetry in the spherical coordinate system in this study should be useful as a reference for diagnosing facial asymmetry.

  18. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  19. Theoretical study of loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Blanco, Sonia Maria; Pollnau, Markus; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    In this paper, a theoretical study of loss compensation in long-range dielectric loaded surface plasmon waveguides (LR-DLSPPs) is presented. Although extendable to other gain materials, rare-earth doped double tungstates are used as gain material in this work. Two different structures are studied

  20. The recovery and dynamics of submerged aquatic macrophyte vegeta­tion in the Wilderness lakes, southern Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Weisser

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1979 and 1981, the submerged aquatic macrophyte vegetation in the Wilderness lakes died back significantly, and in some areas disappeared altogether. This study documents the senescent phase and describes the recovery of the plant populations between May 1982 and May 1983. In two lakes, namely Langvlei and Eilandvlei, the plant biomass approximately doubled between the winters of 1982 and 1983. Seasonal changes in species composition are documented and possible factors accounting for the collapse and recovery of the plant populations are discussed.

  1. Barrier Island Breaching in Response to Extreme Storms: Morphodynamic Evolution of the Fire Island Wilderness Breach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T. R.; Miselis, J. L.; Hapke, C. J.; Van Ormondt, M.

    2016-02-01

    Barrier islands evolve and move landward in response to rising sea levels by transport of sediment from the ocean to the estuarine coast. One mechanism for this redistribution of sediment is the formation of island breaches. Breaches are generally ephemeral features and close through natural processes; those that do not close naturally are often filled to protect coastal infrastructure. As a result, there is limited understanding of the morphodynamics and natural evolution of breach systems. The Wilderness Breach, located within the Otis Pike High Dunes Federal Wilderness Area on Fire Island, NY, was formed during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 and has remained open, providing a rare opportunity to study the morphologic evolution of a natural breach. Bathymetric data from repeat surveys, shoreline positions, aerial imagery, wave buoy observations, and meteorological measurements were used to characterize the temporal and spatial evolution of breach morphology (width, shape, shoreline migration rate, volume, channel depth, orientation, etc.). Our analysis indicates that the initially 50-m-wide breach, grew rapidly as the western shoreline migrated. Sediment redistribution resulted in the development of a well-defined ebb delta and an extensive flood-shoal complex. Approximately 18 months after formation, breach morphology is governed by seasonal conditions, and the rate of growth has declined substantially. The use of various morphometrics has allowed for the development of a conceptual model of breach dynamics, which can be compared to a numerical morphologic model of the breach to assess model performance. Results provide insights on natural breach evolution that can be used to inform the management of breaches caused by future storm events.

  2. Time-reversed lasing in the terahertz range and its preliminary study in sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yun, E-mail: shenyunoptics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Huaqing [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Deng, Xiaohua [Institute of Space Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Guoping [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-02-05

    Time-reversed lasing in a uniform slab and a grating structure are investigated in the terahertz range. The results show that both the uniform slab and grating can support terahertz time-reversed lasing. Nevertheless, due to the tunable effective refractive index, the grating structure can not only exhibit time-reversed lasing more effectively and flexibly than a uniform slab, but also can realize significant absorption in a broader operating frequency range. Furthermore, applications of terahertz time-reversed lasing for novel concentration/thickness sensors are preliminarily studied in a single-channel coherent perfect absorber system. - Highlights: • Time-reversed lasing are investigated in the terahertz range. • The grating structure exhibit time-reversed lasing more effectively and flexibly than a uniform slab. • THz time-reversed lasing for novel concentration/thickness sensors are studied.

  3. Prognosis of chronic kidney disease with normal-range proteinuria: The CKD-ROUTE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Noda, Yumi; Sato, Hidehiko; Nomura, Naohiro; Sohara, Eisei; Okado, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2018-01-01

    Although lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and higher proteinuria are high risks for mortality and kidney outcomes, the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with normal-range proteinuria remains unclear. In this prospective cohort study, 1138 newly visiting stage G2-G5 CKD patients were stratified into normal-range and abnormal-range proteinuria groups. Study endpoints were CKD progression (>50% eGFR loss or initiation of dialysis), cardiovascular events, and all-cause death. In total, 927 patients who were followed for >6 months were included in the analysis. The mean age was 67 years, and 70.2% were male. During a median follow-up of 35 months, CKD progression, cardiovascular events, and mortality were observed in 223, 110, and 55 patients, respectively. Patients with normal-range proteinuria had a significantly lower risk for CKD progression (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.38) than those with abnormal-proteinuria by multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis. We also analyzed patients with normal-range proteinuria (n = 351). Nephrosclerosis was the most frequent cause of CKD among all patients with normal-range proteinuria (59.7%). During a median follow-up of 36 months, CKD progression, cardiovascular events, and mortality were observed in 10, 28, and 18 patients, respectively. The Kaplan-Meyer analysis demonstrated that the risks of CKD progression and cardiovascular events were not significantly different among CKD stages, whereas the risk of death was significantly higher in patients with advanced-stage CKD. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the risk of three endpoints did not significantly differ among CKD stages. Newly visiting CKD patients with normal-range proteinuria, who tend to be overlooked during health checkups did not exhibit a decrease in kidney function even in advanced CKD stages under specialized nephrology care.

  4. Model Study of Wave Overtopping of Marine Structure for a Wide Range of Geometric Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this paper is to enable estimation of wave overtopping rates for slopes/ramps given by a wide range of geometric parameters when subjected to varying wave conditions. To achieve this a great number of model tests are carried out in a wave tank using irregular...

  5. Study of Thai Language Oral Reading Problems for Students with Down Syndrome: Grade Range 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewchote, Nantawan; Chongchaikit, Maturos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the Thai Language Oral Reading Problems of students with Down syndrome, Grade Range1 at Watnonsaparam School, Saraburi Thailand in favor of Web Quest Lessons Development Enhancing Oral Reading Skills of Down syndrome Students. The research instruments were the 2 observation forms on Thai Language Reading…

  6. How the range effect contaminates control scores in studies of visual illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotopf, W H; Brown, S A

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between mean control scores and mean experimental scores in 23 experiments on alignment illusions has been examined. Evidence is presented to show that, through the operation of the range effect, control scores are biased to a significant degree in the direction of experimental scores. The implications of this are considered, not only as regards the value of control scores in psychophysical studies, but also as further evidence of the dangers of within-subjects experimental designs when issues depend upon the values of extreme points in a range of values.

  7. Experimental study on stabilizing range extension of diamagnetic levitation under modulated magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, T C S; Wong, P L; Liu, K P, E-mail: 50578230@student.cityu.edu.h, E-mail: meplwong@cityu.edu.h, E-mail: mekpliu@cityu.edu.h [Manufacturing Engineering and Engineering Management Department, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-01-01

    The real energy-free levitation exists with the help of diamagnetic material. Its ultra-high sensitivity to force is particularly attractive to micro/nano force sensing. A key parameter: Levitation Stabilizing Local Range, LR (allowable moving range of the floater) is critical to the load and self-rotating performance. Besides, larger LR reduces the energy loss due to the eddy current and has greater application potential. Recently, an idea of extending the LR by a modulating coil array has been validated using numerical simulation. This paper takes the next move to carry out an experimental study on the shape effect of stacked coil arrays with different currents on LR.

  8. Quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging. A statistical analysis of the normal range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, K.; Basugi, N.; Fukushima, T.; Tango, T.; Suzuki, I.; Kaminuma, T.; Kurashina, S.

    1987-07-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable.

  9. Fidelity susceptibility study of quantum long-range antiferromagnetic Ising chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gaoyong

    2017-10-01

    We study the fidelity susceptibility of a quantum antiferromagnetic Ising chain with a long-range power-law interaction 1 /rα using the large-scale density matrix renormalization group method. We find that the critical adiabatic dimension μ =2 and the critical exponent of the correlation length ν =1 for arbitrary α >0 , indicating all quantum phase transitions are second-order Ising transitions. In addition, we numerically determine the complete phase diagram for 0 work will shed light on the nature of phase transitions in the quantum long-range antiferromagnetic Ising chain from a quantum information perspective.

  10. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  11. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  12. Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  13. Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  14. Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  15. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Mollie Beattie: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  16. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  17. Huron National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  18. Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  19. Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  20. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  1. Island Bay National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  2. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Assateague Island: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  3. Blackbeard Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  4. Charles M. Russell and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  5. Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  6. Green Bay and Gravel Island National Wildlife Refuges, Wisconsin Islands: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  7. Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  8. Harney Lake National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  9. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  10. Mille Lacs National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  11. Passage Key National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  12. J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  13. Red Rocks National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  14. Wolf Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  15. Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  16. Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  17. West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  18. Pelican Islands National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  19. Big Lake National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  20. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge, Andreafsky and Nunivak: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  1. Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  2. Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, and Wilderness Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the final Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP), Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and Wilderness Review (WR) for the Yukon Flats National...

  3. Proposing New Wilderness Areas: Okefenokee, Pelican Islands, Island Bay, Cedar Keys, Passage Key, and Wichita Mountains

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — President Transmittal on the proposal of wilderness additions that include Okefenokee, Pelican Islands, Island Bay, Cedar Keys, Passage Key, and Wichita Mountains.

  4. Air quality and air quality related values in Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge and Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Chassahowitzka Wilderness Area is a Class I air quality area administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Despite the special protection mandated for...

  5. Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge: A Report on Wilderness Character Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the completed effort of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wilderness Fellows program to develop a monitoring strategy and evaluate the status of...

  6. Additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System : Part 1 [Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is one of the Presidential Transmittals proposing additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System. This particular transmittal focuses on the...

  7. [Letter and accompanying Bill proposing the creation of the Agassiz Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This reference contains both the letter, addressed to the Speaker of the House, proposing the creation of thirty-seven new wilderness areas, and the accompanying...

  8. Public participation in wilderness and backcountry litter control: a review of research and management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert M. Muth; Roger N. Clark

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Incentive System for Litter Control to wilderness and backcountry environments. Based on research, observation, and management experience, a set of procedures was developed and is presented here. Additional management considerations are discussed.

  9. Becharof National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Becharof Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  10. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Alaska Maritime Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  11. Wilderness experience in Rocky Mountain National Park 2002: Report to RMNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Elke; Johnson, S. Shea; Taylor, Jonathan G.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 250,000 acres of backcountry in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP or the Park) may be designated as wilderness use areas in the coming years. Currently, over 3 million people visit RMNP each year; many drive through the park on Trail Ridge Road, camp in designated campgrounds, or hike in front-country areas. However, visitors also report much use of backcountry areas that are not easily accessible by roads or trails. Use of the backcountry is growing at RMNP and is accompanied by changing visitor expectations and preferences for wilderness management. For these reasons it is of great importance for the Park to periodically assess what types of environments and conditions wilderness users seek, to help them facilitate a quality wilderness experience.

  12. Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup...

  13. Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Agassiz Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  14. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Charles M. Russell Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  15. St Marks National Wildlife Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for theSt. Marks Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  16. Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Pelican Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  17. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Okefenokee Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  18. Huron National Wildlife Refuge, Huron Islands Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Huron Islands Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  19. Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Crab Orchard Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  20. Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, Assateague Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the proposed Assateague Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for...

  1. West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the West Sister Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  2. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, Unimak Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Unimak Island Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  3. Wilder's Brigade in the Tullahoma and Chattanooga Campaigns of the American Civil War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harbison, Robert

    2002-01-01

    .... In 1863 General Rosecrans, commander of the Army of the Cumberland, authorized Wilder to mount the brigade on horseback and rearm it with Spencer repeating rifles, giving the brigade unsurpassed mobility and firepower...

  4. Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Michigan Islands Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  5. Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Chassahowitzka Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  6. J.N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the J.N. "Ding" Darling Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  7. Izembek National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Izembek Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  8. Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Cape Romain Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  9. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Moosehorn Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  10. Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Ceder Keys Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see...

  11. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Mingo Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  12. Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the back-end data file for the Kenai Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use (see reference...

  13. Efficacy and tolerability of orlistat in the treatment of obesity: a 6-month dose-ranging study. Orlistat Dose-Ranging Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gaal, L F; Broom, J I; Enzi, G; Toplak, H

    1998-04-01

    To determine the weight-reducing efficacy of orlistat, a novel gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor, and to define the optimal dosage regimen and establish the tolerability of the drug when used for a 6-month treatment period. The study was a multicentre randomised, double-blind, parallel group in design and involved 676 obese male and female subjects aged at least 18 years with a body mass index between 28 and 43 kg x m(-2) Following a 5-week placebo run-in period, subjects were randomised to receive orlistat 30 mg, 60 mg, 120 mg, 240 mg or matching placebo three times a day (tid) for 24 weeks during meals. Patients were maintained on a mildly hypocaloric diet throughout the study period. The primary efficacy parameter was body weight change over time. Orlistat resulted in a significantly greater mean loss of body weight than observed in the placebo group. In absolute terms, mean weight loss was greatest in the 120 mg group (9.8%). More orlistat- than placebo-treated patients lost > 10% of initial body weight (37% of the 120 mg group vs 19% of the placebo group). Orlistat was well tolerated. Predictably, in view of its known pharmacological effects, more orlistat-treated patients experienced gastrointestinal events. Mean levels of vitamins A, D and E, and beta-carotene remained within the clinical reference ranges in all treatment groups and rarely required supplementation. After 24 weeks, plasma concentrations of orlistat were either non-measurable or detected at the assay's limit of quantitation. Orlistat treatment results in a dose-dependent reduction in body weight in obese subjects and is well tolerated. Orlistat 120 mg tid represents the optimal dosage regimen.

  14. Study of the effect of short ranged ordering on the magnetism in FeCr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Ambika Prasad, E-mail: apjena@bose.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India); Sanyal, Biplab, E-mail: biplab.sanyal@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Mookerjee, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.mookerjee61@gmail.com [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2014-01-15

    For the study of magnetism in systems where the local environment plays an important role, we propose a marriage between the Monte Carlo simulation and Zunger's special quasi-random structures. We apply this technique on disordered FeCr alloys and show that our estimates of the transition temperature is in good agreement with earlier experiments. - Highlights: • The magnetism in FeCr is sensitively depended on the ordering of the atoms : disordered or with short ranged ordering. • This work uses the SQS technique suggested by Zunger has been used to generate various degrees of short range ordering in FeCr. • The electronic structure and pair energies have been obatined from first principles ASR and Lichtenstein methods. • The effect of chemical ordering on magnetic ordering is studied in detail. • Only those situations where the chemical ordering is complete have been studied.

  15. Study of identification of geometrically shaped solids using colour and range information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebihara, Kenichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    This report is the revision of the Technical Report (MECSE 1996-7) of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia which has been distributed to the Department Library in this University. The main work which is described in this report was carried out at Intelligent Robotics Research Center (IRRC) in the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering of Monash University from March in 1995 to March in 1996 and was be supported by a grant from Research Development Corporation of Japan (JRDC). This report describes the study of identification of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour using colour and range information. This study aims at recognition of equipment in nuclear plants. For this purpose, it is hypothesized that equipment in nuclear plants can be represented by combination of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour, such as a sphere, an ellipsoid, a cone, a cylinder, a rectangular solid and a pyramid. In this report, the colour image of geometrically shaped solids could be segmented comparatively easily and effectively into regions of each solid by using colour and range information. The range data of each solid was extracted using the segmented colour image. Thus the extracted range data could be classified into a plane surface or a curved surface by checking its spatial distribution. (author)

  16. Effectiveness of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) in Improving Shoulder Range of Motion. A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olędzka, Marianna; Jaczewska-Bogacka, Joanna

    2017-05-10

    [b]Background.[/b] Subacromial impingement syndrome is a condition of the shoulder girdle which limits daily activities. It is worth seeking fast and effective treatment options. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of single-session proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) therapy on the shoulder range of motion and pain level in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.[b]Materials and methods. [/b]The experimental group consisted of 11 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome who had undergone therapy based on the PNF concept. A control group consisted of 12 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome who had undergone laser therapy, magnetic field therapy and local cryotherapy. Both before and after the therapeutic interventions, the painless passive and active ranges of abduction, flexion, and external and internal rotation of the shoulder joint were measured on the same day with the use of a goniometer and measuring tape. Patients also evaluated their pain levels. They were asked to fill in DASH questionnaires in order to evaluate their baseline functional status. Nonparametric tests were used for the statistical analysis.[b]Results:[/b] After single-session PNF therapy, the mean shoulder range of motion increased by 15° (active) and 14° (passive). Active abduction improved by 13° and passive abduction by 18°. The ranges of active and passive external rotation increased by 8° and 7°, respectively. Active and passive internal rotation increased by 4°. 73% of patients who underwent the therapy stated that their pain had decreased. The magnetic field therapy, laser therapy and cryotherapy alone did not contribute to increased ranges of motion.[b]Conclusions.[/b] 1. Subacromial impingement syndrome significantly limits function in daily life. 2. Single-session therapy with the use of the techniques and patterns of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation can improve both the active and passive range of shoulder movement. 3

  17. Diurnal temperature range and childhood asthma: a time-series study

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhiwei; Huang, Cunrui; SU, HONG; Turner, Lyle R.; Qiao, Zhen; Tong, Shilu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hot and cold temperatures have been associated with childhood asthma. However, the relationship between daily temperature variation and childhood asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to examine the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and childhood asthma. Methods A Poisson generalized linear model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the relationship between DTR and emergency department admissions for childhood asthma in B...

  18. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study

    OpenAIRE

    Adie Sam; Ko Victoria; Naylor Justine M; Gaskin Clive; Walker Richard; Harris Ian A; Mittal Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methods Design: Methodolo...

  19. Study of Long-range Collisions and Wire Compensation for Tevatron Run-II

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Erdelyi, B; Boocha, V

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes studies of long-range collisions and their compensation by current carrying wires for the Tevatron Run-II, which were performed during a two-week stay at Fermilab, February 22 to March 8, 2004. The weak-strong code WSDIFF was significantly extended to simulate the actual long-range encounters at the Tevatron for different antiproton bunches in the train at injection and in collision. Tune footprints and diffusive apertures simulated by this code are presented for various cases, differing in the bunch position, the energy, the number of long-range and head-on collisions, the presence of additional compensating wires and the momentum deviation. It is confirmed that the solution of 4 wires for injection, previously found by B. Erdelyi, raises the dynamic aperture, by about 1.0-1.5sigma. For both injection and collision an ideal compensation of the 6 or 3 closest long-range encounters was modeled, by removing these collisions altogether. At collision, an improvement in the dynamic aperture ...

  20. Investigation of Sylvatic Typhus at a Wilderness Camp

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-06-30

    In this podcast, Dr. Greg Dasch discusses an outbreak of four cases of sylvatic typhus that occurred at a wilderness camp in Pennsylvania. Sylvatic typhus is very rare in the United States, with only 41 cases since it was discovered in the United States in 1975. Lab work at CDC and the discovery that all four camp counselors who became ill had slept in the same bunk at the camp between 2004 and 2006 ultimately led to confirmation that flying squirrels living in the wall of the cabin were to blame for the illnesses.  Created: 6/30/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 6/30/2009.

  1. Cenozoic exhumation history of South China: A case study from the Xuefeng Mt. Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yannan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Beihang; Zhao, Heng

    2018-01-01

    New apatite fission track (AFT) dating was applied to the Xuefeng Mt. Range and Yuanma Basin to constrain the Cenozoic exhumation process of the southeastern Yangtze Block, South China. The analyzed samples in this study have AFT ages ranging from 27.9 ± 2.5 to 61.5 ± 5.9 Ma, which are younger than the deposition or crystallization ages of the host rocks. The AFT analysis and thermal history modeling indicate that both the Xuefeng Mt. Range and the Yuanma Basin underwent significant exhumation during the early Cenozoic (ca. 60-40 Ma). These samples were rapidly exhumed to near the surface during this period. Our results suggest that an important tectonic event occurred along or near regional fault zones (e.g., the Qinhang Fault) in South China during the early Cenozoic (ca. 60-40 Ma). However, it is difficult to relate this event to the Eastern Sichuan fold belt, which is much older and is characterized by large-scale folding and thrusting. Combined with fieldwork in the Yuanma, Xupu, and Xinning basins, we refute the Cretaceous "Pan-Yangtze Basin" that was proposed to have been separated by the uplifted Xuefeng Mt. Range after the Late Cretaceous. The exhumation stage from ca. 60 Ma to 40 Ma was an important period during which plate movements across the eastern Asian and Pacific regions were reorganized. The early Cenozoic tectonothermal event in South China can be attributed to a change in the direction and speed of the subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate. An Oligocene-Miocene cooling event was also recorded in the eastern Xuefeng Mt. Range, which we tentatively attribute to the activity of dextral faults in this area as a far-field effect of the collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates.

  2. Short-range correlations studies in collisions of polarized nuclei at Nuclotron-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai H.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The status and prospects of 2-nucleon and 3-nucleon short range correlations (SRCs studies at Nuclotron-M (JINR are presented. This program is focused on the investigations of the spin part of SRCs with polarized deuteron beam from new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source which is under development at JINR. The wide experimental program on the systematic studies of the polarization effects in dp- elastic scattering, dp- nonmesonic breakup, dd → 3Hen(3Hp and d3He → p4He reactions sensitive to SRCs using both internal and extracted beam at Nuclotron-M is presented.

  3. [TSH-reference range of adults: results from the population-based study KORA F4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, K; Ittermann, T; Heier, M; Kirchberger, I; Völzke, H; Wallaschofski, H; Below, H; Nauck, M; Meisinger, C

    2014-02-01

    There is no valid nationwide reference value for Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) for German adults because of different iodine supply and different laboratory equipment, however, reference values for single regions of Germany have been defined. The aim of this study was to find a reference value for South Germany and to compare this with results of other population-based studies. 3080 individuals from the KORA-F4 study (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) at the age range of 32 to 81 years were examined regarding their thyroid characteristics (anamnesis, sonography and clinical chemistry). After excluding individuals with known as well as unknown thyroid disorders revealed by the KORA study, there were 710 thyroid-healthy individuals left to evaluate TSH-, fT3- and fT4-reference ranges. For thyroid-healthy men and women we evaluated a TSH-reference range of 0.52-3.60 mIU/l on Siemens Vista Analysers with a median of 1.49 mIU/l. We could not find any statistically significant influence of age or sex. Median iodine excretion in urine was 118.6 µg/g creatinine in our healthy population which is above the recommended target value of 100 µg/g. The TSH-reference value of the South German population is higher than the one assessed in the Northeast-German SHIP-study 10 years ago. For the definition of a TSH-reference value, population-based and apparatus-specific examinations are necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Charge ordering and long-range interactions in layered transitionmetal oxides: a quasiclassical continuum study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, Branko P.; Yu, Z.G.; Chernyshev, A.L.; Bishop, A.R.; Neto, A.H. Castro; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    1999-12-01

    The competition between long-range and short-range interactions among holes moving in an antiferromagnet (AF), is studied within a model derived from the spin density wave picture of layered transition metal oxides. A novel numerical approach is developed which allows one to solve the problem at finite hole densities in very large systems (of order hundreds of lattice spacings), albeit in a quasiclassical limit, and to correctly incorporate the long-range part of the Coulomb interaction. The focus is on the problem of charge ordering and the charge-phase diagram: at low temperatures four different phases are found, depending on the strength of the magnetic (dipolar) interaction generated by the spin-wave exchange, and the density of holes. The four phases are the Wigner crystal, diagonal shapes, a grid phase (horizontal-vertical stripe loops) and a glassy-clumped phase. In the presence of both in-plane and out-of-plane charged impurities the stripe ordering is suppressed, although finite stripe segments persist.At finite temperatures multiscale (intermittency) dynamics is found, reminiscent of that in glasses. The dynamics of stripe melting and its implications for experiments is discussed.

  5. Charge ordering and long-range interactions in layered transition metal oxides: A quasiclassical continuum study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojkovic, Branko P. [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Yu, Z. G. [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Chernyshev, A. L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Bishop, A. R. [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Castro Neto, A. H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Groenbech-Jensen, Niels [Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 and NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-08-15

    The competition between long-range and short-range interactions among holes moving in an antiferromagnet (AF) is studied within a model derived from the spin-density-wave picture of layered transition metal oxides.A novel numerical approach is developed that allows one to solve the problem at finite hole densities in very large systems (of the order of hundreds of lattice spacings), albeit in a quasiclassical limit, and to correctly incorporate the long-range part of the Coulomb interaction. The focus is on the problem of charge ordering and the charge phase diagram: at low temperatures four different phases are found, depending on the strength of the magnetic (dipolar) interaction generated by the spin-wave exchange and the density of holes. The four phases are the Wigner crystal, diagonal stripes, a grid phase (horizontal-vertical stripe loops), and a glassy-clumped phase. In the presence of both in-plane and out-of-plane charged impurities the stripe ordering is suppressed, although finite stripe segments persist. At finite temperatures multiscale (intermittency) dynamics is found, reminiscent of that in glasses. The dynamics of stripe melting and its implications for experiments is discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Spatiotemporal treadmill gait measurements using a laser range scanner: feasibility study of the healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, S; Ii, T; Koyama, S; Saitoh, E; Itoh, N; Ohtsuka, K; Katoh, Y; Shimizu, A; Tomita, Y

    2017-04-01

    Spatio-temporal parameters are typically used for gait analysis. Although these parameters are measured by sophisticated systems such as 3D motion capture system or optoelectronic bars, these systems cannot be deployed easily because of their high costs, large space requirements and elaborate set-up. The purpose of this study is to develope a system for measuring spatiotemporal gait parameters using a laser range scanner during treadmill gait. To calculate accurate spatiotemporal parameters, the differences between the laser range scanner measured values and the reference values obtained from a 3D motion capture system were investigated in thirty subjects. From measurements in time and position at foot contact/off, adjustments to compensate for the differences in time and position were derived. Then, to determine the validity of the proposed system, values from the proposed system and the reference system were compared in four additional subjects. The results indicate that the data from the laser range scanner demonstrate certain differences in time and position compared with reference values. However, when compensation values were introduced, each spatiotemporal parameter correlated well with the reference values. This newer system is smaller, is easier to deploy and requires less training than the 3D motion capture system.

  7. Study on The Extended Range Weather Forecast of Low Frequency Signal Based on Period Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.

    2016-12-01

    Although many studies have explored the MJO and its application for weather forecasting, low-frequency oscillation has been insufficiently studied for the extend range weather forecasting over middle and high latitudes. In China, low-frequency synoptic map is a useful tool for meteorological operation department to forecast extend range weather. It is therefore necessary to develop objective methods to serve the need for finding low-frequency signal, interpretation and application of this signal in the extend range weather forecasting. In this paper, method of Butterworth band pass filter was applied to get low-frequency height field at 500hPa from 1980 to 2014 by using NCEP/NCAR daily grid data. Then period analysis and optimal subset regression methods were used to process the low frequency data of 150 days before the first forecast day and extend the low frequency signal of 500hPa low-frequency high field to future 30 days in the global from June to August during 2011-2014. Finally, the results were test. The main results are as follows: (1) In general, the fitting effect of low frequency signals of 500hPa low-frequency height field by period analysis in the northern hemisphere was better than that in the southern hemisphere, and was better in the low latitudes than that in the high latitudes. The fitting accuracy gradually reduced with the increase of forecast time length, which tended to be stable during the late forecasting period. (2) The fitting effects over the 6 key regions in China showed that except filtering result over Xinjiang area in the first 10 days and 30 days, filtering results over the other 5 key regions throughout the whole period have passed reliability test with level more than 95%. (3) The center and scope of low and high low frequency systems can be fitted well by using the methods mentioned above, which is consist with the corresponding use of the low-frequency synoptic map for the prediction of the extended period. Application of the

  8. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility, practicability, and potential advantages/disadvantages of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in long range, subsonic transport aircraft of advanced design were studied. Both passenger and cargo-type aircraft were investigated. To provide a valid basis for comparison, conventional hydrocarbon (Jet A) fueled aircraft were designed to perform identical missions using the same advanced technology and meeting the same operational constraints. The liquid hydrogen and Jet A fueled aircraft were compared on the basis of weight, size, energy utilization, cost, noise, emissions, safety, and operational characteristics. A program of technology development was formulated.

  9. Climatic change and wildland recreation: Examining the changing patterns of wilderness recreation in response to the effects of global climate change and the El Nino phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Sasidharan

    2000-01-01

    Impacts of global climate change on the biophysical components of wilderness areas have the potential to alter their recreational utility of wilderness areas. Concomitantly, the frequency and patterns of both land-based and water-based wilderness recreation activities will be affected. Despite the difficulty of responding to the unclear dimensions of global climate...

  10. Expanding Our Horizons. Wilderness Education Association Proceedings of the National Conference on Outdoor Leadership (Estes Park, Colorado, February 18-20, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Maurice, Ed.; Hayashi, Aya, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents the proceedings of the Wilderness Education Association's 2005 National Conference on Outdoor Leadership. Following a brief history of the Wilderness Education Association (WEA), 21 conference papers are presented. Topics of the conference papers include: wilderness education curriculum, programs, history, environmental…

  11. Quantitative estimation of granitoid composition from thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data, Desolation Wilderness, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabine, Charles; Realmuto, Vincent J.; Taranik, James V.

    1994-01-01

    We have produced images that quantitatively depict modal and chemical parameters of granitoids using an image processing algorithm called MINMAP that fits Gaussian curves to normalized emittance spectra recovered from thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) radiance data. We applied the algorithm to TIMS data from the Desolation Wilderness, an extensively glaciated area near the northern end of the Sierra Nevada batholith that is underlain by Jurassic and Cretaceous plutons that range from diorite and anorthosite to leucogranite. The wavelength corresponding to the calculated emittance minimum lambda(sub min) varies linearly with quartz content, SiO2, and other modal and chemical parameters. Thematic maps of quartz and silica content derived from lambda(sub min) values distinguish bodies of diorite from surrounding granite, identify outcrops of anorthosite, and separate felsic, intermediate, and mafic rocks.

  12. Guiding concepts for park and wilderness stewardship in an era of global environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Richard J.; Cole, David N.; Yung, Laurie; Zavaleta, Erika S.; Aplet, Gregory H.; Chapin, F. Stuart; Landres, Peter B.; Parsons, David J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; White, Peter S.; Graber, David M.; Higgs, Eric S.; Millar, Constance I.; Randall, John M.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.; Woodley, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The major challenge to stewardship of protected areas is to decide where, when, and how to intervene in physical and biological processes, to conserve what we value in these places. To make such decisions, planners and managers must articulate more clearly the purposes of parks, what is valued, and what needs to be sustained. A key aim for conservation today is the maintenance and restoration of biodiversity, but a broader range of values are also likely to be considered important, including ecological integrity, resilience, historical fidelity (ie the ecosystem appears and functions much as it did in the past), and autonomy of nature. Until recently, the concept of "naturalness" was the guiding principle when making conservation-related decisions in park and wilderness ecosystems. However, this concept is multifaceted and often means different things to different people, including notions of historical fidelity and autonomy from human influence. Achieving the goal of nature conservation intended for such areas requires a clear articulation of management objectives, which must be geared to the realities of the rapid environmental changes currently underway. We advocate a pluralistic approach that incorporates a suite of guiding principles, including historical fidelity, autonomy of nature, ecological integrity, and resilience, as well as managing with humility. The relative importance of these guiding principles will vary, depending on management goals and ecological conditions.

  13. Study of Particle Motion in He II Counterflow Across a Wide Heat Flux Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Brian; Takada, Suguru; Guo, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Some discrepancy exists in the results of He II counterflow experiments obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV) when compared with those obtained using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV): using PIV, it was observed that tracer particles move at roughly half the expected normal fluid velocity, v_n/2, while tracer particles observed using PTV moved at approximately v_n. A suggested explanation is that two different flow regimes were examined since the range of heat flux applied in each experiment was adjacent but non-overlapping. Another PTV experiment attempted to test this model, but the applied heat flux did not overlap with any PIV experiments. We report on the beginnings of a study of solid {D}_2 particle motion in counterflow using PTV, and the heat flux range overlaps that of all previous visualization studies. The observed particle velocity distribution transitions from a two-peak structure to a single peak as the heat flux is increased. Furthermore, the mean value of one peak in the bi-modal distributions grows at approximately the same rate as v_n, while the mean value of the single-peak distributions grows at roughly 0.4v_n, in reasonable agreement with both previous experiments and with the suggested model.

  14. Study for online range monitoring with the interaction vertex imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Ch; Karakaya, Y.; Reithinger, V.; Rescigno, R.; Baudot, J.; Constanzo, J.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Rinaldi, I.; Rousseau, M.; Testa, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Ray, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ion beam therapy enables a highly accurate dose conformation delivery to the tumor due to the finite range of charged ions in matter (i.e. Bragg peak (BP)). Consequently, the dose profile is very sensitive to patients anatomical changes as well as minor mispositioning, and so it requires improved dose control techniques. Proton interaction vertex imaging (IVI) could offer an online range control in carbon ion therapy. In this paper, a statistical method was used to study the sensitivity of the IVI technique on experimental data obtained from the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center. The vertices of secondary protons were reconstructed with pixelized silicon detectors. The statistical study used the χ2 test of the reconstructed vertex distributions for a given displacement of the BP position as a function of the impinging carbon ions. Different phantom configurations were used with or without bone equivalent tissue and air inserts. The inflection points in the fall-off region of the longitudinal vertex distribution were computed using different methods, while the relation with the BP position was established. In the present setup, the resolution of the BP position was about 4–5 mm in the homogeneous phantom under clinical conditions (106 incident carbon ions). Our results show that the IVI method could therefore monitor the BP position with a promising resolution in clinical conditions.

  15. Normal range of cambridge low contrast test; a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Yekta, Abbas Ali; Heravian, Javad; Abdolahinia, Tahereh; Norouzi Rad, Reza; Asgari, Soheila; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the range of contrast sensitivity (CS) and its determinants in a normal population, Mashhad, Iran. In this cross-sectional population based study, 4,453 individuals were invited of whom 3,132 persons agreed to participate (response rate, 70.4%). CS data from 2,449 eligible individuals were analyzed. CS was determined using the Cambridge low contrast square-wave grating test, and its associations with age, gender, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) refractive error, were analyzed. Mean age of the participants was 29.1±17.3 (range, 4-89) years and 66.4% were female. Mean CS was 239.6±233.3 and 234.6±228.6 cps in right and left eyes, respectively. Mean binocular CS was 310.9±249.0 cps. Multiple linear regression showed that CS was inversely correlated with older age (β=-1.1, PCambridge low-contrast grating test reported herein may serve as a reference for the general population in Iran. Our findings can be used for both research and clinical applications, particularly for evaluations of the outcomes of refractive surgery. In the current study, CS was lower in older subjects, myopic individuals and patients with lower BCVA.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphisms across a species' range: implications for conservation studies of Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeb, L W; Templin, W D; Sato, S; Abe, S; Warheit, K; Park, J Y; Seeb, J E

    2011-03-01

    Studies of the oceanic and near-shore distributions of Pacific salmon, whose migrations typically span thousands of kilometres, have become increasingly valuable in the presence of climate change, increasing hatchery production and potentially high rates of bycatch in offshore fisheries. Genetics data offer considerable insights into both the migratory routes as well as the evolutionary histories of the species. However, these types of studies require extensive data sets from spawning populations originating from across the species' range. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been particularly amenable for multinational applications because they are easily shared, require little interlaboratory standardization and can be assayed through increasingly efficient technologies. Here, we discuss the development of a data set for 114 populations of chum salmon through a collaboration among North American and Asian researchers, termed PacSNP. PacSNP is focused on developing the database and applying it to problems of international interest. A data set spanning the entire range of species provides a unique opportunity to examine patterns of variability, and we review issues associated with SNP development. We found evidence of ascertainment bias within the data set, variable linkage relationships between SNPs associated with ancestral groupings and outlier loci with alleles associated with latitude. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Is self-massage an effective joint range-of-motion strategy? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Estêvão Rios; Cavanaugh, Mark Tyler; Frost, David Michael; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Increases in joint range of motion may be beneficial in both improving performance and reducing the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate short-term changes in passive hip flexion (HF) and extension (HE) after foam rolling (FR) and roller massage (RM) durations of 60 and 120s. Ten recreationally active men (27.6 ± 2.4 years old; 164.8 ± 6.6 cm; 62.2 ± 8.0 kg; 24.2 ± 2.1 m(2)/kg) were recruited for this study. Subjects performed foam rolling (FR) and roller massage (RM) on the hamstrings for 60 (FR60 and RM60) and 120 (FR120 and RM120) seconds. Significant differences between FR120 and RM60 were observed in both HF (p affect range-of-motion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spruce bark beetle in Sumava NP: A precedent case of EU Wilderness Protection, the role of NGOs and the public in wilderness protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaromir Blaha; Vojtech Kotecky

    2015-01-01

    Sumava National Park, in the Czech Republic, is, along with the adjacent Bayerischer Wald NP in Germany, one of the largest wilderness areas in Western and Central Europe. Mountain spruce forests here have been heavily influenced by natural disturbances. Following years of debate about conservation management in the national park, logging operations on the Czech side...

  19. Twentieth-century fire patterns in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area, Idaho/Montana, and the Gila/Aldo Leopold Wilderness Complex, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Rollins; Tom Swetnam; Penelope Morgan

    2000-01-01

    Twentieth century fire patterns were analyzed for two large, disparate wilderness areas in the Rocky Mountains. Spatial and temporal patterns of fires were represented as GIS-based digital fire atlases compiled from archival Forest Service data. We find that spatial and temporal fire patterns are related to landscape features and changes in land use. The rate and...

  20. The role of wilderness protection and societal engagement as indicators of well-being: An examination of change at the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson

    2011-01-01

    A societal decision to protect over 9 million acres of land and water for its wilderness character in the early 1960s reflected US wealth in natural resources, pride in the nation's cultural history and our commitment to the well-being of future generations to both experience wild nature and enjoy benefits flowing from these natural ecosystems. There is no...