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Sample records for range wdr neurons

  1. High Precision Sunphotometer using Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) Camera Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, J.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Chang, C. S.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Pistone, K.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Fahey, L.

    2016-12-01

    High Precision Sunphotometer using Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) Camera TrackingThe NASA Ames Sun-photometer-Satellite Group, DOE, PNNL Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, and NASA Goddard's AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) team recently collaborated on the development of a new airborne sunphotometry instrument that provides information on gases and aerosols extending far beyond what can be derived from discrete-channel direct-beam measurements, while preserving or enhancing many of the desirable AATS features (e.g., compactness, versatility, automation, reliability). The enhanced instrument combines the sun-tracking ability of the current 14-Channel NASA Ames AATS-14 with the sky-scanning ability of the ground-based AERONET Sun/sky photometers, while extending both AATS-14 and AERONET capabilities by providing full spectral information from the UV (350 nm) to the SWIR (1,700 nm). Strengths of this measurement approach include many more wavelengths (isolated from gas absorption features) that may be used to characterize aerosols and detailed (oversampled) measurements of the absorption features of specific gas constituents. The Sky Scanning Sun Tracking Airborne Radiometer (3STAR) replicates the radiometer functionality of the AATS-14 instrument but incorporates modern COTS technologies for all instruments subsystems. A 19-channel radiometer bundle design is borrowed from a commercial water column radiance instrument manufactured by Biospherical Instruments of San Diego California (ref, Morrow and Hooker)) and developed using NASA funds under the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The 3STAR design also incorporates the latest in robotic motor technology embodied in Rotary actuators from Oriental motor Corp. having better than 15 arc seconds of positioning accuracy. Control system was designed, tested and simulated using a Hybrid-Dynamical modeling methodology. The design also replaces the classic quadrant detector tracking sensor with a

  2. Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve results in rapid inhibition of the wide dynamic range neuronal response

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    Wang Wenxue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve has recently been reported to provide rapid short-term relief of pain in patients with various pathologies. Wide dynamic range (WDR neurons transmit nociceptive information from the dorsal horn to higher brain centers. In the present study, we examined the effect of a 2-min application of sciatic nerve pressure on WDR neuronal activity in anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats. Results Experiments were carried out on 41 male Sprague–Dawley albino rats weighing 160–280 grams. Dorsal horn WDR neurons were identified on the basis of characteristic responses to mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Acute pressure was applied for 2 min to the sciatic nerve using a small vascular clip. The responses of WDR neurons to three mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field were recorded before, and 2, 5 and 20 min after cessation of the 2-min pressure application on the sciatic nerve. Two-min pressure applied to the sciatic nerve caused rapid attenuation of the WDR response to pinching, pressure and brushing stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Maximal attenuation of the WDR response to pinching and pressure was noted 5 min after release of the 2-min pressure on the sciatic nerve. The mean firing rate decreased from 31.7±1.7 Hz to 13±1.4 Hz upon pinching (p p p Conclusions Our results indicate that acute pressure applied to the sciatic nerve exerts a rapid inhibitory effect on the WDR response to both noxious and innocuous stimuli. Our results may partially explain the rapid analgesic effect of acute sciatic nerve pressure noted in clinical studies, and also suggest a new model for the study of pain.

  3. Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve results in rapid inhibition of the wide dynamic range neuronal response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxue; Tan, Wei; Luo, Danping; Lin, Jianhua; Yu, Yaoqing; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Wangyeng; Wu, Buling; Chen, Jun; He, Jiman

    2012-12-04

    Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve has recently been reported to provide rapid short-term relief of pain in patients with various pathologies. Wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons transmit nociceptive information from the dorsal horn to higher brain centers. In the present study, we examined the effect of a 2-min application of sciatic nerve pressure on WDR neuronal activity in anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. Experiments were carried out on 41 male Sprague-Dawley albino rats weighing 160-280 grams. Dorsal horn WDR neurons were identified on the basis of characteristic responses to mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Acute pressure was applied for 2 min to the sciatic nerve using a small vascular clip. The responses of WDR neurons to three mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field were recorded before, and 2, 5 and 20 min after cessation of the 2-min pressure application on the sciatic nerve. Two-min pressure applied to the sciatic nerve caused rapid attenuation of the WDR response to pinching, pressure and brushing stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Maximal attenuation of the WDR response to pinching and pressure was noted 5 min after release of the 2-min pressure on the sciatic nerve. The mean firing rate decreased from 31.7±1.7 Hz to 13±1.4 Hz upon pinching (p < 0.001), from 31.2±2.3 Hz to 10.9±1.4 Hz (p < 0.001) when pressure was applied, and from 18.9±1.2 Hz to 7.6±1.1 Hz (p < 0.001) upon brushing. Thereafter, the mean firing rates gradually recovered. Our results indicate that acute pressure applied to the sciatic nerve exerts a rapid inhibitory effect on the WDR response to both noxious and innocuous stimuli. Our results may partially explain the rapid analgesic effect of acute sciatic nerve pressure noted in clinical studies, and also suggest a new model for the study of pain.

  4. Identification of Restriction Factors by Human Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screening of Viral Host Range Mutants Exemplified by Discovery of SAMD9 and WDR6 as Inhibitors of the Vaccinia Virus K1L−C7L− Mutant

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    Sivan, Gilad; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen C.; Martin, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) screens intended to identify host factors that restrict virus replication may fail if the virus already counteracts host defense mechanisms. To overcome this limitation, we are investigating the use of viral host range mutants that exhibit impaired replication in nonpermissive cells. A vaccinia virus (VACV) mutant with a deletion of both the C7L and K1L genes, K1L−C7L−, which abrogates replication in human cells at a step prior to late gene expression, was chosen for this strategy. We carried out a human genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in HeLa cells infected with a VACV K1L−C7L− mutant that expresses the green fluorescent protein regulated by a late promoter. This positive-selection screen had remarkably low background levels and resulted in the identification of a few cellular genes, notably SAMD9 and WDR6, from approximately 20,000 tested that dramatically enhanced green fluorescent protein expression. Replication of the mutant virus was enabled by multiple siRNAs to SAMD9 or WDR6. Moreover, SAMD9 and WDR6 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 knockout HeLa cell lines were permissive for replication of the K1L−C7L− mutant, in agreement with the siRNA data. Expression of exogenous SAMD9 or interferon regulatory factor 1 restricted replication of the K1L−C7L− mutant in the SAMD9−/− cells. Independent interactions of SAMD9 with the K1 and C7 proteins were suggested by immunoprecipitation. Knockout of WDR6 did not reduce the levels of SAMD9 and interactions of WDR6 with SAMD9, C7, and K1 proteins were not detected, suggesting that these restriction factors act independently but possibly in the same innate defense pathway. PMID:26242627

  5. Identification of Restriction Factors by Human Genome-Wide RNA Interference Screening of Viral Host Range Mutants Exemplified by Discovery of SAMD9 and WDR6 as Inhibitors of the Vaccinia Virus K1L-C7L- Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Gilad; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen C; Martin, Scott E; Moss, Bernard

    2015-08-04

    RNA interference (RNAi) screens intended to identify host factors that restrict virus replication may fail if the virus already counteracts host defense mechanisms. To overcome this limitation, we are investigating the use of viral host range mutants that exhibit impaired replication in nonpermissive cells. A vaccinia virus (VACV) mutant with a deletion of both the C7L and K1L genes, K1L(-)C7L(-), which abrogates replication in human cells at a step prior to late gene expression, was chosen for this strategy. We carried out a human genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen in HeLa cells infected with a VACV K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant that expresses the green fluorescent protein regulated by a late promoter. This positive-selection screen had remarkably low background levels and resulted in the identification of a few cellular genes, notably SAMD9 and WDR6, from approximately 20,000 tested that dramatically enhanced green fluorescent protein expression. Replication of the mutant virus was enabled by multiple siRNAs to SAMD9 or WDR6. Moreover, SAMD9 and WDR6 clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 knockout HeLa cell lines were permissive for replication of the K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant, in agreement with the siRNA data. Expression of exogenous SAMD9 or interferon regulatory factor 1 restricted replication of the K1L(-)C7L(-) mutant in the SAMD9(-/-) cells. Independent interactions of SAMD9 with the K1 and C7 proteins were suggested by immunoprecipitation. Knockout of WDR6 did not reduce the levels of SAMD9 and interactions of WDR6 with SAMD9, C7, and K1 proteins were not detected, suggesting that these restriction factors act independently but possibly in the same innate defense pathway. The coevolution of microbial pathogens with cells has led to an arms race in which the invader and host continuously struggle to gain the advantage. For this reason, traditional siRNA screens may fail to uncover important immune mechanisms if the pathogens

  6. Material basis for inhibition of Dragon's Blood on evoked discharges of wide dynamic range neurons in spinal dorsal horn of rats.

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    Guo, Min; Chen, Su; Liu, Xiangming

    2008-11-01

    In vivo experiments were designed to verify the analgesic effect of Dragon's Blood and the material basis for this effect. Extracellular microelectrode recordings were used to observe the effects of Dragon's Blood and various combinations of the three components (cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B) extracted from Dragon's Blood on the discharge activities of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in spinal dorsal horn (SDH) of intact male Wistar rats evoked by electric stimulation at sciatic nerve. When the Hill's coefficients describing the dose-response relations of drugs were different, based on the concept of dose equivalence, the equations of additivity surfaces which can be applied to assess the interaction between three drugs were derived. Adopting the equations and Tallarida's isobole equations used to assess the interaction between two drugs with dissimilar dose-response relations, the effects produced by various combinations of the three components in modulating the evoked discharge activities of WDR neurons were evaluated. Results showed that Dragon's Blood and its three components could inhibit the evoked discharge frequencies of WDR neurons in a concentration-dependent way. The Hill's coefficients describing dose-response relations of three components were different. Only the combined effect of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B and loureirin B was similar to that of Dragons Blood. Furthermore, the combined effect was synergistic. This investigation demonstrated that through the synergistic interaction of the three components Dragon's Blood could interfere with the transmission and processing of pain signals in spinal dorsal horn. All these further proved that the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B was the material basis for the analgesic effect of Dragon's Blood.

  7. Modulation of neuronal dynamic range using two different adaptation mechanisms

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    Wang, Lei; Wang, Ye; Fu, Wen-long; Cao, Li-hong

    2017-01-01

    The capability of neurons to discriminate between intensity of external stimulus is measured by its dynamic range. A larger dynamic range indicates a greater probability of neuronal survival. In this study, the potential roles of adaptation mechanisms (ion currents) in modulating neuronal dynamic range were numerically investigated. Based on the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model, which includes two different adaptation mechanisms, i.e. subthreshold and suprathreshold (spike-triggered) adaptation, our results reveal that the two adaptation mechanisms exhibit rather different roles in regulating neuronal dynamic range. Specifically, subthreshold adaptation acts as a negative factor that observably decreases the neuronal dynamic range, while suprathreshold adaptation has little influence on the neuronal dynamic range. Moreover, when stochastic noise was introduced into the adaptation mechanisms, the dynamic range was apparently enhanced, regardless of what state the neuron was in, e.g. adaptive or non-adaptive. Our model results suggested that the neuronal dynamic range can be differentially modulated by different adaptation mechanisms. Additionally, noise was a non-ignorable factor, which could effectively modulate the neuronal dynamic range. PMID:28469660

  8. Implication of Genetic Deletion of Wdr13 in Mice: Mild Anxiety, Better Performance in Spatial Memory Task, With Upregulation of Multiple Synaptic Proteins

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    Shiladitya Mitra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available WDR13 expresses from the X chromosome and has a highly conserved coding sequence. There have been multiple associations of WDR13 with memory. However, its detailed function in context of brain and behavior remains unknown. We characterized the behavioral phenotype of two months old male mice lacking the homologue of WDR13 gene (Wdr13-/0. Taking cue from analysis of its expression in the brain, we chose hippocampus for molecular studies to delineate its function. Wdr13-/0 mice spent less time in the central area of the open field test and with the novel object in novel object recognition test as compared to the wild-type. However, these mice didn’t show any significant changes in total time spent in arms or frequency of arm entries in elevated plus maze. In the absence of Wdr13, there was a significant upregulation of synaptic proteins, viz., SYN1, RAB3A, CAMK2A etc accompanied with increased spine density of hippocampal CA1 neurons and better spatial memory in mice as measured by increased time spent in target quadrant of Morris water maze during probe test. Parallel study from our lab has established c-JUN, ER α/ β and HDAC 1,3,7 as interacting partners of WDR13. WDR13 represses transcription from AP1 (c-JUN responsive and ERE (Estrogen Receptor Element promoters. We hypothesized that absence of Wdr13 would resulted in de-regulated expression of a number of genes including multiple synaptic genes leading to the observed phenotype. Knocking down Wdr13 in Neuro2a cell lines led to increased transcripts of Camk2a and Nrxn2 consistent with in-vivo results. Summarily, our data provides functional evidence for the role of Wdr13 in brain.

  9. Analysis list: Wdr5 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Wdr5 Muscle,Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr...5.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr5.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bios...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr5.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Wdr5.Muscle....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Wdr5.Pluripotent_stem_ce

  10. The conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex localises to the centrosome and ensures proper spindle length and orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Akiko; Morand, Agathe; Ikebe, Chiho; Frith, David; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Toda, Takashi, E-mail: takashi-toda@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2015-12-04

    The centrosome plays a pivotal role in a wide range of cellular processes and its dysfunction is causally linked to many human diseases including cancer and developmental and neurological disorders. This organelle contains more than one hundred components, and yet many of them remain uncharacterised. Here we identified a novel centrosome protein Wdr8, based upon the structural conservation of the fission yeast counterpart. We showed that Wdr8 constitutively localises to the centrosome and super resolution microscopy uncovered that this protein is enriched at the proximal end of the mother centriole. Furthermore, we identified hMsd1/SSX2IP, a conserved spindle anchoring protein, as one of Wdr8 interactors by mass spectrometry. Wdr8 formed a complex and partially colocalised with hMsd1/SSX2IP. Intriguingly, knockdown of Wdr8 or hMsd1/SSX2IP displayed very similar mitotic defects, in which spindle microtubules became shortened and misoriented. Indeed, Wdr8 depletion resulted in the reduced recruitment of hMsd1/SSX2IP to the mitotic centrosome, though the converse is not true. Together, we propose that the conserved Wdr8-hMsd1/SSX2IP complex plays a critical role in controlling proper spindle length and orientation. - Highlights: • Human Wdr8 is a centrosomal protein enriched in the proximal end of the centriole. • Wdr8 and hMsd1/SSX2IP form a complex conserved in fungi. • Depletion of Wdr8 results in shorter, tilted spindle microtubules. • Depletion phenotypes of Wdr8 are very similar to those of hMsd1/SSX2IP knockdown.

  11. Dynamic range and sensitivity adaptation in a silicon spiking neuron.

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    Shin, J; Koch, C

    1999-01-01

    We here propose an adaptive procedure that enables a spiking neuron, whether artificial or biological, to make optimal use of its dynamic range and gain.We discuss an analog electronic circuit implementation of this algorithm using a biologically realistic artificial "silicon" neuron. The adaptation procedure adapts the neuron's firing threshold and the sensitivity (or gain) of its current-frequency relationship to match the dc offset (or mean) and the dynamic range (or variance) of the time-varying somatic input current. The neuron extracts the minimum and maximum levels of the reconstructed somatic current signals from the cell's own spike trains. These are used to regulate the somatic leak conductance in order to shift the somatic current-frequency relation and to adjust a calcium-activated potassium conductance to change the dynamic range of the cell's somatic current-frequency relationship. We report experimental data from a test neuron--built using analog subthreshold CMOS VLSI technology--that shows the expected behavior.

  12. Analysis list: wdr-5 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available wdr-5 Embryo + ce10 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/wdr-5.1....tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/wdr-5.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/wdr...-5.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/wdr-5.Embryo.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/Embryo.gml ...

  13. Analysis list: Wdr61 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Wdr61 Muscle + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr61.1.ts...v http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr61.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wdr...61.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Wdr61.Muscle.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Muscle.gml ...

  14. Wdr68 requires nuclear access for craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyan Wang

    Full Text Available Wdr68 is a highly conserved scaffolding protein required for craniofacial development and left-right asymmetry. A Ras-Map3k-Wdr68-Dyrk1 signaling relay may mediate these and other diverse signaling events important in development and disease. While the sub-cellular localization of Wdr68 has been shown to be dependent on that of its interaction partners, it is not clear where Wdr68 activity is required during development. Here we show that while a GFP-Wdr68 fusion functionally substituted for craniofacial development in the zebrafish, that a Nuclear Export Signal (NES fusion protein (GFPNESWdr68 failed to support craniofacial development. As control for NES activity, we show that while GFP-Wdr68 exhibited a pan-cellular distribution in C2C12 cells, the GFPNESWdr68 fusion predominantly localized to the cell cytoplasm, as expected. Interestingly, while GFP-Wdr68 and RFP-Dyrk1a co-localized to the cell nucleus as expected based on the known sub-cellular localization for Dyrk1a, we found that the GFPNESWdr68 fusion redistributed RFP-Dyrk1a to the cell cytoplasm potentially disconnecting the Ras/Dyrk1 signal relay from further downstream targets. Consistent with a nuclear role in gene regulation, we also found that while a transcriptional activation domain fusion, CebpFlagWdr68, functionally substituted for endogenous Wdr68 for craniofacial development, that a transcriptional repression domain fusion, MadFlagWdr68, failed to support craniofacial development. Dyrk1b is required for myogenin (myog expression in differentiating mouse C2C12 cells and here we report that wdr68 is also important for myog expression in differentiating C2C12 cells. Using a C2C12 cell myog promoter-reporter system, we found that Wdr68 overexpression increased reporter activity while moderate expression levels of MadFlagWdr68 interfered with reporter activity. Taken together, these findings support a nuclear role for Wdr68-containing complexes.

  15. Gracile neurons contribute to the maintenance of neuropathic pain in peripheral and central neuropathic models.

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    Kim, Hee Young; Wang, Jigong; Gwak, Young Seob

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we compared the roles of gracile neurons in mechanically-induced neuropathic pain caused by spinal injury and L5 spinal nerve ligation in rats. Behavioral and electrophysiological methods were used to measure mechanical allodynia in the hindpaws, and excitability of the gracile neurons in the medulla, respectively. In the spinal hemisection and spinal contusion models, mechanical allodynia developed in both hindpaws and lasted over a month. Three weeks following the hemisection, gracile neurons identified as wide-dynamic-range (WDR) and low-threshold (LT) neurons, showed increased neuronal activity to non-noxious mechanical stimuli compared to control groups, whereas the spinal contusion groups did not show evoked activity (*pmodel, mechanical allodynia developed at the ipsilateral (injured) side of the hindpaw. In addition, WDR neuronal activity at the ipsilateral gracile neurons showed a significant increase with non-noxious mechanical stimuli, whereas the LT neurons did not show significant changes (*pmodel, a lesion of the gracile nucleus attenuated the mechanical allodynia in spinal nerve ligation models. The present data suggest that gracile neurons contribute to the maintenance of non-noxious mechanically-induced neuropathic pain in both hemisection- and ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Wdr5.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Wdr5.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Wdr5 All cell types SRX344974,SRX344975,...SRX344976,SRX023512,SRX023511,SRX213763,SRX213759 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Wdr5.AllCell.bed ...

  17. WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination.

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    Xie, Qingqing; Li, Zengpeng; Chen, Jianming

    2017-05-27

    WD40 repeat protein WDR5 is a core component of the Set/MLL histone methyltransferase complex which catalyzes histone H3 Lys4 trimethylation and activates gene transcription in human cells. WDR5 promotes Set/MLL complex assembly and mediates the complex binding to Lys4-dimethylated histone H3 tail. Most earlier studies report that WDR5 exerts profound effects on various cellular and organismal processes mainly through epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. However, the functions of WDR5 in lung cancer remain largely unknown. Here, we report that WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination in human lung cancer A549 cells. Overexpression of WDR5 dramatically increases p53 protein levels and its half-life in A549 cells, while depletion of WDR5 with WDR5-specific siRNAs significantly decreases p53 protein levels. We also observe that WDR5 is required for p53 induction in response to cisplatin treatment. Mechanistically, WDR5 colocalizes with p53 and inhibits p53 ubiquitination, resulting in p53 stabilization. Consequently, overexpression of WDR5 induces G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and knocking down WDR5 by siRNAs reduces the population at G1 phase. Furthermore, p53 expression levels is at least in part determined by the p53 positive regulator WDR5 in some cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that WDR5 is directly involved in p53 signaling pathway. Our studies provide a new insight into WDR5 functions in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. WDR62 overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Inoue, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Satoki; Fujita, Hidehiko; Funai, Kazuhito; Tanahashi, Masayuki; Niwa, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    Human WDR62, which is localized in the cytoplasm including the centrosome, is known to be responsible for primary microcephaly; however, the role of WDR62 abnormality in cancers remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to reveal the pathological role of WDR62 abnormality in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). We first examined the WDR62 mRNA expression level of LAC (n = 64) using a QRT-PCR analysis and found that WDR62 mRNA transcripts were significantly overexpressed in LAC (P = 0.0432, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). An immunohistochemical analysis for LAC (n = 237) showed that WDR62 proteins were also significantly overexpressed in LAC (P lung cancer cell line H1299. WDR62-overexpressing lung cancer cells exhibited an increase in cell growth. Moreover, the concurrent overexpression of WDR62 and TPX2, a WDR62-interacting protein that is also overexpressed in LAC, induced centrosome amplification in the lung cells. Finally, we disclosed that the concurrent overexpression of WDR62 and TPX2 is common in diverse human cancers, using data from the Cancer Genome Atlas. These results suggested that WDR62 overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with LAC and leads to an increase in the malignant potential of lung cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  20. Phase-coherence transitions and communication in the gamma range between delay-coupled neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barardi, Alessandro; Sancristóbal, Belen; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    Synchronization between neuronal populations plays an important role in information transmission between brain areas. In particular, collective oscillations emerging from the synchronized activity of thousands of neurons can increase the functional connectivity between neural assemblies by coherently coordinating their phases. This synchrony of neuronal activity can take place within a cortical patch or between different cortical regions. While short-range interactions between neurons involve just a few milliseconds, communication through long-range projections between different regions could take up to tens of milliseconds. How these heterogeneous transmission delays affect communication between neuronal populations is not well known. To address this question, we have studied the dynamics of two bidirectionally delayed-coupled neuronal populations using conductance-based spiking models, examining how different synaptic delays give rise to in-phase/anti-phase transitions at particular frequencies within the gamma range, and how this behavior is related to the phase coherence between the two populations at different frequencies. We have used spectral analysis and information theory to quantify the information exchanged between the two networks. For different transmission delays between the two coupled populations, we analyze how the local field potential and multi-unit activity calculated from one population convey information in response to a set of external inputs applied to the other population. The results confirm that zero-lag synchronization maximizes information transmission, although out-of-phase synchronization allows for efficient communication provided the coupling delay, the phase lag between the populations, and the frequency of the oscillations are properly matched.

  1. Phase-coherence transitions and communication in the gamma range between delay-coupled neuronal populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Barardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization between neuronal populations plays an important role in information transmission between brain areas. In particular, collective oscillations emerging from the synchronized activity of thousands of neurons can increase the functional connectivity between neural assemblies by coherently coordinating their phases. This synchrony of neuronal activity can take place within a cortical patch or between different cortical regions. While short-range interactions between neurons involve just a few milliseconds, communication through long-range projections between different regions could take up to tens of milliseconds. How these heterogeneous transmission delays affect communication between neuronal populations is not well known. To address this question, we have studied the dynamics of two bidirectionally delayed-coupled neuronal populations using conductance-based spiking models, examining how different synaptic delays give rise to in-phase/anti-phase transitions at particular frequencies within the gamma range, and how this behavior is related to the phase coherence between the two populations at different frequencies. We have used spectral analysis and information theory to quantify the information exchanged between the two networks. For different transmission delays between the two coupled populations, we analyze how the local field potential and multi-unit activity calculated from one population convey information in response to a set of external inputs applied to the other population. The results confirm that zero-lag synchronization maximizes information transmission, although out-of-phase synchronization allows for efficient communication provided the coupling delay, the phase lag between the populations, and the frequency of the oscillations are properly matched.

  2. An Exploration of the Range of Noise Intensity That Affects the Membrane Potential of Neurons

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    Rubin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity in the human brain occurs in a complex physiologic environment, and noise from all aspects in this physiologic environment affects all aspects of nervous-system function. An essential issue of neural information processing is whether the environmental noise in a neural system can be estimated and quantified in a proper way. In this paper, we calculated the neural energy to estimate the range of critical values of thermal noise intensity that markedly affect the membrane potential and the energy waveform, in order to define such a noisy environment which neuronal activity relies on.

  3. Electrophysiological characterization of spinal neurons in different models of diabetes type 1- and type 2-induced neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuelert, N; Gorodetskaya, N; Just, S; Doods, H; Corradini, L

    2015-04-16

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a devastating complication of diabetes. The underlying pathogenesis of DPN is still elusive and an effective treatment devoid of side effects presents a challenge. There is evidence that in type-1 and -2 diabetes, metabolic and morphological changes lead to peripheral nerve damage and altered central nociceptive transmission, which may contribute to neuropathic pain symptoms. We characterized the electrophysiological response properties of spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in three diabetic models. The streptozotocin (STZ) model was used as a drug-induced model of type-1 diabetes, and the BioBreeding/Worcester (BB/Wor) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat models were used for genetic DPN models. Data were compared to the respective control group (BB/Wor diabetic-resistant, Zucker lean (ZL) and saline-injected Wistar rat). Response properties of WDR neurons to mechanical stimulation and spontaneous activity were assessed. We found abnormal response properties of spinal WDR neurons in all diabetic rats but not controls. Profound differences between models were observed. In BB/Wor diabetic rats evoked responses were increased, while in ZDF rats spontaneous activity was increased and in STZ rats mainly after discharges were increased. The abnormal response properties of neurons might indicate differential pathological, diabetes-induced, changes in spinal neuronal transmission. This study shows for the first time that specific electrophysiological response properties are characteristic for certain models of DPN and that these might reflect the diverse and complex symptomatology of DPN in the clinic. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. P44/WDR77 restricts the sensitivity of proliferating cells to TGFβ signaling

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    Yi, Pengfei [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430022 (China); Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Gao, Shen [Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Gu, Zhongping [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Huang, Tao [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430022 (China); Wang, Zhengxin, E-mail: zhenwang@mdanderson.org [Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • P44/WDR77 causes proliferating cells to become non-responsive to TGFβ signaling. • P44/WDR77 down-regulates TβRII and TβR2 expression. • P44/WDR77 down-regulated TGFβ signaling correlates with lung tumorigenesis. - Abstract: We previously reported that a novel WD-40 domain-containing protein, p44/WDR77, drives quiescent epithelial cells to re-enter the cell cycle and plays an essential role for growth of lung and prostate cancer cells. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling is important in the maintenance of non-transformed cells in the quiescent or slowly cycling stage. However, both non-transformed proliferating cells and human cancer cells are non-responsive to endogenous TGFβ signaling. The mechanism by which proliferating cells become refractory to TGFβ inhibition is not well established. Here, we found that silencing p44/WDR77 increased cellular sensitivity to TGFβ signaling and that this was inversely correlated with decreased cell proliferation. Smad2 or 3 phosphorylation, TGFβ-mediated transcription, and TGFβ2 and TGFβ receptor type II (TβRII) expression were dramatically induced by silencing of p44/WDR77. These data support the hypothesis that p44/WDR77 down-regulates the expression of the TGFβ ligand and its receptor, thereby leading to a cellular non-response to TGFβ signaling. Finally, we found that p44/WDR77 expression was correlated with cell proliferation and decreased TGFβ signaling during lung tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that p44/WDR77 expression causes the non-sensitivity of proliferating cells to TGFβ signaling, thereby contributing to cellular proliferation during lung tumorigenesis.

  5. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  6. WDR62 is associated with the spindle pole and is mutated in human microcephaly

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    Nicholas, Adeline K; Khurshid, Maryam; Désir, Julie; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Cox, James J; Thornton, Gemma; Kausar, Rizwana; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim; Verloes, Alain; Passemard, Sandrine; Misson, Jean-Paul; Lindsay, Susan; Gergely, Fanni; Dobyns, William B

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a disorder of neurodevelopment resulting in a small brain1,2. We identified WDR62 as the second most common cause of MCPH after finding homozygous missense and frame-shifting mutations in seven MCPH families. In human cell lines, we found that WDR62 is a spindle pole protein, as are ASPM and STIL, the MCPH7 and MCHP7 proteins3–5. Mutant WDR62 proteins failed to localize to the mitotic spindle pole. In human and mouse embryonic brain, we found...

  7. WDR62 is associated with the spindle pole and is mutated in human microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Adeline K; Khurshid, Maryam; Désir, Julie; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Cox, James J; Thornton, Gemma; Kausar, Rizwana; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim; Verloes, Alain; Passemard, Sandrine; Misson, Jean-Paul; Lindsay, Susan; Gergely, Fanni; Dobyns, William B; Roberts, Emma; Abramowicz, Marc; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2010-11-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a disorder of neurodevelopment resulting in a small brain. We identified WDR62 as the second most common cause of MCPH after finding homozygous missense and frame-shifting mutations in seven MCPH families. In human cell lines, we found that WDR62 is a spindle pole protein, as are ASPM and STIL, the MCPH7 and MCHP7 proteins. Mutant WDR62 proteins failed to localize to the mitotic spindle pole. In human and mouse embryonic brain, we found that WDR62 expression was restricted to neural precursors undergoing mitosis. These data lend support to the hypothesis that the exquisite control of the cleavage furrow orientation in mammalian neural precursor cell mitosis, controlled in great part by the centrosomes and spindle poles, is critical both in causing MCPH when perturbed and, when modulated, generating the evolutionarily enlarged human brain.

  8. Wdr68 Mediates Dorsal and Ventral Patterning Events for Craniofacial Development.

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    Estibaliz Alvarado

    Full Text Available Birth defects are among the leading causes of infant mortality and contribute substantially to illness and long-term disability. Defects in Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP signaling are associated with cleft lip/palate. Many craniofacial syndromes are caused by defects in signaling pathways that pattern the cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs along the dorsal-ventral axis. For example, auriculocondylar syndrome is caused by impaired Endothelin-1 (Edn1 signaling, and Alagille syndrome is caused by defects in Jagged-Notch signaling. The BMP, Edn1, and Jag1b pathways intersect because BMP signaling is required for ventral edn1 expression that, in turn, restricts jag1b to dorsal CNCC territory. In zebrafish, the scaffolding protein Wdr68 is required for edn1 expression and subsequent formation of the ventral Meckel's cartilage as well as the dorsal Palatoquadrate. Here we report that wdr68 activity is required between the 17-somites and prim-5 stages, that edn1 functions downstream of wdr68, and that wdr68 activity restricts jag1b, hey1, and grem2 expression from ventral CNCC territory. Expression of dlx1a and dlx2a was also severely reduced in anterior dorsal and ventral 1st arch CNCC territory in wdr68 mutants. We also found that the BMP agonist isoliquiritigenin (ISL can partially rescue lower jaw formation and edn1 expression in wdr68 mutants. However, we found no significant defects in BMP reporter induction or pSmad1/5 accumulation in wdr68 mutant cells or zebrafish. The Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β signaling pathway is also known to be important for craniofacial development and can interfere with BMP signaling. Here we further report that TGF-β interference with BMP signaling was greater in wdr68 mutant cells relative to control cells. To determine whether interference might also act in vivo, we treated wdr68 mutant zebrafish embryos with the TGF-β signaling inhibitor SB431542 and found partial rescue of edn1 expression and

  9. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuronal long-range temporal correlations and avalanche dynamics are correlated with behavioral scaling laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palva, M.J.; Zhigalov, A.; Hirvonen, J.; Korhonen, O.; Palva, S.; Linkenkaer-Hansen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Scale-free fluctuations are ubiquitous in behavioral performance and neuronal activity. In time scales from seconds to hundreds of seconds, psychophysical dynamics and the amplitude fluctuations of neuronal oscillations are governed by power-law-form longrange temporal correlations (LRTCs). In

  11. WDR26 in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Novel Regulator of the P13K/AKT Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    chamber [19]. For the invasion assay, a 24-well transwell insert ( Corning Costar), coated with a thin-layer of growth factor-reduced Matrigel was...were used for the study. 1 ×106 of MDA- MB-231 cells expressing inducible EGFP, WDR123-661 and WDR295-661 in 100μl saline were implanted into the

  12. Tissue specific roles for the ribosome biogenesis factor Wdr43 in zebrafish development.

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    Chengtian Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate craniofacial development, neural crest cells (NCCs contribute to most of the craniofacial pharyngeal skeleton. Defects in NCC specification, migration and differentiation resulting in malformations in the craniofacial complex are associated with human craniofacial disorders including Treacher-Collins Syndrome, caused by mutations in TCOF1. It has been hypothesized that perturbed ribosome biogenesis and resulting p53 mediated neuroepithelial apoptosis results in NCC hypoplasia in mouse Tcof1 mutants. However, the underlying mechanisms linking ribosome biogenesis and NCC development remain poorly understood. Here we report a new zebrafish mutant, fantome (fan, which harbors a point mutation and predicted premature stop codon in zebrafish wdr43, the ortholog to yeast UTP5. Although wdr43 mRNA is widely expressed during early zebrafish development, and its deficiency triggers early neural, eye, heart and pharyngeal arch defects, later defects appear fairly restricted to NCC derived craniofacial cartilages. Here we show that the C-terminus of Wdr43, which is absent in fan mutant protein, is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its nucleolar localization and protein interactions in metazoans. We demonstrate that Wdr43 functions in ribosome biogenesis, and that defects observed in fan mutants are mediated by a p53 dependent pathway. Finally, we show that proper localization of a variety of nucleolar proteins, including TCOF1, is dependent on that of WDR43. Together, our findings provide new insight into roles for Wdr43 in development, ribosome biogenesis, and also ribosomopathy-induced craniofacial phenotypes including Treacher-Collins Syndrome.

  13. Wdr18 is required for Kupffer's vesicle formation and regulation of body asymmetry in zebrafish.

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    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available Correct specification of the left-right (L-R axis is important for organ morphogenesis. Conserved mechanisms involving cilia rotation inside node-like structures and asymmetric Nodal signaling in the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM, which are important symmetry-breaking events, have been intensively studied. In zebrafish, the clustering and migration of dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs is critical for the formation of the Kuppfer's vesicle (KV. However, molecular events underlying DFC clustering and migration are less understood. The WD-repeat proteins function in a variety of biological processes, including cytoskeleton assembly, intracellular trafficking, mRNA splicing, transcriptional regulation and cell migration. However, little is known about the function of WD-repeat proteins in L-R asymmetry determination. Here, we report the identification and functional analyses of zebrafish wdr18, a novel gene that encodes a WD-repeat protein that is highly conserved among vertebrate species. wdr18 was identified from a Tol2 transposon-mediated enhancer trap screen. Follow-up analysis of wdr18 mRNA expression showed that it was detected in DFCs or the KV progenitor cells and later in the KV at early somitogenesis stages. Morpholino knockdown of wdr18 resulted in laterality defects in the visceral organs, which were preceded by the mis-expression of Nodal-related genes, including spaw and pitx2. Examination of morphants at earlier stages revealed that the KV had fewer and shorter cilia which are immotile and a smaller cavity. We further investigated the organization of DFCs in wdr18 morphant embryos using ntl and sox17 as specific markers and found that the clustering and migration of DFC was altered, leading to a disorganized KV. Finally, through a combination of wdr18 and itgb1b morpholino injections, we provided evidence that wdr18 and itgb1b genetically interact in the laterality determination process. Thus, we reveal a new and essential role for WD

  14. Regulation of DNA replication and chromosomal polyploidy by the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferases

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    Fei Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication licensing occurs on chromatin, but how the chromatin template is regulated for replication remains mostly unclear. Here, we have analyzed the requirement of histone methyltransferases for a specific type of replication: the DNA re-replication induced by the downregulation of either Geminin, an inhibitor of replication licensing protein CDT1, or the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. We found that siRNA-mediated reduction of essential components of the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferase complexes including WDR5 or RBBP5, which transfer methyl groups to histone H3 at K4 (H3K4, suppressed DNA re-replication and chromosomal polyploidy. Reduction of WDR5/RBBP5 also prevented the activation of H2AX checkpoint caused by re-replication, but not by ultraviolet or X-ray irradiation; and the components of MLL complexes co-localized with the origin recognition complex (ORC and MCM2-7 replicative helicase complexes at replication origins to control the levels of methylated H3K4. Downregulation of WDR5 or RBBP5 reduced the methylated H3K4 and suppressed the recruitment of MCM2-7 complexes onto replication origins. Our studies indicate that the MLL complexes and H3K4 methylation are required for DNA replication but not for DNA damage repair.

  15. WDR36 variants in East Indian primary open-angle glaucoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhadip; Vishal, Mansi; Banerjee, Deblina; Sen, Abhijit; Ray, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of optic neuropathies with a complex genetic basis. To date, only the following four genes have been identified: viz. myocilin (MYOC), optineurin (OPTN), WD repeat domain 36 (WDR36), and neurotrophin 4 (NTF4). However, there are conflicting reports regarding the involvement of WDR36 in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). In the Asian population, mutations in WDR36 appear to play a minor role in POAG pathogenesis but polymorphic variants have been found to be associated with POAG, especially in patients with high tension glaucoma (HTG). The purpose of this study is to determine the role of WDR36 in East Indian POAG patients. To date, no other studies have yet examined this role. Methods Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1971050, rs1993465, rs13153937, rs10038177, rs11241095, rs10043631, rs10038058, rs10491424, rs17553936, and rs13186912) spanning almost the entire WDR36 gene were selected and their association with eastern Indian POAG patients was evaluated. Our study pool consisted of 323 POAG patients. Of these 116 were patients who had HTG with intraocular perssure (IOP) >21mmHg and 207 were found to be non-HTG patients (presenting IOPT) was found to be strongly associated with the HTG cases (OR=2.186; 95% CI=1.458–3.277; p=1.4×10−4). To increase the significance of the study, the SNP was genotyped in an additional 184 of the participants in the control group and it was observed that the SNP retained the association (OR=1.216; 95% CI=1.064–2.306; p=0.002). However, no haplotype was found to have any sustainable association with POAG. Based on the LD pattern and location of rs10038177, exon 5 of WDR36 was sequenced but no suspected disease-causing variant was detected. Conclusions Our study suggests a possible association between WDR36 SNP in a cohort of eastern Indian POAG patients who also have high intraocular pressure (IOP). This study needs to be further validated in a larger

  16. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

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    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1 signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic

  17. Intracisternal injection of palmitoylethanolamide inhibits the peripheral nociceptive evoked responses of dorsal horn wide dynamic range neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Abimael; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Javier; Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; Condés-Lara, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has a key role in pain modulation. Central or peripheral PEA can reduce nociceptive behavior, but no study has yet reported a descending inhibitory effect on the neuronal nociceptive activity of Aδ- and C-fibers. This study shows that intracisternal PEA inhibits the peripheral nociceptive responses of dorsal horn wide dynamic range cells (i.e., inhibition of Aδ- and C-fibers), an effect blocked by spinal methiothepin. These results suggest that a descending analgesic mechanism mediated by the serotonergic system could be activated by central PEA.

  18. Time Delay and Long-Range Connection Induced Synchronization Transitions in Newman-Watts Small-World Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay and long-range connection (LRC) probability have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs. PMID:24810595

  19. Analog VLSI Models of Range-Tuned Neurons in the Bat Echolocation System

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    Horiuchi Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bat echolocation is a fascinating topic of research for both neuroscientists and engineers, due to the complex and extremely time-constrained nature of the problem and its potential for application to engineered systems. In the bat's brainstem and midbrain exist neural circuits that are sensitive to the specific difference in time between the outgoing sonar vocalization and the returning echo. While some of the details of the neural mechanisms are known to be species-specific, a basic model of reafference-triggered, postinhibitory rebound timing is reasonably well supported by available data. We have designed low-power, analog VLSI circuits to mimic this mechanism and have demonstrated range-dependent outputs for use in a real-time sonar system. These circuits are being used to implement range-dependent vocalization amplitude, vocalization rate, and closest target isolation.

  20. WDR26 Haploinsufficiency Causes a Recognizable Syndrome of Intellectual Disability, Seizures, Abnormal Gait, and Distinctive Facial Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skraban, Cara M; Wells, Constance F; Markose, Preetha; Cho, Megan T; Nesbitt, Addie I; Au, P Y Billie; Begtrup, Amber; Bernat, John A; Bird, Lynne M; Cao, Kajia; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Denenberg, Elizabeth H; Douglas, Ganka; Gibson, Kristin M; Grand, Katheryn; Goldenberg, Alice; Innes, A Micheil; Juusola, Jane; Kempers, Marlies; Kinning, Esther; Markie, David M; Owens, Martina M; Payne, Katelyn; Person, Richard; Pfundt, Rolph; Stocco, Amber; Turner, Claire L S; Verbeek, Nienke E; Walsh, Laurence E; Warner, Taylor C; Wheeler, Patricia G; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilkens, Alisha B; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Robertson, Stephen P; Santani, Avni; van Gassen, Koen L I; Deardorff, Matthew A

    2017-07-06

    We report 15 individuals with de novo pathogenic variants in WDR26. Eleven of the individuals carry loss-of-function mutations, and four harbor missense substitutions. These 15 individuals comprise ten females and five males, and all have intellectual disability with delayed speech, a history of febrile and/or non-febrile seizures, and a wide-based, spastic, and/or stiff-legged gait. These subjects share a set of common facial features that include a prominent maxilla and upper lip that readily reveal the upper gingiva, widely spaced teeth, and a broad nasal tip. Together, these features comprise a recognizable facial phenotype. We compared these features with those of chromosome 1q41q42 microdeletion syndrome, which typically contains WDR26, and noted that clinical features are consistent between the two subsets, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of WDR26 contributes to the pathology of 1q41q42 microdeletion syndrome. Consistent with this, WDR26 loss-of-function single-nucleotide mutations identified in these subjects lead to nonsense-mediated decay with subsequent reduction of RNA expression and protein levels. We derived a structural model of WDR26 and note that missense variants identified in these individuals localize to highly conserved residues of this WD-40-repeat-containing protein. Given that WDR26 mutations have been identified in ∼1 in 2,000 of subjects in our clinical cohorts and that WDR26 might be poorly annotated in exome variant-interpretation pipelines, we would anticipate that this disorder could be more common than currently appreciated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. AAA-ATPase NVL2 acts on MTR4-exosome complex to dissociate the nucleolar protein WDR74

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    Hiraishi, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Nagahama, Masami, E-mail: nagahama@my-pharm.ac.jp

    2015-11-20

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a chaperone-like nucleolar ATPase of the AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) family, which exhibits a high level of amino acid sequence similarity with the cytosolic AAA-ATPase VCP/p97. These proteins generally act on macromolecular complexes to stimulate energy-dependent release of their constituents. We previously showed that NVL2 interacts with RNA processing/degradation machinery containing an RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1 and an exonuclease complex, nuclear exosome, and involved in the biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. These observations implicate NVL2 as a remodeling factor for the MTR4-exosome complex during the maturation of pre-ribosomal particles. Here, we used a proteomic screen and identified a WD repeat-containing protein 74 (WDR74) as a factor that specifically dissociates from this complex depending on the ATPase activity of NVL2. WDR74 shows weak amino acid sequence similarity with the yeast ribosome biogenesis protein Nsa1 and is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. Knockdown of WDR74 decreases 60S ribosome levels. Taken together, our results suggest that WDR74 is a novel regulatory protein of the MTR4-exsosome complex whose interaction is regulated by NVL2 and is involved in ribosome biogenesis. - Highlights: • WDR74 accumulates in MTR4-exosome complex upon expression of dominant-negative NVL2. • WDR74 is co-localized with NVL2 in the nucleolus. • WDR74, along with NVL2, is involved in the synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

  2. Dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods affects the relationship of the entrainment range to the coupling strength in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Wang, Man

    2017-11-01

    Living beings on the Earth are subjected to and entrained (synchronized) to the natural 24-h light-dark cycle. Interestingly, they can also be entrained to an external artificial cycle of non-24-h periods. The range of these periods is called the entrainment range and it differs among species. In mammals, the entrainment range is regulated by a main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) which is composed of 10 000 neurons in the brain. Previous works have found that the entrainment range depends on the cellular coupling strength in the SCN. In particular, the entrainment range decreases with the increase of the cellular coupling strength, provided that all the neuronal oscillators are identical. However, the SCN neurons differ in the intrinsic periods that follow a normal distribution in a range from 22 to 28 h. In the present study, taking the dispersion of the intrinsic neuronal periods into account, we examined the relationship between the entrainment range and the coupling strength. Results from numerical simulations and theoretical analyses both show that the relationship is altered to be paraboliclike if the intrinsic neuronal periods are nonidentical, and the maximal entrainment range is obtained with a suitable coupling strength. Our results shed light on the role of the cellular coupling in the entrainment ability of the SCN network.

  3. Characterization of long-range functional connectivity in epileptic networks by neuronal spike-triggered local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopour, Beth A.; Staba, Richard J.; Stern, John M.; Fried, Itzhak; Ringach, Dario L.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Quantifying the relationship between microelectrode-recorded multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) in distinct brain regions can provide detailed information on the extent of functional connectivity in spatially widespread networks. These methods are common in studies of cognition using non-human animal models, but are rare in humans. Here we applied a neuronal spike-triggered impulse response to electrophysiological recordings from the human epileptic brain for the first time, and we evaluate functional connectivity in relation to brain areas supporting the generation of seizures. Approach. Broadband interictal electrophysiological data were recorded from microwires adapted to clinical depth electrodes that were implanted bilaterally using stereotactic techniques in six presurgical patients with medically refractory epilepsy. MUA and LFPs were isolated in each microwire, and we calculated the impulse response between the MUA on one microwire and the LFPs on a second microwire for all possible MUA/LFP pairs. Results were compared to clinical seizure localization, including sites of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges. Main results. We detected significant interictal long-range functional connections in each subject, in some cases across hemispheres. Results were consistent between two independent datasets, and the timing and location of significant impulse responses reflected anatomical connectivity. However, within individual subjects, the spatial distribution of impulse responses was unique. In two subjects with clear seizure localization and successful surgery, the epileptogenic zone was associated with significant impulse responses. Significance. The results suggest that the spike-triggered impulse response can provide valuable information about the neuronal networks that contribute to seizures using only interictal data. This technique will enable testing of specific hypotheses regarding functional connectivity

  4. Characterization of long-range functional connectivity in epileptic networks by neuronal spike-triggered local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopour, Beth A; Staba, Richard J; Stern, John M; Fried, Itzhak; Ringach, Dario L

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the relationship between microelectrode-recorded multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) in distinct brain regions can provide detailed information on the extent of functional connectivity in spatially widespread networks. These methods are common in studies of cognition using non-human animal models, but are rare in humans. Here we applied a neuronal spike-triggered impulse response to electrophysiological recordings from the human epileptic brain for the first time, and we evaluate functional connectivity in relation to brain areas supporting the generation of seizures. Broadband interictal electrophysiological data were recorded from microwires adapted to clinical depth electrodes that were implanted bilaterally using stereotactic techniques in six presurgical patients with medically refractory epilepsy. MUA and LFPs were isolated in each microwire, and we calculated the impulse response between the MUA on one microwire and the LFPs on a second microwire for all possible MUA/LFP pairs. Results were compared to clinical seizure localization, including sites of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges. We detected significant interictal long-range functional connections in each subject, in some cases across hemispheres. Results were consistent between two independent datasets, and the timing and location of significant impulse responses reflected anatomical connectivity. However, within individual subjects, the spatial distribution of impulse responses was unique. In two subjects with clear seizure localization and successful surgery, the epileptogenic zone was associated with significant impulse responses. The results suggest that the spike-triggered impulse response can provide valuable information about the neuronal networks that contribute to seizures using only interictal data. This technique will enable testing of specific hypotheses regarding functional connectivity in epilepsy and the relationship between

  5. WDR8 is a centriolar satellite and centriole-associated protein that promotes ciliary vesicle docking during ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Wang, Wenbo; Ruppert, Thomas; Neuner, Annett; Cerikan, Berati; Viol, Linda; Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gruss, Oliver J; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-02-01

    Ciliogenesis initiates at the mother centriole through a series of events that include membrane docking, displacement of cilia-inhibitory proteins and axoneme elongation. Centriolar proteins, in particular at distal and subdistal appendages, carry out these functions. Recently, cytoplasmic complexes named centriolar satellites have also been shown to promote ciliogenesis. Little is known about the functional and molecular relationship between appendage proteins, satellites and cilia biogenesis. Here, we identified the WD-repeat protein 8 (WDR8, also known as WRAP73) as a satellite and centriolar component. We show that WDR8 interacts with the satellite proteins SSX2IP and PCM1 as well as the centriolar proximal end component Cep135. Cep135 is required for the recruitment of WDR8 to centrioles. Depletion experiments revealed that WDR8 and Cep135 have strongly overlapping functions in ciliogenesis. Both are indispensable for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole and for unlocking the distal end of the mother centriole from the ciliary inhibitory complex CP110-Cep97. Our data thus point to an important function of centriolar proximal end proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis, and establish WDR8 and Cep135 as two factors that are essential for the initial steps of ciliation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Microcephaly Proteins Wdr62 and Aspm Define a Mother Centriole Complex Regulating Centriole Biogenesis, Apical Complex, and Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Divya; Kodani, Andrew; Gonzalez, Dilenny M; Mancias, Joseph D; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Vagnoni, Cristiana; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Harper, J Wade; Reiter, Jeremy F; Yu, Timothy W; Bae, Byoung-Il; Walsh, Christopher A

    2016-11-23

    Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins dramatically decrease the size of the human brain. We show that Aspm (abnormal spindle-like, microcephaly-associated) and Wdr62 (WD repeat-containing protein 62) interact genetically to control brain size, with mice lacking Wdr62, Aspm, or both showing gene dose-related centriole duplication defects that parallel the severity of the microcephaly and increased ectopic basal progenitors, suggesting premature delamination from the ventricular zone. Wdr62 and Aspm localize to the proximal end of the mother centriole and interact physically, with Wdr62 required for Aspm localization, and both proteins, as well as microcephaly protein Cep63, required to localize CENPJ/CPAP/Sas-4, a final common target. Unexpectedly, Aspm and Wdr62 are required for normal apical complex localization and apical epithelial structure, providing a plausible unifying mechanism for the premature delamination and precocious differentiation of progenitors. Together, our results reveal links among centrioles, apical proteins, and cell fate, and illuminate how alterations in these interactions can dynamically regulate brain size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A role for WDR5 in TRA-1/Gli mediated transcriptional control of the sperm/oocyte switch in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengguo; Kelly, William G

    2014-05-01

    The hermaphrodite germline of Caenorhabditis elegans initially engages in spermatogenesis and then switches to oogenesis during late stages of larval development. TRA-1, a member of the Ci/Gli family of transcriptional repressors, plays an essential role in this switch by repressing genes that promote spermatogenesis. WDR5 proteins are conserved components of histone methyltransferase complexes normally associated with gene activation. However, two C. elegans WDR5 homologs, wdr-5.1 and wdr-5.2 are redundantly required for normal TRA-1 dependent repression, and this function is independent of their roles in histone methylation. Animals lacking wdr-5.1/wdr-5.2 function fail to switch to oogenesis at 25°C, resulting in a masculinization of germline (Mog) phenotype. The Mog phenotype is caused by ectopic expression of fog-3, a direct target of TRA-1 repression. WDR-5.1 associates with the fog-3 promoter and is required for TRA-1 to bind to fog-3 promoter. Other direct targets of TRA-1 are similarly derepressed in the double mutant. These results show that WDR5 plays a novel and important role in stabilizing transcriptional repression during C. elegans sex determination, and provide evidence that this important protein may operate independently of its established role in histone methyltransferase complexes. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Entrainment range of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the difference in the neuronal amplitudes between the light-sensitive and light-insensitive regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Ruan, Zhongyuan

    2017-04-01

    Mammals not only can be synchronized to the natural 24-h light-dark cycle, but also to a cycle with a non-24-h period. The range of the period of the external cycle, for which the animals can be entrained to, is called the entrainment range, which differs among species. The entrainment range as a characteristic of the animal is determined by the main circadian clock, i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. The SCN is composed of ˜10 000 heterogeneous neurons, which can be divided into two subgroups, i.e., the ventrolateral subgroup (VL) directly receiving the light information from the retina and relaying the information to the dorsomedial subgroup (DM). Among the SCN neurons, the amplitudes are different; however, it is unclear that the amplitude is related to the location of the neurons in experiments. In the present study, we examined the effect of the difference in the neuronal amplitude between the VL and the DM on the entrainment range of the SCN, based on a mathematical model, i.e., the Poincaré model, which is used to describe the circadian clock. We find that the maximal entrainment range is obtained when the difference is equal to a critical point. If the difference of the amplitudes of the VL neurons to the amplitudes of the DM neurons is smaller than a critical point, with the increase of the difference, the entrainment range of the SCN increases, while if the difference is larger than the critical point, the entrainment range decreases with the increase of the difference. Our finding may give a potential explanation for the diversity of the entrainment range among species.

  9. Upon Infection the Cellular WD Repeat-containing Protein 5 (WDR5) Localizes to Cytoplasmic Inclusion Bodies and Enhances Measles Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dzwokai; George, Cyril X; Nomburg, Jason; Pfaller, Christian K; Cattaneo, Roberto; Samuel, Charles E

    2017-12-13

    Replication of negative-strand RNA viruses occurs in association with discrete cytoplasmic foci called inclusion bodies. Whereas inclusion bodies represent a prominent subcellular structure induced by viral infection, our knowledge of the cellular protein components involved in inclusion body formation and function is limited. Using measles virus-infected HeLa cells, we found that the WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5), a subunit of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases, was selectively recruited to virus-induced inclusion bodies. Furthermore, WDR5 was found in complexes containing viral proteins associated with RNA replication. WDR5 was not detected with mitochondria, stress granules, or other known secretory or endocytic compartments of infected cells. WDR5 deficiency decreased both viral protein production and infectious virus yields. Interferon production was modestly increased in WDR5 deficient cells. Thus, our study identifies WDR5 as a novel viral inclusion body-associated cellular protein and suggests a role for WDR5 in promoting viral replication.IMPORTANCE Measles virus is a human pathogen that remains a global concern with more than 100,000 measles-related deaths annually despite the availability of an effective vaccine. As measles continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality, understanding the virus-host interactions at the molecular level that affect virus replication efficiency is important for development and optimization of treatment procedures. Measles virus is an RNA virus that encodes six genes and replicates in the cytoplasm of infected cells in discrete cytoplasmic replication bodies, though little is known of the biochemical nature of these structures. Here we show that the cellular protein WDR5 is enriched in the cytoplasmic viral replication factories and enhances virus growth. WDR5-containing protein complex includes viral proteins responsible for viral RNA replication. Thus, we have identified WDR5 as a host factor that

  10. Neurone bioelectric activity under magnetic fields of variable frequency in the range of 0.1-80 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Bruzón, R. N.; Azanza, María. J.; Calvo, Ana C.; del Moral, A.

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular recordings from single unit molluscan neurones under exposure to ELF-MF (1 mT, 0.1-80 Hz), show that neurone frequency activity, f, decreases with the applied magnetic field frequency, fM, a phenomenon which indicates a frequency-window effect for the neurone membrane response. The HMHW of the window amounts between 2-10 Hz. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  11. Neurone bioelectric activity under magnetic fields of variable frequency in the range of 0.1-80 Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, R.N.; Azanza, M.J. E-mail: mjazanza@posta.unizar.es; Calvo, Ana C.; Moral, A. del

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular recordings from single unit molluscan neurones under exposure to ELF-MF (1 mT, 0.1-80 Hz), show that neurone frequency activity, f, decreases with the applied magnetic field frequency, f{sub M}, a phenomenon which indicates a frequency-window effect for the neurone membrane response. The HMHW of the window amounts between 2-10 Hz. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  12. WDR26 in Advanced Breast Cancer: A Novel Regulator of the P13K/AKT Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0539 TITLE: WDR26 in Advanced Breast Cancer : A Novel Regulator of the P13K/ AKT Pathway PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER WDR26 in Advanced Breast Cancer : A Novel Regulator of the P13K/AKT Pathway 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0539 5c. PROGRAM...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The PI3K/AKT pathway is one of the most deregulated pathways in breast cancers (>70%), and a major contributor to tumor progression

  13. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  14. MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Chinchole, Akash; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-06-19

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diverse roles of WDR5-RbBP5-ASH2L-DPY30 (WRAD) complex in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 1. Diverse roles of WDR5-RbBP5-ASH2L-DPY30 (WRAD) complex in the functions of the SET1 histone methyltransferase family. AAMIR ALI SHWETA TYAGI. Mini-Review Volume 42 Issue 1 ... Keywords. Cell cycle regulation; SET1 family; transcription; WRAD ...

  16. The Contributions of the Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Utp5/WDR43 to Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondalle, S.B.; Baserga, S.J.; Yelick, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Fairly recently, it was recognized that human ribosomopathies—developmental defects caused by mutations in ribosome biogenesis proteins—can exhibit tissue-specific defects rather than the expected global defects. This apparent anomaly—that seemingly ubiquitously expressed and required ribosomal proteins can have distinct functions in cell and tissue differentiation—has spurred new areas of research focused on better understanding translational mechanisms, biogenesis, and function in diverse cell types. This renewed appreciation for, and need to better understand, roles for ribosomal proteins in human development and disease has identified surprising similarities and differences in a variety of human ribosomopathies. Here, we discuss ribosomal protein functions in health and disease, focusing on the ribosome biogenesis protein Utp5/WDR43. New and exciting research in this field is anticipated to provide insight into a variety of previously understudied craniofacial dysostoses and result in significantly improved knowledge and understanding of roles for translational machinery in human craniofacial development and disease. PMID:27221611

  17. Long-range projection neurons of the mouse ventral tegmental area: a single-cell axon tracing analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eAransay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathways arising from the ventral tegmental area (VTA release dopamine and other neurotransmitters during the expectation and achievement of reward, and are regarded as central links of the brain networks that create drive, pleasure, and addiction. While the global pattern of VTA projections is well-known, the actual axonal wiring of individual VTA neurons had never been investigated. Here, we labeled and analyzed the axons of 30 VTA single neurons by means of single-cell transfection with the Sindbis-pal-eGFP vector in mice. These observations were complemented with those obtained by labeling the axons of small populations of VTA cells with iotophoretic microdeposits of biotinylated dextran amine. In the single-cell labeling experiments, each entire axonal tree was reconstructed from serial sections, the length of terminal axonal arbors was estimated by stereology, and the dopaminergic phenotype was tested by double-labeling for tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence. We observed two main, markedly different VTA cell morphologies: neurons with a single main axon targeting only forebrain structures (FPN cells, and neurons with multibranched axons targeting both the forebrain and the brainstem (F+BSPN cells. Dopaminergic phenotype was observed in FPN cells. Moreover, four subtypes could be distinguished among the FPN cells based on their projection targets: 1 Mesocorticolimbic FPN projecting to both neocortex and basal forebrain; 2 Mesocortical FPN innervating the neocortex almost exclusively; 3 Mesolimbic FPN projecting to the basal forebrain, accumbens and caudateputamen; and 4 Mesostriatal FPN targeting only the caudateputamen. While the F+BSPN cells were scattered within VTA, the mesolimbic neurons were abundant in the paranigral nucleus. The observed diversity in wiring architectures is consistent with the notion that different VTA cell subpopulations modulate the activity of specific sets of prosencephalic and brainstem structures.

  18. Identification of a c.544C>T mutation in WDR34 as a deleterious recessive allele of short rib-polydactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Han You

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: This study was the first to identify c.544C > T [p.Arg182Trp] mutation in WDR34 in a patient with SRPS. According to the database, the homozygous mutation of c.544C > T in WDR34 was deleterious and the prevalence of heterozygous mutation was relatively higher in Asian population. More studies of this mutation in patients with SRPS are required.

  19. Regulation of mitosis by the NIMA kinase involves TINA and its newly discovered partner, An-WDR8, at spindle pole bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuo-Fang; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The NIMA kinase is required for mitotic nuclear pore complex disassembly and potentially controls other mitotic-specific events. To investigate this possibility, we imaged NIMA–green fluorescent protein (GFP) using four-dimensional spinning disk confocal microscopy. At mitosis NIMA-GFP locates to spindle pole bodies (SPBs), which contain Cdk1/cyclin B, followed by Aurora, TINA, and the BimC kinesin. NIMA promotes NPC disassembly in a spatially regulated manner starting near SPBs. NIMA is also required for TINA, a NIMA-interacting protein, to locate to SPBs during initiation of mitosis, and TINA is then necessary for locating NIMA back to SPBs during mitotic progression. To help expand the NIMA-TINA pathway, we affinity purified TINA and found it to uniquely copurify with An-WDR8, a WD40-domain protein conserved from humans to plants. Like TINA, An-WDR8 accumulates within nuclei during G2 but disperses from nuclei before locating to mitotic SPBs. Without An-WDR8, TINA levels are greatly reduced, whereas TINA is necessary for mitotic targeting of An-WDR8. Finally, we show that TINA is required to anchor mitotic microtubules to SPBs and, in combination with An-WDR8, for successful mitosis. The findings provide new insights into SPB targeting and indicate that the mitotic microtubule-anchoring system at SPBs involves WDR8 in complex with TINA. PMID:24152731

  20. A role for WDR5 in integrating threonine 11 phosphorylation to lysine 4 methylation on histone H3 during androgen signaling and in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Banerjee, Taraswi; Vinckevicius, Aurimas; Luo, Qianyi; Parker, J Brandon; Baker, Mairead R; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Wei, Jian-Jun; Barish, Grant D; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2014-05-22

    Upon androgen stimulation, PKN1-mediated histone H3 threonine 11 phosphorylation (H3T11P) promotes AR target gene activation. However, the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we show that WDR5, a subunit of the SET1/MLL complex, interacts with H3T11P, and this interaction facilitates the recruitment of the MLL1 complex and subsequent H3K4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3). Using ChIP-seq, we find that androgen stimulation results in a 6-fold increase in the number of H3T11P-marked regions and induces WDR5 colocalization to one third of H3T11P-enriched promoters, thus establishing a genome-wide relationship between H3T11P and recruitment of WDR5. Accordingly, PKN1 knockdown or chemical inhibition severely blocks WDR5 chromatin association and H3K4me3 on AR target genes. Finally, WDR5 is critical in prostate cancer cell proliferation and is hyperexpressed in human prostate cancers. Together, these results identify WDR5 as a critical epigenomic integrator of histone phosphorylation and methylation and as a major driver of androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of mitosis by the NIMA kinase involves TINA and its newly discovered partner, An-WDR8, at spindle pole bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuo-Fang; Osmani, Stephen A

    2013-12-01

    The NIMA kinase is required for mitotic nuclear pore complex disassembly and potentially controls other mitotic-specific events. To investigate this possibility, we imaged NIMA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) using four-dimensional spinning disk confocal microscopy. At mitosis NIMA-GFP locates to spindle pole bodies (SPBs), which contain Cdk1/cyclin B, followed by Aurora, TINA, and the BimC kinesin. NIMA promotes NPC disassembly in a spatially regulated manner starting near SPBs. NIMA is also required for TINA, a NIMA-interacting protein, to locate to SPBs during initiation of mitosis, and TINA is then necessary for locating NIMA back to SPBs during mitotic progression. To help expand the NIMA-TINA pathway, we affinity purified TINA and found it to uniquely copurify with An-WDR8, a WD40-domain protein conserved from humans to plants. Like TINA, An-WDR8 accumulates within nuclei during G2 but disperses from nuclei before locating to mitotic SPBs. Without An-WDR8, TINA levels are greatly reduced, whereas TINA is necessary for mitotic targeting of An-WDR8. Finally, we show that TINA is required to anchor mitotic microtubules to SPBs and, in combination with An-WDR8, for successful mitosis. The findings provide new insights into SPB targeting and indicate that the mitotic microtubule-anchoring system at SPBs involves WDR8 in complex with TINA.

  2. Peripheral oxytocin receptors inhibit the nociceptive input signal to spinal dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Abimael; Manzano-García, Alfredo; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Tello-García, Irma A; Carranza, Martha; Arámburo, Carlos; Condés-Lara, Miguel

    2017-11-01

    Oxytocin (OT) has emerged as a mediator of endogenous analgesia in behavioral and electrophysiological experiments. In fact, OT receptors (OTRs) in the spinal dorsal horn participate in a selective inhibition of the neuronal activity mediated by Aδ and C fibers but not Aβ fibers. This study shows that OTRs are expressed in the terminal nerve endings and are able to inhibit nociceptive neuronal firing. Indeed, local peripheral OT blocked the first sensorial activity of Aδ and C fibers recorded in the spinal cord neurons. Furthermore, using the formalin behavioral nociceptive test, we demonstrated that only ipsilateral OTR activation inhibits pain behavior. Our data are reinforced by the fact that the OTR protein is expressed in the sciatic nerve. Consistent with this, immunofluorescence of primary afferent fibers suggest that OTRs could be located in nociceptive-specific terminals of the skin. Taken together, our results suggest that OTRs could be found in nociceptive terminals and that on activation they are able to inhibit nociceptive input.

  3. Enhanced spinal neuronal responses as a mechanism for the increased nociceptive sensitivity of interleukin-4 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Sören; Schießer, Peter; Geis, Christian; Sommer, Claudia; Vanegas, Horacio; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-09-01

    Lack of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) is associated with mechanical hypersensitivity in mice, and low systemic levels of IL-4 are associated with pain in humans. We investigated whether the firing properties of murine nociceptive neurons in the spinal dorsal horn are affected by IL-4 deficiency. Single unit recordings from lumbar dorsal horn wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons were performed in IL-4 knock out (ko) mice and wild type (WT) littermates (3, 9, and 22 months old). We measured neuronal responses to innocuous (1g) and noxious (26 g) von Frey mechanical stimulation at the plantar hind paw. Additionally, we induced secondary hyperalgesia by intraplantar injection of capsaicin and recorded discharges before and 5 and 10 min after injection. Baseline activity, activity upon innocuous stimulation, and postdischarges after noxious stimulation were not different between genotypes and ages. Responses to the noxious von Frey filament in 3 (34.5, 26.6-41.1 Hz) and 9 month old (49.7, 21.7-108.2 Hz) IL-4 ko mice were greater than in WT littermates (3 months, 18.1, 16.3-27.2 Hz, n.s.; 9 months, 33.6, 10.4-69.7 Hz; pnociceptive pathway may contribute to the increased behavioral responsiveness to painful stimuli of young IL-4 ko mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A WDR Gene Is a Conserved Member of a Chitin Synthase Gene Cluster and Influences the Cell Wall in Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available WD40 repeat (WDR proteins are pleiotropic molecular hubs. We identify a WDR gene that is a conserved genomic neighbor of a chitin synthase gene in Ascomycetes. The WDR gene is unique to fungi and plants, and was called Fungal Plant WD (FPWD. FPWD is within a cell wall metabolism gene cluster in the Ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina comprising chsD, a Chs activator and a GH17 glucanase. The FPWD, AN1556.2 locus was deleted in Aspergillus nidulans strain SAA.111 by gene replacement and only heterokaryon transformants were obtained. The re-annotation of Aspergilli genomes shows that AN1556.2 consists of two tightly linked separate genes, i.e., the WDR gene and a putative beta-flanking gene of unknown function. The WDR and the beta-flanking genes are conserved genomic neighbors localized within a recently identified metabolic cell wall gene cluster in genomes of Aspergilli. The heterokaryons displayed increased susceptibility to drugs affecting the cell wall, and their phenotypes, observed by optical, confocal, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, suggest cell wall alterations. Quantitative real-time PCR shows altered expression of some cell wall-related genes. The possible implications on cell wall biosynthesis are discussed.

  5. Transnational Relations Between The BBC And The WDR (1960-1969: The Central Roles Of Hugh Greene And Klaus Von Bismarck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Potschka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the relationship between the BBC Director-General Hugh Carleton Greene and the director of the West German Broadcasting Corporation (WDR Klaus von Bismarck between 1960 and 1969. The thrust of the article is to point out the great potential of evaluating interpersonal relationships and their contribution to European perspectives on television history. The research is situated within transnational television historiography and it argues that the relationship between the two key personalities is manifested in multiple interdependencies, exchanges, visits and correspondences that exemplify the long-term British impact on the German broadcasting system as well as the bilateral cordial relations between the BBC and the WDR.

  6. A Simple and Efficient In Vivo Non-viral RNA Transfection Method for Labeling the Whole Axonal Tree of Individual Adult Long-Range Projection Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, César; Rodríguez-Moreno, Javier; Quetglas, José I; Smerdou, Cristian; Furuta, Takahiro; Clascá, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We report a highly efficient, simple, and non-infective method for labeling individual long-range projection neurons (LRPNs) in a specific location with enough sparseness and intensity to allow complete and unambiguous reconstructions of their entire axonal tree. The method is based on the "in vivo" transfection of a large RNA construct that drives the massive expression of green fluorescent protein. The method combines two components: injection of a small volume of a hyperosmolar NaCl solution containing the Pal-eGFP-Sindbis RNA construct (Furuta et al., 2001), followed by the application of high-frequency electric current pulses through the micropipette tip. We show that, although each component alone increases transfection efficacy, compared to simple volume injections of standard RNA solution, the highest efficacy (85.7%) is achieved by the combination of both components. In contrast with the infective viral Sindbis vector, RNA transfection occurs exclusively at the position of the injection micropipette tip. This method simplifies consistently labeling one or a few isolated neurons per brain, a strategy that allows unambiguously resolving and quantifying the brain-wide and often multi-branched monosynaptic circuits created by LRPNs.

  7. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  8. Discovery of a Highly Potent, Cell-Permeable Macrocyclic Peptidomimetic (MM-589) Targeting the WD Repeat Domain 5 Protein (WDR5)–Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein–Protein Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatas, Hacer; Li, Yangbing; Liu, Liu; Ji, Jiao; Lee, Shirley; Chen, Yong; Yang, Jiuling; Huang, Liyue; Bernard, Denzil; Xu, Jing; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Cao, Fang; Ran, Xu; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Sun, Duxin; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng (Michigan)

    2017-06-06

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and evaluation of macrocyclic peptidomimetics that bind to WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and block the WDR5–mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) protein–protein interaction. Compound 18 (MM-589) binds to WDR5 with an IC50 value of 0.90 nM (Ki value <1 nM) and inhibits the MLL H3K4 methyltransferase (HMT) activity with an IC50 value of 12.7 nM. Compound 18 potently and selectively inhibits cell growth in human leukemia cell lines harboring MLL translocations and is >40 times better than the previously reported compound MM-401. Cocrystal structures of 16 and 18 complexed with WDR5 provide structural basis for their high affinity binding to WDR5. Additionally, we have developed and optimized a new AlphaLISA-based MLL HMT functional assay to facilitate the functional evaluation of these designed compounds. Compound 18 represents the most potent inhibitor of the WDR5–MLL interaction reported to date, and further optimization of 18 may yield a new therapy for acute leukemia.

  9. Specific variants in WDR35 cause a distinctive form of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome by disrupting the recruitment of the EvC complex and SMO into the cilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrós-Martín, José A; De Luca, Alessandro; Cartault, François; Aglan, Mona; Temtamy, Samia; Otaify, Ghada A; Mehrez, Mennat; Valencia, María; Vázquez, Laura; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Nevado, Julián; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; Heath, Karen E; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Goodship, Judith A; Mill, Pleasantine; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2015-07-15

    Most patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) are identified with pathogenic changes in EVC or EVC2, however further genetic heterogeneity has been suggested. In this report we describe pathogenic splicing variants in WDR35, encoding retrograde intraflagellar transport protein 121 (IFT121), in three families with a clinical diagnosis of EvC but having a distinctive phenotype. To understand why WDR35 variants result in EvC, we analysed EVC, EVC2 and Smoothened (SMO) in IFT-A deficient cells. We found that the three proteins failed to localize to Wdr35(-/-) cilia, but not to the cilium of the IFT retrograde motor mutant Dync2h1(-/-), indicating that IFT121 is specifically required for their entry into the ciliary compartment. Furthermore expression of Wdr35 disease cDNAs in Wdr35(-/-) fibroblasts revealed that the newly identified variants lead to Hedgehog signalling defects resembling those of Evc(-/-) and Evc2(-/-) mutants. Together our data indicate that splicing variants in WDR35, and possibly in other IFT-A components, underlie a number of EvC cases by disrupting targeting of both the EvC complex and SMO to cilia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Structural Analysis Reveals Features of Ribosome Assembly Factor Nsa1/WDR74 Important for Localization and Interaction with Rix7/NVL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Romes, Erin M; Pillon, Monica C; Sobhany, Mack; Stanley, Robin E

    2017-05-02

    Ribosome assembly is a complex process that requires hundreds of essential assembly factors, including Rix7 (NVL2 in mammals) and Nsa1 (WDR74 in mammals). Rix7 is a type II double ring, AAA-ATPase, which is closely related to the well-known Cdc48/p97. Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggest that Rix7 mediates the release of Nsa1 from nucleolar pre-60S particles; however, the underlying mechanisms of this release are unknown. Through multiple structural analyses we show that S. cerevisiae Nsa1 is composed of an N-terminal seven-bladed WD40 domain followed by a lysine-rich C terminus that extends away from the WD40 domain and is required for nucleolar localization. Co-immunoprecipitation assays with the mammalian homologs identified a well-conserved interface within WDR74 that is important for its association with NVL2. We further show that WDR74 associates with the D1 AAA domain of NVL2, which represents a novel mode of binding of a substrate with a type II AAA-ATPase. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Turbulent spectra and spectral kinks in the transition range from MHD to kinetic Alfvén turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Voitenko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A weakly dispersive range (WDR of kinetic Alfvén turbulence is identified and investigated for the first time in the context of the MHD/kinetic turbulence transition. We find perpendicular wavenumber spectra ∝ k−3 and ∝ k−4 formed in WDR by strong and weak turbulence of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs, respectively. These steep WDR spectra connect shallower spectra in the MHD and strongly dispersive KAW ranges, which results in a specific double-kink (2-k pattern often seen in observed turbulent spectra. The first kink occurs where MHD turbulence transforms into weakly dispersive KAW turbulence; the second one is between weakly and strongly dispersive KAW ranges. Our analysis suggests that partial turbulence dissipation due to amplitude-dependent non-adiabatic ion heating may occur in the vicinity of the first spectral kink. The threshold-like nature of this process results in a conditional selective dissipation that affects only the largest over-threshold amplitudes and that decreases the intermittency in the range below the first spectral kink. Several recent counter-intuitive observational findings can be explained by the coupling between such a selective dissipation and the nonlinear interaction among weakly dispersive KAWs.

  12. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  13. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; Schaik, André van; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems...

  14. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  15. New mutations in DYNC2H1 and WDR60 genes revealed by whole-exome sequencing in two unrelated Sardinian families with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Carla; Incani, Federica; Serra, Maria Luisa; Coiana, Alessandra; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Boccone, Loredana; Rosatelli, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD; Jeune syndrome, MIM 208500) is a rare autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia, phenotypically overlapping with short-rib polydactyly syndromes (SRPS). JATD typical hallmarks include skeletal abnormalities such as narrow chest, shortened ribs, limbs shortened bones, extra fingers and toes (polydactyly), as well as extraskeletal manifestations (renal, liver and retinal disease). To date, disease-causing mutations have been found in several genes, highlighting a marked genetic heterogeneity that prevents a molecular diagnosis of the disease in most families. Here, we report the results of whole-exome sequencing (WES) carried out in four JATD cases, belonging to three unrelated families of Sardinian origin. The exome analysis allowed to identify mutations not previously reported in the DYNC2H1 (MIM 603297) and WDR60 (MIM 615462) genes, both codifying for ciliary intraflagellar transport components whose mutations are known to cause Jeune syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  17. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  18. [The effects of hyperventilation upon spinal dorsal horn neuronal single-unit activities under nitrous oxide anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumu; Sumida, Toshinobu; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of hyperventilation upon spinal dorsal horn neuronal single-unit activities under nitrous oxide anesthesia. Eight decerebrated spinal cats with laminectomy were maintained with oxygen and pancuronium bromide. Following the control period of normocapnia, 50% nitrous oxide was administered for 30 minutes after a hypocapnia period of 20-25 mmHg for 20 minutes. The recoveries of activities followed with normocapnia and pure oxygen administration. The changes of spontaneous and evoked activities by the pinching were investigated every 5 minutes after control study. Inhalation of 50% nitrous oxide suppressed the WDR neuronal activities and with hyperventilation the suppressions significantly increased. These results were compatible with clinical reports on the effectiveness of hyperventilation as a maintenance method under N2O anesthesia.

  19. Analysis of cellulose synthase genes from domesticated apple identifies collinear genes WDR53 and CesA8A: partial co-expression, bicistronic mRNA, and alternative splicing of CESA8A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Spadiut, Oliver; Kerschbamer, Christine; Giorno, Filomena; Baric, Sanja; Ezcurra, Inés

    2012-10-01

    Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes constitute a complex multigene family with six major phylogenetic clades in angiosperms. The recently sequenced genome of domestic apple, Malus×domestica, was mined for CesA genes, by blasting full-length cellulose synthase protein (CESA) sequences annotated in the apple genome against protein databases from the plant models Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Thirteen genes belonging to the six angiosperm CesA clades and coding for proteins with conserved residues typical of processive glycosyltransferases from family 2 were detected. Based on their phylogenetic relationship to Arabidopsis CESAs, as well as expression patterns, a nomenclature is proposed to facilitate further studies. Examination of their genomic organization revealed that MdCesA8-A is closely linked and co-oriented with WDR53, a gene coding for a WD40 repeat protein. The WDR53 and CesA8 genes display conserved collinearity in dicots and are partially co-expressed in the apple xylem. Interestingly, the presence of a bicistronic WDR53-CesA8A transcript was detected in phytoplasma-infected phloem tissues of apple. The bicistronic transcript contains a spliced intergenic sequence that is predicted to fold into hairpin structures typical of internal ribosome entry sites, suggesting its potential cap-independent translation. Surprisingly, the CesA8A cistron is alternatively spliced and lacks the zinc-binding domain. The possible roles of WDR53 and the alternatively spliced CESA8 variant during cellulose biosynthesis in M.×domestica are discussed.

  20. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for adiponectin levels in East Asians identifies a novel locus near WDR11-FGFR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Gao, He; Li, Huaixing; Tabara, Yasuharu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Park, Eun Jung; Wen, Wanqing; Adair, Linda S.; Borja, Judith B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Peng; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Gan, Wei; He, Chih-Tsueng; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hwu, Chii-Min; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Jo, Jaeseong; Kato, Norihiro; Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Kuzawa, Christophor W.; Lee, Jeannette J.M.; Liu, Jianjun; Lu, Ling; Mcdade, Thomas W.; Osawa, Haruhiko; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Teo, Yvonne; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Van Dam, Rob M.; Wang, Yiqin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamamoto, Ken; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Terri L.; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Jingwen; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shin, Chol; Jee, Sun Ha; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Miki, Tetsuro; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Lin, Xu; Mohlke, Karen L; Tai, E Shyong

    2014-01-01

    Blood levels of adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted protein correlated with metabolic and cardiovascular risks, are highly heritable. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies for adiponectin levels have identified 14 loci harboring variants associated with blood levels of adiponectin. To identify novel adiponectin-associated loci, particularly those of importance in East Asians, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWA studies for adiponectin in 7827 individuals, followed by two stages of replications in 4298 and 5954 additional individuals. We identified a novel adiponectin-associated locus on chromosome 10 near WDR11-FGFR2 (P = 3.0 × 10−14) and provided suggestive evidence for a locus on chromosome 12 near OR8S1-LALBA (P = 1.2 × 10−7). Of the adiponectin-associated loci previously described, we confirmed the association at CDH13 (P = 6.8 × 10−165), ADIPOQ (P = 1.8 × 10−22), PEPD (P = 3.6 × 10−12), CMIP (P = 2.1 × 10−10), ZNF664 (P = 2.3 × 10−7) and GPR109A (P = 7.4 × 10−6). Conditional analysis at ADIPOQ revealed a second signal with suggestive evidence of association only after conditioning on the lead SNP (Pinitial = 0.020; Pconditional = 7.0 × 10−7). We further confirmed the independence of two pairs of closely located loci (<2 Mb) on chromosome 16 at CMIP and CDH13, and on chromosome 12 at GPR109A and ZNF664. In addition, the newly identified signal near WDR11-FGFR2 exhibited evidence of association with triglycerides (P = 3.3 × 10−4), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, P = 4.9 × 10−4) and body mass index (BMI)-adjusted waist–hip ratio (P = 9.8 × 10−3). These findings improve our knowledge of the genetic basis of adiponectin variation, demonstrate the shared allelic architecture for adiponectin with lipids and central obesity and motivate further studies of underlying mechanisms. PMID:24105470

  1. Suppressor of sable [Su(s)] and Wdr82 down-regulate RNA from heat-shock-inducible repetitive elements by a mechanism that involves transcription termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer-Jensen, Paul; Wilson, Carrie B.; Abernethy, John; Mollison, Lonna; Card, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA polymerase II (Pol II) productively transcribes very long genes in vivo, transcription through extragenic sequences often terminates in the promoter-proximal region and the nascent RNA is degraded. Mechanisms that induce early termination and RNA degradation are not well understood in multicellular organisms. Here, we present evidence that the suppressor of sable [su(s)] regulatory pathway of Drosophila melanogaster plays a role in this process. We previously showed that Su(s) promotes exosome-mediated degradation of transcripts from endogenous repeated elements at an Hsp70 locus (Hsp70-αβ elements). In this report, we identify Wdr82 as a component of this process and show that it works with Su(s) to inhibit Pol II elongation through Hsp70-αβ elements. Furthermore, we show that the unstable transcripts produced during this process are polyadenylated at heterogeneous sites that lack canonical polyadenylation signals. We define two distinct regions that mediate this regulation. These results indicate that the Su(s) pathway promotes RNA degradation and transcription termination through a novel mechanism. PMID:26577379

  2. Analog Encoding Voltage—A Key to Ultra-Wide Dynamic Range and Low Power CMOS Image Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly Yadid-Pecht

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Usually Wide Dynamic Range (WDR sensors that autonomously adjust their integration time to fit intra-scene illumination levels use a separate digital memory unit. This memory contains the data needed for the dynamic range. Motivated by the demands for low power and chip area reduction, we propose a different implementation of the aforementioned WDR algorithm by replacing the external digital memory with an analog in-pixel memory. This memory holds the effective integration time represented by analog encoding voltage (AEV. In addition, we present a “ranging” scheme of configuring the pixel integration time in which the effective integration time is configured at the first half of the frame. This enables a substantial simplification of the pixel control during the rest of the frame and thus allows for a significantly more remarkable DR extension. Furthermore, we present the implementation of “ranging” and AEV concepts on two different designs, which are targeted to reach five and eight decades of DR, respectively. We describe in detail the operation of both systems and provide the post-layout simulation results for the second solution. The simulations show that the second design reaches DR up to 170 dBs. We also provide a comparative analysis in terms of the number of operations per pixel required by our solution and by other widespread WDR algorithms. Based on the calculated results, we conclude that the proposed two designs, using “ranging” and AEV concepts, are attractive, since they obtain a wide dynamic range at high operation speed and low power consumption.

  3. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Ewan St John

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties, possibly reflecting different

  5. Neuronal control of energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Qian; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal control of body energy homeostasis is the key mechanism by which animals and humans regulate their long-term energy balance. Various hypothalamic neuronal circuits (which include the hypothalamic melanocortin, midbrain dopamine reward and caudal brainstem autonomic feeding systems) control energy intake and expenditure to maintain body weight within a narrow range for long periods of a life span. Numerous peripheral metabolic hormones and nutrients target these structures providing f...

  6. Sensory Neurons in the Human Geniculate Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadasu; Yamaguma, Yu; Sasaki, Yu; Kanda, Noriyuki; Sasahara, Nobuyuki; Kokubun, Souichi; Yajima, Takehiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The geniculate ganglion (GG) contains visceral and somatic sensory neurons of the facial nerve. In this study, the number and cell size of sensory neurons in the human GG were investigated. The estimated number of GG neurons ranged from 1,580 to 2,561 (mean ± SD = 1,960 ± 364.6). The cell size of GG neurons ranged from 393.0 to 2,485.4 μm2 (mean ± SD = 1,067.4 ± 99.5 μm2). Sensory neurons in the GG were significantly smaller in size than those in the dorsal root (range = 326.6-5343.4 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,683.2 ± 203.8 μm2) or trigeminal ganglia (range = 349.6-4,889.28 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,529.0 ± 198.48 μm2). Sensory neurons had similar cell body sizes in the GG and nodose ganglion (range = 357.2-3,488.33 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,160.4 ± 156.61 μm2). These findings suggest that viscerosensory neurons have smaller cell bodies than somatosensory neurons. In addition, immunohistochemistry for several neurochemical substances was performed on the human GG. In the ganglion, sensory neurons were mostly immunoreactive for secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (94.3%). One third of GG neurons showed vesicular glutamate transporter 2 immunoreactivity (31.3%). Only 7.3% of GG neurons were immunoreactive for transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1. Sensory neurons in the human GG may respond to gustatory, nociceptive, and/or mechanoreceptive stimuli from tongues, soft palates, and external auditory canals. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Functions of class V myosins in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John A; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    This minireview focuses on recent studies implicating class V myosins in organelle and macromolecule transport within neurons. These studies reveal that class V myosins play important roles in a wide range of fundamental processes occurring within neurons, including the transport into dendritic spines of organelles that support synaptic plasticity, the establishment of neuronal shape, the specification of polarized cargo transport, and the subcellular localization of mRNA.

  8. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  9. Distinct Corticostriatal GABAergic Neurons Modulate Striatal Output Neurons and Motor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Melzer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The motor cortico-basal ganglion loop is critical for motor planning, execution, and learning. Balanced excitation and inhibition in this loop is crucial for proper motor output. Excitatory neurons have been thought to be the only source of motor cortical input to the striatum. Here, we identify long-range projecting GABAergic neurons in the primary (M1 and secondary (M2 motor cortex that target the dorsal striatum. This population of projecting GABAergic neurons comprises both somatostatin-positive (SOM+ and parvalbumin-positive (PV+ neurons that target direct and indirect pathway striatal output neurons as well as cholinergic interneurons differentially. Notably, optogenetic stimulation of M1 PV+ and M2 SOM+ projecting neurons reduced locomotion, whereas stimulation of M1 SOM+ projecting neurons enhanced locomotion. Thus, corticostriatal GABAergic projections modulate striatal output and motor activity.

  10. WDR-PK-AK-018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollister, R

    2009-08-26

    Method - CES SOP-HW-P556 'Field and Bulk Gamma Analysis'. Detector - High-purity germanium, 40% relative efficiency. Calibration - The detector was calibrated on February 8, 2006 using a NIST-traceable sealed source, and the calibration was verified using an independent sealed source. Count Time and Geometry - The sample was counted for 20 minutes at 72 inches from the detector. A lead collimator was used to limit the field-of-view to the region of the sample. The drum was rotated 180 degrees halfway through the count time. Date and Location of Scans - June 1,2006 in Building 235 Room 1136. Spectral Analysis Spectra were analyzed with ORTEC GammaVision software. Matrix and geometry corrections were calculated using OR TEC Isotopic software. A background spectrum was measured at the counting location. No man-made radioactivity was observed in the background. Results were determined from the sample spectra without background subtraction. Minimum detectable activities were calculated by the Nureg 4.16 method. Results - Detected Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241 and Am-243.

  11. Heavy metals in locus ceruleus and motor neurons in motor neuron disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The causes of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) and other types of motor neuron disease (MND) remain largely unknown. Heavy metals have long been implicated in MND, and it has recently been shown that inorganic mercury selectively enters human locus ceruleus (LC) and motor neurons. We therefore used silver nitrate autometallography (AMG) to look for AMG-stainable heavy metals (inorganic mercury and bismuth) in LC and motor neurons of 24 patients with MND (18 with SALS and 6 with familial MND) and in the LC of 24 controls. Results Heavy metals in neurons were found in significantly more MND patients than in controls when comparing: (1) the presence of any versus no heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 88%, controls 42%), (2) the median percentage of heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 9.5%, control 0.0%), and (3) numbers of individuals with heavy metal-containing LC neurons in the upper half of the percentage range (MND 75%, controls 25%). In MND patients, 67% of remaining spinal motor neurons contained heavy metals; smaller percentages were found in hypoglossal, nucleus ambiguus and oculomotor neurons, but none in cortical motor neurons. The majority of MND patients had heavy metals in both LC and spinal motor neurons. No glia or other neurons, including neuromelanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, contained stainable heavy metals. Conclusions Uptake of heavy metals by LC and lower motor neurons appears to be fairly common in humans, though heavy metal staining in the LC, most likely due to inorganic mercury, was seen significantly more often in MND patients than in controls. The LC innervates many cell types that are affected in MND, and it is possible that MND is triggered by toxicant-induced interactions between LC and motor neurons. PMID:24330485

  12. Asynchronous updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study a network of chaotic model neurons incorporating threshold- activated coupling. We obtain a wide range of spatiotemporal patterns under varying degrees of asynchronicity in the evolution of the neuronal components. For instance, we find that sequential updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons ...

  13. Asynchronous updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a network of chaotic model neurons incorporating threshold activated coupling. We obtain a wide range of spatiotemporal patterns under varying degrees of asynchronicity in the evolution of the neuronal components. For instance, we find that sequential updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons can yield ...

  14. Growth control mechanisms in neuronal regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doron-Mandel, Ella; Fainzilber, Mike; Terenzio, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neurons grow during development and extend long axons to make contact with their targets with the help of an intrinsic program of axonal growth as well as a range of extrinsic cues and a permissive milieu...

  15. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  16. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  17. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  18. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  19. Combinatorial analysis of lupulin gland transcription factors from R2R3Myb, bHLH and WDR families indicates a complex regulation of chs_H1 genes essential for prenylflavonoid biosynthesis in hop (Humulus Lupulus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matoušek Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lupulin glands of hop produce a specific metabolome including hop bitter acids valuable for the brewing process and prenylflavonoids with promising health-beneficial activities. The detailed analysis of the transcription factor (TF-mediated regulation of the oligofamily of one of the key enzymes, i.e., chalcone synthase CHS_H1 that efficiently catalyzes the production of naringenin chalcone, a direct precursor of prenylflavonoids in hop, constitutes an important part of the dissection of the biosynthetic pathways leading to the accumulation of these compounds. Results Homologues of flavonoid-regulating TFs HlMyb2 (M2, HlbHLH2 (B2 and HlWDR1 (W1 from hop were cloned using a lupulin gland-specific cDNA library from the hop variety Osvald's 72. Using a "combinatorial" transient GUS expression system it was shown that these unique lupulin-gland-associated TFs significantly activated the promoter (P of chs_H1 in ternary combinations of B2, W1 and either M2 or the previously characterized HlMyb3 (M3. The promoter activation was strongly dependent on the Myb-P binding box TCCTACC having a core sequence CCWACC positioned on its 5' end region and it seems that the complexity of the promoter plays an important role. M2B2W1-mediated activation significantly exceeded the strength of expression of native chs_H1 gene driven by the 35S promoter of CaMV, while M3B2W1 resulted in 30% of the 35S:chs_H1 expression level, as quantified by real-time PCR. Another newly cloned hop TF, HlMyb7, containing a transcriptional repressor-like motif pdLNLD/ELxiG/S (PDLNLELRIS, was identified as an efficient inhibitor of chs_H1-activating TFs. Comparative analyses of hop and A. thaliana TFs revealed a complex activation of Pchs_H1 and Pchs4 in combinatorial or independent manners. Conclusions This study on the sequences and functions of various lupulin gland-specific transcription factors provides insight into the complex character of the regulation of the

  20. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  1. Investigating Circadian Rhythmicity in Pain Sensitivity Using a Neural Circuit Model for Spinal Cord Processing of Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena; Booth, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    the resultant pain signal. The differential equation models describe the average firing rates of excitatory and inhibitory interneuron populations, as well as the wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons whose output correlates with the pain signal. The temporal profile of inputs on the different afferent nerve fibers...

  2. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  3. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  4. Vagal Sensory Neuron Subtypes that Differentially Control Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Rui B.; Strochlic, David E.; Williams, Erika K.; Umans, Benjamin D.; Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Breathing is essential for survival and under precise neural control. The vagus nerve is a major conduit between lung and brain required for normal respiration. Here, we identify two populations of mouse vagus nerve afferents (P2ry1, Npy2r), each a few hundred neurons, that exert powerful and opposing effects on breathing. Genetically guided anatomical mapping revealed that these neurons densely innervate the lung and send long-range projections to different brainstem targets. Npy2r neurons a...

  5. Exploring neuronal bistability at the depolarization block.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dovzhenok

    Full Text Available Many neurons display bistability--coexistence of two firing modes such as bursting and tonic spiking or tonic spiking and silence. Bistability has been proposed to endow neurons with richer forms of information processing in general and to be involved in short-term memory in particular by allowing a brief signal to elicit long-lasting changes in firing. In this paper, we focus on bistability that allows for a choice between tonic spiking and depolarization block in a wide range of the depolarization levels. We consider the spike-producing currents in two neurons, models of which differ by the parameter values. Our dopaminergic neuron model displays bistability in a wide range of applied currents at the depolarization block. The Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid giant axon shows no bistability. We varied parameter values for the model to analyze transitions between the two parameter sets. We show that bistability primarily characterizes the inactivation of the Na(+ current. Our study suggests a connection between the amount of the Na(+ window current and the length of the bistability range. For the dopaminergic neuron we hypothesize that bistability can be linked to a prolonged action of antipsychotic drugs.

  6. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  7. Energy-efficient neural information processing in individual neurons and neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lianchun; Yu, Yuguo

    2017-11-01

    Brains are composed of networks of an enormous number of neurons interconnected with synapses. Neural information is carried by the electrical signals within neurons and the chemical signals among neurons. Generating these electrical and chemical signals is metabolically expensive. The fundamental issue raised here is whether brains have evolved efficient ways of developing an energy-efficient neural code from the molecular level to the circuit level. Here, we summarize the factors and biophysical mechanisms that could contribute to the energy-efficient neural code for processing input signals. The factors range from ion channel kinetics, body temperature, axonal propagation of action potentials, low-probability release of synaptic neurotransmitters, optimal input and noise, the size of neurons and neuronal clusters, excitation/inhibition balance, coding strategy, cortical wiring, and the organization of functional connectivity. Both experimental and computational evidence suggests that neural systems may use these factors to maximize the efficiency of energy consumption in processing neural signals. Studies indicate that efficient energy utilization may be universal in neuronal systems as an evolutionary consequence of the pressure of limited energy. As a result, neuronal connections may be wired in a highly economical manner to lower energy costs and space. Individual neurons within a network may encode independent stimulus components to allow a minimal number of neurons to represent whole stimulus characteristics efficiently. This basic principle may fundamentally change our view of how billions of neurons organize themselves into complex circuits to operate and generate the most powerful intelligent cognition in nature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thermal impact on spiking properties in Hodgkin–Huxley neuron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of environmental temperature on neuronal spiking behaviors is investigated by numerically simulating the temperature dependence of spiking threshold of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron subject to synaptic stimulus. We find that the spiking threshold exhibits a global minimum in a specific temperature range where ...

  9. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Visser Sid; van Gils Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is ...

  10. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  11. Direct Neuronal Reprogramming for Disease Modeling Studies Using Patient-Derived Neurons: What Have We Learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Drouin-Ouellet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct neuronal reprogramming, by which a neuron is formed via direct conversion from a somatic cell without going through a pluripotent intermediate stage, allows for the possibility of generating patient-derived neurons. A unique feature of these so-called induced neurons (iNs is the potential to maintain aging and epigenetic signatures of the donor, which is critical given that many diseases of the CNS are age related. Here, we review the published literature on the work that has been undertaken using iNs to model human brain disorders. Furthermore, as disease-modeling studies using this direct neuronal reprogramming approach are becoming more widely adopted, it is important to assess the criteria that are used to characterize the iNs, especially in relation to the extent to which they are mature adult neurons. In particular: i what constitutes an iN cell, ii which stages of conversion offer the earliest/optimal time to assess features that are specific to neurons and/or a disorder and iii whether generating subtype-specific iNs is critical to the disease-related features that iNs express. Finally, we discuss the range of potential biomedical applications that can be explored using patient-specific models of neurological disorders with iNs, and the challenges that will need to be overcome in order to realize these applications.

  12. Peripheral and Spinal Mechanisms of Acupoint Sensitization Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jing Rong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out on adult female Sprague-Dawley rats to observe the position, size, and sensitivity change of inflammatory reactions on body surfaces induced by colorectal import of inflammatory irritant mustard oil. Colorectal distension (CRD was adopted as a visceral noxious stimulus to record the activities of spinal dorsal horn wide-dynamic range (WDR neurons activities at spinal segments L1–L3. The study also observed the activations of WDR neurons by electro-acupuncture (EA on acupoints of Zusanli-Shangjuxu before and after different intensities of CRD stimulation and the dose-response relationship between stimulus and response. The results show that in the case of visceral inflammation, the number of exudation points of neurogenic reaction on body surfaces increased along with the severity of visceral inflammation (Li et al. 2006. The area of peripheral receptive fields of WDR neurons also enlarged along with the intensity of visceral inflammatory response. The activation effect of EA on WDR neurons was positively correlated with the severity of visceral inflammation. Therefore, we concluded that the function of acupoints can be sensitized by visceral noxious stimuli. When the function of internal organs was damaged, the number of reaction points on body surfaces, the size of acupoints’ receptive fields, and the sensitivity of acupoints changed accordingly.

  13. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  14. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  15. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Sid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behavior intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is a slight mismatch of the burst frequency. The lumped model accurately accounts for both intrinsic bursting and post inhibitory rebound potentials in the neuron model, features which are absent in prevalent neural mass models.

  16. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  17. Imaging voltage in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  18. Doubly stochastic coherence in complex neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with various topological structures is investigated under the co-presence of two independently additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noises, in which particular attention is paid to the neuronal networks spiking regularity. As the additive noise intensity and the multiplicative noise intensity are simultaneously adjusted to optimal values, the temporal periodicity of the output of the system reaches the maximum, indicating the occurrence of doubly stochastic coherence. The network topology randomness exerts different influences on the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation for dissimilar coupling strength regimes. At a small coupling strength, the spiking regularity shows nearly no difference in the regular, small-world, and completely random networks. At an intermediate coupling strength, the temporal periodicity in a small-world neuronal network can be improved slightly by adding a small fraction of long-range connections. At a large coupling strength, the dynamical behavior of the neurons completely loses the resonance property with regard to the additive noise intensity or the multiplicative noise intensity, and the spiking regularity decreases considerably with the increase of the network topology randomness. The network topology randomness plays more of a depressed role than a favorable role in improving the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation in the neuronal network research study.

  19. Glutamate gated spiking Neuron Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Krisha M; Roy, Soumik

    2014-01-01

    Biological neuron models mainly analyze the behavior of neural networks. Neurons are described in terms of firing rates viz an analog signal. The Izhikevich neuron model is an efficient, powerful model of spiking neuron. This model is a reduction of Hodgkin-Huxley model to a two variable system and is capable of producing rich firing patterns for many biological neurons. In this paper, the Regular Spiking (RS) neuron firing pattern is used to simulate the spiking of Glutamate gated postsynaptic membrane. Simulation is done in MATLAB environment for excitatory action of synapses. Analogous simulation of spiking of excitatory postsynaptic membrane potential is obtained.

  20. Photosensitive neurons in mollusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartelija Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to regular photoreceptors, some invertebrates possess simple extra ocular photoreceptors. For ex­ample, the central ganglia of mollusks contain photosensitive neurons. These neurons are located on the dorsal surface of the ganglia and based on their electrophysiological properties it has been postulated that they are internal photoreceptors. Besides the eye, transduction of light also occurs in these extra-ocular photoreceptors. In the present work, we analyze the reactivity of these nerve cells to light and describe the underlying mechanism mediating the light-induced response.

  1. From Neurons to Newtons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    proteins generate forces, to the macroscopic levels where overt arm movements are vol- untarily controlled within an unpredictable environment by legions of neurons¯ring in orderly fashion. An extensive computer simulation system has been developed for this thesis, which at present contains a neural...... network scripting language for specifying arbitrary neural architectures, de¯nition ¯les for detailed spinal networks, various biologically realistic models of neurons, and dynamic synapses. Also included are structurally accurate models of intrafusal and extra-fusal muscle ¯bers and a general body...

  2. Diverse coupling of neurons to populations in sensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Michael; Steinmetz, Nicholas; Cossell, Lee; Iacaruso, M Florencia; Ko, Ho; Barthó, Péter; Moore, Tirin; Hofer, Sonja B; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D; Carandini, Matteo; Harris, Kenneth D

    2015-05-28

    A large population of neurons can, in principle, produce an astronomical number of distinct firing patterns. In cortex, however, these patterns lie in a space of lower dimension, as if individual neurons were "obedient members of a huge orchestra". Here we use recordings from the visual cortex of mouse (Mus musculus) and monkey (Macaca mulatta) to investigate the relationship between individual neurons and the population, and to establish the underlying circuit mechanisms. We show that neighbouring neurons can differ in their coupling to the overall firing of the population, ranging from strongly coupled 'choristers' to weakly coupled 'soloists'. Population coupling is largely independent of sensory preferences, and it is a fixed cellular attribute, invariant to stimulus conditions. Neurons with high population coupling are more strongly affected by non-sensory behavioural variables such as motor intention. Population coupling reflects a causal relationship, predicting the response of a neuron to optogenetically driven increases in local activity. Moreover, population coupling indicates synaptic connectivity; the population coupling of a neuron, measured in vivo, predicted subsequent in vitro estimates of the number of synapses received from its neighbours. Finally, population coupling provides a compact summary of population activity; knowledge of the population couplings of n neurons predicts a substantial portion of their n(2) pairwise correlations. Population coupling therefore represents a novel, simple measure that characterizes the relationship of each neuron to a larger population, explaining seemingly complex network firing patterns in terms of basic circuit variables.

  3. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether......Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  4. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  5. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  6. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.; van Gils, Stephanus A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting

  7. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational...

  8. Identifying neuronal oscillations using rhythmicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, A.M.M.; Ede, F.L. van; Maris, E.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are a characteristic feature of neuronal activity and are typically investigated through measures of power and coherence. However, neither of these measures directly reflects the distinctive feature of oscillations: their rhythmicity. Rhythmicity is the extent to which future

  9. A Neuron Model Based Ultralow Current Sensor System for Bioapplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. M. Arifuzzman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultralow current sensor system based on the Izhikevich neuron model is presented in this paper. The Izhikevich neuron model has been used for its superior computational efficiency and greater biological plausibility over other well-known neuron spiking models. Of the many biological neuron spiking features, regular spiking, chattering, and neostriatal spiny projection spiking have been reproduced by adjusting the parameters associated with the model at hand. This paper also presents a modified interpretation of the regular spiking feature in which the firing pattern is similar to that of the regular spiking but with improved dynamic range offering. The sensor current ranges between 2 pA and 8 nA and exhibits linearity in the range of 0.9665 to 0.9989 for different spiking features. The efficacy of the sensor system in detecting low amount of current along with its high linearity attribute makes it very suitable for biomedical applications.

  10. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... We reported earlier that motor neuron disease occurs more commonly among blacks than Parkinson's disease, which is relatively rare in this race group.! The hypothesis that these conditions, and other neuronal abiotrophies, are the result of previous subclinical neuronal insult and subsequent age-related.

  11. Simple model of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented that reproduces spiking and bursting behavior of known types of cortical neurons. The model combines the biologically plausibility of Hodgkin-Huxley-type dynamics and the computational efficiency of integrate-and-fire neurons. Using this model, one can simulate tens of thousands of spiking cortical neurons in real time (1 ms resolution) using a desktop PC.

  12. Moving Neurons back into place

    OpenAIRE

    Kerjan, Geraldine; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2009-01-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) is a neuron migration disorder characterized by an aberrant ‘band-like’ accumulation of neurons within the neocortical white matter, frequently leading to mental retardation and epilepsy. SBH can now be regressed by reactivating neuronal migration.

  13. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  14. Understanding Neuronal Mechanisms of Epilepsy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Control il ti. Human brain. Control epileptic. Mutani et al., 1994 ... of Calcium Transients Evoked in. Response to Spontaneous Epileptic ... Proof : Feed forward inhibition in subiculum. CA1. Subiculum. Stimulation artifact. -60 mV. Excitatory neuron. Inhibitory neuron. Excitatory neuron. Excitatory. Synapse. Inhibitory. Synapse.

  15. Vasculo-Neuronal Coupling: Retrograde Vascular Communication to Brain Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Ramiro Diaz, Juan; Iddings, Jennifer A; Filosa, Jessica A

    2016-12-14

    Continuous cerebral blood flow is essential for neuronal survival, but whether vascular tone influences resting neuronal function is not known. Using a multidisciplinary approach in both rat and mice brain slices, we determined whether flow/pressure-evoked increases or decreases in parenchymal arteriole vascular tone, which result in arteriole constriction and dilation, respectively, altered resting cortical pyramidal neuron activity. We present evidence for intercellular communication in the brain involving a flow of information from vessel to astrocyte to neuron, a direction opposite to that of classic neurovascular coupling and referred to here as vasculo-neuronal coupling (VNC). Flow/pressure increases within parenchymal arterioles increased vascular tone and simultaneously decreased resting pyramidal neuron firing activity. On the other hand, flow/pressure decreases evoke parenchymal arteriole dilation and increased resting pyramidal neuron firing activity. In GLAST-CreERT2; R26-lsl-GCaMP3 mice, we demonstrate that increased parenchymal arteriole tone significantly increased intracellular calcium in perivascular astrocyte processes, the onset of astrocyte calcium changes preceded the inhibition of cortical pyramidal neuronal firing activity. During increases in parenchymal arteriole tone, the pyramidal neuron response was unaffected by blockers of nitric oxide, GABAA, glutamate, or ecto-ATPase. However, VNC was abrogated by TRPV4 channel, GABAB, as well as an adenosine A1 receptor blocker. Differently to pyramidal neuron responses, increases in flow/pressure within parenchymal arterioles increased the firing activity of a subtype of interneuron. Together, these data suggest that VNC is a complex constitutive active process that enables neurons to efficiently adjust their resting activity according to brain perfusion levels, thus safeguarding cellular homeostasis by preventing mismatches between energy supply and demand. We present evidence for vessel-to-neuron

  16. Analysis of laser-induced heating in optical neuronal guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Christian L.; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to control the growth direction of neuronal growth cones by stimulation with weak laser light; an effect dubbed optical neuronal guidance. The effect exists for a broad range of laser wavelengths, spot sizes, spot intensities, optical intensity...... of the guided neuron have been neglected in the optical neuronal guidance literature. The results of our finite-element-method simulations show the relevance of the temperature field in optical guidance experiments and are consistent with published experimental results and modeling in the field of optical traps....... Furthermore, we propose two experiments designed to test this hypotheses experimentally. For one of these experiments, we have designed a microfluidic platform, to be made using standard microfabrication techniques, for incubation of neurons in temperature gradients on micrometer lengthscales....

  17. A mechanism for cognitive dynamics: neuronal communication through neuronal coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    At any one moment, many neuronal groups in our brain are active. Microelectrode recordings have characterized the activation of single neurons and fMRI has unveiled brain-wide activation patterns. Now it is time to understand how the many active neuronal groups interact with each other and how their communication is flexibly modulated to bring about our cognitive dynamics. I hypothesize that neuronal communication is mechanistically subserved by neuronal coherence. Activated neuronal groups oscillate and thereby undergo rhythmic excitability fluctuations that produce temporal windows for communication. Only coherently oscillating neuronal groups can interact effectively, because their communication windows for input and for output are open at the same times. Thus, a flexible pattern of coherence defines a flexible communication structure, which subserves our cognitive flexibility.

  18. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in these neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  19. Vagal Sensory Neuron Subtypes that Differentially Control Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rui B; Strochlic, David E; Williams, Erika K; Umans, Benjamin D; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-04-23

    Breathing is essential for survival and under precise neural control. The vagus nerve is a major conduit between lung and brain required for normal respiration. Here, we identify two populations of mouse vagus nerve afferents (P2ry1, Npy2r), each a few hundred neurons, that exert powerful and opposing effects on breathing. Genetically guided anatomical mapping revealed that these neurons densely innervate the lung and send long-range projections to different brainstem targets. Npy2r neurons are largely slow-conducting C fibers, while P2ry1 neurons are largely fast-conducting A fibers that contact pulmonary endocrine cells (neuroepithelial bodies). Optogenetic stimulation of P2ry1 neurons acutely silences respiration, trapping animals in exhalation, while stimulating Npy2r neurons causes rapid, shallow breathing. Activating P2ry1 neurons did not impact heart rate or gastric pressure, other autonomic functions under vagal control. Thus, the vagus nerve contains intermingled sensory neurons constituting genetically definable labeled lines with different anatomical connections and physiological roles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Review Essay: Mirror Neurons in the Discourse of Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Pätzold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery in the mid-1990s, mirror neurons have been the subject of continuous discussions in neurosciences as well as in the social sciences. The interest of scientists outside the life sciences in mirror neurons is primarily based on the fact that mirror neurons not only have epistemological meaning, but also seem to play an important role in processes of social insights and emotions, like empathy. With her book, Nadia ZABOURA provides a new contribution from a social and cultural sciences point of view, which critically reflects the discussion on mirror neurons and its consequences on the social sciences and humanities. Starting off from philosophical approaches to the mind-matter-dualism and the question of intersubjectivity, she explores the meaning of mirror neurons for the debate on empathy and communication. By discussing concepts of philosophy and communication sciences as well as current knowledge on mirror neurons, she concludes that they do not provide a stable basis for any material reductionism, which would explain phenomena like intersubjectivity only by recordable neuronal processes. The book refers to a variety of related theories (ranging from DESCARTES through to MEAD and TOMASELLO; these references are inspiring, yet they stay cursory for the most part. All in all the book offers avenues for further inquiry on the issues in focus, and can rather be taken as "tour of suggestions" through the topical field of mirror neurons and the related research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1003245

  1. Neuron-specific splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Nor Hakimah Ab; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2017-03-22

    During pre-mRNA splicing events, introns are removed from the pre-mRNA, and the remaining exons are connected together to form a single continuous molecule. Alternative splicing is a common mechanism for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. More than 90% of human genes are known to undergo alternative splicing. The most common type of alternative splicing is exon skipping, which is also known as cassette exon. Other known alternative splicing events include alternative 5' splice sites, alternative 3' splice sites, intron retention, and mutually exclusive exons. Alternative splicing events are controlled by regulatory proteins responsible for both positive and negative regulation. In this review, we focus on neuronal splicing regulators and discuss several notable regulators in depth. In addition, we have also included an example of splicing regulation mediated by the RBFox protein family. Lastly, as previous studies have shown that a number of splicing factors are associated with neuronal diseases such as Alzheime's disease (AD) and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), here we consider their importance in neuronal diseases wherein the underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated.

  2. On the Basis of Synaptic Integration Constancy during Growth of a Neuronal Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana De-La-Rosa Tovar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied how a neuronal circuit composed of two neuron types connected by chemical and electrical synapses maintains constant its integrative capacities as neurons grow. For this we combined electrophysiological experiments with mathematical modeling in pairs of electrically-coupled Retzius neurons from postnatal to adult leeches. The electrically-coupled dendrites of both Retzius neurons receive a common chemical input, which produces excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs with varying amplitudes. Each EPSP spreads to the soma, but also crosses the electrical synapse to arrive at the soma of the coupled neuron. The leak of synaptic current across the electrical synapse reduces the amplitude of the EPSPs in proportion to the coupling ratio. In addition, summation of EPSPs generated in both neurons generates the baseline action potentials of these serotonergic neurons. To study how integration is adjusted as neurons grow, we first studied the characteristics of the chemical and electrical connections onto the coupled dendrites of neuron pairs with soma diameters ranging from 21 to 75 μm. Then by feeding a mathematical model with the neuronal voltage responses to pseudorandom noise currents we obtained the values of the coupling ratio, the membrane resistance of the soma (rm and dendrites (rdend, the space constant (λ and the characteristic dendritic length (L = l/λ. We found that the EPSPs recorded from the somata were similar regardless on the neuron size. However, the amplitude of the EPSPs and the firing frequency of the neurons were inversely proportional to the coupling ratio of the neuron pair, which also was independent from the neuronal size. This data indicated that the integrative constancy relied on the passive membrane properties. We show that the growth of Retzius neurons was compensated by increasing the membrane resistance of the dendrites and therefore the λ value. By solely increasing the dendrite resistance this circuit

  3. Electrolyte-gated organic synapse transistor interfaced with neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Desbief, Simon; Casalini, Stefano; Guerin, David; Tortorella, Silvia; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Kyndiah, Adrica; Murgia, Mauro; Cramer, Tobias; Biscarini, Fabio; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an electrolyte-gated hybrid nanoparticle/organic synapstor (synapse-transistor, termed EGOS) that exhibits short-term plasticity as biological synapses. The response of EGOS makes it suitable to be interfaced with neurons: short-term plasticity is observed at spike voltage as low as 50 mV (in a par with the amplitude of action potential in neurons) and with a typical response time in the range of tens milliseconds. Human neuroblastoma stem cells are adhered and differentiated into neurons on top of EGOS. We observe that the presence of the cells does not alter short-term plasticity of the device.

  4. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  5. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks as defined by the shape of individual neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Travençolo, Bruno A. N.; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2009-10-01

    Biological neuronal networks constitute a special class of dynamical systems, as they are formed by individual geometrical components, namely the neurons. In the existing literature, relatively little attention has been given to the influence of neuron shape on the overall connectivity and dynamics of the emerging networks. The current work addresses this issue by considering simplified neuronal shapes consisting of circular regions (soma/axons) with spokes (dendrites). Networks are grown by placing these patterns randomly in the two-dimensional (2D) plane and establishing connections whenever a piece of dendrite falls inside an axon. Several topological and dynamical properties of the resulting graph are measured, including the degree distribution, clustering coefficients, symmetry of connections, size of the largest connected component, as well as three hierarchical measurements of the local topology. By varying the number of processes of the individual basic patterns, we can quantify relationships between the individual neuronal shape and the topological and dynamical features of the networks. Integrate-and-fire dynamics on these networks is also investigated with respect to transient activation from a source node, indicating that long-range connections play an important role in the propagation of avalanches.

  7. Connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks as defined by the shape of individual neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahnert, Sebastian E [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); A N Travencolo, Bruno; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura [Instituto de FIsica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao Carlense 400, Caixa Postal 369, CEP 13560-970, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: luciano@if.sc.usp.br

    2009-10-15

    Biological neuronal networks constitute a special class of dynamical systems, as they are formed by individual geometrical components, namely the neurons. In the existing literature, relatively little attention has been given to the influence of neuron shape on the overall connectivity and dynamics of the emerging networks. The current work addresses this issue by considering simplified neuronal shapes consisting of circular regions (soma/axons) with spokes (dendrites). Networks are grown by placing these patterns randomly in the two-dimensional (2D) plane and establishing connections whenever a piece of dendrite falls inside an axon. Several topological and dynamical properties of the resulting graph are measured, including the degree distribution, clustering coefficients, symmetry of connections, size of the largest connected component, as well as three hierarchical measurements of the local topology. By varying the number of processes of the individual basic patterns, we can quantify relationships between the individual neuronal shape and the topological and dynamical features of the networks. Integrate-and-fire dynamics on these networks is also investigated with respect to transient activation from a source node, indicating that long-range connections play an important role in the propagation of avalanches.

  8. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neurons diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas eStifani

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons (MNs) are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS) controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal motor neurons (SpMNs) that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs a...

  9. Nasal neuron PET imaging quantifies neuron generation and degeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Riley, Misha M; Cao, Luxiang; Ehses, Janina; Herrick, Scott P; Ricq, Emily L; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; O'Neill, Michael J; Ahmed, Zeshan; Murray, Tracey K; Smith, Jaclyn E; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Albers, Mark W; Hooker, Jacob M

    2017-01-01

    .... Quantification of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which detect odors within the nasal cavity, would provide insight into the etiology of olfactory dysfunction associated with disease and mortality...

  10. Properties of solitary tract neurones responding to peripheral arterial chemoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, J F; Deuchars, J; Li, Y W; Kasparov, S

    2001-01-01

    Despite the highly integrated pattern of response evoked by peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, limited information exists regarding the neurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract that mediate this reflex. Using a working heart-brainstem preparation, we describe evoked synaptic response patterns, some intrinsic membrane properties, location, morphology and axonal projections of physiologically characterised 'chemoreceptive' neurones located in the solitary tract nucleus in the rat. From 172 whole cell recordings, 56 neurones were identified as chemoreceptive since they responded to aortic injections of low doses of sodium cyanide (2-5 microg). Chemoreceptive neurones had a mean resting membrane potential of -52+/-1 mV and input resistance was 297+/-15 M(Omega) (n=56). Synaptic responses evoked included excitatory synaptic potentials alone, excitatory-inhibitory post-synaptic potential complexes, inhibitory synaptic potentials alone and central respiratory modulated synaptic potentials. Synaptic response latency data were obtained by stimulating electrically the solitary tract: the mean excitatory synaptic latency was 5.2+/-0.4 ms (range 2.5-8.0 ms; n=17). Chemoreceptive neurones showed a heterogeneity in their intrinsic membrane properties: neurones displayed either steady state, augmenting or adapting firing responses to depolarising current injection and, in some neurones, either delayed excitation or rebound activity following hyperpolarising pulses. Eleven chemoreceptive neurones were labelled and provided the first morphological data of these cells. Labelled somata were detected dorsomedial or medial to the solitary tract spanning the obex. Neurones typically had three to eight primary dendrites which often entered the solitary tract as well as extending across the ipsilateral region of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Axons were mostly unmyelinated with boutons of the en passant variety and often ramified within the solitary tract nucleus as well

  11. A Very Low Dark Current Temperature-Resistant, Wide Dynamic Range, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-07-01

    A very low dark current (VLDC) temperature-resistant approach which best suits a wide dynamic range (WDR) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a lateral over-flow integration capacitor (LOFIC) has been developed. By implementing a low electric field photodiode without a trade-off of full well-capacity, reduced plasma damage, re-crystallization, and termination of silicon-silicon dioxide interface states in the front end of line and back end of line (FEOL and BEOL) in a 0.18 µm, two polycrystalline silicon, three metal (2P3M) process, the dark current is reduced to 11 e-/s/pixel (0.35 e-/s/µm2: pixel area normalized) at 60 °C, which is the lowest value ever reported. For further robustness at low and high temperatures, 1/3-in., 5.6-µm pitch, 800×600 pixel sensor chips with low noise readout circuits designed for a signal and noise hold circuit and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) have also been deposited with an inorganic cap layer on a micro-lens and covered with a metal hermetically sealed package assembly. Image sensing performance results in 2.4 e-rms temporal noise and 100 dB dynamic range (DR) with 237 ke- full well-capacity. The operating temperature range is extended from -40 to 85 °C while retaining good image quality.

  12. Resonate-and-fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2001-01-01

    We suggest a simple spiking model-resonate-and-fire neuron, which is similar to the integrate-and-fire neuron except that the state variable is complex. The model provides geometric illustrations to many interesting phenomena occurring in biological neurons having subthreshold damped oscillations of membrane potential. For example, such neurons prefer a certain resonant frequency of the input that is nearly equal to their eigenfrequency, they can be excited or inhibited by a doublet (two pulses) depending on its interspike interval, and they can fire in response to an inhibitory input. All these properties could be observed in Hodgkin-Huxley-type models. We use the resonate-and-fire model to illustrate possible sensitivity of biological neurons to the fine temporal structure of the input spike train. Being an analogue of the integrate-and-fire model, the resonate-and-fire model is computationally efficient and suitable for simulations of large networks of spiking neurons.

  13. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons: co-existence and co-absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Martin; Schlabrakowski, Anne; Schrödl, Falk; Neuhuber, Winfried; Brehmer, Axel

    2009-10-01

    Most myenteric neurons contain one of the two generating enzymes for major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Two minor groups of myenteric neurons contain either both enzymes or neither. Our study had two aims: (1) to compare the proportions of neurons stained for ChAT and/or NOS in human small and large intestinal whole-mounts by co-staining with an antibody against the human neuronal protein Hu C/D (HU); (2) to characterize these neurons morphologically by co-staining with a neurofilament (NF) antibody. In small intestinal whole-mounts co-stained with HU, we counted more ChAT-positive (ChAT+) than NOS+ neurons (52% vs. 38%), whereas the large intestine exhibited fewer ChAT+ than NOS+ neurons (38% vs. 50%). Neurons co-reactive for both ChAT and NOS accounted for about 3% in both regions, whereas neurons negative for both enzymes accounted for 7% in the small intestine and 8% in the large intestine. Co-staining with NF revealed that, in both small and large intestine, ChAT+/NOS+ neurons were either spiny (type I) neurons or displayed smaller perikarya that were weakly or not NF-stained. Of all spiny neurons, almost one third was co-reactive for ChAT and NOS, whereas nearly two thirds were positive only for NOS. Neurons negative for both ChAT and NOS were heterogeneous in size and NF reactivity. Thus, neither the co-existence nor the co-absence of ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons is indicative for particular neuron types, with several qualitative and quantitative parameters showing a wide range of interindividual variability.

  15. STDP in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Gilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented.

  16. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  17. How neurons migrate: a dynamic in-silico model of neuronal migration in the developing cortex

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Setty, Yaki

    2011-09-30

    , testable framework. Our model accounts for a range of observable behaviors and affords a computational framework to study aspects of neuronal migration as a complex process that is driven by a relatively simple molecular program. Analysis of the model generated new hypotheses and yet unobserved phenomena that may guide future experimental studies. This paper thus reports a first step toward a comprehensive in-silico model of neuronal migration.

  18. Cell Type-Specific Effects of Adenosine on Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aerde, Karlijn I.; Qi, Guanxiao; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The neuromodulator adenosine is widely considered to be a key regulator of sleep homeostasis and an indicator of sleep need. Although the effect of adenosine on subcortical areas has been previously described, the effects on cortical neurons have not been addressed systematically to date. To that purpose, we performed in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and biocytin staining of pyramidal neurons and interneurons throughout all layers of rat prefrontal and somatosensory cortex, followed by morphological analysis. We found that adenosine, via the A1 receptor, exerts differential effects depending on neuronal cell type and laminar location. Interneurons and pyramidal neurons in layer 2 and a subpopulation of layer 3 pyramidal neurons that displayed regular spiking were insensitive to adenosine application, whereas other pyramidal cells in layers 3–6 were hyperpolarized (range 1.2–10.8 mV). Broad tufted pyramidal neurons with little spike adaptation showed a small adenosine response, whereas slender tufted pyramidal neurons with substantial adaptation showed a bigger response. These studies of the action of adenosine at the postsynaptic level may contribute to the understanding of the changes in cortical circuit functioning that take place between sleep and awakening. PMID:24108800

  19. Population Coding in Sparsely Connected Networks of Noisy Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Patrick Tripp

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between population coding and spatial connection statistics in networks of noisy neurons. Encoding of sensory information in the neocortex is thought to require coordinated neural populations, because individual cortical neurons respond to a wide range of stimuli, and exhibit highly variable spiking in response to repeated stimuli. Population coding is rooted in network structure, because cortical neurons receive information only from other neurons, and because the information they encode must be decoded by other neurons, if it is to affect behaviour. However, population coding theory has often ignored network structure, or assumed discrete, fully-connected populations (in contrast with the sparsely connected, continuous sheet of the cortex. In this study, we model a sheet of cortical neurons with sparse, primarily local connections, and find that a network with this structure can encode multiple internal state variables with high signal-to-noise ratio. However, in our model, although connection probability varies with the distance between neurons, we find that the connections cannot be instantiated at random according to these probabilities, but must have additional structure if information is to be encoded with high fidelity.

  20. Gold Nanoparticles for Modulating Neuronal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Paviolo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the detailed functioning and pathophysiology of the brain and the nervous system continues to challenge the scientific community, particularly in terms of scaling up techniques for monitoring and interfacing with complex 3D networks. Nanotechnology has the potential to support this scaling up, where the eventual goal would be to address individual nerve cells within functional units of both the central and peripheral nervous system. Gold nanoparticles provide a variety of physical and chemical properties that have attracted attention as a light-activated nanoscale neuronal interface. This review provides a critical overview of the photothermal and photomechanical properties of chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles that have been exploited to trigger a range of biological responses in neuronal tissues, including modulation of electrical activity and nerve regeneration. The prospects and challenges for further development are also discussed.

  1. Transistor analogs of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmuth, Guy; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2008-01-01

    Neuromorphic analog metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) transistor circuits promise compact, low-power, and high-speed emulations of iono-neuronal dynamics orders-of-magnitude faster than digital simulation. However, their inherently limited input voltage dynamic range vs power consumption and silicon die area tradeoffs makes them highly sensitive to transistor mismatch due to fabrication inaccuracy, device noise, and other nonidealities. This limitation precludes robust analog very-large-scale-integration (aVLSI) circuits implementation of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics computations beyond simple spiking with limited ion channel dynamics. Here we present versatile neuromorphic analog building-block circuits that afford near-maximum voltage dynamic range operating within the low-power MOS transistor weak-inversion regime which is ideal for aVLSI implementation or implantable biomimetic device applications. The fabricated microchip allowed robust realization of dynamic iono-neuronal computations such as coincidence detection of presynaptic spikes or pre- and postsynaptic activities. As a critical performance benchmark, the high-speed and highly interactive iono-neuronal simulation capability on-chip enabled our prompt discovery of a minimal model of chaotic pacemaker bursting, an emergent iono-neuronal behavior of fundamental biological significance which has hitherto defied experimental testing or computational exploration via conventional digital or analog simulations. These compact and power-efficient transistor analogs of emergent iono-neuronal dynamics open new avenues for next-generation neuromorphic, neuroprosthetic, and brain-machine interface applications. PMID:19404469

  2. Study of ATM Phosphorylation by Cdk5 in Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2017-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-like kinase ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) plays a central role in coordinating the DNA damage responses including cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Mutations of ATM cause a spectrum of defects ranging from neurodegeneration to cancer predisposition. We previously showed that Cdk5 (cyclin-dependent kinase 5) is activated by DNA damage and directly phosphorylates ATM at serine 794 in postmitotic neurons. Phosphorylation at serine 794 precedes and is required for ATM autophosphorylation at serine 1981, and activates ATM kinase activity. Cdk5-ATM pathway plays a crucial role in DNA damage-induced neuronal injury. This chapter describes protocols used in analyzing ATM phosphorylation by Cdk5 in CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons) and its effects on neuronal survival.

  3. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  4. Distribution of glycinergic neuronal somata in the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, Mehdi; French, Pim J; Holstege, Jan C

    2007-04-20

    Glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2) mRNA is exclusively expressed in glycinergic neurons, and is presently considered a reliable marker for glycinergic neuronal somata. In this study, we have performed non-radioactive in situ hybridization to localize GlyT2 mRNA in fixed free-floating sections of cervical (C2 and C6), thoracic (T5), lumbar (L2 and L5) and sacral (S1) segments of the rat spinal cord. The results showed that in all segments the majority of the GlyT2 mRNA labeled (glycinergic) neuronal somata was present in the deep dorsal horn and the intermediate zone (laminae III-VIII), with around 50% (range 43.7-70.9%) in laminae VII&VIII. In contrast, the superficial dorsal horn, the motoneuronal cell groups and the area around the central canal contained only few glycinergic neuronal somata. The density (number of glycinergic neuronal somata per mm(2)) was also low in these areas, while the highest densities were found in laminae V to VIII. The lateral spinal nucleus and the lateral cervical nucleus also contained a limited number of glycinergic neurons. Our findings showed that the distribution pattern of the glycinergic neuronal somata is similar in all the examined segments. The few differences that were found in the relative laminar distribution between some of the segments, are most likely due to technical reasons. We therefore conclude that the observed distribution pattern of glycinergic neuronal somata is present throughout the spinal cord. Our findings further showed that the non-radioactive in situ hybridization technique for identifying GlyT2 mRNA in fixed free-floating sections is a highly efficient tool for identifying glycinergic neurons in the spinal cord.

  5. [Neurons and values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    This article examines the advances made by neuroscience in the attempt to find an answer to the question regarding the origin and foundation of moral judgements and of human behaviour in compliance with them. The conception of the brain as something dynamic and capable of adapting to the social and cultural surroundings is seen to be an important point for philosophy. At the same time, the complexity of ethical issues that cannot be reduced to observations based strictly on neurons alone also becomes quite apparent. Nevertheless, scientists and philosophers should get together and communicate with one another so as to be able to pose their questions with greater rigour and take advantage of each other's respective knowledge.

  6. Multiplying with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, F.; Krapp, H.; Koch, C.; Laurent, G.

    1998-03-01

    LGMD and DCMD are a pair of identified neurons in the locust brain thought to be involved in visually triggered escape behavior. LGMD integrates visual inputs in its dendritic arbor, converts them into spikes transmitted in a 1:1 manner to DCMD which relays this information to motor centers. We measured the spike activity of DCMD during simulated object approach and observed that its peak occured prior to the expected collision. The time difference between peak activity and collision depended linearly on the ratio of object size to approach velocity, as expected if LGMD/DCMD were detecting the moment in time when the approaching object reaches a fixed angular threshold θ_thresh on the locust's retina. The response of LGMD/DCMD could be fitted by multiplying the angular velocity at which an approaching object is increasing in size over the retina, dot θ, with an exponential function of the object's angular size, θ: f(t) = g(dot θ(t-δ) e^-α θ(t-δ)) where g is a static non-linearity, α a constant related to the angular threshold detected by LGMD/DCMD (θ_thresh = arctan (2/α)) and δ denotes the lag of the neuronal response with respect to the stimulus. This suggests that LGMD/DCMD derives its angular threshold sensitivity by multiplying dot θ with an exponential of θ. A biophysical implementation would be through linear summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs proportional to log(dot θ) and -α θ, followed by a conversion to spike rate according to the static non-linearity (g circ exp). We have performed several experiments to test this hypothesis.

  7. Inferring nonlinear neuronal computation based on physiologically plausible inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M McFarland

    Full Text Available The computation represented by a sensory neuron's response to stimuli is constructed from an array of physiological processes both belonging to that neuron and inherited from its inputs. Although many of these physiological processes are known to be nonlinear, linear approximations are commonly used to describe the stimulus selectivity of sensory neurons (i.e., linear receptive fields. Here we present an approach for modeling sensory processing, termed the Nonlinear Input Model (NIM, which is based on the hypothesis that the dominant nonlinearities imposed by physiological mechanisms arise from rectification of a neuron's inputs. Incorporating such 'upstream nonlinearities' within the standard linear-nonlinear (LN cascade modeling structure implicitly allows for the identification of multiple stimulus features driving a neuron's response, which become directly interpretable as either excitatory or inhibitory. Because its form is analogous to an integrate-and-fire neuron receiving excitatory and inhibitory inputs, model fitting can be guided by prior knowledge about the inputs to a given neuron, and elements of the resulting model can often result in specific physiological predictions. Furthermore, by providing an explicit probabilistic model with a relatively simple nonlinear structure, its parameters can be efficiently optimized and appropriately regularized. Parameter estimation is robust and efficient even with large numbers of model components and in the context of high-dimensional stimuli with complex statistical structure (e.g. natural stimuli. We describe detailed methods for estimating the model parameters, and illustrate the advantages of the NIM using a range of example sensory neurons in the visual and auditory systems. We thus present a modeling framework that can capture a broad range of nonlinear response functions while providing physiologically interpretable descriptions of neural computation.

  8. Postmitotic specification of Drosophila insulinergic neurons from pioneer neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7 and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic beta-cells.

  9. Layer 6 Corticothalamic Neurons Activate a Cortical Output Layer, Layer 5a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Matney, Chanel J.; Blankenship, Aaron; Hestrin, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Layer 6 corticothalamic neurons are thought to modulate incoming sensory information via their intracortical axons targeting the major thalamorecipient layer of the neocortex, layer 4, and via their long-range feedback projections to primary sensory thalamic nuclei. However, anatomical reconstructions of individual layer 6 corticothalamic (L6 CT) neurons include examples with axonal processes ramifying within layer 5, and the relative input of the overall population of L6 CT neurons to layers 4 and 5 is not well understood. We compared the synaptic impact of L6 CT cells on neurons in layers 4 and 5. We found that the axons of L6 CT neurons densely ramified within layer 5a in both visual and somatosensory cortices of the mouse. Optogenetic activation of corticothalamic neurons generated large EPSPs in pyramidal neurons in layer 5a. In contrast, excitatory neurons in layer 4 exhibited weak excitation or disynaptic inhibition. Fast-spiking parvalbumin-positive cells in both layer 5a and layer 4 were also strongly activated by L6 CT neurons. The overall effect of L6 CT activation was to suppress layer 4 while eliciting action potentials in layer 5a pyramidal neurons. Together, our data indicate that L6 CT neurons strongly activate an output layer of the cortex. PMID:25031405

  10. Preferential labeling of inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons by endogenous tropism of AAV and lentiviral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Nathanson, Jason L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Callaway, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors for transduction of neurons in a wide range of brain structures and species, the diversity of cell types within a given brain structure is rarely considered. For example, the ability of a vector to transduce neurons within a brain structure is often assumed to indicate that all neuron types within the structure are transduced. We have characterized the transduction of mouse somatosensor...

  11. Nonsmooth dynamics in spiking neuron models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, S.; Thul, R.; Wedgwood, K. C. A.

    2012-11-01

    Large scale studies of spiking neural networks are a key part of modern approaches to understanding the dynamics of biological neural tissue. One approach in computational neuroscience has been to consider the detailed electrophysiological properties of neurons and build vast computational compartmental models. An alternative has been to develop minimal models of spiking neurons with a reduction in the dimensionality of both parameter and variable space that facilitates more effective simulation studies. In this latter case the single neuron model of choice is often a variant of the classic integrate-and-fire model, which is described by a nonsmooth dynamical system. In this paper we review some of the more popular spiking models of this class and describe the types of spiking pattern that they can generate (ranging from tonic to burst firing). We show that a number of techniques originally developed for the study of impact oscillators are directly relevant to their analysis, particularly those for treating grazing bifurcations. Importantly we highlight one particular single neuron model, capable of generating realistic spike trains, that is both computationally cheap and analytically tractable. This is a planar nonlinear integrate-and-fire model with a piecewise linear vector field and a state dependent reset upon spiking. We call this the PWL-IF model and analyse it at both the single neuron and network level. The techniques and terminology of nonsmooth dynamical systems are used to flesh out the bifurcation structure of the single neuron model, as well as to develop the notion of Lyapunov exponents. We also show how to construct the phase response curve for this system, emphasising that techniques in mathematical neuroscience may also translate back to the field of nonsmooth dynamical systems. The stability of periodic spiking orbits is assessed using a linear stability analysis of spiking times. At the network level we consider linear coupling between voltage

  12. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-ru Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson′s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5-30 μM elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson′s disease.

  13. A Neuron Model for FPGA Spiking Neuronal Network Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONTEANU, G.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a neuron model, able to reproduce the basic elements of the neuronal dynamics, optimized for digital implementation of Spiking Neural Networks. Its architecture is structured in two major blocks, a datapath and a control unit. The datapath consists of a membrane potential circuit, which emulates the neuronal dynamics at the soma level, and a synaptic circuit used to update the synaptic weight according to the spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP mechanism. The proposed model is implemented into a Cyclone II-Altera FPGA device. Our results indicate the neuron model can be used to build up 1K Spiking Neural Networks on reconfigurable logic suport, to explore various network topologies.

  14. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  15. Evidence of involvement of neurone-glia/neurone-neurone communications via gap junctions in synchronised activity of KNDy neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, K; Minabe, S; Ieda, N; Goto, T; Sugimoto, A; Nakamura, S; Inoue, N; Oishi, S; Maturana, A D; Sanbo, M; Hirabayashi, M; Maeda, K-I; Tsukamura, H; Uenoyama, Y

    2017-06-01

    Pulsatile secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinising hormone is indispensable for the onset of puberty and reproductive activities at adulthood in mammalian species. A cohort of neurones expressing three neuropeptides, namely kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin A, localised in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), so-called KNDy neurones, comprises a putative intrinsic source of the GnRH pulse generator. Synchronous activity among KNDy neurones is considered to be required for pulsatile GnRH secretion. It has been reported that gap junctions play a key role in synchronising electrical activity in the central nervous system. Thus, we hypothesised that gap junctions are involved in the synchronised activities of KNDy neurones, which is induced by NKB-NK3R signalling. We determined the role of NKB-NK3R signalling in Ca 2+ oscillation (an indicator of neuronal activities) of KNDy neurones and its synchronisation mechanism among KNDy neurones. Senktide, a selective agonist for NK3R, increased the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations in cultured Kiss1-GFP cells collected from the mediobasal hypothalamus of the foetal Kiss1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice. The senktide-induced Ca 2+ oscillations were synchronised in the Kiss1-GFP and neighbouring glial cells. Confocal microscopy analysis of these cells, which have shown synchronised Ca 2+ oscillations, revealed close contacts between Kiss1-GFP cells, as well as between Kiss1-GFP cells and glial cells. Dye coupling experiments suggest cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions between Kiss1-GFP cells and neighbouring glial cells. Connexin-26 and -37 mRNA were found in isolated ARC Kiss1 cells taken from adult female Kiss1-GFP transgenic mice. Furthermore, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acids and mefloquine, which are gap junction inhibitors, attenuated senktide-induced Ca 2+ oscillations in Kiss1-GFP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that NKB-NK3R signalling

  16. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in cerebral neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Harkany, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a widely expressed neuropeptide system originally discovered in the gut. Both cerebral and peripheral neurons as well as endocrine I-cells in the small intestine process proCCK to tyrosyl-O-sulfated and α-carboxyamidated peptides. Recently, we reported that gut endocrine I...... for nonsulfated CCK-8 with an antibody recognizing both sulfated and nonsulfated CCK. However, nonsulfated CCK immunoreactivity was stronger than that of sulfated CCK in cell bodies and weaker in nerve terminals. We conclude that only a small fraction of neuronal CCK is nonsulfated. The intracellular distribution...... of nonsulfated CCK in neurons suggests that they contribute only modestly to the CCK transmitter activity....

  17. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides......) was isolated, which also belongs to the less than Glu...Arg-X-NH2 family. Using specific antisera it was shown that all four peptides were located in neurones. Application of low doses of Antho-RFamide, or Antho-RWamide I or II induced contractions of endodermal muscles of sea anemones. This indicates...

  18. Statistical inference on spontaneous neuronal discharge patterns. I. Single neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lánský, P; Radil, T

    1987-01-01

    A statistical analysis was performed on extracellularly recorded spike trains of spontaneously active mesencephalic reticular neurons of rats. Only stationary records were used for detailed examination. The moments of interspike intervals were computed, hypothesis of renewal process and its specific forms was tested. Implications for statistical methodology are considered on the basis of the results. The main emphasis is laid on the connection between experimental results and stochastic neuronal models.

  19. Optimizing information processing in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres; Melo-Silva, Hiago Lucas Cardeal; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Critical dynamics have been postulated as an ideal regime for neuronal networks in the brain, considering optimal dynamic range and information processing. Herein, we focused on how information entropy encoded in spatiotemporal activity patterns may vary in critical networks. We employed branching process based models to investigate how entropy can be embedded in spatiotemporal patterns. We determined that the information capacity of critical networks may vary depending on the manipulation of microscopic parameters. Specifically, the mean number of connections governed the number of spatiotemporal patterns in the networks. These findings are compatible with those of the real neuronal networks observed in specific brain circuitries, where critical behavior is necessary for the optimal dynamic range response but the uncertainty provided by high entropy as coded by spatiotemporal patterns is not required. With this, we were able to reveal that information processing can be optimized in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

  20. Optimizing information processing in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Sacrini Ayres Ferraz

    Full Text Available Critical dynamics have been postulated as an ideal regime for neuronal networks in the brain, considering optimal dynamic range and information processing. Herein, we focused on how information entropy encoded in spatiotemporal activity patterns may vary in critical networks. We employed branching process based models to investigate how entropy can be embedded in spatiotemporal patterns. We determined that the information capacity of critical networks may vary depending on the manipulation of microscopic parameters. Specifically, the mean number of connections governed the number of spatiotemporal patterns in the networks. These findings are compatible with those of the real neuronal networks observed in specific brain circuitries, where critical behavior is necessary for the optimal dynamic range response but the uncertainty provided by high entropy as coded by spatiotemporal patterns is not required. With this, we were able to reveal that information processing can be optimized in neuronal networks beyond critical states.

  1. Patterning human neuronal networks on photolithographically engineered silicon dioxide substrates functionalized with glial analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Mark A; Brennan, Paul M; Bunting, Andrew S; Cameron, Katherine; Murray, Alan F; Shipston, Mike J

    2014-05-01

    Interfacing neurons with silicon semiconductors is a challenge being tackled through various bioengineering approaches. Such constructs inform our understanding of neuronal coding and learning and ultimately guide us toward creating intelligent neuroprostheses. A fundamental prerequisite is to dictate the spatial organization of neuronal cells. We sought to pattern neurons using photolithographically defined arrays of polymer parylene-C, activated with fetal calf serum. We used a purified human neuronal cell line [Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES)] to establish whether neurons remain viable when isolated on-chip or whether they require a supporting cell substrate. When cultured in isolation, LUHMES neurons failed to pattern and did not show any morphological signs of differentiation. We therefore sought a cell type with which to prepattern parylene regions, hypothesizing that this cellular template would enable secondary neuronal adhesion and network formation. From a range of cell lines tested, human embryonal kidney (HEK) 293 cells patterned with highest accuracy. LUHMES neurons adhered to pre-established HEK 293 cell clusters and this coculture environment promoted morphological differentiation of neurons. Neurites extended between islands of adherent cell somata, creating an orthogonally arranged neuronal network. HEK 293 cells appear to fulfill a role analogous to glia, dictating cell adhesion, and generating an environment conducive to neuronal survival. We next replaced HEK 293 cells with slower growing glioma-derived precursors. These primary human cells patterned accurately on parylene and provided a similarly effective scaffold for neuronal adhesion. These findings advance the use of this microfabrication-compatible platform for neuronal patterning. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neuronal spike initiation modulated by extracellular electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Sheng Yi

    Full Text Available Based on a reduced two-compartment model, the dynamical and biophysical mechanism underlying the spike initiation of the neuron to extracellular electric fields is investigated in this paper. With stability and phase plane analysis, we first investigate in detail the dynamical properties of neuronal spike initiation induced by geometric parameter and internal coupling conductance. The geometric parameter is the ratio between soma area and total membrane area, which describes the proportion of area occupied by somatic chamber. It is found that varying it could qualitatively alter the bifurcation structures of equilibrium as well as neuronal phase portraits, which remain unchanged when varying internal coupling conductance. By analyzing the activating properties of somatic membrane currents at subthreshold potentials, we explore the relevant biophysical basis of spike initiation dynamics induced by these two parameters. It is observed that increasing geometric parameter could greatly decrease the intensity of the internal current flowing from soma to dendrite, which switches spike initiation dynamics from Hopf bifurcation to SNIC bifurcation; increasing internal coupling conductance could lead to the increase of this outward internal current, whereas the increasing range is so small that it could not qualitatively alter the spike initiation dynamics. These results highlight that neuronal geometric parameter is a crucial factor in determining the spike initiation dynamics to electric fields. The finding is useful to interpret the functional significance of neuronal biophysical properties in their encoding dynamics, which could contribute to uncovering how neuron encodes electric field signals.

  3. Neuronal AKAP150 coordinates PKA and Epac-mediated PKB/Akt phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Dolga, Amalia M.; Ostroveanu, Anghelus; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Schmidt, Martina; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.

    2008-01-01

    In diverse neuronal processes ranging from neuronal survival to synaptic plasticity cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling is tightly connected with the protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt pathway but the precise nature of this connection remains unknown. In the current study we

  4. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eOster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition.

  5. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-12-06

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild.

  6. Information processing by neuronal populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hölscher, Christian; Munk, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... simultaneously recorded spike trains 120 Mark Laubach, Nandakumar S. Narayanan, and Eyal Y. Kimchi Part III Neuronal population information coding and plasticity in specific brain areas 149 7 F...

  7. Hydrodynamic Limit for Interacting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.; Galves, A.; Löcherbach, E.; Presutti, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic process describing the time evolution of a system with N neurons with mean-field interactions produced both by chemical and by electrical synapses. This system can be informally described as follows. Each neuron spikes randomly following a point process with rate depending on its membrane potential. At its spiking time, the membrane potential of the spiking neuron is reset to the value 0 and, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of the other neurons are increased by an amount of potential . This mimics the effect of chemical synapses. Additionally, the effect of electrical synapses is represented by a deterministic drift of all the membrane potentials towards the average value of the system. We show that, as the system size N diverges, the distribution of membrane potentials becomes deterministic and is described by a limit density which obeys a non linear PDE which is a conservation law of hyperbolic type.

  8. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  9. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-ind......We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N...... of an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose utilization...... is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based...

  10. Distributed processing and temporal codes in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Wolf

    2009-09-01

    The cerebral cortex presents itself as a distributed dynamical system with the characteristics of a small world network. The neuronal correlates of cognitive and executive processes often appear to consist of the coordinated activity of large assemblies of widely distributed neurons. These features require mechanisms for the selective routing of signals across densely interconnected networks, the flexible and context dependent binding of neuronal groups into functionally coherent assemblies and the task and attention dependent integration of subsystems. In order to implement these mechanisms, it is proposed that neuronal responses should convey two orthogonal messages in parallel. They should indicate (1) the presence of the feature to which they are tuned and (2) with which other neurons (specific target cells or members of a coherent assembly) they are communicating. The first message is encoded in the discharge frequency of the neurons (rate code) and it is proposed that the second message is contained in the precise timing relationships between individual spikes of distributed neurons (temporal code). It is further proposed that these precise timing relations are established either by the timing of external events (stimulus locking) or by internal timing mechanisms. The latter are assumed to consist of an oscillatory modulation of neuronal responses in different frequency bands that cover a broad frequency range from 40 Hz (gamma) and ripples. These oscillations limit the communication of cells to short temporal windows whereby the duration of these windows decreases with oscillation frequency. Thus, by varying the phase relationship between oscillating groups, networks of functionally cooperating neurons can be flexibly configurated within hard wired networks. Moreover, by synchronizing the spikes emitted by neuronal populations, the saliency of their responses can be enhanced due to the coincidence sensitivity of receiving neurons in very much the same way as

  11. Automated Sholl analysis of digitized neuronal morphology at multiple scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzing, Melinda K; Langhammer, Christopher G; Luo, Vincent; Lakdawala, Hersh; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2010-11-14

    Neuronal morphology plays a significant role in determining how neurons function and communicate. Specifically, it affects the ability of neurons to receive inputs from other cells and contributes to the propagation of action potentials. The morphology of the neurites also affects how information is processed. The diversity of dendrite morphologies facilitate local and long range signaling and allow individual neurons or groups of neurons to carry out specialized functions within the neuronal network. Alterations in dendrite morphology, including fragmentation of dendrites and changes in branching patterns, have been observed in a number of disease states, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and mental retardation. The ability to both understand the factors that shape dendrite morphologies and to identify changes in dendrite morphologies is essential in the understanding of nervous system function and dysfunction. Neurite morphology is often analyzed by Sholl analysis and by counting the number of neurites and the number of branch tips. This analysis is generally applied to dendrites, but it can also be applied to axons. Performing this analysis by hand is both time consuming and inevitably introduces variability due to experimenter bias and inconsistency. The Bonfire program is a semi-automated approach to the analysis of dendrite and axon morphology that builds upon available open-source morphological analysis tools. Our program enables the detection of local changes in dendrite and axon branching behaviors by performing Sholl analysis on subregions of the neuritic arbor. For example, Sholl analysis is performed on both the neuron as a whole as well as on each subset of processes (primary, secondary, terminal, root, etc.) Dendrite and axon patterning is influenced by a number of intracellular and extracellular factors, many acting locally. Thus, the resulting arbor morphology is a result of specific processes acting on specific neurites, making it

  12. Communication among neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth

    2012-04-01

    The communication among neurons is the prerequisite for the working brain. To understand the cellular, neurochemical, and structural basis of this communication, and the impacts of aging and disease on brain function, quantitative measures are necessary. This thesis evaluates several quantitative neurobiological methods with respect to possible bias and methodological issues. Stereological methods are suited for the unbiased estimation of number, length, and volumes of components of the nervous system. Stereological estimates of the total length of myelinated nerve fibers were made in white matter of post mortem brains, and the impact of aging and diseases as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease were evaluated. Although stereological methods are in principle unbiased, shrinkage artifacts are difficult to account for. Positron emission tomography (PET) recordings, in conjunction with kinetic modeling, permit the quantitation of radioligand binding in brain. The novel serotonin 5-HT4 antagonist [11C]SB207145 was used as an example of the validation process for quantitative PET receptor imaging. Methods based on reference tissue as well as methods based on an arterial plasma input function were evaluated with respect to precision and accuracy. It was shown that [11C]SB207145 binding had high sensitivity to occupancy by unlabeled ligand, necessitating high specific activity in the radiosynthesis to avoid bias. The established serotonin 5-HT2A ligand [18F]altanersin was evaluated in a two-year follow-up study in elderly subjects. Application of partial volume correction of the PET data diminished the reliability of the measures, but allowed for the correct distinction between changes due to brain atrophy and receptor availability. Furthermore, a PET study of patients with Alzheimer's disease with the serotonin transporter ligand [11C]DASB showed relatively preserved serotonergic projections, despite a marked decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding. Possible confounders are

  13. How adaptation shapes spike rate oscillations in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eAugustin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural mass signals from in-vivo recordings often show oscillations with frequencies ranging from <1 Hz to 100 Hz. Fast rhythmic activity in the beta and gamma range can be generated by network based mechanisms such as recurrent synaptic excitation-inhibition loops. Slower oscillations might instead depend on neuronal adaptation currents whose timescales range from tens of milliseconds to seconds. Here we investigate how the dynamics of such adaptation currents contribute to spike rate oscillations and resonance properties in recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Based on a network of sparsely coupled spiking model neurons with two types of adaptation current and conductance based synapses with heterogeneous strengths and delays we use a mean-field approach to analyze oscillatory network activity. For constant external input, we find that spike-triggered adaptation currents provide a mechanism to generate slow oscillations over a wide range of adaptation timescales as long as recurrent synaptic excitation is sufficiently strong. Faster rhythms occur when recurrent inhibition is slower than excitation and oscillation frequency increases with the strength of inhibition. Adaptation facilitates such network based oscillations for fast synaptic inhibition and leads to decreased frequencies. For oscillatory external input, adaptation currents amplify a narrow band of frequencies and cause phase advances for low frequencies in addition to phase delays at higher frequencies. Our results therefore identify the different key roles of neuronal adaptation dynamics for rhythmogenesis and selective signal propagation in recurrent networks.

  14. Spectral components of cytosolic [Ca2+] spiking in neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardos, J; Szilágyi, N; Juhász, G

    1998-01-01

    . Delayed complex responses of large [Ca2+]c spiking observed in cells from a different set of cultures were synthesized by a set of frequencies within the range 0.018-0.117 Hz. Differential frequency patterns are suggested as characteristics of the [Ca2+]c spiking responses of neurons under different...

  15. Culture of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Qizhi

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons, located in the nasal epithelium, detect and transmit odorant information to the central nervous system. This requires that these neurons form specific neuronal connections within the olfactory bulb and express receptors and signaling molecules specific for these functions. This protocol describes a primary olfactory sensory neuron culture technique that allows in vitro investigation of olfactory sensory neuron differentiation, axon outgrowth, odorant receptor expres...

  16. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  17. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  18. Domoic acid disrupts the activity and connectivity of neuronal networks in organotypic brain slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiolski, E M; Ito, S; Beggs, J M; Lefebvre, K A; Litke, A M; Smith, D R

    2016-09-01

    Domoic acid is a neurotoxin produced by algae and is found in seafood during harmful algal blooms. As a glutamate agonist, domoic acid inappropriately stimulates excitatory activity in neurons. At high doses, this leads to seizures and brain lesions, but it is unclear how lower, asymptomatic exposures disrupt neuronal activity. Domoic acid has been detected in an increasing variety of species across a greater geographical range than ever before, making it critical to understand the potential health impacts of low-level exposure on vulnerable marine mammal and human populations. To determine whether prolonged domoic acid exposure altered neuronal activity in hippocampal networks, we used a custom-made 512 multi-electrode array with high spatial and temporal resolution to record extracellular potentials (spikes) in mouse organotypic brain slice cultures. We identified individual neurons based on spike waveform and location, and measured the activity and functional connectivity within the neuronal networks of brain slice cultures. Domoic acid exposure significantly altered neuronal spiking activity patterns, and increased functional connectivity within exposed cultures, in the absence of overt cellular or neuronal toxicity. While the overall spiking activity of neurons in domoic acid-exposed cultures was comparable to controls, exposed neurons spiked significantly more often in bursts. We also identified a subset of neurons that were electrophysiologically silenced in exposed cultures, and putatively identified those neurons as fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. These results provide evidence that domoic acid affects neuronal activity in the absence of cytotoxicity, and suggest that neurodevelopmental exposure to domoic acid may alter neurological function in the absence of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ephaptic coupling in cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Anastassiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical processes that underlie neural function manifest themselves in ceaseless spatial and temporal fluctuations in the extracellular electric field. The local field potential (LFP, used to study neural interactions during various brain states, is regarded as an epiphenomenon of coordinated neural activity. Yet the extracellular field activity feeds back onto the electrical potential across the neuronal membrane via ephaptic coupling (Jefferys et al, Physiol Rev, 1995. The extent to which such ephaptic coupling alters the functioning of individual neurons and neural assemblies under physiological conditions has remained largely speculative despite recent advances (Ozen et al, JNeurosci, 2010; Fröhlich & McCormick, Neuron, 2010, Anastassiou et al, JNeurosci, 2010. To address this question we use a 12-pipette setup that allows independent positioning of each pipette under visual control with μm accuracy, with the flexibility of using an arbitrary number of these as patching, extracellularly stimulating or extracellular recording pipettes only a few μm away from the cell body of patched neurons (Anastassiou et al, Nat Neurosci, 2011. We stimulated in rat somatosensory cortical slices a variety of layer 5 neural types and recorded inside and outside their cell bodies while pharmacologically silencing synaptic transmission. Pyramidal cells couple to the extracellular field distinctly different from interneurons. Ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the neuron soma as well as the spike-history of neurons. In particular, we find that ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the cell body as well as the spike-history of neurons. How do such effects manifest themselves in vivo? We address this question through detailed large-scale simulations from thousands of biophysically realistic and interconnected neurons (Reimann, Anastassiou et al, Neuron, 2013 emulating

  20. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-05

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. © 2015 The Author(s).

  1. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  2. Neuronal vulnerability in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Double, Kay L

    2012-01-01

    The classic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease result from the progressive death of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. To date the relatively selective vulnerability of this brain region is not understood. The unique feature of dopaminergic neurons of the human substantia nigra pars compacta is the presence of the polymer pigment neuromelanin which gives this region its characteristic dark colour. In the healthy brain, neuromelanin appears to play a functional role to protect neurons from oxidative load but we have shown that in the Parkinson's disease brain the pigment undergoes structural changes and is associated with aggregation of α-synuclein protein, even early in the disease process. Further, the role of the pigment as a metal binder has also been suggested to underlie the relative vulnerability of these neurons, as changes in metal levels are suggested to be associated with neurodegenerative cascades in Parkinson's disease. While most research to date has focused on the role of iron in these pathways we have recently shown that changes in copper may contribute to neuronal vulnerability in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Combined Single Neuron Unit Activity and Local Field Potential Oscillations in a Human Visual Recognition Memory Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Michael Berry, B; Bower, Mark R; Cimbalnik, Jan; Svehlik, Vojtech; Matt Stead, S; Worrell, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Activities of neuronal networks range from action potential firing of individual neurons, coordinated oscillations of local neuronal assemblies, and distributed neural populations. Here, we describe recordings using hybrid electrodes, containing both micro- and clinical macroelectrodes, to simultaneously sample both large-scale network oscillations and single neuron spiking activity in the medial temporal lobe structures of human subjects during a visual recognition memory task. We quantify and compare single neuron unit activity (SUA) with high-frequency macrofield oscillations (HFOs) for decoding visual images. SUA and HFOs were recorded using hybrid electrodes containing both micro and macroelectrode contacts, implanted in patients with focal epilepsy. Decoding of image properties in different task trials was performed, analyzing SUA and HFO as point processes to capture the dynamics of neurons and their assemblies at different spatiotemporal scales, ranging from submillisecond discharges of single units to fast oscillations across large neuronal populations. Results highlight the limitations and potential complementary use of SUA and HFOs for decoding of general image properties. The dynamics of SUA and HFOs can be used to explore a wide range of neuronal assembly activities engaged in human memory processing. Hybrid electrodes provide a technological bridge for exploring multiscale activity, spanning individual neurons, their assemblies, and large-scale population activity reflected in local field potentials. Analysis of SUA and HFO dynamics as point processes provides a potentially useful signal processing method for exploring the neuronal correlates operating at different spatial scales.

  4. Statistical analyses support power law distributions found in neuronal avalanches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Klaus

    Full Text Available The size distribution of neuronal avalanches in cortical networks has been reported to follow a power law distribution with exponent close to -1.5, which is a reflection of long-range spatial correlations in spontaneous neuronal activity. However, identifying power law scaling in empirical data can be difficult and sometimes controversial. In the present study, we tested the power law hypothesis for neuronal avalanches by using more stringent statistical analyses. In particular, we performed the following steps: (i analysis of finite-size scaling to identify scale-free dynamics in neuronal avalanches, (ii model parameter estimation to determine the specific exponent of the power law, and (iii comparison of the power law to alternative model distributions. Consistent with critical state dynamics, avalanche size distributions exhibited robust scaling behavior in which the maximum avalanche size was limited only by the spatial extent of sampling ("finite size" effect. This scale-free dynamics suggests the power law as a model for the distribution of avalanche sizes. Using both the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic and a maximum likelihood approach, we found the slope to be close to -1.5, which is in line with previous reports. Finally, the power law model for neuronal avalanches was compared to the exponential and to various heavy-tail distributions based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance and by using a log-likelihood ratio test. Both the power law distribution without and with exponential cut-off provided significantly better fits to the cluster size distributions in neuronal avalanches than the exponential, the lognormal and the gamma distribution. In summary, our findings strongly support the power law scaling in neuronal avalanches, providing further evidence for critical state dynamics in superficial layers of cortex.

  5. Temporally selective processing of communication signals by auditory midbrain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliott, Taffeta M; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Kelley, Darcy B

    2011-01-01

    of the rate of clicks in calls. The majority of neurons (85%) were selective for click rates, and this selectivity remained unchanged over sound levels 10 to 20 dB above threshold. Selective neurons give phasic, tonic, or adapting responses to tone bursts and click trains. Some algorithms that could compute...... of auditory neurons in the laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis (TS) of X. laevis specializes in encoding vocalization click rates. We recorded single TS units while pure tones, natural calls, and synthetic clicks were presented directly to the tympanum via a vibration-stimulation probe. Synthesized...... click rates ranged from 4 to 50 Hz, the rate at which the clicks begin to overlap. Frequency selectivity and temporal processing were characterized using response-intensity curves, temporal-discharge patterns, and autocorrelations of reduplicated responses to click trains. Characteristic frequencies...

  6. Contrasting responses within a single neuron class enable sex-specific attraction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Narayan, Anusha; Venkatachalam, Vivek; Durak, Omer; Reilly, Douglas K.; Bose, Neelanjan; Schroeder, Frank C.; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Srinivasan, Jagan; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Animals find mates and food, and avoid predators, by navigating to regions within a favorable range of available sensory cues. How are these ranges set and recognized? Here we show that male Caenorhabditis elegans exhibit strong concentration preferences for sex-specific small molecule cues secreted by hermaphrodites, and that these preferences emerge from the collective dynamics of a single male-specific class of neurons, the cephalic sensory neurons (CEMs). Within a single worm, CEM respons...

  7. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  8. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanni Brea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ.

  9. Connectivity patterns in neuronal networks of experimentally defined geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, A K; Brewer, G J; Offenhäusser, A

    2005-01-01

    Experimental control over the position and connectivity pattern of neurons on a surface is of central interest for applications in biotechnology, such as cell-based biosensors and tissue engineering. By restricting neuronal networks to a simple grid pattern, a drastic reduction of network complexity can be achieved relative to networks on homogeneous substrates. Therefore, patterned neuronal networks are also a valuable tool in research on neuronal signal transduction. Microcontact printing has emerged as a simple and efficient method for surface patterning to direct cellular attachment. Although the formation of synaptic contacts in networks of rat cortical cells on such surfaces has been demonstrated, evidence of more complex circuits has been lacking. Triple patch-clamp measurements were performed to analyze connectivity in neuronal networks complying with a grid-shaped micropattern. Cells adhered stringently to the pattern and interconnected to a range of different types of circuits: linear connections, feedback loops, as well as branching and converging pathways. We conclude that in spite of the severe geometric restrictions, a complex repertoire of different connectivity patterns can form along the provided pathways. At the same time, network complexity is kept low enough to allow the study of these patterns at the resolution of single cell-cell contacts.

  10. Selected statins produce rapid spinal motor neuron loss in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murinson Beth B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hmg-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are widely used to prevent disease associated with vascular disease and hyperlipidemia. Although side effects are uncommon, clinical observations suggest statin exposure may exacerbate neuromuscular diseases, including peripheral neuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Although some have postulated class-effects, prior studies of hepatocytes and myocytes indicate that the statins may exhibit differential effects. Studies of neuronal cells have been limited. Methods We examined the effects of statins on cultured neurons and Schwann cells. Cultured spinal motor neurons were grown on transwell inserts and assessed for viability using immunochemical staining for SMI-32. Cultured cortical neurons and Schwann cells were assessed using dynamic viability markers. Results 7 days of exposure to fluvastatin depleted spinal motor neurons in a dose-dependent manner with a KD of  Conclusions It is known from pharmacokinetic studies that daily treatment of young adults with fluvastatin can produce serum levels in the single micromolar range. We conclude that specific mechanisms may explain neuromuscular disease worsening with statins and further study is needed.

  11. Copying and evolution of neuronal topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisantha Fernando

    Full Text Available We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed.

  12. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  13. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  14. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  15. Neuronal coherence and its functional role in communication between neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitler-Geurds, M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are observed in many brain areas in various frequency bands. Each of the frequency bands is associated with a particular functional role. Gamma oscillations (30-80 Hz) are thought to be related to cognitive tasks like memory and attention and possibly also involved in the

  16. A case of presumptive primary lateral sclerosis with upper and lower motor neurone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Cathy L; Scott, Grace; Blumbergs, Peter C; Koblar, Simon A

    2005-08-01

    Motor Neurone Disease (MND) is one of the commonest neurodegenerative disorders of adulthood. MND characteristically presents with a combination of both upper and lower motor neurone features. Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS) is thought to be a variant of MND presenting with purely upper motor neurone signs. Debate continues over whether PLS constitutes a distinct pathological entity or whether it is part of the spectrum of motor neurone diseases that present as an upper motor neurone-predominant form of MND. We present a case of MND with purely upper motor neurone features and a prominent pain component. A pre-mortem diagnosis of PLS was made, however autopsy findings demonstrated both upper and lower motor neurone involvement. We believe these findings support the view that PLS is not a discrete pathological entity, but that it is a part of the range of motor neurone diseases that present with predominant but not exclusive upper motor neurone involvement. This case also highlights the feature that pain may be associated with MND even though it is not appreciated to have a sensory pathology.

  17. Correlations between neuronal morphology and electrophysiological features in the rodent superficial dorsal horn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudt, T J; Perl, E R

    2002-01-01

    Relationships between the morphology of individual neurones of the spinal superficial dorsal horn (SDH), laminae I and II, and their electrophysiological properties were studied in spinal cord slices prepared from anaesthetized, free-ranging hamsters. Tight-seal, whole-cell recordings were made with pipette microelectrodes filled with biocytin to establish electrophysiological characteristics and to label the studied neurones. Neurones were categorized according to location and size of the somata, the dendritic and axonal pattern of arborization, spontaneous synaptic potentials, evoked postsynaptic currents, pattern of discharge to depolarizing pulses and current-voltage relationships. Data were obtained for 170 neurones; 13 of these had somata in lamina I and 157 in lamina II. Stimulation of the segmental dorsal root evoked a prompt excitatory response in almost every neurone sampled (161/166) with nearly 3/4 displaying putative monosynaptic EPSCs. The majority of neurones (133/170) fitted one of several distinctive morphological categories. To a considerable extent, neurones with a common morphological configuration and neurite disposition shared electrophysiological characteristics. Five of the 13 lamina I neurones were relatively large with extensive dendritic arborization in the horizontal dimension and a prominent axon directed ventrally and contralaterally. These presumptive ventrolateral projection neurones differed structurally and electrophysiologically from the other lamina I neurones, which had ipsilateral, locally arborizing axons and/or branches entering the dorsal lateral funiculus. One hundred and twenty lamina II neurones fitted one of five morphological categories: islet, central, medial-lateral, radial or vertical. Central cells were further divided into three groups on functional features. We conclude that the spinal SDH comprises many types of neurones whose morphological characteristics are associated with specific functional features implying

  18. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  19. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  20. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  1. Models of the stochastic activity of neurones

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Arun Vivian

    1976-01-01

    These notes have grown from a series of seminars given at Leeds between 1972 and 1975. They represent an attempt to gather together the different kinds of model which have been proposed to account for the stochastic activity of neurones, and to provide an introduction to this area of mathematical biology. A striking feature of the electrical activity of the nervous system is that it appears stochastic: this is apparent at all levels of recording, ranging from intracellular recordings to the electroencephalogram. The chapters start with fluctuations in membrane potential, proceed through single unit and synaptic activity and end with the behaviour of large aggregates of neurones: L have chgaen this seque~~e\\/~~';uggest that the interesting behaviourr~f :the nervous system - its individuality, variability and dynamic forms - may in part result from the stochastic behaviour of its components. I would like to thank Dr. Julio Rubio for reading and commenting on the drafts, Mrs. Doris Beighton for producing the fin...

  2. Stochastic resonance in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, William Charles

    Stochastic Resonance (SR) is a phenomenon observed in nonlinear systems whereby the introduction of noise enhances the detection of a subthreshold signal for a certain range of noise intensity. Many central neurons, such as hippocampal CAI cells, are good candidates for SR due to their function of signal detection in a noisy environment, but the role of SR in the CNS is unclear. Physiological levels of noise are able to improve signal detection through SR, as found in simulated CAI neurons and in vitro rat hippocampal slices. Further investigation, utilizing a novel method of in vitro noise modulation, shows that endogenous noise sources can generate SR activity. These results suggest SR may provide a means for the hippocampus to modulate detection of specific inputs through endogenous noise sources. The role of noise in signal detection for a network of CAI cells is tested with a network simulation. The network shows improved detection as the number of cells and coupling increase for noise with low variance. One cell receiving the signal cannot recruit the remaining cells unless the network is very active and tuned by the coupling and noise. Periodic oscillations at high noise amplitudes corrupt all outputs. These oscillations develop into synchronized, periodic bursts as a function of both noise and coupling. These findings are relevant for the analysis of the role of physiological noise in signal processing in the brain and in the synchronization of neural activity as in epilepsy.

  3. p38 phosphorylation in medullary microglia mediates ectopic orofacial inflammatory pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomoto, Masaaki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Nakaya, Yuka; Dezawa, Ko; Katagiri, Ayano; Kamakura, Satoshi; Inoue, Tomio; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-08-12

    Orofacial inflammatory pain is likely to accompany referred pain in uninflamed orofacial structures. The ectopic pain precludes precise diagnosis and makes treatment problematic, because the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Using the established ectopic orofacial pain model induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection into trapezius muscle, we analyzed the possible role of p38 phosphorylation in activated microglia in ectopic orofacial pain. Mechanical allodynia in the lateral facial skin was induced following trapezius muscle inflammation, which accompanied microglial activation with p38 phosphorylation and hyperexcitability of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Intra-cisterna successive administration of a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase selective inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed microglial activation and its phosphorylation of p38. Moreover, SB203580 administration completely suppressed mechanical allodynia in the lateral facial skin and enhanced WDR neuronal excitability in Vc. Microglial interleukin-1β over-expression in Vc was induced by trapezius muscle inflammation, which was significantly suppressed by SB203580 administration. These findings indicate that microglia, activated via p38 phosphorylation, play a pivotal role in WDR neuronal hyperexcitability, which accounts for the mechanical hypersensitivity in the lateral facial skin associated with trapezius muscle inflammation.

  4. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data

  5. The Neuronal Infrastructure of Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, Laura; Segaert, Katrien; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Models of speaking distinguish producing meaning, words and syntax as three different linguistic components of speaking. Nevertheless, little is known about the brain's integrated neuronal infrastructure for speech production. We investigated semantic, lexical and syntactic aspects of speaking using fMRI. In a picture description task, we…

  6. ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives To study ultrastructural changes in the neuronal component of the detrusor muscle during the spinal shock phase and following early electric neurostimulation in an animal model. Material and Methods 12 dogs were decentralized at the levels from S1 to S3, while three animals were provided as normal controls.

  7. Bursting deep dorsal horn neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    In a recent publication, Thaweerattanasinp et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1644–1653, 2016) investigated spinal cord injury and firing properties of deep dorsal horn neurons during NMDA or zolmitriptan application by employing electrophysiology in an in vitro spinal cord preparation. Deep dorsal horn...

  8. Computing with Spiking Neuron Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Paugam-Moisy; S.M. Bohte (Sander); G. Rozenberg; T.H.W. Baeck (Thomas); J.N. Kok (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractAbstract Spiking Neuron Networks (SNNs) are often referred to as the 3rd gener- ation of neural networks. Highly inspired from natural computing in the brain and recent advances in neurosciences, they derive their strength and interest from an ac- curate modeling of synaptic interactions

  9. Uncertainty propagation in neuronal dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres Valderrama (Aldemar); J.G. Blom (Joke)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractOne of the most notorious characteristics of neuronal electrical activity is its variability, whose origin is not just instrumentation noise, but mainly the intrinsically stochastic nature of neural computations. Neuronal models based on deterministic differential equations cannot

  10. Shape, connectedness and dynamics in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2013-11-15

    The morphology of neurons is directly related to several aspects of the nervous system, including its connectedness, health, development, evolution, dynamics and, ultimately, behavior. Such interplays of the neuronal morphology can be understood within the more general shape-function paradigm. The current article reviews, in an introductory way, some key issues regarding the role of neuronal morphology in the nervous system, with emphasis on works developed in the authors' group. The following topics are addressed: (a) characterization of neuronal shape; (b) stochastic synthesis of neurons and neuronal systems; (c) characterization of the connectivity of neuronal networks by using complex networks concepts; and (d) investigations of influences of neuronal shape on network dynamics. The presented concepts and methods are useful also for several other multiple object systems, such as protein-protein interaction, tissues, aggregates and polymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tonotopic Variation of the T-Type Ca2+ Current in Avian Auditory Coincidence Detector Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Ryota; Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi

    2018-01-10

    Neurons in avian nucleus laminaris (NL) are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization and are characterized by striking structural variations in dendrites and axon initial segment (AIS) according to their acoustic tuning [characteristic frequency (CF)]. T-type Ca2+ (CaT) channels regulate synaptic integration and firing behavior at these neuronal structures. However, whether or how CaT channels contribute to the signal processing in NL neurons is not known. In this study, we addressed this issue with whole-cell recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging in brain slices of posthatch chicks of both sexes. We found that the CaT current was prominent in low-CF neurons, whereas it was almost absent in higher-CF neurons. In addition, a large Ca2+ transient occurred at the dendrites and the AIS of low-CF neurons, indicating a localization of CaT channels at these structures in the neurons. Because low-CF neurons have long dendrites, dendritic CaT channels may compensate for the attenuation of EPSPs at dendrites. Furthermore, the short distance of AIS from the soma may accelerate activation of axonal CaT current in the neurons and help EPSPs reach spike threshold. Indeed, the CaT current was activated by EPSPs and augmented the synaptic response and spike generation of the neurons. Notably, the CaT current was inactivated during repetitive inputs, and these augmenting effects predominated at the initial phase of synaptic activity. These results suggested that dendritic and axonal CaT channels increase the sensitivity to sound at its onset, which may expand the dynamic range for binaural computation in low-CF NL neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in nucleus laminaris are binaural coincidence detectors for sound localization. We report that T-type Ca2+ (CaT) current was prominent at dendrites and the axonal trigger zone in neurons tuned to low-frequency sound. Because these neurons have long dendrites and a closer trigger zone compared with those tuned to higher

  12. Spiking Neuron Network Helmholtz Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eSountsov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule.

  13. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  14. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  15. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  16. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  17. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  18. Ecological constraints on the origin of neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Travis; Paulin, Michael G; Green, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The basic functional characteristics of spiking neurones are remarkably similar throughout the animal kingdom. Their core design and function features were presumably established very early in their evolutionary history. Identifying the selection pressures that drove animals to evolve spiking neurones could help us interpret their design and function today. This paper provides a quantitative argument, based on ecology, that animals evolved neurones after they started eating each other, about 550 million years ago. We consider neurones as devices that aid an animal's foraging performance, but incur an energetic cost. We introduce an idealised stochastic model ecosystem of animals and their food, and obtain an analytic expression for the probability that an animal with a neurone will fix in a neurone-less population. Analysis of the fixation probability reveals two key results. First, a neurone will never fix if an animal forages low-value food at high density, even if that neurone incurs no cost. Second, a neurone will fix with high probability if an animal is foraging high-value food at low density, even if that neurone is expensive. These observations indicate that the transition from neurone-less to neurone-armed animals can be facilitated by a transition from filter-feeding or substrate grazing to episodic feeding strategies such as animal-on-animal predation (macrophagy).

  19. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Grattan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016 report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits.

  20. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Taken together, our study shows that low dose methamidophos may negatively impact. TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal events. Keywords: Methamidophos, Thyroid hormone, Purkinje cells, Granule cell, Neuronal development.

  1. Neuronal Network Mechanisms of Gamma Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viriyopase, A.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations at various frequency bands play an important role in neuronal information processing. In this thesis, we mathematically and computationally investigated the properties of the gamma band (30-80 Hz) with different networks: a simplified network with two neurons, a large network

  2. Disrupting neuronal transmission: Mechanism of DBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi eChiken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Applying high-frequency stimulation to deep brain rain structure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, has now been recognized an effective therapeutic option for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the basal ganglia thalamo-cortical loop, especially the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, has been widely employed as a successful surgical therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. However, the neurophysiological mechanism underling the action of DBS remains unclear and is still under debate: does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this review, we will examine this question and propose the alternative interpretation: DBS dissociates inputs and outputs, resulting in disruption of abnormal signal transmission.

  3. The pairwise phase consistency in cortical network and its relationship with neuronal activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-band neuronal oscillation and synchronization with the range of 30-90 Hz are ubiquitous phenomenon across numerous brain areas and various species, and correlated with plenty of cognitive functions. The phase of the oscillation, as one aspect of CTC (Communication through Coherence hypothesis, underlies various functions for feature coding, memory processing and behaviour performing. The PPC (Pairwise Phase Consistency, an improved coherence measure, statistically quantifies the strength of phase synchronization. In order to evaluate the PPC and its relationships with input stimulus, neuronal activation and firing rate, a simplified spiking neuronal network is constructed to simulate orientation columns in primary visual cortex. If the input orientation stimulus is preferred for a certain orientation column, neurons within this corresponding column will obtain higher firing rate and stronger neuronal activation, which consequently engender higher PPC values, with higher PPC corresponding to higher firing rate. In addition, we investigate the PPC in time resolved analysis with a sliding window.

  4. Evidence for a persistent sodium conductance in neurons from the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Laursen, A M

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from 39 neurons in a slice preparation of the prepositus hypoglossi nucleus from guinea pigs. Morphological characteristics were confirmed by dying neurons with Lucifer yellow. The neurons were spontaneously active, firing in the range of 8-50 spikes/s. Spike...... with the inorganic calcium blockers Mn2+ or Co2+ resulted in oscillatory firing, depolarizing excursions being sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX). Mn2+ or Co2+ in combination with extracellular Cs+ elicited TTX-sensitive plateau potentials, blocked in Na+ -free solution. In conclusion, the prepositus neurons displayed...... spontaneous activity in the slice preparation and active membrane properties above as well as below the threshold of the action potential. In addition, the prepositus neurons possess a persistent sodium conductance that can be uncovered by inorganic calcium blockers. It may be involved in sustaining...

  5. Dopamine Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area: An Autopsy Case of Disorganized Type of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Ikemoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic dopamine (DA system has been associated with the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, we examined DA-containing neuronal structures of the ventral tegmental area (VTA of an autopsy case of disorganized type of schizophrenia (75-year-old female, using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunohistochemistry. A free floating method using 50-μm cryostat sections and three-dimensional imaging analyzer AxioVision were applied to observe the wide range structures of TH-immunoreactive (-ir neurons. TH-ir neuronal cell bodies in the VTA of the present case had irregular shape and various size, and TH-ir neuronal processes had irregular thickness and straightened shape or curved shape having many corners, when compared to a control autopsy case with no detectable neurological and psychiatric diseases (64-year-old male. The mechanisms underlying the morphological characteristics of DA neurons of the brains with schizophrenia should be elucidated epigenetically as well as genetically.

  6. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad eMortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In humans and non-human primates (NHP, white matter neurons (WMNs persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR, temporal (TE, and parietal (Par association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30μm thickness, and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of

  7. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  8. Integrative spike dynamics of rat CA1 neurons: a multineuronal imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takuya; Kimura, Rie; Tsukamoto, Masako; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2006-07-01

    The brain operates through a coordinated interplay of numerous neurons, yet little is known about the collective behaviour of individual neurons embedded in a huge network. We used large-scale optical recordings to address synaptic integration in hundreds of neurons. In hippocampal slice cultures bolus-loaded with Ca2+ fluorophores, we stimulated the Schaffer collaterals and monitored the aggregate presynaptic activity from the stratum radiatum and individual postsynaptic spikes from the CA1 stratum pyramidale. Single neurons responded to varying synaptic inputs with unreliable spikes, but at the population level, the networks stably output a linear sum of synaptic inputs. Nonetheless, the network activity, even though given constant stimuli, varied from trial to trial. This variation emerged through time-varying recruitment of different neuron subsets, which were shaped by correlated background noise. We also mapped the input-frequency preference in spiking activity and found that the majority of CA1 neurons fired in response to a limited range of presynaptic firing rates (20-40 Hz), acting like a band-pass filter, although a few neurons had high pass-like or low pass-like characteristics. This frequency selectivity depended on phasic inhibitory transmission. Thus, our imaging approach enables the linking of single-cell behaviours to their communal dynamics, and we discovered that, even in a relatively simple CA1 circuit, neurons could be engaged in concordant information processing.

  9. Carbon dioxide and fruit odor transduction in Drosophila olfactory neurons. What controls their dynamic properties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S French

    Full Text Available We measured frequency response functions between odorants and action potentials in two types of neurons in Drosophila antennal basiconic sensilla. CO2 was used to stimulate ab1C neurons, and the fruit odor ethyl butyrate was used to stimulate ab3A neurons. We also measured frequency response functions for light-induced action potential responses from transgenic flies expressing H134R-channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 in the ab1C and ab3A neurons. Frequency response functions for all stimulation methods were well-fitted by a band-pass filter function with two time constants that determined the lower and upper frequency limits of the response. Low frequency time constants were the same in each type of neuron, independent of stimulus method, but varied between neuron types. High frequency time constants were significantly slower with ethyl butyrate stimulation than light or CO2 stimulation. In spite of these quantitative differences, there were strong similarities in the form and frequency ranges of all responses. Since light-activated ChR2 depolarizes neurons directly, rather than through a chemoreceptor mechanism, these data suggest that low frequency dynamic properties of Drosophila olfactory sensilla are dominated by neuron-specific ionic processes during action potential production. In contrast, high frequency dynamics are limited by processes associated with earlier steps in odor transduction, and CO2 is detected more rapidly than fruit odor.

  10. Vasopressin regularizes the phasic firing pattern of rat hypothalamic magnocellular vasopressin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzènes, L; Desarménien, M G; Hussy, N; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-03-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) magnocellular neurons of hypothalamic nuclei express specific phasic firing (successive periods of activity and silence), which conditions the mode of neurohypophyseal vasopression release. In situations favoring plasmatic secretion of AVP, the hormone is also released at the somatodendritic level, at which it is believed to modulate the activity of AVP neurons. We investigated the nature of this autocontrol by testing the effects of juxtamembrane applications of AVP on the extracellular activity of presumed AVP neurons in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of anesthetized rats. AVP had three effects depending on the initial firing pattern: (1) excitation of faintly active neurons (periods of activity of <10 sec), which acquired or reinforced their phasic pattern; (2) inhibition of quasi-continuously active neurons (periods of silences of <10 sec), which became clearly phasic; and (3) no effect on neurons already showing an intermediate phasic pattern (active and silent periods of 10-30 sec). Consequently, AVP application resulted in a narrower range of activity patterns of the population of AVP neurons, with a Gaussian distribution centered around a mode of 57% of time in activity, indicating a homogenization of the firing pattern. The resulting phasic pattern had characteristics close to those established previously for optimal release of AVP from neurohypophyseal endings. These results suggest a new role for AVP as an optimizing factor that would foster the population of AVP neurons to discharge with a phasic pattern known to be most efficient for hormone release.

  11. Spontaneous Neuronal Activity in Developing Neocortical Networks: From Single Cells to Large-Scale Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Sinning, Anne; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Stüttgen, Maik C; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal activity has been shown to be essential for the proper formation of neuronal circuits, affecting developmental processes like neurogenesis, migration, programmed cell death, cellular differentiation, formation of local and long-range axonal connections, synaptic plasticity or myelination. Accordingly, neocortical areas reveal distinct spontaneous and sensory-driven neuronal activity patterns already at early phases of development. At embryonic stages, when immature neurons start to develop voltage-dependent channels, spontaneous activity is highly synchronized within small neuronal networks and governed by electrical synaptic transmission. Subsequently, spontaneous activity patterns become more complex, involve larger networks and propagate over several neocortical areas. The developmental shift from local to large-scale network activity is accompanied by a gradual shift from electrical to chemical synaptic transmission with an initial excitatory action of chloride-gated channels activated by GABA, glycine and taurine. Transient neuronal populations in the subplate (SP) support temporary circuits that play an important role in tuning early neocortical activity and the formation of mature neuronal networks. Thus, early spontaneous activity patterns control the formation of developing networks in sensory cortices, and disturbances of these activity patterns may lead to long-lasting neuronal deficits.

  12. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  13. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  14. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  15. Dynamics of intrinsic electrophysiological properties in spinal cord neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, R E; Hounsgaard, J

    1999-01-01

    The spinal cord is engaged in a wide variety of functions including generation of motor acts, coding of sensory information and autonomic control. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of spinal neurones represent a fundamental building block of the spinal circuits executing these tasks. ....... Specialised, cell specific electrophysiological phenotypes gradually differentiate during development and are continuously adjusted in the adult animal by metabotropic synaptic interactions and activity-dependent plasticity to meet a broad range of functional demands....

  16. Elasticity maps of living neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedden, Elise; White, James D; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2012-09-05

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here, we combine atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy with fluorescence microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 kPa (cortical). In contrast, dorsal root ganglion neurons are stiffer than P-19 and cortical cells, yielding elastic moduli in the range 0.1-8 kPa, with typical average values of 0.9 kPa. Finally, we report no measurable influence of substrate protein coating on cell body elasticity for the three types of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Results on a Binding Neuron Model and Their Implications for Modified Hourglass Model for Neuronal Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical models of single neuron like Hodgkin-Huxley point neuron or leaky integrate and fire neuron assume the influence of postsynaptic potentials to last till the neuron fires. Vidybida (2008 in a refreshing departure has proposed models for binding neurons in which the trace of an input is remembered only for a finite fixed period of time after which it is forgotten. The binding neurons conform to the behaviour of real neurons and are applicable in constructing fast recurrent networks for computer modeling. This paper develops explicitly several useful results for a binding neuron like the firing time distribution and other statistical characteristics. We also discuss the applicability of the developed results in constructing a modified hourglass network model in which there are interconnected neurons with excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs. Limited simulation results of the hourglass network are presented.

  18. Single-cell axotomy of cultured hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-Rüth, Susana; Stiess, Michael; Wierenga, Corette J; Meyn, Liane; Bradke, Frank

    2014-05-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms of axon regeneration after injury is key for the development of potential therapies. Single-cell axotomy of dissociated neurons enables the study of the intrinsic regenerative capacities of injured axons. This protocol describes how to perform single-cell axotomy on dissociated hippocampal neurons containing synapses. Furthermore, to axotomize hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits, we describe how to set up coculture with a few fluorescently labeled neurons. This approach allows axotomy of single cells in a complex neuronal network and the observation of morphological and molecular changes during axon regeneration. Thus, single-cell axotomy of mature neurons is a valuable tool for gaining insights into cell intrinsic axon regeneration and the plasticity of neuronal polarity of mature neurons. Dissociation of the hippocampus and plating of hippocampal neurons takes ∼2 h. Neurons are then left to grow for 2 weeks, during which time they integrate into neuronal circuits. Subsequent axotomy takes 10 min per neuron and further imaging takes 10 min per neuron.

  19. Stochastic bursting synchronization in a population of subthreshold Izhikevich neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Youngnam; Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Jean; Lim, Woochang

    2012-05-01

    We consider a population of subthreshold Izhikevich neurons that cannot fire spontaneously without noise. As the coupling strength passes a threshold, individual neurons exhibit noise-induced burstings ( i.e., discrete groups or bursts of noise-induced spikes). We investigate stochastic bursting synchronization by varying the noise intensity. Through competition between the constructive and the destructive roles of noise, collective coherence between noise-induced burstings is found to occur over a large range of intermediate noise intensities. This kind of stochastic bursting synchronization is well characterized by using the techniques of statistical mechanics and nonlinear dynamics, such as the order parameter, the raster plot of neural spikes, the time series of the ensemble-averaged global potential, and the phase portraits of limit cycles. In contrast to spiking neurons showing only spike synchronization (characterizing a temporal relationship between spikes), bursting neurons are found to exhibit both spike synchronization and burst synchronization (characterizing a temporal relationship between the onset times of the active phases of repetitive spikings). The degree of stochastic bursting synchronization is also measured in terms of a synchronization measure that reflects the resemblance of the global potential to the individual potential.

  20. Mitostasis in Neurons: Maintaining Mitochondria in an Extended Cellular Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misgeld, Thomas; Schwarz, Thomas L

    2017-11-01

    Neurons have more extended and complex shapes than other cells and consequently face a greater challenge in distributing and maintaining mitochondria throughout their arbors. Neurons can last a lifetime, but proteins turn over rapidly. Mitochondria, therefore, need constant rejuvenation no matter how far they are from the soma. Axonal transport of mitochondria and mitochondrial fission and fusion contribute to this rejuvenation, but local protein synthesis is also likely. Maintenance of a healthy mitochondrial population also requires the clearance of damaged proteins and organelles. This involves degradation of individual proteins, sequestration in mitochondria-derived vesicles, organelle degradation by mitophagy and macroautophagy, and in some cases transfer to glial cells. Both long-range transport and local processing are thus at work in achieving neuronal mitostasis-the maintenance of an appropriately distributed pool of healthy mitochondria for the duration of a neuron's life. Accordingly, defects in the processes that support mitostasis are significant contributors to neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene therapy and editing: Novel potential treatments for neuronal channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, R C; Lignani, G

    2017-05-28

    Pharmaceutical treatment can be inadequate, non-effective, or intolerable for many people suffering from a neuronal channelopathy. Development of novel treatment options, particularly those with the potential to be curative is warranted. Gene therapy approaches can permit cell-specific modification of neuronal and circuit excitability and have been investigated experimentally as a therapy for numerous neurological disorders, with clinical trials for several neurodegenerative diseases ongoing. Channelopathies can arise from a wide array of gene mutations; however they usually result in periods of aberrant network excitability. Therefore gene therapy strategies based on up or downregulation of genes that modulate neuronal excitability may be effective therapy for a wide range of neuronal channelopathies. As many channelopathies are paroxysmal in nature, optogenetic or chemogenetic approaches may be well suited to treat the symptoms of these diseases. Recent advances in gene-editing technologies such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system could in the future result in entirely novel treatment for a channelopathy by repairing disease-causing channel mutations at the germline level. As the brain may develop and wire abnormally as a consequence of an inherited or de novo channelopathy, the choice of optimal gene therapy or gene editing strategy will depend on the time of intervention (germline, neonatal or adult). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Network architecture underlying maximal separation of neuronal representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron A Jortner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most basic and general tasks faced by all nervous systems is extracting relevant information from the organism’s surrounding world. While physical signals available to sensory systems are often continuous, variable, overlapping and noisy, high-level neuronal representations used for decision-making tend to be discrete, specific, invariant, and highly separable. This study addresses the question of how neuronal specificity is generated. Inspired by experimental findings on network architecture in the olfactory system of the locust, I construct a highly simplified theoretical framework which allows for analytic solution of its key properties. For generalized feed-forward systems, I show that an intermediate range of connectivity values between source- and target-populations leads to a combinatorial explosion of wiring possibilities, resulting in input spaces which are, by their very nature, exquisitely sparsely populated. In particular, connection probability ½, as found in the locust antennal-lobe–mushroom-body circuit, serves to maximize separation of neuronal representations across the target Kenyon-cells, and explains their specific and reliable responses. This analysis yields a function expressing response specificity in terms of lower network-parameters; together with appropriate gain control this leads to a simple neuronal algorithm for generating arbitrarily sparse and selective codes and linking network architecture and neural coding. I suggest a way to easily construct ecologically meaningful representations from this code.

  3. Axonal dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Marik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical topography can be remapped as a consequence of sensory deprivation, suggesting that cortical circuits are continually modified by experience. To see the effect of altered sensory experience on specific components of cortical circuits, we imaged neurons, labeled with a genetically modified adeno-associated virus, in the intact mouse somatosensory cortex before and after whisker plucking. Following whisker plucking we observed massive and rapid reorganization of the axons of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, accompanied by a transient increase in bouton density. For horizontally projecting axons of excitatory neurons there was a net increase in axonal projections from the non-deprived whisker barrel columns into the deprived barrel columns. The axon collaterals of inhibitory neurons located in the deprived whisker barrel columns retracted in the vicinity of their somata and sprouted long-range projections beyond their normal reach towards the non-deprived whisker barrel columns. These results suggest that alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition in deprived and non-deprived barrel columns underlie the topographic remapping associated with sensory deprivation.

  4. [Influence of centrophenoxine on the incorporation of 32P into glycerophosphatides of neurons and gliocytes (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, H

    1982-01-01

    Investigations on the incorporation of intraventricularly injected 32P in neuronal and glial phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and ethanolamine plasmalogen at intervals ranging from 5 to 60 min showed different incorporation rates of the radioactive precursor into neuronal and glial phosphatides. The incorporation rate of 32P into the different glycerophosphatides was faster in neurons as compared to the gliocyte compartment. Phosphatidylinositol showed the fastest and ethanolamine plasmalogen the slowest incorporation of 32P in both neurons and gliocytes. Centrophenoxine (meclofenoxate, Helfergin) increased the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylserine and ethanolamine plasmalogen of both glial and neuronal cell bodies whereas the incorporation of the radioactive precursor into phosphatidylcholine was slightly inhibited. The incorporation rate into phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine was not influenced by centrophenoxine. The data obtained in the present work suggest that centrophenoxine may stimulate excitatory neurons and may be involved in the process of synaptic transmission and axonal conduction.

  5. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neurons diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eStifani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor neurons (MNs are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal motor neurons (SpMNs that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs are responsible for the contraction of effector muscles in the periphery. Humans possess more than 500 different skeletal muscles capable to work in a precise time and space coordination to generate complex movements such as walking or grasping. To ensure such refined coordination, SpMNs must retain the identity of the muscle they innervate.Within the last two decades, scientists around the world have produced considerable efforts to elucidate several critical steps of SpMNs differentiation. During development, SpMNs emerge from dividing progenitor cells located in the medial portion of the ventral neural tube. MN identities are established by patterning cues working in cooperation with intrinsic sets of transcription factors. As the embryo develop, MNs further differentiate in a stepwise manner to form compact anatomical groups termed pools connecting to a unique muscle target. MN pools are not homogeneous and comprise subtypes according to the muscle fibers they innervate.This article aims to provide a global view of MN classification as well as an up-to-date review of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SpMN diversity. Remaining conundrums will be discussed since a complete understanding of those mechanisms constitutes the foundation required for the elaboration of prospective MN regeneration therapies.

  6. Unsupervised learning in neural networks with short range synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnet, L. G.; Agnes, E. J.; Mizusaki, B. E. P.; Erichsen, R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Different areas of the brain are involved in specific aspects of the information being processed both in learning and in memory formation. For example, the hippocampus is important in the consolidation of information from short-term memory to long-term memory, while emotional memory seems to be dealt by the amygdala. On the microscopic scale the underlying structures in these areas differ in the kind of neurons involved, in their connectivity, or in their clustering degree but, at this level, learning and memory are attributed to neuronal synapses mediated by longterm potentiation and long-term depression. In this work we explore the properties of a short range synaptic connection network, a nearest neighbor lattice composed mostly by excitatory neurons and a fraction of inhibitory ones. The mechanism of synaptic modification responsible for the emergence of memory is Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP), a Hebbian-like rule, where potentiation/depression is acquired when causal/non-causal spikes happen in a synapse involving two neurons. The system is intended to store and recognize memories associated to spatial external inputs presented as simple geometrical forms. The synaptic modifications are continuously applied to excitatory connections, including a homeostasis rule and STDP. In this work we explore the different scenarios under which a network with short range connections can accomplish the task of storing and recognizing simple connected patterns.

  7. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be

  8. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  9. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  10. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Michael J; Soffe, Stephen R; Willshaw, David J; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition.

  11. Spinal afferent neurons projecting to the rat lung and pleura express acid sensitive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Michael; Helbig, Tanja; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang; Haberberger, Rainer V

    2006-01-01

    Background The acid sensitive ion channels TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1) and ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel-3) respond to tissue acidification in the range that occurs during painful conditions such as inflammation and ischemia. Here, we investigated to which extent they are expressed by rat dorsal root ganglion neurons projecting to lung and pleura, respectively. Methods The tracer DiI was either injected into the left lung or applied to the costal pleura. Retrogradely labelled dorsal root ganglion neurons were subjected to triple-labelling immunohistochemistry using antisera against TRPV1, ASIC3 and neurofilament 68 (marker for myelinated neurons), and their soma diameter was measured. Results Whereas 22% of pulmonary spinal afferents contained neither channel-immunoreactivity, at least one is expressed by 97% of pleural afferents. TRPV1+/ASIC3- neurons with probably slow conduction velocity (small soma, neurofilament 68-negative) were significantly more frequent among pleural (35%) than pulmonary afferents (20%). TRPV1+/ASIC3+ neurons amounted to 14 and 10% respectively. TRPV1-/ASIC3+ neurons made up between 44% (lung) and 48% (pleura) of neurons, and half of them presumably conducted in the A-fibre range (larger soma, neurofilament 68-positive). Conclusion Rat pleural and pulmonary spinal afferents express at least two different acid-sensitive channels that make them suitable to monitor tissue acidification. Patterns of co-expression and structural markers define neuronal subgroups that can be inferred to subserve different functions and may initiate specific reflex responses. The higher prevalence of TRPV1+/ASIC3- neurons among pleural afferents probably reflects the high sensitivity of the parietal pleura to painful stimuli. PMID:16813657

  12. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries...... in optimal O(k) time. The structure uses O(n) words of space and can be constructed in O(n logn) time. The data structure can be extended to solve the online version of the problem, where the elements in A[i..j] are reported one-by-one in sorted order, in O(1) worst-case time per element. The problem...... is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  13. Somal size of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia: differential effects across neuronal subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierri, Joseph N; Volk, Christine L E; Auh, Sungyoung; Sampson, Allan; Lewis, David A

    2003-07-15

    Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia may be related to morphologic abnormalities of pyramidal neurons in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) and the largest pyramidal neurons in deep layer 3 may be most affected. Immunoreactivity (IR) for the nonphosphorylated epitopes of neurofilament protein (NNFP) identifies a subset of large dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We tested the hypotheses that the average size of NNFP-IR neurons is smaller in schizophrenia and that the decrease in size of these neurons is greater than that observed in the general population of deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We estimated the mean somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons in deep layer 3 of 9 in 13 matched pairs of control and schizophrenia subjects and compared the differences in somal size of NNFP-IR neurons to the differences in size of all deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons identified in Nissl-stained material. In subjects with schizophrenia, the somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons was nonsignificantly decreased by 6.6%, whereas that of the Nissl-stained pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased by 14.2%. These results suggest that the NNFP-IR subpopulation of dPFC pyramidal neurons are not preferentially affected in schizophrenia. Thus, a subpopulation of dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons, other than those identified by NNFP-IR, may be selectively vulnerable in schizophrenia.

  14. Glutamatergic Nonpyramidal Neurons From Neocortical Layer VI and Their Comparison With Pyramidal and Spiny Stellate Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L.; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity. PMID:19052106

  15. L-system modeling of neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Bruce H.; Mulchandani, K.

    1994-09-01

    A formal representation of neuron morphology, adequate for the geometric modeling of manually-traced neurons, is presented. The concept of a stochastic L-system is then introduced and the critical distribution functions governing the stochastic generation of dendritic and axonal trees are defined. Experiments with various stochastic L-system models for pyramidal, motoneuron, and Purkinje cells are reported which generate synthetic neurons with promising proximity to neurons in the neurobiology literature. Work is in progress to improve this degree of proximity, but more importantly to validate the derived stochastic models against available databases of manually-traced neurons. To this end a neuron morphology modeler is described which provides a methodology for iterative refinement of the stochastic L-system model.

  16. Performance limitations of relay neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Agarwal

    Full Text Available Relay cells are prevalent throughout sensory systems and receive two types of inputs: driving and modulating. The driving input contains receptive field properties that must be transmitted while the modulating input alters the specifics of transmission. For example, the visual thalamus contains relay neurons that receive driving inputs from the retina that encode a visual image, and modulating inputs from reticular activating system and layer 6 of visual cortex that control what aspects of the image will be relayed back to visual cortex for perception. What gets relayed depends on several factors such as attentional demands and a subject's goals. In this paper, we analyze a biophysical based model of a relay cell and use systems theoretic tools to construct analytic bounds on how well the cell transmits a driving input as a function of the neuron's electrophysiological properties, the modulating input, and the driving signal parameters. We assume that the modulating input belongs to a class of sinusoidal signals and that the driving input is an irregular train of pulses with inter-pulse intervals obeying an exponential distribution. Our analysis applies to any [Formula: see text] order model as long as the neuron does not spike without a driving input pulse and exhibits a refractory period. Our bounds on relay reliability contain performance obtained through simulation of a second and third order model, and suggest, for instance, that if the frequency of the modulating input increases or the DC offset decreases, then relay increases. Our analysis also shows, for the first time, how the biophysical properties of the neuron (e.g. ion channel dynamics define the oscillatory patterns needed in the modulating input for appropriately timed relay of sensory information. In our discussion, we describe how our bounds predict experimentally observed neural activity in the basal ganglia in (i health, (ii in Parkinson's disease (PD, and (iii in PD during

  17. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Débora; Lambert, Kelly; Noctor, Stephen; Pestana, Fernanda M; de Castro Leal, Maria E; Bertelsen, Mads F; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Mohammad, Osama B; Manger, Paul R; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion) share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans), roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal composition of carnivoran

  18. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Débora; Lambert, Kelly; Noctor, Stephen; Pestana, Fernanda M.; de Castro Leal, Maria E.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N.; Mohammad, Osama B.; Manger, Paul R.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion) share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans), roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal composition of carnivoran

  19. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Jardim-Messeder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans, roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal

  20. Neuronal communication: firing spikes with spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Michael

    2012-08-21

    Spikes of single cortical neurons can exert powerful effects even though most cortical synapses are too weak to fire postsynaptic neurons. A recent study combining single-cell stimulation with population imaging has visualized in vivo postsynaptic firing in genetically identified target cells. The results confirm predictions from in vitro work and might help to understand how the brain reads single-neuron activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Timme

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree or sends out (out-degree. To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to

  2. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  3. Role of DAPK in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2014-02-01

    Neuronal cell death happens as a result of the normal physiological process that occurs during development, or as part of the pathological process that occurs during disease. Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is an intracellular protein that mediates cell death by its serine/threonine kinase activity, and transmits apoptotic cell death signals in various cells, including neurons. DAPK is elevated in injured neurons in acute models of injury such as ischemia and seizure. The absence of DAPK has been shown to protect neurons from a wide variety of acute toxic insults. Moreover, DAPK also regulates neuronal cell death during central nervous system development. Neurons are initially overproduced in the developing nervous system, following which approximately one-half of the original cell population dies. This "naturally-occurring" or "programmed" cell death is essential for the construction of the developing nervous system. In this review, we focus on the role of DAPK in neuronal cell death after neuronal injury. The participation of DAPK in developmental neuronal death is also explained.

  4. Tuning curves, neuronal variability, and sensory coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Butts

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuning curves are widely used to characterize the responses of sensory neurons to external stimuli, but there is an ongoing debate as to their role in sensory processing. Commonly, it is assumed that a neuron's role is to encode the stimulus at the tuning curve peak, because high firing rates are the neuron's most distinct responses. In contrast, many theoretical and empirical studies have noted that nearby stimuli are most easily discriminated in high-slope regions of the tuning curve. Here, we demonstrate that both intuitions are correct, but that their relative importance depends on the experimental context and the level of variability in the neuronal response. Using three different information-based measures of encoding applied to experimentally measured sensory neurons, we show how the best-encoded stimulus can transition from high-slope to high-firing-rate regions of the tuning curve with increasing noise level. We further show that our results are consistent with recent experimental findings that correlate neuronal sensitivities with perception and behavior. This study illustrates the importance of the noise level in determining the encoding properties of sensory neurons and provides a unified framework for interpreting how the tuning curve and neuronal variability relate to the overall role of the neuron in sensory encoding.

  5. Cognition and behaviour in motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Patricia; Hodges, John R

    2010-12-01

    Motor neurone disease has traditionally been considered a pure motor syndrome which spares aspects of cognition and behaviour, although in recent years it has been suggested that up to 50% of patients with motor neurone disease may develop frontal dysfunction which, in some cases, is severe enough to reach criteria for frontotemporal dementia. We review the cognitive and behavioural changes in motor neurone disease emphasizing the recent advances. A major advance in pathology has been the recent discovery of TDP-43 and FUS inclusions as the key components in cases of motor neurone disease, frontotemporal dementia-motor neurone disease and some cases with pure frontotemporal dementia. In addition, mutations in TARDBP and FUS genes have been reported in recent years. Longitudinal studies showed that progression of cognitive impairment over the course of motor neurone disease appears to be mild and occurs only in a proportion of motor neurone disease patients. The presence of cognitive impairment seems to be related to a faster disease and a shorter survival. Motor neurone disease is a multi-system disorder which overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Behavioural and cognitive changes appear to occur in a subset of patients with motor neurone disease, but the cause of this variability remains unclear.

  6. Functional connectivity in in vitro neuronal assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Daniele; Pastore, Vito P.; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Complex network topologies represent the necessary substrate to support complex brain functions. In this work, we reviewed in vitro neuronal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) as biological substrate. Networks of dissociated neurons developing in vitro and coupled to MEAs, represent a valid experimental model for studying the mechanisms governing the formation, organization and conservation of neuronal cell assemblies. In this review, we present some examples of the use of statistical Cluster Coefficients and Small World indices to infer topological rules underlying the dynamics exhibited by homogeneous and engineered neuronal networks. PMID:26500505

  7. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  8. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  9. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Druckmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose.

  10. Odor processing by adult-born neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Adam, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-03-05

    The adult mammalian brain is continuously supplied with adult-born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) and hippocampus, where they are thought to be important for circuit coding and plasticity. However, direct evidence for the actual involvement of these neurons in neural processing is still lacking. We recorded the spiking activity of adult-born periglomerular neurons in the mouse OB in vivo using two-photon-targeted patch recordings. We show that odor responsiveness reaches a peak during neuronal development and then recedes at maturity. Sensory enrichment during development enhances the selectivity of adult-born neurons after maturation, without affecting neighboring resident neurons. Thus, in the OB circuit, adult-born neurons functionally integrate into the circuit, where they acquire distinct response profiles in an experience-dependent manner. The constant flow of these sensitive neurons into the circuit provides it with a mechanism of long-term plasticity, wherein new neurons mature to process odor information based on past demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  12. Neuronal mechanisms of oxygen chemoreception: an invertebrate perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Tara A; Syed, Naweed I

    2012-01-01

    Since the evolution of aerobic metabolism, cellular requirements for molecular oxygen have been the major driver for the development of sophisticated mechanisms underlying both invertebrate and vertebrate respiratory behaviour. Among the most important characteristics of respiration is its adaptability, which allows animals to maintain oxygen homeostasis over a wide range of environmental and metabolic conditions. In all animals, the respiratory behaviour is controlled by neural networks often termed respiratory central pattern generators (rCPG). While rCPG neurons are intrinsically capable of generating rhythmical outputs, the respiratory needs are generally "sensed" by either central or peripheral chemoreceptive neurons. The mechanisms by which chemoreceptors respond to changes in oxygen and modulate central respiratory control centers have been the focus of decades of research. However, our understanding of these mechanisms has been limited due to an inability to precisely locate oxygen chemoreceptor populations, combined with the overwhelming complexity of vertebrate neural circuits. Although mammalian models remain the gold standard for research in general, invertebrates do nevertheless offer greatly simplified neural networks that share fundamental similarities with vertebrates. The following review will provide evidence for the existence of oxygen chemoreceptors in many invertebrate groups and reveal the mechanisms by which these neurons may "perceive" environmental oxygen and drive central rCPG activity. For this, we will specifically highlight an invertebrate model, the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis whose episodic respiratory behaviour resembles that of diving mammals. The rCPG neurons have been identified and fully characterized in this model both in vivo and in vitro. The Lymnaea respiratory network has also been reconstructed in vitro and the contributions of individual rCPG neurons towards rhythm generation characterized through direct intracellular

  13. Long-range temporal correlations, multifractality, and the causal relation between neural inputs and movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eHu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the causal relation between neural inputs and movements is very important for the success of brain machine interfaces (BMIs. In this study, we analyze 104 neurons’ firings using statistical, information theoretic, and fractal analysis. The latter include Fano factor analysis, multifractal adaptive fractal analysis (MF-AFA, and wavelet multifractal analysis. We find neuronal firings are highly nonstationary, and Fano factor analysis always indicates long-range correlations in neuronal firings, irrespective of whether those firings are correlated with movement trajectory or not, and thus does not reveal any actual correlations between neural inputs and movements. On the other hand, MF-AFA and wavelet multifractal analysis clearly indicate that when neuronal firings are not well correlated with movement trajectory, they do not have or only have weak temporal correlations. When neuronal firings are well correlated with movements, they are characterized by very strong temporal correlations, up to a time scale comparable to the average time between two successive reaching tasks. This suggests that neurons well correlated with hand trajectory experienced a re-setting effect at the start of each reaching task, in the sense that within the movement correlated neurons the spike trains’ long range dependences persisted about the length of time the monkey used to switch between task executions. A new task execution re-sets their activity, making them only weakly correlated with their prior activities on longer time scales. We further discuss the significance of the coalition of those important neurons in executing cortical control of prostheses.

  14. The Role of Rho GTPase Proteins in CNS Neuronal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govek, Eve-Ellen; Hatten, Mary E.; Van Aelst, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The architectonics of the mammalian brain arise from a remarkable range of directed cell migrations, which orchestrate the emergence of cortical neuronal layers and pattern brain circuitry. At different stages of cortical histogenesis, specific modes of cell motility are essential to the stepwise formation of cortical architecture. These movements range from interkinetic nuclear movements at the ventricular zone (VZ), to migrations of early-born, postmitotic polymorphic cells into the preplate, to the radial migration of precursors of cortical output neurons across the thickening cortical wall, and the vast, tangential migrations of interneurons from the basal forebrain into the emerging cortical layers. In all cases, acto-myosin motors act in concert with cell adhesion receptor systems to provide the force and traction needed for forward movement. As key regulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell polarity, and adhesion, the Rho GTPases play a critical role in CNS neuronal migration. This review will focus on the different types of migration in the developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex, and the role of the Rho GTPases, their regulators and effectors in these CNS migrations, with particular emphasis on their involvement in radial migration. PMID:21557504

  15. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, A. del, E-mail: delmoral@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Física de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain); Azanza, María J., E-mail: mjazanza@unizar.es [Laboratorio de Magnetobiología, Departamento de Anatomía e Histología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate (“frequency”), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD–CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD–CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B{sub 0}≅0.2–15 mT) AC-MF of frequency f{sub M}=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation. - Highlights: • Neuron pair synchronization under low frequency alternating (AC) magnetic field (MF). • Superdiamagnetism and Ca{sup 2+} Coulomb explosion for AC MF effect in synchronized frequency. • Membrane lipid electrical quadrupolar pair interaction as synchronization mechamism. • Good agreement of model with electrophysiological experiments on mollusc Helix neurons.

  16. Spinal sensory projection neuron responses to spinal cord stimulation are mediated by circuits beyond gate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhe C; Janik, John J; Peters, Ryan V; Chen, Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong; Grill, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a therapy used to treat intractable pain with a putative mechanism of action based on the Gate Control Theory. We hypothesized that sensory projection neuron responses to SCS would follow a single stereotyped response curve as a function of SCS frequency, as predicted by the Gate Control circuit. We recorded the responses of antidromically identified sensory projection neurons in the lumbar spinal cord during 1- to 150-Hz SCS in both healthy rats and neuropathic rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). The relationship between SCS frequency and projection neuron activity predicted by the Gate Control circuit accounted for a subset of neuronal responses to SCS but could not account for the full range of observed responses. Heterogeneous responses were classifiable into three additional groups and were reproduced using computational models of spinal microcircuits representing other interactions between nociceptive and nonnociceptive sensory inputs. Intrathecal administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, increased spontaneous and evoked activity in projection neurons, enhanced excitatory responses to SCS, and reduced inhibitory responses to SCS, suggesting that GABAA neurotransmission plays a broad role in regulating projection neuron activity. These in vivo and computational results challenge the Gate Control Theory as the only mechanism underlying SCS and refine our understanding of the effects of SCS on spinal sensory neurons within the framework of contemporary understanding of dorsal horn circuitry. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The Role of Rab Proteins in Neuronal Cells and in the Trafficking of Neurotrophin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Bucci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that are important for neuronal development, neuronal survival and neuronal functions. Neurotrophins exert their role by binding to their receptors, the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC and p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor superfamily. Binding of neurotrophins to receptors triggers a complex series of signal transduction events, which are able to induce neuronal differentiation but are also responsible for neuronal maintenance and neuronal functions. Rab proteins are small GTPases localized to the cytosolic surface of specific intracellular compartments and are involved in controlling vesicular transport. Rab proteins, acting as master regulators of the membrane trafficking network, play a central role in both trafficking and signaling pathways of neurotrophin receptors. Axonal transport represents the Achilles' heel of neurons, due to the long-range distance that molecules, organelles and, in particular, neurotrophin-receptor complexes have to cover. Indeed, alterations of axonal transport and, specifically, of axonal trafficking of neurotrophin receptors are responsible for several human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and some forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we will discuss the link between Rab proteins and neurotrophin receptor trafficking and their influence on downstream signaling pathways.

  18. NETMORPH: a framework for the stochastic generation of large scale neuronal networks with realistic neuron morphologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, R.A.; Tijms, B.; van Hees, P.; Postma, F.; de Ridder, A.; Ramakers, G.J.A.; van Pelt, J.; van Ooyen, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simulation framework, called NETMORPH, for the developmental generation of 3D large-scale neuronal networks with realistic neuron morphologies. In NETMORPH, neuronal morphogenesis is simulated from the perspective of the individual growth cone. For each growth cone in a growing axonal

  19. Protection of dopaminergic neurons in primary culture by lisuride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, G; Rausch, W D; Hung, S T; Moldzio, R; Ngyuen, A; Janetzky, B; Engfer, A; Reichmann, H

    2002-02-01

    Dopamine agonists play an important role in the treatment of Parkinson's disease by reducing the administration of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). The enzymatic and non-enzymatic conversion of L-DOPA is suspected to increase oxidative stress, which leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. In primary mouse mesencephalic cultures we show that the dopamine D1/D2 receptor agonist lisuride, in a concentration range of 0.001-1 microM, enhances the survival of dopaminergic neurons, protects against toxicity induced by L-DOPA or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) and stimulates 3H-dopamine uptake. Lisuride also reduces anaerobic metabolism during incubation with L-DOPA. The present findings suggest that lisuride may have trophic/survival-promoting properties and potentially reduces oxidative stress.

  20. Serotonin: a regulator of neuronal morphology and circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubert, Elizabeth A.; Condron, Barry G.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neuromodulator associated with a wide range of physiological effects in the central nervous system. The exact mechanisms for how serotonin influences brain development are not well understood, although studies in invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms are beginning to unravel a regulatory role for serotonin in neuronal morphology and circuit formation. Recent data suggests a developmental window during which altered serotonin levels permanently impact circuitry, however, the temporal constraints and molecular mechanisms responsible are still under investigation. Growing evidence suggests that alterations in early serotonin signaling contribute to a number of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, understanding how altered serotonin signaling affects neuronal morphology and plasticity, and ultimately animal physiology and pathophysiology, will be of great significance. PMID:20561690

  1. Photoelectron microscopy in the life sciences: Imaging neuron networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercanti, D. (Istituto di Neurobiologia del CNR, Viale Marx 15, 00100 Roma (Italy)); De Stasio, G. (ISM-CNR, Via E. Fermi 38, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy)); Ciotti, M.T. (Istituto di Neurobiologia del CNR, Viale Marx 15, 00100 Roma (Italy)); Capasso, C.; Ng, W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Liang, S.H.; Cole, R.K.; Guo, Z.Y.; Wallace, J. (Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (USA) Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (USA)); Margaritondo, G. (Institut de Physique Appliquee, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Ecublens (Switzerland)); Cerrina, F. (Departments of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (USA) Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (USA)); Underwood, J.; Perera, R.; Kortright, J. (Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Photoemission techniques like electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis are the leading electronic probes in materials science---but their impact in the life sciences has been minimal. A critical problem is that the lateral resolution in ordinary photoemission does not exceed a few tenths of a millimeter. This space-averaged probe is nearly useless for most of the fundamental problems in biophysics and biochemistry, which deal with microstructures in the submicron range or smaller. This limit is being overcome with photoemission microscopes, such as our scanning instrument MAXIMUM. The first scanning photoelectron micrographs of a cellular system with submicron resolution are presented. Minute details of neuron networks are imaged on MAXIMUM, thereby opening the way to novel applications of photoemission in the life sciences. The details include individual neurons, axons, dendrites, and synapses, and composite large-area scanning micrographs were routinely produced with a lateral resolution of 0.5 {mu}m.

  2. Glucose-sensing neurons of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, Denis; Luckman, Simon M; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2005-12-29

    Specialized subgroups of hypothalamic neurons exhibit specific excitatory or inhibitory electrical responses to changes in extracellular levels of glucose. Glucose-excited neurons were traditionally assumed to employ a 'beta-cell' glucose-sensing strategy, where glucose elevates cytosolic ATP, which closes KATP channels containing Kir6.2 subunits, causing depolarization and increased excitability. Recent findings indicate that although elements of this canonical model are functional in some hypothalamic cells, this pathway is not universally essential for excitation of glucose-sensing neurons by glucose. Thus glucose-induced excitation of arcuate nucleus neurons was recently reported in mice lacking Kir6.2, and no significant increases in cytosolic ATP levels could be detected in hypothalamic neurons after changes in extracellular glucose. Possible alternative glucose-sensing strategies include electrogenic glucose entry, glucose-induced release of glial lactate, and extracellular glucose receptors. Glucose-induced electrical inhibition is much less understood than excitation, and has been proposed to involve reduction in the depolarizing activity of the Na+/K+ pump, or activation of a hyperpolarizing Cl- current. Investigations of neurotransmitter identities of glucose-sensing neurons are beginning to provide detailed information about their physiological roles. In the mouse lateral hypothalamus, orexin/hypocretin neurons (which promote wakefulness, locomotor activity and foraging) are glucose-inhibited, whereas melanin-concentrating hormone neurons (which promote sleep and energy conservation) are glucose-excited. In the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, excitatory actions of glucose on anorexigenic POMC neurons in mice have been reported, while the appetite-promoting NPY neurons may be directly inhibited by glucose. These results stress the fundamental importance of hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons in orchestrating sleep-wake cycles, energy expenditure and

  3. Preferential labeling of inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons by endogenous tropism of adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, J L; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Callaway, E M

    2009-06-30

    Despite increasingly widespread use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors for transduction of neurons in a wide range of brain structures and species, the diversity of cell types within a given brain structure is rarely considered. For example, the ability of a vector to transduce neurons within a brain structure is often assumed to indicate that all neuron types within the structure are transduced. We have characterized the transduction of mouse somatosensory cortical neuron types by recombinant AAV pseudotyped with serotype 1 capsid (rAAV2/1) and by recombinant lentivirus pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein. Both vectors used human synapsin (hSyn) promoter driving DsRed-Express. We demonstrate that high titer rAAV2/1-hSyn efficiently transduces both cortical excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations, but use of lower titers exposes a strong preference for transduction of cortical inhibitory neurons and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, we find that VSV-G-LV-hSyn principally labels excitatory cortical neurons at the highest viral titer generated. These findings demonstrate that endogenous tropism of rAAV2/1 and VSV-G-LV can be used to obtain preferential gene expression in mouse somatosensory cortical inhibitory and excitatory neuron populations, respectively.

  4. A feasibility study of multi-site,intracellular recordings from mammalian neurons by extracellular gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojovan, Silviya M; Rabieh, Noha; Shmoel, Nava; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Cohen, Ariel; Spira, Micha E

    2015-09-14

    The development of multi-electrode array platforms for large scale recording of neurons is at the forefront of neuro-engineering research efforts. Recently we demonstrated, at the proof-of-concept level, a breakthrough neuron-microelectrode interface in which cultured Aplysia neurons tightly engulf gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμEs). While maintaining their extracellular position, the gMμEs record synaptic- and action-potentials with characteristic features of intracellular recordings. Here we examined the feasibility of using gMμEs for intracellular recordings from mammalian neurons. To that end we experimentally examined the innate size limits of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to engulf gMμEs and measured the width of the "extracellular" cleft formed between the neurons and the gold surface. Using the experimental results we next analyzed the expected range of gMμEs-neuron electrical coupling coefficients. We estimated that sufficient electrical coupling levels to record attenuated synaptic- and action-potentials can be reached using the gMμE-neuron configuration. The definition of the engulfment limits of the gMμEs caps diameter at ≤2-2.5 μm and the estimated electrical coupling coefficients from the simulations pave the way for rational development and application of the gMμE based concept for in-cell recordings from mammalian neurons.

  5. Neuronal representation of stand and squat in the primary motor cortex of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaolin; Ma, Xuan; Zhang, Hang; Xu, Jiang; He, Jiping

    2015-04-09

    Determining neuronal topographical information in the cerebral cortex is of fundamental importance for developing neuroprosthetics. Significant progress has been achieved in decoding hand voluntary movement with cortical neuronal activity in nonhuman primates. However, there are few successful reports in scientific literature for decoding lower limb voluntary movement with the cortical neuronal firing. We once reported an experimental system, which consists of a specially designed chair, a visually guided stand and squat task training paradigm and an acute neuron recording setup. With this system, we can record high quality cortical neuron activity to investigate the correlation between these neuronal signals and stand/squat movement. In this research, we train two monkeys to perform the visually guided stand and squat task, and record neuronal activity in the vast areas targeted to M1 hind-limb region, at a distance of 1 mm. We find that 76.9% of recorded neurons (1230 out of 1598 neurons) showing task-firing modulation, including 294 (18.4%) during the pre-response window; 310 (19.4%) for standing up; 104 (6.5%) for the holding stand phase; and 205 (12.8%) during the sitting down. The distributions of different type neurons have a high degree of overlap. They are mainly ranged from +7.0 to 13 mm in the Posterior-Anterior dimension, and from +0.5 to 4.0 mm in Dosal-lateral dimension, very close to the midline, and just anterior of the central sulcus. The present study examines the neuronal activity related to lower limb voluntary movements in M1 and find topographical information of various neurons tuned to different stages of the stand and squat task. This work may contribute to understanding the fundamental principles of neural control of lower limb movements. Especially, the topographical information suggests us where to implant the chronic microelectrode arrays to harvest the most quantity and highest quality neurons related to lower limb movements, which

  6. Intrinsic properties of and thalamocortical inputs onto identified corticothalamic-VPM neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qizong; Chen, Chia-Chien; Ramos, Raddy L; Katz, Elizabeth; Keller, Asaf; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2014-06-01

    Corticothalamic (CT) feedback plays an important role in regulating the sensory information that the cortex receives. Within the somatosensory cortex layer VI originates the feedback to the ventral posterior medial (VPM) nucleus of the thalamus, which in turn receives sensory information from the contralateral whiskers. We examined the physiology and morphology of CT neurons in rat somatosensory cortex, focusing on the physiological characteristics of the monosynaptic inputs that they receive from the thalamus. To identify CT neurons, rhodamine microspheres were injected into VPM and allowed to retrogradely transport to the soma of CT neurons. Thalamocortical slices were prepared at least 3 days post injection. Whole-cell recordings from labeled CT cells in layer VI demonstrated that they are regular spiking neurons and exhibit little spike frequency adaption. Two anatomical classes were identified based on their apical dendrites that either terminated by layer V (compact cells) or layer IV (elaborate cells). Thalamic inputs onto identified CT-VPM neurons demonstrated paired pulse depression over a wide frequency range (2-20 Hz). Stimulus trains also resulted in significant synaptic depression above 10 Hz. Our results suggest that thalamic inputs differentially impact CT-VPM neurons in layer VI. This characteristic may allow them to differentiate a wide range of stimulation frequencies which in turn further tune the feedback signals to the thalamus.

  7. Translocation and neurotoxicity of CdTe quantum dots in RMEs motor neurons in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yunli; Wang, Xiong; Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yiping; Wang, Dayong, E-mail: dayongw@seu.edu.cn

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We investigated in vivo neurotoxicity of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons in C. elegans. • CdTe QDs in the range of μg/L caused neurotoxicity on RMEs motor neurons. • Bioavailability of CdTe QDs may be the primary inducer for CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. • Both oxidative stress and cell identity regulate the CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. • CdTe QDs were translocated and deposited into RMEs motor neurons. - Abstract: We employed Caenorhabditis elegans assay system to investigate in vivo neurotoxicity of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on RMEs motor neurons, which are involved in controlling foraging behavior, and the underlying mechanism of such neurotoxicity. After prolonged exposure to 0.1–1 μg/L of CdTe QDs, abnormal foraging behavior and deficits in development of RMEs motor neurons were observed. The observed neurotoxicity from CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons might be not due to released Cd{sup 2+}. Overexpression of genes encoding Mn-SODs or unc-30 gene controlling cell identity of RMEs neurons prevented neurotoxic effects of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons, suggesting the crucial roles of oxidative stress and cell identity in regulating CdTe QDs neurotoxicity. In nematodes, CdTe QDs could be translocated through intestinal barrier and be deposited in RMEs motor neurons. In contrast, CdTe@ZnS QDs could not be translocated into RMEs motor neurons and therefore, could only moderately accumulated in intestinal cells, suggesting that ZnS coating might reduce neurotoxicity of CdTe QDs on RMEs motor neurons. Therefore, the combinational effects of oxidative stress, cell identity, and bioavailability may contribute greatly to the mechanism of CdTe QDs neurotoxicity on RMEs motor neurons. Our results provide insights into understanding the potential risks of CdTe QDs on the development and function of nervous systems in animals.

  8. Visual patch clamp recording of neurons in thick portions of the adult spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders Sonne; Smith, Morten; Moldovan, Mihai

    2010-01-01

    enlargement of the spinal cord. With a conventional upright microscope in which the light condenser was carefully adjusted, we could visualize neurons present at the surface of the slice and record them with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. We show that neurons present in the middle of the preparation...... (IPSCs) remains constant. These preliminary data suggest that inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections are balanced locally while excitation dominates long-range connections in the spinal cord....... remain alive and capable of generating action potentials. By stimulating the lateral funiculus we can evoke intense synaptic activity associated with large increases in conductance of the recorded neurons. The conductance increases substantially more in neurons recorded in thick slices suggesting...

  9. Long-term optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing neurons to study network plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignani, Gabriele; Ferrea, Enrico; Difato, Francesco; Amarù, Jessica; Ferroni, Eleonora; Lugarà, Eleonora; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity produces changes in excitability, synaptic transmission, and network architecture in response to external stimuli. Network adaptation to environmental conditions takes place in time scales ranging from few seconds to days, and modulates the entire network dynamics. To study the network response to defined long-term experimental protocols, we setup a system that combines optical and electrophysiological tools embedded in a cell incubator. Primary hippocampal neurons transduced with lentiviruses expressing channelrhodopsin-2/H134R were subjected to various photostimulation protocols in a time window in the order of days. To monitor the effects of light-induced gating of network activity, stimulated transduced neurons were simultaneously recorded using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The developed experimental model allows discerning short-term, long-lasting, and adaptive plasticity responses of the same neuronal network to distinct stimulation frequencies applied over different temporal windows. PMID:23970852

  10. Transient neuronal populations are required to guide callosal axons: a role for semaphorin 3C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Niquille

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum (CC is the main pathway responsible for interhemispheric communication. CC agenesis is associated with numerous human pathologies, suggesting that a range of developmental defects can result in abnormalities in this structure. Midline glial cells are known to play a role in CC development, but we here show that two transient populations of midline neurons also make major contributions to the formation of this commissure. We report that these two neuronal populations enter the CC midline prior to the arrival of callosal pioneer axons. Using a combination of mutant analysis and in vitro assays, we demonstrate that CC neurons are necessary for normal callosal axon navigation. They exert an attractive influence on callosal axons, in part via Semaphorin 3C and its receptor Neuropilin-1. By revealing a novel and essential role for these neuronal populations in the pathfinding of a major cerebral commissure, our study brings new perspectives to pathophysiological mechanisms altering CC formation.

  11. Neuronal dynamics on FPGA: Izhikevich's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, M.; Caruso, E.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.; Occhipinti, L.; Rivoli, F.

    2005-06-01

    The study of spatio-temporal patterns generation and processing in systems with high parallelism like biological neuronal networks gives birth to a new technology able to realize architectures with robust performance even in noisy environments. The behavioural properties of neural assemblies warrant an effective exchange and use of information in presence of high-level neuronal noise. Neuron population processing and self-organization have been reproduced by connecting several neuron through synaptic connections, which can be either electrical or chemical, in artificial information processing architectures based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The adopted neuron model is based on Izhikevich"s description of cortical neuron dynamics [1]. The development of biological neuronal network models has been focused on architecture features like changes over time of topologies, uniformity of the connections, node diversity, etc. The hardware reproduction of neuron dynamical behaviour, by giving high computation performance, allows the development of innovative computational methods and models based on self-organizing nonlinear architectures.

  12. Bursting and synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Networks of neonatal cortical neurons, cultured on multi electrode arrays (MEAs) exhibit spontaneous action potential firings. The electrodes embedded in the glass surface of a MEA can be used to record and stimulate activity at 60 sites in a network of ~50.000 neurons. Such in-vitro networks enable

  13. Sorting out polarized transport mechanisms in neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with two distinct processes called axons and dendrites. To establish and maintain their specialized morphology and function, neurons use molecular motors: kinesins, myosins and dynein to steer cargo transport along the cytoskeleton into axons and dendrites.

  14. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  15. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  16. Power laws from linear neuronal cable theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, Klas H; Lindén, Henrik Anders; Tetzlaff, Tom

    2014-01-01

    suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general...

  17. Locally active Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Paolo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy); Fortuna, Luigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: lfortuna@diees.unict.it; Frasca, Mattia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: mfrasca@diees.unict.it; Rosa, Manuela La [SST Group, Corporate R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: manuela.la-rosa@st.com

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the locally active and the edge of chaos regions of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model for neuron dynamics are studied. From these regions parameters are chosen to set emergent phenomena both in 2D and 3D grids of HR neurons.

  18. Long-term Cre-mediated Retrograde Tagging of Neurons Using a Novel Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassana eOyibo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain regions contain diverse populations of neurons that project to different long-range targets. The study of these subpopulations in circuit function and behavior requires a toolkit to characterize and manipulate their activity in vivo. We have developed a novel set of reagents based on Pseudorabies Virus (PRV for efficient and long-term genetic tagging of neurons based on their projection targets. By deleting IE180, the master transcriptional regulator in the PRV genome, we have produced a mutant virus capable of infection and transgene expression in neurons but unable to replicate in or spread from those neurons. IE180-null mutants showed no cytotoxicity, and infected neurons exhibited normal physiological function more than 45 days after infection, indicating the utility of these engineered viruses for chronic experiments. To enable rapid and convenient construction of novel IE180-null recombinants, we engineered a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC shuttle-vector system for moving new constructs into the PRV IE180-null genome. Using this system we generated an IE180-null recombinant virus expressing the site-specific recombinase Cre. This Cre-expressing virus (PRV-hSyn-Cre efficiently and robustly infects neurons in vivo and activates transgene expression from Cre-dependent vectors in local and retrograde projecting populations of neurons in the mouse. We also generated an assortment of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins (mCherry, EGFP, ECFP. These viruses exhibit long-term labeling of neurons in vitro but transient labeling in vivo. Together these novel IE180-null PRV reagents expand the toolkit for targeted gene expression in the brain, facilitating functional dissection of neuronal circuits in vivo.

  19. Fast neuronal labeling in live tissue using a biocytin conjugated fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsløf, Mads; Müller, Felix C; Rohrberg, Julie; Rekling, Jens C

    2015-09-30

    Biocytin has found numerous uses as a neuronal tracer, since it shows both antero- and retrograde transport in neuronal tracts. The main advantage of biocytin lies in the comprehensive intracellular distribution of the molecule, and in effective detection using avidin-based reactions. The main drawback is that biocytin cannot be visualized in live tissue. We demonstrate that TMR biocytin, a conjugate of biocytin and a rhodamine fluorophore, is an effective neuronal tracer in live tissue when applied by electroporation. The initial fiber transport velocity of TMR biocytin is high-5.4mm/h. TMR biocytin can be used in conjunction with AM calcium dyes to label neuronal somas from distances of several millimetres, and record calcium transients during the course of a few hours. Juxtacellular application of TMR biocytin leads to fast anterograde transport with labeling of local synapses within 10min. TMR biocytin is fixable, stable during methyl salicylate clearing, and can be visualized deep in nervous tissue. Retrograde labeling with TMR biocytin enables long-range neuronal visualization and concurrent calcium imaging after only a few hours, which is substantially faster than other fluorescence-based tracers. The green emitting Atto 488 biotin is also taken up and transported retrogradely, but it is not compatible with standard green emitting calcium dyes. TMR biocytin is an attractive neuronal tracer. It labels neurons fast over long distances, and it can be used in conjunction with calcium dyes to report on neuronal activity in retrogradely labeled live neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural...... of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes...

  1. Optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons increases sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konadhode, Roda Rani; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Zayachkivsky, Andrew; Liu, Meng; Uhde, Thomas; Glen, W Bailey; van den Pol, Anthony N; Mulholland, Patrick J; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2013-06-19

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide present in the hypothalamus of all vertebrates. MCH is implicated in a number of behaviors but direct evidence is lacking. To selectively stimulate the MCH neurons the gene for the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, was inserted into the MCH neurons of wild-type mice. Three weeks later MCH neurons were stimulated for 1 min every 5 min for 24 h. A 10 Hz stimulation at the start of the night hastened sleep onset, reduced length of wake bouts by 50%, increased total time in non-REM and REM sleep at night, and increased sleep intensity during the day cycle. Sleep induction at a circadian time when all of the arousal neurons are active indicates that MCH stimulation can powerfully counteract the combined wake-promoting signal of the arousal neurons. This could be potentially useful in treatment of insomnia.

  2. Neuronal Migration and AUTS2 Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Kei; Hoshino, Mikio

    2017-05-14

    Neuronal migration is one of the pivotal steps to form a functional brain, and disorganization of this process is believed to underlie the pathology of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy. However, it is not clear how abnormal neuronal migration causes mental dysfunction. Recently, a key gene for various psychiatric diseases, the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2), has been shown to regulate neuronal migration, which gives new insight into understanding this question. Interestingly, the AUTS2 protein has dual functions: Cytoplasmic AUTS2 regulates actin cytoskeleton to control neuronal migration and neurite extension, while nuclear AUTS2 controls transcription of various genes as a component of the polycomb complex 1 (PRC1). In this review, we discuss AUTS2 from the viewpoint of human genetics, molecular function, brain development, and behavior in animal models, focusing on its role in neuronal migration.

  3. Neuronal hyperplasia in the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, C; Schrøder, H D

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of minor surgical specimens from the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was found in nine of 56 haemorrhoidectomy specimens and in four of 23 fibrous polyps. In an additional series of 14 resections of the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was present in six cases, of which...... five showed haemorrhoids. In all cases, neuronal hyperplasia was located in the submucosa beneath squamous epithelium and extended over an area from 5 to 12 mm. Immunohistochemically, the foci of hyperplasia were found to consist of both neuronal and Schwann cell components. Staining for vasoactive...... intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene related peptide, did not demonstrate any increased terminal density. It is suggested that anal neuronal hyperplasia in these cases represents an acquired lesion due to local mechanical influence....

  4. Attractor dynamics in local neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe eThivierge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of synaptic connectivity in various regions of the brain are characterized by the presence of synaptic motifs, defined as unidirectional and bidirectional synaptic contacts that follow a particular configuration and link together small groups of neurons. Recent computational work proposes that a relay network (two populations communicating via a third, relay population of neurons can generate precise patterns of neural synchronization. Here, we employ two distinct models of neuronal dynamics and show that simulated neural circuits designed in this way are caught in a global attractor of activity that prevents neurons from modulating their response on the basis of incoming stimuli. To circumvent the emergence of a fixed global attractor, we propose a mechanism of selective gain inhibition that promotes flexible responses to external stimuli. We suggest that local neuronal circuits may employ this mechanism to generate precise patterns of neural synchronization whose transient nature delimits the occurrence of a brief stimulus.

  5. Multidisciplinary Interventions in Motor Neuron Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. E. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper motor neuron in the motor cortex and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Death occurs 2–4 years after the onset of the disease. A complex interplay of cellular processes such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and impaired axonal transport are proposed pathogenetic processes underlying neuronal cell loss. Currently evidence exists for the use of riluzole as a disease modifying drug; multidisciplinary team care approach to patient management; noninvasive ventilation for respiratory management; botulinum toxin B for sialorrhoea treatment; palliative care throughout the course of the disease; and Modafinil use for fatigue treatment. Further research is needed in management of dysphagia, bronchial secretion, pseudobulbar affect, spasticity, cramps, insomnia, cognitive impairment, and communication in motor neuron disease.

  6. Neuron-derived IgG Protects Neurons from Complement-dependent Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Bingjie; McNutt, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunity of the nervous system has traditionally been thought to be predominantly due to the blood-brain barrier. This concept must now be revisited based on the existence of neuron-derived IgG. The conventional concept is that IgG is produced solely by mature B lymphocytes, but it has now been found to be synthesized by murine and human neurons. However, the function of this endogenous IgG is poorly understood. In this study, we confirm IgG production by rat cortical neurons at the protein and mRNA levels, with 69.0 ± 5.8% of cortical neurons IgG-positive. Injury to primary-culture neurons was induced by complement leading to increases in IgG production. Blockage of neuron-derived IgG resulted in more neuronal death and early apoptosis in the presence of complement. In addition, FcγRI was found in microglia and astrocytes. Expression of FcγR I in microglia was increased by exposure to neuron-derived IgG. Release of NO from microglia triggered by complement was attenuated by neuron-derived IgG, and this attenuation could be reversed by IgG neutralization. These data demonstrate that neuron-derived IgG is protective of neurons against injury induced by complement and microglial activation. IgG appears to play an important role in maintaining the stability of the nervous system. PMID:23979841

  7. Chimera states in a multilayer network of coupled and uncoupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Soumen; Perc, Matjaž; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-07-01

    We study the emergence of chimera states in a multilayer neuronal network, where one layer is composed of coupled and the other layer of uncoupled neurons. Through the multilayer structure, the layer with coupled neurons acts as the medium by means of which neurons in the uncoupled layer share information in spite of the absence of physical connections among them. Neurons in the coupled layer are connected with electrical synapses, while across the two layers, neurons are connected through chemical synapses. In both layers, the dynamics of each neuron is described by the Hindmarsh-Rose square wave bursting dynamics. We show that the presence of two different types of connecting synapses within and between the two layers, together with the multilayer network structure, plays a key role in the emergence of between-layer synchronous chimera states and patterns of synchronous clusters. In particular, we find that these chimera states can emerge in the coupled layer regardless of the range of electrical synapses. Even in all-to-all and nearest-neighbor coupling within the coupled layer, we observe qualitatively identical between-layer chimera states. Moreover, we show that the role of information transmission delay between the two layers must not be neglected, and we obtain precise parameter bounds at which chimera states can be observed. The expansion of the chimera region and annihilation of cluster and fully coherent states in the parameter plane for increasing values of inter-layer chemical synaptic time delay are illustrated using effective range measurements. These results are discussed in the light of neuronal evolution, where the coexistence of coherent and incoherent dynamics during the developmental stage is particularly likely.

  8. Coupled activation of primary sensory neurons contributes to chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C.; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by “hijacking” neighboring neurons through gap junctions. PMID:27568517

  9. Physiological functions of glucose-inhibited neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, D; González, J A

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited neurones are an integral part of neurocircuits regulating cognitive arousal, body weight and vital adaptive behaviours. Their firing is directly suppressed by extracellular glucose through poorly understood signalling cascades culminating in opening of post-synaptic K(+) or possibly Cl(-) channels. In mammalian brains, two groups of glucose-inhibited neurones are best understood at present: neurones of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that express peptide transmitters NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neurones of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that express peptide transmitters orexins/hypocretins. The activity of ARC NPY/AgRP neurones promotes food intake and suppresses energy expenditure, and their destruction causes a severe reduction in food intake and body weight. The physiological actions of ARC NPY/AgRP cells are mediated by projections to numerous hypothalamic areas, as well as extrahypothalamic sites such as the thalamus and ventral tegmental area. Orexin/hypocretin neurones of the LH are critical for normal wakefulness, energy expenditure and reward-seeking, and their destruction causes narcolepsy. Orexin actions are mediated by highly widespread central projections to virtually all brain areas except the cerebellum, including monosynaptic innervation of the cerebral cortex and autonomic pre-ganglionic neurones. There, orexins act on two specific G-protein-coupled receptors generally linked to neuronal excitation. In addition to sensing physiological changes in sugar levels, the firing of both NPY/AgRP and orexin neurones is inhibited by the 'satiety' hormone leptin and stimulated by the 'hunger' hormone ghrelin. Glucose-inhibited neurones are thus well placed to coordinate diverse brain states and behaviours based on energy levels.

  10. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Joseph D; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V; Belousov, Andrei B

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed.

  11. Contribution of synchronized GABAergic neurons to dopaminergic neuron firing and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Zakharov, Denis; di Volo, Matteo; Gutkin, Boris; Lapish, Christopher C.; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), interactions between dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are critical for regulating DA neuron activity and thus DA efflux. To provide a mechanistic explanation of how GABA neurons influence DA neuron firing, we developed a circuit model of the VTA. The model is based on feed-forward inhibition and recreates canonical features of the VTA neurons. Simulations revealed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAR) stimulation can differentially influence the firing pattern of the DA neuron, depending on the level of synchronization among GABA neurons. Asynchronous activity of GABA neurons provides a constant level of inhibition to the DA neuron and, when removed, produces a classical disinhibition burst. In contrast, when GABA neurons are synchronized by common synaptic input, their influence evokes additional spikes in the DA neuron, resulting in increased measures of firing and bursting. Distinct from previous mechanisms, the increases were not based on lowered firing rate of the GABA neurons or weaker hyperpolarization by the GABAR synaptic current. This phenomenon was induced by GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the DA neuron that leads to decreases in intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration, thus reducing the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) current. In this way, the GABA-mediated hyperpolarization replaces Ca2+-dependent K+ current; however, this inhibition is pulsatile, which allows the DA neuron to fire during the rhythmic pauses in inhibition. Our results emphasize the importance of inhibition in the VTA, which has been discussed in many studies, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby computations can occur locally. PMID:27440240

  12. Generation of sensory neurons is stimulated by leukemia inhibitory factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, M; Reid, K; Hilton, D J; Bartlett, P F

    1991-01-01

    The processes that regulate the development of peripheral neurons from their precursors in the embryonic neural crest are essentially unknown. In this report, we show that leukemia inhibitory factor stimulates the generation of neurons in cultures of mouse neural crest. These neurons have the morphology of sensory neurons and contain neuropeptides found in mammalian sensory neurons. Consistent with these neurons being of the sensory lineage is the finding that they arise from nondividing prec...

  13. SPARCL1-containing neurons in the human brainstem and sensory ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sato, Ayumi; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Shimada, Yusuke; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) is a member of the osteonectin family of proteins. In this study, immunohistochemistry for SPARCL1 was performed to obtain its distribution in the human brainstem, cervical spinal cord, and sensory ganglion. SPARCL1-immunoreactivity was detected in neuronal cell bodies including perikarya and proximal dendrites, and the neuropil. The motor nuclei of the IIIrd, Vth, VIth, VIIth, IXth, Xth, XIth, and XIIth cranial nerves and spinal nerves contained many SPARCL1-immunoreactive (-IR) neurons with medium-sized to large cell bodies. Small and medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons were distributed in sensory nuclei of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves. In the medulla oblongata, the dorsal column nuclei also had small to medium-sized SPARCL1-IR neurons. In addition, SPARCL1-IR neurons were detected in the nucleus of the trapezoid body and pontine nucleus within the pons and the arcuate nucleus in the medulla oblongata. In the cervical spinal cord, the ventral horn contained some SPARCL1-IR neurons with large cell bodies. These findings suggest that SPARCL1-containing neurons function to relay and regulate motor and sensory signals in the human brainstem. In the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG), primary sensory neurons contained SPARCL1-immunoreactivity. The proportion of SPARCL1-IR neurons in the TG (mean ± SD, 39.9 ± 2.4%) was higher than in the DRG (30.6 ± 2.1%). SPARCL1-IR neurons were mostly medium-sized to large (mean ± SD, 1494.5 ± 708.3 μm(2); range, 320.4-4353.4 μm(2)) in the DRG, whereas such neurons were of various cell body sizes in the TG (mean ± SD, 1291.2 ± 532.8 μm(2); range, 209.3-4326.4 μm(2)). There appears to be a SPARCL1-containing sensory pathway in the ganglion and brainstem of the spinal and trigeminal nervous systems.

  14. Optical cell stimulation for neuronal excitation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsmeier, Sonja; Heeger, Patrick; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo; Heinemann, Dag

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation of cellular functions represents a growing field in biomedical sciences. The possibility to modulate specific targets with high spatial and temporal precision in a contactless manner allows a broad range of applications. Here, we present a study on stimulation of neuronal cells by optical means. As a long-term objective, we seek to improve the performance of current electric neurostimulation, especially in the context of cochlear implants. Firstly, we tested a gold nanoparticle mediated approach to modulate transmembrane conductivity by irradiation using a picosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 40 ms in a neuroblastoma cell line (N2A) and primary murine neurons. The light absorption leads to a rapid temperature increase of the gold nanoparticles, which can induce an increased permeabilisation of the cellular membrane. Calcium transients were recorded as an indicator of neuronal activity. Although calcium signals were reliably detected upon laser irradiation, the temporal behavior did not resemble action potentials. The origin of these signals was investigated by an inhibitor study. These results indicate calcium induced calcium release (CICR) as the major source of the calcium transients. Consecutively, we tested alternative approaches for cell stimulation, such as glutamate release and optogenetics, and evaluated the potential of these methods for the application in a cochlear implant. Compared to the gold nanoparticle approach, both techniques induce less cellular stress and reliably produce action potentials.

  15. Common Synaptic Input to Motor Neurons and Neural Drive to Targeted Reinnervated Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; Vujaklija, Ivan; Sturma, Agnes; Salminger, Stefan; Hofer, Christian; Aszmann, Oskar

    2017-11-15

    We compared the behavior of motor neurons innervating their physiological muscle targets with motor neurons from the same spinal segment whose axons were surgically redirected to remnant muscles (targeted muscle reinnervation). The objective was to assess whether motor neurons with nonphysiological innervation receive similar synaptic input and could be voluntary controlled as motor neurons with natural innervation. For this purpose, we acquired high-density EMG signals from the biceps brachii in 5 male transhumeral amputees who underwent targeted reinnervation of this muscle by the ulnar nerve and from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of 5 healthy individuals to investigate the natural innervation of the ulnar nerve. The same recordings were also performed from the biceps brachii muscle of additional 5 able-bodied individuals. The EMG signals were decomposed into discharges of motor unit action potentials. Motor neurons were progressively recruited for the full range of submaximal muscle activation in all conditions. Moreover, their discharge rate significantly increased from recruitment to target activation level in a similar way across the subject groups. Motor neurons across all subject groups received common synaptic input as identified by coherence analysis of their spike trains. However, the relative strength of common input in both the delta (0.5-5 Hz) and alpha (5-13 Hz) bands was significantly smaller for the surgically reinnervated motor neuron pool with respect to the corresponding physiologically innervated one. The results support the novel approach of motor neuron interfacing for prosthesis control and provide new insights into the role of afferent input on motor neuron activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Targeted muscle reinnervation surgically redirects nerves that lost their target in the amputation into redundant muscles in the region of the stump. The study of the behavior of motor neurons following this surgery is needed for designing

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of vestibular efferent neurons innervating semicircular canals of the gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, I. M.; Perachio, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Anterograde labeling techniques were used to examine peripheral innervation patterns of vestibular efferent neurons in the crista ampullares of the gerbil. Vestibular efferent neurons were labeled by extracellular injections of biocytin or biotinylated dextran amine into the contralateral or ipsilateral dorsal subgroup of efferent cell bodies (group e) located dorsolateral to the facial nerve genu. Anterogradely labeled efferent terminal field varicosities consist mainly of boutons en passant with fewer of the terminal type. The bouton swellings are located predominately in apposition to the basolateral borders of the afferent calyces and type II hair cells, but several boutons were identified close to the hair cell apical border on both types. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological analysis of the terminal fields from these cells located in the sensory neuroepithelium of the anterior, horizontal, and posterior cristae were performed. We show that efferent neurons densely innervate each end organ in widespread terminal fields. Subepithelial bifurcations of parent axons were minimal, with extensive collateralization occurring after the axons penetrated the basement membrane of the neuroepithelium. Axonal branching ranged between the 6th and 27th orders and terminal field collecting area far exceeds that of the peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. The terminal fields of the efferent neurons display three morphologically heterogeneous types: central, peripheral, and planum. All cell types possess terminal fields displaying a high degree of anisotropy with orientations typically parallel to or within +/-45 degrees of the longitudinal axis if the crista. Terminal fields of the central and planum zones predominately project medially toward the transverse axis from the more laterally located penetration of the basement membrane by the parent axon. Peripheral zone terminal fields extend predominately toward the planum semilunatum. The innervation

  17. Olfaction in the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni. I: Identification of olfactory receptor neuron types responding to environmental odors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, C D; Cribb, B W

    2001-05-01

    The electroantennogram method was used to investigate the number of distinct olfactory receptor neuron types responding to a range of behaviorally active volatile chemicals in gravid Queensland fruit flies, Bactrocera tryoni. Three receptor neuron types were identified. One type responds to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide; a second to ethanol; and a third to n-butyric acid and ammonia. The receptor neuron type responding to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide consists of three subtypes. The presence of a limited number of receptor neuron types responding to a diverse set of chemicals and the reception of carbon dioxide by a receptor neuron type that responds to other odorants are novel aspects of the peripheral olfactory discrimination process.

  18. Engrafted Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Functional Recovery through Synapse Reorganization with Spared Host Neurons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Yokota

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI. However, the efficacy of NSPC transplantation on severe SCI is poorly understood. We herein show that NSPC transplantation promotes functional recovery after mild and moderate SCI, but not after severe SCI. In severe SCI mice, there were few remaining host neurons within the range of NSPC engraftment; thus, we examined whether the co-distribution of transplant and host is a contributory factor for functional improvement. A cellular selective analysis using laser microdissection revealed that drug-induced host neuronal ablation considerably decreased the synaptogenic potential of the engrafted NSPCs. Furthermore, following host neuronal ablation, neuronal retrograde tracing showed less propriospinal relay connections bridging the lesion after NSPC transplantation. Our findings suggest that the interactive synaptic reorganization between engrafted NSPCs and spared host neurons is crucial for functional recovery, providing significant insight for establishing therapeutic strategies for severe SCI.

  19. Forced neuronal interactions cause poor communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzisch, Marine; Toni, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in hippocampal function, and neurons born post-natally participate to spatial memory and mood control. However, a great proportion of granule neurons generated in the post-natal hippocampus are eliminated during the first 3 weeks of their maturation, a mechanism that depends on their synaptic integration. In a recent study, we examined the possibility of enhancing the synaptic integration of neurons born post-natally, by specifically overexpressing synaptic cell adhesion molecules in these cells. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are transmembrane proteins mediating the physical connection between pre- and post-synaptic neurons at the synapse, and their overexpression enhances synapse formation. Accordingly, we found that overexpressing synaptic adhesion molecules increased the synaptic integration and survival of newborn neurons. Surprisingly, the synaptic adhesion molecule with the strongest effect on new neurons' survival, Neuroligin-2A, decreased memory performances in a water maze task. We present here hypotheses explaining these surprising results, in the light of the current knowledge of the mechanisms of synaptic integration of new neurons in the post-natal hippocampus.

  20. Staufen2 Regulates Neuronal Target RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacki E. Heraud-Farlow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in directing RNA translation to neuronal synapses. Staufen2 (Stau2 has been implicated in both dendritic RNA localization and synaptic plasticity in mammalian neurons. Here, we report the identification of functionally relevant Stau2 target mRNAs in neurons. The majority of Stau2-copurifying mRNAs expressed in the hippocampus are present in neuronal processes, further implicating Stau2 in dendritic mRNA regulation. Stau2 targets are enriched for secondary structures similar to those identified in the 3′ UTRs of Drosophila Staufen targets. Next, we show that Stau2 regulates steady-state levels of many neuronal RNAs and that its targets are predominantly downregulated in Stau2-deficient neurons. Detailed analysis confirms that Stau2 stabilizes the expression of one synaptic signaling component, the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4 mRNA, via its 3′ UTR. This study defines the global impact of Stau2 on mRNAs in neurons, revealing a role in stabilization of the levels of synaptic targets.

  1. Responses of MST neurons to plaid stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Farhan A; Liu, Liu D; Pack, Christopher C

    2013-07-01

    The estimation of motion information from retinal input is a fundamental function of the primate dorsal visual pathway. Previous work has shown that this function involves multiple cortical areas, with each area integrating information from its predecessors. Compared with neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1), neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area more faithfully represent the velocity of plaid stimuli, and the observation of this pattern selectivity has led to two-stage models in which MT neurons integrate the outputs of component-selective V1 neurons. Motion integration in these models is generally complemented by motion opponency, which refines velocity selectivity. Area MT projects to a third stage of motion processing, the medial superior temporal (MST) area, but surprisingly little is known about MST responses to plaid stimuli. Here we show that increased pattern selectivity in MST is associated with greater prevalence of the mechanisms implemented by two-stage MT models: Compared with MT neurons, MST neurons integrate motion components to a greater degree and exhibit evidence of stronger motion opponency. Moreover, when tested with more challenging unikinetic plaid stimuli, an appreciable percentage of MST neurons are pattern selective, while such selectivity is rare in MT. Surprisingly, increased motion integration is found in MST even for transparent plaid stimuli, which are not typically integrated perceptually. Thus the relationship between MST and MT is qualitatively similar to that between MT and V1, as repeated application of basic motion mechanisms leads to novel selectivities at each stage along the pathway.

  2. AgRP Neurons Regulate Bone Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Geun Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus has been implicated in skeletal metabolism. Whether hunger-promoting neurons of the arcuate nucleus impact the bone is not known. We generated multiple lines of mice to affect AgRP neuronal circuit integrity. We found that mice with Ucp2 gene deletion, in which AgRP neuronal function was impaired, were osteopenic. This phenotype was rescued by cell-selective reactivation of Ucp2 in AgRP neurons. When the AgRP circuitry was impaired by early postnatal deletion of AgRP neurons or by cell autonomous deletion of Sirt1 (AgRP-Sirt1−/−, mice also developed reduced bone mass. No impact of leptin receptor deletion in AgRP neurons was found on bone homeostasis. Suppression of sympathetic tone in AgRP-Sirt1−/− mice reversed osteopenia in transgenic animals. Taken together, these observations establish a significant regulatory role for AgRP neurons in skeletal bone metabolism independent of leptin action.

  3. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V.; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G.; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro. PMID:25870293

  4. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  5. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction) with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation. Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling. PMID:25249944

  6. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eTorben-Nielsen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation.Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate.As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling.

  7. Probabilistic identification of cerebellar cortical neurones across species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Van Dijck

    Full Text Available Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our

  8. Reaction-Diffusion in the NEURON Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. McDougal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON has developed a Reaction-Diffusion (rxd module in Python which provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy’s sparse linear algebra library.

  9. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    isoform compositions of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K(+) from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K...... characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K(+) from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform combinations in K(+) management in the central nervous system might...

  10. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlmann Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the developing midbrain. See research article http://www.neuraldevelopment.com/content/6/1/29

  11. Statistical Mechanics Characterization of Neuronal Mosaics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; de Lima, Silene Maria Araujo

    2005-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neuronal cells is an important requirement for achieving proper neuronal function in several parts of the nervous system of most animals. For instance, specific distribution of photoreceptors and related neuronal cells, particularly the ganglion cells, in mammal's retina is required in order to properly sample the projected scene. This work presents how two concepts from the areas of statistical mechanics and complex systems, namely the \\emph{lacunarity} and the \\emph{multiscale entropy} (i.e. the entropy calculated over progressively diffused representations of the cell mosaic), have allowed effective characterization of the spatial distribution of retinal cells.

  12. Neuron-glia interactions in glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sickmann, H M; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    theses processes also has not been fully elucidated. Cultured astrocytes and neurons were utilized to monitor these processes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission. Inhibitors of glycolysis and TCA cycle in combination with pathway-selective substrates were used to study glutamate uptake and release...... in providing energy for glutamate uptake both in astrocytes and in neurons. The neuronal vesicular glutamate release was less dependent on glycolytic ATP. Dependence of glutamate uptake on glycolytic ATP may be at least partially explained by a close association in the membrane of GAPDH and PGK...

  13. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H

    2003-01-01

    signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment...... of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates...

  14. Responses of neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to monaural and binaural tone bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiming; Kelly, Jack B

    2006-04-01

    Responses to monaural and binaural tone bursts were recorded from neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL). Most of the neurons (55%) had V- or U-shaped frequency-tuning curves with a single clearly defined characteristic frequency (CF). However, many neurons had more complex, multipeaked tuning curves (37%), or other patterns (8%). Temporal firing patterns included both onset and sustained responses to contralateral tone bursts. Onset and sustained responses were distributed along the dorsoventral length of VNLL with no indication of segregation into different regions. Onset neurons had shorter average first-spike latencies than neurons with sustained responses (means, 8.3 vs. 14.8 ms). They also had less jitter, as reflected in the SD of first-spike latencies, than neurons with sustained responses (means, 0.59 and 4.2 ms, respectively). The extent of jitter decreased with an increase in stimulus intensity for neurons with sustained responses, but remained unchanged for onset neurons tested over the same range. Many neurons had binaural responses, primarily of the excitatory/inhibitory (EI) type, widely distributed along the dorsoventral extent of VNLL. Local application of the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX reduced excitatory responses, indicating that responses were dependent on synaptic activity and not recorded from passing fibers. The results show that many neurons in VNLL have a precision of timing that is well suited for processing auditory temporal information. In the rat, these neurons are intermingled among cells with less precise temporal response features and include cells with binaural as well as monaural responses.

  15. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression on neurons in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and experimental subacute measles encephalitis

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    Gogate, N.; Yamabe, Toshio; Verma, L.; Dhib-Jalbut, S. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Lack of major histocompatibility class I antigens on neurons has been implicated as a possible mechanism for viral persistence in the brain since these antigens are required for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition of infected cells. In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), measles virus (MV) persists in neurons, resulting in a fatal chronic infection. MHC class I mRNA expression was examined in formalin-fixed brain tissue from 6 SSPE patients by in situ hybridization. In addition MHC class I protein expression in MV-infected neurons was examined in experimental Subacute Measles Encephalitis (SME) by double immunohistochemistry. MHC class I mRNA expression was found to be upregulated in SSPE tissues studied, and in 5 out of 6 cases the expression was definitively seen on neurons. The percentage of neurons expressing MHC class I mRNA ranged between 20 to 84% in infected areas. There was no correlation between the degree of infection and expression of MHC class I molecules on neurons. Importantly, the number of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens was markedly low, varying between 2 to 8%. Similar results were obtained in SME where 20 to 30% of the neurons expressed MHC class I but < 8% co-expressed MHC class I and MV antigens. Perivascular infiltrating cells in the infected regions in SME expressed IFN{gamma} immunoreactivity. The results suggest that MV may not be directly involved in the induction of MHC class I on neurons and that cytokines such as IFN{gamma} may play an important role. Furthermore, the paucity of neurons co-expressing MHC class I and MV antigens in SSPE and SME suggests that such cells are either rapidly cleared by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), or, alternatively, lack of co-expression of MHC class I on MV infected neurons favors MV persistence in these cells by escaping CTL recognition. 33 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Spatial consistency of neural firing regulates long-range local field potential synchronization: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki

    2015-02-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are thought to integrate neuronal processes within the range of a few millimeters of radius, which corresponds to the scale of multiple columns. In this study, the model of LFP in the visual cortex proposed by Mazzoni et al. (2008) was adapted to organize a network of two cortical areas, in which pyramidal neurons were divided into two sub-population modeling columns with spatially organized connections to neurons in other areas. Using the model enabled the relationship between neural firing and LFP to be evaluated, in addition to the LFP coherence between the two areas. Results showed that: (1) neurons in a particular sub-population generated the LFP in the area; (2) the spatial consistency of neural firing in the two areas was strongly correlated with LFP coherence; and (3) this consistency was capable of regulating LFP coherence in a lower frequency band, which was originally introduced to neurons in a particular sub-population. These results were derived from a winner-take-all operation in the columnar structure; thus, they are expected to be common in the cortex. It is suggested that the spatial consistency of neural firing is essential for regulating long-range LFP synchronization, which would facilitate neuronal integration processes over multiple cortical areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glial Regulation of the Neuronal Connectome through Local and Long-Distant Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, R Douglas; Woo, Dong Ho; Basser, Peter J

    2015-04-22

    If "the connectome" represents a complete map of anatomical and functional connectivity in the brain, it should also include glia. Glia define and regulate both the brain's anatomical and functional connectivity over a broad range of length scales, spanning the whole brain to subcellular domains of synaptic interactions. This Perspective article examines glial interactions with the neuronal connectome (including long-range networks, local circuits, and individual synaptic connections) and highlights opportunities for future research. Our understanding of the structure and function of the neuronal connectome would be incomplete without an understanding of how all types of glia contribute to neuronal connectivity and function, from single synapses to circuits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel enteric neuron-glia coculture system reveals the role of glia in neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre-Scoul, Catherine; Chevalier, Julien; Oleynikova, Elena; Cossais, François; Talon, Sophie; Neunlist, Michel; Boudin, Hélène

    2017-01-15

    Unlike astrocytes in the brain, the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the formation of the enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. To examine the role of EGCs in the formation of the neuronal network, we developed a novel neuron-enriched culture model from embryonic rat intestine grown in indirect coculture with EGCs. We found that EGCs shape axonal complexity and synapse density in enteric neurons, through purinergic- and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent pathways. Using a novel and valuable culture model to study enteric neuron-glia interactions, our study identified EGCs as a key cellular actor regulating neuronal network maturation. In the nervous system, the formation of neuronal circuitry results from a complex and coordinated action of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In the CNS, extrinsic mediators derived from astrocytes have been shown to play a key role in neuronal maturation, including dendritic shaping, axon guidance and synaptogenesis. In the enteric nervous system (ENS), the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the maturation of developing enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. A major obstacle in addressing this question is the difficulty in obtaining a valuable experimental model in which enteric neurons could be isolated and maintained without EGCs. We adapted a cell culture method previously developed for CNS neurons to establish a neuron-enriched primary culture from embryonic rat intestine which was cultured in indirect coculture with EGCs. We demonstrated that enteric neurons grown in such conditions showed several structural, phenotypic and functional hallmarks of proper development and maturation. However, when neurons were grown without EGCs, the complexity of the axonal arbour and the density of synapses were markedly reduced, suggesting that glial-derived factors contribute strongly to the formation of the neuronal circuitry. We found that these effects played by EGCs were

  19. Phase-locked cluster oscillations in periodically forced integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuronal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Angela J.; Breakspear, Michael; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The minimal integrate-and-fire-or-burst neuron model succinctly describes both tonic firing and postinhibitory rebound bursting of thalamocortical cells in the sensory relay. Networks of integrate-and-fire-or-burst (IFB) neurons with slow inhibitory synaptic interactions have been shown to support stable rhythmic states, including globally synchronous and cluster oscillations, in which network-mediated inhibition cyclically generates bursting in coherent subgroups of neurons. In this paper, we introduce a reduced IFB neuronal population model to study synchronization of inhibition-mediated oscillatory bursting states to periodic excitatory input. Using numeric methods, we demonstrate the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked bursting oscillations in the sinusoidally forced IFB neuronal population model. Phase locking is shown to arise when periodic excitation is sufficient to pace the onset of bursting in an IFB cluster without counteracting the inhibitory interactions necessary for burst generation. Phase-locked bursting states are thus found to destabilize when periodic excitation increases in strength or frequency. Further study of the IFB neuronal population model with pulse-like periodic excitatory input illustrates that this synchronization mechanism generalizes to a broad range of n:m phase-locked bursting states across both globally synchronous and clustered oscillatory regimes.

  20. Synchronization properties of coupled chaotic neurons: The role of random shared input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rupesh [School of Computational and Integrative Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Bilal, Shakir [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India); Ramaswamy, Ram [School of Computational and Integrative Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-06-15

    Spike-time correlations of neighbouring neurons depend on their intrinsic firing properties as well as on the inputs they share. Studies have shown that periodically firing neurons, when subjected to random shared input, exhibit asynchronicity. Here, we study the effect of random shared input on the synchronization of weakly coupled chaotic neurons. The cases of so-called electrical and chemical coupling are both considered, and we observe a wide range of synchronization behaviour. When subjected to identical shared random input, there is a decrease in the threshold coupling strength needed for chaotic neurons to synchronize in-phase. The system also supports lag–synchronous states, and for these, we find that shared input can cause desynchronization. We carry out a master stability function analysis for a network of such neurons and show agreement with the numerical simulations. The contrasting role of shared random input for complete and lag synchronized neurons is useful in understanding spike-time correlations observed in many areas of the brain.

  1. Effects of Chemically Doped Bioactive Borate Glass on Neuron Regrowth and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Brinda; Papke, Jason B; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Day, Delbert E; Harkins, Amy B

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries present challenges to regeneration. Currently, the gold standard for nerve repair is an autograft that results in another region of the body suffering nerve damage. Previously, bioactive borate glass (BBG) has been studied in clinical trials to treat patients with non-healing wounds, and we have reported that BBG is conducive for soft tissue repair. BBG provides structural support, degrades in a non-cytotoxic manner, and can be chemically doped. Here, we tested a wide range of chemical compounds that are reported to have neuroprotective characteristics to promote regeneration of peripheral neurons after traumatic injury. We hypothesized that chemical dopants added in trace amounts to BBG would improve neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. We measured neurite outgrowth from whole DRG explants, and survival rates of dissociated neurons and support cells that comprise the DRG. Results show that chemically doped BBGs have differentially variable effects on neuronal survival and outgrowth, with iron, gallium, and zinc improving outgrowth of neurons, and iodine causing the most detriment to neurons. Because chemically doped BBGs support increased nerve regrowth and survival, they show promise for use in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  2. Evolvable neuronal paths: a novel basis for information and search in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Vasas, Vera; Szathmáry, Eörs; Husbands, Phil

    2011-01-01

    We propose a previously unrecognized kind of informational entity in the brain that is capable of acting as the basis for unlimited hereditary variation in neuronal networks. This unit is a path of activity through a network of neurons, analogous to a path taken through a hidden Markov model. To prove in principle the capabilities of this new kind of informational substrate, we show how a population of paths can be used as the hereditary material for a neuronally implemented genetic algorithm, (the swiss-army knife of black-box optimization techniques) which we have proposed elsewhere could operate at somatic timescales in the brain. We compare this to the same genetic algorithm that uses a standard 'genetic' informational substrate, i.e. non-overlapping discrete genotypes, on a range of optimization problems. A path evolution algorithm (PEA) is defined as any algorithm that implements natural selection of paths in a network substrate. A PEA is a previously unrecognized type of natural selection that is well suited for implementation by biological neuronal networks with structural plasticity. The important similarities and differences between a standard genetic algorithm and a PEA are considered. Whilst most experiments are conducted on an abstract network model, at the conclusion of the paper a slightly more realistic neuronal implementation of a PEA is outlined based on Izhikevich spiking neurons. Finally, experimental predictions are made for the identification of such informational paths in the brain.

  3. Evolvable neuronal paths: a novel basis for information and search in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisantha Fernando

    Full Text Available We propose a previously unrecognized kind of informational entity in the brain that is capable of acting as the basis for unlimited hereditary variation in neuronal networks. This unit is a path of activity through a network of neurons, analogous to a path taken through a hidden Markov model. To prove in principle the capabilities of this new kind of informational substrate, we show how a population of paths can be used as the hereditary material for a neuronally implemented genetic algorithm, (the swiss-army knife of black-box optimization techniques which we have proposed elsewhere could operate at somatic timescales in the brain. We compare this to the same genetic algorithm that uses a standard 'genetic' informational substrate, i.e. non-overlapping discrete genotypes, on a range of optimization problems. A path evolution algorithm (PEA is defined as any algorithm that implements natural selection of paths in a network substrate. A PEA is a previously unrecognized type of natural selection that is well suited for implementation by biological neuronal networks with structural plasticity. The important similarities and differences between a standard genetic algorithm and a PEA are considered. Whilst most experiments are conducted on an abstract network model, at the conclusion of the paper a slightly more realistic neuronal implementation of a PEA is outlined based on Izhikevich spiking neurons. Finally, experimental predictions are made for the identification of such informational paths in the brain.

  4. Firing statistics of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. I. Output ISI probability density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidybida, A K; Kravchuk, K G

    2013-06-01

    Activity of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback is considered in the framework of point stochastic processes. The neuron receives excitatory input impulses from a Poisson stream, and inhibitory impulses from the feedback line with a delay. We investigate here, how does the presence of inhibitory feedback affect the output firing statistics. Using binding neuron (BN) as a model, we derive analytically the exact expressions for the output interspike intervals (ISI) probability density, mean output ISI and coefficient of variation as functions of model's parameters for the case of threshold 2. Using the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model, as well as the BN model with higher thresholds, these statistical quantities are found numerically. In contrast to the previously studied situation of no feedback, the ISI probability densities found here both for BN and LIF neuron become bimodal and have discontinuity of jump type. Nevertheless, the presence of inhibitory delayed feedback was not found to affect substantially the output ISI coefficient of variation. The ISI coefficient of variation found ranges between 0.5 and 1. It is concluded that introduction of delayed inhibitory feedback can radically change neuronal output firing statistics. This statistics is as well distinct from what was found previously (Vidybida and Kravchuk, 2009) by a similar method for excitatory neuron with delayed feedback. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Properties of sodium currents in neonatal and young adult mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Melissa A; Farrell, Kristen E; Graham, Brett A; Brichta, Alan M; Callister, Robert J

    2015-03-28

    Superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons process nociceptive information and their excitability is partly determined by the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Recently, we showed the excitability and action potential properties of mouse SDH neurons change markedly during early postnatal development. Here we compare sodium currents generated in neonate (P0-5) and young adult (≥P21) SDH neurons. Whole cell recordings were obtained from lumbar SDH neurons in transverse spinal cord slices (CsF internal, 32°C). Fast activating and inactivating TTX-sensitive inward currents were evoked by depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV. Poorly clamped currents, based on a deflection in the IV relationship at potentials between -60 and -50 mV, were not accepted for analysis. Current density and decay time increased significantly between the first and third weeks of postnatal development, whereas time to peak was similar at both ages. This was accompanied by more subtle changes in activation range and steady state inactivation. Recovery from inactivation was slower and TTX-sensitivity was reduced in young adult neurons. Our study suggests sodium channel expression changes markedly during early postnatal development in mouse SDH neurons. The methods employed in this study can now be applied to future investigations of spinal cord sodium channel plasticity in murine pain models.

  6. Cellular and molecular neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Hovda, David A

    2015-01-01

    The brain has the capability to adapt to function when tissue is compromised. This capability of adaptation paves the road to recovery and allows for rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This chapter addresses neuroplasticity within the context of TBI. Here neuroplasticity is defined as changes in neuronal structure and function, including synaptic changes as well as modifications in neural pathways. First, the influence of TBI pathology on neuroplasticity is addressed. Here, proteins that are important in neuroplasticity are introduced and a description given of how these are affected in a temporal and severity-dependent manner. Secondly, given that we are becoming increasingly aware that the brain's response to injury is highly influenced by the environmental milieu, the manner in which behavioral manipulations have an effect on TBI-associated neuroplasticity is addressed. A description is given of how specific environmental qualities may facilitate or hinder neuroplasticity. Finally, the long-term effects of neuroplasticity and the relevance it has to rehabilitation are described. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensory neuron-derived eph regulates glomerular arbors and modulatory function of a central serotonergic neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Pratap Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons connect to the antennal lobe of the fly to create the primary units for processing odor cues, the glomeruli. Unique amongst antennal-lobe neurons is an identified wide-field serotonergic neuron, the contralaterally-projecting, serotonin-immunoreactive deutocerebral neuron (CSDn. The CSDn spreads its termini all over the contralateral antennal lobe, suggesting a diffuse neuromodulatory role. A closer examination, however, reveals a restricted pattern of the CSDn arborization in some glomeruli. We show that sensory neuron-derived Eph interacts with Ephrin in the CSDn, to regulate these arborizations. Behavioural analysis of animals with altered Eph-ephrin signaling and with consequent arborization defects suggests that neuromodulation requires local glomerular-specific patterning of the CSDn termini. Our results show the importance of developmental regulation of terminal arborization of even the diffuse modulatory neurons to allow them to route sensory-inputs according to the behavioural contexts.

  8. Vertical binocular disparity is encoded implicitly within a model neuronal population tuned to horizontal disparity and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny C A Read

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary visual cortex is often viewed as a "cyclopean retina", performing the initial encoding of binocular disparities between left and right images. Because the eyes are set apart horizontally in the head, binocular disparities are predominantly horizontal. Yet, especially in the visual periphery, a range of non-zero vertical disparities do occur and can influence perception. It has therefore been assumed that primary visual cortex must contain neurons tuned to a range of vertical disparities. Here, I show that this is not necessarily the case. Many disparity-selective neurons are most sensitive to changes in disparity orthogonal to their preferred orientation. That is, the disparity tuning surfaces, mapping their response to different two-dimensional (2D disparities, are elongated along the cell's preferred orientation. Because of this, even if a neuron's optimal 2D disparity has zero vertical component, the neuron will still respond best to a non-zero vertical disparity when probed with a sub-optimal horizontal disparity. This property can be used to decode 2D disparity, even allowing for realistic levels of neuronal noise. Even if all V1 neurons at a particular retinotopic location are tuned to the expected vertical disparity there (for example, zero at the fovea, the brain could still decode the magnitude and sign of departures from that expected value. This provides an intriguing counter-example to the common wisdom that, in order for a neuronal population to encode a quantity, its members must be tuned to a range of values of that quantity. It demonstrates that populations of disparity-selective neurons encode much richer information than previously appreciated. It suggests a possible strategy for the brain to extract rarely-occurring stimulus values, while concentrating neuronal resources on the most commonly-occurring situations.

  9. Vertical binocular disparity is encoded implicitly within a model neuronal population tuned to horizontal disparity and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jenny C A

    2010-04-22

    Primary visual cortex is often viewed as a "cyclopean retina", performing the initial encoding of binocular disparities between left and right images. Because the eyes are set apart horizontally in the head, binocular disparities are predominantly horizontal. Yet, especially in the visual periphery, a range of non-zero vertical disparities do occur and can influence perception. It has therefore been assumed that primary visual cortex must contain neurons tuned to a range of vertical disparities. Here, I show that this is not necessarily the case. Many disparity-selective neurons are most sensitive to changes in disparity orthogonal to their preferred orientation. That is, the disparity tuning surfaces, mapping their response to different two-dimensional (2D) disparities, are elongated along the cell's preferred orientation. Because of this, even if a neuron's optimal 2D disparity has zero vertical component, the neuron will still respond best to a non-zero vertical disparity when probed with a sub-optimal horizontal disparity. This property can be used to decode 2D disparity, even allowing for realistic levels of neuronal noise. Even if all V1 neurons at a particular retinotopic location are tuned to the expected vertical disparity there (for example, zero at the fovea), the brain could still decode the magnitude and sign of departures from that expected value. This provides an intriguing counter-example to the common wisdom that, in order for a neuronal population to encode a quantity, its members must be tuned to a range of values of that quantity. It demonstrates that populations of disparity-selective neurons encode much richer information than previously appreciated. It suggests a possible strategy for the brain to extract rarely-occurring stimulus values, while concentrating neuronal resources on the most commonly-occurring situations.

  10. Multiplex networks of cortical and hippocampal neurons revealed at different timescales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Timme

    Full Text Available Recent studies have emphasized the importance of multiplex networks--interdependent networks with shared nodes and different types of connections--in systems primarily outside of neuroscience. Though the multiplex properties of networks are frequently not considered, most networks are actually multiplex networks and the multiplex specific features of networks can greatly affect network behavior (e.g. fault tolerance. Thus, the study of networks of neurons could potentially be greatly enhanced using a multiplex perspective. Given the wide range of temporally dependent rhythms and phenomena present in neural systems, we chose to examine multiplex networks of individual neurons with time scale dependent connections. To study these networks, we used transfer entropy--an information theoretic quantity that can be used to measure linear and nonlinear interactions--to systematically measure the connectivity between individual neurons at different time scales in cortical and hippocampal slice cultures. We recorded the spiking activity of almost 12,000 neurons across 60 tissue samples using a 512-electrode array with 60 micrometer inter-electrode spacing and 50 microsecond temporal resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this preparation and recording method represents a superior combination of number of recorded neurons and temporal and spatial recording resolutions to any currently available in vivo system. We found that highly connected neurons ("hubs" were localized to certain time scales, which, we hypothesize, increases the fault tolerance of the network. Conversely, a large proportion of non-hub neurons were not localized to certain time scales. In addition, we found that long and short time scale connectivity was uncorrelated. Finally, we found that long time scale networks were significantly less modular and more disassortative than short time scale networks in both tissue types. As far as we are aware, this analysis represents the first

  11. Neuronal correlates of amblyopia in the visual cortex of macaque monkeys with experimental strabismus and anisometropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiorpes, L; Kiper, D C; O'Keefe, L P; Cavanaugh, J R; Movshon, J A

    1998-08-15

    Amblyopia is a developmental disorder of pattern vision. After surgical creation of esotropic strabismus in the first weeks of life or after wearing -10 diopter contact lenses in one eye to simulate anisometropia during the first months of life, macaques often develop amblyopia. We studied the response properties of visual cortex neurons in six amblyopic macaques; three monkeys were anisometropic, and three were strabismic. In all monkeys, cortical binocularity was reduced. In anisometropes, the amblyopic eye influenced a relatively small proportion of cortical neurons; in strabismics, the influence of the two eyes was more nearly equal. The severity of amblyopia was related to the relative strength of the input of the amblyopic eye to the cortex only for the more seriously affected amblyopes. Measurements of the spatial frequency tuning and contrast sensitivity of cortical neurons showed few differences between the eyes for the three less severe amblyopes (two strabismic and one anisometropic). In the three more severely affected animals (one strabismic and two anisometropic), the optimal spatial frequency and spatial resolution of cortical neurons driven by the amblyopic eye were substantially and significantly lower than for neurons driven by the nonamblyopic eye. There were no reliable differences in neuronal contrast sensitivity between the eyes. A sample of neurons recorded from cortex representing the peripheral visual field showed no interocular differences, suggesting that the effects of amblyopia were more pronounced in portions of the cortex subserving foveal vision. Qualitatively, abnormalities in both the eye dominance and spatial properties of visual cortex neurons were related on a case-by-case basis to the depth of amblyopia. Quantitative analysis suggests, however, that these abnormalities alone do not explain the full range of visual deficits in amblyopia. Studies of extrastriate cortical areas may uncover further abnormalities that explain these

  12. Hedonic taste in Drosophila revealed by olfactory receptors expressed in taste neurons.

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    Makoto Hiroi

    Full Text Available Taste and olfaction are each tuned to a unique set of chemicals in the outside world, and their corresponding sensory spaces are mapped in different areas in the brain. This dichotomy matches categories of receptors detecting molecules either in the gaseous or in the liquid phase in terrestrial animals. However, in Drosophila olfactory and gustatory neurons express receptors which belong to the same family of 7-transmembrane domain proteins. Striking overlaps exist in their sequence structure and in their expression pattern, suggesting that there might be some functional commonalities between them. In this work, we tested the assumption that Drosophila olfactory receptor proteins are compatible with taste neurons by ectopically expressing an olfactory receptor (OR22a and OR83b for which ligands are known. Using electrophysiological recordings, we show that the transformed taste neurons are excited by odor ligands as by their cognate tastants. The wiring of these neurons to the brain seems unchanged and no additional connections to the antennal lobe were detected. The odor ligands detected by the olfactory receptor acquire a new hedonic value, inducing appetitive or aversive behaviors depending on the categories of taste neurons in which they are expressed i.e. sugar- or bitter-sensing cells expressing either Gr5a or Gr66a receptors. Taste neurons expressing ectopic olfactory receptors can sense odors at close range either in the aerial phase or by contact, in a lipophilic phase. The responses of the transformed taste neurons to the odorant are similar to those obtained with tastants. The hedonic value attributed to tastants is directly linked to the taste neurons in which their receptors are expressed.

  13. Wave-processing of long-scale information by neuronal chains.

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    José Antonio Villacorta-Atienza

    Full Text Available Investigation of mechanisms of information handling in neural assemblies involved in computational and cognitive tasks is a challenging problem. Synergetic cooperation of neurons in time domain, through synchronization of firing of multiple spatially distant neurons, has been widely spread as the main paradigm. Complementary, the brain may also employ information coding and processing in spatial dimension. Then, the result of computation depends also on the spatial distribution of long-scale information. The latter bi-dimensional alternative is notably less explored in the literature. Here, we propose and theoretically illustrate a concept of spatiotemporal representation and processing of long-scale information in laminar neural structures. We argue that relevant information may be hidden in self-sustained traveling waves of neuronal activity and then their nonlinear interaction yields efficient wave-processing of spatiotemporal information. Using as a testbed a chain of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons, we show that the wave-processing can be achieved by incorporating into the single-neuron dynamics an additional voltage-gated membrane current. This local mechanism provides a chain of such neurons with new emergent network properties. In particular, nonlinear waves as a carrier of long-scale information exhibit a variety of functionally different regimes of interaction: from complete or asymmetric annihilation to transparent crossing. Thus neuronal chains can work as computational units performing different operations over spatiotemporal information. Exploiting complexity resonance these composite units can discard stimuli of too high or too low frequencies, while selectively compress those in the natural frequency range. We also show how neuronal chains can contextually interpret raw wave information. The same stimulus can be processed differently or identically according to the context set by a periodic wave train injected at the opposite end of the

  14. Developmental changes in membrane excitability and morphology of neurons in the nucleus angularis of the chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Iwao; Ohmori, Harunori

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand how sound intensity information is extracted and processed in the auditory nuclei, we investigated the neuronal excitability in the nucleus angularis (NA) of the chicken (P0–5) and the chicken embryo (E16–21). In embryos, neurons fired basically in three patterns in response to current injections: the onset pattern (19 %), the tonic pattern (52 %) and the pause pattern (29 %). After hatching, neurons fired either in the tonic pattern (83 %) or in the onset pattern (17 %). In both pre- and post-hatch periods, multiple firing neurons (tonic and pause) increased the maximum rate of rise of the action potential 2.6-fold, the fall 3.9-fold, and the maximum firing frequency 4-fold, and shifted the threshold potential to be more negative. After hatching, the firing frequency of tonic neurons reached a maximum at about 650 Hz. Application of TEA (1 mm) reduced the firing frequency, broadened action potentials and reduced the maximum rate of fall, but the threshold current was not changed. Dendrotoxin-I (DTX, 100 nm) reduced the threshold current. Application of DTX induced the onset neuron to fire repetitively. Branching patterns of auditory nerve fibres (ANFs) in NA were visualized by labelling with 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Di-I) placed within the cochlea. Di-I placed near the apex of the cochlea labelled the ventral part of the NA, and Di-I placed in the base labelled the dorso-lateral part. Tonic neurons labelled with biocytin extended dendrites in parallel with the projection of ANFs in the nucleus after hatching. ANF activity of a limited range of characteristic sound frequencies is thought to be extracted by tonic neurons and encoded into firing frequencies proportional to the strength of the input. PMID:12576492

  15. Anatomical characterization of PDF-Tri neurons and peptidergic neurons associated with eclosion behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcho, Mareike; Mühlbauer, Barbara; Hensgen, Ronja; Shiga, Sakiko; Wegener, Christian; Yasuyama, Kouji

    2018-02-10

    The peptidergic PDF-Tri neurons are a group of non-clock neurons that appear transiently around the time of adult ecdysis (=eclosion) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This specific developmental pattern points to a function of these neurons in eclosion or other processes that are active around pupal-adult transition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula G Slater

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5 on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  17. Transient Synchronization in Complex Neuronal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    Transient synchronization in complex neuronal networks as a consequence of activation-conserved dynamics induced by having sources placed at specific neurons is investigated. The basic integrate-and-fire neuron is adopted, and the dynamics is estimated computationally so as to obtain the activation at each node along each instant of time. The dynamics is implemented so as to conserve the total activation entering the system, which is a distinctive feature of the current work. The synchronization of the activation of the network is then quantified along time in terms of its normalized instantaneous entropy. The potential of such concepts and measurements is explored with respect to 6 theoretical models, as well as for the neuronal network of \\emph{C. elegans}. A series of interesting results are obtained and discussed, including the fact that all models led to a transient period of synchronization, whose specific features depend heavily on the topological features of the networks.

  18. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  19. Review Paper: Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ataie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases.

  20. The Neuronal Network Orchestration behind Motor Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Christian

    In biological networks, millions of neurons organize themselves from microscopic noisy individuals to robust macroscopic entities. These entities are capable of producing higher functions like sensory processing, decision-making, and elaborate behavioral responses. Every aspect of these behaviors...... is the outcome of an advanced orchestration of the activity of populations of neurons. Through spiking activity, neurons are able to interact; yet we know little about how this interaction occurs in spinal networks. How is the activity distributed across the population? What is the composition of synaptic input...... that is received by the individual neurons and how is the synaptic input processed? This thesis focuses on aspects of these questions for spinal networks involved in the generation of stereotypical motor behaviors. The thesis consists of two studies. In the first study, I investigated the synaptic input...

  1. Sigma-1 Receptor and Neuronal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), via interaction with various proteins, including voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels (VGICs and LGICs), is involved in a plethora of neuronal functions. This capability to regulate a variety of ion channel targets endows the Sig-1R with a powerful capability to fine tune neuronal excitability, and thereby the transmission of information within brain circuits. This versatility may also explain why the Sig-1R is associated to numerous diseases at both peripheral and central levels. To date, how the Sig-1R chooses its targets and how the combinations of target modulations alter overall neuronal excitability is one of the challenges in the field of Sig-1R-dependent regulation of neuronal activity. Here, we will describe and discuss the latest findings on Sig-1R-dependent modulation of VGICs and LGICs, and provide hypotheses that may explain the diverse excitability outcomes that have been reported so far.

  2. Transition to Chaos in Random Neuronal Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Kadmon; Haim Sompolinsky

    2015-01-01

    .... Indeed, simplified rate-based neuronal networks with synaptic connections drawn from Gaussian distribution and sigmoidal nonlinearity are known to exhibit chaotic dynamics when the synaptic gain (i.e...

  3. How Might New Neurons Buffer Against Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible mechanisms involving stress-related thinking and emotion circuitry. VIDEO Maturation and function of new neurons ... A college student’s stint in a Porter neuroscience lab Heather Frank, then a senior majoring in neuroscience ...

  4. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  5. Estimated cochlear delays in low best-frequency neurons in the barn owl cannot explain coding of interaural time difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singheiser, Martin; Fischer, Brian J; Wagner, Hermann

    2010-10-01

    The functional role of the low-frequency range (barn owl hearing is not well understood. Here, it was tested whether cochlear delays could explain the representation of interaural time difference (ITD) in this frequency range. Recordings were obtained from neurons in the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The response of these neurons varied with the ITD of the stimulus. The response peak shared by all neurons in a dorsoventral penetration was called the array-specific ITD and served as criterion for the representation of a given ITD in a neuron. Array-specific ITDs were widely distributed. Isolevel frequency response functions obtained with binaural, contralateral, and ispilateral stimulation exhibited a clear response peak and the accompanying frequency was called the best frequency. The data were tested with respect to predictions of a model, the stereausis model, assuming cochlear delays as source for the best ITD of a neuron. According to this model, different cochlear delays determined by mismatches between the ipsilateral and contralateral best frequencies are the source for the ITD in a binaural neuron. The mismatch should depend on the best frequency and the best ITD. The predictions of the stereausis model were not fulfilled in the low best-frequency neurons analyzed here. It is concluded that cochlear delays are not responsible for the representation of best ITD in the barn owl.

  6. The non-apoptotic role of p53 in neuronal biology: enlightening the dark side of the moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Andrea; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2009-06-01

    The transcription factor p53 protects neurons from transformation and DNA damage through the induction of cell-cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis in a range of in vitro and in vivo conditions. Indeed, p53 has a crucial role in eliciting neuronal cell death during development and in adult organisms after exposure to a range of stressors and/or DNA damage. Nevertheless, accumulating evidence challenges this one-sided view of the role of p53 in the nervous system. Here, we discuss how-unexpectedly-p53 can regulate the proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells independently of its role in apoptosis, and p53 post-translational modifications might promote neuronal maturation, as well as axon outgrowth and regeneration, following neuronal injury. We hope to encourage a more comprehensive view of the non-apoptotic functions of p53 during neural development, and to warn against oversimplifications regarding its role in neurons. In addition, we discuss how further insight into the p53-dependent modulation of these mechanisms is necessary to elucidate the decision-making processes between neuronal cell death and differentiation during development, and between neuronal degeneration and axonal regeneration after injury.

  7. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Shin; Homma, Ryota; Imamura, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit. PMID:25232305

  8. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  9. Efavirenz Induces Neuronal Autophagy and Mitochondrial Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor in wide use for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although EFV is generally well tolerated, neuropsychiatric toxicity has been well documented. The toxic effects of EFV in hepatocytes and keratinocytes have been linked to mitochondrial perturbations and changes in autophagy. Here, we studied the effect of EFV on mitochondria and autophagy in neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, EFV...

  10. On the dynamics of random neuronal networks

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Philippe; Touboul, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    We study the mean-field limit and stationary distributions of a pulse-coupled network modeling the dynamics of a large neuronal assemblies. Our model takes into account explicitly the intrinsic randomness of firing times, contrasting with the classical integrate-and-fire model. The ergodicity properties of the Markov process associated to finite networks are investigated. We derive the limit in distribution of the sample path of the state of a neuron of the network when its size gets large. T...

  11. Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Neuron Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Adam

    The starting point and focal point for this thesis was stochastic dynamical modelling of neuronal imaging data with the declared objective of drawing inference, within this model framework, in a large-scale (high-dimensional) data setting. Implicitly this objective entails carrying out three......-temporal array data. This framework was developed with neuron field models in mind but may in turn be applied to other settings conforming to the spatio-temporal array data setup....

  12. Inducible gene manipulations in serotonergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillmann Weber

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An impairment of the serotonergic (5-HT system has been implicated in the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the considerable genetic evidence, the exact molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain largely unknown. To address the lack of instruments for the molecular dissection of gene function in serotonergic neurons we have developed a new mouse transgenic tool that allows inducible Cre-mediated recombination of genes selectively in 5-HT neurons of all raphe nuclei. In this transgenic mouse line, the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase is expressed under the regulatory control of the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2 gene locus (177kb. Tamoxifen treatment efficiently induced recombination selectively in serotonergic neurons with minimal background activity in vehicle-treated mice. These genetic manipulations can be initiated at any desired time during embryonic development, neonatal stage or adulthood. To illustrate the versatility of this new tool, we show that Brainbow-1.0LTPH2-CreERT2 mice display highly efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons with individual 5-HT neurons labelling with multiple distinct fluorescent colors. This labelling is well suited for visualization and tracing of serotonergic neurons and their network architecture. Finally, the applicability of TPH2-CreERT2 for loxP-flanked candidate gene manipulation is evidenced by our successful knockout induction of the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid-receptor (GR exclusively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. The TPH2-CreERT2 line will allow detailed analysis of gene function in both developing and adult serotonergic neurons

  13. Action observation: Inferring intentions without mirror neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Kilner, James M

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand.......A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand....

  14. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin eNagayama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit.

  15. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Serotonergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tillmann; Böhm, Gerald; Hermann, Elke; Schütz, Günther; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    An impairment of the serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the considerable genetic evidence, the exact molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain largely unknown. To address the lack of instruments for the molecular dissection of gene function in serotonergic neurons we have developed a new mouse transgenic tool that allows inducible Cre-mediated recombination of genes selectively in 5-HT neurons of all raphe nuclei. In this transgenic mouse line, the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase is expressed under the regulatory control of the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) gene locus (177 kb). Tamoxifen treatment efficiently induced recombination selectively in serotonergic neurons with minimal background activity in vehicle-treated mice. These genetic manipulations can be initiated at any desired time during embryonic development, neonatal stage or adulthood. To illustrate the versatility of this new tool, we show that Brainbow-1.0LTPH2-CreERT2 mice display highly efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons with individual 5-HT neurons labeling with multiple distinct fluorescent colors. This labeling is well suited for visualization and tracing of serotonergic neurons and their network architecture. Finally, the applicability of TPH2-CreERT2 for loxP-flanked candidate gene manipulation is evidenced by our successful knockout induction of the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid-receptor exclusively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. The TPH2-CreERT2 line will allow detailed analysis of gene function in both developing and adult serotonergic neurons. PMID:19936315

  16. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  17. Analysis of Neuronal Sequences Using Pairwise Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Traversal of a series of place fields results in the generation of a neuronal sequence called a place-field sequence , such as pictured in Figure 1.1. It...16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Sequences of neuronal activation have long been implicated in a variety of brain func- tions. In particular, these... sequences have been tied to memory formation and spatial navigation in the hippocampus, a region of mammalian brains. Traditionally, neu- ronal

  18. Intrinsically active and pacemaker neurons in pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-03-11

    Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks.

  19. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-05

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  20. A neuron-astrocyte transistor-like model for neuromorphic dressed neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, G; Pioggia, G; Armato, A; Ferro, M; Scilingo, E P; De Rossi, D

    2011-09-01

    Experimental evidences on the role of the synaptic glia as an active partner together with the bold synapse in neuronal signaling and dynamics of neural tissue strongly suggest to investigate on a more realistic neuron-glia model for better understanding human brain processing. Among the glial cells, the astrocytes play a crucial role in the tripartite synapsis, i.e. the dressed neuron. A well-known two-way astrocyte-neuron interaction can be found in the literature, completely revising the purely supportive role for the glia. The aim of this study is to provide a computationally efficient model for neuron-glia interaction. The neuron-glia interactions were simulated by implementing the Li-Rinzel model for an astrocyte and the Izhikevich model for a neuron. Assuming the dressed neuron dynamics similar to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of a bipolar junction transistor, we derived our computationally efficient model. This model may represent the fundamental computational unit for the development of real-time artificial neuron-glia networks opening new perspectives in pattern recognition systems and in brain neurophysiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Computational Modeling of Neuronal Current MRI Signals with Rat Somatosensory Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BagheriMofidi, Seyed Mehdi; Pouladian, Majid; Jameie, Seyed Behnammodin; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field generated by active neurons has recently been considered to determine location of neuronal activity directly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but controversial results have been reported about detection of such small magnetic fields. In this study, multiple neuronal morphologies of rat tissue were modeled to investigate better estimation of MRI signal change produced by neuronal magnetic field (NMF). Ten pyramidal neurons from layer II to VI of rat somatosensory area with realistic morphology, biophysics, and neuronal density were modeled to simulate NMF of neuronal tissue, from which effects of NMF on MRI signals were obtained. Neuronal current MRI signals, which consist of relative magnitude signal change (RMSC) and phase signal change (PSC), were at least three and one orders of magnitude less than a tissue with single neuron type, respectively. Also, a reduction in voxel size could increase signal alterations. Furthermore, with selection of zenith angle of external main magnetic field related to tissue surface near to 90°, RMSC could be maximized. This value for PSC would be 90° for small voxel size and zero degree for large ones.

  2. Statistics of Visual Responses to Image Object Stimuli from Primate AIT Neurons to DNN Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiulei; Wang, Hong; Hu, Zhanyi

    2018-02-01

    Under the goal-driven paradigm, Yamins et al. ( 2014 ; Yamins & DiCarlo, 2016 ) have shown that by optimizing only the final eight-way categorization performance of a four-layer hierarchical network, not only can its top output layer quantitatively predict IT neuron responses but its penultimate layer can also automatically predict V4 neuron responses. Currently, deep neural networks (DNNs) in the field of computer vision have reached image object categorization performance comparable to that of human beings on ImageNet, a data set that contains 1.3 million training images of 1000 categories. We explore whether the DNN neurons (units in DNNs) possess image object representational statistics similar to monkey IT neurons, particularly when the network becomes deeper and the number of image categories becomes larger, using VGG19, a typical and widely used deep network of 19 layers in the computer vision field. Following Lehky, Kiani, Esteky, and Tanaka ( 2011 , 2014 ), where the response statistics of 674 IT neurons to 806 image stimuli are analyzed using three measures (kurtosis, Pareto tail index, and intrinsic dimensionality), we investigate the three issues in this letter using the same three measures: (1) the similarities and differences of the neural response statistics between VGG19 and primate IT cortex, (2) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons at different layers from low to high, and (3) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons when the numbers of stimuli and neurons increase. We find that the response statistics on both single-neuron selectivity and population sparseness of VGG19 neurons are fundamentally different from those of IT neurons in most cases; by increasing the number of neurons in different layers and the number of stimuli, the response statistics of neurons at different layers from low to high do not substantially change; and the estimated intrinsic dimensionality values at the low

  3. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  4. Intrinsically Active and Pacemaker Neurons in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks. PMID:24672755

  5. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Presynaptic and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown whether plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealisIn vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However, distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range as a result of distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. The Gamma renewal process as an output of the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansky, Petr; Sacerdote, Laura; Zucca, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Statistical properties of spike trains as well as other neurophysiological data suggest a number of mathematical models of neurons. These models range from entirely descriptive ones to those deduced from the properties of the real neurons. One of them, the diffusion leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model, which is based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) stochastic process that is restricted by an absorbing barrier, can describe a wide range of neuronal activity in terms of its parameters. These parameters are readily associated with known physiological mechanisms. The other model is descriptive, Gamma renewal process, and its parameters only reflect the observed experimental data or assumed theoretical properties. Both of these commonly used models are related here. We show under which conditions the Gamma model is an output from the diffusion OU model. In some cases, we can see that the Gamma distribution is unrealistic to be achieved for the employed parameters of the OU process.

  7. Response characteristics of vibration-sensitive neurons in the midbrain of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1989-01-01

    of best frequencies (BF's) was bimodal with peaks at 10 and 100 Hz and the thresholds ranged from 0.02 to 1.28 cm/s2 at the BF. Twenty-three neurons showed phasic-tonic and 11 neurons phasic responses. The dynamic range of seismic intensity for most neurons was 20-30 dB. In contrast to the sharp phase...... response characteristics expressed by inhibition of their spontaneous activity by vibration or by bi- and trimodal sensory sensitivities. In conclusion, the vibration sensitive cells in the midbrain of the grassfrog can encode the frequency, intensity, onset and cessation of vibration stimuli. Seismic...... stimuli probably play a role in communication and detection of predators and the vibration-sensitive midbrain neurons may be involved in the central processing of such behaviorally significant stimuli....

  8. Green laser light (532nm) activates a chloride current in the C1 neuron of Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Peter J; Dholakia, Kishan; Thomas, Roger C; Cottrell, Glen A

    2008-03-15

    Five hundred and thirty-two nanometers laser light evokes neuron-specific electrical responses in identified neurons of Helix ganglia. Such responses are intensity-dependent over the range 25-1500 mW, readily reversible and repeatable. Detailed experiments on the C1 neuron, which is inhibited by 532 nm light, showed that inhibition results from a selective increase in transmembrane Cl(-) ion conductance. Experiments with calcium-sensitive microelectrodes suggest that the response does not result from an increase in [Ca(2+)](i). The change in Cl(-) ion conductance probably occurs in the extensive plasmalemma infoldings of the proximal axon.

  9. Arsenic Trioxide Modulates the Central Snail Neuron Action Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Ling Lu

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: As2O3 at 10 mM elicits BoPs in central snail neurons and this effect may relate to the PLC activity of the neuron, rather than protein kinase A activity, or calcium influxes of the neuron. As2O3 at higher concentration irreversibly abolishes the spontaneous action potentials of the neuron.

  10. Functional maps within a single neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The presence and plasticity of dendritic ion channels are well established. However, the literature is divided on what specific roles these dendritic ion channels play in neuronal information processing, and there is no consensus on why neuronal dendrites should express diverse ion channels with different expression profiles. In this review, we present a case for viewing dendritic information processing through the lens of the sensory map literature, where functional gradients within neurons are considered as maps on the neuronal topograph. Under such a framework, drawing analogies from the sensory map literature, we postulate that the formation of intraneuronal functional maps is driven by the twin objectives of efficiently encoding inputs that impinge along different dendritic locations and of retaining homeostasis in the face of changes that are required in the coding process. In arriving at this postulate, we relate intraneuronal map physiology to the vast literature on sensory maps and argue that such a metaphorical association provides a fresh conceptual framework for analyzing and understanding single-neuron information encoding. We also describe instances where the metaphor presents specific directions for research on intraneuronal maps, derived from analogous pursuits in the sensory map literature. We suggest that this perspective offers a thesis for why neurons should express and alter ion channels in their dendrites and provides a framework under which active dendrites could be related to neural coding, learning theory, and homeostasis. PMID:22933729

  11. Spike-timing dynamics of neuronal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M; Gally, Joseph A; Edelman, Gerald M

    2004-08-01

    A neuronal network inspired by the anatomy of the cerebral cortex was simulated to study the self-organization of spiking neurons into neuronal groups. The network consisted of 100 000 reentrantly interconnected neurons exhibiting known types of cortical firing patterns, receptor kinetics, short-term plasticity and long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), as well as a distribution of axonal conduction delays. The dynamics of the network allowed us to study the fine temporal structure of emerging firing patterns with millisecond resolution. We found that the interplay between STDP and conduction delays gave rise to the spontaneous formation of neuronal groups--sets of strongly connected neurons capable of firing time-locked, although not necessarily synchronous, spikes. Despite the noise present in the model, such groups repeatedly generated patterns of activity with millisecond spike-timing precision. Exploration of the model allowed us to characterize various group properties, including spatial distribution, size, growth, rate of birth, lifespan, and persistence in the presence of synaptic turnover. Localized coherent input resulted in shifts of receptive and projective fields in the model similar to those observed in vivo.

  12. Rewiring of neuronal networks during synaptic silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrosch, Jana Katharina; Einem, Vicky von; Breininger, Katharina; Dahlmanns, Marc; Maier, Andreas; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja Wolfgang

    2017-09-15

    Analyzing the connectivity of neuronal networks, based on functional brain imaging data, has yielded new insight into brain circuitry, bringing functional and effective networks into the focus of interest for understanding complex neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the analysis of network changes, based on the activity of individual neurons, is hindered by the lack of suitable meaningful and reproducible methodologies. Here, we used calcium imaging, statistical spike time analysis and a powerful classification model to reconstruct effective networks of primary rat hippocampal neurons in vitro. This method enables the calculation of network parameters, such as propagation probability, path length, and clustering behavior through the measurement of synaptic activity at the single-cell level, thus providing a fuller understanding of how changes at single synapses translate to an entire population of neurons. We demonstrate that our methodology can detect the known effects of drug-induced neuronal inactivity and can be used to investigate the extensive rewiring processes affecting population-wide connectivity patterns after periods of induced neuronal inactivity.

  13. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  14. The neuronal insulin receptor in its environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralle, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Insulin is known mainly for its effects in peripheral tissues, such as the liver, skeletal muscles and adipose tissue, where the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) has both short-term and long-term effects. Insulin and the IR are also present in the brain, and since there is evidence that neuronal insulin signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and that it is impaired in disease, this pathway might be the key to protection or reversal of symptoms, especially in Alzheimer's disease. However, there are controversies about the importance of the neuronal IR, partly because biophysical data on its activation and signaling are much less complete than for the peripheral IR. This review briefly summarizes the neuronal IR signaling in health and disease, and then focuses on known differences between the neuronal and peripheral IR with regard to alternative splicing and glycosylation, and lack of data with respect to phosphorylation and membrane subdomain localization. Particularities in the neuronal IR itself and its environment may have consequences for downstream signaling and impact synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, establishing the relative importance of insulin signaling through IR or through hybrids with its homolog, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, is crucial for evaluating the consequences of brain IR activation. An improved biophysical understanding of the neuronal IR may help predict the consequences of insulin-targeted interventions. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Optimal stimulus shapes for neuronal excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Forger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in neuronal computation is to discern how features of stimuli control the timing of action potentials. One aspect of this problem is to determine how an action potential, or spike, can be elicited with the least energy cost, e.g., a minimal amount of applied current. Here we show in the Hodgkin & Huxley model of the action potential and in experiments on squid giant axons that: 1 spike generation in a neuron can be highly discriminatory for stimulus shape and 2 the optimal stimulus shape is dependent upon inputs to the neuron. We show how polarity and time course of post-synaptic currents determine which of these optimal stimulus shapes best excites the neuron. These results are obtained mathematically using the calculus of variations and experimentally using a stochastic search methodology. Our findings reveal a surprising complexity of computation at the single cell level that may be relevant for understanding optimization of signaling in neurons and neuronal networks.

  16. Purification of dopamine neurons by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C W; Lee, L J; Romero, A A; Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    1994-12-05

    The heterogeneity and preponderence of other cell types present in cultures has greatly impeded our ability to study dopamine neurons. In this report, we describe methods for isolating nearly pure dopamine neurons for study in culture. To do so, the lipid-soluble dye, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (diI) was injected into the embryonic rat striata where it was taken up by nerve terminals and transported overnight back to the innervating perikarya in the ventral midbrain. Midbrain cells were then dissected, dissociated and separated on the basis of their (rhodamine) fluorescence by flow cytometry. Nearly all cells recovered as fluorescent positive (> 98%) were also immunoreactive for the dopamine specific enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (80%-96%). Little contamination by other cells types was observed after labeling for specific neuronal and glial markers. Purified dopamine neurons continued to thrive and elaborate neuronal processes for at least 3 days in culture. Using this new model, it may now be possible to directly study the cellular and molecular processes regulating the survival and functioning of developing, injured and transplanted dopamine neurons.

  17. Neuronal Rho GTPase Rac1 elimination confers neuroprotection in a mouse model of permanent ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabiyik, Cansu; Fernandes, Rui; Figueiredo, Francisco Rosário

    2018-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 is a multifunctional protein involved in distinct pathways ranging from development to pathology. The aim of the present study was to unravel the contribution of neuronal Rac1 in regulating the response to brain injury induced by permanent focal cerebral ischemia (pMCAO). Our ...

  18. An Innovative High-Tech Acupuncture Product: SXDZ-100 Nerve Muscle Stimulator, Its Theoretical Basis, Design, and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xinyan; Rong, Peijing; Li, Liang; He, Wei; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the theoretical basis, design, and application of a patented innovative high-tech product, SXDZ-100 nerve and muscle stimulator. This product is featured with a built-in chip containing transcoding information from different acupuncture manipulation collected from the wide dynamic neurons (WDR) in the spinal dorsal horn in animal experiments, which is bioinformation feedback therapy. The discharges of WDR neurons excited by different manipulations are analyzed using chaos theory ...

  19. NeuronMetrics: software for semi-automated processing of cultured neuron images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro, Martha L; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L

    2007-03-23

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based on geometric features called faces to extract a branch number estimate from complex arbors with numerous neurite-to-neurite contacts, without creating a precise, contact-free representation of the neurite arbor. It estimates total neurite length, branch number, primary neurite number, territory (the area of the convex polygon bounding the skeleton and cell body), and Polarity Index (a measure of neuronal polarity). These parameters provide fundamental information about the size and shape of neurite arbors, which are critical factors for neuronal function. NeuronMetrics streamlines optional manual tasks such as removing noise, isolating the largest primary neurite, and correcting length for self-fasciculating neurites. Numeric data are output in a single text file, readily imported into other applications for further analysis. Written as modules for ImageJ, NeuronMetrics provides practical analysis tools that are easy to use and support batch processing. Depending on the need for manual intervention, processing time for a batch of approximately 60 2D images is 1.0-2.5 h, from a folder of images to a table of numeric data. NeuronMetrics' output accelerates the quantitative detection of mutations and chemical compounds that alter neurite morphology in vitro, and will contribute to the use of cultured neurons for drug discovery.

  20. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-10-28

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain's morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the nervous

  1. Small molecules enable highly efficient neuronal conversion of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig, Julia; Mertens, Jerome; Kesavan, Jaideep; Doerr, Jonas; Poppe, Daniel; Glaue, Finnja; Herms, Stefan; Wernet, Peter; Kögler, Gesine; Müller, Franz-Josef; Koch, Philipp; Brüstle, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    Forced expression of proneural transcription factors has been shown to direct neuronal conversion of fibroblasts. Because neurons are postmitotic, conversion efficiencies are an important parameter for this process. We present a minimalist approach combining two-factor neuronal programming with small molecule-based inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and SMAD signaling, which converts postnatal human fibroblasts into functional neuron-like cells with yields up to >200% and neuronal purities up to >80%.

  2. Emergent patterns in interacting neuronal sub-populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2015-05-01

    We investigate an ensemble of coupled model neurons, consisting of groups of varying sizes and intrinsic dynamics, ranging from periodic to chaotic, where the inter-group coupling interaction is effectively like a dynamic signal from a different sub-population. We observe that the minority group can significantly influence the majority group. For instance, when a small chaotic group is coupled to a large periodic group, the chaotic group de-synchronizes. However, counter-intuitively, when a small periodic group couples strongly to a large chaotic group, it leads to complete synchronization in the majority chaotic population, which also spikes at the frequency of the small periodic group. It then appears that the small group of periodic neurons can act like a pacemaker for the whole network. Further, we report the existence of varied clustering patterns, ranging from sets of synchronized clusters to anti-phase clusters, governed by the interplay of the relative sizes and dynamics of the sub-populations. So these results have relevance in understanding how a group can influence the synchrony of another group of dynamically different elements, reminiscent of event-related synchronization/de-synchronization in complex networks.

  3. Axonal branching patterns of nucleus accumbens neurons in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anushree; Prensa, Lucía; Cebrián, Carolina; Mengual, Elisa

    2010-11-15

    The patterns of axonal collateralization of nucleus accumbens (Acb) projection neurons were investigated in the rat by means of single-axon tracing techniques using the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Seventy-three axons were fully traced, originating from either the core (AcbC) or shell (AcbSh) compartment, as assessed by differential calbindin D28k-immunoreactivity. Axons from AcbC and AcbSh showed a substantial segregation in their targets; target areas were either exclusively or preferentially innervated from AcbC or AcbSh. Axon collaterals in the subthalamic nucleus were found at higher than expected frequencies; moreover, these originated exclusively in the dorsal AcbC. Intercompartmental collaterals were observed from ventral AcbC axons into AcbSh, and likewise, interconnections at pallidal and mesencephalic levels were also observed, although mostly from AcbC axons toward AcbSh targets, possibly supporting crosstalk between the two subcircuits at several levels. Cell somata giving rise to short-range accumbal axons, projecting to the ventral pallidum (VP), were spatially intermingled with others, giving rise to long-range axons that innervated VP and more caudal targets. This anatomical organization parallels that of the dorsal striatum and provides the basis for possible dual direct and indirect actions from a single axon on either individual or small sets of neurons. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Injection of fully-defined signal mixtures: a novel high-throughput tool to study neuronal encoding and computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ilin

    Full Text Available Understanding of how neurons transform fluctuations of membrane potential, reflecting input activity, into spike responses, which communicate the ultimate results of single-neuron computation, is one of the central challenges for cellular and computational neuroscience. To study this transformation under controlled conditions, previous work has used a signal immersed in noise paradigm where neurons are injected with a current consisting of fluctuating noise that mimics on-going synaptic activity and a systematic signal whose transmission is studied. One limitation of this established paradigm is that it is designed to examine the encoding of only one signal under a specific, repeated condition. As a result, characterizing how encoding depends on neuronal properties, signal parameters, and the interaction of multiple inputs is cumbersome. Here we introduce a novel fully-defined signal mixture paradigm, which allows us to overcome these problems. In this paradigm, current for injection is synthetized as a sum of artificial postsynaptic currents (PSCs resulting from the activity of a large population of model presynaptic neurons. PSCs from any presynaptic neuron(s can be now considered as "signal", while the sum of all other inputs is considered as "noise". This allows us to study the encoding of a large number of different signals in a single experiment, thus dramatically increasing the throughput of data acquisition. Using this novel paradigm, we characterize the detection of excitatory and inhibitory PSCs from neuronal spike responses over a wide range of amplitudes and firing-rates. We show, that for moderately-sized neuronal populations the detectability of individual inputs is higher for excitatory than for inhibitory inputs during the 2-5 ms following PSC onset, but becomes comparable after 7-8 ms. This transient imbalance of sensitivity in favor of excitation may enhance propagation of balanced signals through neuronal networks. Finally, we

  5. Channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Nax is a sodium-concentration ([Na+]-sensitive Na channel with a gating threshold of ~150 mM for extracellular [Na+] ([Na+]o in vitro. We previously reported that Nax was preferentially expressed in the glial cells of sensory circumventricular organs including the subfornical organ, and was involved in [Na+] sensing for the control of salt-intake behavior. Although Nax was also suggested to be expressed in the neurons of some brain regions including the amygdala and cerebral cortex, the channel properties of Nax have not yet been adequately characterized in neurons. We herein verified that Nax was expressed in neurons in the lateral amygdala of mice using an antibody that was newly generated against mouse Nax. To investigate the channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons, we established an inducible cell line of Nax using the mouse neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a, which is endogenously devoid of the expression of Nax. Functional analyses of this cell line revealed that the [Na+]-sensitivity of Nax in neuronal cells was similar to that expressed in glial cells. The cation selectivity sequence of the Nax channel in cations was revealed to be Na+ ≈ Li+ > Rb+ > Cs+ for the first time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Nax bound to postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 through its PSD95/Disc-large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus in neurons. The interaction between Nax and PSD95 may be involved in promoting the surface expression of Nax channels because the depletion of endogenous PSD95 resulted in a decrease in Nax at the plasma membrane. These results indicated, for the first time, that Nax functions as a [Na+]-sensitive Na channel in neurons as well as in glial cells.

  6. Ancient origin of somatic and visceral neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A key to understanding the evolution of the nervous system on a large phylogenetic scale is the identification of homologous neuronal types. Here, we focus this search on the sensory and motor neurons of bilaterians, exploiting their well-defined molecular signatures in vertebrates. Sensorimotor circuits in vertebrates are of two types: somatic (that sense the environment and respond by shaping bodily motions) and visceral (that sense the interior milieu and respond by regulating vital functions). These circuits differ by a small set of largely dedicated transcriptional determinants: Brn3 is expressed in many somatic sensory neurons, first and second order (among which mechanoreceptors are uniquely marked by the Brn3+/Islet1+/Drgx+ signature), somatic motoneurons uniquely co-express Lhx3/4 and Mnx1, while the vast majority of neurons, sensory and motor, involved in respiration, blood circulation or digestion are molecularly defined by their expression and dependence on the pan-visceral determinant Phox2b. Results We explore the status of the sensorimotor transcriptional code of vertebrates in mollusks, a lophotrochozoa clade that provides a rich repertoire of physiologically identified neurons. In the gastropods Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica, we show that homologues of Brn3, Drgx, Islet1, Mnx1, Lhx3/4 and Phox2b differentially mark neurons with mechanoreceptive, locomotory and cardiorespiratory functions. Moreover, in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis, we show that Phox2 marks the stellate ganglion (in line with the respiratory — that is, visceral— ancestral role of the mantle, its target organ), while the anterior pedal ganglion, which controls the prehensile and locomotory arms, expresses Mnx. Conclusions Despite considerable divergence in overall neural architecture, a molecular underpinning for the functional allocation of neurons to interactions with the environment or to homeostasis was inherited from the urbilaterian ancestor by

  7. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  8. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardy, C.; Hurk, M. van den; Eames, T.; Marchand, C.; Hernandez, R.V.; Kellogg, M.; Gorris, M.A.J.; Galet, B.; Palomares, V.; Brown, J.; Bang, A.G.; Mertens, J.; Bohnke, L.; Boyer, L.; Simon, S.; Gage, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely

  9. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  10. Long-Range GABAergic Inputs Regulate Neural Stem Cell Quiescence and Control Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hechen; Asrican, Brent; Li, Weidong; Gu, Bin; Wen, Zhexing; Lim, Szu-Aun; Haniff, Issac; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Philpot, Benjamin; Song, Juan

    2017-11-02

    The quiescence of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) is regulated by local parvalbumin (PV) interneurons within the dentate gyrus (DG). Little is known about how local PV interneurons communicate with distal brain regions to regulate NSCs and hippocampal neurogenesis. Here, we identify GABAergic projection neurons from the medial septum (MS) as the major afferents to dentate PV interneurons. Surprisingly, dentate PV interneurons are depolarized by GABA signaling, which is in sharp contrast to most mature neurons hyperpolarized by GABA. Functionally, these long-range GABAergic inputs are necessary and sufficient to maintain adult NSC quiescence and ablating them leads to NSC activation and subsequent depletion of the NSC pool. Taken together, these findings delineate a GABAergic network involving long-range GABAergic projection neurons and local PV interneurons that couples dynamic brain activity to the neurogenic niche in controlling NSC quiescence and hippocampal neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuronal migration illuminated: a look under the hood of the living neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Niraj; Solecki, David J

    2011-01-01

    During vertebrate brain development, migration of neurons from the germinal zones to their final laminar positions is essential to establish functional neural circuits. Whereas key insights into neuronal migration initially came from landmark studies identifying the genes mutated in human cortical malformations, cell biology has recently greatly advanced our understanding of how cytoskeletal proteins and molecular motors drive the morphogenic cell movements that build the developing brain. This Commentary & View reviews recent studies examining the role of the molecular motors during neuronal migration and critically examines current models of acto-myosin function in the two-step neuronal migration cycle. Given the apparent emerging diversity of neuronal sub-type cytoskeletal organizations, we propose that two approaches must be taken to resolve differences between the current migration models: the mechanisms of radial and tangential migration must be compared and the loci of tension generation, migration substrates, and sites of adhesion dynamics must be precisely examined in an integrated manner.

  12. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengler, Johannes; Jug, Florian; Steger, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  13. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lengler

    Full Text Available For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  14. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Abhronil, E-mail: asengup@purdue.edu; Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ∼3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ∼80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  15. Memristors Empower Spiking Neurons With Stochasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-06-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that probabilistic spiking can be interpreted as learning and inference in cortical microcircuits. This interpretation creates new opportunities for building neuromorphic systems driven by probabilistic learning algorithms. However, such systems must have two crucial features: 1) the neurons should follow a specific behavioral model, and 2) stochastic spiking should be implemented efficiently for it to be scalable. This paper proposes a memristor-based stochastically spiking neuron that fulfills these requirements. First, the analytical model of the memristor is enhanced so it can capture the behavioral stochasticity consistent with experimentally observed phenomena. The switching behavior of the memristor model is demonstrated to be akin to the firing of the stochastic spike response neuron model, the primary building block for probabilistic algorithms in spiking neural networks. Furthermore, the paper proposes a neural soma circuit that utilizes the intrinsic nondeterminism of memristive switching for efficient spike generation. The simulations and analysis of the behavior of a single stochastic neuron and a winner-take-all network built of such neurons and trained on handwritten digits confirm that the circuit can be used for building probabilistic sampling and pattern adaptation machinery in spiking networks. The findings constitute an important step towards scalable and efficient probabilistic neuromorphic platforms. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  17. Magnetic skyrmion-based artificial neuron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-08-01

    Neuromorphic computing, inspired by the biological nervous system, has attracted considerable attention. Intensive research has been conducted in this field for developing artificial synapses and neurons, attempting to mimic the behaviors of biological synapses and neurons, which are two basic elements of a human brain. Recently, magnetic skyrmions have been investigated as promising candidates in neuromorphic computing design owing to their topologically protected particle-like behaviors, nanoscale size and low driving current density. In one of our previous studies, a skyrmion-based artificial synapse was proposed, with which both short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation functions have been demonstrated. In this work, we further report on a skyrmion-based artificial neuron by exploiting the tunable current-driven skyrmion motion dynamics, mimicking the leaky-integrate-fire function of a biological neuron. With a simple single-device implementation, this proposed artificial neuron may enable us to build a dense and energy-efficient spiking neuromorphic computing system.

  18. Motor neuron disease after electric injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H; Couratier, P; Camu, W

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of motor neuron disease after electrical injury in six patients is reported and compared with patients from the literature. The patients were five men with spinal onset and one woman with bulbar motor neuron disease after electric shock. Two patients were struck by lightning and four by industrial electric shock. For all six of them, the disease started at the site of the electrical trauma. The mean delay for onset of motor neuron disease was 44 months. In four of the spinal patients the disease progressed slowly with mild handicap after several years. For the fifth patient, improvement was noted progressively. The patient with bulbar disease died 26 months after onset. A link between electric shock and motor neuron disease is likely, given the homogenous profile of the patients both in the five spinal cases presented here and in the literature. Bulbar onset has not been reported to date. However, in this patient the long delay between the electrical injury and motor neuron disease, together with the rapid evolution may suggest a chance association.

 PMID:11459909

  19. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  20. Magnetic skyrmion-based artificial neuron device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-08-04

    Neuromorphic computing, inspired by the biological nervous system, has attracted considerable attention. Intensive research has been conducted in this field for developing artificial synapses and neurons, attempting to mimic the behaviors of biological synapses and neurons, which are two basic elements of a human brain. Recently, magnetic skyrmions have been investigated as promising candidates in neuromorphic computing design owing to their topologically protected particle-like behaviors, nanoscale size and low driving current density. In one of our previous studies, a skyrmion-based artificial synapse was proposed, with which both short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation functions have been demonstrated. In this work, we further report on a skyrmion-based artificial neuron by exploiting the tunable current-driven skyrmion motion dynamics, mimicking the leaky-integrate-fire function of a biological neuron. With a simple single-device implementation, this proposed artificial neuron may enable us to build a dense and energy-efficient spiking neuromorphic computing system.

  1. WNT signaling in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Silvana B.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulates the structure and function of the adult nervous system. Wnt components are key regulators of a variety of developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. In the nervous system, Wnt signaling also regulates the formation and function of neuronal circuits by controlling neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth and guidance, dendrite development, synaptic function, and neuronal plasticity. Wnt factors can signal through three very well characterized cascades: canonical or β-catenin pathway, planar cell polarity pathway and calcium pathway that control different processes. However, divergent downstream cascades have been identified to control neuronal morphogenesis. In the nervous system, the expression of Wnt proteins is a highly controlled process. In addition, deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we will review different aspects of neuronal and dendrite maturation, including spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Finally, the role of Wnt pathway components on Alzheimer’s disease will be revised. PMID:23847469

  2. Binding by asynchrony: the neuronal phase code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Nadasdy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons display continuous subthreshold oscillations and discrete action potentials. When action potentials are phase-locked to the subthreshold oscillation, we hypothesize they represent two types of information: the presence/absence of a sensory feature and the phase of subthreshold oscillation. If subthreshold oscillation phases are neuron-specific, then the sources of action potentials can be recovered based on the action potential times. If the spatial information about the stimulus is converted to action potential phases, then action potentials from multiple neurons can be combined into a single axon and the spatial configuration reconstructed elsewhere. For the reconstruction to be successful, we introduce two assumptions: that a subthreshold oscillation field has a constant phase gradient and that coincidences between action potentials and intracellular subthreshold oscillations are neuron-specific as defined by the "interference principle." Under these assumptions, a phase coding model enables information transfer between structures and reproduces experimental phenomenons such as phase precession, grid cell architecture, and phase modulation of cortical spikes. This article reviews a recently proposed neuronal algorithm for information encoding and decoding from the phase of action potentials (Nadasdy 2009. The focus is given to the principles common across different systems instead of emphasizing system specific differences.

  3. WNT signalling in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beatriz Rosso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in the development of the central nervous system (CNS and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulates the structure and function of the adult nervous system. Wnt components are key regulators of a variety of developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. In the nervous system, Wnt signaling also regulates the formation and function of neuronal circuits by controlling neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth and guidance, dendrite development, synaptic function and neuronal plasticity. Wnt factors can signal through three very well characterized cascades: canonical or β-catenin pathway, planar cell polarity pathway and calcium pathway that control different processes. However, divergent downstream cascades have been identified to control neuronal morphogenesis. In the nervous system, the expression of Wnt proteins is a highly controlled process. In addition, deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we will review different aspects of neuronal and dendrite maturation, including spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Finally, the role of Wnt pathway components on Alzheimer’s disease will be revised.

  4. Optogenetic identification of hypothalamic orexin neuron projections to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Schwartz, Alan R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Mendelowitz, David

    2017-04-01

    Orexin neurons, and activation of orexin receptors, are generally thought to be sympathoexcitatory; however, the functional connectivity between orexin neurons and a likely sympathetic target, the hypothalamic spinally projecting neurons (SPNs) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) has not been established. To test the hypothesis that orexin neurons project directly to SPNs in the PVN, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was selectively expressed in orexin neurons to enable photoactivation of ChR2-expressing fibers while examining evoked postsynaptic currents in SPNs in rat hypothalamic slices. Selective photoactivation of orexin fibers elicited short-latency postsynaptic currents in all SPNs tested (n = 34). These light-triggered responses were heterogeneous, with a majority being excitatory glutamatergic responses (59%) and a minority of inhibitory GABAergic (35%) and mixed glutamatergic and GABAergic currents (6%). Both glutamatergic and GABAergic responses were present in the presence of tetrodotoxin and 4-aminopyridine, suggesting a monosynaptic connection between orexin neurons and SPNs. In addition to generating postsynaptic responses, photostimulation facilitated action potential firing in SPNs (current clamp configuration). Glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, postsynaptic currents were diminished by application of the orexin receptor antagonist almorexant, indicating orexin release facilitates glutamatergic neurotransmission in this pathway. This work identifies a neuronal circuit by which orexin neurons likely exert sympathoexcitatory control of cardiovascular function.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to establish, using innovative optogenetic approaches in a transgenic rat model, that there are robust heterogeneous projections from orexin neurons to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons, including excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. Endogenous orexin release modulates glutamatergic, but not GABAergic

  5. Crosstalks between kisspeptin neurons and somatostatin neurons are not photoperiod dependent in the ewe hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufourny, Laurence; Lomet, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal reproduction is under the control of gonadal steroid feedback, itself synchronized by day-length or photoperiod. As steroid action on GnRH neurons is mostly indirect and therefore exerted through interneurons, we looked for neuroanatomical interactions between kisspeptin (KP) neurons and somatostatin (SOM) neurons, two populations targeted by sex steroids, in three diencephalic areas involved in the central control of ovulation and/or sexual behavior: the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the preoptic area (POA) and the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl). KP is the most potent secretagogue of GnRH secretion while SOM has been shown to centrally inhibit LH pulsatile release. Notably, hypothalamic contents of these two neuropeptides vary with photoperiod in specific seasonal species. Our hypothesis is that SOM inhibits KP neuron activity and therefore indirectly modulate GnRH release and that this effect may be seasonally regulated. We used sections from ovariectomized estradiol-replaced ewes killed after photoperiodic treatment mimicking breeding or anestrus season. We performed triple immunofluorescent labeling to simultaneously detect KP, SOM and synapsin, a marker for synaptic vesicles. Sections from the POA and from the mediobasal hypothalamus were examined using a confocal microscope. Randomly selected KP or SOM neurons were observed in the POA and ARC. SOM neurons were also observed in the VMHvl. In both the ARC and POA, nearly all KP neurons presented numerous SOM contacts. SOM neurons presented KP terminals more frequently in the ARC than in the POA and VMHvl. Quantitative analysis failed to demonstrate major seasonal variations of KP and SOM interactions. Our data suggest a possible inhibitory action of SOM on all KP neurons in both photoperiodic statuses. On the other hand, the physiological significance of KP modulation of SOM neuron activity and vice versa remain to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  7. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  8. PCB 136 atropselectively alters morphometric and functional parameters of neuronal connectivity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via ryanodine receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongren; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Ghogha, Atefeh; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Bose, Diptiman D; Pessah, Isaac N; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Lein, Pamela J

    2014-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners with multiple ortho chlorine substitutions sensitize ryanodine receptors (RyRs), and this activity promotes Ca²⁺-dependent dendritic growth in cultured neurons. Many ortho-substituted congeners display axial chirality, and we previously reported that the chiral congener PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl) atropselectively sensitizes RyRs. Here, we test the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers differentially alter dendritic growth and other parameters of neuronal connectivity influenced by RyR activity. (-)-PCB 136, which potently sensitizes RyRs, enhances dendritic growth in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, whereas (+)-PCB 136, which lacks RyR activity, has no effect on dendritic growth. The dendrite-promoting activity of (-)-PCB 136 is observed at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 100 nM and is blocked by pharmacologic RyR antagonism. Neither atropisomer alters axonal growth or cell viability. Quantification of PCB 136 atropisomers in hippocampal cultures indicates that atropselective effects on dendritic growth are not due to differential partitioning of atropisomers into cultured cells. Imaging of hippocampal neurons loaded with Ca²⁺-sensitive dye demonstrates that (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ oscillations. Similarly, (-)-PCB 136 but not (+)-PCB 136 increases the activity of hippocampal neurons plated on microelectrode arrays. These data support the hypothesis that atropselective effects on RyR activity translate into atropselective effects of PCB 136 atropisomers on neuronal connectivity, and suggest that the variable atropisomeric enrichment of chiral PCBs observed in the human population may be a significant determinant of individual susceptibility for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes following PCB exposure.

  9. Neuronal replacement therapy: previous achievements and challenges ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grade, Sofia; Götz, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Lifelong neurogenesis and incorporation of newborn neurons into mature neuronal circuits operates in specialized niches of the mammalian brain and serves as role model for neuronal replacement strategies. However, to which extent can the remaining brain parenchyma, which never incorporates new neurons during the adulthood, be as plastic and readily accommodate neurons in networks that suffered neuronal loss due to injury or neurological disease? Which microenvironment is permissive for neuronal replacement and synaptic integration and which cells perform best? Can lost function be restored and how adequate is the participation in the pre-existing circuitry? Could aberrant connections cause malfunction especially in networks dominated by excitatory neurons, such as the cerebral cortex? These questions show how important connectivity and circuitry aspects are for regenerative medicine, which is the focus of this review. We will discuss the impressive advances in neuronal replacement strategies and success from exogenous as well as endogenous cell sources. Both have seen key novel technologies, like the groundbreaking discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells and direct neuronal reprogramming, offering alternatives to the transplantation of fetal neurons, and both herald great expectations. For these to become reality, neuronal circuitry analysis is key now. As our understanding of neuronal circuits increases, neuronal replacement therapy should fulfill those prerequisites in network structure and function, in brain-wide input and output. Now is the time to incorporate neural circuitry research into regenerative medicine if we ever want to truly repair brain injury.

  10. Osprey Range - CWHR [ds601

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  11. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  12. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges

  13. Impacts of brain serotonin deficiency following Tph2 inactivation on development and raphe neuron serotonergic specification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Gutknecht

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT is implicated in a wide range of functions from basic physiological mechanisms to complex behaviors, including neuropsychiatric conditions, as well as in developmental processes. Increasing evidence links 5-HT signaling alterations during development to emotional dysregulation and psychopathology in adult age. To further analyze the importance of brain 5-HT in somatic and brain development and function, and more specifically differentiation and specification of the serotonergic system itself, we generated a mouse model with brain-specific 5-HT deficiency resulting from a genetically driven constitutive inactivation of neuronal tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2. Tph2 inactivation (Tph2-/- resulted in brain 5-HT deficiency leading to growth retardation and persistent leanness, whereas a sex- and age-dependent increase in body weight was observed in Tph2+/- mice. The conserved expression pattern of the 5-HT neuron-specific markers (except Tph2 and 5-HT demonstrates that brain 5-HT synthesis is not a prerequisite for the proliferation, differentiation and survival of raphe neurons subjected to the developmental program of serotonergic specification. Furthermore, although these neurons are unable to synthesize 5-HT from the precursor tryptophan, they still display electrophysiological properties characteristic of 5-HT neurons. Moreover, 5-HT deficiency induces an up-regulation of 5-HT(1A and 5-HT(1B receptors across brain regions as well as a reduction of norepinephrine concentrations accompanied by a reduced number of noradrenergic neurons. Together, our results characterize developmental, neurochemical, neurobiological and electrophysiological consequences of brain-specific 5-HT deficiency, reveal a dual dose-dependent role of 5-HT in body weight regulation and show that differentiation of serotonergic neuron phenotype is independent from endogenous 5-HT synthesis.

  14. Evaluating the Autonomy of the Drosophila Circadian Clock in Dissociated Neuronal Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Sabado

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian behavioral rhythms offer an excellent model to study intricate interactions between the molecular and neuronal mechanisms of behavior. In mammals, pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN generate rhythms cell-autonomously, which are synchronized by the network interactions within the circadian circuit to drive behavioral rhythms. However, whether this principle is universal to circadian systems in animals remains unanswered. Here, we examined the autonomy of the Drosophila circadian clock by monitoring transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms of individual clock neurons in dispersed culture with time-lapse microscopy. Expression patterns of the transcriptional reporter show that CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC-mediated transcription is constantly active in dissociated clock neurons. In contrast, the expression profile of the post-transcriptional reporter indicates that PERIOD (PER protein levels fluctuate and ~10% of cells display rhythms in PER levels with periods in the circadian range. Nevertheless, PER and TIM are enriched in the cytoplasm and no periodic PER nuclear accumulation was observed. These results suggest that repression of CLK/CYC-mediated transcription by nuclear PER is impaired, and thus the negative feedback loop of the molecular clock is incomplete in isolated clock neurons. We further demonstrate that, by pharmacological assays using the non-amidated form of neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF, which could be specifically secreted from larval LNvs and adult s-LNvs, downstream events of the PDF signaling are partly impaired in dissociated larval clock neurons. Although non-amidated PDF is likely to be less active than the amidated one, these results point out the possibility that alteration in PDF downstream signaling may play a role in dampening of molecular rhythms in isolated clock neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that Drosophila clocks are weak oscillators that need to be in the

  15. Identifying and tracking simulated synaptic inputs from neuronal firing: insights from in vitro experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Volgushev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurately describing synaptic interactions between neurons and how interactions change over time are key challenges for systems neuroscience. Although intracellular electrophysiology is a powerful tool for studying synaptic integration and plasticity, it is limited by the small number of neurons that can be recorded simultaneously in vitro and by the technical difficulty of intracellular recording in vivo. One way around these difficulties may be to use large-scale extracellular recording of spike trains and apply statistical methods to model and infer functional connections between neurons. These techniques have the potential to reveal large-scale connectivity structure based on the spike timing alone. However, the interpretation of functional connectivity is often approximate, since only a small fraction of presynaptic inputs are typically observed. Here we use in vitro current injection in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons to validate methods for inferring functional connectivity in a setting where input to the neuron is controlled. In experiments with partially-defined input, we inject a single simulated input with known amplitude on a background of fluctuating noise. In a fully-defined input paradigm, we then control the synaptic weights and timing of many simulated presynaptic neurons. By analyzing the firing of neurons in response to these artificial inputs, we ask 1 How does functional connectivity inferred from spikes relate to simulated synaptic input? and 2 What are the limitations of connectivity inference? We find that individual current-based synaptic inputs are detectable over a broad range of amplitudes and conditions. Detectability depends on input amplitude and output firing rate, and excitatory inputs are detected more readily than inhibitory. Moreover, as we model increasing numbers of presynaptic inputs, we are able to estimate connection strengths more accurately and detect the presence of connections more quickly. These results

  16. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob eJacobs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee, carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard, cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe and primates (human, common chimpanzee. Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317 of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967 and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974, although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures.

  17. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  18. Lactate-mediated glia-neuronal signalling in the mammalian brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F.; Lane, S.; Korsak, A.; Paton, J. F. R.; Gourine, A. V.; Kasparov, S.; Teschemacher, A. G.

    2014-02-01

    Astrocytes produce and release L-lactate as a potential source of energy for neurons. Here we present evidence that L-lactate, independently of its caloric value, serves as an astrocytic signalling molecule in the locus coeruleus (LC). The LC is the principal source of norepinephrine to the frontal brain and thus one of the most influential modulatory centers of the brain. Optogenetically activated astrocytes release L-lactate, which excites LC neurons and triggers release of norepinephrine. Exogenous L-lactate within the physiologically relevant concentration range mimics these effects. L-lactate effects are concentration-dependent, stereo-selective, independent of L-lactate uptake into neurons and involve a cAMP-mediated step. In vivo injections of L-lactate in the LC evokes arousal similar to the excitatory transmitter, L-glutamate. Our results imply the existence of an unknown receptor for this ‘glio-transmitter’.

  19. Clathrin assembly protein AP180 and CALM differentially control axogenesis and dendrite outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushlin, Ittai; Petralia, Ronald S; Wu, Fangbai; Harel, Asaff; Mughal, Mohamed R; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2008-10-08

    Emerging data suggest that, much like epithelial cells, the polarized growth of neurons requires both the secretory and endocytic pathways. The clathrin assembly proteins AP180 and CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein) are known to be involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but their roles in mammalian neurons and, in particular, in developmental processes before synaptogenesis are unknown. Here we provide evidence that AP180 and CALM play critical roles in establishing the polarity and controlling the growth of axons and dendrites in embryonic hippocampal neurons. Knockdown of AP180 primarily impairs axonal development, whereas reducing CALM levels results in dendritic dystrophy. Conversely, neurons that overexpress AP180 or CALM generate multiple axons. Ultrastructural analysis shows that CALM affiliates with a wider range of intracellular trafficking organelles than does AP180. Functional analysis shows that endocytosis is reduced in both AP180-deficient and CALM-deficient neurons. Additionally, CALM-deficient neurons show disrupted secretory transport. Our data demonstrate previously unknown functions for AP180 and CALM in intracellular trafficking that are essential in the growth of neurons.

  20. The PPAR-gamma agonist pioglitazone protects cortical neurons from inflammatory mediators via improvement in peroxisomal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is known to play a pivotal role in mediating neuronal damage and axonal injury in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Among the range of inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide are potent neurotoxic agents. Recent evidence has suggested that oligodendrocyte peroxisomes may play an important role in protecting neurons from inflammatory damage. Methods To assess the influence of peroxisomal activation on nitric oxide mediated neurotoxicity, we investigated the effects of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR gamma agonist, pioglitazone in primary cortical neurons that were either exposed to a nitric oxide donor or co-cultured with activated microglia. Results Pioglitazone protected neurons and axons against both nitric-oxide donor-induced and microglia-derived nitric oxide-induced toxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons treated with this compound showed a significant increase in the protein and gene expression of PPAR-gamma, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the enzymatic activity of catalase. In addition, the protection of neurons and axons against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity afforded by pioglitazone appeared to be dependent on catalase. Conclusions Collectively, these observations provide evidence that modulation of PPAR-gamma activity and peroxisomal function by pioglitazone attenuates both NO and hydrogen peroxide-mediated neuronal and axonal damage suggesting a new therapeutic approach to protect against neurodegenerative changes associated with neuroinflammation.

  1. Transgenic Mouse Lines Subdivide External Segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPe) Neurons and Reveal Distinct GPe Output Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastro, Kevin J.; Bouchard, Rachel S.; Holt, Hiromi A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-type diversity in the brain enables the assembly of complex neural circuits, whose organization and patterns of activity give rise to brain function. However, the identification of distinct neuronal populations within a given brain region is often complicated by a lack of objective criteria to distinguish one neuronal population from another. In the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe), neuronal populations have been defined using molecular, anatomical, and electrophysiological criteria, but these classification schemes are often not generalizable across preparations and lack consistency even within the same preparation. Here, we present a novel use of existing transgenic mouse lines, Lim homeobox 6 (Lhx6)–Cre and parvalbumin (PV)–Cre, to define genetically distinct cell populations in the GPe that differ molecularly, anatomically, and electrophysiologically. Lhx6–GPe neurons, which do not express PV, are concentrated in the medial portion of the GPe. They have lower spontaneous firing rates, narrower dynamic ranges, and make stronger projections to the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta compared with PV–GPe neurons. In contrast, PV–GPe neurons are more concentrated in the lateral portions of the GPe. They have narrower action potentials, deeper afterhyperpolarizations, and make stronger projections to the subthalamic nucleus and parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus. These electrophysiological and anatomical differences suggest that Lhx6–GPe and PV–GPe neurons participate in different circuits with the potential to contribute to different aspects of motor function and dysfunction in disease. PMID:24501350

  2. NaV1.8 channels are expressed in large, as well as small, diameter sensory afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Howard, Jason R; Elmslie, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express a subset of voltage dependent sodium channels (NaV) including NaV1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9. Previous work supported preferential localization of NaV1.8 channels to small-medium diameter, nociceptive afferent neurons. However, we recently published evidence that NaV1.8 was the dominant NaV channel expressed in the somas of small, medium and large diameter muscle afferent neurons, which is consistent with other reports. Here, we extend those results to show that NaV1.8 expression is not correlated with afferent neuron diameter. Using immunocytochemistry, we found NaV1.8 expression in ~50% of sensory afferent neurons with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 µm. In addition, electrophysiological analysis shows that the kinetic and inactivation properties of NaV1.8 current are invariant with neuron size. These data add further support to the idea that NaV1.8 contributes to the electrical excitability of both nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory neurons.

  3. Responses of the antennal bimodal hygroreceptor neurons to innocuous and noxious high temperatures in the carabid beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurme, Karin; Merivee, Enno; Must, Anne; Sibul, Ivar; Muzzi, Maurizio; Di Giulio, Andrea; Williams, Ingrid; Tooming, Ene

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological responses of thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons from antennal dome-shaped sensilla of the carabid beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus to different levels of steady temperature ranging from 20 to 35°C and rapid step-changes in it were measured and analysed at both constant relative and absolute ambient air humidity conditions. It appeared that both hygroreceptor neurons respond to temperature which means that they are bimodal. For the first time in arthropods, the ability of antennal dry and moist neurons to produce high temperature induced spike bursts is documented. Burstiness of the spike trains is temperature dependent and increases with temperature increase. Threshold temperatures at which the two neurons switch from regular spiking to spike bursting are lower compared to that of the cold neuron, differ and approximately coincide with the upper limit of preferred temperatures of the species. We emphasise that, in contrast to various sensory systems studied, the hygroreceptor neurons of P. oblongopunctatus have stable and continuous burst trains, no temporal information is encoded in the timing of the bursts. We hypothesise that temperature dependent spike bursts produced by the antennal thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons may be responsible for detection of noxious high temperatures important in behavioural thermoregulation of carabid beetles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Merkel cells and neurons keep in touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2014-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex is a unique vertebrate touch receptor comprising two distinct cell types in the skin. Its presence in touch-sensitive skin areas was recognized more than a century ago, but the functions of each cell type in sensory transduction have been unclear. Three recent studies demonstrate that Merkel cells are mechanosensitive cells that function in touch transduction via Piezo2. One study concludes that Merkel cells rather than sensory neurons are principal sites of mechanotransduction, whereas the other two studies report that both Merkel cells and neurons encode mechanical inputs. Together, these studies settle a longstanding debate on whether Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells, and enable future investigations of how these skin cells communicate with neurons. PMID:25480024

  5. Microglia in neuronal plasticity: Influence of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnes; Joffre, Corinne; Wohleb, Eric S; Layé, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has previously been regarded as an immune-privileged site with the absence of immune cell responses but this dogma was not entirely true. Microglia are the brain innate immune cells and recent findings indicate that they participate both in CNS disease and infection as well as facilitate normal CNS function. Microglia are highly plastic and play integral roles in sculpting the structure of the CNS, refining neuronal circuitry and connectivity, and contribute actively to neuronal plasticity in the healthy brain. Interestingly, psychological stress can perturb the function of microglia in association with an impaired neuronal plasticity and the development of emotional behavior alterations. As a result it seemed important to describe in this review some findings indicating that the stress-induced microglia dysfunction may underlie neuroplasticity deficits associated to many mood disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stochastic resonance in noisy threshold neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosko, Bart; Mitaim, Sanya

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic resonance occurs when noise improves how a nonlinear system performs. This paper presents two general stochastic-resonance theorems for threshold neurons that process noisy Bernoulli input sequences. The performance measure is Shannon mutual information. The theorems show that small amounts of independent additive noise can increase the mutual information of threshold neurons if the neurons detect subthreshold signals. The first theorem shows that this stochastic-resonance effect holds for all finite-variance noise probability density functions that obey a simple mean constraint that the user can control. A corollary shows that this stochastic-resonance effect occurs for the important family of (right-sided) gamma noise. The second theorem shows that this effect holds for all infinite-variance noise types in the broad family of stable distributions. Stable bell curves can model extremely impulsive noise environments. So the second theorem shows that this stochastic-resonance effect is robust against violent fluctuations in the additive noise process.

  7. Mirror Neurons and Mirror-Touch Synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkovski, Omer; Katzin, Naama; Salti, Moti

    2016-05-30

    Since mirror neurons were introduced to the neuroscientific community more than 20 years ago, they have become an elegant and intuitive account for different cognitive mechanisms (e.g., empathy, goal understanding) and conditions (e.g., autism spectrum disorders). Recently, mirror neurons were suggested to be the mechanism underlying a specific type of synesthesia. Mirror-touch synesthesia is a phenomenon in which individuals experience somatosensory sensations when seeing someone else being touched. Appealing as it is, careful delineation is required when applying this mechanism. Using the mirror-touch synesthesia case, we put forward theoretical and methodological issues that should be addressed before relying on the mirror-neurons account. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Nicotinic activation of laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2009-01-01

    ). However, recent data suggest that neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nucleus, which sends cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic-containing projections to DA-containing neurons of the VTA, are critical to gating normal functioning of this nucleus. The actions of nicotine on LDT neurons...... depolarization that often induced firing and TTX-resistant inward currents. Nicotine also enhanced sensitivity to injected current; and, baseline changes in intracellular calcium were elicited in the dendrites of some cholinergic LDT cells. In addition, activity-dependent calcium transients were increased......, suggesting that nicotine exposure sufficient to induce firing may lead to enhancement of levels of intracellular calcium. Nicotine also had strong actions on glutamate and GABA-releasing presynaptic terminals, as it greatly increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs and IPSCs to both cholinergic and non...

  9. Mechanosensor Channels in Mammalian Somatosensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Delmas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoreceptive sensory neurons innervating the skin, skeletal muscles andviscera signal both innocuous and noxious information necessary for proprioception, touchand pain. These neurons are responsible for the transduction of mechanical stimuli intoaction potentials that propagate to the central nervous system. The ability of these cells todetect mechanical stimuli impinging on them relies on the presence of mechanosensitivechannels that transduce the external mechanical forces into electrical and chemical signals.Although a great deal of information regarding the molecular and biophysical properties ofmechanosensitive channels in prokaryotes has been accumulated over the past two decades,less is known about the mechanosensitive channels necessary for proprioception and thesenses of touch and pain. This review summarizes the most pertinent data onmechanosensitive channels of mammalian somatosensory neurons, focusing on theirproperties, pharmacology and putative identity.

  10. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  11. Coping with Variability in Small Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ronald L.; Norris, Brian J.; Wenning, Angela; Wright, Terrence M.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and corresponding modeling studies indicate that there is a 2- to 5-fold variation of intrinsic and synaptic parameters across animals while functional output is maintained. Here, we review experiments, using the heartbeat central pattern generator (CPG) in medicinal leeches, which explore the consequences of animal-to-animal variation in synaptic strength for coordinated motor output. We focus on a set of segmental heart motor neurons that all receive inhibitory synaptic input from the same four premotor interneurons. These four premotor inputs fire in a phase progression and the motor neurons also fire in a phase progression because of differences in synaptic strength profiles of the four inputs among segments. Our work tested the hypothesis that functional output is maintained in the face of animal-to-animal variation in the absolute strength of connections because relative strengths of the four inputs onto particular motor neurons is maintained across animals. Our experiments showed that relative strength is not strictly maintained across animals even as functional output is maintained, and animal-to-animal variations in strength of particular inputs do not correlate strongly with output phase. Further experiments measured the precise temporal pattern of the premotor inputs, the segmental synaptic strength profiles of their connections onto motor neurons, and the temporal pattern (phase progression) of those motor neurons all in the same animal for a series of 12 animals. The analysis of input and output in this sample of 12 individuals suggests that the number (four) of inputs to each motor neuron and the variability of the temporal pattern of input from the CPG across individuals weaken the influence of the strength of individual inputs. Moreover, the temporal pattern of the output varies as much across individuals as that of the input. Essentially, each animal arrives at a unique solution for how the network produces functional output. PMID

  12. Dopamine inhibits mitochondrial motility in hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigeng Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The trafficking of mitochondria within neurons is a highly regulated process. In an earlier study, we found that serotonin (5-HT, acting through the 5-HT1A receptor subtype, promotes axonal transport of mitochondria in cultured hippocampal neurons by increasing Akt activity, and consequently decreasing glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta activity. This finding suggests a critical role for neuromodulators in the regulation of mitochondrial trafficking in neurons. In the present study, we investigate the effects of a second important neuromodulator, dopamine, on mitochondrial transport in hippocampal neurons.Here, we show that dopamine, like 5-HT, regulates mitochondrial motility in cultured hippocampal neurons through the Akt-GSK3beta signaling cascade. But, in contrast to the stimulatory effect of 5-HT, administration of exogenous dopamine or bromocriptine, a dopamine 2 receptor (D2R agonist, caused an inhibition of mitochondrial movement. Moreover, pretreatment with bromocriptine blocked the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on mitochondrial movement. Conversely, in cells pretreated with 5-HT, no further increases in movement were observed after administration of haloperidol, a D2R antagonist. In contrast to the effect of the D2R agonist, addition of SKF38393, a dopamine 1 receptor (D1R agonist, promoted mitochondrial transport, indicating that the inhibitory effect of dopamine was actually the net summation of opposing influences of the two receptor subtypes. The most pronounced effect of dopamine signals was on mitochondria that were already moving directionally. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment with either a D2R agonist or a D1R antagonist decreased Akt activity, and conversely, treatment with either a D2R antagonist or a D1R agonist increased Akt activity.Our observations strongly suggest a role for both dopamine and 5-HT in regulating mitochondrial movement, and indicate that the integrated effects of these two neuromodulators may be

  13. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  14. Developmental regulation of neuronal genes by DNA methylation: environmental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Melinda E; Sengoku, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    Steroid hormones have wide-ranging organizational, activational and protective actions in the brain. In particular, the organizational effects of early exposure to 17β-estradiol (E2) and glucocorticoids are essential for long-lasting behavioral and cognitive functions. Both steroid hormones mediate many of their actions through intracellular receptors that act as transcription factors. In the rodent cerebral cortex, estrogen receptor mRNA and protein expression are high early in postnatal life and declines dramatically as the animal approaches puberty. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving this developmental regulation of gene expression is critical for understanding the complex events that determine lasting brain physiology and prime the plasticity of neurons. Gene expression can be suppressed by the epigenetic modification of the promoter regions by DNA methylation that results in gene silencing. Indeed, the decrease in ERα mRNA expression in the cortex during development is accompanied by an increase in promoter methylation. Numerous environmental stimuli can alter the DNA methylation that occurs for ERα, glucocorticoid receptors, as well as many other critical genes involved in neuronal development. For example, maternal behavior toward pups can alter epigenetic regulation of ERα mRNA expression. Additionally perinatal stress and exposure to environmental estrogens can also have lasting effects on gene expression by modifying DNA methylation of these important genes. Taken together, there appears to be a critical window during development where, outside factors that alter epigenetic programming can have lasting effects on neuronal gene expression. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Elasticity Maps of Living Neurons Measured by Combined Fluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spedden, Elise; Naumova, Elena N; Kaplan, David L; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here we combine Atomic Force Microscopy based force spectroscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for three different types of live neuronal cells: cortical (embryonic rat), embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion, and P-19 (mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells) neurons. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon disruption of microtubules of the cell. We find reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules. We also report that cortical and P-19 neurons have similar elasticity maps, with elastic moduli in the range 0.1-2 kPa, with typical average values of 0.4 kPa (P-19) and 0.2 k...

  16. Parallel optical control of spatiotemporal neuronal spike activity using high-frequency digital light processingtechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eJerome

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential firing in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses Digital-Light-Processing (DLP technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 µm and temporal (>13kHz resolution. Light is projected through the quartz-glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 x 2.07 mm2 of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential firing in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales.

  17. Capturing the Dynamical Repertoire of Single Neurons with Generalized Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alison I; Pillow, Jonathan W

    2017-12-01

    A key problem in computational neuroscience is to find simple, tractable models that are nevertheless flexible enough to capture the response properties of real neurons. Here we examine the capabilities of recurrent point process models known as Poisson generalized linear models (GLMs). These models are defined by a set of linear filters and a point nonlinearity and are conditionally Poisson spiking. They have desirable statistical properties for fitting and have been widely used to analyze spike trains from electrophysiological recordings. However, the dynamical repertoire of GLMs has not been systematically compared to that of real neurons. Here we show that GLMs can reproduce a comprehensive suite of canonical neural response behaviors, including tonic and phasic spiking, bursting, spike rate adaptation, type I and type II excitation, and two forms of bistability. GLMs can also capture stimulus-dependent changes in spike timing precision and reliability that mimic those observed in real neurons, and can exhibit varying degrees of stochasticity, from virtually deterministic responses to greater-than-Poisson variability. These results show that Poisson GLMs can exhibit a wide range of dynamic spiking behaviors found in real neurons, making them well suited for qualitative dynamical as well as quantitative statistical studies of single-neuron and population response properties.

  18. Two-photon single-cell optogenetic control of neuronal activity by sculpted light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasfalvy, Bertalan K; Zemelman, Boris V; Tang, Jianyong; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2010-06-29

    Recent advances in optogenetic techniques have generated new tools for controlling neuronal activity, with a wide range of neuroscience applications. The most commonly used approach has been the optical activation of the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). However, targeted single-cell-level optogenetic activation with temporal precessions comparable to the spike timing remained challenging. Here we report fast (< or = 1 ms), selective, and targeted control of neuronal activity with single-cell resolution in hippocampal slices. Using temporally focused laser pulses (TEFO) for which the axial beam profile can be controlled independently of its lateral distribution, large numbers of channels on individual neurons can be excited simultaneously, leading to strong (up to 15 mV) and fast (< or = 1 ms) depolarizations. Furthermore, we demonstrated selective activation of cellular compartments, such as dendrites and large presynaptic terminals, at depths up to 150 microm. The demonstrated spatiotemporal resolution and the selectivity provided by TEFO allow manipulation of neuronal activity, with a large number of applications in studies of neuronal microcircuit function in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Parallel optical control of spatiotemporal neuronal spike activity using high-speed digital light processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Jason; Foehring, Robert C; Armstrong, William E; Spain, William J; Heck, Detlef H

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential firing in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses digital light processing technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D) stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 μm) and temporal (>13 kHz) resolution. Light is projected through the quartz-glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 mm × 2.07 mm) of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential firing in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales.

  20. Putamen neurons process both sensory and motor information during a complex task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ana F; Bermudez, Maria A; Romero, Maria Del Carmen; Perez, Rogelio; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2012-07-23

    The putamen has classically been considered to be primarily a motor structure. It is involved in a broad range of roles and its neurons have been postulated to function as pattern classifiers of behaviourally significant events. However, its specific role in motor and sensory processing is still unclear. For the purpose of better categorizing putamen neurons, we trained two rhesus monkeys to perform multisensory operant tasks by using complex stimuli such as short videoclips. Trials involved image or soundtrack or both. Some stimuli required a motor response associated to reward, whereas others did not require response and produced no reward. We found that neurons in the putamen showed pure visual responses, action-related activity, and reward responses. Insofar as action-related activity, preparation of movement, movement execution, and withholding of movement involved three different putamen neuron populations. Moreover, our data suggest an involvement of putamen neurons in processing primary rewards and visual events in a complex task, which may contribute to reinforcement learning through stimulus-reward association. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacological and model-based interpretation of neuronal dynamics transitions during sleep-waking cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M; Nakao, M; Mizutani, Y; Takahashi, T; Watanabe, K; Arai, H; Sasaki, N

    1994-03-01

    Power spectral analysis has been applied to spontaneous single neuronal activities during the sleep-waking cycle in various regions of the cat's central nervous system. During slow-wave sleep (SWS), the spontaneous activities of many neurons had a white noise-like power-spectral density profile in a very low frequency range (0.01-1.0 Hz) whereas, during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS), they showed a 1/f-like spectral pattern. This spectral transition between SWS and REMS was hypothesized to depend on the influence of serotonergic and cholinergic neuronal activity which is considered to modulate various brain functions. According to both pharmacological experiments and simulation studies with a neural network model, it was concluded that the serotonergic system may have a function to eliminate slow fluctuations in neuronal activity in wide areas, from the reticulo-thalamo-neocortical to the limbic systems. Consequently, simple signal processing of spontaneous neuronal activity has elucidated an important neurophysiological fact, which may lead to a principle of the basic brain function and its mechanism.

  2. A model explaining synchronization of neuron bioelectric frequency under weak alternating low frequency magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Moral, A.; Azanza, María J.

    2015-03-01

    A biomagnetic-electrical model is presented that explains rather well the experimentally observed synchronization of the bioelectric potential firing rate ("frequency"), f, of single unit neurons of Helix aspersa mollusc under the application of extremely low frequency (ELF) weak alternating (AC) magnetic fields (MF). The proposed model incorporates to our widely experimentally tested model of superdiamagnetism (SD) and Ca2+ Coulomb explosion (CE) from lipid (LP) bilayer membrane (SD-CE model), the electrical quadrupolar long range interaction between the bilayer LP membranes of synchronized neuron pairs, not considered before. The quadrupolar interaction is capable of explaining well the observed synchronization. Actual extension of our SD-CE-model shows that the neuron firing frequency field, B, dependence becomes not modified, but the bioelectric frequency is decreased and its spontaneous temperature, T, dependence is modified. A comparison of the model with synchronization experimental results of pair of neurons under weak (B0 ≅0.2-15 mT) AC-MF of frequency fM=50 Hz is reported. From the deduced size of synchronized LP clusters under B, is suggested the formation of small neuron networks via the membrane lipid correlation.

  3. In-vitro exposure of neuronal networks to the GSM-1800 signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Daniela; Garenne, André; Haro, Emmanuelle; Poulletier de Gannes, Florence; Lagroye, Isabelle; Lévêque, Philippe; Veyret, Bernard; Lewis, Noëlle

    2013-12-01

    The central nervous system is the most likely target of mobile telephony radiofrequency (RF) field exposure in terms of biological effects. Several electroencephalography (EEG) studies have reported variations in the alpha-band power spectrum during and/or after RF exposure, in resting EEG and during sleep. In this context, the observation of the spontaneous electrical activity of neuronal networks under RF exposure can be an efficient tool to detect the occurrence of low-level RF effects on the nervous system. Our research group has developed a dedicated experimental setup in the GHz range for the simultaneous exposure of neuronal networks and monitoring of electrical activity. A transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell was used to expose the neuronal networks to GSM-1800 signals at a SAR level of 3.2 W/kg. Recording of the neuronal electrical activity and detection of the extracellular spikes and bursts under exposure were performed using microelectrode arrays (MEAs). This work provides the proof of feasibility and preliminary results of the integrated investigation regarding exposure setup, culture of the neuronal network, recording of the electrical activity, and analysis of the signals obtained under RF exposure. In this pilot study on 16 cultures, there was a 30% reversible decrease in firing rate (FR) and bursting rate (BR) during a 3 min exposure to RF. Additional experiments are needed to further characterize this effect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fabrication of biocompatible free-standing nanopatterned films for primary neuronal cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Cesca, F.

    2014-09-10

    Devising and constructing biocompatible devices for nervous system regeneration is an extremely challenging task. Besides tackling the issue of biocompatibility, biomaterials for neuroscience applications should mimic the complex environment of the extracellular matrix, which in vivo provides neurons with a series of cues and signals to guide cells towards their appropriate targets. In this work, a novel nanopatterned biocompatible poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) film is realized to assist the attachment and growth of primary hippocampal neurons. Costly and time-consuming processes can be avoided using plasma-surface nanotexturing obtained by a mixed gas SF6/Ar at −5 °C. The intrinsic composition and line topography of nanopatterned PCL ensure healthy development of the neuronal network, as shown by confocal microscopy, by analysing the expression of a range of neuronal markers typical of mature cultures, as well as by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we show that surface nanopatterning improves differentiation of neurons compared to flat PCL films, while no neural growth was observed on either flat or nanopatterned substrates in the absence of a poly-D-lysine coating. Thus, we successfully optimized a nanofabrication protocol to obtain nanostructured PCL layers endowed with several mechanical and structural characteristics that make them a promising, versatile tool for future tissue engineering studies aimed at neural tissue regeneration.

  5. A temperature rise reduces trial-to-trial variability of locust auditory neuron responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Monika J B; Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Schreiber, Susanne; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    The neurophysiology of ectothermic animals, such as insects, is affected by environmental temperature, as their body temperature fluctuates with ambient conditions. Changes in temperature alter properties of neurons and, consequently, have an impact on the processing of information. Nevertheless, nervous system function is often maintained over a broad temperature range, exhibiting a surprising robustness to variations in temperature. A special problem arises for acoustically communicating insects, as in these animals mate recognition and mate localization typically rely on the decoding of fast amplitude modulations in calling and courtship songs. In the auditory periphery, however, temporal resolution is constrained by intrinsic neuronal noise. Such noise predominantly arises from the stochasticity of ion channel gating and potentially impairs the processing of sensory signals. On the basis of intracellular recordings of locust auditory neurons, we show that intrinsic neuronal variability on the level of spikes is reduced with increasing temperature. We use a detailed mathematical model including stochastic ion channel gating to shed light on the underlying biophysical mechanisms in auditory receptor neurons: because of a redistribution of channel-induced current noise toward higher frequencies and specifics of the temperature dependence of the membrane impedance, membrane potential noise is indeed reduced at higher temperatures. This finding holds under generic conditions and physiologically plausible assumptions on the temperature dependence of the channels' kinetics and peak conductances. We demonstrate that the identified mechanism also can explain the experimentally observed reduction of spike timing variability at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Coincident Generation of Pyramidal Neurons and Protoplasmic Astrocytes in Neocortical Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magavi, Sanjay; Friedmann, Drew; Banks, Garrett; Stolfi, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes, one of the most common cell types in the brain, are essential for processes ranging from neural development through potassium homeostasis to synaptic plasticity. Surprisingly, the developmental origins of astrocytes in the neocortex are still controversial. To investigate the patterns of astrocyte development in the neocortex we examined cortical development in a transgenic mouse in which a random, sparse subset of neural progenitors undergoes CRE/lox recombination, permanently labeling their progeny. We demonstrate that neural progenitors in neocortex generate discrete columnar structures that contain both projection neurons and protoplasmic astrocytes. Ninety-five percent of developmental cortical columns labeled in our system contained both astrocytes and neurons. The astrocyte to neuron ratio of labeled cells in a developmental column was 1:7.4, similar to the overall ratio of 1:8.4 across the entire gray matter of the neocortex, indicating that column-associated astrocytes account for the majority of protoplasmic astrocytes in neocortex. Most of the labeled columns contained multiple clusters of several astrocytes. Dividing cells were found at the base of neuronal columns at the beginning of gliogenesis, and later within the cortical layers, suggesting a mechanism by which astrocytes could be distributed within a column. These data indicate that radial glia are the source of both neurons and astrocytes in the neocortex, and that these two cell types are generated in a spatially restricted manner during cortical development. PMID:22492032

  7. Sensory modulation of the medial preoptic area neuronal activity by dorsal penile nerve stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, H N; Manchanda, S K; Kumar, V M

    1994-03-01

    The study was aimed at finding out the influence exerted by the genital afferents on the medial preoptic area (mPOA), which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of male sex behavior. To fulfil this objective, the effects of stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) on the activity of 82 mPOA neurons were studied. The base line firing rates of the mPOA neurons, studied by extracellular recording, ranged between 0.5 and 38.5 Hz (mean 7.18 +/- 7.91). The stimulation of the DPN (20 Hz, 0.4 msec. 70 microA) influenced 79.69% of the neurons studied. Though increased firing was the predominant influence produced (50%), decreased firing was also seen in a few (29.69%). The excited and inhibited neurons were randomly distributed within the mPOA. Neurons located in the lateral and posterior hypothalamus were not affected by the DPN stimulation. The stimulation parameters used in this study did not produce any change in the systemic arterial pressure and heart rate. The results provide electrophysiological evidence of afferent inputs from the male sex organ to the mPOA, which is an important area controlling male sex behavior.

  8. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  9. Leader neurons in leaky integrate and fire neural network simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Cyrille

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we highlight the topological properties of leader neurons whose existence is an experimental fact. Several experimental studies show the existence of leader neurons in population bursts of activity in 2D living neural networks (Eytan and Marom, J Neurosci 26(33):8465-8476, 2006; Eckmann et al., New J Phys 10(015011), 2008). A leader neuron is defined as a neuron which fires at the beginning of a burst (respectively network spike) more often than we expect by chance considering its mean firing rate. This means that leader neurons have some burst triggering power beyond a chance-level statistical effect. In this study, we characterize these leader neuron properties. This naturally leads us to simulate neural 2D networks. To build our simulations, we choose the leaky integrate and fire (lIF) neuron model (Gerstner and Kistler 2002; Cessac, J Math Biol 56(3):311-345, 2008), which allows fast simulations (Izhikevich, IEEE Trans Neural Netw 15(5):1063-1070, 2004; Gerstner and Naud, Science 326:379-380, 2009). The dynamics of our lIF model has got stable leader neurons in the burst population that we simulate. These leader neurons are excitatory neurons and have a low membrane potential firing threshold. Except for these two first properties, the conditions required for a neuron to be a leader neuron are difficult to identify and seem to depend on several parameters involved in the simulations themselves. However, a detailed linear analysis shows a trend of the properties required for a neuron to be a leader neuron. Our main finding is: A leader neuron sends signals to many excitatory neurons as well as to few inhibitory neurons and a leader neuron receives only signals from few other excitatory neurons. Our linear analysis exhibits five essential properties of leader neurons each with different relative importance. This means that considering a given neural network with a fixed mean number of connections per neuron, our analysis gives us a way of