WorldWideScience

Sample records for range transported dust

  1. Long-range transported Asian Dust and emergency ambulance dispatches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nitta, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kenichiro

    2012-10-01

    Asian Dust (AD) particles transported from source areas contribute to sharp increases in coarse particles in Japan. We examined the association of exposure to AD events with emergency ambulance dispatches in Nagasaki city. We also examined whether AD transported at different altitude routes from source areas influenced dispatch rates. Using lidar (light detection and ranging), we determined moderate AD days (0.066/km dust extinction coefficient ≤0.105/km) and heavy AD days (0.105/km dust extinction coefficient). We applied a time-stratified case-crossover analysis to estimate the association between AD days and emergency ambulance dispatches. There were 9,070 dispatches from March to May during 2003-2007. The heavy AD events at cumulative lag0-3 were associated with an increase in emergency dispatches due to all causes by 12.1% (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3, 22.9) and an increase for those due to cardiovascular diseases by 20.8% (95% CI: 3.5, 40.9). We categorized 31 AD days based on backward trajectory analyses into AD days with lower altitude routes and those with higher altitude routes. We observed a greater increase in emergency ambulance dispatches on AD days with lower altitude routes compared with those on AD days with higher altitude routes although the difference was not significant (p for interaction 0.49). These results have shown that exposure to high AD particle levels could increase emergency ambulance dispatches due to illnesses such as cardiovascular stress, and that AD traveling through different routes may have different health effects.

  2. Impact of Long-Range Dust Transport on Northern California in Spring 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Bergmann, D; Chuang, C; Bench, G; Cliff, S; Kelly, P; Perry, K; VanCuren, T

    2005-02-10

    It has been well documented that spectacular dust storms in Asia (e.g. the events in 1998 and 2001) can affect the USA through long-range transport of dust across the Pacific. However, our observations and modeling show that the majority of dust at sites in Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps (Northern California) in spring 2002 (a year with no spectacular Asian dust events) is still from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. We implemented the interactive dust emission algorithm of Ginoux et al. (2004) into the LLNL 3-D global atmospheric chemistry and aerosol transport model (IMPACT), then ran the model using a separate tracer for each dust emission region, using hi-resolution (1 x 1 degree) meteorological data from the NASA GMAO GEOS-3 assimilation system for 2001 and 2002. We also experimentally analyzed size- and time-resolved aerosol samples at Lassen National Park and Trinity Alps in the spring of 2002, which were taken as part of NOAA's ITCT 2k2 measurement campaign. The model-predicted time-series of soil dust over Northern California agrees remarkably well with our measurements, with a strong temporal correlation between the observations and intercontinental transport of dust across the Pacific in the model. Hence, we conclude that the majority of dust we sampled in Northern California in spring 2002, with aerodynamic diameters of 0.56-5 microns, is from long-range intercontinental transport across the Pacific. The strong correlations also strongly validate atmospheric transport in the IMPACT model over the Northern Pacific in spring.

  3. Biogeochemical Impact of Long-Range Transported Dust over Northern South China Sea

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    Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, S. H.; Hsu, N. C.

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport and impact of Asian dust aerosols have been well documented (e.g., results from ACE-Asia and regional follow-on campaigns), but little is known about dust invasion to the South China Sea (SCS). On 19-21 March 2010, a fierce Asian dust storm affected large areas from the Gobi deserts to the West Pacific, including Taiwan and Hong Kong. As a pilot study of the 7-SEAS (Seven South East Asian Studies) in the northern SCS, detailed characteristics of long-range transported dust aerosols were first observed by a comprehensive set of ground-based instruments deployed at the Dongsha islands (20deg42'52" N, 116deg43'51" E). Aerosol measurements such as particle mass concentrations, size distribution, optical properties, hygroscopicity, and vertical profiles help illustrate the evolution of this dust outbreak. Our results indicate that these dust particles were mixed with anthropogenic and marine aerosols, and transported near the surface. Satellite assessment of biogeochemical impact of dust deposition into open oceans is hindered by our current inability in retrieving areal dust properties and ocean colors over an extensive period of time, particularly under the influence of cloudy conditions. In this paper, we analyze the changes of retrieved Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration over the northern SCS, considered as oligotophic waters in the spring, from long-term SeaWiFS measurements since 1997. Over the past decade, six long-range transported dust events are identified based on spatiotemporal evolutions of PM10 measurements from regional monitoring stations, with the aid of trajectory analysis. Multi-year composites of Chl-a imagery for dust event and non-dust background during March-April are applied to overcome insufficient retrievals of Chl-a due to cloudy environment. Due to anthropogenic modification within a shallow boundary layer off the densely populated and industrial southeast coast of China, the iron ion activation of deliquescent dust

  4. Increasing cardiopulmonary emergency visits by long-range transported Asian dust storms in Taiwan.

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    Chan, Chang-Chuan; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chang, Wei-Tien; Lee, Chung-Te; Peng, Chi-Ming

    2008-03-01

    This study aims to explore whether Asian dust storms can affect health after 4000 km long-range transport from their origins to downwind areas. Asian dust storms reaching Taipei, Taiwan are tracked by satellite images and confirmed by backward trajectory analysis and ground air pollution monitoring between 1995 and 2002. Our outcome variables include emergency visits for ischaemic heart diseases (ICD-9-CM 410-411, 414), cerebrovascular diseases (ICD-9-CM 430-437), and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) (ICD-9-CM 493, 496) from the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). We use simple paired t-test and Poisson regression models to compare difference in emergency visits, air pollution levels and meteorological conditions for the pairs of Asian dust events and pre-dust periods. There were 39 high dust events with PM(10) greater than 90 microg/m(3) and another 46 low dust events with PM(10) less than 90 microg/m(3). Compared to their pre-dust periods, PM(10) concentrations are significantly increased by 77 microg/m(3) per event for the high dust events. Asian dust storms increase cardiopulmonary emergency visits during storm-affecting periods in Taipei when ambient PM(10) concentrations are above 90 microg/m(3). Compared to their pre-dust periods, emergency visits for ischaemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and COPD during high dust events are increased by 0.7 case (35%), 0.7 case (20%), and 0.9 case (20%) per event, respectively, by paired t-tests. By comparing the model-predicted to the observed emergency visits, we find emergency visits for cardiovascular diseases (ICD-9-CM 410-411, 414, 430-437) were significantly increased by 2.9 cases (67%) per event for the 39 high Asian dust events.

  5. Dependence of simulations of long range transport on meteorology, model and dust size

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    Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Smith, M.; Losno, R.; Marticorena, B.; Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.; Qu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral aerosols interact with radiation directly, as well as modifying climate, and provide important micronutrients to ocean and land ecosystems. Mineral aerosols are transported long distances from the source regions to remote regions, but the rates at which this occurs can be difficult to deduce from either observations or models. Here we consider interactions between the details of the simulation of dust size and long-range transport. In addition, we compare simulations of dust using multiple reanalysis datasets, as well as different model basis to understand how robust the mean, seasonality and interannual variability are in models. Models can provide insight into how long observations are required in order to characterize the atmospheric concentration and deposition to remote regions.

  6. Influence of tropical storms in the Northern Indian Ocean on dust entrainment and long-range transport.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.

    Ninety five tropical cyclonic events (tropical storms, depressions and cyclones) between 2001 and 2010 were studied to determine their impact on dust outbreaks and long-range transport over the northern Indian Ocean and south Asia. In addition...

  7. Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Lin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants are major environmental concerns of Taiwan during the winter monsoon season when northeasterly winds prevail following passages of cold fronts. Based on hourly measurements of Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (TEPA air quality monitoring stations, Lidar and in-situ IC, a significant long-range transport dust and air pollutants event on 18 March 2005 has been identified. During this episode, drastically elevated concentrations of PM10, CO and SO2 along with the strong northeasterly on 18 March were observed over background Wanli station, with peaks of about 170 μgm−3, 1.0 ppm and 14 ppb, respectively. We have found that air masses of air pollutants and Asian dust are transported separately. Although the mixing takes place on the way to Taiwan, it mixes slightly when they arrived in Taiwan. The major component of the first PM10 peak were air pollutants, evidenced by the consistent peaks of SO42− and NO3 measured by in-situ IC, while no significant depolarization was measured by Lidar. In contrast, the evident non-spherical particles and hourly PM10 concentration consistently varied with Ca2+ indicating that mineral dust was the major component of the second peak. Trajectory analysis showed that these two peaks come from quite different sources areas. The air masses of the first peak mainly come from anthropogenic area and transport in the low boundary layer (<1500 m while the masses of the second peak originate from high altitude (>4000 m of desert areas. Numerical results showed significant agreement of temporal and vertical variation of aerosol concentration with observations. The phenomena of split air parcels between air pollutants and Asian dust transported to Taiwan are strongly associated with the transport paths and stable and dry atmospheric boundary conditions.

  8. Long-range Transport of Asian Dust Storms: A Satellite/Surface Perspective on Societal and Scientific Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Among the many components contributing to air pollution, airborne mineral dust plays an important role due to its biogeochemical impact on the ecosystem and its radiative forcing effect on the weather/climate system. As much as one-third to half of the global dust emissions, estimated about 800 Tg, are introduced annually into Earth's atmosphere from various deserts in China. Asian dust storm outbreaks are believed to have persisted for hundreds and thousands years over the vast territory of north and northwest China, but not until recent decades that many studies reveal the compelling evidence in recognizing the importance of these eolian dust particles for forming Chinese Loess Plateau and for biogeochemical cycling in the North Pacific Ocean to as far as in the Greenland ice-sheets through long-range transport. The Asian dust and air pollution aerosols can be detected by its colored appearance on current Earth observing satellites and its evolution monitored by satellite and surface network. In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm, called Deep Blue, to retrieve aerosol properties, particularly but not limited to, over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Recently, many field campaigns were designed and executed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. We will provide an overview of the outbreak of Asian dust storms, near source/sink and their evolution along transport pathway, from space and surface observations. The climatic effects and societal impacts of the Asian dusts will be addressed in depth. (to be presented in the International Workshop on Semi-Arid Land Surface-

  9. Long-range transport of giant particles in Asian dust identified by physical, mineralogical, and meteorological analysis

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    Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Seo, J.; Kim, G. M.; Jin, H. C.; Chun, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Giant particles transported over long distances are generally of limited concern in atmospheric studies due to their low number concentrations in mineral dust and possible local origin. However, they can play an important role in regional circulation of earth materials due to their enormous volume concentration. Asian dust laden with giant particles was observed in Korea on 31 March 2012, after a migration of about 2000 km across the Yellow Sea from the Gobi Desert. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that 20% of the particles exceeded 10 μm in equivalent sphere diameter, with a maximum of 60 μm. The median diameter from the number distribution was 5.7 μm, which was larger than the diameters recorded of 2.5 and 2.9 μm in Asian dust storms in 2010 and 2011, respectively, and was consistent with independent optical particle counter data. Giant particles (>10 μm) contributed about 89% of the volume of the dust in the 2012 storm. Illite-smectite series clay minerals were the major mineral group followed by quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, and calcite. The total phyllosilicate content was ~52%. The direct long-range transport of giant particles was confirmed by calcite nanofibers closely associated with clays in a submicron scale identified by high-resolution SEM and transmission electron microscopy. Since giant particles consisted of clay agglomerates and clay-coated quartz, feldspars, and micas, the mineral composition varied little throughout the fine (20 μm) size bins. Analysis of the synoptic conditions of the 2012 dust event and its migration indicated that the mid-tropospheric strong wind belt directly stretching to Korea induced rapid transport of the dust, delivering giant particles. Giant dust particles with high settling velocity would be the major input into the terrestrial and marine sedimentary and ecological systems of East Asia and the western Pacific. Analysis of ancient aeolian deposits in Korea suggested the common deposition of giant

  10. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

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    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  11. What is driving changes in long-range transport of dust from Africa to the Americas? A 30 year synthesis of the GEOS-Chem model and observations

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    Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Sahara and Sahelian regions produce approximately half of the world's dust emissions, resulting in significant radiative effects, air quality issues and mineral deposition, not only in Africa, but across the Atlantic and in the Americas. Determining how these impacts may change in the future requires a thorough understanding of the processes controlling emission, transport and deposition of dust. Long-term records of dust concentration measured in the Caribbean have, until the nineties, correlated with Sahelian precipitation and climatic indicators, potentially providing ways to predict changes in dust. However, this relationship is no longer clear and there are significant changes in the seasonality of dust transported to the Americas currently with no obvious explanation. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with NASA GMAO meteorological re-analyses (MERRA) to simulate the 30 year period 1979 - 2008. A synthesis of observations from multiple satellite and surface-based platforms is used to evaluate the model, primarily in terms of its ability to simulate the long-range transport of mineral dust from Africa. We then investigate what drives the changes in long-range transport of African dust to the Americas over diurnal to decadal timescales. This enables understanding of the relative importance of the individual processes controlling these changes, and the sensitivity of air quality and dust deposition downwind. This work aims to determine 1) how sensitive air quality and dust deposition in the Americas is to changes in African dust emissions, 2) the role of meteorological variables affecting the inter-annual variability of dust emission and deposition, and 3) the impact that land use changes and desertification in the Sahel may have in terms of the influence on dust transported to the Americas.

  12. Origin and pathways of the mineral dust transport to two Spanish EARLINET sites: Effect on the observed columnar and range-resolved dust optical properties

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    Mandija, Florian; Sicard, Michaël; Comerón, Adolfo; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Barragan, Ruben; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Granados-Muñoz, Maria Jose; Lyamani, Hassan; Muñoz Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francisco; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Valenzuela, Antonio; García Vizcaíno, David

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, is presented a method for estimation of the effect of the transport process to aerosol optical properties. Aerosol optical data retrieved by lidars and sun-photometer measurements, are applied to Saharan dust events observed simultaneously at the two EARLINET/AERONET sites of Barcelona and Granada during the periods of June-September of 2012 and 2013. For this purpose, elastic lidar profiles and sun-photometer columnar retrievals are analyzed together with satellite observations and dust forecast models. Granada presents more than twice Saharan dust outbreaks compared to Barcelona. The scenarios favoring the Saharan dust outbreaks are identified in both places. The mineral dust originating in the Sahara region and arriving at both stations is usually transport wither over the Atlas Mountains or through an Atlantic pathway. Analyses of dust events affecting both stations reveal how differences in the transport process lead to differences in the aerosol optical properties measured at each station. Mean dust related Ångström exponent is 1.8 times higher in Barcelona than in Granada. This difference is a result of the additional contribution of anthropogenic aerosol, mainly in the aerosol fine mode, during the transport of the mineral dust plume over the Iberian Peninsula.

  13. Spectral optical properties of long-range transport Asian dust and pollution aerosols over Northeast Asia in 2007 and 2008

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    J. Jung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the IGAC (International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mega-cities program, aerosol physical and optical properties were continuously measured from March 2007 to March 2008 at an urban site (37.57° N, 126.94° E in Seoul, Korea. Spectral optical properties of long-range transported Asian dust and pollution aerosols have been investigated based on the year long measurement data. Optically measured black carbon/thermally measured elemental carbon (BC/EC ratio showed clear monthly variation with high values in summer and low values in winter mainly due to the enhancement of light attenuation by the internal mixing of EC. Novel approach has been suggested to retrieve the spectral light absorption coefficient (babs from Aethalometer raw data by using BC/EC ratio. Mass absorption efficiency, σabs (=babs/EC at 550 nm was determined to be 9.0±1.3, 8.9±1.5, 9.5±2.0, and 10.3±1.7 m2 g−1 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively with an annual mean of 9.4±1.8 m2 g−1. Threshold values to classify severe haze events were suggested in this study. Increasing trend of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA with wavelength was observed during Asian dust events while little spectral dependence of SSA was observed during long-range transport pollution (LTP events. Satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT and Hysplit air mass backward trajectory analyses as well as chemical analysis were performed to characterize the dependence of spectral optical properties on aerosol type. Results from this study can provide useful information for studies on regional air quality and aerosol's effects on climate change.

  14. Source Allocation of Long-Range Asian Dusts Transportation across the Taiwan Strait by Innovative Chemical-Assisted Identification Methods

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    Yi-Hsiu Jen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used the backward trajectory calculation to obtain the transportation routes of Asian dusts and further combined the chemical composition with the enrichment factor (EF and the grey relational analysis (GR to identify the potential sources of eighteen Asian dust storm (ADS events. The results showed that the chemical compositions of atmospheric particles sampled at the Pescadores Islands were very similar to source soils fugitively emitted from Inner Mongolia, which could assist in identifying the source regions of Asian dusts. This study further compared the source allocation of Asian dusts obtained from EF, GR, and backward trajectory, which showed that the source regions of Asian dusts obtained from these three methods were quite similar. The similarity of backward trajectory and GR reached as high as 83.3%. Moreover, the similarity of backward trajectory calculation and EF or GR was up to 77.8% while that of the GR and EF was up to 83.3%. Overall, these three methods can successfully allocate the source regions of Asian dusts by 66.7%. Moreover, these innovative chemical-assisted methods can be successfully applied to identify the source regions of Asian dusts for 18 ADS events.

  15. Change of iron species and iron solubility in Asian dust during the long-range transport from western China to Japan

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    Y. Takahashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the North Pacific, transport and deposition of mineral dust from Asia appear to be one of major sources of iron which can regulate growth of phytoplankton in the ocean. In this process, it is essential to identify chemical species of iron contained in Asian dust, because bioavailability of iron in the ocean is strongly influenced by the solubility of iron, which in turn is dependent on iron species in the dust. Here, we report that clay minerals (illite and chlorite in the dusts near the source collected at Aksu (western China can be transformed into ferrihydrite by atmospheric chemical processes during their long-range transport to eastern China (Qingdao and Japan (Tsukuba based on the speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS and other methods such as X-ray diffraction and chemical extraction. As a result, Fe molar ratio in Aksu (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 70 : 25 : 5 was changed to that in Tsukuba (illite : chlorite : ferrihydrite = 65 : 10 : 25. Moreover, leaching experiments were conducted to study the change of iron solubility. It was found that the iron solubility for the dust in Tsukuba (soluble iron fraction: 11.8 % and 1.10 % for synthetic rain water and seawater, respectively was larger than that in Aksu (4.1 % and 0.28 %, respectively, showing that iron in the dust after the transport becomes more soluble possibly due to the formation of ferrihydrite in the atmosphere. Our findings suggested that secondary formation of ferrihydrite during the transport should be considered as one of important processes in evaluating the supply of soluble iron to seawater.

  16. Long-range transport of dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and Indian region – A case study using satellite data and ground-based measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Badarinath, K.V.S.; Kharol, S.K.; Kaskaoutis, D.G.; Sharma, A.R.; Ramaswamy, V.; Kambezidis, H.D.

    reduction in solar irradiance on the dust-laden day (22 February 2008) over Hyderabad, while sun photometer derived AODs from six AERONET sites in south Asia verify the presence of dust and its transport from west to east....

  17. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  18. Transport of dust particles in tokamak devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A.Yu. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)]. E-mail: apigarov@uscd.edu; Smirnov, R.D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Rosenberg, M. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico, DistritoFederal (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  19. Saharan Dust Fertilizing Atlantic Ocean and Amazon Rainforest via Long-range Transport and Deposition: A Perspective from Multiyear Satellite Measurements

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    Yu, H.; Chin, M.; Yuan, T.; Bian, H.; Remer, L. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Massive dust emitted from Sahara desert is carried by trade winds across the tropical Atlantic Ocean, reaching the Amazon Rainforest and Caribbean Sea. Airborne dust degrades air quality and interacts with radiation and clouds. Dust falling to land and ocean adds essential nutrients that could increase the productivity of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and modulate the biogeochemical cycles and climate. The resultant climate change will feed back on the production of dust in Sahara desert and its subsequent transport and deposition. Understanding the connections among the remote ecosystems requires an accurate quantification of dust transport and deposition flux on large spatial and temporal scales, in which satellite remote sensing can play an important role. We provide the first multiyear satellite-based estimates of altitude-resolved across-Atlantic dust transport and deposition based on eight-year (2007-2014) record of aerosol three-dimensional distributions from the CALIPSO lidar. On a basis of the 8-year average, 179 Tg (million tons) of dust leaves the coast of North Africa and is transported across Atlantic Ocean, of which 102, 20, and 28 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Amazon Rainforest, respectively. The dust deposition adds 4.3 Tg of iron and 0.1 Tg of phosphorus to the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea where the productivity of marine ecosystem depends on the availability of these nutrients. The 28 Tg of dust provides about 0.022 Tg of phosphorus to Amazon Rainforest yearly that replenishes the leak of this plant-essential nutrient by rains and flooding, suggesting an important role of Saharan dust in maintaining the productivity of Amazon rainforest on timescales of decades or centuries. We will also discuss seasonal and interannual variations of the dust transport and deposition, and comparisons of the CALIOP-based estimates with model simulations.

  20. Alpine lakes preserve mineral dust signatures: Implications for long-range mineral dust transport and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) tornado frequency in the United States

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    Bhattacharya, A.; Lora, J. M.; Pollen, A.; Vollmer, T.; Thomas, M.; Leithold, E. L.; Mitchell, J.; Tripati, A.

    2016-12-01

    The net amount of mineral dust accumulation in arid and semi-arid regions might not be entirely sourced locally or even regionally; in fact, new evidence suggests that there could be significant contributions from distal sources. The contribution from the distal sources needs to be identified, and accounted for, in order to accurately understand the meteorological and climatologic factors, both regional and global, that control mineral dust accumulation in arid and semi-arid regions. Most importantly, if identified, the two components of mineral dust accumulation- fine fraction (typically 25 microns)- could provide critical information about regional as well as global climate. There are large-scale climatological controls on the finer fraction of mineral dust, while the coarser fraction is related to intense invents (i.e., the occurrence of cyclones). However, studies attempting to separate these two size fractions in terrestrial archives have been limited. Here we separate the two size fractions using grain size analysis, and use trace element analysis in each size fraction to identify contributing source regions. We apply this technique to well-dated cores collected from three lakes that are distributed across the western, southwestern and Great Plains in the United States: Pear Lake in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (CA), Senator Beck Lake in the San Juan Mountains (CO), and North Lake (WY). These lakes are uniquely situated to monitor dust fluxes; previous studies have demonstrated that sedimentation in these lakes are dominated by mineral dust accumulation; there is also evidence of remotely and locally sourced dust in these lakes, and of textural differences between the two types of dust fractions. We compare our results with previously published data on dust from loess deposits in the United States, and isotopic modeling (LMDZ). We find evidence that the finer-grain size fraction in alpine lake cores could be of remote origin; work is underway to quantify this

  1. Mixing and Deposition of Saharan Dust during Transatlantic Transport

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    Heinold, Bernd; Schepanski, Kerstin; Gieseler, Daniel; Ulrich, Max

    2017-04-01

    Mineral dust from arid and semi-arid regions plays an important environmental role due to its ability to alter the Earth's energy budget by aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions as well as due to its impact on the biogeochemical cycle and air quality. The Sahara desert is the world's main dust source contributing at least 50% to the global dust load. Large amounts of dust are carried towards the Caribbean within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), with maximum transport in late boreal spring and early summer. During long-range transport, the dust particles are transformed by aging and mixing, which may have significant but as yet unquantified effects on the dust impact on radiation, cloud properties, and the biogeochemical processes of ecosystems. This study focuses on the important role of mixing and deposition processes on the distribution, lifetime, and particle properties of mineral dust. Regional dust modelling and trajectory analysis are used to investigate the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Caribbean. Specifically, we address the questions of (1) how the Saharan dust export is influenced by the atmospheric circulation over West Africa and (2) which role the different removal and mixing processes play during long-range transport? Modelling the emission, transport, and deposition of Saharan dust as well as the effect of dust radiative forcing is performed with the regional model COSMO-MUSCAT. The COSMO-MUSCAT simulations are combined with a LAGRANTO trajectory analysis. The consistent dataset is then evaluated to study the boundary layer impact on deposition and dust-cloud interactions along transport paths. The results show that as the source activity, dust deposition is driven by the atmospheric circulation patterns over West Africa. Convective mixing controls dry deposition in the tropics and can explain sporadic deposition events in the subtropics. Overall, this study provides an improved model-based assessment of the

  2. The global transport of dust

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    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    By some estimates as much as two billion metric tons of dust are lifted into the Earth's atmosphere every year. Most of this dust is stirred up by storms, the more dramatic of which are aptly named dust storms. But more than mere dirt is carried aloft. Drifting with the suspended dust particles are soil pollutants such as herbicides and pesticides and a significant number of microorganisms-bacteria, viruses and fungi. We can gain some appreciation of how much microbial life is actually floating in our atmosphere by performing a quick calculation. There are typically about one million bacteria per gram of soil, but let's be conservative and suppose there are only 10,000 bacteria per gram of airborne sediment. Assuming a modest one billion metric tons of sediment in the atmosphere, these numbers translate into a quintillion (1018) sediment-borne bacteria moving around the planet each year-enough to form a microbial bridge between Earth and Jupiter. Here we consider what we've learned about the airborne transport of sediment across the globe, and review some of the remarkable studies in this reemerging field that had it origins more than 100 years ago.

  3. Dust-Particle Transport in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A Y; Krasheninnikov, S I; Soboleva, T K; Rognlien, T D

    2005-09-12

    Dust particulates in the size range of 10nm-100{micro}m are found in all fusion devices. Such dust can be generated during tokamak operation due to strong plasma/material-surface interactions. Some recent experiments and theoretical estimates indicate that dust particles can provide an important source of impurities in the tokamak plasma. Moreover, dust can be a serious threat to the safety of next-step fusion devices. In this paper, recent experimental observations on dust in fusion devices are reviewed. A physical model for dust transport simulation, and a newly developed code DUSTT, are discussed. The DUSTT code incorporates both dust dynamics due to comprehensive dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust heating, charging, and evaporation. The code tracks test dust particles in realistic plasma backgrounds as provided by edge-plasma transport codes. Results are presented for dust transport in current and next-step tokamaks. The effect of dust on divertor plasma profiles and core plasma contamination is examined.

  4. Synoptic-scale dust transport events in the southern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, R.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bourcier, L.; Laj, P.; Calzolari, F.; Adhikary, B.; Verza, G. P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Bonasoni, P.

    2014-06-01

    The variability of long-range dust transport events observed in the southern Himalaya and its relation with source areas have been studied thanks to five years’ continuous measurements which were carried out at the “Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid” (NCO-P, 27°57‧N, 86°48‧E), the highest Northern Hemisphere GAW-WMO global station sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the high Khumbu valley (Nepal) on the southern Himalaya. During the period March 2006-February 2011, the analyses of the aerosol particle concentrations and LAGRANTO three-dimensional backward trajectories indicated the occurrence of 275 days affected by synoptic-scale dust transport, which account for 22.2% of the investigated period. The frequency of dust transport days (DTDs) showed a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest seasonal value observed during pre-monsoon season (33.5% of the pre-monsoon’s days are DTDs). Large enhancements in coarse aerosol number concentration N1-10 (average: +689%) and mass PM1-10 (average: +1086%) were observed during the dust transport events as compared to the days without dust (dust-free days, DFDs). In addition, the single scattering albedo (SSA) also showed higher values, ranging from 0.87 to 0.90, during DTDs with respect to DFDs (0.80-0.87). The predominant source of mineral dust reaching the measurement site was identified in the arid regions of the north-western Indian subcontinent (Thar desert), which accounted for 41.6% of the trajectories points associated with DTDs. Seasonal analysis also indicated that the winter season was significantly influenced by far western desert regions, such as North Africa and the Arabic Peninsula.

  5. Trans-pacific dust transport: integrated analysis of NASA/CALIPSO and a global aerosol transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Eguchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Detailed 3-D structures of Trans-Pacific Asian dust transport occurring during 5–15 May 2007 were investigated using the NASA/CALIOP vertical-resolved measurements and a three-dimensional aerosol model (SPRINTARS. Both CALIOP and SPRINTARS dust extinctions showed a good agreement along the way of the transport from the dust source regions across North Pacific into North America. A vertically two-layered dust distribution was observed over the northeastern Pacific and North America. The lower dust layer originated from a dust storm generated in the Gobi Desert on 5 May. It was transported at an altitude of around 4 km MSL and has mixed with Asian anthropogenic air pollutants during the course of transport. The upper dust layer mainly originated from a dust storm that occurred in the Taklimakan Desert 2–3 days after the Gobi dust storm generation. The upper dust cloud was transported in higher altitudes above the major clouds layer during the Trans-Pacific transport. It therefore has remained unmixed with the Asian air pollutants and almost unaffected by wet removal. The decay of its concentration level was small (only one-half after its long-distance transport crossing the Pacific. Our dust budget analysis revealed that the Asian dust flux passing through the longitude plane of 140° E was 2.1 Tg, and one third of that arrived North America. The cases analyzed in this study revealed that, while the Gobi Desert is an important source that can contribute to the long-range dust transport, the Taklimakan Desert appears to be another important source that can contribute to the dust transport occurring particularly at high altitudes.

  6. The 3D simulation of Dust particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu. [MAE, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Tanaka, Y. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma-cho, Kanazawa (Japan); Hutchinson, I.H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, Mexico D., F. (Mexico)

    2006-09-15

    Recently, the presence of dust particles in tokamak plasma and the role of dust in material re-deposition, core contamination, and tritium inventory brought significant attention of the fusion community. The physical model for dust transport in fusion devices and the newly developed 3D code DUSTT are discussed. The DUSTT code takes into account both the dust dynamics due to dust-plasma interactions as well as the effects of dust charging, heating and evaporation. The code allows tracking of test dust particle in realistic plasma background calculated with edge-plasma transport code UEDGE. Some results on dust transport in DIII-D tokamak are presented. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Atmospheric transport route determines components of Asian dust and health effects in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kazunari; Kurosaki, Yasunori; Otani, Shinji; Yoshida, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Kurozawa, Youichi

    2012-03-01

    Asian dust (yellow sand) events are a frequent problem throughout Northeast Asia, where they produce a diverse range of health issues and symptoms in humans that have been widely reported. Asian dust includes soil-derived metals, anthropogenic metals, and many other air pollutants at various concentrations, depending on the atmospheric transport route. Here, we investigated the possible causes for the diversity in symptoms produced by Asian dust events, as reported in a questionnaire survey, on the basis of the dust components and estimated trajectories. Nine dust events were recorded and classified into three types on the basis of light detection and ranging (lidar) data: Type 1 events with high counts of non-mineral dust (spherical) particles, Type 2 events with high counts of mineral dust particles in comparison to non-mineral dust particles, and Type 3 events with very low counts of non-mineral dust particles as compared with other Asian dust events during the surveillance period. Ensemble backward trajectory analysis showed that the atmospheric transport route indeed accounted for the differences. Subjective symptom scores showed the greatest increase after exposure to Type 1 events and a decrease after exposure to Type 3 events. A variety of aerosols were detected concurrent with Asian dust events, and the link between health effects in humans and changes in pollutant levels was explored. The results suggest that the components of Asian dust should be considered when investigating related health effects.

  8. Poleward transport of Saharan dust initiated by a Saharan cyclone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam Francis, Diana Bou; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Cuesta, Juan

    2016-04-01

    To enhance the understanding of the role of Saharan mineral dust in the Arctic climate system, this study focuses on dust emission and poleward transport associated with an intense Saharan cyclone that occurred over North Africa in early April 2011. Satellites observations at high spatio-temporal resolution are used in this study in order to characterize qualitatively (using MSG-SEVIRI and CALIPSO/CloudSat) and quantitatively (using MODIS and OMI) the dust activity over North Africa associated with the Saharan cyclone as well as the transport of dust toward the northern pole. Beside the observations, a simulation at high resolution is performed using the MesoNh model in order to estimation the dust load transported northward and to evaluate the dust deposition north to 60°N and its impact on the Albedo. In this study, we identify in new and important mechanism for the transport of dust over long distances toward the northern pole: the poleward migration of Saharan cyclones, in which the dust is transported toward the Arctic following a newly identified path; across the Northern Atlantic Ocean around the Icelandic Low. This path is to be added to the two preferable paths mentioned in previous studies i.e. through transport across Northern Europe and across the Atlantic Ocean around the Bermuda High. Key words: Arctic, North Africa, dust storm, dust deposition, surface albedo.

  9. Characterization of airborne float coal dust emitted during continuous mining, longwall mining and belt transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, M.R.; Seaman, C.E.; Beck, T.W.; Colinet, J.F.; Mischler, S.E.

    2017-01-01

    Float coal dust is produced by various mining methods, carried by ventilating air and deposited on the floor, roof and ribs of mine airways. If deposited, float dust is re-entrained during a methane explosion. Without sufficient inert rock dust quantities, this float coal dust can propagate an explosion throughout mining entries. Consequently, controlling float coal dust is of critical interest to mining operations. Rock dusting, which is the adding of inert material to airway surfaces, is the main control technique currently used by the coal mining industry to reduce the float coal dust explosion hazard. To assist the industry in reducing this hazard, the Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health initiated a project to investigate methods and technologies to reduce float coal dust in underground coal mines through prevention, capture and suppression prior to deposition. Field characterization studies were performed to determine quantitatively the sources, types and amounts of dust produced during various coal mining processes. The operations chosen for study were a continuous miner section, a longwall section and a coal-handling facility. For each of these operations, the primary dust sources were confirmed to be the continuous mining machine, longwall shearer and conveyor belt transfer points, respectively. Respirable and total airborne float dust samples were collected and analyzed for each operation, and the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust was calculated. During the continuous mining process, the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ranged from 10.3 to 13.8. The ratios measured on the longwall face were between 18.5 and 21.5. The total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ratio observed during belt transport ranged between 7.5 and 21.8. PMID:28936001

  10. Characterization of airborne float coal dust emitted during continuous mining, longwall mining and belt transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahan, M R; Seaman, C E; Beck, T W; Colinet, J F; Mischler, S E

    2017-09-01

    Float coal dust is produced by various mining methods, carried by ventilating air and deposited on the floor, roof and ribs of mine airways. If deposited, float dust is re-entrained during a methane explosion. Without sufficient inert rock dust quantities, this float coal dust can propagate an explosion throughout mining entries. Consequently, controlling float coal dust is of critical interest to mining operations. Rock dusting, which is the adding of inert material to airway surfaces, is the main control technique currently used by the coal mining industry to reduce the float coal dust explosion hazard. To assist the industry in reducing this hazard, the Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health initiated a project to investigate methods and technologies to reduce float coal dust in underground coal mines through prevention, capture and suppression prior to deposition. Field characterization studies were performed to determine quantitatively the sources, types and amounts of dust produced during various coal mining processes. The operations chosen for study were a continuous miner section, a longwall section and a coal-handling facility. For each of these operations, the primary dust sources were confirmed to be the continuous mining machine, longwall shearer and conveyor belt transfer points, respectively. Respirable and total airborne float dust samples were collected and analyzed for each operation, and the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust was calculated. During the continuous mining process, the ratio of total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ranged from 10.3 to 13.8. The ratios measured on the longwall face were between 18.5 and 21.5. The total airborne float coal dust to respirable dust ratio observed during belt transport ranged between 7.5 and 21.8.

  11. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M., E-mail: mwada@mail.doshisha.ac.jp [Graduate school of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  12. Dynamics and transport of dust particles in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S I [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Soboleva, T K [UNAM, Mexico D.F., Mexico and Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    We discuss the dust particle dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas, with special emphasis on dust particle transport in the sheath and plasma recycling regions. We demonstrate that being dragged by plasma flows in the vicinity of the material surface, dust particles can be accelerated to speeds of {approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} cm s{sup -1}. The opposite direction of plasma recycling flow as well as the frictional forces at the inner and outer divertor legs, propel the dust particles in opposite toroidal directions depending on their location. The interactions of a dust particle with a corrugated surface or plasma turbulence can cause it to exit the recycling region and fly through the scrape-off layer plasma towards the tokamak core. It is conceivable that dust formation in and transport from the divertor region can play an important role in core plasma contamination. However, even then, the dust particle density around the separatrix is {approx}10{sup -2} cm{sup -3}, which makes it difficult to detect.

  13. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Denjean

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June–July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco, time of transport (1–5 days and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried a higher concentration of pollution particles below 3 km above sea level (a.s.l. than above 3 km a.s.l., resulting in a scattering Ångström exponent up to 2.2 below 3 km a.s.l. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate absorption of light by the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assumed similar to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modelling

  14. Aeolian transport of Icelandic dust: a look from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smejda, Ladislav; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Hejcman, Michal

    2017-04-01

    Iceland represents a unique type of Arctic environment where glaciers capture the precipitation, consequently forming large deserts on the leeward side. Deserts are subject to strong winds and dust is reported to be suspended at least 135 days a year. Icelandic dust has seven major dust sources in extensive deserts, consisting mainly of volcanic glass. In this paper, we address a new approach to the question of the island's contribution to atmospheric dust transport in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. We explore the strengths and limitations of satellite imagery for the study of high altitude dust storm phenomenon, and more specifically the potential of freely available set of tools for remote sensing and spatial data analysis, the Earth Engine provided by Google. This cloud-based geospatial processing platform requires only a web browser on the side of a user, and it allows writing powerful and versatile algorithms for scientific analysis of spatial data. We demonstrate how this approach can be applied to mapping of Icelandic dust sources and studying the wind erosion and transport of particles in the atmosphere in high latitudes.

  15. Identification of atmospheric transport and dispersion of Asian dust storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Backward trajectories of individual Asian dust storm (ADS events were calculated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT at four representative stations in Korea. A total of 743 ADS events and associated 2229 (endings of altitudes at 1000, 1500, and 2000 m per ADS event backward trajectories from four stations were traced from January 2003 to August 2015. Regardless of the locations of the observed stations and the threshold time divide, a recent increase in the ADS occurrence rate was statistically significant with a 99.9 % confidence limit. Winter and spring were high-occurrence seasons for the ADS, while it rarely occurred in summer. Angular distributions of dust transport indicated a dominance of northwesterly wind, as more than two-thirds of ADS events are azimuthally confined from 290 to 340°. In addition, there is a tendency for stronger PM10 dust air concentration to be from the northwest. We found a strong inverse correlation between the number of days with ADS events and cumulative PM10 dust air concentration, indicating that the total amount of cumulative PM10 discharge was rather constant over time. If so, relatively shorter transport distances and a more continental dust passage over the Shandong peninsular would yield less PM10 in a shorter transport path but with a stronger concentration.

  16. Identification of atmospheric transport and dispersion of Asian dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Raegyung; Baatar, Amarjargal; Yu, Yongjae

    2017-08-01

    Backward trajectories of individual Asian dust storm (ADS) events were calculated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) at four representative stations in Korea. A total of 743 ADS events and associated 2229 (endings of altitudes at 1000, 1500, and 2000 m per ADS event) backward trajectories from four stations were traced from January 2003 to August 2015. Regardless of the locations of the observed stations and the threshold time divide, a recent increase in the ADS occurrence rate was statistically significant with a 99.9 % confidence limit. Winter and spring were high-occurrence seasons for the ADS, while it rarely occurred in summer. Angular distributions of dust transport indicated a dominance of northwesterly wind, as more than two-thirds of ADS events are azimuthally confined from 290 to 340°. In addition, there is a tendency for stronger PM10 dust air concentration to be from the northwest. We found a strong inverse correlation between the number of days with ADS events and cumulative PM10 dust air concentration, indicating that the total amount of cumulative PM10 discharge was rather constant over time. If so, relatively shorter transport distances and a more continental dust passage over the Shandong peninsular would yield less PM10 in a shorter transport path but with a stronger concentration.

  17. Dust prevention in bulk material transportation and handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. L.; Pogodin, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    The environmental problem of territory and atmosphere pollution caused by transportation and handling of dust-generating bulk cargo materials is quite common for the whole world. The reducing of weight of fine class coal caused by air blowing reaches the level of 0.5–0.6 t per railcar over the 500 km transportation distance, which is equal to the loss of 1 % of the total weight. The studies showed that all over the country in the process of the railroad transportation, the industry loses 3–5 metric tonnes of coal annually. There are several common tactical measurers to prevent dust formation: treating the dust-producing materials at dispatch point with special liquid solutions; watering the stacks and open handling points of materials; frequent dust removing and working area cleaning. Recently there appeared several new radical measures for pollution prevention in export of ore and coal materials via sea port terminals, specifically: wind-dust protection screens, the container cargo handling system of delivery materials to the hold of the vessels. The article focuses on the discussion of these measures.

  18. Asian dust transport during the springtime of year 2001 and 2002 with a nested version of dust transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, I.; Satake, S.; Hara, Y.; Takemura, T.; Wang, Z.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2002-12-01

    Number of yellow sand (Kosa) observation has been surprisingly increasing in Japan and Korea since 2000. Especially extremely high PM10 concentration (exceeding 0.5mg/m3) was observed in Japan several times in 2002, so we have an urgent scientific and political need to forecast/reproduce the detailed dust emission, transport and deposition processes. Intensive modeling studies have already been conducted to examine transport of Sahara dust and its impact on global radiation budget. One of the important differences between the Sahara desert and the Asian desert (mainly Gobi Desert and Takla Makan Desert) is the elevation of the dust source. The averaged elevation of Gobi Desert is approximately 1500 to 2500 m. These deserts are surrounded by high mountains. Furthermore advance of the recent manmade desertification made complicated land use patches for the arid region in Inner Mongolia. Therefore the development of a high horizontal resolution dust model is highly required. In this study, we will report a newly developed nested version of the dust transport model (as a part of Chemical weather FORecasting System; CFORS) in order to have a better understanding of Asian springtime heady dust episode. Here, CFORS is a multi-tracer, on-line, system built within the RAMS mesoscale meteorological model. A unique feature of nested CFORS is that multiple tracers are run on-line in RAMS under the two-way nesting, so that all the fine-scale on-line meteorological information such as 3-D winds, boundary-layer turbulence, surface fluxes and precipitation amount are directly used by the dust emission and transport at every time step. As a result, nested-CFORS produces with high time resolution 3-dimensional fields of dust distributions and major meteorological parameters under the nesting capability of RAMS. In this work, the dust transport model simulation with the nested-CFORS was conducted between March and April of the years 2001 and 2002, respectively. The sensititivy

  19. Model Study on the Transport and Mixing of Dust Aerosols and Pollutants during an Asian Dust Storm in March 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport and mixing of dust aerosols and pollutants in East Asia during March 18 to 22, 2002 was studied using the nested air quality prediction model system (NAQPMS. Dust was primarily generated in the Gobi desert on 19 March and then swept across several areas of East Asia. The model results were verified with observations of surface weather, TSP/PM10, SO2 and lidar data. The model simulated the right timing and strength of dust events, capturing most of the variation features in dust and SO2. Numerical results showed that the dust aerosols were mainly transported in two layers and mixed with pollutants in different ways. Some of the dust kicked up in the source region was uplifted to a higher layer (200 - 2000 m layer and transported downwind faster than dust of the lower level. This lower-level dust was of greater concentration. The dust arriving at the upper layer began to drop and mixed well with pollutants in the atmosphere during _ first _ During _ second _ pollutants were diluted by the dust air mass that was transported along the lower layer. The remaining pollutants mixed well with dust aerosols during this period. The mixed air mass of the higher layer (1500 m eventually reached the Northwestern Pacific. A large amount of clouds in the upper layers potentially led to an increase in sulfate mass on the surface of dust particles.

  20. The effect of mineral dust transport on PM10 concentrations and physical properties in Istanbul during 2007-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Kaya, Nefel; Eşer, Övgü; Saltan, Şehnaz

    2017-11-01

    Mineral dust is the most significant source of natural particulate matter. In urban regions, where > 50% of the world population is currently living, local emissions of particulate matter are further aggravated by mineral dust loadings from deserts. The megacity of Istanbul is located in an area sensitive to local pollution due to transportation (i.e., private cars, public transportation, aircrafts, ships, heavy diesel trucks, etc.), industrial emissions, residential heating, and long-range transport from Europe, Asia, and deserts. In this work, the effect of desert dust transport on PM10 concentrations and physical properties was investigated for the period of 2007-2014 in the touristic area of Aksaray, Istanbul. The Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM8b) was used to predict dust loading in Istanbul during dust transport events. Variations on surface PM10 concentrations were investigated according to seasons and during dust transport events. Cluster analysis of air mass backward trajectories was useful to understand frequency analysis and air mass trajectory dependence of PM10 concentrations on dust loadings. The effect of desert dust transport on aerosol optical depths was also investigated. It was observed that PM10 concentrations exceeded the air quality standard of 50 μg m- 3 50% of the time during the study period. The largest number of exceedances in air quality standard occurred during the spring and winter seasons. Approximately 40-60% of the dust loading occurs during the spring. Desert dust and non-desert dust sources contribute to 22-72% and 48-81% of the ground-level PM10 concentrations in Aksaray, Istanbul during the study period. Averaged AOD observed during dust transport events in spring and summer ranged 0.35-0.55. Cluster analysis resolved over 82% the variability of individual air mass backward trajectories into 5 clusters. Overall, air masses arriving to Istanbul at 500 m are equally distributed into northern (52%) and southern (48

  1. Mixing of dust with pollution on the transport path of Asian dust--revealed from the aerosol over Yulin, the north edge of Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongzhen; Zhuang, Guoshun; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhang, Rong; Jiang, Yilun; Lin, Yanfen; Fu, Joshua S

    2011-01-01

    Both PM(2.5) and TSP were monitored in the spring from 2006 to 2008 in an intensive ground monitoring network of five sites (Tazhong, Yulin, Duolun, Beijing, and Shanghai) along the pathway of Asian dust storm across China to investigate the mixing of dust with pollution on the pathway of the long-range transport of Asian dust. Mineral was found to be the most loading component of aerosols both in dust event days and non-dust days. The concentrations of those pollution elements, As, Cd, Pb, Zn, and S in aerosol were much higher than their mean abundances in the crust even in dust event days. The high concentration of SO(4)(2-) could be from both sources: one from the transformation of the local emitted SO(2) and the other from the sulfate that existed in primary dust, which was transported to Yulin. Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were mainly from the crustal source, while NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were from the local pollution sources. The mixing of dust with pollution aerosol over Yulin in dust event day was found to be ubiquitous, and the mixing extent could be expressed by the ratio of NO(3)(-)/Al in dust aerosol. The ratio of Ca/Al was used as a tracer to study the dust source. The comparison of the ratios of Ca/Al together with back trajectory analysis indicated that the sources of the dust aerosol that invaded Yulin could be from the northwestern desert in China and Mongolia Gobi. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Asian dust event observed in Seoul, Korea, during 29-31 May 2008: analysis of transport and vertical distribution of dust particles from lidar and surface measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung; Kang, Jung-Yoon; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the transport of dust particles, its vertical distribution, and the associated meteorological conditions during an Asian dust event that was observed in Seoul, Korea on May 29-31, 2008. This study analyzes data from ground-based and space-borne 2-wavelength polarization lidars, particulate mass concentrations, and synoptic weather data. Surface meteorological station observations of dust phenomena, dust transport model, and weather maps consistently show that the dust particles were transported from the source regions (Inner Mongolia, Man-Ju, and Ordos areas) to Korea via the northeastern part of China. Network observations of the PM(10) concentrations in Korea revealed that a majority of the heavy dust particles traveled across South Korea from the northwest to the southeast direction with a horizontal scale of 250-300km and a traveling speed of approximately 40kmh(-1). This extraordinary dust event, in terms of its intensity and timing during the year, occurred due to the blockage of an unusually intensified low-pressure system in the northeastern part of China as well as high-pressure system centered over the Sea of Okhotsk and the Kuril Islands. The low values of the particle depolarization ratio (delta(532)) (dust period indicate the presence of spherical, non-dust, and relatively small particles. The mean delta(532) value was approximately 0.123+/-0.069 between altitudes of ground approximately 2.8km, and 0.161+/-0.049 for near-surface dust layer (ground approximately 1.2km). This value is quite similar to that obtained during the 3-year SNU-Lidar measurements in Seoul (delta(532) approximately 0.136+/-0.027). The value of delta(532) during the 2nd multilayered dust episode ranged between 0.081 and 0.120 for near-surface dust layers, and between 0.076 and 0.114 for elevated dust layers. The CALIPSO measurements of beta(532), delta(532), and CR also revealed the presence of dense dust aerosols along the transport route.

  3. Survivability of dust in tokamaks: dust transport in the divertor sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Delzanno, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    The survivability of dust being transported in the magnetized sheath near the divertor plate of a tokamak and its impact on the mandatory balance of erosion and redeposition for a steady-state reactor are investigated. Two different divertor scenarios are considered. The first is characterized by an energy flux perpendicular to the plate $q_0\\simeq 1$ MW/m$^2$ typical of current short-pulse tokamaks. The second has $q_0\\simeq 10$ MW/m$^2$ and is relevant to long-pulse machines like ITER or DEMO. It is shown that micrometer dust particles can survive rather easily near the plates of a divertor plasma with $q_0\\simeq 1$ MW/m$^2$ because thermal radiation provides adequate cooling for the dust particle. On the other hand, the survivability of micrometer dust particles near the divertor plates is drastically reduced when $q_0\\simeq 10$ MW/m$^2$. Micrometer dust particles redeposit their material non-locally, leading to a net poloidal mass migration across the divertor. Smaller particles (with radius $\\sim 0.1$ $\\...

  4. Vertical and horizontal transport of mesospheric Na: Implications for the mass influx of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles as they enter the Earth's upper atmosphere. We show that the downward fluxes of these metal atoms, induced locally by waves and turbulence, are related in a straightforward way to the meteoric influxes of the metals, their chemical losses and their advective transport by the large-scale vertical and horizontal motions associated with the meridional circulation system. Above the peak of the metal layers where chemical losses and large-scale vertical motions are small, the wave-induced flux is insensitive to changes in local wave activity. If the downward transport velocity increases, because wave activity increases, then in response, the metal densities will decrease to maintain a constant vertical flux. By fitting the theoretical Na flux profile to the annual mean vertical flux profile measured during the night at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, we derive improved estimates for the global influxes of both Na and cosmic dust. The mean Na influx is 22,500±1050 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 389±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor. If the Na composition of the dust particles is identical to CI chondritic meteorites (4990 ppm by mass), then the global influx of cosmic dust is 176±38 t/d. If the composition is identical to ordinary chondrites (7680 ppm), the global dust influx is 107±22 t/d.

  5. Dust sources and atmospheric circulation in concert controlling Saharan dust emission and transport towards the Western Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Mallet, Marc; Heinold, Bernd; Ulrich, Max

    2017-04-01

    Dust transported from north African source regions towards Europe is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the Mediterranean region, a geographic region that is in part densely populated. Besides its impacts on the atmospheric radiation budget, dust suspended in the atmosphere results in reduced air quality, which is generally sensed as a reduction in quality of life. Furthermore, the exposure to dust aerosols enhances the prevalence of respiratory diseases, which reduces the general human wellbeing, and ultimately results in an increased loss of working hours due to illness and hospitalization rates. Characteristics of the atmospheric dust life cycle that determine dust transport will be presented with focus on the ChArMEx special observation period in June and July 2013 using the atmosphere-dust model COSMO-MUSCAT (COSMO: Consortium for Small-scale MOdeling; MUSCAT: MUltiScale Chemistry Aerosol Transport Model). Modes of atmospheric circulation were identified from empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the geopotential height at 850 hPa for summer 2013 and compared to EOFs calculated from 1979-2015 ERA-Interim reanalysis. Generally, two different phases were identified. They are related to the eastward propagation of the subtropical ridge into the Mediterranean basin, the position of the Saharan heat low, and the predominant Iberian heat low. The relation of these centres of action illustrates a dipole pattern for enhanced (reduced) dust emission fluxes, stronger (weaker) meridional dust transport, and consequent increase (decrease) atmospheric dust concentrations and deposition fluxes. In concert, the results from this study aim at illustrating the relevance of knowing the dust source locations in concert with the atmospheric circulation. Ultimately, this study addresses the question of what is finally transported towards the Mediterranean basin and Europe from which source regions - and fostered by which atmospheric circulation pattern. Outcomes from this study

  6. A Combined Observational and Modeling Approach to Study Modern Dust Transport from the Patagonia Desert to East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS ,POLDER, OMI,), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (approx.54deg S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (approx.46deg S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant de- position over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and approx.800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the

  7. A combined observational and modeling approach to study modern dust transport from the Patagonia desert to East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gassó

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH.

    This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America. The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS, POLDER, OMI, transport model simulation (HYSPLIT and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites.

    Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF island (~54° S and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (~46° S in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6–7 and 9–10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant deposition over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and ~800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis

  8. A combined observational and modeling approach to study modern dust transport from the Patagonia desert to East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassó, S.; Stein, A.; Marino, F.; Castellano, E.; Udisti, R.; Ceratto, J.

    2010-09-01

    The understanding of present atmospheric transport processes from Southern Hemisphere (SH) landmasses to Antarctica can improve the interpretation of stratigraphic data in Antarctic ice cores. In addition, long range transport can deliver key nutrients normally not available to marine ecosystems in the Southern Ocean and may trigger or enhance primary productivity. However, there is a dearth of observational based studies of dust transport in the SH. This work aims to improve current understanding of dust transport in the SH by showing a characterization of two dust events originating in the Patagonia desert (south end of South America). The approach is based on a combined and complementary use of satellite retrievals (detectors MISR, MODIS, GLAS, POLDER, OMI), transport model simulation (HYSPLIT) and surface observations near the sources and aerosol measurements in Antarctica (Neumayer and Concordia sites). Satellite imagery and visibility observations confirm dust emission in a stretch of dry lakes along the coast of the Tierra del Fuego (TdF) island (~54° S) and from the shores of the Colihue Huapi lake in Central Patagonia (~46° S) in February 2005. Model simulations initialized by these observations reproduce the timing of an observed increase in dust concentration at the Concordia Station and some of the observed increases in atmospheric aerosol absorption (here used as a dust proxy) in the Neumayer station. The TdF sources were the largest contributors of dust at both sites. The transit times from TdF to the Neumayer and Concordia sites are 6-7 and 9-10 days respectively. Lidar observations and model outputs coincide in placing most of the dust cloud in the boundary layer and suggest significant deposition over the ocean immediately downwind. Boundary layer dust was detected as far as 1800 km from the source and ~800 km north of the South Georgia Island over the central sub-Antarctic Atlantic Ocean. Although the analysis suggests the presence of dust at

  9. Multi-year model simulations of mineral dust distribution and transport over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijikumar, S.; Aneesh, S.; Rajeev, K.

    2016-08-01

    Aerosol distribution over the Arabian Sea and the Indian subcontinent during the northern hemispheric summer is dominated by mineral dust transport from the West Asian desert regions. The radiative impact of these dust plumes is expected to have a prominent role in regulating the Asian Summer Monsoon circulation. While satellite observations have provided information in the spatial distribution of aerosols over the oceanic regions during the season, their utility over the land is rather limited. This study examines the transport of mineral dust over the West Asian desert, the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding oceanic regions during the summer monsoon season with the help of a regional scale model, WRF-Chem. Geographical locations of prominent dust sources, altitude ranges of mineral dust transport and their inter-annual variations are examined in detail. Multi-year model simulations were carried out during 2007 to 2012 with a model integration from 15 May to 31 August of each year. Six-year seasonal mean (June to August) vertically integrated dust amount from 1000 to 300 hPa level shows prominent dust loading over the eastern parts of Arabian desert and the northwestern part of India which are identified as two major sources of dust production. Large latitudinal gradient in dust amount is observed over the Arabian Sea with the largest dust concentration over the northwestern part and is primarily caused by the prevailing northwesterly wind at 925 hPa level from the Arabian desert. The model simulations clearly show that most of the dust distributed over the Indo-Gangetic plane originates from the Rajasthan desert located in the northwestern part of India, whereas dust observed over the central and south peninsular India and over the Arabian Sea are mainly transported from the Arabian desert. Abnormal dust loading is observed over the north Arabian Sea during June 2008. This has been produced as a result of the low pressure system (associated with the onset of

  10. Regionality of Dust Haze Transport in the Mars Atmosphere Revealed by Ensemble Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogohara, K.

    2017-06-01

    Regionality of dust haze transport in the Mars atmosphere is investigated by ensemble simulations using a GCM. It is turned out that processes of dust haze dispersion by advection are categorized into a few cases.

  11. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  12. Aeolian transport of biota with dust: A wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Gill, T. E.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Walsh, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ephemeral wetlands are ideal sources for dust emission, as well as repositories for dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates. An important component of invertebrate dispersal and colonization to new areas is the ability to be entrained into the atmosphere. Aquatic invertebrate eggs fall within the size of dust and sand grains (30-600μm), are less dense and aerodynamically shaped. We have shown previously that aquatic invertebrates can be dispersed long distances in dust storms but the extent of transport of taxa based on diapausing egg size/morphology has not been investigated. Here, we control the wind erosion process in a wind tunnel to test entrainment of diapausing stages of brine shrimp, clam shrimp, tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp, Daphnia, and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and B. calyciflorus into the air by saltation. Diapausing eggs were mixed with sterilized wind-erodible soil. The soil/egg mixture was moistened with distilled water and air dried to form a crust. Dust was generated in a wind tunnel by releasing sand grains that act as saltator material similar to wind-entrained natural sands. Maximum wind velocity was 10m/s and entrained particles were sampled through an isokinetic horizontal intake opening. Aeolian sediment was collected from three points in the system; transfer section for coarse sediment, the pan subtending a settling chamber for finer saltation-sized sediment, and two paper filters for suspension-sized sediment. Samples were then passed through 250 and 350 μm sieves to remove abrader sand and rehydrated with various sterile media depending on the type of organism. We retrieved viable brine, fairy, and tadpole shrimp, ostracods, Daphnia, and diapausing eggs of the rotifers after hydration. This experiment demonstrates that resting stages of many invertebrates can be wind-eroded due to size and egg morphology and remain viable under controlled conditions mimicking dust emission.

  13. Transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols across Alexandria, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Askary

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow of pollutants from Europe and desert dust to Europe from the Sahara desert both affects the air quality of the coastal regions of Egypt. As such, measurements from both ground and satellite observations assume great importance to ascertain the conditions and flow affecting the Nile Delta and the large city of Alexandria. We note that special weather conditions prevailing in the Mediterranean Sea result in a westerly wind flow pattern during spring and from North to South during the summer. Such flow patterns transport dust-loaded and polluted air masses from the Sahara desert and Europe, respectively, through Alexandria, and the Nile Delta in Egypt. We have carried out measurements acquired with a ground- based portable sun photometer (Microtops II and the satellite-borne TERRA/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS sensor during the periods of October 1999–August 2001 and July 2002–September 2003. These measurements show a seasonal variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD following these flow patterns. Maximum aerosol loadings accompanied by total precipitable water vapor (W enhancements are observed during the spring and summer seasons. Pronounced changes have been observed in the Ångström exponent (α derived from ground-based measurements over Alexandria (31.14° N, 29.59° E during both dust and pollution periods. We have followed up the observations with a 3-day back-trajectories model to trace the probable sources and pathways of the air masses causing the observed aerosol loadings. We have also used other NASA model outputs to estimate the sea salt, dust, sulfates and black carbon AOD spatial distributions during different seasons. Our results reveal the probable source regions of these aerosol types, showing agreement with the trajectory and Ångström exponent analysis results. It is confirmed that Alexandria is subjected to different atmospheric conditions involving dust, pollution, mixed aerosols and

  14. Simulation of W dust transport in the KSTAR tokamak, comparison with fast camera data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Autricque

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, dust transport in tokamak plasmas is studied through both experimental and modeling aspects. Image processing routines allowing dust tracking on CCD camera videos are presented. The DUMPRO (DUst Movie PROcessing code features a dust detection method and a trajectory reconstruction algorithm. In addition, a dust transport code named DUMBO (DUst Migration in a plasma BOundary is briefly described. It has been developed at CEA in order to simulate dust grains transport in tokamaks and to evaluate the contribution of dust to the impurity inventory of the plasma. Like other dust transport codes, DUMBO integrates the Orbital Motion Limited (OML approach for dust/plasma interactions modeling. OML gives direct expressions for plasma ions and electrons currents, forces and heat fluxes on a dust grain. The equation of motion is solved, giving access to the dust trajectory. An attempt of model validation is made through comparison of simulated and measured trajectories on the 2015 KSTAR dust injection experiment, where W dust grains were successfully injected in the plasma using a gun-type injector. The trajectories of the injected particles, estimated using the DUMPRO routines applied on videos from the fast CCD camera in KSTAR, show two distinct general dust behaviors, due to different dust sizes. Simulations were made with DUMBO to match the measurements. Plasma parameters were estimated using different diagnostics during the dust injection experiment plasma discharge. The experimental trajectories show longer lifetimes than the simulated ones. This can be due to the substitution of a boiling/sublimation point to the usual vaporization/sublimation cooling, OML limitations (eventual potential barriers in the vicinity of a dust grain are neglected and/or to the lack of a vapor shielding model in DUMBO.

  15. Trans-Pacific Transport of Saharan Dust to Western North America: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendry, Ian G. M.; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; O'Neill, Norman; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Liu, Peter S. K.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Anlauf, Kurt G.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    The first documented case of long range transport of Saharan dust over a pathway spanning Asia and the Pacific to Western North America is described. Crustal material generated by North African dust storms during the period 28 February - 3 March 2005 reached western Canada on 13-14 March 2005 and was observed by lidar and sunphotometer in the Vancouver region and by high altitude aerosol instrumentation at Whistler Peak. Global chemical models (GEOS-CHEM and NRL NAAPS) confirm the transport pathway and suggest source attribution was simplified in this case by the distinct, and somewhat unusual, lack of dust activity over Eurasia (Gobi and Takla Makan deserts) at this time. Over western North America, the dust layer, although subsiding close to the boundary layer, did not appear to contribute to boundary layer particulate matter concentrations. Furthermore, sunphotometer observations (and associated inversion products) suggest that the dust layer had only subtle optical impact (Aerosol Optical Thickness (Tau(sub a500)) and Angstrom exponent (Alpha(sub 440-870) were 0.1 and 1.2 respectively) and was dominated by fine particulate matter (modes in aerodynamic diameter at 0.3 and 2.5microns). High Altitude observations at Whistler BC, confirm the crustal origin of the layer (rich in Ca(++) ions) and the bi-modal size distribution. Although a weak event compared to the Asian Trans-Pacific dust events of 1998 and 2001, this novel case highlights the possibility that Saharan sources may contribute episodically to the aerosol burden in western North America.

  16. Transport of mineral dust to Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l., South Himalayas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, Rocco; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Decesari, Stefano; Laj, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Sprenger, Michael; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Desert dust is one of the greatest sources of natural aerosol in atmosphere, representing about 37% of the total (natural and anthropogenic) emission of atmospheric primary aerosols. Mineral dust can impact climate through many complex processes, i.e. by scattering and absorbing solar and infrared radiation and by affecting the variability of cloud aerosol optical properties. Moreover, mineral dust can also affect the concentrations of other climate-altering species (e.g. surface ozone) in troposphere. South Asia is a region frequently affected by major dust transport from Africa and Asia. In particular, these "dust clouds" can reach the Himalayas also mixed with the heavy anthropogenic pollution present within the so-called Asian Brown Cloud. With the purpose to define the frequency of long-range mineral dust transport towards the Himalayan range and to evaluate their influence on the atmospheric aerosol background level, in this work we analyse the first 2-year (from March 2006 to February 2008) of coarse (Dp > 1 micron) aerosol number concentration observed at the WMO - GAW station "Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid" (NCO-P, 5079 m a.s.l., Nepal). This measurement station, part of UNEP-ABC and EV-K2-CNR SHARE projects, is not far from the Everest Base Camp and the observation here conducted can be considered representative for the South-Eastern slope of the Himalayan range. During the investigated period we detect more than 80 days/year as possibly affected by mineral dust transport. As deduced by the NCO-P measurements, these events significantly influenced the seasonal variation of coarse aerosol number concentration as well as the number and volumetric aerosol size distribution over South Himalayas. Due to the combination of the large-scale westerly circulation and the higher frequency of dust out-breaks, the majority of the identified events occurred during the pre-monsoon season. Although of lesser intensity and frequency, a significant amount of dust

  17. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  18. Insights into a dust event transported through Beijing in spring 2012: Morphology, chemical composition and impact on surface aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto 862-8502 (Japan); Niu, Hongya [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory of Resource Exploration Research of Hebei Province, Hebei University of Engineering, Handan, Hebei 056038 (China); Zhang, Daizhou [Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto 862-8502 (Japan); Wu, Zhijun [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen, Chen [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center, Beijing 100044 (China); Wu, Yusheng; Shang, Dongjie [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Hu, Min, E-mail: minhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Multiple approaches were used to investigate the evolution of surface aerosols in Beijing during the passage of a dust event at high altitude, which was from the Gobi areas of southern Mongolia and covered a wide range of North China. Single particle analysis with electron microscope showed that the majority of coarse particles were mineral ones, and most of them were in the size range of 1–7 μm with a peak of number concentration at about 3.5 μm. Based on elemental composition and morphology, the mineral particles could be classified into several groups, including Si-rich (71%), Ca-rich (15%), Fe-rich (6%), and halite-rich (2%), etc., and they were the main contributors to the aerosol optical depth as the dust occurred. The size distributions of surface aerosols were significantly affected by the dust intrusion. The average number concentration of accumulation mode particles during the event was about 400 cm{sup −3}, which was much lower than that in heavily polluted days (6300 cm{sup −3}). At the stage of floating dust, the number concentration of accumulation mode particles decreased, and coarse particles contributed to total volume concentration of particulate matter as much as 90%. The accumulation mode particles collected in this stage were mostly in the size range of 0.2–0.5 μm, and were rectangular or spherical. They were considered to be particles consisting of ammonium sulfate. New particle formation (NPF) was observed around noon in the three days during the dust event, indicating that the passage of the dust was probably favorable for NPF. - Highlights: • A dust event transported at high altitude through Beijing was investigated. • The dust event caused high variation in surface aerosol number concentrations. • Fine particles in the floating dust period probably consisted of ammonium sulfate. • Passage of the dust induced a favorable condition for new particle formation.

  19. Trans-Pacific transport of dust aerosols from East Asia: Insights gained from multiple observations and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianping; Lou, Mengyun; Miao, Yucong; Wang, Yuan; Zeng, Zhaoliang; Liu, Huan; He, Jing; Xu, Hui; Wang, Fu; Min, Min; Zhai, Panmao

    2017-11-01

    East Asia is one of the world's largest sources of dust and anthropogenic pollution. Dust particles originating from East Asia have been recognized to travel across the Pacific to North America and beyond, thereby affecting the radiation incident on the surface as well as clouds aloft in the atmosphere. In this study, integrated analyses are performed focusing on one trans-Pacific dust episode during 12-22 March 2015, based on space-borne, ground-based observations, reanalysis data combined with Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT), and the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). From the perspective of synoptic patterns, the location and strength of Aleutian low pressure system largely determined the eastward transport of dust plumes towards western North America. Multi-sensor satellite observations reveal that dust aerosols in this episode originated from the Taklimakan and Gobi Deserts. Moreover, the satellite observations suggest that the dust particles can be transformed to polluted particles over the East Asian regions after encountering high concentration of anthropogenic pollutants. In terms of the vertical distribution of polluted dust particles, at the very beginning, they were mainly located in the altitudes ranging from 1 km to 7 km over the source region, then ascended to 2 km-9 km over the Pacific Ocean. The simulations confirm that these elevated dust particles in the lower free troposphere were largely transported along the prevailing westerly jet stream. Overall, observations and modeling demonstrate how a typical springtime dust episode develops and how the dust particles travel over the North Pacific Ocean all the way to North America. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PREVAILING DUST-TRANSPORT DIRECTIONS ON COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Tobias; Noack, Matthias [Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum für Informationstechnik, Takustrasse 7, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-10

    Dust transport and deposition behind larger boulders on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67P/C–G) have been observed by the Rosetta mission. We present a mechanism for dust-transport vectors based on a homogeneous surface activity model incorporating in detail the topography of 67P/C–G. The combination of gravitation, gas drag, and Coriolis force leads to specific dust transfer pathways, which for higher dust velocities fuel the near-nucleus coma. By distributing dust sources homogeneously across the whole cometary surface, we derive a global dust-transport map of 67P/C–G. The transport vectors are in agreement with the reported wind-tail directions in the Philae descent area.

  1. Mineral Dust Transport to the North Atlantic and the North Pacific Oceans: Temporal Variability and the Link to Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospero, J. M.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-05-01

    The North Atlantic and the North Pacific are heavily impacted by dust transport from North Africa and Asia respectively. The University of Miami, often in cooperation with other groups, has operated networks of aerosol sampling stations in these ocean regions for many years. In this presentation we present an overview of dust concentration data from these networks focusing on the temporal and geographical variability. Our objective is a better understanding of this variability in terms of source and transport processes. We place emphasis on two stations where we have a long record of aerosol measurements: Barbados, West Indies, (13.17N, 59.43W) and Midway (28.22N,177.35W) in the central North Pacific. The Barbados record is continuous from 1965 to present and Midway from 1981 to 2001. Dust concentrations show considerable variation over decadal and shorter time-scales. Prospero and Lamb [2003] recently showed that Barbados dust concentrations varied over a large range in a coherent way that is closely linked to rainfall (or the meteorology associated with rainfall) in the Soudano-Sahel region of North Africa. The dust record from Midway also shows large excursions especially over 1999 to 2001 reflecting intensified dust activity in Asia. During this period, large areas of China were impacted by drought. Thus both the Barbados and Midway data suggest that dust emissions increase sharply with the onset of drought. The question arises about the cause of increased dust emissions and transport. Is it simply due to drought conditions or does it reflect the combined effects of drought and human impacts? We suggest that poor land-use practices do not appear to be a major factor in these two examples. In the case of the North African dust sources, satellite images show that the major dust sources are located in exceedingly remote environments. In the case of Chinese dust sources, much literature has attributed increased dust to vastly increased agriculture and grazing in

  2. High-resolution regional modeling of summertime transport and impact of African dust over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Kalenderski, Stoitchko Dimitrov

    2016-05-23

    Severe dust outbreaks and high dust loading over Eastern Africa and the Red Sea are frequently detected in the summer season. Observations suggest that small-scale dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand these processes, we present here the first high resolution modeling study of a dust outbreak in June 2012 developed over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry component (WRF-Chem), we identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea, most of the dust transport occurs above 2 km height, whereas across the central and southern parts of the sea, dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. Dust is the dominant contributor (87%) to the aerosol optical depth, producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at the surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. Both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations, but generally underestimate the observed maximum values of aerosol optical depth. The satellite-retrieved mean optical depth at some locations are underestimated by a factor of two. A sensitive experiment suggests that these large local differences may result from poor characterization of dust emissions in some areas of the modeled domain. In this case study we successfully simulate the major fine-scale dust generating dynamical processes, explicitly resolving convection and haboob

  3. Composition of dust deposited to snow cover in the Wasatch Range (Utah, USA): Controls on radiative properties of snow cover and comparison to some dust-source sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Flagg, Cody B.; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma; Breit, George; Ketterer, Michael; Fernandez, Daniel; Miller, Mark E.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2014-12-01

    Dust layers deposited to snow cover of the Wasatch Range (northern Utah) in 2009 and 2010 provide rare samples to determine the relations between their compositions and radiative properties. These studies are required to comprehend and model how such dust-on-snow (DOS) layers affect rates of snow melt through changes in the albedo of snow surfaces. We evaluated several constituents as potential contributors to the absorption of solar radiation indicated by values of absolute reflectance determined from bi-conical reflectance spectroscopy. Ferric oxide minerals and carbonaceous matter appear to be the primary influences on lowering snow-cover albedo. Techniques of reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as rock magnetism provide information about the types, amounts, and grain sizes of ferric oxide minerals. Relatively high amounts of ferric oxide, indicated by hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM), are associated with relatively low average reflectance (anthropogenic sources for at least some of the carbonaceous matter, such as emissions from transportation and industrial activities. The composition of the DOS samples can be compared with sediments in a likely dust-source setting at the Milford Flat Fire (MFF) area about 225 km southwest of Salt Lake City. The MFF area represents geologically and physiographically similar and widespread dust sources west-southwest of the Wasatch Range and heavily populated Wasatch Front. The DOS layers and MFF sediments are similar in some textural, chemical, and magnetic properties, as well as in the common presence of goethite, hematite, magnetite-bearing basalt fragments, quartz, plagioclase, illite, and kaolinite. Textural and some chemical differences among these deposits can be explained by atmospheric sorting as well as by inputs from other settings, such as salt-crusted playas and contaminant sources.

  4. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gulikova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust

  5. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejicek, Lubos; Janour, Zbynek; Benes, Ludek; Bodnar, Tomas; Gulikova, Eva

    2008-06-06

    Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust deposition at a

  6. Case study of the Asian dust and pollutant event in spring 2006: source, transport, and contribution to Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fujung; Tu, Jien-Yi; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2014-04-15

    Surface measurements and a regional dust model were used to analyze the source, transport, and contribution of a dust event transporting with aerosol pollutant over Taiwan from 16 to 19 March, 2006. During the event, the hourly aerosol concentrations reached close to 400 μg m(-3) in northern Taiwan, and approximately 300 μg m(-3) in other areas of the island. Trajectory and regional dust models show that the dust event originated in eastern Mongolia and northern China, and the dust layer can descend from 2 to 3 km in the source area to below 1.5 km over Taiwan. On the other hand, model results show that pollution was transported near the surface from coastal China to Taiwan. During this dust event, polluted aerosol was first observed over northern Taiwan right after a frontal passage, and the concentration was strongly enhanced following the passage of the light rainfall 12h later. The descent of dusty air from the free troposphere lagged the arrival of polluted air by 7h, and was partially mixed with polluted aerosol when the transport decelerated over Taiwan. During the event, dust particles accounted for up to 60% of observed particulate matter less than 10 μm (PM10) over Taiwan, but decreased to less than 35% for particulate matter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) over most areas of the island. On the other hand, the long-range transport of non-dust aerosols, mainly anthropogenic pollutants, accounted for close to 30% of observed PM10 concentration in northern and western Taiwan prior to dust arrival, and the contribution of PM2.5 increased to close to 40% over the same areas. Local emission of aerosols accounted for less than 25% of PM10 concentrations in northern Taiwan, but was about 60% for PM2.5 in central and southern Taiwan because these areas are less influenced by long-range transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial composition and survival on Sahara dust particles transported to the European Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eMeola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Sahara dust (SD particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.. After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria.Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport.

  8. Implications of high altitude desert dust transport from Western Sahara to Nile Delta during biomass burning season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Anup K., E-mail: aprasad@chapman.ed [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Center of Excellence in Earth Observing, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); El-Askary, Hesham [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Center of Excellence in Earth Observing, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Moharem Bek, Alexandria 21522 (Egypt); National Authority for Remote Sensing and Space Science (NARSS), Cairo (Egypt); Kafatos, Menas [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Center of Excellence in Earth Observing, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The air over major cities and rural regions of the Nile Delta is highly polluted during autumn which is the biomass burning season, locally known as black cloud. Previous studies have attributed the increased pollution levels during the black cloud season to the biomass or open burning of agricultural waste, vehicular, industrial emissions, and secondary aerosols. However, new multi-sensor observations (column and vertical profiles) from satellites, dust transport models and associated meteorology present a different picture of the autumn pollution. Here we show, for the first time, the evidence of long range transport of dust at high altitude (2.5-6 km) from Western Sahara and its deposition over the Nile Delta region unlike current Models. The desert dust is found to be a major contributor to the local air quality which was previously considered to be due to pollution from biomass burning enhanced by the dominant northerly winds coming from Europe. - New evidence of desert dust transport from Western Sahara to Nile Delta during black cloud season and its significance for regional aerosols, dust models, and potential impact on the regional climate.

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of Icelandic dust emissions and atmospheric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine D.; Arnalds, Ólafur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Eckhardt, Sabine; Prospero, Joseph M.; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Icelandic dust sources are known to be highly active, yet there exist few model simulations of Icelandic dust that could be used to assess its impacts on the environment. We here present estimates of dust emission and transport in Iceland over 27 years (1990-2016) based on FLEXDUST and FLEXPART simulations and meteorological re-analysis data. Simulations for the year 2012 based on high-resolution operational meteorological analyses are used for model evaluation based on PM2. 5 and PM10 observations in Iceland. For stations in Reykjavik, we find that the spring period is well predicted by the model, while dust events in late fall and early winter are overpredicted. Six years of dust concentrations observed at Stórhöfði (Heimaey) show that the model predicts concentrations of the same order of magnitude as observations and timing of modelled and observed dust peaks agrees well. Average annual dust emission is 4.3 ± 0.8 Tg during the 27 years of simulation. Fifty percent of all dust from Iceland is on average emitted in just 25 days of the year, demonstrating the importance of a few strong events for annual total dust emissions. Annual dust emission as well as transport patterns correlate only weakly to the North Atlantic Oscillation. Deposition amounts in remote regions (Svalbard and Greenland) vary from year to year. Only limited dust amounts reach the upper Greenland Ice Sheet, but considerable dust amounts are deposited on Icelandic glaciers and can impact melt rates there. Approximately 34 % of the annual dust emission is deposited in Iceland itself. Most dust (58 %), however, is deposited in the ocean and may strongly influence marine ecosystems.

  10. Temporal and spatial variability of Icelandic dust emissions and atmospheric transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Groot Zwaaftink

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Icelandic dust sources are known to be highly active, yet there exist few model simulations of Icelandic dust that could be used to assess its impacts on the environment. We here present estimates of dust emission and transport in Iceland over 27 years (1990–2016 based on FLEXDUST and FLEXPART simulations and meteorological re-analysis data. Simulations for the year 2012 based on high-resolution operational meteorological analyses are used for model evaluation based on PM2. 5 and PM10 observations in Iceland. For stations in Reykjavik, we find that the spring period is well predicted by the model, while dust events in late fall and early winter are overpredicted. Six years of dust concentrations observed at Stórhöfði (Heimaey show that the model predicts concentrations of the same order of magnitude as observations and timing of modelled and observed dust peaks agrees well. Average annual dust emission is 4.3 ± 0.8 Tg during the 27 years of simulation. Fifty percent of all dust from Iceland is on average emitted in just 25 days of the year, demonstrating the importance of a few strong events for annual total dust emissions. Annual dust emission as well as transport patterns correlate only weakly to the North Atlantic Oscillation. Deposition amounts in remote regions (Svalbard and Greenland vary from year to year. Only limited dust amounts reach the upper Greenland Ice Sheet, but considerable dust amounts are deposited on Icelandic glaciers and can impact melt rates there. Approximately 34 % of the annual dust emission is deposited in Iceland itself. Most dust (58 %, however, is deposited in the ocean and may strongly influence marine ecosystems.

  11. The transport history of two Saharan dust events archived in an Alpine ice core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sodemann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust from the Saharan desert can be transported across the Mediterranean towards the Alpine region several times a year. When coinciding with snowfall, the dust can be deposited on Alpine glaciers and then appears as yellow or red layers in ice cores. Two such significant dust events were identified in an ice core drilled at the high-accumulation site Piz Zupó in the Swiss Alps (46°22' N, 9°55' E, 3850 m a.s.l.. From stable oxygen isotopes and major ion concentrations, the events were approximately dated as October and March 2000. In order to link the dust record in the ice core to the meteorological situation that led to the dust events, a novel methodology based on back-trajectory analysis was developed. It allowed the detailed analysis of the specific meteorologic flow evolution that was associated with Saharan dust transport into the Alps, and the identification of dust sources, atmospheric transport paths, and wet deposition periods for both dust events. Differences in the chemical signature of the two dust events were interpreted with respect to contributions from the dust sources and aerosol scavenging during the transport. For the October event, the trajectory analysis indicated that dust deposition took place during 13–15 October 2000. Mobilisation areas of dust were mainly identified in the Algerian and Libyan deserts. A combination of an upper-level potential vorticity streamer and a midlevel jet across Algeria first brought moist Atlantic air and later mixed air from the tropics and Saharan desert across the Mediterranean towards the Alps. The March event consisted of two different deposition phases which took place during 17–19 and 23–25 March 2000. The first phase was associated with an exceptional transport pathway past Iceland and towards the Alps from northerly directions. The second phase was similar to the October event. A significant peak of methanesulphonic acid associated with the March dust event was most

  12. Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mohamed; Metzger, Swen; Steil, Benedikt; Klingmüller, Klaus; Tost, Holger; Pozzer, Andrea; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Barrie, Leonard; Lelieveld, Jos

    2017-03-01

    We present a sensitivity study on transatlantic dust transport, a process which has many implications for the atmosphere, the ocean and the climate. We investigate the impact of key processes that control the dust outflow, i.e., the emission flux, convection schemes and the chemical aging of mineral dust, by using the EMAC model following Abdelkader et al. (2015). To characterize the dust outflow over the Atlantic Ocean, we distinguish two geographic zones: (i) dust interactions within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), or the dust-ITCZ interaction zone (DIZ), and (ii) the adjacent dust transport over the Atlantic Ocean (DTA) zone. In the latter zone, the dust loading shows a steep and linear gradient westward over the Atlantic Ocean since particle sedimentation is the dominant removal process, whereas in the DIZ zone aerosol-cloud interactions, wet deposition and scavenging processes determine the extent of the dust outflow. Generally, the EMAC simulated dust compares well with CALIPSO observations; however, our reference model configuration tends to overestimate the dust extinction at a lower elevation and underestimates it at a higher elevation. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Caribbean responds to the dust emission flux only when the emitted dust mass is significantly increased over the source region in Africa by a factor of 10. These findings point to the dominant role of dust removal (especially wet deposition) in transatlantic dust transport. Experiments with different convection schemes have indeed revealed that the transatlantic dust transport is more sensitive to the convection scheme than to the dust emission flux parameterization. To study the impact of dust chemical aging, we focus on a major dust outflow in July 2009. We use the calcium cation as a proxy for the overall chemical reactive dust fraction and consider the uptake of major inorganic acids (i.e., H2SO4, HNO3 and HCl) and their anions, i.e., sulfate (SO42-), bisulfate (HSO4

  13. Transport of North African dust from the Bodélé depression to the Amazon Basin: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ben-Ami

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Through long-range transport of dust, the North-African desert supplies essential minerals to the Amazon rain forest. Since North African dust reaches South America mostly during the Northern Hemisphere winter, the dust sources active during winter are the main contributors to the forest. Given that the Bodélé depression area in southwestern Chad is the main winter dust source, a close link is expected between the Bodélé emission patterns and volumes and the mineral supply flux to the Amazon.

    Until now, the particular link between the Bodélé and the Amazon forest was based on sparse satellite measurements and modeling studies. In this study, we combine a detailed analysis of space-borne and ground data with reanalysis model data and surface measurements taken in the central Amazon during the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08 in order to explore the validity and the nature of the proposed link between the Bodélé depression and the Amazon forest.

    This case study follows the dust events of 11–16 and 18–27 February 2008, from the emission in the Bodélé over West Africa (most likely with contribution from other dust sources in the region the crossing of the Atlantic Ocean, to the observed effects above the Amazon canopy about 10 days after the emission. The dust was lifted by surface winds stronger than 14 m s−1, usually starting early in the morning. The lofted dust, mixed with biomass burning aerosols over Nigeria, was transported over the Atlantic Ocean, and arrived over the South American continent. The top of the aerosol layer reached above 3 km, and the bottom merged with the boundary layer. The arrival of the dusty air parcel over the Amazon forest increased the average concentration of aerosol crustal elements by an order of magnitude.

  14. Intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols: implications for regional air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Chin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the global model GOCART to examine the impact of pollution and dust aerosols emitted from their major sources on surface fine particulate matter concentrations at regional and hemispheric scales. Focusing on the North America region in 2001, we use measurements from the IMPROVE network in the United States to evaluate the model-simulated surface concentrations of the "reconstructed fine mass" (RCFM and its components of ammonium sulfate, black carbon (BC, organic matter (OM, and fine mode dust. We then quantify the RCFM budget in terms of the RCFM chemical composition, source type, and region of origin to find that in the eastern U.S., ammonium sulfate is the dominant RCFM component (~60% whereas in the western U.S., dust and OM are just as important as sulfate but have considerable seasonal variations, especially in the NW. On an annual average, pollution aerosol (defined as aerosols from fuel combustion for industrial and transportation uses from North America accounts for 65–70% of the surface RCFM in the eastern U.S. and for a lower proportion of 30–40% in the western U.S.; by contrast, pollution from outside of North America contributes to just 2–6% (~0.2 μg m−3 of the total RCFM over the U.S. In comparison, long-range transport of dust brings 3 to 4 times more fine particles than the transport of pollution to the U.S. (0.5–0.8 μg m−3 on an annual average with a maximum influence in spring and over the NW. Of the major pollution regions, Europe has the largest potential to affect the surface aerosol concentrations in other continents due to its shorter distance from receptor continents and its larger fraction of sulfate-producing precursor gas in the outflow. With the IPCC emission scenario for the year 2000, we find that European emissions increase levels of ammonium sulfate by 1–5 μg m−3 over the surface of northern Africa and western Asia, and its contribution to eastern Asia (

  15. Observed chemical characteristics of long-range transported particles at a marine background site in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayetano, Mylene G; Kim, Young J; Jung, Jin Sang; Batmunkh, Tsatsral; Lee, Kwang Yul; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Kwan Chul; Kim, Dong Gyu; Lee, Suk Jo; Kim, Jeong Soo; Chang, Lim Seek

    2011-11-01

    Deokjeok Island is located off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula and is a suitable place to monitor the long-range transport of air pollutants from the Asian continent. In addition to pollutants, Asian dust particles are also transported to the island during long-range transport events. Episodic transport of dust and secondary particles was observed during intensive measurements in the spring (March 31-April 11) and fall (October 13-26) of 2009. In this study, the chemical characteristics of long-range-transported particles were investigated based on highly time-resolved ionic measurements with a particle-into-liquid system coupled with an online ion chromatograph (PILS-IC) that simultaneously measures concentrations of cations (Li+, Na , NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and anions (F-, C1-, NO3-, SO42-). The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) distribution retrieved by the modified Bremen Aerosol Retrieval (M-BAER) algorithm from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data confirmed the presence of a thick aerosol plume coming from the Asian continent towards the Korean peninsula. Seven distinctive events involving the long-range transport (LRT) of aerosols were identified and studied, the chemical components of which were strongly related to sector sources. Enrichment of acidic secondary aerosols on mineral dust particles, and even of sea-salt components, during transport was observed in this study. Backward trajectory, chemical analyses, and satellite aerosol retrievals identified two distinct events: a distinctively high [Ca2++Mg2]/[Na+] ratio (>2.0), which was indicative of a preprocessed mineral dust transport event, and a low [Ca2++Mg2+]/[Na+] ratio (<2.0), which was indicative of severe aging of sea-salt components on the processed dust particles. Particulate C1- was depleted by up to 85% in spring and 50% in the fall. A consistent fraction of carbonate replacement (FCR) averaged 0.53 in spring and 0.55 in the fall. Supporting evidences of C1

  16. A Research Program for Fission Product/Dust Transport in HTGR’s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyalka, Sudarshan [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High and Very High Temperatures Gas Reactors (HTGRs/VHTRs) have five barriers to fission product (FP) release: the TRISO fuel coating, the fuel elements, the core graphite, the primary coolant system, and the reactor building. This project focused on measurements and computations of FP diffusion in graphite, FP adsorption on graphite and FP interactions with dust particles of arbitrary shape. Diffusion Coefficients of Cs and Iodine in two nuclear graphite were obtained by the release method and use of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and Instrumented Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). A new mathematical model for fission gas release from nuclear fuel was also developed. Several techniques were explored to measure adsorption isotherms, notably a Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) and Instrumented Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Some of these measurements are still in progress. The results will be reported in a supplemental report later. Studies of FP interactions with dust and shape factors for both chain-like particles and agglomerates over a wide size range were obtained through solutions of the diffusion and transport equations. The Green's Function Method for diffusion and Monte Carlo technique for transport were used, and it was found that the shape factors are sensitive to the particle arrangements, and that diffusion and transport of FPs can be hindered. Several journal articles relating to the above work have been published, and more are in submission and preparation.

  17. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    is that the majority of dust deposited in northern Ghana may not be from the original Harmattan source in the Bodélé Depression. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the origin of deposited dust in Tamale, Ghana. This is examined by comparing wind data, grain size distribution, mineralogical...

  18. Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkader, Mohamed

    2017-03-20

    We present a sensitivity study on transatlantic dust transport, a process which has many implications for the atmosphere, the ocean and the climate. We investigate the impact of key processes that control the dust outflow, i.e., the emission flux, convection schemes and the chemical aging of mineral dust, by using the EMAC model following Abdelkader et al. (2015). To characterize the dust outflow over the Atlantic Ocean, we distinguish two geographic zones: (i) dust interactions within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), or the dust–ITCZ interaction zone (DIZ), and (ii) the adjacent dust transport over the Atlantic Ocean (DTA) zone. In the latter zone, the dust loading shows a steep and linear gradient westward over the Atlantic Ocean since particle sedimentation is the dominant removal process, whereas in the DIZ zone aerosol–cloud interactions, wet deposition and scavenging processes determine the extent of the dust outflow. Generally, the EMAC simulated dust compares well with CALIPSO observations; however, our reference model configuration tends to overestimate the dust extinction at a lower elevation and underestimates it at a higher elevation. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Caribbean responds to the dust emission flux only when the emitted dust mass is significantly increased over the source region in Africa by a factor of 10. These findings point to the dominant role of dust removal (especially wet deposition) in transatlantic dust transport. Experiments with different convection schemes have indeed revealed that the transatlantic dust transport is more sensitive to the convection scheme than to the dust emission flux parameterization. To study the impact of dust chemical aging, we focus on a major dust outflow in July 2009. We use the calcium cation as a proxy for the overall chemical reactive dust fraction and consider the uptake of major inorganic acids (i.e., H2SO4, HNO3 and HCl) and their anions, i.e., sulfate (SO42−), bisulfate

  19. Laboratory study of PCB transport from primary sources to settled dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transport of house dust and Arizona Test Dust on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-containing panels and PCB-free panels was investigated in a 30-m3 stainless steel chamber. The PCB-containing panels were aluminum sheets coated with a PCB-spiked, oil-based primer or two-part polysul...

  20. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matejicek, Lubos; Janour, Zbynek; Benes, Ludek; Bodnar, Tomas; Gulikova, Eva

    2008-01-01

    .... In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal...

  1. Comparison of the Synoptic Environments Conducive to Eastward versus Southeastward Transport of Asian Dust Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujung Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asian dust events that travel eastward and southeastward in the lower troposphere affect different areas near the coastal East Asia. To understand the synoptic differences between the two types of dust events, four dust events from 2006 to 2009 are selected for each type and the synoptic environment is compared. Surface measurements, trajectory analyses, and a regional dust model are also applied to further analyze each type. Results show that the strength of the low-level trough and the surface anticyclonic system are important in determining the transport route of dust event. A deep 700–850 hPa trough extending far south beyond 30°N associated with an intense surface anticyclone with maximum pressure greater than 1020 hPa over coastal East Asia favors southeastward movement of dust event. The prevailing northwesterlies or northerlies behind the deep trough and ahead of the intense surface anticyclone promote the southeastward movement of dust event. Since intense surface anticyclones often associated with strong dust events, severe dust activities tend to move southeastward. In contrast, a shallow trough accompanied by a weak surface high locating north of 30°N over the coastal East Asia favors an eastward transport route.

  2. Characterization of Modern and Fossil Mineral Dust Transported to High Altitude in the Western Alps: Saharan Sources and Transport Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Thevenon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust aerosols recently collected at the high-altitude Jungfraujoch research station (N, E; 3580 m a.s.l. were compared to mineral dust deposited at the Colle Gnifetti glacier (N, E; 4455 m a.s.l. over the last millennium. Radiogenic isotope signatures and backward trajectories analyses indicate that major dust sources are situated in the north-central to north-western part of the Saharan desert. Less radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions of PM10 aerosols and of mineral particles deposited during periods of low dust transfer likely result from the enhancement of the background chemically-weathered Saharan source. Saharan dust mobilization and transport were relatively reduced during the second part of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1690–1870 except within the greatest Saharan dust event deposited around 1770. After ca. 1870, sustained dust deposition suggests that increased mineral dust transport over the Alps during the last century could be due to stronger spring/summer North Atlantic southwesterlies and drier winters in North Africa. On the other hand, increasing carbonaceous particle emissions from fossil fuel combustion combined to a higher lead enrichment factor point to concomitant anthropogenic sources of particulate pollutants reaching high-altitude European glaciers during the last century.

  3. Long-range spin transport in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Detlef; Wolf, Michael J. [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Huebler, Florian [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Recently, there has been some controversy about spin-polarized quasiparticle transport and relaxation in superconductors, with reports of both anomalously short or anomalously long relaxation times as compared to the normal state. Here, we report on non-local transport in multiterminal superconductor-ferromagnet structures. We find signatures of spin transport over distances much larger than the normal-state spin-diffusion length in the presence of a large Zeeman splitting of the quasiparticle states. The relaxation length shows a nearly linear increase with magnetic field, hinting at a freeze-out of spin relaxation by the Zeeman splitting.

  4. The effects of transported Asian dust on the composition and concentration of ambient fungi in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, H. Jasmine; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Rao, Carol Y.; Lee, Chung-Te; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of transported Asian dust and other environmental parameters on the levels and compositions of ambient fungi in the atmosphere of northern Taiwan. We monitored Asian dust events in Taipei County, Taiwan from January 2003 to June 2004. We used duplicate Burkard portable air samplers to collect ambient fungi before, during, and after dust events. Six transported Asian dust events were monitored during the study period. Elevated concentrations of Aspergillus ( A. niger, specifically), Coelomycetes, Rhinocladiella, Sporothrix and Verticillium were noted ( p < 0.05) during Asian dust periods. Botryosporium and Trichothecium were only recovered during dust event days. Multiple regression analysis showed that fungal levels were positively associated with temperature, wind speed, rainfall, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM10), and negatively correlated with relative humidity and ozone. Our results demonstrated that Asian dust events affected ambient fungal concentrations and compositions in northern Taiwan. Ambient fungi also had complex dynamics with air pollutants and meteorological factors. Future studies should explore the health impacts of ambient fungi during Asian dust events, adjusting for the synergistic/antagonistic effects of weather and air pollutants.

  5. The effects of transported Asian dust on the composition and concentration of ambient fungi in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, H Jasmine; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Rao, Carol Y; Lee, Chung-Te; Chuang, Ying-Chih; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Wu, Yi-Hua

    2012-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of transported Asian dust and other environmental parameters on the levels and compositions of ambient fungi in the atmosphere of northern Taiwan. We monitored Asian dust events in Taipei County, Taiwan from January 2003 to June 2004. We used duplicate Burkard portable air samplers to collect ambient fungi before, during, and after dust events. Six transported Asian dust events were monitored during the study period. Elevated concentrations of Aspergillus (A. niger, specifically), Coelomycetes, Rhinocladiella, Sporothrix and Verticillium were noted (p Asian dust periods. Botryosporium and Trichothecium were only recovered during dust event days. Multiple regression analysis showed that fungal levels were positively associated with temperature, wind speed, rainfall, non-methane hydrocarbons and particulates with aerodynamic diameters ≤10 μm (PM(10)), and negatively correlated with relative humidity and ozone. Our results demonstrated that Asian dust events affected ambient fungal concentrations and compositions in northern Taiwan. Ambient fungi also had complex dynamics with air pollutants and meteorological factors. Future studies should explore the health impacts of ambient fungi during Asian dust events, adjusting for the synergistic/antagonistic effects of weather and air pollutants.

  6. Dust Plume Modeling from Ranges and Maneuver Areas on Fort Bliss and the White Sands Missile Range: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Barnard, James C.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Shaw, William J.

    2009-05-04

    The potential for air quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating on and between the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical move-out activities occurring on the installations were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing the modeling scenarios are summarized and results of simulations conducted under these assumptions are presented for four representative meteorological periods.

  7. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van der Does

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust has a large impact on regional and global climate, depending on its particle size. Especially in the Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dust source on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorly understood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variations in particle size of Saharan dust deposition across the Atlantic Ocean, using an array of submarine sediment traps moored along a transect at 12° N. We show that the particle size decreases downwind with increased distance from the Saharan source, due to higher gravitational settling velocities of coarse particles in the atmosphere. Modal grain sizes vary between 4 and 32 µm throughout the different seasons and at five locations along the transect. This is much coarser than previously suggested and incorporated into climate models. In addition, seasonal changes are prominent, with coarser dust in summer and finer dust in winter and spring. Such seasonal changes are caused by transport at higher altitudes and at greater wind velocities during summer than in winter. Also, the latitudinal migration of the dust cloud, associated with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, causes seasonal differences in deposition as the summer dust cloud is located more to the north and more directly above the sampled transect. Furthermore, increased precipitation and more frequent dust storms in summer coincide with coarser dust deposition. Our findings contribute to understanding Saharan dust transport and deposition relevant for the interpretation of sedimentary records for climate reconstructions, as well as for global and regional models for improved prediction of future climate.

  8. Understanding the Transport of Patagonian Dust and Its Influence on Marine Biological Activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Meskhidze, Nicholas; Kiliyanpilakkil, Praju; Gasso, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and remote sensing techniques were applied to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of soluble-iron- laden mineral dust deposition on marine primary productivity in the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO) surface waters. The global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem, implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, was applied to evaluate the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron during two dust outbreaks originating in the source regions of Patagonia. In addition to this "rapidly released" iron, offline calculations were also carried out to estimate the amount of bioavailable iron leached during the residence time of dust in the ocean mixed layer. Model simulations showed that the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes were largely influenced by the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems. Model-predicted horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust over the SAO were in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Comparison between remotely-sensed and offline calculated ocean surface chlorophyll-a concentrations indicated that, for the two dust outbreaks examined in this study, the deposition of bioavailable iron in the SAO through atmospheric pathways was insignificant. As the two dust transport episodes examined here represent typical outflows of mineral dust from South American sources, our study suggests that the atmospheric deposition of mineral dust is unlikely to induce large scale marine primary productivity and carbon sequestration in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean.

  9. Review of dust transport and mitigation technologies in lunar and Martian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Wu, Chang-Yu; Curtis, Jennifer Sinclair; Gaier, James R.

    2015-09-01

    Dust resuspension and deposition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in all lunar and Martian missions. The near-term plans to return to the Moon as a stepping stone to further exploration of Mars and beyond bring scientists' attention to development and evaluation of lunar and Martian dust mitigation technologies. In this paper, different lunar and Martian dust transport mechanisms are presented, followed by a review of previously developed dust mitigation technologies including fluidal, mechanical, electrical and passive self-cleaning methods for lunar/Martian installed surfaces along with filtration for dust control inside cabins. Key factors in choosing the most effective dust mitigation technology are recognized to be the dust transport mechanism, energy consumption, environment, type of surface materials, area of the surface and surface functionality. While electrical methods operating at higher voltages are identified to be suitable for small but light sensitive surfaces, pre-treatment of the surface is effective for cleaning thermal control surfaces, and mechanical methods are appropriate for surfaces with no concerns of light blockage, surface abrasion and 100% cleaning efficiency. Findings from this paper can help choose proper surface protection/cleaning for future space explorations. Hybrid techniques combining the advantages of different methods are recommended.

  10. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, MacKenzie R; Jones, Robert M; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  11. Dust transportation in bounday layers on complex areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelsky, Kirill; Petrosyan, Arakel

    2017-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  12. INVESTIGATION OF SAHARAN DUST TRANSPORT ON THE BASIS OF AEROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. TÓTH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sahara Desert is the largest dust source on Earth. Its dust is frequently emitted into the Mediterranean atmosphere and transported by the winds sometimes as far north as Central Europe. The accumulated particles contribute to soil forming processes, while the atmospheric mineral dust has an impact on the radiation budget, cloud forming processes, the pH of precipitation and biogeochemical cycles of marine ecosystems. The PM (particulate matter in ambient air does not contain only primary particles but secondary particles formed in the atmosphere from precursor gases as well. Especially these latter ones have significant negative impacts to human health. There are in average four-five Saharan dust episodes annually in Hungary, sometimes in form of colour precipitation (brown rainfall, red snow. There are several possibilities for providing evidence for the Saharan origin of the dust observed in our country: back-trajectories using NOAA HYSPLIT model, TOMS satellite maps of NASA, maps of aerosol index of Ozone Monitoring Instrument, observations of spectral aerosol optical depth of Aerosol Robotic Network, satellite maps of EUMETSAT, elemental analysis of dust samples. In this study we try to reveal the suitability of the upper-air wind fields in detection of Saharan dust episodes in Central Europe. We deployed the global upper-air data base of the last 41 years that is available by courtesy of College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at University of Wyoming. We apply this method also for tracking air pollution of vegetation fires.

  13. Summer variability of Saharan dust transport events in mountain areas north and south of Po basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Tony C.; Marinoni, Angela; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Putero, Davide; Duchi, Rocco; Alborghetti, Marcello; Bonafè, Ubaldo; Calzolari, Francescopiero; Pietro Verza, Gian; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Mineral dust intrusions from northern African desert regions have a strong impact on the Mediterranean areas and Italian peninsula as they can cause an anomalous increase of aerosol concentrations in the tropospheric column and often an increase of particulate matter at ground level. The estimate of Saharan dust contribution to aerosols concentrations is therefore a key issue in air quality assessment and policy formulation, since can cause air quality exceedances of the PM10 daily limits (50 μg m-3) set by the European Union (EU/2008/50). This study presents a first identification and characterization of Saharan dust outbreaks observed during summer season at two high mountain stations located both South (Mt. Cimone, 2165 m asl) and North (Rifugio Guasti, Stelvio National Park, 3285 m asl) of Po valley. An estimation of their impact on PM10 concentrations in both sites, and in urban and rural areas of the Po basin is provided. Joining specific measurements (ground and satellite based) and numerical modeling, an investigation into the vertical structure of dust load will be presented. Actually, methodologies conceived for distinguishing dust outbreaks transported above the boundary layer without any impact at the ground level from those causing deposition are currently still lacking. Basically, the approach proposed in this work includes a deep analysis of in-situ measurements starting from long-term observation of Saharan dust carried out at the Mt. Cimone and more recent measurements performed in the framework of SHARE Stelvio Project, as well as the usage of ad hoc model chain (meteorological processor, chemical transport model, and aerosols optical properties calculation) to describe emission, transport and deposition dynamics of mineral dust that - in summertime - often affect the North Italy.

  14. Modeling the emission, transport and deposition of contaminated dust from a mine tailing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo; Villar, Omar Ignacio Felix; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, Mackenzie R; King, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of contaminants from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are significantly contaminated with lead and arsenic with an average soil concentration of 1616 and 1420 ppm, respectively. Similar levels of these contaminants have also been measured in soil samples taken from the area surrounding the mine tailings. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we have been able to model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes a distributed Eulerian model to simulate fine aerosol transport and a Lagrangian approach to model fate and transport of larger particles. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations.

  15. Dust Transport from Enceladus to the moons of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, A.; Hsu, H. W.; Kempf, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    Saturn's vast E-ring engulfs the satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rea, reaching even beyond Titan, while its inner edge is adjacent with the outskirts of the A-ring. The E-ring is comprised of characteristically micron and submicron sized particles, originating mainly from the active plumes of Enceladus, and possibly the other moons as well due to their continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles. The dynamics of the E-ring grains can be surprising as in addition to the gravity of Saturn and its moons, their motion is governed by radiation pressure, plasma drag, and electromagnetic forces as they collect charges interacting with the magnetospheric plasma environment of Saturn. Due to sputtering, their mass is diminishing and, hence, their charge-to-mass ratio is increasing in time. A "young" gravitationally dominated micron-sized particle will "mature" into a nanometer-sized grain whose motion resembles that of a heavy ion. Simultaneously with their mass loss, the dust particles are pushed outwards by plasma drag. Time to time, their evolving orbits intersect the orbits of the Saturnian moons and the E-ring particles can be deposited onto their surfaces, possibly altering their makeup and spectral properties. Using the Cassini magnetospheric observations, we have followed the orbital evolution of E-ring particles, through their entire life, starting at Enceladus, ending in: a) a collision with the A-ring or any of the satellites; or b) losing all their mass due to sputtering; or c) leave the magnetosphere of Saturn. This presentation will focus on the deposition rates and maps of E-ring particles to the surfaces of the moons.

  16. Implications of high altitude desert dust transport from Western Sahara to Nile Delta during biomass burning season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Anup K; El-Askary, Hesham; Kafatos, Menas

    2010-11-01

    The air over major cities and rural regions of the Nile Delta is highly polluted during autumn which is the biomass burning season, locally known as black cloud. Previous studies have attributed the increased pollution levels during the black cloud season to the biomass or open burning of agricultural waste, vehicular, industrial emissions, and secondary aerosols. However, new multi-sensor observations (column and vertical profiles) from satellites, dust transport models and associated meteorology present a different picture of the autumn pollution. Here we show, for the first time, the evidence of long range transport of dust at high altitude (2.5-6 km) from Western Sahara and its deposition over the Nile Delta region unlike current Models. The desert dust is found to be a major contributor to the local air quality which was previously considered to be due to pollution from biomass burning enhanced by the dominant northerly winds coming from Europe. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vertical Variation of Optical Properties of Mixed Asian Dust/Pollution Plumes According to Pathway of Airmass Transport Over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Sung-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We use five years (2009 – 2013 of multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements at Gwangju, Korea (35.10° N, 126.53° E for the identification of changes of optical properties of East Asian dust in dependence of its transport path over China. Profiles of backscatter and extinction coefficients, lidar ratios, and backscatter-related Ångström exponents (wavelength pair 355/532nm were measured at Gwangju. Linear particle depolarization ratios were used to identify East Asian dust layers. We used backward trajectory modelling to identify the pathway and the vertical position of dust-laden air masses over China during long-range transport. Most cases of Asian dust events can be described by the emission of dust in desert areas and subsequent transport over highly polluted regions of China. The Asian dust plumes could be categorized into two classes according to the height above ground in which these plumes were transported: (I the dust layers passed over China at high altitude levels until arrival over Gwangju, and (II the Asian dust layers were transported near the surface and the lower troposphere over industrialized areas before they arrived over Gwangju. We find that the optical characteristics of these mixed Asian dust layers over Gwangju differ in dependence of their vertical position above ground over China and the change of height above ground during transport. The mean linear particle depolarization ratio was 0.21±0.06 (at 532 nm, the mean lidar ratios were 52±7 sr at 355 nm and 53±8 sr at 532 nm, and the mean Ångström exponent was 0.74±0.31 in case I. In contrast, plumes transported at lower altitudes (case II showed low depolarization ratios, and higher lidar ratio and Ångström exponents. The mean linear particle depolarization ratio was 0.13 ± 0.04, the mean lidar ratios were 63±9 sr at 355 nm and 62±8 sr at 532 nm, respectively, and the mean Ångström exponent was 0.98±0.51. These numbers show that the optical

  18. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  19. The Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Influence of Clouds on the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are critical to the current Martian climate, and they interact with each other through cloud formation. Dust modulates the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly influences atmospheric circulation. Clouds provide radiative forcing and control the net hemispheric transport of water through the alteration of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent advancements in the quality and sophistication of both climate models and observations enable an increased understanding of how the coupling between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) impacts the dust and water cycles. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distributions of dust and water and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. We utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) to show that the magnitude and nature of the hemispheric exchange of water during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. Further, we investigate how clouds influence atmospheric temperatures and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to isolate and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  20. Dust transport and abrasion assessment within simulated standing vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop residues are useful in protecting the top soil from depletion and abrasion due to wind erosion. A wind tunnel study was done to measure sand transport and abrasion energies within the simulated artificial standing vegetation. Wind profiles, relative abrasion energies and rates of sand dischar...

  1. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2016 Meteorological, Radiological, and Wind Transported Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if wind blowing across the Clean Slate sites is transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites.

  2. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. This experiment demonstrated that advanced aircraft-mounted instruments operated by

  3. Determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range for wood dust collected by air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S; Bartolucci, Al

    2002-10-01

    In the absence of methods for determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range with good discrimination, the samples collected by personal air sampling devices can only be characterized by their total mass. This parameter gives no information regarding the size distribution of the aerosol or the size-selection characteristics of different samplers in field use conditions. A method is described where the particles collected by a sampler are removed, suspended, and re-deposited on a mixed cellulose-ester filter, and examined by optical microscopy to determine particle aerodynamic diameters. This method is particularly appropriate to wood dust particles which are generally large and close to rectangular prisms in shape. Over 200 wood dust samples have been collected in three different wood-products industries, using the traditional closed-face polystyrene/acrylonitrile cassette, the Institute of Occupational Medicine inhalable sampler, and the Button sampler developed by the University of Cincinnati. A portion of these samples has been analyzed to determine the limitations of this method. Extensive quality control measures are being developed to improve the robustness of the procedure, and preliminary results suggest the method has an accuracy similar to that required of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods. The results should provide valuable insights into the collection characteristics of the samplers and the impact of these characteristics on comparison of sampler results to present and potential future limit values. The NIOSH Deep South Education and Research Center has a focus on research into hazards of the forestry and associated wood-products industry, and it is hoped to expand this activity in the future.

  4. The long-range transport of aerosols from northern China to Hong Kong - a multi-technique study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M.; Zheng, M.; Wang, F.; Chim, K. S.; Kot, S. C.

    The results of the inorganic and organic analyses of aerosol samples collected on the east and west sides of Hong Kong during a dust episode (9-10 May 1996) are reported. The origin of the dust was traced to Northern China. The dust reached Hong Kong by way of the East China Sea. The characteristics of the inorganic elements and organic compounds were quite different from the non-episodic samples collected on 1-2 April 1996, EPD (Environmental Protection Department, Special Administrative Region, Hong Kong, China) results for April-May 1994, and our early studies (Zheng et al., 1997. Atmospheric Environment 31(2), 227-237.). Results from X-ray spectrometry showed pronounced increase in the relative abundance of Al, Fe, Ca, S and Cl in the dust samples compared to the non-episodic samples. The high abundance of Cl in the dust samples suggested the aerosols experienced long-range transport by way of the sea. ICP-MS analysis revealed higher concentrations of Fe, Ca, S and Pb in the episodic samples relative to the values measured during April-May 1994 by EPD. The high Ca content in the soil samples is a characteristic of northern Chinese crustal material (Liu et al., 1985). Hong Kong aerosols are characterized by high octadecenoic acid concentration due to heavy urbanization and Chinese-style stir-fry cooking. A much lower C 18:1/C 18:0 ratio was found in the episodic samples, however, suggesting the aerosols were transported from a long distance. The high ratio of ⩾C 20/Asian Dust. This is the first scientific report of Asian Dust in Hong Kong.

  5. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: the importance of African dust transport and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (N/YbN, GdN/YbN that can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past –500 ka.

  6. Three-dimensional evolution of Saharan dust transport towards Europe based on a 9-year EARLINET-optimized CALIPSO dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinou, Eleni; Amiridis, Vassilis; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Solomos, Stavros; Proestakis, Emannouil; Konsta, Dimitra; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Vlastou, Georgia; Zanis, Prodromos; Balis, Dimitrios; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert

    2017-05-01

    In this study we use a new dust product developed using CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) observations and EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) measurements and methods to provide a 3-D multiyear analysis on the evolution of Saharan dust over North Africa and Europe. The product uses a CALIPSO L2 backscatter product corrected with a depolarization-based method to separate pure dust in external aerosol mixtures and a Saharan dust lidar ratio (LR) based on long-term EARLINET measurements to calculate the dust extinction profiles. The methodology is applied on a 9-year CALIPSO dataset (2007-2015) and the results are analyzed here to reveal for the first time the 3-D dust evolution and the seasonal patterns of dust over its transportation paths from the Sahara towards the Mediterranean and Continental Europe. During spring, the spatial distribution of dust shows a uniform pattern over the Sahara desert. The dust transport over the Mediterranean Sea results in mean dust optical depth (DOD) values up to 0.1. During summer, the dust activity is mostly shifted to the western part of the desert where mean DOD near the source is up to 0.6. Elevated dust plumes with mean extinction values between 10 and 75 Mm-1 are observed throughout the year at various heights between 2 and 6 km, extending up to latitudes of 40° N. Dust advection is identified even at latitudes of about 60° N, but this is due to rare events of episodic nature. Dust plumes of high DOD are also observed above the Balkans during the winter period and above northwest Europe during autumn at heights between 2 and 4 km, reaching mean extinction values up to 50 Mm-1. The dataset is considered unique with respect to its potential applications, including the evaluation of dust transport models and the estimation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) concentration profiles. Finally, the product can be used to study dust dynamics during

  7. Impact of long-range transport pollution on aerosol properties over West Africa: observations during the DACCIWA airborne campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Bourrianne, Thierry; Burnet, Frederic; Deroubaix, Adrien; Brito, Joel; Dupuy, Régis; Colomb, Aurélie; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Sellegri, Karine; Chazette, Patrick; Duplissy, Jonathan; Flamant, Cyrille

    2017-04-01

    Southern West Africa (SWA) is a region highly vulnerable to climate change. Emissions of anthropogenic pollution have increased substantially over the past decades in the region and are projected to keep increasing. The region is also strongly impacted by important natural pollution from distant locations. Biomass burning mainly from vegetation fires in Central Africa and mineral dust from the Saharan and Sahel-Sudan regions are advected by winds to the SWA region especially in summer. Both biomass burning and mineral dust aerosols scatter and absorb solar radiation and are able to significantly modify the regional radiative budget. Presently, the potential radiative impact of dust and biomass burning particles on SWA is unclear due to inadequate data information on the aerosols properties and vertical distribution. In the framework of the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project, an unprecedented field campaign took place in summer 2016 in West Africa. The ATR-42 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE performed twenty flights to sample the local air pollution from maritime traffic and coastal megacities, as well as regional pollution from biomass burning and desert dust. The aircraft was equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the aerosol optical properties (CAPS, nephelometer, PSAP), the aerosol size distribution (SMPS, GRIMM, USHAS, PCASP, FSSP) and the aerosol chemical composition (SP2, AMS). A mini backscattered lidar system provided additional measurements of the aerosol vertical structure and the aerosol optical properties such as the particulate depolarization ratio. The CHIMERE chemistry and transport model has been used to characterize the source area and the long-range transport of dust and biomass burning plumes. Here, we investigate the aerosol microphysical, chemical and optical properties of biomass burning and dust aerosols transported in SWA. In particular the following questions will be

  8. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL. The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  9. Chemical Analysis of Aerosols for Characterization of Long-Range Transport at Mt. Lassen, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Waddell, J. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Perry, K. D.; Kelly, P. B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective regional air pollution regulation requires an understanding of long-range aerosol transport and natural aerosol chemistry. Sample collection was performed at the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sampling site on Mt. Lassen in the Sierra Nevada range at 1755 m elevation. The site is in Northern California at Longitude 121° 34' 40", Latitude 40° 32' 25". Size segregated and time resolved aerosol samples were collected with an 8 DRUM sampler from April 15th to May 24th 2002 as part of the NOAA Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Experiment (ITCT). The samples were analyzed with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence (S-XRF) and Time of Flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS). The total aerosol concentration exhibits a clear daily cycling of total mass, due to a nighttime down-slope air circulation from the free troposphere. The sulfate peaked in concentration during the night. Elemental data is suggestive of dust transport from continental Asia. The micron size ranges were dominated by nitrate, while the sub-micron size ranges had high levels of sulfate. Chemical analysis shows oceanic influence through strong correlations between methyl sulfonic acid (MSA), iodine, and oxalate. The appearance of the oceanic biogenic tracers in the sub-micron fraction is most likely a result of vertical mixing over the Pacific Ocean. MSA follows a diurnal pattern similar to sulfate, however the differences suggest both an oceanic and continental source for sulfate. The carbon particulate signal did not show any diurnal pattern during the measurement period.

  10. Seasonal transport patterns of intense Saharan dust events at the Mediterranean island of Lampedusa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, D.; di Sarra, A.; Monteleone, F.; Pace, G.; Piacentino, S.; Sferlazzo, D. M.

    2008-05-01

    Saharan dust (SD) episodes occurring at the Mediterranean island of Lampedusa (35.52° N, 12.63° E) from May 1999 to December 2005 have been shown to occur in the 26% of the cloud-free days [Meloni, D., di Sarra, A., Biavati, G., DeLuisi, J.J., Monteleone, F., Pace, G., Piacentino, S., Sferlazzo, D.M., 2007. Seasonal behavior of Saharan dust events at the Mediterranean island of Lampedusa in the period 1999-2005, Atmos. Environ. 41, 3041-3056]. In this paper we focus on intense SD events detected until September 2006, characterized by large values of the Saharan Dust Event Index (SDEI), the sum of the daily average aerosol optical depth at 500 nm, τ, over the duration of the dust episode. The SDEI index provides an indication about the intensity of SD events, due either to a long duration and/or to high dust optical depth. A total of 24 episodes characterized by large values of SDEI are examined. The NCEP-based maps of geopotential height and temperature at 700 mbar are used to identify the main circulation patterns driving SD to the Central Mediterranean and Lampedusa. Dust transport episodes in summer last for several days, and the corresponding SDEI values are the highest of the year. These episodes are mainly governed by two circulation patterns: the trough extending near the Atlantic coast of Europe and the high pressure system present in North Africa, generally above 25° N. This configuration causes strong south-westerly flows from the Sahara towards Southern Italy. The time evolution of τ for these long SD events shows that the largest values (> 0.3) are usually observed when the two patterns are present simultaneously, while low (< 0.3) τ values are measured when the Atlantic trough influence is weak. Moreover, the most probable loading region typically shows a warm kernel in North-Western Sahara, with a tongue extending north-eastward towards Sicily. In spring, moderate to high τ are measured, and SD episodes last as long as 13 days. Two synoptic

  11. Wind Transport of Radionuclide- Bearing Dust, Peña Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, R.; Goodell, P. C.; Gill, T. E.; Arimoto, R.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation evaluates radionuclide fractionation during wind erosion of high-grade uranium ore storage piles at Peña Blanca (50km north of Chihuahua City), Chihuahua, Mexico. The aridity of the local environment promotes dust resuspension by high winds. Although active operations ceased in 1983, the Peña Blanca mining district is one of Mexico`s most important uranium ore reserves. The study site contains piles of high grade ore, left loose on the surface, and separated by the specific deposits from which they were derived (Margaritas, Nopal I, and Puerto I). Similar locations do not exist in the United States, since uranium mining sites in the USA have been reclaimed. The Peña Blanca site serves as an analog for the Yucca Mountain project. Dust deposition is collected at Peña Blanca with BSNE sediment catchers (Fryrear, 1986) and marble dust traps (Reheis, 1999). These devices capture windblown sediment; subsequently, the sample data will help quantify potentially radioactive short term field sediment loss from the repository surface and determine sediment flux. Aerosols and surface materials will be analyzed and radioactivity levels established utilizing techniques such as gamma spectroscopy. As a result, we will be able to estimate how much radionuclide contaminated dust is being transported or attached geochemically to fine grain soils or minerals (e.g., clays or iron oxides). The high-grade uranium-bearing material is at secular equilibrium, thus the entire decay series is present. Of resulting interest is not only the aeolian transport of uranium, but also of the other daughter products. These studies will improve our understanding of geochemical cycling of radionuclides with respect to sources, transport, and deposition. The results may also have important implications for the geosciences and homeland security, and potential applications to public health. Funding for this project is provided in part via a NSF grant to Arimoto.

  12. Characterization and quantification of bioaerosols in Saharan dust transported across the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Ditas, Florian; Klimach, Thomas; Prass, Maria; Hrabe de Angelis, Isabella; Blades, Edmund; Holanda, Bruna; Pöhlker, Mira; Maurus, Isabel; Kopper, Gila; Farrell, David; Stevens, Bjorn; Prospero, Joseph M.; Ulrich, Pöschl; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Pöhlker, Christopher; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Primary biological aerosols (bioaerosols), forming a subset of atmospheric particles, are directly released from the biosphere into the atmosphere. They comprise living and dead organisms (e.g., algae, bacteria, archaea), reproduction units (e.g., pollen, seeds, spores) as well as organism fragments and excretions. They play a key role in the dispersal of otherwise mostly sessile organisms (e.g. plants), but also in the spread of pathogens and diseases. Recently, also soil dust has been described to frequently occur in a close connection with biological particles (Conen et al., 2011). Bioaerosols can serve as nuclei for cloud droplets and ice crystals and may influence the radiative properties of the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrological cycle and climate (Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2016). It has been well described that dust masses are transported across the Atlantic comprising a large variety of bacteria and fungi, but the origin of the biological material remained largely unknown (Prospero et al., 2005). In the present study we aim to accomplish three major tasks, i.e., 1) Thorough identification and quantification of bioaerosol particles, 2) Characterization of ice nucleating (IN) properties of bioaerosols, and 3) Evaluation of similarities between bioaerosols and biological material in source regions of dust. For our field work we utilized filter techniques to collect aerosol samples of transatlantically transported dust at the easternmost site (Ragged Point) on the Caribbean island Barbados. Sampling took place from July to August 2016, when dust transport volumes were expected to reach peak amounts. Total suspended particles were collected ˜30 m above sea level using a high volume sampler (˜ 500 L min-1) and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI™) to obtain size-resolved samples. Directly after sampling at different time intervals (i.e. 24-hour, 48-hour, and 7-day samples) the filters were frozen until further analyses. In a

  13. Airmass Trajectories and Long Range Transport of Pollutants: Review of Wet Deposition Scenario in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Kulshrestha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of airmass trajectories and their role in air pollution transport. It describes the concept, history, and basic calculation of air trajectories citing various trajectory models used worldwide. It highlights various areas of trajectory applications and errors associated with trajectory calculations. South Asian region receives airmasses from Europe, Middle East, Africa, and Indian Ocean, and so forth, depending upon the season. These airmasses are responsible for export and import of pollutants depositing in nearby states. Trajectory analysis revealed that soil is contributed by the dust storms coming from Oman through Gulf and Iran, while most of black carbon (BC sources are located in India. A detailed review of trajectories associated with wet deposition events indicated that airmasses coming from Europe and Middle East carry high concentration of acidic pollutants which are deposited in Himalayan ranges. Similarly, trajectory analysis revealed that acidic pollutants from continental anthropogenic sources are transported to an ecosensitive site in Western Ghats in India and the outward fluxes of anthropogenic activities of Indo-Gangetic region are transported towards Bay of Bengal. Hence, transboundary and long range transport of pollutants are very important issues in South Asia which need immediate attention of scientists and policy makers.

  14. PM{sub 10} composition during an intense Saharan dust transport event over Athens (Greece)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remoundaki, E., E-mail: remound@metal.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Bourliva, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), Department of Geology, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Hellenic Open University, School of Science and Technology, 26335 Patras (Greece); Kokkalis, P.; Mamouri, R.E.; Papayannis, A. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Laser Remote Sensing Laboratory, Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Grigoratos, T.; Samara, C. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH), Department of Chemistry, Environmental Pollution Control Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Tsezos, M. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Laboratory of Environmental Science and Engineering, Heroon Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece)

    2011-09-15

    The influence of Saharan dust on the air quality of Southern European big cities became a priority during the last decade. The present study reports results on PM{sub 10} monitored at an urban site at 14 m above ground level during an intense Saharan dust transport event. The elemental composition was determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF) for 12 elements: Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Mg, Ti, S, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn. PM{sub 10} concentrations exceeded the EU limit (50 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) several times during the sampling period. Simultaneous maxima have been observed for the elements of crustal origin. The concentrations of all the elements presented a common maximum, corresponding to the date where the atmosphere was heavily charged with particulate matter permanently for an interval of about 10 h. Sulfur and heavy metal concentrations were also associated to local emissions. Mineral dust represented the largest fraction of PM{sub 10} reaching 79%. Seven days back trajectories have shown that the air masses arriving over Athens, originated from Western Sahara. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) revealed that particle agglomerates were abundant, most of them having sizes < 2 {mu}m. Aluminosilicates were predominant in dust particles also rich in calcium which was distributed between calcite, dolomite, gypsum and Ca-Si particles. These results were consistent with the origin of the dust particles and the elemental composition results. Sulfur and heavy metals were associated to very fine particles < 1 {mu}m. - Highlights: {yields} The paper focuses on the contribution of Saharan dust in PM10 levels at an urban site. {yields} High Ca and Fe, calcite, illite and smectites and poor quartz contents are related to source-regions. {yields} The data sets presented are in very good agreement and are also strongly confirmed by literature. {yields} Dust contribution in PM10 can be of comparable importance for

  15. Trace-metal concentrations in African dust: effects of long-distance transport and implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia; Lamothe, Paul; Morman, Suzette; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Gilkes, Robert; Prakongkep, Nattaporn

    2010-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel lose billions of tons of eroded mineral soils annually to the Americas and Caribbean, Europe and Asia via atmospheric transport. African dust was collected from a dust source region (Mali, West Africa) and from downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad-Tobago (TT) and U.S. Virgin Islands (VI)] and analysed for 32 trace-elements. Elemental composition of African dust samples was similar to that of average upper continental crust (UCC), with some enrichment or depletion of specific trace-elements. Pb enrichment was observed only in dust and dry deposition samples from the source region and was most likely from local use of leaded gasoline. Dust particles transported long-distances (VI and TT) exhibited increased enrichment of Mo and minor depletion of other elements relative to source region samples. This suggests that processes occurring during long-distance transport of dust produce enrichment/depletion of specific elements. Bioaccessibility of trace-metals in samples was tested in simulated human fluids (gastric and lung) and was found to be greater in downwind than source region samples, for some metals (e.g., As). The large surface to volume ratio of the dust particles (<2.5 µm) at downwind sites may be a factor.

  16. Mid-troposphere transport of Middle-East dust over the Arabian Sea and its effect on rainwater composition and sensitive ecosystems over India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, V; Muraleedharan, P M; Babu, C Prakash

    2017-10-20

    The importance of mineral dust and aerosols in the transfer of bio-essential elements to terrestrial and marine ecosystems far removed from the source region is well known. Aerosol concentrations measured at the surface over the west coast of India during the SW monsoon period (June to September) are usually very low as pristine maritime air from the Southern Indian Ocean blows over this region. However, we find very high levels of mineral dust and dust derived nutrients in rainwater collected during the SW monsoon period. We show that the dry, warm and dusty Red Sea Wind and Shamal Wind from the Middle-East override the moist oceanic Low-Level Jet (Findlater Jet) of the SW monsoon and transport large quantities of dust at heights between 2 km and 5 km over the Indian Peninsula. A substantial portion is the desert dust is scavenged and wet-deposited over the Western Ghats of India where it neutralizes the acidity of rainwater and provides substantial amounts of nutrients that have the potential to impact sensitive ecosystems in this region. After the Red Sea and Shamal Winds subside in September, the alkaline rainwater reverts to the acidic range due to soluble ions derived from local carbonaceous aerosols.

  17. Transport of East Asian dust storms to the marginal seas of China and the southern North Pacific in spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Li, Jiawei; Che, Huizheng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The transport of a super-severe dust storm that occurred in East Asia from 19 to 22 March 2010 has been well documented by both model simulations and surface observations. We investigated the transport of this severe dust storm and several other spring 2010 dust storms using model simulations, backward trajectories, and measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The model simulations indicated that the emission of dust in spring 2010 was about 35% higher than that in spring 2006 and was twice that of the 44-year average from 1960 to 2003. The dust emissions over two major source regions (western China and the Gobi Desert) in spring 2010 accounted for 86% of the total amount of dust. The simulated depositional flux over the two major source regions was c.2.7-9.0 times that over two marginal seas (the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea) and more than two magnitudes higher than that over the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. The mean extinction coefficient observed by the CALIPSO satellite over the two source regions was c.1.3-3.7 times that over the two marginal seas and one magnitude higher than that over the North Pacific. This was consistent with the result from our model, suggesting that this model is able to capture the major features of dust storms. The vertical profiles recorded by the CALIPSO satellite indicated that the dust aerosol mainly floated from the ground to 13 km above ground level over the source regions and above the seas. A multiple dust layer appeared over the seas and the backward trajectories suggested that the dust aerosol in different layers may have been sourced from different regions.

  18. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  19. The effect of surface topography on the lunar photoelectron sheath and electrostatic dust transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Piquette, Marcus; Likhanskii, Alexandre; Horányi, Mihály

    2012-09-01

    The dayside near-surface lunar plasma environment is electrostatically complex, due to the interaction between solar UV-induced photoemission, the collection of ambient ions and electrons, and the presence of micron and sub-micron sized dust grains. Further complicating this environment, although less well understood in effect, is the presence of surface relief, typically in the form of craters and/or boulders. It has been suggested that such non-trivial surface topography can lead to complex electrostatic potentials and fields, including “mini-wakes” behind small obstacles to the solar wind flow and “supercharging” near sunlit-shadowed boundaries (Criswell, D.R., De, B.R. [1977]. J. Geophys. Res. 82 (7); De, B.R., Criswell, D.R. [1977]. J. Geophys. Res. 82 (7); Farrell, W.M., Stubbs, T.J., Vondrak, R.R., Delory, G.T., Halekas, J.S. [2007]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 34; Wang, X., Horányi, M., Sternovsky, Z., Robertson, S., Morfill, G.E. [2007]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 34, L16104). In this paper, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, electrostatic particle-in-cell code used to model the dayside near-surface lunar plasma environment over a variety of local times with the presence of a crater. Additionally, we use the particle-in-cell model output to study the effect of surface topography on the dynamics of electrostatic dust transport, with the goal of understanding previous observations of dust dynamics on the Moon and dust ponding on various asteroids.

  20. Experiments on the photophoretic motion of chondrules and dust aggregates -indications for the transport of matter in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Teiser, Jens; Bischoff, Addi

    2010-01-01

    In a set of 16 drop tower experiments the motion of sub-millimeter to millimeter-sized particles under microgravity was observed. Illumination by a halogen lamp induced acceleration of the particles due to photophoresis. Photophoresis on dust-free chondrules, on chondrules, glass spheres and meta....... The strength of the photophoretic force varies for chondrules, dust covered particles and pure dust from low to strong, respectively. The measurements support the idea that photophoresis in the early Solar System can be efficient to transport solid particles outward....

  1. Can Transport of Saharan Dust Explain Extensive Clay Deposits in the Amazon Basin? A Test Using Radiogenic Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Abouchami, W.; Näthe, K.; Kumar, A.; Galer, S. J.; Jochum, K. P.; Williams, E.; Horbe, A. M.; Rosa, J. W.; Adams, D. K.; Balsam, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Bodélé Depression, located in the Southern Sahara, is a huge source of atmospheric dust and thus an important element in biogeochemical cycles and the radiative budget of Earth's atmosphere. Previous studies have shown that Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic acts as an important source of mineral nutrients to the Amazon rainforest. The Belterra Clay, which outcrops extensively across the Amazon Basin in Brazil, has been proposed to result from dry deposition of African dusts. We have investigated this hypothesis by measuring the radiogenic isotopic composition (Sr, Nd and Pb) of a suite of samples from the Belterra Clay, the Bodélé Depression, dusts deposits collected at various locations along the airmass transport trajectory, as well as loess from the Cape Verde Islands. Radiogenic isotope systems are powerful tracers of provenance and can be used to fingerprint dust sources and atmospheric transport patterns. Our results identify distinct isotopic signatures in the Belterra Clay samples and the African sources. The Belterra Clay display radiogenic Sr and Pb isotope ratios associated with non-radiogenic Nd isotope signatures. In contrast, Bodélé samples and dusts deposits show lower Pb isotope ratios, variable 87Sr/86Sr, and relatively homogeneous Nd isotopic compositions, albeit more radiogenic than those of the Belterra Clay. Our data show unambiguously that the Belterra Clay is not derived from African dust deposition, nor from the Andean chain, as originally suggested by W. Sombroek. Rather, isotopic compositions and Nd model ages are consistent with simple mixing of Archean and younger Proterozoic terranes within the Amazon Basin as a result of weathering and erosion under humid tropical conditions. Whether Saharan dusts contribute to the fertilization in the Amazon Basin cannot be ruled out, however, since the African dust isotopic signature is expected to be entirely overprinted by local sources. Radiogenic isotope data obtained on

  2. Energy transport in the presence of long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Debarshee

    2017-10-01

    We study energy transport in the paradigmatic Hamiltonian mean-field (HMF) model and other related long-range interacting models using molecular dynamics simulations. We show that energy diffusion in the HMF model is subdiffusive in nature, which confirms a recently obtained intriguing result that, despite being globally interacting, this model is a thermal insulator in the thermodynamic limit. Surprisingly, when additional nearest-neighbor interactions are introduced to the HMF model, an energy superdiffusion is observed. We show that these results can be consistently explained by studying energy localization due to thermally generated intrinsic localized excitation modes (discrete breathers) in nonlinear discrete systems. Our analysis for the HMF model can also be readily extended to more generic long-range interacting models where the interaction strength decays algebraically with the (shortest) distance between two lattice sites. This reconciles many of the apparently counterintuitive results presented recently [C. Olivares and C. Anteneodo, Phys. Rev. E 94, 042117 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.042117; D. Bagchi, Phys. Rev. E 95, 032102 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.95.032102] concerning energy transport in two such long-range interacting models.

  3. The impact of channel effect on Asian dust transport dynamics: a case in southeastern Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A super heavy dust event was identified with unprecedented PM10 in terms of speed and concentration in the southeastern Asia. The average concentration was observed exceeding the value of 1000 μg m−3 for the duration lasting more than 10 h, with the highest value reached 1724 μg m−3 in northern Taiwan on 21 March 2010. We found that this case exhibited an uneven and intriguing spatial distribution of PM10 concentration and transport speed between eastern and western Taiwan. Higher values were observed in the western and northern areas. The peak concentrations can vary up to 5-fold between western and eastern Taiwan, and ten-fold between the northern tip and southern tip of Taiwan, only about 400 km apart. A high resolution, 10 km, numerical study by Weather Research Forecast (WRF and WRF-chem models revealed that this intriguing spatial distribution of the Asian dust transport was resulting from a strong coupling effect of the geographic channel effect and blocking of the easterly from the Pacific Ocean. We are confident that this coupling effect can be revealed only by applying a high resolution numerical study in other similar regions.

  4. Simulation of impurity transport in the peripheral plasma due to the emission of dust in long pulse discharges on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoji

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two different plasma termination processes by dust emission were observed in long pulse discharges in the Large Helical Device. One is a plasma termination caused by large amounts of carbon dust released from a lower divertor region. The other is termination caused by stainless steel (iron dust emission from the surface of a helical coil can. The effect of the dust emission on the sustainment of the long pulse discharges are investigated using a three-dimensional edge plasma transport code (EMC3-EIRENE coupled with a dust transport code (DUSTT. The simulation shows that the plasma is more influenced by the iron dust emission from the helical coil can than by the carbon dust emission from the divertor region. The simulation revealed that the plasma flow in divertor legs is quite effective for preventing dust from terminating the long pulse discharges.

  5. Measurements of the Atmospheric Electric Field through a Triangular Array and the Long-range Saharan Dust Electrification in Southern Portugal

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, H G; Pereira, S; Barbosa, S M; Nicoll, K; Pereira, M Collares; Harrison, R G

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric electric field (AEF) measurements were carried out in three different sites forming a triangular array in Southern Portugal. The campaign was performed during the summer characterized by Saharan dust outbreaks; the 16th-17th July 2014 desert dust event is considered here. Evidence of long-range dust electrification is attributed to the air-Earth electrical current creating a positive space-charge inside of the dust layer. An increase of ~23 V/m is observed in AEF on the day of the dust event corresponding to space-charges of ~20-2 pCm-3 (charge layer thicknesses ~10-100 m). A reduction of AEF is observed after the dust event.

  6. Dust Transport Across the Atlantic Studied by Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar During the Saltrace Experiment in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chouza Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SALTRACE field experiment, conducted during June/July 2013, the Saharan dust transport across the Atlantic was analyzed by a set of ground based, in-situ and airborne instruments, including a 2-μm coherent DWL (Doppler wind lidar mounted onboard the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. An overview of the measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction, horizontal and vertical winds retrieved from the DWL are presented together with a brief description of the applied methods. The retrieved measurements provide direct observation of Saharan dust transport mechanisms across the Atlantic as well as island induced lee waves in the Barbados region.

  7. Trends of Dust Transport Episodes in Cyprus Using a Classification of Synoptic Types Established with Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Michaelides

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between dust episodes over Cyprus and specific synoptic patterns has long been considered but also further supported in recent studies by the authors. Having defined a dust episode as a day when the average PM10 measurement exceeds the threshold of 50 mg/(m3 day, the authors have utilized Artificial Neural Networks and synoptic charts, together with satellite and ground measurements, in order to establish a scheme which links specific synoptic patterns with the appearance of dust transport over Cyprus. In an effort to understand better these complicated synoptic-scale phenomena and their associations with dust transport episodes, the authors attempt in the present paper a followup of the previous tasks with the objective to further investigate dust episodes from the point of view of their time trends. The results have shown a tendency for the synoptic situations favoring dust events to increase in the last decades, whereas, the synoptic situations not favoring such events tend to decrease with time.

  8. Holocene secular variations in dust transport to east Antarctica (Vostok and Dome-C): a response to solar forcing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, B.; Petit, J.-R.; Krinner, G.; Maggi, V.; Raisbeck, G.; Yiou, F.; Jouzel, J.; Lipenkov, V.

    2003-04-01

    Two Holocene sections from EPICA-Dome C and Vostok ice cores have been analysed at high temporal resolution (1 sample per 40 and 50 yrs respectively) for continental dust concentration and size distribution. A new Holocene record of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be has also been obtained from the Vostok ice core, and the chronologies of all three records are tightly linked by stratigraphic markers. Both dust records of size distribution, good proxy for the efficiency of atmospheric dust transport to the Antarctic plateau, clearly show secular oscillations in the 200-year band that are opposite in phase between the two sites. This suggests a secular variability in the efficiency of dust advection to East Antarctica and a regional character of dust transport. The combined dust record and the 10Be record appear highly coherent in the 200-year band, but the atmospheric response to solar forcing seems lagged by about 50 years. We speculate an amplification by the Southern Ocean: sea ice can interact with atmospheric circulation both responding to atmospheric conditions and modifying the cyclonic behaviour and sea ice itself. We performed a sensitivity test with the LMDz atmosphere-only general circulation model with present-day and modified sea-surface conditions, and the model response evidence that Antarctic ocean surface temperature anomalies propagate vertically to high levels in the troposphere, likely affecting dust advection. Such an amplification of solar frequencies by the Southern Ocean can allow a combination of them and originate the millennial-scale oscillations also present in EPICA dust record.

  9. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; Schum, Simeon; Dzepina, Katja; Wright, Kendra; Owen, R. Chris; Fialho, Paulo; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition between samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. This study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.

  10. Recently deglaciated high-altitude soils of the Himalaya: diverse environments, heterogenous bacterial communities and long-range dust inputs from the upper troposphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaz Stres

    Full Text Available The Himalaya with its altitude and geographical position forms a barrier to atmospheric transport, which produces much aqueous-particle monsoon precipitation and makes it the largest continuous ice-covered area outside polar regions. There is a paucity of data on high-altitude microbial communities, their native environments and responses to environmental-spatial variables relative to seasonal and deglaciation events.Soils were sampled along altitude transects from 5000 m to 6000 m to determine environmental, spatial and seasonal factors structuring bacterial communities characterized by 16 S rRNA gene deep sequencing. Dust traps and fresh-snow samples were used to assess dust abundance and viability, community structure and abundance of dust associated microbial communities. Significantly different habitats among the altitude-transect samples corresponded to both phylogenetically distant and closely-related communities at distances as short as 50 m showing high community spatial divergence. High within-group variability that was related to an order of magnitude higher dust deposition obscured seasonal and temporal rearrangements in microbial communities. Although dust particle and associated cell deposition rates were highly correlated, seasonal dust communities of bacteria were distinct and differed significantly from recipient soil communities. Analysis of closest relatives to dust OTUs, HYSPLIT back-calculation of airmass trajectories and small dust particle size (4-12 µm suggested that the deposited dust and microbes came from distant continental, lacustrine and marine sources, e.g. Sahara, India, Caspian Sea and Tibetan plateau. Cyanobacteria represented less than 0.5% of microbial communities suggesting that the microbial communities benefitted from (codeposited carbon which was reflected in the psychrotolerant nature of dust-particle associated bacteria.The spatial, environmental and temporal complexity of the high-altitude soils of the

  11. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Watanabe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Light detection and ranging (LIDAR can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI; 0.03, 0.05, and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11. The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

  12. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  13. Transport of carbon-bearing dusts from Iraq to Japan during Iraq's War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazaki, Kazue; Wakimoto, Rie; Minami, Yukiya; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Miyata, Koshirou; Sato, Kazuhiro; Saji, Ichiro; Chaerun, S. Khodijah; Zhou, Guoping; Morishita, Tomoaki; Asada, Ryuji; Segawa, Hiromi; Imanishi, Hiroki; Kato, Rie; Otani, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tomoko

    Rainwater collected during the period of February-April, 2003 in Kanazawa University and Hakui, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan, was investigated by ion chromatography of the dissolved ions, and Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive analyzer (SEM-EDX), electron microprobe analyzer (EPMA), transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses of the filtered samples. The pH, Eh, EC, dissolved oxygen (DO) and depleted U (DU) of the rainwater were also measured. The results show a rare case with low pH value of rain and high value of electrical conductivity (EC) in the rainwater during certain period. The NO 3-, SO 42- and NH 4+ concentrations on 26th March, show quite high values after oil field fires on 21st March 2003. The powdery dust and carbon-bearing nm sized particles contained in the rainwater have characteristics different from that of the Asian dust (Kosa). Since 21 March, 2003 the Iraq plunged into the war, the 9 oil field fires were reported on 25 March, 2003 in Rumaylah oil field near the borderline of Kuwait. The first precipitation was caught in Kanazawa on 24 March, 2003. The pH value of the rainwater indicated a strong acid rain (pH 3.6) with black powdery dusts. The acid rain on 27th March to 2nd April (pH 3.4-4.3; 5-17 mm) associated with WNW wind (2.7-4.1 m/s) has continued to the first 10 days of April in Kanazawa, during the 9 oil fields were burning in Iraq. The EC in rainwater collected from 24 March to 15 April, 2003, shows high concentrations of ions, suggesting high contents of water soluble-carbon particles and soot. In the meantime, it was the highest season of sandstorms at bare dried land in Iraq from the end of March to the beginning of April. Westerly wind blew around 5500 m high, and the sandstorm with 2000 m wide was transported by strong wind to Zagros 3000 m high mountains. The hot wind hit the Zagros Mountains and easily to join and rise to Westerly wind high by a rising air current. The

  14. Mixing and Transport of Dust in the Early Solar Nebula as Inferred from Titanium Isotope Variations among Chondrules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Simone; Burkhardt, Christoph; Budde, Gerrit; Metzler, Knut; Kleine, Thorsten, E-mail: burkhardt@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Planetologie, University of Münster, Wilhelm Klemm-Straße 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2017-05-20

    Chondrules formed by the melting of dust aggregates in the solar protoplanetary disk and as such provide unique insights into how solid material was transported and mixed within the disk. Here, we show that chondrules from enstatite and ordinary chondrites show only small {sup 50}Ti variations and scatter closely around the {sup 50}Ti composition of their host chondrites. By contrast, chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites have highly variable {sup 50}Ti compositions, which, relative to the terrestrial standard, range from the small {sup 50}Ti deficits measured for enstatite and ordinary chondrite chondrules to the large {sup 50}Ti excesses known from Ca–Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). These {sup 50}Ti variations can be attributed to the addition of isotopically heterogeneous CAI-like material to enstatite and ordinary chondrite-like chondrule precursors. The new Ti isotopic data demonstrate that isotopic variations among carbonaceous chondrite chondrules do not require formation over a wide range of orbital distances, but can instead be fully accounted for by the incorporation of isotopically anomalous “nuggets” into chondrule precursors. As such, these data obviate the need for disk-wide transport of chondrules prior to chondrite parent body accretion and are consistent with formation of chondrules from a given chondrite group in localized regions of the disk. Finally, the ubiquitous presence of {sup 50}Ti-enriched material in carbonaceous chondrites and the lack of this material in the non-carbonaceous chondrites support the idea that these two meteorite groups derive from areas of the disk that remained isolated from each other, probably through the formation of Jupiter.

  15. Mixing and Transport of Dust in the Early Solar Nebula as Inferred from Titanium Isotope Variations among Chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Simone; Burkhardt, Christoph; Budde, Gerrit; Metzler, Knut; Kleine, Thorsten

    2017-05-01

    Chondrules formed by the melting of dust aggregates in the solar protoplanetary disk and as such provide unique insights into how solid material was transported and mixed within the disk. Here, we show that chondrules from enstatite and ordinary chondrites show only small 50Ti variations and scatter closely around the 50Ti composition of their host chondrites. By contrast, chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites have highly variable 50Ti compositions, which, relative to the terrestrial standard, range from the small 50Ti deficits measured for enstatite and ordinary chondrite chondrules to the large 50Ti excesses known from Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). These 50Ti variations can be attributed to the addition of isotopically heterogeneous CAI-like material to enstatite and ordinary chondrite-like chondrule precursors. The new Ti isotopic data demonstrate that isotopic variations among carbonaceous chondrite chondrules do not require formation over a wide range of orbital distances, but can instead be fully accounted for by the incorporation of isotopically anomalous “nuggets” into chondrule precursors. As such, these data obviate the need for disk-wide transport of chondrules prior to chondrite parent body accretion and are consistent with formation of chondrules from a given chondrite group in localized regions of the disk. Finally, the ubiquitous presence of 50Ti-enriched material in carbonaceous chondrites and the lack of this material in the non-carbonaceous chondrites support the idea that these two meteorite groups derive from areas of the disk that remained isolated from each other, probably through the formation of Jupiter.

  16. Nearly a Decade of CALIPSO Observations of Asian and Saharan Dust Properties Near Source and Transport Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Z.; Tackett, J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C.; Winker, D.; H. Yu,

    2015-01-01

    The lidar on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, makes robust measurements of dust and has generated a length of record that is significant both seasonally and inter-annually. We exploit this record to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Asian and Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol, between 2006-2015. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on the morphology, vertical extent and size of the dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source to the same distributions in the far field or transport region. CALIPSO is collaboration between NASA and Centre National D'études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  17. Characterization of Saharan dust properties transported towards Europe in the frame of the FENNEC project: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnas, F.; Chazette, P.; Flamant, C.; Royer, P.; Sodemman, H.; Derimian, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In the framework of the FENNEC experiment (6 to 30 June 2011) an effort has been dedicated to characterize Saharan dust plumes transported towards southern Europe. Hence, a multi instrumented field campaign has been conducted. Ground based nitrogen Raman LIDAR (GBNRL) has been deployed in southern Spain close to Marbella, simultaneously with airborne lidar (AL) performing measurements over both the tropical Atlantic Ocean and the western Africa (from 2 to 23 June). The GBNRL was equipped with co-polar and cross-polar channels to perform continuous measurements of the dust aerosols trapped in the troposphere. It was developed by LSCE with the support of the LEOSPHERE Company. The French FALCON 20 research aircraft operated by SAFIRE (Service des Avions Francais Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) carried the AL Leandre Nouvelle Generation (LNG) as well as a dropsonde releasing system and radiometers. A major, one week long, dust event has been sampled over Spain from 25 June to 1 July with high optical depth (>0.5 at 355nm) and particular depolarization ratios (15 to 25%). Backtrajectory studies suggest that the dust particles observed were from dust uplifts that occurred in Southern Morocco and Northern Mauritania. The event has been also documented 3 days before by the AL flying over Mauritania. AERONET sunphotometer measurements of aerosol properties, along the dust plume transport path appear to be coherent with both the lidar and the backtrajectory analysis. These analysis exhibit a likely major contribution from the Western Sahara sources to the Southern Europe. Such a contribution may impact the visibility and then the airtrafic, modify the tropospheric chemistry, and add nutrients to both the Mediterranean Sea and the continental surfaces. It can also affect the health of European populations. We will present strategy of the experiment and the case study built from measurements performed at the end of June.

  18. Comparison of Key Absorption and Optical Properties Between Pure and Transported Anthropogenic Dust over East and Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Jianping; Holben, Brent N.; Zhang, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    Asian dust particulate is one of the primary aerosol constituents in the Earth-atmosphere system that exerts profound influences on environmental quality, human health, the marine biogeochemical cycle, and Earth's climate. To date, the absorptive capacity of dust aerosol generated from the Asian desert region is still an open question. In this article, we compile columnar key absorption and optical properties of mineral dust over East and Central Asian areas by utilizing the multiyear quality-assured datasets observed at 13 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We identify two types of Asian dust according to threshold criteria from previously published literature. (1) The particles with high aerosol optical depth at 440 nm (AOD(440) > or = 0.4) and a low Angstrom wavelength exponent at 440-870 nm (alpha or = 0.4 and 0.2 Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) mineral-accumulated (mineral-acc.) and mineral-transported (mineral-tran.) modes. Therefore, we are convinced that our results hold promise for updating and improving accuracies of Asian dust characteristics in present-day remote sensing applications and regional or global climate models.

  19. Desert dust hazards: A global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    Dust storms originate in many of the world's drylands and frequently present hazards to human society, both within the drylands themselves but also outside drylands due to long-range transport of aeolian sediments. Major sources of desert dust include the Sahara, the Middle East, central and eastern Asia, and parts of Australia, but dust-raising occurs all across the global drylands and, on occasion, beyond. Dust storms occur throughout the year and they vary in frequency and intensity over a number of timescales. Long-range transport of desert dust typically takes place along seasonal transport paths. Desert dust hazards are here reviewed according to the three phases of the wind erosion system: where dust is entrained, during the transport phase, and on deposition. This paper presents a synthesis of these hazards. It draws on empirical examples in physical geography, medical geology and geomorphology to discuss case studies from all over the world and in various fields. These include accelerated soil erosion in agricultural zones - where dust storms represent a severe form of accelerated soil erosion - the health effects of air pollution caused by desert aerosols via their physical, chemical and biological properties, transport accidents caused by poor visibility during desert dust events, and impacts on electricity generation and distribution. Given the importance of desert dust as a hazard to human societies, it is surprising to note that there have been relatively few attempts to assess their impact in economic terms. Existing studies in this regard are also reviewed, but the wide range of impacts discussed in this paper indicates that desert dust storms deserve more attention in this respect.

  20. Tennessee long-range transportation plan : financial plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Meeting Tennessees transportation requirements over the next 25 years is a major challenge. The infrastructure demands associated with building and maintaining the states aviation, bicycle and pedestrian, rail, water, highway, and public transp...

  1. Comparison of Key Absorption and Optical Properties Between Pure and Transported Anthropogenic Dust over East and Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Jianping; Holben, Brent N.; Zhang, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    Asian dust particulate is one of the primary aerosol constituents in the Earth-atmosphere system that exerts profound influences on environmental quality, human health, the marine biogeochemical cycle, and Earth's climate. To date, the absorptive capacity of dust aerosol generated from the Asian desert region is still an open question. In this article, we compile columnar key absorption and optical properties of mineral dust over East and Central Asian areas by utilizing the multiyear quality-assured datasets observed at 13 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We identify two types of Asian dust according to threshold criteria from previously published literature. (1) The particles with high aerosol optical depth at 440 nm (AOD(440) > or = 0.4) and a low Angstrom wavelength exponent at 440-870 nm (alpha or = 0.4 and 0.2 < alpha < 0.6 are designated as Transported Anthropogenic Dust (TDU), which is mainly dominated by dust aerosol and might mix with other anthropogenic aerosol types. Our results reveal that the primary components of high AOD days are predominantly dust over East and Central Asian regions, even if their variations rely on different sources, distance from the source, emission mechanisms, and meteorological characteristics. The overall mean and standard deviation of single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, real part and imaginary part of complex refractive index at 550 nm for Asian PDU are 0.935 +/- 0.014, 0.742 +/- 0.008, 1.526 +/- 0.029, and 0.00226 +/- 0.00056, respectively, while corresponding values are 0.921 +/- 0.021, 0.723 +/- 0.009, 1.521 +/- 0.025, and 0.00364 +/- 0.0014 for Asian TDU. Aerosol shortwave direct radiative effects at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), at the surface (SFC), and in the atmospheric layer (ATM) for Asian PDU (alpha < 0.2) and TDU (0.2 < alpha < 0.6) computed in this study, are a factor of 2 smaller than the results of Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) mineral-accumulated (mineral-acc.) and

  2. Climate-controlled multidecadal variability in North African dust transport to the Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.; Reichart, G.-J.; Aeschlimann, B.; Günther, D.; Boer, W.; Lange, G.J. de

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution laser ablation–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy scanning of resin-embedded laminated sediments is used to detail variability in the composition and magnitude of recent eolian dust deposition in the Eastern Mediterranean. The composition of dust accumulating in the anoxic

  3. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  4. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  5. Size-segregated sugar composition of transported dust aerosols from Middle-East over Delhi during March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Fu, P. Q.; Kang, M.; Sarangi, B.; Sinha, D.; Kotnala, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    During March 20-22, 2012 Delhi experienced a massive dust-storm which originated in Middle-East. Size segregated sampling of these dust aerosols was performed using a nine staged Andersen sampler (5 sets of samples were collected including before dust-storm (BDS)), dust-storm day 1 to 3 (DS1 to DS3) and after dust storm (ADS). Sugars (mono and disaccharides, sugar-alcohols and anhydro-sugars) were determined using GC-MS technique. It was observed that on the onset of dust-storm, total suspended particulate matter (TSPM, sum of all stages) concentration in DS1 sample increased by > 2.5 folds compared to that of BDS samples. Interestingly, fine particulate matter (sum of stages with cutoff size 2.5 folds as compared to that of BDS samples. Sugars analyzed in DS1 coarse mode (sum of stages with cutoff size > 2.1 μm) samples showed a considerable increase ( 1.7-2.8 folds) compared to that of other samples. It was further observed that mono-saccharides, disaccharides and sugar-alcohols concentrations were enhanced in giant (> 9.0 μm) particles in DS1 samples as compared to other samples. On the other hand, anhydro-sugars comprised 13-27% of sugars in coarse mode particles and were mostly found in fine mode constituting 66-85% of sugars in all the sample types. Trehalose showed an enhanced ( 2-4 folds) concentration in DS1 aerosol samples in both coarse (62.80 ng/m3) and fine (8.57 ng/m3) mode. This increase in Trehalose content in both coarse and fine mode suggests their origin to the transported desert dust and supports their candidature as an organic tracer for desert dust entrainments. Further, levoglucosan to mannosan (L/M) ratios which have been used to predict the type of biomass burning influences on aerosols are found to be size dependent in these samples. These ratios are higher for fine mode particles, hence should be used with caution while interpreting the sources using this tool.

  6. Half-range acceleration for one-dimensional transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zika, M.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Larsen, E.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Researchers have devoted considerable effort to developing acceleration techniques for transport iterations in highly diffusive problems. The advantages and disadvantages of source iteration, rebalance, diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), transport synthetic acceleration (TSA), and projection acceleration methods are documented in the literature and will not be discussed here except to note that no single method has proven to be applicable to all situations. Here, the authors describe a new acceleration method that is based solely on transport sweeps, is algebraically linear (and is therefore amenable to a Fourier analysis), and yields a theoretical spectral radius bounded by one-third for all cases. This method does not introduce spatial differencing difficulties (as is the case for DSA) nor does its theoretical performance degrade as a function of mesh and material properties (as is the case for TSA). Practical simulations of the new method agree with the theoretical predictions, except for scattering ratios very close to unity. At this time, they believe that the discrepancy is due to the effect of boundary conditions. This is discussed further.

  7. Regional transport of anthropogenic pollution and dust aerosols in spring to Tianjin - A coastal megacity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoli; Wang, Qiao; Li, Zhengqiang; Calvello, Mariarosaria; Esposito, Francesco; Pavese, Giulia; Lin, Meijing; Cao, Junji; Zhou, Chunyan; Li, Donghui; Xu, Hua

    2017-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of columnar aerosol microphysical and optical properties, as well as PM2.5 chemical compositions, were made during two types of spring pollution episodes in Tianjin, a coastal megacity of China. The events were investigated using field observations, satellite data, model simulations, and meteorological fields. The lower Ångström Exponent and the higher aerosol optical depth on 29 March, compared with the earlier event on 26 March, implied a dominance of coarse mode particles - this was consistent with the differences in volume-size distributions. Based on the single scattering spectra, the dominant absorber (at blue wavelength) changed from black carbon during less polluted days to brown carbon on 26 March and dust on 29 March. The concentrations of major PM2.5 species for these two episodes also differed, with the earlier event enriched in pollution-derived substances and the later with mineral dust elements. The formation mechanisms of these two pollution episodes were also examined. The 26 March episode was attributed to the accumulation of both local emissions and anthropogenic pollutants transported from the southwest of Tianjin under the control of high pressure system. While the high aerosol loading on 29 March was caused by the mixing of transported dust from northwest source region with local urban pollution. The mixing of transported anthropogenic pollutants and dust with local emissions demonstrated the complexity of springtime pollution in Tianjin. The synergy of multi-scale observations showed excellent potential for air pollution study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Trends in statewide long-range transportation plans : core and emerging topics in 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This report synthesizes key findings and trends from the 2017 Statewide Long-Range Transportation Plan (SLRTP) Database, which represents key observations identified through a review of all 52 SLRTPs and Statewide Transportation Improvement Programs ...

  9. Long-term (2002–2012 investigation of Saharan dust transport events at Mt. Cimone GAW global station, Italy (2165 m a.s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Duchi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mineral dust transport from North Africa towards the Mediterranean basin and Europe was monitored over an 11-y period (2002–2012 using the continuous observations made at Mt. Cimone WMO/GAW global station (CMN. CMN is in a strategic position for investigating the impact of mineral dust transported from northern Africa on the atmospheric composition of the Mediterranean basin and southern Europe. The identification of “dusty days” is based on coupling the measured in situ coarse aerosol particle number concentration with an analysis of modeled back trajectories tracing the origin of air masses from North Africa. More than 400 episodes of mineral dust transport were identified, accounting for 15.7% of the investigated period. Our analysis points to a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest frequency from spring to autumn, and a dust-induced variation of the coarse particle number concentration larger than 123% on a seasonal basis. In addition, FLEXTRA 10-d back trajectories showed that northwestern and central Africa are the major mineral dust source regions. Significant inter-annual variability of dust outbreak frequency and related mineral dust loading were detected and during spring the NAO index was positively correlated (R2 = 0.32 with dust outbreak frequency. Lastly, the impact of transported mineral dust on the surface O3 mixing ratio was quantified over the 11-y investigation period. Evidence of a non-linear and negative correlation between mineral dust and ozone concentrations was found, resulting in an average spring and summer decrease of the O3 mixing ratio down to 7%.

  10. Investigation of near-surface lunar dust transport in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Gruen, Eberhard; Robertson, Scott; Wang, Xu; Dove, Adrienne; Munsat, Tobin; Poppe, Andrew; Duncan, Nicole; Drake, Keith; Auer, Siegfried

    The lunar surface is a natural dusty plasma laboratory. The solar UV radiation and the solar wind charge the surface and differential charging due to light/shadow boundaries may enhance the electrostatic field intensity locally. The lunar surface is also exposed to the continual bombardment by interplanetary dust particles with an estimated influx of mass at about 5103 kg/day and impact speed ¿ 2 km/s. Besides a small impact plasma cloud, the micrometeoroid impacts also generate secondary ejecta particles with an estimated mass yield of 10e3 that form a permanently present dust exosphere about the Moon. The combination of these processes may be responsible for a mobilization and lofting of small grains from the surface to explain historical data sets from in situ and remote sensing observations that indicate the presence of lofted dust populations, possibly reaching high altitudes over the lunar surface. Our laboratory has over a decade long history of simulating the lunar surface environment and the charging and dynamics of dust. The recent work include: 1) the dust charging and the mobilization of dust pile on negatively biased surface exposed to low density plasma. Individual grains can lift from the surface and move outward from the pile to transform the pile of dust into a ring shape. 2) The development of a strong UV source using Xe excimer lamps that can generate sufficient photoelectron emission to create a photoelectron sheath. 3) Development of a 3 MV dust accelerator facility to study the generation of impact plasmas and the charging of the surface in the vicinity of the impact. The accelerator will be able to provide particles with speeds up to 50 km/s. 4) The development of the Electrostatic Lunar Dust Analyzer instrument to measure the abundance, charge, size and velocity of dust particles mobilized near the lunar surface. The instrument employs an array of wire electrodes, each connected to sensitive electronics to measure the induced charge from a

  11. Long-range transport and mixing of aerosol sources during the 2013 North American biomass burning episode: analysis of multiple lidar observations in the western Mediterranean basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-range transport of biomass burning (BB aerosols between North America and the Mediterranean region took place in June 2013. A large number of ground-based and airborne lidar measurements were deployed in the western Mediterranean during the Chemistry-AeRosol Mediterranean EXperiment (ChArMEx intensive observation period. A detailed analysis of the potential North American aerosol sources is conducted including the assessment of their transport to Europe using forward simulations of the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model initialized using satellite observations by MODIS and CALIOP. The three-dimensional structure of the aerosol distribution in the ChArMEx domain observed by the ground-based lidars (Minorca, Barcelona and Lampedusa, a Falcon-20 aircraft flight and three CALIOP tracks, agrees very well with the model simulation of the three major sources considered in this work: Canadian and Colorado fires, a dust storm from western US and the contribution of Saharan dust streamers advected from the North Atlantic trade wind region into the westerlies region. Four aerosol types were identified using the optical properties of the observed aerosol layers (aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio and the transport model analysis of the contribution of each aerosol source: (i pure BB layer, (ii weakly dusty BB, (iii significant mixture of BB and dust transported from the trade wind region, and (iv the outflow of Saharan dust by the subtropical jet and not mixed with BB aerosol. The contribution of the Canadian fires is the major aerosol source during this episode while mixing of dust and BB is only significant at an altitude above 5 km. The mixing corresponds to a 20–30 % dust contribution in the total aerosol backscatter. The comparison with the MODIS aerosol optical depth horizontal distribution during this episode over the western Mediterranean Sea shows that the Canadian fire contributions were as large as the direct

  12. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Miao, E-mail: hemiao.cmu@gmail.com [Environment and Chronic Non-communicable Disease Research Center, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001 Shenyang (China); Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Ichinose, Takamichi, E-mail: ichinose@oita-nhs.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Song, Yuan, E-mail: freude@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, Yasuhiro, E-mail: songyuan1107@163.com [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Arashidani, Keiichi, E-mail: arashi@snow.ocn.ne.jp [Department of Immunology and Parasitology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555 Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, Seiichi, E-mail: syoshida@oita-nhs.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Liu, Boying, E-mail: boyingliu321@gmail.com [Environment and Chronic Non-communicable Disease Research Center, College of Public Health, China Medical University, 11001 Shenyang (China); Department of Health Sciences, Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 870-1201 Oita (Japan); Nishikawa, Masataka, E-mail: mnishi@nies.go.jp [Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 305-8506 Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Takano, Hirohisa, E-mail: htakano@health.env.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Environmental Health Division, Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); and others

    2013-11-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and β-glucan (ASD1 < ASD2) and SiO{sub 2} (ASD1 > ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1 < ASD2) and chemokine eotaxin (ASD1 > ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and β-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2 −/−), TLR4 −/−, and MyD88 −/− mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2 −/− BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1α secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4 −/− BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88 −/− BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Asian sand dust (ASD) from the deserts of China causes serious respiratory problems. • The aggravating effects of two ASDs on lung eosinophilia were compared. • The ASDs contained different LPS and β-glucan (ASD1

  13. Effects of two Asian sand dusts transported from the dust source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on murine lung eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Seiichi; Liu, Boying; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa; Sun, Guifan

    2013-11-01

    The quality and quantity of toxic materials adsorbed onto Asian sand dust (ASD) are different based on dust source regions and passage routes. The aggravating effects of two ASDs (ASD1 and ASD2) transported from the source regions of Inner Mongolia and northeast China on lung eosinophilia were compared to clarify the role of toxic materials in ASD. The ASDs contained different amounts of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and β-glucan (ASD1ASD2). CD-1 mice were instilled intratracheally with ASD1, ASD2 and/or ovalbumin (OVA) four times at 2-week intervals. ASD1 and ASD2 enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the submucosa of the airway, with goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. ASD1 and ASD2 synergistically increased OVA-induced eosinophil-relevant cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5), IL-13 (ASD1ASD2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. ASD2 aggravating effects on lung eosinophilia were greater than ASD1. The role of LPS and β-glucan in ASD2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators was assessed using in vitro bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type, Toll-like receptor 2-deficient (TLR2-/-), TLR4-/-, and MyD88-/- mice (on Balb/c background). ASD2-stimulated TLR2-/- BMDMs enhanced IL-6, IL-12, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1α secretion compared with ASD2-stimulated TLR4-/- BMDMs. Protein expression from ASD2-stimulated MyD88-/- BMDM were very low or undetectable. The in vitro results indicate that lung eosinophilia caused by ASD is TLR4 dependent. Therefore, the aggravation of OVA-related lung eosinophilia by ASD may be dependent on toxic substances derived from microbes, such as LPS, rather than SiO2. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of heating by transported dust layers on cloud and precipitation: a numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous recent publications showing that mineral dust might be a good absorber for solar radiation in addition to its capability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice forming nuclei (IFN, and could lead to reduced cloud cover and precipitation in the region where it is present. This effect is investigated using a dynamic cloud model with detailed microphysics of both warm and ice phase processes. The model is initialized using measured size distributions and concentrations of mineral dust particles. Our results show that when dust appears at the cloud-base height and below 3 km, where the temperature is warmer than −5°C, the heating induced by the presence of dust layers can inhibit the formation of cloud droplets and suppresses the development of precipitation, leading to lower cloud optical depth and albedo. On the other hand, when the dust layers are located at altitudes with temperature colder than −5°C, or above the −5°C level, mineral aerosols can act as effective ice nuclei, intensify the ice-forming processes, and may enhance the development of cloud and precipitation. It is also found that the heating effect is more pronounced in continental clouds than in maritime clouds.

  15. Development of the online MM5 tracer model and its applications to air pollution episodes in Istanbul, Turkey and Sahara dust transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-H.; Dudhia, J.; Kain, J. S.; Kindap, T.; Tan, E.

    2008-06-01

    An online tracer model, based on the fifth-generation Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale model, was developed. The new model includes full representation of processes for advection, boundary layer mixing, subgrid cumulus convective mixing, and sedimentation of tracers. The model was used in two very different applications to document its potential utility. The first application involves pollutant transport to Istanbul, Turkey, focusing on two high-pollution episodes in January 2002. To better maintain large scale features, model simulations were nudged to reanalysis for this application. Using a semi-idealized approach, it was shown that much of the pollution that affected Istanbul during these events may have come from other highly polluted cities located upstream, rather than just local emission sources. Pollutants from upstream sources were trapped in the boundary layer by statically stable low-level conditions and efficient transport to Istanbul was supported by strong northwesterly flow near the surface. The second application involves the transport of dust from the Sahara Desert to the Atlantic Ocean, and the potential role of this dust and the dry, warm Saharan Air Layer (SAL) in the genesis and development of Tropical Storm Chantal in 2001. No nudging was applied to this case study since it may degrade small scale features, which were important to dust saltation. The dust uplifting and transport during the earlier period of Chantal's life cycle were simulated to show a potential link between Sahara dust and Chantal's evolution. Results show strong evidence that Chantal started interacting with SAL and dust at a very early stage of storm development after propagating into the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Moreover, it was found that the peak of the averaged surface dust flux occurred in the early morning right before the mixed boundary layer developed, and the mechanism of dust uptake for this event, nocturnal low-level jets, was different from those previously documented.

  16. Particle size traces modern Saharan dust transport and deposition across the equatorial North Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Does, M.; Korte, L.F.; Munday, C.I.; Brummer, G.-J. A.; Stuut, J-B W.

    2016-01-01

    Mineral dust has a large impact on regional andglobal climate, depending on its particle size. Especially inthe Atlantic Ocean downwind of the Sahara, the largest dustsource on earth, the effects can be substantial but are poorlyunderstood. This study focuses on seasonal and spatial variationsin

  17. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    fraction that arrives at another continent [2]. At the deposition end of the chain, it is still unclear how the limited minerals in the dust such as iron are released for uptake by organisms either on land or in the ocean. Not all dust deposited into oceans results in a phytoplankton bloom. The process requires a chemical pathway that mobilizes a fraction of the iron into soluble form. Meskhidze et al [3] show that phytoplankton blooms following dust transport from the Gobi desert in Asia into the Pacific ocean result in a phytoplankton bloom only if the dust is accompanied by high initial SO2-to-dust ratios, suggesting that sulfuric acid coatings on the dust particle mobilize the embedded iron in the dust for phytoplankton uptake. Quantifying transport, deposition and nutrient availability are the latter ends of a puzzle that must begin by identifying and quantifying dust emission at the sources. The emission process is complex at the microscale requiring the right conditions for saltation and bombardment, which makes identification and inclusion of sources in global transport models very difficult. The result is that estimates of annual global dust emissions range from 1000 to 3000 Tg per year [4]. Even as global estimates of dust emissions are uncertain, localizing the sources brings even greater uncertainty. It has been recognized for several years that dust sources are not uniformly distributed over the arid regions of the Earth, but are regulated to topographic lows associated with dried lake deposits [5]. Using aerosol information from satellites, a comprehensive map of the world's source regions shows sources localized to specific areas of the Earth's arid regions [6]. Still these maps suggest broad emission sources covering several degrees of latitude and longitude. In the paper by Koren and co-authors [7] appearing in this issue, one particular dust source, the Bodélé depression in Chad, is analyzed in detail. They find that the specific topography of the

  18. Composition and origin of PM10 in Cape Verde: Characterization of long-range transport episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, P.; Almeida, S. M.; Cardoso, J.; Almeida-Silva, M.; Nunes, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Alves, C.; Reis, M. A.; Chaves, P. C.; Artíñano, B.; Pio, C.

    2016-02-01

    A receptor modelling study was performed to identify source categories and their contributions to the PM10 total mass at the Cape Verde archipelago. Trajectory statistical methods were also used to characterize the main atmospheric circulation patterns causing the transport of air masses and to geographically identify the main potential source areas of each PM10 source category. Our findings point out that the variability of the PM10 levels at Cape Verde was prompted by the advections of African mineral dust. The mineral dust load was mainly composed by clay-silicates mineral derived elements (22% of the PM10 total mass on average) with lower amounts of carbonates (9%). A clear northward gradient was observed in carbonates concentration that illustrates the differences in the composition according to the source regions of mineral dust. Mineral dust was frequently linked to industrial emissions from crude oil refineries, fertilizer industries as well as oil and coal power plants, located in the northern and north-western coast of the African continent (29%). Sea salt was also registered in the PM10 mass during most part of the sampling period, with a lower impact in the PM10 levels than the mineral dust one (26%). Combustion aerosols (6%) reached the highest mean values in summer as a consequence of the emissions from local-regional sources. Biomass burning aerosols produced from October to November in sub-sahelian latitudes, had a clear influence in the content of elemental carbon (EC) recorded at Cape Verde but a small impact in the PM10 total mass levels. A minor contribution to the PM10 mass has been associated to secondary inorganic compounds-SIC. Namely, ammonium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 1-5%) and calcium sulfate and nitrate (SIC 2-3%). The main origin of SIC 1 was attributed to emissions of SO2 and NOx from industrial sources located in the northern and north-western African coast and from wildfires produced in the continent. SIC 2 had a clear regional origin

  19. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-07-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  20. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  1. Ways of far-distance dust transport onto Caucasian glaciers and chemical composition of snow on the Western plateau of Elbrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kutuzov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss the chronology of dust deposition events documented by the shallow firn and ice cores extracted on the Western Plateau, Mt. Elbrus (5150 m a.s.l. in 2009, 2012 and 2013. Snow and ice samples were analysed for major ions and minor element concentrations including heavy metals. Dust layers are formed on the surface of the glaciers as a result of atmospheric transport of mineral dust and aerosol particles to the Caucasus region. Satellite imagery (SEVIRI, trajectory models, and meteorological data were used for accurate dating of each the dust layers revealed in the ice cores. Then we tried to determine origins of the dust clouds and to investigate their transport pathways with high resolution (50–100 km. It was found that the desert dust is deposited on Caucasus glaciers 3–7 times in a year and it comes mainly from deserts of the Middle East and more rarely from the Northern Sahara desert. For the first time average annual dust flux (264 µg/cm2 per a year and average mass concentration (1.7 mg/kg over the period 2007–2013 were calculated for this region. The deposition of dust resulted in elevated concentrations consists of mostly ions, especially Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and sulphates. Dust originated from various sources in the Middle East, including Mesopotamia, or similar dust clouds passing over the Middle East are characterised by high concentrations of nitrates and ammonia that may be related to atmospheric transport of ammonium from agricultural lands that may explain high concentrations of ammonium in the dust originating from this region. Mean values of crustal enrichment factors (EF for the measured minor elements including heavy metals were calculated. We believe that high content of Cu, Zn and Cd can be a result of possible contribution from anthropogenic sources. Studies of the Caucasus ice cores may allow obtaining new independent data on the atmosphere circulation and high-altitude environment of this region.

  2. Dust emission: small-scale processes with global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  3. Dust: Small-scale processes with global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, G.S.; Bullard, J.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Ballantine, J.-A.C.; Schepanski, K.; Todd, M.C.; Belnap, J.; Baddock, M.C.; Gill, T.E.; Miller, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored. ?? Author(s) 2011.

  4. The role of aeolian dust in ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTainsh, Grant; Strong, Craig

    2007-09-01

    The recent upsurge in research attention to aeolian dust has shown that dust transport systems operate on very large spatial and temporal scales, and involve much larger quantities of sediment than was previously realized. An inevitable consequence of this is that researchers from a range of neighbouring disciplines, including ecology, are beginning to realize that this new knowledge has important implications for their study areas. In the present paper, we examine the ecological implications (real and potential) of this expanding knowledge of dust transport systems, with a particular emphasis upon the Australian dust transport system. We track these ecological effects from source to sink. At source, wind erosion-soil-vegetation relationships are often dominated by temporal changes in rainfall. Nine years of measurements in the Channel Country of the Lake Eyre Basin, Australia show that vegetation and soils in dune fields can recover from drought, whereas on inter-fluve grasslands uni-directional and negative successional vegetation changes can result from wind erosion during drought. On floodplains, both wind erosion and vegetation responses are complicated by flood frequency. Up to 1999 flooding of saline claypans did not increase vegetation but did increase wind erosion through the supply of alluvial fines. However, after three floods within as many months vegetation became established and wind erosion rates were dramatically reduced. Wind erosion research attention is now gradually turning from the physical to the organic content of eroded dusts. In Australia organic matter content can reach 65% by mass, but this cannot be explained by removal of soil organic matter alone. Biological soil crusts not only stabilize soils against wind erosion but contribute to some of the organic dusts. The role of dust as a vector for pathogens is an area which deserves greater research attention in the future. Downwind from source, we show that dust contributions to soils are

  5. Radioactive Iron Rain: Transporting 60Fe in Supernova Dust to the Ocean Floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Brian J.; Fields, Brian D.; Ellis, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Several searches have found evidence of {}60{{Fe}} deposition, presumably from a near-Earth supernova (SN), with concentrations that vary in different locations on Earth. This paper examines various influences on the path of interstellar dust carrying {}60{{Fe}} from an SN through the heliosphere, with the aim of estimating the final global distribution on the ocean floor. We study the influences of magnetic fields, angle of arrival, wind, and ocean cycling of SN material on the concentrations at different locations. We find that the passage of SN material through the mesosphere/lower thermosphere has the greatest influence on the final global distribution, with ocean cycling causing lesser alteration as the SN material sinks to the ocean floor. SN distance estimates in previous works that assumed a uniform distribution are a good approximation. Including the effects on surface distributions, we estimate a distance of {46}-6+10 pc for an 8{--}10 {M}⊙ SN progenitor. This is consistent with an SN occurring within the Tuc-Hor stellar group ˜2.8 Myr ago, with SN material arriving on Earth ˜2.2 Myr ago. We note that the SN dust retains directional information to within 1◦ through its arrival in the inner solar system, so that SN debris deposition on inert bodies such as the Moon will be anisotropic, and thus could in principle be used to infer directional information. In particular, we predict that existing lunar samples should show measurable {}60{{Fe}} differences.

  6. Interactions Between Mineral Dust, Climate, and Ocean Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasso, Santiago; Grassian, Vicki H.; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, technological improvements in the chemical and physical characterization of dust have provided insights into a number of phenomena that were previously unknown or poorly understood. In addition, models are now incorporating a wider range of physical processes, which will allow us to better quantify the climatic and ecological impacts of dust. For example, some models include the effect of dust on oceanic photosynthesis and thus on atmospheric CO 2 (Friedlingstein et al. 2006). The impact of long-range dust transport, with its multiple forcings and feedbacks, is a relatively new and complex area of research, where input from several disciplines is needed. So far, many of these effects have only been parameterized in models in very simple terms. For example, the representation of dust sources remains a major uncertainty in dust modeling and estimates of the global mass of airborne dust. This is a problem where Earth scientists could make an important contribution, by working with climate scientists to determine the type of environments in which easily erodible soil particles might have accumulated over time. Geologists could also help to identify the predominant mineralogical composition of dust sources, which is crucial for calculating the radiative and chemical effects of dust but is currently known for only a few regions. Understanding how climate and geological processes control source extent and characterizing the mineral content of airborne dust are two of the fascinating challenges in future dust research.

  7. Historic records of organic compounds from a high Alpine glacier: influences of biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and dust transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Müller-Tautges

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historic records of α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, carboxylic acids (C6–C12 dicarboxylic acids, pinic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, phthalic acid, 4-methylphthalic acid, and ions (oxalate, formate, calcium were determined with annual resolution in an ice core from Grenzgletscher in the southern Swiss Alps, covering the time period from 1942 to 1993. Chemical analysis of the organic compounds was conducted using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS for dicarbonyls and long-chain carboxylic acids and ion chromatography for short-chain carboxylates. Long-term records of the carboxylic acids and dicarbonyls, as well as their source apportionment, are reported for western Europe. This is the first study comprising long-term trends of dicarbonyls and long-chain dicarboxylic acids (C6–C12 in Alpine precipitation. Source assignment of the organic species present in the ice core was performed using principal component analysis. Our results suggest biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions, and transport of mineral dust to be the main parameters influencing the concentration of organic compounds. Ice core records of several highly correlated compounds (e.g., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, pinic acid, pimelic, and suberic acids can be related to the forest fire history in southern Switzerland. P-hydroxybenzoic acid was found to be the best organic fire tracer in the study area, revealing the highest correlation with the burned area from fires. Historical records of methylglyoxal, phthalic acid, and dicarboxylic acids adipic acid, sebacic acid, and dodecanedioic acid are comparable with that of anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. The small organic acids, oxalic acid and formic acid, are both highly correlated with calcium, suggesting their records to be affected by changing mineral dust transport to the drilling site.

  8. Global dust simulations in the multiscale modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, W. C.; Rosa, D.; Collins, W. D.

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the role of subgrid vertical transport in global simulations of soil-dust aerosols. The evolution and long-range transport of aerosols are strongly affected by vertical transport. In conventional global models, convective and turbulent transport is highly parameterized. This study applies the superparameterization (SP) framework in which a cloud-resolving model (CRM) is embedded in each grid cell of a global model to replace these parametric treatments with explicit simulation of subgrid processes at the cloud-system scale. We apply the implementation of the SP framework in the National Center for Atmospheric Research community atmospheric model (CAM) denoted by SPCAM for dust simulations. We focus on the effects of subgrid transport on dust simulations; thus, the sources and sinks of dust are calculated in the large-scale CAM grids, and the vertical transport of dust is computed in the CRM. We simulate present-day distributions of soil-dust aerosols using CAM and SPCAM operated in chemical transport mode with large-scale meteorological fields prescribed using the same meteorological reanalysis. Therefore, the differences of dust fields between two models caused by explicit versus parameterized treatments of convective transport are examined. Comparison of dust profiles shows that SPCAM predicts less dust in the low to mid troposphere but relatively higher concentration in the upper troposphere. The larger dust mass in upper troposphere in SPCAM may be related to the dust implementation approach in this study, in which the larger resolved updrafts in CRM for deep convection transport more dust aloft but are not accounted by the removal processes in the CRM grid scale. A slightly higher mobilization flux of less than 5% on an average is shown in SPCAM when compared with CAM. Similar patterns of elevated dry deposition are also produced with increases larger than 100% in some areas. For wet deposition, on average CAM is ˜31% higher than SPCAM

  9. Morphochemical characteristics and mixing state of long range transported wildfire particles at Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Cappelletti, David; Crocchianti, Stefano; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto; Mazzola, Mauro; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Ritter, Christoph; Zielinski, Tymon

    2017-05-01

    A prolonged and exceptionally intense air mass advection event transporting biomass burning aerosols generated in Alaska affected Ny-Ålesund in the mid of July 2015. This paper reports the morphochemical characteristics and mixing state of individual aerosol particles collected during the event. To this aim aerosol samples were collected on nucleopore polycarbonate membrane filters using a DEKATI 12-stage low volume impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Results of SEM investigations depict a complex aerosol characterized by an external mixing between a main part of carbonaceous organic particles (tar balls and organic particles), lower ammonium sulfate and minor potassium chloride and mineral dust amounts. The carbonaceous particles are spherical to slightly elongated and the organic particles show an internal mixing of low density organics and/or ammonium sulfate upon denser nuclei. Most particles are in the accumulation mode size range although the size and the morphology of the chloride and the sulfate salts evidence the growth of these species both in the air and upon the sampling membranes. Individual particle analyses were complemented by aerosol size distribution (Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) and optical (Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, nephelometer) measurements at ground level in order to retrieve the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere and to predict the fate and behaviour of particles upon deposition at ground level. Individual particle analyses were also compared with bulk chemical analyses on daily sampling filters and back-trajectory analyses of the air mass movement in order to enucleate distinct sources of the aerosol during the long range transport.

  10. African Dust Transport Across the North Atlantic: The Temporal Variability of Aerosol Vertical Distributions Based on Micropulse Lidar Measurements on Barbados (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospero, J. M.; Welton, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    The study of African dust transport across the Atlantic began in 1965 in ground-based studies carried out on Barbados. In 1969 aircraft studies in BOMEX suggested that on average the highest dust concentrations were aloft, above the marine boundary layer (MBL), typically extending to 700mb [Prospero and Carlson, 1972; Carlson and Prospero, 1972]. This dust-laden layer was characterized by a relatively high and constant potential temperature and a low mixing ratio, properties that were linked to the origins of the air parcels over the deserts of North Africa. On the basis of these features, the layer was named the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). Except for a one month study in Puerto Rico in 2000 (PRIDE), there has been no systematic effort to better characterize the vertical distribution of dust, the associated synoptic settings of these events, and the seasonal variability. Consequently, 40 years after the "discovery" of the SAL, this crude picture of dust transport remains essentially unchanged. To address this issue, in 2008, in conjunction with the NASA MPLNET program, a micropulse lidar (MPL) was installed at the University of Miami aerosol research station on the east coast of Barbados. Two years of MPL operations provide us with a unique picture of the variability of aerosol vertical structure after a week's transit from sources over 5000km distant. A remarkable feature in these data is the frequent presence of aerosol layers, in most cases clearly dominated by dust. These layers often remain stable and sharply defined over the course of a day to as many as several days as they pass over the site. Also located at this site is a NASA AERONET aerosol photometer. These collocated instruments enable the retrieval of vertical profiles of extinction and optical depth. During dust events, the major part of the extinction takes place above the MBL. Here we present an overview of the MPL studies over this two year period. We focus mainly on major dust events that typically

  11. Transport of Australian Continental Dust to Australia's Great Barrier Reef Region: First Results From Sampling, Remote Sensing, Synoptic and Trajectory Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, N.; O'Loingsigh, T.; de Deckker, P.; Cohen, D.

    2009-04-01

    As part of a large multi-disciplinary project funded by the Australian Research Council and in collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, we established in mid-2008 three PM 2.5 samplers in eastern Australia to determine possible transport of continental dust from the major dust source region of the Lake Eyre Basin (LEB). These samplers were located at Fowlers Gap, New South Wales [NSW] (31.09S, 141.70E), Mount Stromlo, NSW (35.30S, 149.00E) and Heron Island, Queensland (23.44S, 151.83E). The latter location is of particular significance because of its proximity to the World Heritage Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and to the tropical rainforest of coastal North Queensland. In previous studies, dust and associated organic material of African origin has been associated with rainforest fertilisation in Amazonia and coral bleaching in the Carribean. In this presentation three case studies of continental dust transport to Heron Island that occurred in the first four months of sampling are examined. In each case transport of soil material from the LEB region and/or western NSW is confirmed by the nature of material sampled, by remote sensing of the dust, by forward and backward air parcel trajectory analysis and by synoptic analysis. In each case the dust arrived over Heron Island 3-7 days after passing over the southern samplers, generally having followed an anti-clockwise curved path to approach Heron Island from the southeast. The potential significance of this finding for the GBR is briefly discussed.

  12. Dust Opacities*

    OpenAIRE

    Min Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Dust particles are the dominant source of opacity at (almost) all wavelengths and in (almost) all regions of protoplanetary disks. By this they govern the transport of energy through the disk and thus the thermal structure. Furthermore, their spectral properties determine the low resolution spectral signature observed at infrared wavelengths. The infrared resonances that can be observed using low resolution infrared spectroscopy can be used to identify the composition and size distribution of...

  13. Sensitivity of the dust cycle in a Chemistry-GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, G.; Kerkweg, A.; Wernli, H.

    2010-09-01

    Mineral dust is an important part of the atmospheric aerosol. The export of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean to the South American continent is known to be an important source of nutrition to the rain forest and the sea. Dust mobilisation in deserts and long-range transport occurs in episodic events and is strongly influenced by synoptic-scale flow patterns. The scientific understanding of these processes, the resulting global dust distribution and the climate impact is still low. In this study, the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy (EMAC) is used to simulate the mineral dust cycle. We performed free-running 5-year time slice simulations and nudged experiments for selected dust emission episodes. Two different dust emission schemes and four different horizontal resolutions have been used for investigating their influence on the entire dust cycle. The horizontal resolutions T42 (~312 km), T63 (~208 km), T85 (~155 km) and T106 (~125 km) are explored. Independent of the horizontal resolution the "Balkanski" dust emission scheme simulates global maxima of the dust emissions and the dust column mass in the north-western part of India. Various observations indicate that in reality the maximum lies over the Sahara Desert. The "Tegen" dust emission scheme shows a much more realistic distribution. For all horizontal resolutions both schemes simulate dust emissions, total dust load and a dust life time within the range of the 15 GCMs participating in the AEROCOM-project (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). However, in T42 and T63 the northward transport of dust is too strong leading to unrealistic high column masses in high northern latitudes. The transport and subsequently the global dust distribution in T85 and T106 is much more sensible. The dust emission (total load) is 28 % (16 %) higher in T106 as in T85 which is traced back to higher wind velocities in T106. In addition to these climatological investigations, the

  14. 25 CFR 170.413 - What is the public role in developing the long-range transportation plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Roads Program Facilities Long-Range Transportation Planning § 170.413 What is the public role in developing the long-range transportation plan? BIA or the tribe must solicit public involvement. If there are... newspapers when the draft long-range transportation plan is complete. In the absence of local public...

  15. Principle Component Analysis of the Evolution of the Saharan Air Layer and Dust Transport: Comparisons between a Model Simulation and MODIS Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S.; Colarco, P. R.; Dessler, A.

    2006-01-01

    The onset and evolution of Saharan Air Layer (SAL) episodes during June-September 2002 are diagnosed by applying principal component analysis to the NCEP reanalysis temperature anomalies at 850 hPa, where the largest SAL-induced temperature anomalies are located. The first principal component (PC) represents the onset of SAL episodes, which are associated with large warm anomalies located at the west coast of Africa. The second PC represents two opposite phases of the evolution of the SAL. The positive phase of the second PC corresponds to the southwestward extension of the warm anomalies into the tropical-subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the negative phase corresponds to the northwestward extension into the subtropical to mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean and the southwest Europe. A dust transport model (CARMA) and the MODIS retrievals are used to study the associated effects on dust distribution and deposition. The positive (negative) phase of the second PC corresponds to a strengthening (weakening) of the offshore flows in the lower troposphere around 10deg - 20degN, causing more (less) dust being transported along the tropical to subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. The variation of the offshore flow indicates that the subseasonal variation of African Easterly Jet is associated with the evolution of the SAL. Significant correlation is found between the second PC time series and the daily West African monsoon index, implying a dynamical linkage between West African monsoon and the evolution of the SAL and Saharan dust transport.

  16. Combustibility Determination for Cotton Gin Dust and Almond Huller Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughs, Sidney E; Wakelyn, Phillip J

    2017-04-26

    It has been documented that some dusts generated while processing agricultural products, such as grain and sugar, can constitute combustible dust hazards. After a catastrophic dust explosion in a sugar refinery in 2008, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) initiated action to develop a mandatory standard to comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dusts. Cotton fiber and related materials from cotton ginning, in loose form, can support smoldering combustion if ignited by an outside source. However, dust fires and other more hazardous events, such as dust explosions, are unknown in the cotton ginning industry. Dust material that accumulates inside cotton gins and almond huller plants during normal processing was collected for testing to determine combustibility. Cotton gin dust is composed of greater than 50% inert inorganic mineral dust (ash content), while almond huller dust is composed of at least 7% inert inorganic material. Inorganic mineral dust is not a combustible dust. The collected samples of cotton gin dust and almond huller dust were sieved to a known particle size range for testing to determine combustibility potential. Combustibility testing was conducted on the cotton gin dust and almond huller dust samples using the UN test for combustibility suggested in NFPA 652.. This testing indicated that neither the cotton gin dust nor the almond huller dust should be considered combustible dusts (i.e., not a Division 4.1 flammable hazard per 49 CFR 173.124). Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  17. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  18. Bedload transport flux fluctuations over a wide range of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Ancey, C.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport is a highly fluctuating process. Our previous study (Ma et al., 2014) demonstrated a three-regime relation of the variance of bedload transport flux across a wide range of sampling time scales. This study further explored the fluctuation spectrum of at-a-point bedload transport flux with different sampling times. We derived out analytical solutions of the third- and fourth-order moments of bedload transport flux, based on a physically-based formulation (Ancey et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2014). A formulation of the probability density function of bedload transport flux was constructed based on the 1st through 4th order moments. Experimental data were used to test against the solutions of both the moments and PDF. Interestingly, the higher order statistical moments were found to exhibit the three-regime pattern as well. This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of bedload transport flux fluctuation and emphasizes its timescale-dependent features resulting from the discrete nature and correlated motion of bedload material. The correlated structures of bedload transport, such as bed forms and particle clusters, deserve to be further exploration in future studies. Keywords: bedload transport; stochastic theory; high order moment; fluctuation; time scale; PDF. Ancey, C., Davison, A. C., Bohm, T., Jodeau, M., and Frey, P. Entrainment and motion of coarse particles in a shallow water stream down a steep slope, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2008, 595, 83-114, doi: 10.1017/S0022112007008774. Ma, H. B., Heyman, J., Fu, X. D., Mettra, F., Ancey, C. and Parker, G. Bedload transport over a broad range of time scales: determination of three regimes of fluctuations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 2014. (under review)

  19. Radioactive Iron Rain: Transporting $^{60}$Fe in Supernova Dust to the Ocean Floor

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Brian J.; Ellis, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Several searches have found evidence of $^{60}$Fe deposition, presumably from a near-Earth supernova (SN), with concentrations that vary in different locations on Earth. This paper examines various influences on the path of interstellar dust carrying $^{60}$Fe from a SN through the heliosphere, with the aim of estimating the final global distribution on the ocean floor. We study the influences of magnetic fields, angle of arrival, wind and ocean cycling of SN material on the concentrations at different locations. We find that the passage of SN material through the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is the greatest influence on the final global distribution, with ocean cycling causing lesser alteration as the SN material sinks to the ocean floor. SN distance estimates in previous works that assumed a uniform distribution are a good approximation. Including the effects on surface distributions, we estimate a distance of $46^{+10}_{-6}$ pc for a $8-10 \\ M_{\\odot}$ SN progenitor. This is consistent with a SN occ...

  20. Approximate solutions of range for constant altitude - constant high subsonic speed flight of transport aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavcar, A.; Cavcar, M. [Anadolu Univ., School of Civil Aviation, Eskisehir, (Turkey)

    2004-09-01

    Approximate cruise range solutions are introduced for the constant altitude constant high subsonic speed flight of turbojet/fan transport aircraft with cambered wing design. The variation of the specific fuel consumption with Mach number is also considered in derivation of the approximate solutions. The method aims at estimation of the cruise range of aircraft during conceptual or preliminary design phase. An application of the solutions is also presented. (author)

  1. Impacts of long-range transports of PM10 on air quality in Gwangju, South Korea using satellite and in-situ measured data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R.; Han, K.; Song, C.; Kang, Y.; Jung, W.; Ahan, S.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the impact of long-range transported particular matter on the city of Gwangju which is one of metropolitan cities in the South Korea and is located in the southwestern part of the Korean peninsula, the PM10 concentrations measured at six measurement sites in Gwangju area were used. A decadal trend (2002-2011) of PM10 was analyzed and then the monthly and daily variations of PM10 for the years of 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011 were investigated. The events of long-range transport were selected from peaks of daily PM10 and were evaluated through 72-hours backward trajectory analysis using NOAA HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, the events were evaluated using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)-retrieved AI (Aerosol Index), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI)-retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Then the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport was filtered and the monthly variations calculated from the filtered daily PM10 and the daily PM10 influenced by the long-range transport were compared. For the year of 2002, up to ~50% of the PM10 concentration was influenced by Asian dust in March and April, respectively. In contrast, for the year of 2003, the impact of LRT on the PM10 concentrations were relatively small in the Gwangju areas. The monthly variations and annual mean values for 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2011, calculated from the filtered daily PM10, were similar and therefore, the annual variations of PM10 in Gwangju could be mainly affected by the long-range transport.

  2. Long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuśmierczyk-Michulec, J; Krysta, M; Kalinowski, M; Hoffmann, E; Baré, J

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. The air mass trajectory ideally provides a "link" between a radionuclide release and a detection confirmed by radionuclide measurements. This paper investigates the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective and non-convective conditions, with special emphasis on evaluating the changes in the simulated activity concentration values due to the inclusion of the convective transport in the ATM simulations. For that purpose a series of 14 day forward simulations, with and without convective transport, released daily in the period from 1 January 2011 to 30 June 2013, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The simulated activity concentrations for the period January 2011 to February 2012 were calculated using the daily emission values provided by the ANSTO facility; outside the aforementioned period, the median daily emission value was used. In the simulations the analysed meteorological input data provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used with the spatial resolution of 0.5°. It was found that the long-range transport of Xe-133 emissions under convective conditions, where convection was included in the ATM simulation, led to a small decrease in the activity concentration, as compared to transport without convection. In special cases related to deep convection, the opposite effect was observed. Availability of both daily emission values and measured Xe-133 activity concentration values was an opportunity to validate the simulations. Based on the paired t-test, a 95% confidence interval for the true mean difference between simulations without convective transport and measurements was constructed. It was estimated that the overall uncertainty lies between 0.08 and 0.25 mBq/m3

  3. Matrix methods to analyze long-range transport of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, R H

    1981-01-01

    To assess air quality constraints and impacts of energy activities, models that account for long-range transport processes, as well as for local effects of meteorological dispersion, are required. At the present state of the art of modeling, separate models are used to estimate the detailed, rapidly varying effects of local sources and the long-term average effects of distant sources. Development of the air transport matrix method was undertaken to provide a simpler, faster method of analysis. The method represents results of comprehensive longrange transport models in a simple, easy to use form. The present report is a description of the concept and methodologies used in developing matrices, a preliminary analysis of those matrices and their properties, and a guide to the types of applications they can serve. Matrices have been generated by BNL for transport of sulfur oxide emissions among the 238 Air Quality Control Regions in the conterminous United States, using their AIRSOX model. PNL has used their long-range transport model and a streamlined calculation method to generate matrices for sulfur oxides and for emitted fine particulates. Matrices have been completed for 4 months of meterological data (one in each season) from 1974. BNL further separates matrices according to three categories of sources: utility, industrial, and area sources. They differ in terms of effective stack heights and detailed distribution of source locations within each AQCR. Matrices have also been calculated at the more aggregated levels of state and Federal region boundaries.

  4. Numerical Upscaling of Transport Through Obstructed Regions Over a Broad Range of Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Mattis, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    While historically flow and transport in porous media has focused on low Reynolds number and Peclet number regimes there are a variety of examples relevant to environmental fluid dynamics where higher Reynolds number flows are important. A common example might include flow and transport through wetlands where plants act as the solid phase of an effective porous medium. In particular, heterogeneity in the flow field due to presence of the solid phases gives rise to complex transport and mixing behaviors that cannot be upscaled at pre-asymptotic times using conventional approaches. We numerically simulate pore-scale flow and transport through obstructed domains over a range of Reynolds numbers from 15 to 280 and then upscale transport. We upscale using a correlated continuous time random walk (correlated CTRW) model, originally introduced in [1]. We then assess the correlated CTRW's ability to predict observables for both asymptotic and pre-asymptotic time scales and compare our results to those of a classical CTRW to determine when velocity correlations must be accounted for. REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Lagrangian statistical model for transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, Physical Review Letters 101 (2008) 090601.

  5. Quantification of the sources of long-range transport of PM2.5 pollution in the Ordos region, Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuzestani, Reza Bashiri; Schauer, James J; Wei, Yongjie; Zhang, Lulu; Cai, Tianqi; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2017-10-01

    The Ordos region of Inner Mongolia is rapidly developing and suffers from poor air quality and unhealthy levels of fine particulate matter. PM2.5 concentrations in the Ordos region were found to exceed 75 μg/m(3) on average, annually, with peak pollution days in excess of 350 μg/m(3), but local air pollution emissions from surrounding sources are not sufficient to drive pollution levels to these concentrations. The current study was designed to quantify sources of PM2.5 and assess the local source contributions and effects of regional transport on local pollution. The results show that the Ordos region is primarily impacted by regional long-range transport of pollutants from anthropogenic sources located outside of the Inner Mongolia in Shanxi province areas but is also largely affected by regional dust transported from the deserts located in western Inner Mongolia. The analysis proved that approximately 77% of PM2.5 mass is transported long-range from the sites exterior to the study area and contributes 59.32 μg/m(3) on average, annually, while the local sources contribute 17.41 μg/m(3) (23%) on annual average to the PM2.5 mass in the study area. High spatial correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.6) were observed for most of the factors pointing to the transport of external emissions into the area. Spatial correlation analysis, bivariate polar plots and hybrid trajectory models for industrial and secondary inorganic factors provide evidence for the impact of long-range transport from Shanxi province areas. In addition, the deserts in western Inner Mongolia were found to be the source regions for dust. Finally, our analysis shows that the source of oil combustion and mobile factors are impacted by local sources in the Ordos region; however, some regional impacts from other regions were also observed for mobile source in the area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrical and thermoelectric transport by variable range hopping in reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min; Hong, Sung Ju; Kim, Kyung Ho; Kang, Hojin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Park, Yung Woo; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the transport properties of single-layer reduced graphene oxides (rGOs). The rGOs were prepared by the bubble deposition method followed by thermal reduction. The crossover of the transport mechanism from Efros-Shklovskii (ES) variable range hopping (VRH) between the localized states to Mott-VRH was observed near 70 K using the temperature-dependent conductance. The ES-VRH conduction below 70 K is apparent in the electric field dependence of the field-driven hopping transport in the high-electric field regime. We also figure out that the thermoelectric power is consistent with the 2D Mott VRH above 70 K. We argue that the VRH conduction results from the topological disorders of rGO as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. This infers that the average distance between defects is approximately 2.0 nm.

  7. Far-Reaching Impacts of African Dust- A Calipso Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Prospero, Joseph; Omar, Ali; Remer, Lorraine; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; hide

    2014-01-01

    .6 and 2.5 for the deposition to the tropical Atlantic and Amazon, respectively. The MODIS-based estimates appear to fall within the range of CALIPSO-based estimates; and the difference between MODIS and CALIPSO estimates can be largely attributed to the interannual variability, which is corroborated by long-term surface dust concentration observations in the tropical Atlantic. Considering that CALIPSO generally tends to underestimate the aerosol loading, our estimate is likely to represent a low bound for the dust transport and deposition estimate. The finding suggests that models have substantial biases and considerable effort is needed to improve model simulations of dust cycle.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Gulikova; Tomas Bodnar; Ludek Benes; Zbynek Janour; Lubos Matejicek

    2008-01-01

    Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a cas...

  9. Long- and/or short-range transportation of local Asian aerosols in DRAGON-Osaka Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    This work intends to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particles in East Asia, especially around AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) -Osaka site during Dragon Asia period in the spring of 2012, named Dragon-Osaka. It is known that the air pollution in East Asia becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Thus the precise observations of atmospheric particles in East Asia are desired. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. The population of the region is around 20 millions including neighbor prefectures. Therefore, air quality in the region is slightly bad compared to remote area due to industries and auto mobiles. In recent years, Asian dusts and anthropogenic small particles transported from China and cover those cities throughout year. AERONET Osaka site was established in 2002 on the campus of Kinki University. Nowadays, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), an SPM sampler (SPM-613D, Kimoto Electric, Japan) and others are available on the roof of a building. The site data are useful for algorithm development of aerosol retrieval over busy city. On the other hand, human activities in this region also emit the huge amount of pollutions, thus it is needed to investigate the local distribution of aerosols in this region. In order to investigate change of aerosol properties, PM-individual analysis is made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). SEM/EDX is an effective instrument to observe the surface microstructure and analyze the chemical composition of such materials as metals, powders, biological specimens, etc. We used sampling data from the SPM sampler at AERONET Osaka site. During a period of DRAGON-Asia, high concentrations of air pollutant were observed on the morning of March 11 in Fukue Island in the East China Sea. On the

  10. Long-range transported dissolved organic matter, ions and black carbon deposited on Central Asian snow covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Kang, Shichang; Peltier, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Ninety percent of the Central Asian population depend on water precipitated in the mountains stored in glaciers and snow cover. Accelerated melting of the snow and ice can be induced by the deposition of airborne impurities such as mineral dust, black carbon and co-emitted species leading to significant reductions of the surface albedo. However, Central Asia is a relatively understudied region and data on the source regions, chemical and microphysical characteristics as well as modelling studies of long-range transported air pollution and dust to the Tien Shan mountains is very scarce. We studied the atmospheric aerosol deposited most likely between summer 2012 and summer 2013on three different glaciers in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were taken from four snow pits on the glaciers Abramov (2 pits, 39.59 °N, 71.56 °E, 4390 m elevation, 240 cm deep, and 39.62°N, 71.52 °E, 4275 m elevation, 125 cm deep), Ak-Shiirak (41.80 °N, 78.18 °E, 4325 m elevation, 75 cm deep) and Suek (41.78 °N, 77.75 °E, 4341 m elevation, 200 cm deep). The latter two glaciers are located roughly within 6 and 38 km of an operating gold mine. The snow was analyzed for black carbon, ions, metals and organic carbon. We here focus on the results of inorganic ion measurements and organic carbon speciation based on analysis with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and potential pollution sources that can be deduced from the chemical information as well as back trajectories. Average contributions of snow impurities measured by the HR-ToF-AMS were dominated by organic carbon. Relative concentrations of organic carbon, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in snow were 86 %, 3 %, 9 % and 2 % respectively for Abramov, 92 %, 1 %, 5 % and 1 % for Suek, and 95 %, 1 %, 3 % and 1 % for Ak-Shiirak. Generally, impurities on Suek and Ak-Shiirak were three and five times higher than on Abramov. Mass concentrations of organic carbon were on average 6 times higher in samples

  11. Subtropical Dust Storms and Downslope Wind Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ashok Kumar; Kaplan, Michael L.; Fiedler, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    We performed detailed mesoscale observational analyses and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations to study the terrain-induced downslope winds that generated dust-emitting winds at the beginning of three strong subtropical dust storms in three distinctly different regions of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. We revisit the Harmattan dust storm of 2 March 2004, the Saudi dust storm of 9 March 2009, and the Bodélé Depression dust storm of 8 December 2011 and use high-resolution WRF modeling to assess the dynamical processes during the onset of the storms in more depth. Our results highlight the generation of terrain-induced downslope winds in response to the transition of the atmospheric flow from a subcritical to supercritical state in all three cases. These events precede the unbalanced adjustment processes in the lee of the mountain ranges that produced larger-scale dust aerosol mobilization and transport. We see that only the higher-resolution data sets can resolve the mesoscale processes, which are mainly responsible for creating strong low-level terrain-induced downslope winds leading to the initial dust storms.

  12. On dust in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I. [Jacobs School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, Engineering Building II, room 474, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)]. E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu; Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomita, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Smirnov, R.D. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Janev, R.K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    We study the dust particle dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas, with special emphasis on dust particle transport in the sheath and plasma recycling regions. The characteristics of this transport have been examined for both smooth and corrugated wall surfaces. The implications of dust particle transport in the divertor region on the core plasma contamination with impurities have also been examined.

  13. Aerosol content survey by mini N 2 -Raman lidar: Application to local and long-range transport aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Lardier, Melody; Sauvage, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This study shows an aerosol content survey in the low and middle troposphere over Paris with a compact and light Nitrogen-Raman lidar which has been recently developed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and LEOSPHERE company. This eye-safe and wide field-of-view system (full overlap between 150 and 200 m) is particularly well-adapted to air pollution survey in the vicinity of Megalopolis. Extinction-to-backscatter coefficient (so-called Lidar Ratio LR) profiles obtained with a Tikhonov regularization scheme are presented for long-range transport events of aerosols (volcanic ash plume LR = 48 ± 10 sr, and desert dust, LR = 45 ± 8 sr) which may contribute to the local load of aerosols emitted by traffic and industries in Megalopolis. Due to an insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR < 30), a new dichotomous algorithm has been developed to perform daytime inversions every hour which is in accordance with the typical time evolution of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer. This inversion scheme is based on the constraint of the elastic channel with the aerosol optical depth (between typically 0.2 and 0.7 km) determined with the N 2-Raman channel and thus only gives access to an equivalent LR between 0.2 and 0.7 km with a relative uncertainty lower than 15%. This approach has been applied to retrieve diurnal cycle of LR for polluted continental aerosols over Paris and is compared with Tikhonov regularization applied during the night. We found a mean value of 85 ± 18 sr for polluted continental aerosols which is in agreement with other studies performed around the Paris urban area. Results for aerosol optical properties are presented and the error sources are discussed for each approach.

  14. Enhanced SO2 Concentrations Observed over Northern India: Role of Long-range Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, C.; Lal, S.; Naja, M.; Chand, Duli; Venkataramani, S.; Joshi, H.; Pant, P.

    2013-01-17

    Volcanic emissions and coal burning are among the major sources of SO2 over the continental environment. In this study, we show episodes of long-range transport of volcanic SO2 from Africa to Northern India using satellite observations. Monthly averaged SO2 from OMI were of the order of 0.6-0.9 DU during November, 2008 over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), which far exceeded background values (<0.3 DU) retrieved from observations across different locations over North India during 2005-2010. The columnar SO2 loadings were much higher on November 6 over most of the IGP and even exceeded 6 DU, a factor of 10 higher than background levels at some places. These enhanced SO2 levels were, however, not reciprocated in satellite derived NO2 or CO columns, indicating transport from a non-anthropogenic source of SO2. Backward trajectory analysis revealed strong winds in the free troposphere, which originated from the Dalaffilla volcanic eruption over the Afar region of Ethiopia during November 4-6, 2008. Wind streams and stable atmospheric conditions were conducive to the long-range transport of volcanic plume into the IGP. As most of the local aerosols over IGP region are below 3 km, a well separated layer at 4-5 km is observed from CALIPSO, most likely as a result of this transport. Apart from known anthropogenic sources, the additional transport of volcanic SO2 over the IGP region would have implications to air quality and radiation balance over this region.

  15. Long range transport of mercury to the Arctic and across Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Durnford

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is the most extensive study to date on the transport of mercury to the Arctic. Moreover, it is the first such study to use a fully-coupled, online chemical transport model, Environment Canada's Global/Regional Atmospheric Heavy Metals model (GRAHM, where the meteorology and mercury processes are fully integrated. It is also the only study to date on the transport of mercury across Canada. We estimated source attribution from Asia, North America, Russia and Europe at six arctic verification stations, as well as three subarctic and eight midlatitude Canadian stations.

    We have found that Asia, despite having transport efficiencies that were almost always lower than those of North America and often lower than those of Russia, was the dominant source of gaseous atmospheric mercury at all verification stations: it contributed the most mercury (29–37% at all stations, seasons and levels considered, its concentrations frequently explained nearly 100% of the variability in the concentrations produced by the simulation performed with full global emissions, particularly in the absence of local sources, and it generated the most long range transport (LRT events, causing 43%, 67% and 75% of the events at the arctic, subarctic and midlatitude stations, respectively. For the Arctic, Russian transport efficiencies tended to be the strongest, as expected, while European and Asian efficiencies were lower and higher, respectively, than those found in the literature. This disagreement is likely produced by mercury's long lifetime relative to that of other pollutants. The accepted springtime preference for the trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution was evident only in the midlatitude group of stations, being masked in the arctic and subarctic groups by the occurrence of atmospheric mercury depletion events. Some neighbouring arctic stations recorded dissimilar numbers of LRT events; despite their proximity, the behaviour of mercury at these

  16. Mixing of Dust and NH3 Observed Globally over Anthropogenic Dust Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, P.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Dubovik, O.; Hsu, N. C.; Van Damme, M.

    2012-01-01

    The global distribution of dust column burden derived from MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products is compared to NH3 column burden retrieved from IASI infrared spectra. We found similarities in their spatial distributions, in particular their hot spots are often collocated over croplands and to a lesser extent pastures. Globally, we found 22% of dust burden collocated with NH3, with only 1% difference between land-use databases. This confirms the importance of anthropogenic dust from agriculture. Regionally, the Indian subcontinent has the highest amount of dust mixed with NH3 (26 %), mostly over cropland and during the pre-monsoon season. North Africa represents 50% of total dust burden but accounts for only 4% of mixed dust, which is found over croplands and pastures in Sahel and the coastal region of the Mediterranean. In order to evaluate the radiative effect of this mixing on dust optical properties, we derive the mass extinction efficiency for various mixtures of dust and NH3, using AERONET sunphotometers data. We found that for dusty days the coarse mode mass extinction efficiency decreases from 0.62 to 0.48 square meters per gram as NH3 burden increases from 0 to 40 milligrams per square meter. The fine mode extinction efficiency, ranging from 4 to 16 square mters per gram, does not appear to depend on NH3 concentration or relative humidity but rather on mineralogical composition and mixing with other aerosols. Our results imply that a significant amount of dust is already mixed with ammonium salt before its long range transport. This in turn will affect dust lifetime, and its interactions with radiation and cloud properties

  17. Chemical signatures of urban, open burning and dust transportation in an urban environment- megacity in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadharshini, B.; Verma, S.

    2016-12-01

    A sub-micron aerosol sampler (SAS) consisting of two parallel stacked filter units (SFU) was deployed at an urban location (Kolkata) to study the sub-micron aerosols (water soluble inorganic ions (WSII) and carbonaceous aerosols (elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC)) collected over a year (September 2010 to August 2011). Quantification of 10 WSII species using Ion Chromatograph (IC) indicated alkaline nature of aerosols with calcium (Ca2+) being the major neutralizing factor of acidity at the study site. In terms of WSII percentage contribution, the most abundant were crustal species (Ca2+, magnesium (Mg2+) and marine species (chloride (Cl-)), followed by the secondary species sulphate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) . Ca2+ (fugitive and transported dust) was dominant throughout the study period with K+ concentrations exhibiting seasonality with agricultural residue burning. Further, results of carbonaceous aerosols analyzed using the OC-EC aerosol analyzer following Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) protocol exhibited pronounced seasonality in OC than EC with the overall mean concentration of OC being three folds than EC. Primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon concentrations (SOC) estimated using EC tracer method showed 57% (43%) of POC (SOC) from various emission sources. Investigation of OC/EC ratio along with non-sea salt potassium (nss-K+) values revealed influence of season specific anthropogenic activities on both OC and EC concentrations (viz. Open burning (OB)) besides fossil fuel (FF) and biofuel (BF) usage for cooking and heating prevalent over the region. Source apportionment was discerned using positive matrix factorization (PMF) with four major factors (crustal, agricultural, anthropogenic sources and mixed source (crustal + agriculture + anthropogenic) as the primary contributors to the sub-micron aerosols at the study site.

  18. Study of Chinese pollution with the 3D regional chemistry transport CHIMERE model and remote sensing observations, with a focus on mineral dust impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachatre, Mathieu; Foret, Gilles; Beekmann, Matthias; Cheiney, Audrey; Dufour, Gaëlle; Laurent, Benoit; Cuesta, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Since the end of the 20th century, China has observed important growth in numerous sectors. China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has been multiply by 4 during the 2000-2010 decade (National Bureau of Statistics of China), mostly because of the industry's growth. These evolutions have been accompanied by important increases of atmospheric pollutants emissions (Yinmin et al, Atmo Env, 2016). As a consequence and for about 10 years now, Chinese authorities have been working to reduce pollutant levels, because atmospheric pollution is a major health issue for Chinese population especially within cities, for which World Health Organisation's standards for major pollutants (Ozone, PM2.5, PM10) are often exceeded. Particles have multiple issues, as they impact on health and global warming. Their impacts will depend on their sources (primary or secondary pollutants) and natures (Particle size distribution, chemical composition…). Controlling particles loading is a complex task as their sources are various and dispersed on the Chinese territories: mineral dust can be emitted from Chinese deserts in large amount (Laurent et al., GPC, 2006), ammonia can be emitted from agriculture and livestock (Kang et al., ACP, 2016) and lots of urban primary pollutants can be emitted from urbanized areas. It is then necessary to work from a continental to local scales to understand more precisely pollution of urbanized areas. It is then mandatory to discriminate and quantify pollution sources and to estimate the impact of natural pollution and the major contributing sources. We propose here an approach based on a model and satellite observation synergy to estimate what controls Chinese pollution. We use the regional chemistry transport model CHIMERE (Menut et al., GMD, 2013) to simulate atmospheric pollutants concentrations. A large domain (72°E-145°E; 17.5°N-55°N), with a ¼°x¼° resolution is used to make multi-annual simulations. CHIMERE model include most of the pollutants

  19. Simulation of the dust suppression process with foam in the areas of belt conveyors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespalov Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the analysis of the physical essence and simulation of the process of dust retention with foam in the air of working zones of belt conveyors transporting sand, crushed stone, gravel, coal, grain. In accordance with the proposed physical-energy concept of simulation of the process of dust control its physical essence is in a deliberate sequential action on the dust particles with previously prepared by the parameters external (additional dispersed systems. Use of dust retention technology foam method provides high efficiency of reducing the concentration of dust in the air of working areas of belt conveyors, which varies in the range of 85.0–99.0 %, which provides the standard level of dust contamination (MPC in air of working areas of listed industrial sources of formation and emission of dust.

  20. Transport of pollutants considered from the point of view of a short and medium range-material balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel Benaire

    1976-01-01

    Episodical long-range transport is the quasi-instantaneous peak event. It does not express the total dosage of pollutant carried over from the source area to some distant place. The purpose of the present paper is to obtain an average material balance of a pollutant leaving a given area. Available information from the OECD "Long Range Transport of Air Pollutants...

  1. Contributions of Icelandic and other high-latitude sources to mineral dust in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Grythe, Henrik; Arnalds, Olafur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Skov, Henrik; Jóhannsson, Thorsteinn; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts at 0.2 degrees, we distinguish most important dust sources and study dust concentrations at remote distances from sources based on PM10 measurements in and near Reykjavik. Some dust events were described well with the model, while the model appears to overpredict dust concentrations in Reykjavik in late fall. We further look into interannual variability of dust emission from Iceland with FLEXDUST simulations based on ERA Interim data over two decades. Here, we found that annual dust emission is on average about 3.5±0.7 Tg. In some years, the inland sources in the region of Dyngjusandur are most prominent, while in others near-coast southern dust sources are especially active. Much of the dust emitted from Iceland is transported southwards and therefore less than 6% of dust deposited in the near Arctic (>60°N) is from Icelandic sources.

  2. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility, practicability, and potential advantages/disadvantages of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in long range, subsonic transport aircraft of advanced design were studied. Both passenger and cargo-type aircraft were investigated. To provide a valid basis for comparison, conventional hydrocarbon (Jet A) fueled aircraft were designed to perform identical missions using the same advanced technology and meeting the same operational constraints. The liquid hydrogen and Jet A fueled aircraft were compared on the basis of weight, size, energy utilization, cost, noise, emissions, safety, and operational characteristics. A program of technology development was formulated.

  3. Steady stokes flow with long-range correlations, fractal fourier spectrum, and anomalous transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaks, Michael A; Straube, Arthur V

    2002-12-09

    We consider viscous two-dimensional steady flows of incompressible fluids past doubly periodic arrays of solid obstacles. In a class of such flows, the autocorrelations for the Lagrangian observables decay in accordance with the power law, and the Fourier spectrum is neither discrete nor absolutely continuous. We demonstrate that spreading of the droplet of tracers in such flows is anomalously fast. Since the flow is equivalent to the integrable Hamiltonian system with 1 degree of freedom, this provides an example of integrable dynamics with long-range correlations, fractal power spectrum, and anomalous transport properties.

  4. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, A P; Mateos, José L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs.

  5. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, A. P.; Mateos, José L.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs.

  6. Long-range transport of sulfur in the western United States. [Projections for 1985 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, W. F.; Eadie, W. J.; Drewes, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Pollutants, such as SO/sub 2/ and sulfate, emitted from both utility and industrial coal burning processes have long residence time in the atmosphere. Therefore, the long-range atmospheric transport and diffusion of these pollutants must be considered in any environmental assessment of proposed plant operation. The most useful tool in predicting the long-range transport of pollutants is a computer simulation technique for the Gaussian diffusion equation. Information produced by the model includes: SO/sub 2/ and sulfate ground-level air concentrations, the amount of SO/sub 2/ and sulfate deposited on the ground surface, the minimum pH value in the rainfall, and the budget of SO/sub 2/ and sulfate material over the diffusion grid. Information on siting and emissions is also required. For this study, siting was based on projected coal use in 1985 and 1990 based on a two-thirds increase in coal production. Results of the modeling for the western United States indicate that the maximum incremental ground-level air concentrations for SO/sub 2/ are 8.4 and 14 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ for utility and industrial sources, respectively. Maximum predicted incremental ground-level sulfate concentrations for utility and industrial sources are 0.8 and 1.2 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, respectively. The minimum calculated pH values for both utility and industrial sulfur emission were 5.3. Maximum SO/sub 2/ deposition amounts range from 0.5 to 0.8 gm/m/sup 2/ for both the utility and industrial coal use scenarios. The largest sulfate deposition amounts range from a factor of 55 to 24 smaller than SO/sub 2/ deposition amounts. (ERB)

  7. Flux-corrected transport algorithms preserving the eigenvalue range of symmetric tensor quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to constraining the eigenvalue range of symmetric tensors in numerical advection schemes based on the flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm and a continuous finite element discretization. In the context of element-based FEM-FCT schemes for scalar conservation laws, the numerical solution is evolved using local extremum diminishing (LED) antidiffusive corrections of a low order approximation which is assumed to satisfy the relevant inequality constraints. The application of a limiter to antidiffusive element contributions guarantees that the corrected solution remains bounded by the local maxima and minima of the low order predictor. The FCT algorithm to be presented in this paper guarantees the LED property for the maximal and minimal eigenvalues of the transported tensor at the low order evolution step. At the antidiffusive correction step, this property is preserved by limiting the antidiffusive element contributions to all components of the tensor in a synchronized manner. The definition of the element-based correction factors for FCT is based on perturbation bounds for auxiliary tensors which are constrained to be positive semidefinite to enforce the generalized LED condition. The derivation of sharp bounds involves calculating the roots of polynomials of degree up to 3. As inexpensive and numerically stable alternatives, limiting techniques based on appropriate estimates are considered. The ability of the new limiters to enforce local bounds for the eigenvalue range is confirmed by numerical results for 2D advection problems.

  8. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  9. Long-range atmospheric transport and the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Changbai Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangai; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Zhu, Weihong; Kannan, Narayanan; Li, Donghao

    2015-01-01

    The Changbai (also known as "Baekdu") Mountain, on the border between China and North Korea, is the highest mountain (2750 m) in northeastern China. Recently, this mountain region has experienced a dramatic increase in air pollution, not only because of increasing volumes of tourism-derived traffic but also because of the long-range transport of polluted westerly winds passing through major industrial and urban cities in the eastern region of China. To assess the relative importance of the two sources of pollution, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model substances were determined in the mountain soil. A total of 32 soil samples were collected from different sides of the mountain at different latitudes between July and August of 2009. The ∑PAH concentrations were within the range 38.5-190.1 ng g(-1) on the northern side, 117.7-443.6 ng g(-1) on the southern side, and 75.3-437.3 ng g(-1) on the western side. A progressive increase in the level of ∑PAHs with latitude was observed on the southern and western sides that face the westerly wind with abundant precipitation. However, a similar concentration gradient was not observed on the northern side that receives less rain and is on the leeward direction of the wind. The high-molecular-weight PAH compounds were predominant in the soils on the southern and western sides, while low-molecular-weight PAHs dominated the northern side soils. These findings show that the distribution of PAHs in the mountain soil is strongly influenced by the atmospheric long-range transport and cold trapping. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  11. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  12. Long range transport of nitrate in the low atmosphere over Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikang; Xu, Jun; He, Youjiang; Chen, Yunbo; Meng, Fan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the source-relationships were established for surface nitrate concentrations in Northeast Asia, using the Particulate Matter Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) in the CAMx (a regional chemical transport model). Both of the local emissions and Chinese emissions were important among the sources of the particle nitrate in Japan and South Korea, accounting for 27.9-62.9% and 22.9-50.5% respectively. The local contributions of nitrate were 4-20% higher than the figures of sulfate, and this was caused by the different chemical processes and emissions involved. The seasonal variation of the nitrate concentration in East Asia led to different amounts of nitrate being attributed to long-range transport, and was higher in winter (>53%) than in summer (Japan and some regions of South Korea. And that was different in most parts of East Asia, where there were large quantities of ammonia. The ammonia from local emissions were most likely responsible for some particulate nitrate being transformed from trans-boundary gaseous nitric, which signified that local emissions of ammonia increased the contribution of China to the nitrate concentrations in Japan and South Korea.

  13. Correlation of Disorder and Charge Transport in a Range of Indacenodithiophene-Based Semiconducting Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Nikolka, Mark

    2017-12-13

    Over the past 25 years, various design motifs have emerged for the development of organic semiconductors for demanding applications in flexible organic light emitting diode display backplanes or even printed organic logic. Due to their large area uniformity paired with high charge carrier mobilities, conjugated polymers have attracted increasing attention in this respect. However, the performances delivered by current generation conjugated polymers still fall short of many industrial requirements demanding devices with ideal transistor characteristics and higher mobilities. The discovery of conjugated polymers with low energetic disorder, such as the indacenodithiophene-based polymer indacenodithiophene-co-benzothiadiazole, represent an exciting opportunity to breach this chasm if these materials can be further optimized while maintaining their low disorder. Here, it is shown how both the charge transport properties as well as the energetic disorder are affected by tuning the molecular structure of a large range of indacenodithiophene-based semiconducting polymer derivatives. This study allows to understand better the interplay between molecular design and structure of the polymer backbone and the degree of energetic disorder that governs the charge transport properties in thin polymer films.

  14. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  15. 23 CFR 450.214 - Development and content of the long-range statewide transportation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...., transportation, safety, economic development, social and environmental effects, or energy) that were relevant to... providers of transportation, representatives of users of public transportation, representatives of users of... freight transportation services, and other interested parties with a reasonable opportunity to comment on...

  16. The representation of dust transport and missing urban sources as major issues for the simulation of PM episodes in a Mediterranean area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Flaounas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its adverse effects on human health, atmospheric particulate matter (PM constitutes a growing challenge for air quality management. It is also a complex subject of study. The understanding of its atmospheric evolution is indeed made difficult by the wide number of sources and the numerous processes that govern its evolution in the troposphere. As a consequence, the representation of particulate matter in chemistry-transport models needs to be permanently evaluated and enhanced in order to refine our comprehension of PM pollution events and to propose consistent environmental policies. The study presented here focuses on two successive summer particulate pollution episodes that occurred on the French Mediterranean coast. We identify and analyze the constitutive elements of the first and more massive episode and we discuss their representation within a eulerian model.

    The results show that the model fails in reproducing the variability and the amplitude of dust import from western Africa, and that it constitutes a strong bias in PM daily forecasts. We then focus on the lack of diurnal variability in the model, which is attributed to missing urban sources in standard emission inventories, and notably the resuspension of particles by urban road traffic. Through a sensitivity study based on PM and NOx measurements, we assess the sensitivity of PM to local emissions and the need to reconsider road traffic PM sources. In parallel, by coupling the CHIMERE-DUST model outputs to our simulation, we show that the representation of transcontinental dust transport allows a much better representation of atmospheric particles in southern France, and that it is needed in the frame of air quality management for the quantification of the anthropogenic part of particulate matter pollution.

  17. Multi-decadal and seasonal variability of dust observations in West Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Mockford, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Since the early 1900s expedition records from west Greenland have reported local dust storms. The Kangerlussuaq region, near the inland ice, is dry (mean annual precipitation snow-free days per year. The main local dust sources are active, proglacial outwash plains although reworking of loess deposits may also be important. This paper presents an analysis of 70-years of dust storm observations (1945-2015) based on WMO weather codes 6 (dust haze), 7 (raised dust or sand) and 9 (distant or past dust storm) and associated wind data. The 70-year average number of dust observations days is 5 per year but variable ranging from 0 observations to 23 observations in 1985. Over the past 7 decades the number of dust days has increased from 75 in 1995-2004 and 2005-2015. The seasonality of dust observations has remained consistent throughout most of the period. Dust days occur all year round but are most frequent in May-June and September-October and are associated with minimum snow cover and glacial meltwater-driven sediment supply to the outwash plains during spring and fall flood events. Wind regime is bimodal dominated by katabatic winds from the northeast, which are strongest and most frequent during winter months (Nov-Jan), with less frequent, southwesterly winds generated by Atlantic storms mostly confined to spring (May, June). The southwesterly winds are those most likely to transport dust onto the Greenland ice sheet.

  18. Parameterization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2015-06-01

    boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near-surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low-level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidence around thermal plumes in typically less than 1 h. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong nonlinearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERA-Interim reanalyses. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyses used for nudging themselves. It also generates dust emissions in better agreement with current estimates, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  19. Dust Quantization and Effects on Agriculture Over Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    Dust plays a very important role in the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this communication, the effect of atmospheric dust on the yields of certain crops grown in Uttar Pradesh, India is assessed. Coherent physical and thermodynamic fingerprints of dust parameters such as from Satellite data- KALPANA-1, MODIS, OMI, CALIPSO; Model data- DREAM, HYSPLIT, ECMWF; have been considered to run the APSIM model to derive the impacts. This paper assesses dust as a physical atmospheric phenomenon including its Long Range Transport (LRT) and dispersion along with considerable variations of Aerosol Optical Depths (AODs) over the subcontinent of India. While AODs significantly increase by more dust concentration, the local dispersion of pollutants is a major concern with deposition of atmospheric dust such as sulphates and other chemical constituents that affect agricultural land. An approach in atmospheric physics is also taken to parameterize the model outputs. This communication indicates dust to be a positive factor for the cultivation of certain crops such as wheat, maize in the experimental location. Initial results suggest that LRT dust is a viable counterpart to decrease the concentration of soil acidity and related parameters thus enhancing the vitality of crops.

  20. The pulsating nature of large-scale Saharan dust transport as a result of interplays between mid-latitude Rossby waves and the North African Dipole Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, E.; Gómez-Peláez, A. J.; Rodríguez, S.; Terradellas, E.; Basart, S.; García, R. D.; García, O. E.; Alonso-Pérez, S.

    2017-10-01

    It was previously shown that during August the export of Saharan dust to the Atlantic was strongly affected by the difference of the 700-hPa geopotential height anomaly between the subtropics and the tropics over North Africa, which was termed the North African Dipole Intensity (NAFDI). In this work a more comprehensive analysis of the NAFDI is performed, focusing on the entire summer dust season (June-September), and examining the interactions between the mid-latitude Rossby waves (MLRWs) and NAFDI. Widespread and notable aerosol optical depth (AOD) monthly anomalies are found for each NAFDI-phase over the dust corridors off the Sahara, indicating that NAFDI presents intra-seasonal variability and drives dust transport over both the Mediterranean basin and the North Atlantic. Those summer months with the same NAFDI-phase show similar AOD-anomaly patterns. Variations in NAFDI-phase also control the displacement of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) westwards or eastwards through horizontal advection of temperature over Morocco-Western Sahara or eastern Algeria-Western Libya, respectively. The connection between the SHL and the NAFDI is quantified statistically by introducing two new daily indexes that account for their respective phases (NAFDI daily index -NAFDIDI-, and SHL longitudinal shift index -SHLLSI-) and explained physically using the energy equation of the atmospheric dynamics. The Pearson's correlation coefficient between the one-day-lag SHLLSI and the NAFDIDI for an extended summer season (1980-2013) is 0.78. A positive NAFDI is associated with the West-phase of the SHL, dust sources intensification on central Algeria, and positive AOD anomalies over this region and the Subtropical North Atlantic. A negative NAFDI is associated with the East-phase of the SHL, and positive AOD anomalies over central-eastern Sahara and the central-western Mediterranean Sea. The results point out that the phase changes of NAFDI at intra-seasonal time scale are conducted by those

  1. Trends, Long-range Transport and Lifetime of DDT in and over Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammel, G.; Dvorská, A.; Stohl, A.; Klánová, J.; Ries, L.

    2009-04-01

    Dichlorophenyltrichloroethane, DDT, and its major metabolites dichlorophenyldichloroethylene, DDE, and dichlorophenyldichloroethane, DDD, are long-lived in the environment (persistent) and circulate since the 1950s. They accumulate along food chains, cause detrimental effects in marine and terrestrial wild life, and pose a hazard for human health. DDT is a multicompartmental substance with only a small mass fraction residing in air. Decreasing concentration trends are recorded in Europe, where the substance has not been used since ?1988 (Holoubek et al., 2007). Transport in the free troposphere is expected by models (Lammel & Semeena, 2005; Semeena et al., 2006), but no observations in the free troposphere had been reported in Europe. The degradation rates of DDT, DDE and DDD are uncertain. In particular, the hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients in air are unknown. DDT monitoring data in air at a central European continental background station, Kosetice, Czech Republic, were used in combination with back-trajectories (HYSPLIT model, NOAA) to localize DDT sources in central, western and northern Europe. The decreasing trend continued during recent years, 2004-06. During 2 campaigns at a high mountain site in the Alps (Zugspitze, 2650 m a.s.l.) mean concentrations of 0.23, 0.63 and 0.08 pg m-3 of DDT, DDE and DDD, respectively, were measured in summer and 0.73, 2.22, and 0.52 pg m-3, respectively, in winter. The levels were not lower in free tropospheric air than in boundary layer air. Transport and residence times in air were quantified using Lagrangian particle dispersion model retroplume analyses (FLEXPART model; Stohl et al., 1998). During a stable anti-cyclonic situation photochemical lifetimes corresponded to kOH climate and substance properties on the fate and atmospheric long-range transport of persistent organic pollutants - examples of DDT and γ-HCH, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 6, 1231-1248 Stohl A., Hittenberger M., Wotawa G. (1998): Validation of the

  2. Investigation of Three-Dimensional Evolution of East Asian Dust Storm by Modeling and Remote Sensing Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional evolution of an East Asian dust storm during 23–26 April 2009 was investigated by utilizing a regional air quality model system (RAQMS and satellite measurements. This severe dust storm hit Mt. Tai in east China with daily mean PM10 concentration reaching 1400 μg/m3 and the model captured the PM10 variation reasonably well. Modeled spatial distributions of AOD and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficient during the dust storm were compared with MODIS and CALIPSO data, demonstrating that RAQMS was able to reproduce the 3D structure and the evolution of the dust storm reasonably well. During early days of the dust storm, daily mean dust-induced AOD exceeded 2.0 over dust source regions (the Gobi desert and the Taklamakan desert and was in a range of 1.2–1.8 over the North China Plain, accounting for about 98% and up to 90% of total AOD over corresponding areas, respectively. The top of the dust storm reached about 8 km over east China, with high dust concentration locating at around 40°N. Dust aerosol below 2 km was transported southeastward off the Gobi desert while dust above 2 km was transported out of China along 40°–45°N.

  3. Using background air pollutants levels correlation analysis to identify periods of long-range transport of anthropogenic pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkova, Elizaveta S.; Burtseva, Larisa V.; Gromov, Sergey A.; Gromov, Sergey S.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing trends of airborne lead and cadmium at background station within the central region of European Russia have been identified previously (e.g., Gromov & Konkova, 2016). In order to reveal the possible drivers of these trends, a deeper investigation of correlation among these heavy metals (HM) and other co-measured pollutants is done in this study. Based on the data for the 2001-2012 period, calculations have been carried out for the period from 2006 onwards, when the growth of HM concentrations is observed. Pairwise correlations of individual species abundances were derived for the entire time series and subsets for each calendar year, including warm (April to September) and cold seasons (October to March). The calculated values for the seasons and the whole years vary substantially, suggesting that that variable ratios of atmospheric HM emission sources could affect the final air concentrations at measurement site in these periods. To distinguish the events of predominant influence of natural and anthropogenic sources, we assume that correlation between lead and cadmium levels must be greater in the case of natural sources being in effect. High values of the correlation coefficient are expected in cases when HM air abundances are induced by the long-range transport from the regions of anthropogenic sources (co-emission of these metals results from a number of same sources, and both of them are also present on same matrix aerosols). The results demonstrate a substantial correlation between Pb and Cd, with higher values for individual seasons (70% of 0.5 and higher) than for whole years. Higher mass concentrations of airborne dust (TSP) in remote areas are to large extent promoted by large particles blown away from the surface at local surroundings. Captured better by filters, such events could be a particular indicator of local (mostly natural) sources. Low or insignificant correlation with HM indicates prevalence of long-range transport of them and could

  4. The Dust Management Project: Characterizing Lunar Environments and Dust, Developing Regolith Mitigation Technology and Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth?s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting long-term operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it?s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, plans, and accomplishments will be presented.

  5. Trans-pacific Dust during Atmospheric River Landfall in the Western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Hu, Z.; Leung, L. R.; Hagos, S. M.; Huang, J.; Qian, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are prominent features of the global water cycle. On long-term average, 20%-50% of annual precipitation over California is attributed to several AR events in the cool season that produce heavy precipitation. Local and trans-Pacific dust has been found to interact with ARs and affect clouds and precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Such interactions depend on the dust vertical and size distributions and its mineral compositions. Therefore, local and long-range transported dust from different sources may modulate clouds and precipitation differently. In this study, a state-of-the-art model WRF-Chem is used to characterize the evolution of dust distributions and source contributions during AR events that made landfall in the western U.S. in 2010-2015. Quasi-global WRF-Chem simulations are evaluated with reanalysis and observations. The model simulations successfully capture the AR events and aerosol distributions in 2010-2015. During AR landfall in the cool season (September-March), a higher fraction of dust mass is associated with trans-Pacific dust than local dust compared to the average conditions, suggesting that the circulation patterns associated with ARs may enhance transport of dust across the Pacific Ocean. In the U.S. west coast, dust of local origin dominates the total dust amount below 2 km and to the south of 40oN during the AR landfall, while trans-pacific dust dominates above 2 km with comparable contributions from East Asian, African, and Central Asian sources, respectively. The contribution of East Asian dust mass is higher during AR landfall than the average conditions. These results suggest that trans-Pacific dust could be incorporated in orographic clouds at high altitude, with implications to precipitation produced by landfalling ARs in the U.S. west coast.

  6. Theoretical aspects of Dust in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A.Yu.; Smirnov, R.D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [ICN, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2010-05-15

    It is known that micro-particles (dust) exist in fusion devices. However, an impact of dust on plasma contamination, material migration, and performance of fusion devices is still under debate. In burning plasma experiments like ITER dust can also pose safety problems related to it's chemical activity, toxicity, tritium retention, and radioactive content. In order to address all these issues we need to understand the physics of dust generation, dynamics, and transport. In this paper, the results of recent theoretical studies of dust in fusion plasmas are reviewed. Different aspects of the physics of dust in fusion plasmas, including the processes of dust generation, charging, heating, destruction, spinning, forces acting on dust, dust collision with material walls, etc are discussed. The numerical models of these processes have been incorporated into the dust transport code DUSTT, which is capable of tracking of dust particles in fusion devices in 3D geometry. The results of the simulations of dust particle dynamics, transport, and the impact on edge plasma performance are considered. The latest results on nonlinear interactions of dust grain with tokamak plasma as well as remaining gaps in the understanding of physics of dust in fusion devices are discussed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. A probabilistic dispersion model applied to the long-range transport of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.; Mikkelsen, T.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range atmospheric transport of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident is modelled as an Eulerian diffusion process. From observations of the gross deposition pattern of particulate radiocaesium an effective long-range Eddy diffusivity K of the order of 10(6) m(2) s(-1) is inferred...

  8. Modelling atmospheric chemistry and long-range transport of emerging Asian pollutants

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Modeling is a very important tool for scientific processes, requiring long-term dedication, desire, and continuous reflection. In this work, we discuss several aspects of modeling, and the reasons for doing it. We discuss two major modeling systems that have been built by us over the last 10 years. It is a long and arduous process but the reward of understanding can be enormous, as demonstrated in the examples shown in this work. We found that long-range transport of emerging Asian pollutants can be interpreted using a Lagrangian framework for wind analysis. More detailed processes still need to be modeled but an accurate representation of the wind structure is the most important thing above all others. Our long-term chemistry integrations reveal the capability of the IMS model in simulating tropospheric chemistry on a climate scale. These long-term integrations also show ways for further model development. Modeling is a quantitative process, and the understanding can be sustained only when theories are vigor...

  9. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  10. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  11. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lnnar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however. the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  12. Andromeda's Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Draine, B.T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and PAH abundance, out to R=25kpc. The global dust mass is M_d=5.4x10^7Msol, the global dust/H mass ratio is M_d/M_H=0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is =0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R=5.6kpc, a maximum at R=11.2kpc, and an outer ring at R=15.1kpc. The dust/gas ratio var...

  13. Evaluation of long-range transport models in NOVANA; Evaluering af langtransportmodeller i NOVANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohn, L.M.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J.H.; Geels, C.; Hertel, O.; Skjoeth, C.A.; Ellemann, T.

    2007-06-15

    obtained with ACDEP for 11 out of 16 chemical parameters. In general the performance of the DEHM model is at least as good as the performance of the ACDEP model, and for the majority of the chemical parameters the performance of DEHM is better than the performance of ACDEP when model results are compared to measurements. This result is expected since the description of the long-range transport of air pollution, which contributes significantly to the concentration levels in Denmark, is better in DEHM. (BA)

  14. Satellite observations of megacity air pollution, biomass burning emissions, and their long- range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, W. W.; Kollonige, D.; Yurganov, L.; Krueger, A.; Hoff, R.; Barnet, C.; Gleason, J.; Celarier, E.; Krotkov, N.; Liu, X.; Kurosu, T. P.; Osterman, G.; Torres, O.

    2008-12-01

    present satellite observations of long-range transport of air pollution and biomass burning emissions.

  15. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  16. Merging long range transportation planning with public health: a case study from Utah's Wasatch Front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, Shaunna K

    2010-01-01

    US transportation systems have been identified as a problem for public health, as they often encourage automobile transportation and discourage physical activity. This paper provides a case study examination of the Public Health Component of the Wasatch Front Regional Council's Regional Transportation Plan. This plan provides an example of what transportation planners at Utah's largest metropolitan planning organization (MPO) are doing to encourage physical activity through transportation. Existing active living research was used to guide recommendations using a process that included a comprehensive literature review and a review of existing state programs, advisory group and stakeholder meetings, and policy recommendations based on existing local conditions. Stakeholders from a diversity of background and interests came together with one common goal: to improve public health. Based on this collaborative process, nine policy approaches were specifically recommended for approval and integration in the Wasatch Front Regional Transportation Plan. By using current research as a guide and integrating a variety of interests, the Wasatch Front Regional Council is setting a new standard for a collaborative multi-modal focus in transportation planning, which can be replicated nationwide.

  17. Dry lake beds as sources of dust in Australia during the Late Quaternary: A volumetric approach based on lake bed and deflated dune volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farebrother, Will; Hesse, Paul P.; Chang, Hsing-Chung; Jones, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Dust affects Earth's climate, ecology and economies across a broad range of scales, both temporally and spatially, and is an integral part of the earth's climate system. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of inland lake beds to dust emissions both locally and globally. This study aims to explore the relative volumetric importance of ephemeral lakes that emit dust to the Australian southeastern dust path over the last glacial cycle. SRTM DEMs and GIS analyses of long-term (up to 80 ka) lake-bed deflation volumes and deposition of sand-sized sediment onto downwind source bordering dunes were used to derive estimates of transported dust mass. A strong power relationship was found between lake area and the mass of deflated lake bed sediments. Total dust masses for the largest 53 lakes in southeastern Australia were derived using the relationship between lake area and dust mass and used to determine an upper value for total dust mass deflated from lake beds in southeastern Australia. Ephemeral lake-derived dust was found to represent at most 13% of the dust derived from southeastern Australia deposited in the southern Pacific over the last 80 ka or 22% over the last 40 ka. Lake Eyre (the largest lake) has contributed at most 3% of the Australian southeast dust plume. These results imply that there are significant additional sources of dust in Australia over these timescales, such as floodplains or dunefields, and that modelling must allow for diverse climatic and geomorphic controls on dust production.

  18. Potential of polarization/Raman lidar to separate fine dust, coarse dust, maritime, and anthropogenic aerosol profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2017-09-01

    We applied the recently introduced polarization lidar-photometer networking (POLIPHON) technique for the first time to triple-wavelength polarization lidar measurements at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. The lidar observations were performed at Barbados during the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in the summer of 2014. The POLIPHON method comprises the traditional lidar technique to separate mineral dust and non-dust backscatter contributions and the new, extended approach to separate even the fine and coarse dust backscatter fractions. We show that the traditional and the advanced method are compatible and lead to a consistent set of dust and non-dust profiles at simplified, less complex aerosol layering and mixing conditions as is the case over the remote tropical Atlantic. To derive dust mass concentration profiles from the lidar observations, trustworthy extinction-to-volume conversion factors for fine, coarse, and total dust are needed and obtained from an updated, extended Aerosol Robotic Network sun photometer data analysis of the correlation between the fine, coarse and total dust volume concentration and the respective fine, coarse, and total dust extinction coefficient for all three laser wavelengths. Conversion factors (total volume to extinction) for pure marine aerosol conditions and continental anthropogenic aerosol situations are presented in addition. As a new feature of the POLIPHON data analysis, the Raman lidar method for particle extinction profiling is used to identify the aerosol type (marine or anthropogenic) of the non-dust aerosol fraction. The full POLIPHON methodology was successfully applied to a SALTRACE case and the results are discussed. We conclude that the 532 nm polarization lidar technique has many advantages in comparison to 355 and 1064 nm polarization lidar approaches and leads to the most robust and accurate POLIPHON products.

  19. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  20. New Satellite Laser Ranging TRF and EOP Series for Mass Transport Studies in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, E. C.

    2001-12-01

    The new millennium has started on the right note for geodesy. We finally see a series of gravity mapping missions materialize. What now becomes important is that well-established geodetic techniques rise to the challenge of validating and complementing the data these new missions will deliver. An area where this is likely to be important is the temporal variations in the zonal gravitational field and its very low degree and order components in general. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has for a long time monitored the continuous redistribution of mass within the Earth system through concomitant changes in the Stokes' coefficients of the terrestrial gravity field. Secular changes in J2 due to post-glacial relaxation have been observed since many years and similar changes in J3, J4 J5, etc. are attributed to changes in the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Seasonal changes in these coefficients have also been closely correlated with mass transfer in the atmosphere and oceans. JCET's latest analysis of the 1993-present SLR data set from LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 data for the IERS (International Earth Rotation Service) Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) development, includes the weekly monitoring of such compound changes in the low degree and order harmonics. This latest solution (2001) incorporates several important changes in the modeling of SLR data with resulting improvements in the geophysical products. Along with the static parameters of the TRF we have determined a time series of variations of its origin with respect to the center of mass of the Earth system (geocenter). These estimates provide a measure of the total motion due to all sources of mass transport within the Earth system and can be used to either complement the estimates from the future missions or to validate them through comparisons with their estimates for the same quantities. The data were reduced using NASA Goddard's GEODYN/SOLVE II software, resulting to a final RMS error of ~8 mm - close to the

  1. Long-range transport of airborne microbes over the global tropical and subtropical ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Mayol, Eva

    2017-07-28

    The atmosphere plays a fundamental role in the transport of microbes across the planet but it is often neglected as a microbial habitat. Although the ocean represents two thirds of the Earth\\'s surface, there is little information on the atmospheric microbial load over the open ocean. Here we provide a global estimate of microbial loads and air-sea exchanges over the tropical and subtropical oceans based on the data collected along the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition. Total loads of airborne prokaryotes and eukaryotes were estimated at 2.2 × 1021 and 2.1 × 1021 cells, respectively. Overall 33-68% of these microorganisms could be traced to a marine origin, being transported thousands of kilometres before re-entering the ocean. Moreover, our results show a substantial load of terrestrial microbes transported over the oceans, with abundances declining exponentially with distance from land and indicate that islands may act as stepping stones facilitating the transoceanic transport of terrestrial microbes.The extent to which the ocean acts as a sink and source of airborne particles to the atmosphere is unresolved. Here, the authors report high microbial loads over the tropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans and propose islands as stepping stones for the transoceanic transport of terrestrial microbes..

  2. The Mineral Dust Cycle in EMAC 2.40: sensitivity to the spectral resolution and the dust emission scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gläser

    2012-02-01

    dust emission and long-range transport.

  3. Geochemical characterization of critical dust source regions in the American West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sarah M.; Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Emily I.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Scott, Sean R.; Aarons, Charles

    2017-10-01

    The generation, transport, and deposition of mineral dust are detectable in paleoclimate records from land, ocean, and ice, providing valuable insight into earth surface conditions and cycles on a range of timescales. Dust deposited in marine and terrestrial ecosystems can provide critical nutrients to nutrient-limited ecosystems, and variations in dust provenance can indicate changes in dust production, sources and transport pathways as a function of climate variability and land use change. Thus, temporal changes in locations of dust source areas and transport pathways have implications for understanding interactions between mineral dust, global climate, and biogeochemical cycles. This work characterizes dust from areas in the American West known for dust events and/or affected by increasing human settlement and livestock grazing during the last 150 years. Dust generation and uplift from these dust source areas depends on climate and land use practices, and the relative contribution of dust has likely changed since the expansion of industrialization and agriculture into the western United States. We present elemental and isotopic analysis of 28 potential dust source area samples analyzed using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd composition and Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) for 176Hf/177Hf composition, and ICPMS for major and trace element concentrations. We find significant variability in the Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope compositions of potential source areas of dust throughout western North America, ranging from 87Sr/86Sr = 0.703699 to 0.740236, εNd = -26.6 to 2.4, and εHf = -21.7 to -0.1. We also report differences in the trace metal and phosphorus concentrations in the geologic provinces sampled. This research provides an important resource for the geochemical tracing of dust sources and sinks in western North America, and will aid in modeling the biogeochemical impacts of increased

  4. PM(10) episodes in Greece: Local sources versus long-range transport-observations and model simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N; Triantafyllou, Athanasios G; Koutrakis, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Periods of abnormally high concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, defined as air pollution episodes, can cause adverse health effects. Southern European countries experience high particulate matter (PM) levels originating from local and distant sources. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and nature of extreme PM10 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm) pollution episodes in Greece. We examined PM10 concentration data from 18 monitoring stations located at five sites across the country: (1) an industrial area in northwestern Greece (Western Macedonia Lignite Area, WMLA), which includes sources such as lignite mining operations and lignite power plants that generate a high percentage of the energy in Greece; (2) the greater Athens area, the most populated area of the country; and (3) Thessaloniki, (4) Patra, and (5) Volos, three large cities in Greece. We defined extreme PM10 pollution episodes (EEs) as days during which PM10 concentrations at all five sites exceeded the European Union (EU) 24-hr PM10 standards. For each EE, we identified the corresponding prevailing synoptic and local meteorological conditions, including wind surface data, for the period from January 2009 through December 2011. We also analyzed data from remote sensing and model simulations. We recorded 14 EEs that occurred over 49 days and could be grouped into two categories: (1) Local Source Impact (LSI; 26 days, 53%) and (2) African Dust Impact (ADI; 23 days, 47%). Our analysis suggested that the contribution of local sources to ADI EEs was relatively small. LSI EEs were observed only in the cold season, whereas ADI EEs occurred throughout the year, with a higher frequency during the cold season. The EEs with the highest intensity were recorded during African dust intrusions. ADI episodes were found to contribute more than local sources in Greece, with ADI and LSI fraction contribution ranging from 1.1 to 3.10. The EE contribution during ADI fluctuated from 41 to 83 μg/m3

  5. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  6. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution. (KRM)

  7. Satellite observations of long range transport of a large BrO plume in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Begoin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozone Depletion Events (ODE during polar springtime are a well known phenomenon in the Arctic and Antarctic boundary layer. They are caused by the catalytic destruction of ozone by halogens producing reactive halogen oxides like bromine monoxide (BrO. The key halogen bromine can be rapidly transferred into the gas phase in an autocatalytic process – the so called "Bromine Explosion". However, the exact mechanism, which leads to an initial bromine release as well as the influence of transport and chemical processes on BrO, is still not clearly understood.

    In this study, BrO measurements from the satellite instrument GOME-2 are used together with model calculations with the dispersion model FLEXPART to study an arctic BrO event in March 2007, which could be tracked over several days and a large area. Full BrO activation was observed within one day east of Siberia with subsequent transport to Hudson Bay. The event was linked to a cyclone with very high surface wind speeds, which could have been involved in the production and lifting of aerosols or blowing snow. Considering the short life time of BrO, transported aerosols or snow can also provide the surface for BrO recycling within the plume for several days. The evolution of the BrO plume could be reproduced by FLEXPART simulations of a passive tracer indicating that the activated air mass was transported all the way from Siberia to Hudson Bay. To localise the most probable transport height, model runs initialised in different heights have been performed showing similar transport patterns throughout the troposphere but best agreement with the measurements between the surface and 3 km. The influence of changes in tropopause height on measured BrO values has been considered, but cannot completely explain the observed high BrO values. Backward trajectories from the area of BrO initialisation show upward lifting from the surface up to 3 km and no indication for intrusion of stratospheric

  8. THE VISUALIZATION METHOD OF THE 3D CONCENTRATION DISTRIBUTION OF ASIAN DUST IN THE GOOGLE EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Okuda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian dust (called "Kosa" in Japan transported from desert areas in the northern China often covers over East Asia in the late winter and spring seasons. In this study, first of all, for dust events observed at various places in Japan on April 1, 2007 and March 21, 2010, the long-range transport simulation of Asian dust from desert areas in the northern China to Japan is carried out. Next, the method for representing 3D dust clouds by means of the image overlay functionality provided in the Google Earth is described. Since it is very difficult to display 3D dust clouds along the curvature of the Earth on the global scale, the 3D dust cloud distributed at the altitude of about 6300m was divided into many thin layers, each of which is the same thickness. After each of layers was transformed to the image layer, each image layer was displayed at the appropriate altitude in the Google Earth. Thus obtained image layers were displayed every an hour in the Google Earth. Finally, it is shown that 3D Asian dust clouds generated by the method described in this study are represented as smooth 3D cloud objects even if we looked at Asian dust clouds transversely in the Google Earth.

  9. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  10. The Dust Bowl in the American West: A geochemical record of dust provenance and deposition in the Upper Fremont Glacier ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, S. M.; Aciego, S.; Blakowski, M. A.; Delmonte, B.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of earth surface processes, and influences the present-day climate through both direct and indirect means. Dust is also critical to biogeochemical cycles, providing limiting nutrients to both continental and marine ecosystems. Mineral dust generation, transport and deposition are detectable in paleoclimate records from land, ocean, and ice, providing valuable insight into earth surface conditions and cycles on a variety of timescales. Here, we have characterized dust from areas in the American West known for dust events and/or affected by increasing human settlement and livestock grazing during the last 150 years. Dust generation and uplift from these dust source areas depends on climate and land use practices; furthermore, the relative contribution of dust has likely changed since the expansion of industrialization and agriculture into the western United States. In tandem with the potential dust source characterization, we present elemental and isotopic analysis of dust preserved in the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core, WY, USA through a series of 23 ice core samples. These ice core samples span 20.29-158.74 m in depth and cover a time period of 1715-1998 A.D. and were analyzed along with 28 potential dust source area samples using traditional Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd composition. Trace element concentrations were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS), and ice core dust concentration and size distribution by Coulter Counter. We find that the radiogenic isotope compositions of dust from the UFG ice core are variable over the past 150 years, and that the dust is most likely originating from a combination of source areas including the provinces of the Colorado Plateau, Mojavia, the Basin and Range, and an additional uncharacterized source. Ice core dust particle diameter increases with decreasing age, suggesting a source

  11. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huneeus

    2011-08-01

    but they overestimate the AOD and they transport too fine particles. The models also reproduce the dust transport across the Atlantic in the summer in terms of both AOD and AE but not so well in winter-spring nor the southward displacement of the dust cloud that is responsible of the dust transport into South America. Based on the dependency of AOD on aerosol burden and size distribution we use model bias with respect to AOD and AE to infer the bias of the dust emissions in Africa and the Middle East. According to this analysis we suggest that a range of possible emissions for North Africa is 400 to 2200 Tg yr−1 and in the Middle East 26 to 526 Tg yr−1.

  12. The Fate of Saharan Dust Across the Atlantic and Implications for a Central American Dust Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P.; da Silva, A.; Hlavka, D.; McGill, M.

    2011-01-01

    Saharan dust was observed over the Caribbean basin during the summer 2007 NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) field experiment. Airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and satellite observations from MODIS suggest a barrier to dust transport across Central America into the eastern Pacific. We use the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model with online aerosol tracers to perform simulations of the TC4 time period in order to understand the nature of this barrier. Our simulations are driven by the Modem Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological analyses. We evaluate our baseline simulated dust distributions using MODIS and CALIOP satellite and ground-based AERONET sun photometer observations. GEOS-5 reproduces the observed location, magnitude, and timing of major dust events, but our baseline simulation does not develop as strong a barrier to dust transport across Central America as observations suggest. Analysis of the dust transport dynamics and lost processes suggest that while both mechanisms play a role in defining the dust transport barrier, loss processes by wet removal of dust are about twice as important as transport. Sensitivity analyses with our model showed that the dust barrier would not exist without convective scavenging over the Caribbean. The best agreement between our model and the observations was obtained when dust wet removal was parameterized to be more aggressive, treating the dust as we do hydrophilic aerosols.

  13. Can clouds enhance long-range transport of low volatile, ionizable and surface-active chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric partitioning and transport of low volatile organic compounds is strongly influenced by the presence of water (e.g. clouds) and its deposition velocity (e.g. rainfall, snow). It was identified that the assumption of continuous rainfall underestimates the residence time and the transport...... potential of non-volatile substances. The liquid water content of clouds and the high specific surface of frozen or liquid cloud droplets can significantly contribute to the total activity capacity (i.e. the capacity to sorb chemicals) of the atmosphere for non-volatile, ionizable and surface active...... substances. A modified version of the regional multimedia activity model for ionics MAMI, including twolayered atmosphere with atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower/middle troposphere (LMT), interface partitioning, intermittent rainfall and variable cloud coverage was applied to a selection of ten low...

  14. Seasonal variations in the content of dust particles pm10 and pm2.5 in the air of resort cities depending on intensity transport traffic and other conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Valeriy; Sergina, Natalia; Sidyakin, Pavel; Kovtunov, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation aimed at evaluating the content of dust particles PM10 and PM2.5 in the air of Yessentuki, one of the resort cities in the Caucasus Mineral Waters region. It gives the data on the size distribution and concentration of fine dust in the city atmosphere with regard to the specific features of urban territory zoning, the climatic factors and seasonal changes in the number of citizens as well as to the remoteness from the industrial zone, the intensity of public and transport traffic. The authors show that it is reasonable to use sequences of random values for the purpose of air quality evaluation in various zones of the city in case of the absence of monitoring stations with continuous measurements checking the probability of the standard values exceedance for fine dust content. Similar investigations are carried out in other resort cities of the Caucasus Mineral Waters region.

  15. Mixed Calcium Dust and Carbonaceous Particles from Asia Contributing to Precipitation Changes in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L.; Cornwell, G.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), with enhanced CCN activity observed when the dust is mixed with additional soluble species. Long range atmospheric transport can change the composition of dust particles through aging, cloud processing and mixing with other particles. The CalWater2 campaign measured single particles and cloud dynamics to investigate the influence aerosols have on the hydrological cycle in California. An Aircraft Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to characterize and identify single particles within clouds potentially acting as ice and cloud nuclei. Two matching flights over California's mountains in March 2015 detected significantly different particle types that resulted in different precipitation totals. Calcium dust dominated the particle composition during the first flight which had an observed decrease in orographic precipitation. Particle composition and air mass back trajectories indicate an Asian desert origin. The calcium dust particles contained secondary acids, in particular oxalic acid, acquired during transport from Asia to California. This chemical processing likely increased the solubility of the dust, enabling the particles to act as more effective CCN. The chemical composition also showed oligomeric carbonaceous species were mixed with the calcium dust particles, potentially further increasing the solubility the particles. A single particle soot photometer (SP2) measured black carbon concurrently and returned intense incandescence when calcium dust was present, confirming the calcium dust particles were internally mixed with a carbonaceous species. Dust particles were greatly reduced during the second flight with local biomass burning particles the dominant type. Observed precipitation in California were within forecast levels during the second flight. These single particle measurements from CalWater2 show that dust particles from Asia can affect cloud process and thus

  16. Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Arash; Murphy, Lisa N.; Pourmand, Ali; Clement, Amy C.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Naderi Beni, Abdolmajid; Lahijani, Hamid A. K.; Delanghe, Doriane; Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam

    2018-01-01

    Production, transport and deposition of mineral dust have significant impacts on different components of the Earth systems through time and space. In modern times, dust plumes are associated with their source region(s) using satellite and land-based measurements and trajectory analysis of air masses through time. Reconstruction of past changes in the sources of mineral dust as related to changes in climate, however, must rely on the knowledge of the geochemical and mineralogical composition of modern and paleo-dust, and that of their potential source origins. In this contribution, we present a 13,000-yr record of variations in radiogenic Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes and Rare Earth Element (REE) anomalies as well as dust grain size from an ombrotrophic (rain fed) peat core in NW Iran as proxies of past changes in the sources of dust over the interior of West Asia. Our data shows that although the grain size of dust varies in a narrow range through the entire record, the geochemical fingerprint of dust particles deposited during the low-flux, early Holocene period (11,700-6,000 yr BP) is distinctly different from aerosols deposited during high dust flux periods of the Younger Dryas and the mid-late Holocene (6,000-present). Our findings indicate that the composition of mineral dust deposited at the study site changed as a function of prevailing atmospheric circulation regimes and land exposure throughout the last deglacial period and the Holocene. Simulations of atmospheric circulation over the region show the Northern Hemisphere Summer Westerly Jet was displaced poleward across the study area during the early Holocene when Northern Hemisphere insolation was higher due to the Earth's orbital configuration. This shift, coupled with lower dust emissions simulated based on greening of the Afro-Asian Dust Belt during the early Holocene likely led to potential sources in Central Asia dominating dust export to West Asia during this period. In contrast, the dominant western and

  17. High Proportions of Sub-micron Particulate Matter in Icelandic Dust Storms in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Magnusdottir, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    Iceland is extremely active dust region and desert areas of over 44,000 km2 acknowledge Iceland as the largest Arctic and European desert. Frequent dust events, up to 135 dust days annually, transport dust particles far distances towards the Arctic and Europe. Satellite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes exceeding 1,000 km. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 40.1 million tons yr-1. Two dust storms were measured in transverse horizontal profile about 90 km far from different dust sources in southwestern Iceland in the summer of 2015. Aerosol monitor DustTrak DRX 8533EP was used to measure PM mass concentrations corresponding to PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10 and the total PM15 at several places within the dust plume. Images from camera network operated by the Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. A numerical simulation of surface winds was carried out with the numerical model HIRLAM with horizontal resolution of 5 km and used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources. The in situ measurements inside the dust plumes showed that aeolian dust can be very fine. The study highlights that suspended volcanic dust in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations comparable to the polluted urban stations in Europe or Asia rather than reported dust event observations from around the world. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios are generally low during dust storms outside of Iceland, much lower than > 0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 found in our study. It shows that Icelandic volcanic dust consists of higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. The submicron particles are predicted to travel long distances. Moreover, such submicron particles pose considerable health risk because of high potential for entering the lungs. Icelandic volcanic glass has often fine pipe-vesicular structures known from asbestos and high content of heavy metals. Previous

  18. Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Dust Grain Charging in Space Environments: Measurements on Apollo 11 and 17 Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10- 400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approximately 0.2 to 13 microns diameters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  19. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  20. Fine particulate matter events associated with synoptic weather patterns, long-range transport paths and mixing height in the Taipei Basin, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li-Wei

    2015-07-01

    Asian dust storms (ADS) and PM2.5 (particle pollution) events have an evident influence on air quality in Taiwan. However, the synoptic weather patterns and atmospheric conditions on ADS days are not entirely similar to those related to PM2.5 event days. The aim of this study is to clarify the weather characteristics such as synoptic weather patterns, long-range transport paths, and stagnant conditions that precipitate PM2.5 events. Air quality and meteorological data from 2006 to 2013 were obtained from government-owned observation stations, and the mixing height was estimated in relation to the Nozaki planetary boundary layer height. This study used back trajectories as simulated gridded analysis data, which were based on kinematic trajectory analysis using NASA's GMAO (Global Modeling Assimilation Office) and NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) analyses. For testing the differences between means of two large, independent samples, the confidence interval of a common statistical indicator was employed. The results show that in comparison to low PM2.5 level days, weather features such as stagnant conditions, including low mixing height and low wind speed, low rainfall amount, and high solar hours, are favorable for inducing PM2.5 events. Eighty percent of the synoptic weather patterns on PM2.5 days were associated with either polar continental high pressure, a high-pressure system in mainland China moving from the continent to the sea, or a stationary front stretching from southern China to the East Sea, and moving eastwards. More than 81% of the contributing factors of the causes of PM2.5 events were found to be related to stagnant conditions. The pattern of the contributing factors causing the maximum-recorded concentration of PM2.5, (73.90 μg/m3) was attributed to local emissions, and a long-range transport time that was extended for a longer period over the land than over the sea. The synoptic weather patterns were also found to affect the

  1. An overview of mineral dust modeling over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, Jianping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Kang, Litai; Yang, Ben; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yuzhi; Yuan, Tiangang; Wang, Tianhe; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guolong

    2017-08-01

    East Asian dust (EAD) exerts considerable impacts on the energy balance and climate/climate change of the earth system through its influence on solar and terrestrial radiation, cloud properties, and precipitation efficiency. Providing an accurate description of the life cycle and climate effects of EAD is therefore critical to better understanding of climate change and socioeconomic development in East Asia and even worldwide. Dust modeling has undergone substantial development since the late 1990s, associated with improved understanding of the role of EAD in the earth system. Here, we review the achievements and progress made in recent decades in terms of dust modeling research, including dust emissions, long-range transport, radiative forcing (RF), and climate effects of dust particles over East Asia. Numerous efforts in dust/EAD modeling have been directed towards furnishing more sophisticated physical and chemical processes into the models on higher spatial resolutions. Meanwhile, more systematic observations and more advanced retrieval methods for instruments that address EAD related science issues have made it possible to evaluate model results and quantify the role of EAD in the earth system, and to further reduce the uncertainties in EAD simulations. Though much progress has been made, large discrepancies and knowledge gaps still exist among EAD simulations. The deficiencies and limitations that pertain to the performance of the EAD simulations referred to in the present study are also discussed.

  2. The Design of an Ultra High Capacity Long Range Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, Terrence A.; Bucci, Gregory; Hare, Angela; Szolwinski, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the design of a 650 passenger aircraft with 8000 nautical mile range to reduce seat mile cost and to reduce airport and airway congestion. This design effort involves the usual issues that require trades between technologies, but must also include consideration of: airport terminal facilities; passenger loading and unloading; and, defeating the 'square-cube' law to design large structures. This paper will review the long range ultra high capacity or megatransport design problem and the variety of solutions developed by senior student design teams at Purdue University.

  3. Simulation of the mineral dust content over Western Africa from the event to the annual scale with the CHIMERE-DUST model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schmechtig

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-DUST have been used to simulate the mineral dust cycle over the Sahara in 2006. Surface measurements deployed during the AMMA field campaign allow to test the capability of the model to correctly reproduce the atmospheric dust load and surface concentrations from the daily to the seasonal time-scale. The simulated monthly mean Aerosol Optical Depths (AOD and surface concentrations are significantly correlated with the measured ones. The simulated daily concentrations and hourly AOD are in the same range of magnitude than the observed ones despite relatively high simulated dust emissions. The level of agreement between the simulations and the observations has been quantified at different time scales using statistical parameters classically used to evaluate air quality models. The capability of the model to reproduce the altitude of the dust transport was tested for two contrasted cases of low and high altitude transport. These results highlight the sensitivity of the simulations to the surface winds used as external forcing and the necessity to further constrain the dust mass budget at the regional scale.

  4. A climatology of Northeast Asian dust events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Y. [City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science; Wang, J. [Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). State Meteorological Administration, National Meteorological Centre

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the synoptic features of Northeast Asian dust events in spring are studied. Using surface meteorological records for March, April and May of 2000, 2001 and 2002, the distribution of dust-event frequencies, possible dust-source regions and the synoptic conditions responsible for dust activities are examined. Four regions of frequent dust events are found in the domain of analysis. These are the Tarim Basin, the southern Mongolia and the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China, the Hexi (Yellow River West) Corridor and the northern part of the Indian Subcontinent. The Tarim Basin has the highest dust-event frequency, with most of the events being weak ones (classified as dust-in-suspension). Dust events occur less frequently in the Gobi Desert, but they are often severe and widespread. Dust concentrations in the Tarim and the Gobi regions are found to be of similar order of magnitude with (averaged) maximum values reaching 1 mg m{sup -3}. In different regions, dust events are generated by different synoptic systems. Over the Gobi, almost all dust events arise from the strong northwesterly winds associated with low-pressure systems. In the Tarim Basin, dust events are mostly associated with light winds. Strong northeasterly winds may affect the eastern and southeastern parts of the basin, generating dust storms. It is shown that topography plays a significant role in the transport of dust particles. A preferred route of dust transport is found to exist along the northeastern boundary, and another along the southern boundary, of the Tibetan Plateau. It is suggested the mechanisms for dust emission in the Tarim Basin requires further investigation. (orig.)

  5. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  6. The fate of saharan dust across the atlantic and implications for a central american dust barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nowottnick

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Saharan dust was observed over the Caribbean basin during the summer 2007 NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4 field experiment. Airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL and satellite observations from MODIS suggest a barrier to dust transport across Central America into the eastern Pacific. We use the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model with online aerosol tracers to perform simulations of the TC4 time period in order to understand the nature of this barrier. Our simulations are driven by the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA meteorological analyses. Compared to observations from MODIS and CALIOP, GEOS-5 reproduces the observed location and magnitude of observed dust events, but our baseline simulation does not develop as strong a barrier to dust transport across Central America as observations suggest. Analysis of the dust transport dynamics and loss processes suggest that while both mechanisms play a role in defining the dust transport barrier, loss processes by wet removal of dust are about twice as important as transport. Sensitivity analyses with our model showed that the dust barrier would not exist without convective scavenging over the Caribbean. The best agreement between our model and the observations was obtained when dust wet removal was parameterized to be more aggressive, treating the dust as we do hydrophilic aerosols.

  7. Dust composition changes from Taylor Glacier (East Antarctica) during the last glacial-interglacial transition: A multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sarah M.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Arendt, Carli A.; Blakowski, Molly A.; Steigmeyer, August; Gabrielli, Paolo; Sierra-Hernández, M. Roxana; Beaudon, Emilie; Delmonte, Barbara; Baccolo, Giovanni; May, Nathaniel W.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-04-01

    Mineral dust is transported in the atmosphere and deposited in oceans, ice sheets and the terrestrial biosphere. Temporal changes in locations of dust source areas and transport pathways have implications for global climate and biogeochemical cycles. The chemical and physical characterization of the dust record preserved in ice cores is useful for identifying of dust source regions, dust transport, dominant wind direction and storm trajectories. Here, we present a 50,000-year geochemical characterization of mineral dust entrapped in a horizontal ice core from the Taylor Glacier in East Antarctica. Strontium (Sr) and neodymium (Nd) isotopes, grain size distribution, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations, and inorganic ion (Cl- and Na+) concentrations were measured in 38 samples, corresponding to a time interval from 46 kyr before present (BP) to present. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions of insoluble dust in the Taylor Glacier ice shows distinct changes between the Last Glacial Period (LGP in this study ranging from ∼46.7-15.3 kyr BP) the early Holocene (in this study ranging from ∼14.5-8.7 kyr BP), and zero-age samples. The 87Sr/86Sr isotopic composition of dust in the Taylor Glacier ice ranged from 0.708 to 0.711 during the LGP, while the variability during the early Holocene is higher ranging from 0.707 to 0.714. The εNd composition ranges from 0.1 to -3.9 during the LGP, and is more variable from 1.9 to -8.2 during the early Holocene. The increased isotopic variability during the early Holocene suggests a shift in dust provenance coinciding with the major climate transition from the LGP to the Holocene. The isotopic composition and multiple physical and chemical constraints support previous work attributing Southern South America (SSA) as the main dust source to East Antarctica during the LGP, and a combination of both local Ross Sea Sector dust sources and SSA after the transition into the Holocene. This study provides the first high time

  8. Harmattan, Saharan heat low, and West African monsoon circulation: modulations on the Saharan dust outflow towards the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schepanski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The outflow of dust from the northern African continent towards the North Atlantic is stimulated by the atmospheric circulation over North Africa, which modulates the spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation and consequently the entrainment of mineral dust into the boundary layer, as well as the transport of dust out of the source regions. The atmospheric circulation over the North African dust source regions, predominantly the Sahara and the Sahel, is characterized by three major circulation regimes: (1 the harmattan (trade winds, (2 the Saharan heat low (SHL, and (3 the West African monsoon circulation. The strength of the individual regimes controls the Saharan dust outflow by affecting the spatio-temporal distribution of dust emission, transport pathways, and deposition fluxes.This study aims at investigating the atmospheric circulation pattern over North Africa with regard to its role favouring dust emission and dust export towards the tropical North Atlantic. The focus of the study is on summer 2013 (June to August, during which the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range TRansport and Aerosol-Cloud interaction Experiment field campaign also took place. It involves satellite observations by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI flying on board the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG satellite, which are analysed and used to infer a data set of active dust sources. The spatio-temporal distribution of dust source activation frequencies (DSAFs allows for linking the diurnal cycle of dust source activations to dominant meteorological controls on dust emission. In summer, Saharan dust source activations clearly differ from dust source activations over the Sahel regarding the time of day when dust emission begins. The Sahara is dominated by morning dust source activations predominantly driven by the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet. In contrast, dust source activations in the Sahel are

  9. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model – Part 1: Model description, annual simulations and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Perlwitz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate the NMMB/BSC-Dust, a new dust aerosol cycle model embedded online within the NCEP Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model (NMMB. NMMB is a further evolution of the operational Non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM, which together with other upgrades has been extended from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core is prepared for regional and global simulation domains. The new NMMB/BSC-Dust is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales and represents a first step towards the development of a unified chemical-weather model. This paper describes the parameterizations used in the model to simulate the dust cycle including sources, transport, deposition and interaction with radiation. We evaluate monthly and annual means of the global configuration of the model against the AEROCOM dust benchmark dataset for year 2000 including surface concentration, deposition and aerosol optical depth (AOD, and we evaluate the daily AOD variability in a regional domain at high resolution covering Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe against AERONET AOD for year 2006. The NMMB/BSC-Dust provides a good description of the horizontal distribution and temporal variability of the dust. Daily AOD correlations at the regional scale are around 0.6–0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. At the global scale the model lies within the top range of AEROCOM dust models in terms of performance statistics for surface concentration, deposition and AOD. This paper discusses the current strengths and limitations of the modeling system and points towards future improvements.

  10. Characteristics in the atmosphere of long-range transport aircraft cabins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillefond, H; Fourn, P; Auffret, R

    1977-06-01

    In the long run, the fatigue in aircrews performing frequent, long-range flights is linked to factors connected to the aircraft, such as noise, temperature, cabin pressure, atmosphere quality, and flight characteristics. These are the factors inherent to the aircraft which we have investigated during six long-range flights without time zone changes in DC-8 and DC-10 aircraft of the U.T.A. Cie. The results show that none of the pollutants researched reach doses considered hazardous by FAR 25 or by French legislation. This fact is due to the effective ventilation in the cabins. In flight, thermal comfort is limited by a too-low hygrometry RH = 12%. Even in a modern aircraft, the noise level remains high, but acoustical energy is spread over the less detrimental frequencies.

  11. Long-range correlations and charge transport properties of DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-liang; Ren, Yi; Xie, Qiong-tao; Deng, Chao-sheng; Xu, Hui

    2010-04-01

    By using Hurst's analysis and transfer approach, the rescaled range functions and Hurst exponents of human chromosome 22 and enterobacteria phage lambda DNA sequences are investigated and the transmission coefficients, Landauer resistances and Lyapunov coefficients of finite segments based on above genomic DNA sequences are calculated. In a comparison with quasiperiodic and random artificial DNA sequences, we find that λ-DNA exhibits anticorrelation behavior characterized by a Hurst exponent 0.5range correlation properties to some extent but the correlations are not strong enough to maintain the scale invariance properties.

  12. Long-range correlations and charge transport properties of DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiaoliang, E-mail: xlliucsu@yahoo.com.c [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Ren, Yi [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xie, Qiong-tao [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education (Hunan Normal University), Changsha 410081 (China); Deng, Chao-sheng; Xu, Hui [College of Physical Science and Technology and College of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2010-04-26

    By using Hurst's analysis and transfer approach, the rescaled range functions and Hurst exponents of human chromosome 22 and enterobacteria phage lambda DNA sequences are investigated and the transmission coefficients, Landauer resistances and Lyapunov coefficients of finite segments based on above genomic DNA sequences are calculated. In a comparison with quasiperiodic and random artificial DNA sequences, we find that lambda-DNA exhibits anticorrelation behavior characterized by a Hurst exponent 0.5range correlation properties to some extent but the correlations are not strong enough to maintain the scale invariance properties.

  13. Long-Range Charge Transport in Adenine-Stacked RNA:DNA Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanhui; Artés, Juan M; Hihath, Joshua

    2016-01-27

    An extremely important biological component, RNA:DNA can also be used to design nanoscale structures such as molecular wires. The conductance of single adenine-stacked RNA:DNA hybrids is rapidly and reproducibly measured using the break junction approach. The conductance decreases slightly over a large range of molecular lengths, suggesting that RNA:DNA can be used as an oligonucleotide wire. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. LADEE Search for a Dust Exosphere: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Elphic, R.

    2014-01-01

    The LADEE search for exospheric dust is strongly motivated by putative detections of forward-scattered sunlight from exospheric dust grains which were observed during the Apollo era. This dust population, if it exists, has been associated with charging and transport of dust near the terminators. It is likely that the concentration of these dust grains is governed by a saltation mechanism originated by micrometeoroid impacts, which are the source of the more tenuous ejecta cloud.

  15. Dynamic model for kinesin-mediated long-range transport and its local traffic jam caused by tau proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Woochul; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2017-01-01

    In neurons, several intracellular cargoes are transported by motor proteins (kinesins) which walk on microtubules (MTs). However, kinesins can possibly unbind from the MTs before they reach their destinations. The unbound kinesins randomly diffuse in neurons until they bind to MTs. Then, they walk again along the MTs to continue their tasks. Kinesins repeat this cycle of motion until they transport their cargoes to the destinations. However, most previous models mainly focused on the motion of kinesins when they walk on MTs. Thus, a new model is required to encompass the various types of kinesin motion. We developed a comprehensive model and studied the long-range axonal transport of neurons using the model. To enhance reliability of the model, it was constructed based on multiphysics on kinesin motion (i.e., chemical kinetics, diffusion, fluid dynamics, nonlinear dynamics, and stochastic characteristics). Also, parameter values for kinesin motions are carefully obtained by comparing the model predictions and several experimental observations. The axonal transport can be degraded when a large number of binding sites on MTs are blocked by excessive tau proteins. By considering the interference between walking kinesins and tau molecules on MTs, effects of tau proteins on the axonal transport are studied. One of the meaningful predictions obtained from the model is that the velocity is not an effective metric to estimate the degradation of the transport because the decrease in velocity is not noticeable when the concentration of tau protein is not high. However, our model shows that the transport locally changes near tau molecules on MTs even when the change in the velocity is not significant. Thus, a statistical method is proposed to detect this local change effectively. The advantage of this method is that a value obtained from this method is highly sensitive to the concentration of tau protein. Another benefit of this method is that this highly sensitive value can

  16. DIRTMAP: the geological record of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohfeld, Karen E.; Harrison, Sandy P.

    2001-06-01

    Atmospheric dust is an important feedback in the climate system, potentially affecting the radiative balance and chemical composition of the atmosphere and providing nutrients to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Yet the potential impact of dust on the climate system, both in the anthropogenically disturbed future and the naturally varying past, remains to be quantified. The geologic record of dust provides the opportunity to test earth system models designed to simulate dust. Records of dust can be obtained from ice cores, marine sediments, and terrestrial (loess) deposits. Although rarely unequivocal, these records document a variety of processes (source, transport and deposition) in the dust cycle, stored in each archive as changes in clay mineralogy, isotopes, grain size, and concentration of terrigenous materials. Although the extraction of information from each type of archive is slightly different, the basic controls on these dust indicators are the same. Changes in the dust flux and particle size might be controlled by a combination of (a) source area extent, (b) dust emission efficiency (wind speed) and atmospheric transport, (c) atmospheric residence time of dust, and/or (d) relative contributions of dry settling and rainout of dust. Similarly, changes in mineralogy reflect (a) source area mineralogy and weathering and (b) shifts in atmospheric transport. The combination of these geological data with process-based, forward-modelling schemes in global earth system models provides an excellent means of achieving a comprehensive picture of the global pattern of dust accumulation rates, their controlling mechanisms, and how those mechanisms may vary regionally. The Dust Indicators and Records of Terrestrial and MArine Palaeoenvironments (DIRTMAP) data base has been established to provide a global palaeoenvironmental data set that can be used to validate earth system model simulations of the dust cycle over the past 150,000 years.

  17. Variation of soluble and insoluble calcium in red rains related to dust sources and transport patterns from North Africa to northeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, A.; Alarcón, M.; Castillo, S.; Escudero, M.; GarcíA Orellana, J.; Masqué, P.; Querol, X.

    2007-03-01

    We use the chemical composition of African dust delivered by red rains at a rural site in northeastern Spain (Montseny, 41°46'N, 2°21'E) to describe its relationship with the possible provenance areas and the processes occurring during transport. To this end, we obtained the red rain insoluble composition for the major elements (Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, P, Ti, and Na) in 30 filters, the 210Pb concentration in 23 filters, and the soluble cation concentrations (Na, K, Ca, and Mg) in 28 coincident red rain samples. These samples comprised most major events occurring at the site from 1983 to 2002. On the basis of back trajectories and satellite images, a distinction has been made between an eastern and western air mass flux with respect to 0° Greenwich for the analyzed samples. Principal component and ANOVA analyses between the two provenance groups have shown striking differences in the insoluble phase, with eastern samples being significantly richer in insoluble Ca, Mg, and Sr compared to western samples. Conversely, western samples had significantly higher concentrations of insoluble Al, Fe, K, V, and 210Pb than eastern samples. Therefore, in the insoluble phase, the ratios of various elements to Ca were significantly higher in western provenances. However, these differences disappeared when considering bulk Ca ratios (bulk Ca = insoluble + soluble Ca). Neither of the ratios Fe/Al and Ti/Fe showed significant differences. This lack of differences is interpreted in view of a similar carbonated lithology broadly underlying both areas. The difference in insoluble Ca with respect to total Ca between provenances (Cainsoluble/Catotal = 0.10 and 0.70 for western and eastern trajectories, respectively) is interpreted as a difference in calcite dissolution during transport. Evidence from 210Pb data and from the length of the back trajectories indicates that western trajectories covered a longer distance than the eastern ones; their higher soluble Ca could be due to (1) higher

  18. Change characteristic of atmospheric particulate mercury during dust weather of spring in Qingdao, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Liu, Ruhai; Wang, Yan; Cui, Xueqing; Qi, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected during dust weather of spring from 2008 to 2011 in Qingdao, in which the concentrations of atmospheric particulate mercury (PHg) were measured to analyze its distribution characteristics and source. PHg concentration during the study ranged from 0.050 ng m-3 to 0.788 ng m-3 with the average 0.292 ng m-3 in dust day, while 0.085 ng m-3 to 0.444 ng m-3 with the average 0.188 ng m-3 in non-dust day. PHg concentration in dust day is far higher than that in some cities of South Korea and Japan and comparable to some cities in China. There was a statistically power function between PHg/TSP and TSP concentrations, which meant that intense dust (high TSP) brought particles with low mercury content. The estimated dry deposition flux of PHg is 0.9-14.2 ng m-2 h-1 with the mean 5.26 ng m-2 h-1 in dust day. The mercury deposition flux in a dust day accounts for almost 1% annual flux, which should be paid attention in the regional and global cycle of mercury. The trajectories are categorized into 4 sectors. Cluster 1 and cluster 4 were the main routes of dust to Qingdao, coming from Kazakhstan and north of Mongolia individually. There is higher TSP, and lower PHg/TSP in dust of cluster 4 compared with cluster 1, because of longer transport distance and faster movement speed. There is highest PHg/TSP in cluster 2 because of passing polluted East China. The slow transport speed, long stay at polluted developed region caused pollutants to accumulate in the aerosols. Differences of transport route, movement speed affects the mercury content significantly.

  19. A study of long-term trends in mineral dust aerosol distributions in Asia using a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Makiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2004-10-01

    Dust events have been observed in Japan with high frequency since 2000. On the other hand, the frequency of dust storms is said to have decreased in the desert regions of China since about the middle of the 1970s. This study simulates dust storms and transportation of mineral dust aerosols in the east Asia region from 1981 to 2001 using an aerosol transport model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), implemented in the Center for Climate System Research/National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric global circulation model, in order to investigate the main factors that control a dust event and its long-term variation. The model was forced to simulate a real atmospheric condition by a nudging technique using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis data on wind velocities, temperature, specific humidity, soil wetness, and snow depth. From a comparison between the long-term change in the dust emission and model parameters, it is found that the wind speed near the surface level had a significant influence on the dust emission, and snow is also an important factor in the early spring dust emission. The simulated results suggested that dust emissions from northeast China have a great impact on dust mass concentration in downwind regions, such as the cities of northeastern China, Korea, and Japan. When the frequency of dust events was high in Japan, a low-pressure system tended to develop over the northeast China region that caused strong winds. From 2000 to 2001 the simulated dust emission flux decreased in the Taklimakan desert and the northwestern part of China, while it increased in the Gobi desert and the northeastern part of China. Consequently, dust particles seem to be transported more from the latter region by prevailing westerlies in the springtime to downwind areas as actually observed. In spite of the similarity, however, there is still a large disagreement between observed and simulated dust

  20. Health effects of Asian dust events: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Masahiro; Ueda, Kayo; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Michikawa, Takehiro; Onozuka, Daisuke

    2010-05-01

    Asian dust, called 'kosa' in Japan, is the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants originating from the desert areas of China and Mongolia. Although Asian dust has a long history of appearing in Japan, it is only quite recently that there is increasing concern for its possible adverse health effects. We reviewed the epidemiologic evidence of potential health effects of Asian dust events. PubMed was used to search for the following keywords: Asian dust, yellow sand, desert dust, dust storm, sandstorm, mortality, death, morbidity, hospitalization, hospital admission, health, pulmonary and respiratory. The search was limited to the epidemiologic studies published between January 1980 and May 2009. JMEDPlus was used to search for Japanese literature. Seventeen studies were retrieved from PubMed and one study from JMEDPlus. In addition, one study was identified for reviewing from the references of another study. In total, we identified 19 epidemiologic studies (3 for mortality, 13 for hospital visits or admissions and 3 for respiratory functions or symptoms) mainly from Taiwan and Korea. There were many combinations of outcomes and lagged exposures examined, and some suggested possible associations of dust exposure with an increase in mortality and hospital visits and admissions due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, whereas the rest of the studies did not show statistically significant associations. The evidence from these studies was limited because exposure assessments were inadequately described and potential confounders were insufficiently controlled. Well-designed epidemiological studies are required to clarify any potential health effects of Asian dust events in Japan.

  1. Influence of long-range transboundary transport on atmospheric water vapor mercury collected at the largest city of Tibet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jie [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli FI 50130 (Finland); Kang, Shichang, E-mail: shichang.kang@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Tian, Lide [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Junming [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli FI 50130 (Finland); and others

    2016-10-01

    Monsoon circulation is an important process that affects long-range transboundary transport of anthropogenic contaminants such as mercury (Hg). During the Indian monsoon season of 2013, a total of 92 and 26 atmospheric water vapor samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of the Tibet, for Hg and major ions analysis, respectively. The relatively low pH/high electronic conductivity values, together with the fact that NH{sub 4}{sup +} in atmospheric water vapor was even higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa, indicated the effects of anthropogenic perturbations through long-range transboundary atmospheric transport. Concentrations of Hg in atmospheric water vapor ranged from 2.5 to 73.7 ng L{sup −1}, with an average of 12.5 ng L{sup −1}. The elevated Hg and major ions concentrations, and electronic conductivity values were generally associated with weak acidic samples, and Hg mainly loaded with anthropogenic ions such as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. The results of principal component analysis and trajectory analysis suggested that anthropogenic emissions from the Indian subcontinent may have largely contributed to the determined Hg in atmospheric water vapor. Furthermore, our study reconfirmed that below-cloud scavenging contribution was significant for precipitation Hg in Lhasa, and evaluated that on average 74.1% of the Hg in precipitation could be accounted for by below-cloud scavenging. - Highlights: • The low pH/high electronic conductivity was found in atmospheric water vapor. • Anthropogenic NH{sub 4}{sup +} was higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa. • Elevated Hg and major ions levels were usually associated with weak acidic samples. • Hg in atmospheric water vapor was largely influenced by transboundary transport. • Below-cloud scavenging accounted for most Hg in precipitation.

  2. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in advanced designs of long range, subsonic transport aircraft is assessed. Both passenger and cargo type aircraft are investigated. Comparisons of physical, performance, and economic parameters of the LH2 fueled designs with conventionally fueled aircraft are presented. Design studies are conducted to determine appropriate characteristics for the hydrogen related systems required on board the aircraft. These studies included consideration of material, structural, and thermodynamic requirements of the cryogenic fuel tanks and fuel systems with the structural support and thermal protection systems.

  3. Isospin transport and reaction mechanism in nuclear reactions in the range 20–40 MeV/n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlini, S., E-mail: barlini@fi.infn.it; Piantelli, S.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Valdré, S.; Pastore, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell’Università and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Bougault, R.; Lopez, O.; Le Neindre, N.; Parlog, M.; Vient, E. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ENSICAEN et Université de Caen, F-14050 Caen-Cedex (France); Bonnet, E.; Chibhi, A.; Frankland, J. D. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P.5027, F-14076 Caen cedex (France); Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Sud 11, F-91406 Orsay cedex (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, many efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the isospin degree of freedom in nuclear reactions. Comparing systems involving partners with different N/Z, it has been possible to investigate the isospin transport process and its influence on the final products population. This can be then related to the symmetry energy term of the nuclear EOS. From the experimental point of view, this task requires detectors able to measure both charge and mass of the emitted products, in the widest possible range of energy and size of the fragments. With this objective, the FAZIA and GARFIELD+RCo apparatus have been used with success in some recent experiments.

  4. Fingerprints in the Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These MISR nadir-camera images of eastern China compare a somewhat hazy summer view from July 9, 2000 (left) with a spectacularly dusty spring view from April 7, 2001 (middle). The left-hand and middle images are from Terra orbits 2967 and 6928, respectively, and extend from central Manchuria near the top to portions of North and South Korea at the bottom. They are approximately 380 kilometers in width.Asia's desert areas are prone to soil erosion, as underground water tables are lowered by prolonged drought and by industrial and agricultural water use. Heavy winds blowing eastward across the arid and sparsely vegetated surfaces of Mongolia and western China pick up large quantities of yellow dust. Airborne dust clouds from the April 2001 storm blew across the Pacific Ocean and were carried as far as North America. The minerals transported in this manner are believed to provide nutrients for both oceanic and land ecosystems.According to the Xinhua News Agency in China, nearly one million tons of Gobi Desert dust blow into Beijing each year. During a similar dust outbreak last year, the Associated Press reported that the visibility in Beijing had been reduced the point where buildings were barely visible across city streets, and airline schedules were significantly disrupted. The dust has also been implicated in adverse health effects such as respiratory discomfort and eye irritation.The image on the right is a higher resolution MISR nadir-camera view of a portion of the April 7, 2001 dust cloud. It covers an area roughly 250 kilometers wide by 470 kilometers high. When viewed at full magnification, a number of atmospheric wave features, like the ridges and valleys of a fingerprint, are apparent. These are probably induced by surface topography, which can disturb the wind flow. A few small cumulus clouds are also visible, and are casting shadows on the thick lower dust layer.Analyses of images such as these constitute one phase of MISR's participation in the Asian

  5. Dry deposition of PM10 over the Yellow Sea during Asian dust events from 2001 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Liu, Xiaohuan; Qi, Jianhua; Gao, Huiwang

    2014-01-01

    Dry deposition velocities and fluxes of PM10 during Asian dust events over the Yellow Sea from 2001 to 2007 were investigated using observation data in Qingdao, China and Jeju, Korea. The dry deposition velocities of PM10 during dust events over the Yellow Sea ranged from 0.19 to 8.17 cm/sec, with an average of 3.38 cm/sec. Dry deposition fluxes of PM10 during dust events over the Yellow Sea were in the range of 68.5-2647.1 mg/(m2 x day), with an average of 545.4 mg/(m2 x day), which is 2-10 times higher than those reported by other studies for both dust and non-dust periods. It was estimated that 2.6 x 10(11) -48.7 x 10(11) g dust particles deposit to the Yellow Sea during dust events through dry deposition every year. Compared with the results in previous studies, it was found that the dry deposition of PM10 over the Yellow Sea during dust events in the years with high frequency of dust could account for a large or overwhelming fraction of the annual total dry deposition. Backward air mass trajectory analysis showed that dust events influenced Jeju mainly originated from the desert regions located in Mongolia and Inner Mongolia, China. There were 119 backward trajectories influenced both Qingdao and Jeju during 15 dust events from 2001 to 2007, accounting for 61.3% of the total trajectories of 194, indicating that Qingdao and Jeju were usually on the same pathway of dust transport downwind from source areas.

  6. Role of dust alkalinity in acid mobilization of iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by acid gases (e.g., SO2, HNO3, N2O5, and HCl may play a key role in the transformation of insoluble iron (Fe in the oxidized or ferric (III form to soluble forms (e.g., Fe(II, inorganic soluble species of Fe(III, and organic complexes of iron. On the other hand, mineral dust particles have a potential of neutralizing the acidic species due to the alkaline buffer ability of carbonate minerals (e.g., CaCO3 and MgCO3. Here we demonstrate the impact of dust alkalinity on the acid mobilization of iron in a three-dimensional aerosol chemistry transport model that includes a mineral dissolution scheme. In our model simulations, most of the alkaline dust minerals cannot be entirely consumed by inorganic acids during the transport across the North Pacific Ocean. As a result, the inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during the long-range transport to the North Pacific Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2% dissolves from hematite in the coarse-mode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. On the other hand, a significant fraction of iron (1–2% dissolves in the fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model quantitatively reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles as suggested by measurements over the Pacific Ocean. It implies that the buffering effect of alkaline content in dust aerosols might help to explain the inverse relationship between aerosol iron solubility and particle size. We also demonstrate that the iron solubility is sensitive to the chemical specification of iron-containing minerals in dust. Compared with the dust sources, soluble iron from combustion sources contributes to a relatively marginal effect for deposition of soluble iron over the North

  7. Community variability of bacteria in alpine snow (Mont Blanc) containing Saharan dust deposition and their snow colonisation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvochina, Maria S; Marie, Dominique; Chevaillier, Servanne; Petit, Jean-Robert; Normand, Philippe; Alekhina, Irina A; Bulat, Sergey A

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms uplifted during dust storms survive long-range transport in the atmosphere and could colonize high-altitude snow. Bacterial communities in alpine snow on a Mont Blanc glacier, associated with four depositions of Saharan dust during the period 2006-2009, were studied using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and flow cytometry. Also, sand from the Tunisian Sahara, Saharan dust collected in Grenoble and Mont Blanc snow containing no Saharan dust (one sample of each) were analyzed. The bacterial community composition varied significantly in snow containing four dust depositions over a 3-year period. Out of 61 phylotypes recovered from dusty snow, only three phylotypes were detected in more than one sample. Overall, 15 phylotypes were recognized as potential snow colonizers. For snow samples, these phylotypes belonged to Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria, while for Saharan sand/dust samples they belonged to Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Deinococcus-Thermus and Proteobacteria. Thus, regardless of the time-scale, Saharan dust events can bring different microbiota with no common species set to alpine glaciers. This seems to be defined more by event peculiarities and aeolian transport conditions than by the bacterial load from the original dust source.

  8. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Chun Tan

    Full Text Available A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the 50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36. These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  9. Possible half-metallicity and variable range hopping transport in Sb-substituted Fe2TiSn Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Bhobe, P. A.; Nigam, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    The investigation of the magnetotransport properties on Fe2 TiSn1-x Sb x with 0 ≤slant x ≤slant 0.6 are presented in this paper. The substitution of Sb in place of Sn decreases the anti-site disorder as evident from x-ray diffraction patterns as well as from transport properties measurement. The much-disputed upturn in low temperature electrical resistivity of Fe2 TiSn has been demonstrated to be a result of weak localization induced by anti-site disorder. With increased Sb substitution (⩾25%) the metallic transport behavior of Fe2 TiSn changes to semiconductor-like. At low temperature, carrier transport in such compositions occurs via the variable range hopping mechanism. Moreover, a systematic increase in the anomalous Hall voltage is observed with increasing Sb-content, attributable to a side jump or Berry phase curvature effect. Electrical resistivity in the entire temperature regime hints towards half metallicity of the system. Our ab initio electronic structure calculations using generalised gradient approximation formalism further supports the results of our magnetotransport study.

  10. Ab initio electronic transport and thermoelectric properties of solids from full and range-separated hybrid functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Giuseppe; Ferretti, Andrea; Maschio, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Within the semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory in the constant relaxation-time approximation, we perform an ab initio study of the transport properties of selected systems, including crystalline solids and nanostructures. A local (Gaussian) basis set is adopted and exploited to analytically evaluate band velocities as well as to access full and range-separated hybrid functionals (such as B3LYP, PBE0, or HSE06) at a moderate computational cost. As a consequence of the analytical derivative, our approach is computationally efficient and does not suffer from problems related to band crossings. We investigate and compare the performance of a variety of hybrid functionals in evaluating Boltzmann conductivity. Demonstrative examples include silicon and aluminum bulk crystals as well as two thermoelectric materials (CoSb3, Bi2Te3). We observe that hybrid functionals other than providing more realistic bandgaps—as expected—lead to larger bandwidths and hence allow for a better estimate of transport properties, also in metallic systems. As a nanostructure prototype, we also investigate conductivity in boron-nitride (BN) substituted graphene, in which nanoribbons (nanoroads) alternate with BN ones.

  11. Analysis for the application of hybrid laminar flow control to a long-range subsonic transport aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcara, P.C. Jr.; Bartlett, D.W.; Mccullers, L.A. (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States) Vigyan, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The FLOPS aircraft conceptual design/analysis code has been used to evaluate the effects of incorporating hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) in a 300-passenger, 6500 n. mi. range, twin-engine subsonic transport aircraft. The baseline configuration was sized to account for 50 percent chord laminar flow on the wing upper surface as well as both surfaces of the empennage airfoils. Attention is given to the additional benefits of achieving various degrees of laminar flow on the engine nacelles, and the horsepower extraction and initial weight and cost increments entailed by the HLFC system. The sensitivity of the results obtained to fuel-price and off-design range are also noted. 6 refs.

  12. Aromatic amino acids required for pili conductivity and long-range extracellular electron transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Madeline; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Leang, Ching; Smith, Jessica A; Patel, Pranav; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona; Synoeyenbos-West, Oona; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-03-12

    It has been proposed that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires conductive pili for long-range electron transport to Fe(III) oxides and for high-density current production in microbial fuel cells. In order to investigate this further, we constructed a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated Aro-5, which produced pili with diminished conductivity. This was accomplished by modifying the amino acid sequence of PilA, the structural pilin protein. An alanine was substituted for each of the five aromatic amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of PilA, the region in which G. sulfurreducens PilA differs most significantly from the PilAs of microorganisms incapable of long-range extracellular electron transport. Strain Aro-5 produced pili that were properly decorated with the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, pili preparations of the Aro-5 strain had greatly diminished conductivity and Aro-5 cultures were severely limited in their capacity to reduce Fe(III) compared to the control strain. Current production of the Aro-5 strain, with a graphite anode serving as the electron acceptor, was less than 10% of that of the control strain. The conductivity of the Aro-5 biofilms was 10-fold lower than the control strain's. These results demonstrate that the pili of G. sulfurreducens must be conductive in order for the cells to be effective in extracellular long-range electron transport. Extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter species plays an important role in the biogeochemistry of soils and sediments and has a number of bioenergy applications. For example, microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxide is one of the most geochemically significant processes in anaerobic soils, aquatic sediments, and aquifers, and Geobacter organisms are often abundant in such environments. Geobacter sulfurreducens produces the highest current densities of any known pure culture, and close relatives are often the most abundant organisms colonizing anodes

  13. Analysis of aircraft and satellite measurements from the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B to quantify long-range transport of East Asian sulfur to Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Donkelaar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We interpret a suite of satellite, aircraft, and ground-based measurements over the North Pacific Ocean and western North America during April–May 2006 as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B campaign to understand the implications of long-range transport of East Asian emissions to North America. The Canadian component of INTEX-B included 33 vertical profiles from a Cessna 207 aircraft equipped with an aerosol mass spectrometer. Long-range transport of organic aerosols was insignificant, contrary to expectations. Measured sulfate plumes in the free troposphere over British Columbia exceeded 2 μg/m3. We update the global anthropogenic emission inventory in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and use it to interpret the observations. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD retrieved from two satellite instruments (MISR and MODIS for 2000–2006 are analyzed with GEOS-Chem to estimate an annual growth in Chinese sulfur emissions of 6.2% and 9.6%, respectively. Analysis of aircraft sulfate measurements from the NASA DC-8 over the central Pacific, the NSF C-130 over the east Pacific and the Cessna over British Columbia indicates most Asian sulfate over the ocean is in the lower free troposphere (800–600 hPa, with a decrease in pressure toward land due to orographic effects. We calculate that 56% of the measured sulfate between 500–900 hPa over British Columbia is due to East Asian sources. We find evidence of a 72–85% increase in the relative contribution of East Asian sulfate to the total burden in spring off the northwest coast of the United States since 1985. Campaign-average simulations indicate anthropogenic East Asian sulfur emissions increase mean springtime sulfate in Western Canada at the surface by 0.31 μg/m3 (~30% and account for 50% of the overall regional sulfate burden between 1 and 5 km. Mean measured daily surface sulfate concentrations taken in the Vancouver area increase by

  14. Role of soil organic carbon and colloids in sorption and transport of TNT, RDX and HMX in training range soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prasesh; Mayes, Melanie A; Tang, Guoping

    2013-08-01

    Contamination of soils and groundwater by munitions compounds (MCs) is of significant concern at many U.S. Department of Defense sites. Soils were collected from operational training ranges in Maryland (APG), Massachusetts (MMR-B and MMR-E) and Washington (JBLM) and sorption and transport studies were conducted to investigate the effects of soil organic carbon (OC) and textural clay content on fate of dissolved MCs (TNT, RDX, HMX). Sorption experiments showed higher distribution coefficients [TNT:42-68 L kg(-1), RDX:6.9-8.7 L kg(-1) and HMX:2.6-3.1 L kg(-1)] in OC rich soils (JBLM, MMR-E) compared to clay rich soils (MMR-B and APG) [TNT:19-21 L kg(-1), RDX:2.5-3.4 L kg(-1), HMX:0.9-1.2 L kg(-1)]. In column experiments, breakthrough of MCs was faster in MMR-B and APG compared to MMR-E and JBLM soils. Among TNT, RDX and HMX, breakthrough was fastest for RDX followed by HMX and TNT for all columns. Defining the colloidal fraction as the difference between unfiltered samples and samples filtered with a 3 kDa filter, ~36%, ~15% and ~9% of TNT, RDX and HMX were found in the colloidal fraction in the solutions from sorption experiments, and around 20% of TNT in the effluent from the transport experiments. Results demonstrate that OC rich soils may enhance sorption and delay transport of TNT, RDX and HMX compared to clay-rich soils. Further, transport of TNT may be associated with soil colloid mobilization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - fate and long-range atmospheric transport studied using a global model, EMAC-SVOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octaviani, Mega; Tost, Holger; Lammel, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are emitted by incomplete combustion from fossil fuel, vehicles, and biomass burning. They may persist in environmental compartments, pose a health hazard and may bio accumulate along food chains. The ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model had been used to simulate global tropospheric, stratospheric chemistry and climate. In this study, we improve the model to include simulations of the transport and fate of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). The EMAC-SVOC model takes into account essential environmental processes including gas-particle partitioning, dry and wet deposition, chemical and bio-degradation, and volatilization from sea surface, soils, vegetation, and snow. The model was evaluated against observational data in the Arctic, mid-latitudes, and tropics, and further applied to study total environmental lifetime and long-range transport potential (LRTP) of PAHs. We selected four compounds for study, spanning a wide range of volatility, i.e., phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. Several LRTP indicators were investigated, including the Arctic contamination potential, meridional spreading, and zonal and meridional fluxes to remote regions.

  16. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  17. Dust storms

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Bihui; Rousseau, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Dust storms are remarkable natural phenomena. They affect many countries in the Northern Hemisphere and, as such, have become an interesting research topic. We show that nowadays China is the number one publishing country of articles related to their study. On a world scale the number of publications on this topic is increasing exponentially.

  18. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  19. Dust layer profiling using an aerosol dropsonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including dust. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing, to meet the demands from areas such as climate research, air quality monitoring, civil emergencies etc. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such as long-range transport depend on the vertical distribution of aerosol. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. A disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter has been used for ground based air-quality monitoring around Heathrow airport. The counter has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of

  20. Long-term (2001-2012) observation of the modeled hygroscopic growth factor of remote marine TSP aerosols over the western North Pacific: impact of long-range transport of pollutants and their mixing states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreddy, S K R; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Haque, Md Mozammel

    2015-11-21

    In order to assess the seasonal and annual variability of long-range transported anthropogenic pollutants from East Asia and their effect on the hygroscopicity and precipitation process over the western North Pacific, we conducted long-term calculations of bulk hygroscopicity, g(90%)ZSR, based on the ZSR model using chemical composition data from 2001-2012 at Chichijima Island. We found that sea-salts (Na(+) and Cl(-)) are the major mass fraction (65%) of the total water-soluble matter followed by SO4(2-) (20%) and WSOM (6%). The seasonal variation of g(90%)ZSR was high in summer to autumn and low in winter to spring months, probably due to the influence of the long-range transport of anthropogenic SO4(2-), dust, and organics from East Asia and their interaction with sea-salts through heterogeneous reactions. On the other hand, annual variations of g(90%)ZSR showed a decrease from 2001 to 2006 and then an increase from 2007 to 2012. Interestingly, the annual variations in SO4(2-) mass fractions showed an increase from 2001 to 2006 and then a decrease from 2007 to 2012, demonstrating that SO4(2-) seriously suppresses the hygroscopic growth of sea-salt particles over the western North Pacific. This is further supported by the strong negative correlation between SO4(2-) and g(90%)ZSR. Based on the MODIS satellite data, the present study demonstrates that long-range transported anthropogenic pollutants from East Asia to the North Pacific can act as efficient cloud condensation nuclei but significantly suppress the precipitation by reducing the size of cloud droplets over the western North Pacific.

  1. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be

  2. Long-range tropospheric transport of uranium and plutonium weapons fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site to Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Cato Christian; Fifield, L Keith; Oughton, Deborah H; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Bartnicki, Jerzy; Tims, Stephen G; Høibråten, Steinar; Salbu, Brit

    2013-09-01

    A combination of state-of-the-art isotopic fingerprinting techniques and atmospheric transport modelling using real-time historical meteorological data has been used to demonstrate direct tropospheric transport of radioactive debris from specific nuclear detonations at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan to Norway via large areas of Europe. A selection of archived air filters collected at ground level at 9 stations in Norway during the most intensive atmospheric nuclear weapon testing periods (1957-1958 and 1961-1962) has been screened for radioactive particles and analysed with respect to the concentrations and atom ratios of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Digital autoradiography screening demonstrated the presence of radioactive particles in the filters. Concentrations of (236)U (0.17-23nBqm(-3)) and (239+240)Pu (1.3-782μBqm(-3)) as well as the atom ratios (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.237) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.7) varied widely indicating several different sources. Filter samples from autumn and winter tended to have lower atom ratios than those sampled in spring and summer, and this likely reflects a tropospheric influence in months with little stratospheric fallout. Very high (236)U, (239+240)Pu and gross beta activity concentrations as well as low (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.077), (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.00025-0.00062) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.046) atom ratios, characteristic of close-in and tropospheric fallout, were observed in filters collected at all stations in Nov 1962, 7-12days after three low-yield detonations at Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan). Atmospheric transport modelling (NOAA HYSPLIT_4) using real-time meteorological data confirmed that long range transport of radionuclides, and possibly radioactive particles, from Semipalatinsk to Norway during this period was plausible. The present work shows that direct tropospheric transport of fallout from atmospheric nuclear detonations periodically may have

  3. Dust deposition events in Caucasus Mountains as revealed by shallow ice cores from Mt Elbrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuzov, Stanislav; Shahgedanova, Maria; Kemp, Sarah; Lavrentiev, Ivan; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Popov, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Dust aerosol transported to the high mountains and is deposited and stored in snow pack and glacier ice. Present and past records of dust stored in glaciers provide valuable information on frequency of deposition events, source regions and atmospheric pathways of mineral dust. The Caucasus Mountains, located between the Black and the Caspian seas is a glacierized region affected by deposition of desert dust from the Middle East and Sahara. In this study, a combination of ice core analysis, remote sensing and air mass trajectory modelling was used to identify the source regions of dust deposited on the glaciers of Mt Elbrus in the central Greater Caucasus and to characterize atmospheric pathways of dust with high temporal and spatial resolution. Shallow ice cores were extracted at Mt Elbrus in 2009 and 2012. Dust deposition events, recorded as brown layers in the snow, firn and ice were dated to the precision on months using oxygen and deuterium isotopic analyses. Examination of the local meteorological and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and application of HYSPLIT atmospheric trajectory model enabled dating dust deposition events with a precision of days, identification of potential source regions of desert dust and its pathways in the atmosphere. Examination of red-blue green infrared composite imagery from Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite enabled further provenancing of desert dust with high temporal (hours) and spatial (c. 100 km) resolution. Seventeen dust layers deposited between May 2009 and July 2012 were detected in the shallow cores. The source regions of the desert dust transported to Mt Elbrus were primarily located in the Middle East, in particular in eastern Syria and in the Syrian Desert at the border between Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Jordan. Northern Sahara, the foothills of the Djebel Akhdar Mountains in eastern Libya and the border region between Libya and Algeria were other

  4. Impacts of Long-Range Transport of Metals from East Asia in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Okinawa Archipelago, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Sotaro; S, Yuka; I, Moriaki; N, Fumiya; H, Daishi; A, Takemitsu; T, Akira

    2010-05-01

    Economy of East Asia has been growing rapidly, and atmospheric aerosols discharged from this region have been transported to Japan. Okinawa island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km of south Korea. Its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same type of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of acid-digested metals using atomic absorption spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of metals in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island during June, 2008 to June 2009. We also determined 'background' concentration of metals in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island to elucidate the influence of the transport processes and distances from Asian continent on metal concentrations.

  5. Energy transport in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of collagen molecule with long-range interactions effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvogo, Alain; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofané, T. C.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated with the influence of power-law long-range exciton-exciton interactions. The continuum limit of the discrete equations reveal that the collagen dynamics is governed by a set of three coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, whose dispersive coefficient depends on the LRI parameter r. We construct the analytic symmetric and asymmetric (antisymmetric) soliton solutions, which match with the structural features of collagen related with the acupuncture channels. These solutions are used as initial conditions for the numerical simulations of the discrete equations, which reveal a coherent transport of energy in the molecule for r > 3. The results also indicate that the width of the solitons is a decreasing function of r, which help to stabilize the solitons propagating in the molecule. To confirm further the efficiency of energy transport in the molecule, the modulational instability of the system is performed and the numerical simulations show that the energy can flow from one polypeptide chain to another in the form of nonlinear waves.

  6. Source apportionment of the particulate PAHs at Seoul, Korea: impact of long range transport to a megacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Northeast Asia including China, Korea, and Japan is one of the world's largest fossil fuel consumption regions. Seoul, Korea, is a megacity in Northeast Asia. Its emissions of air pollutants can affect the region, and in turn it is also affected by regional emissions. To understand the extent of these influences, major sources of ambient particulate PAHs in Seoul were identified and quantified based on measurements made between August 2002 and December 2003. The chemical mass balance (CMB model was applied. Seven major emission sources were identified based on the emission data in Seoul and Northeast Asia: Gasoline and diesel vehicles, residential coal use, coke ovens, coal power plants, biomass burning, and natural gas (NG combustion. The major sources of particulate PAHs in Seoul during the whole measurement period were gasoline and diesel vehicles, together accounted for 31% of the measured particulate PAHs levels. However, the source contributions showed distinct daily and seasonal variations. High contributions of biomass burning and coal (residential and coke oven were observed in fall and winter, accounting for 63% and 82% of the total concentration of PAHs, respectively. Since these sources were not strong in and around Seoul, they are likely to be related to transport from outside of Seoul, from China and/or North Korea. This implies that the air quality in a mega-city such as Seoul can be influenced by the long range transport of air pollutants such as PAHs.

  7. Interstellar Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Compiegne, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way, certain elements -- e.g., Mg, Si, Al, Ca, Ti, Fe -- reside predominantly in interstellar dust grains. These grains absorb, scatter, and emit electromagnetic radiation, heat the interstellar medium by photoelectric emission, play a role in the ionization balance of the gas, and catalyze the formation of molecules, particularly H2. I review the state of our knowledge of the composition and sizes of interstellar grains, including what we can learn fro...

  8. Incorporation of planetary boundary layer dynamics in a numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakov, D.; Djolov, G.; Yordanov, D.

    1983-05-01

    A numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport is developed, in which a simple planetary boundary layer (PBL) is incorporated. The pollution field results from the superposition of discrete ‘puffs’ of pollutants which are emitted periodically in different regions. The instantaneous sources in the different cells are approximated by rotational ellipsoids with Gaussian concentration distributions. The puff movement due to the external flow is followed by the displacement of the centroid. The expansion of the puff is modelled by nonisotropic Fickian diffusion. A simple barotropic PBL model is used to study the PBL influence. This model gives the flow velocity and the vertical turbulent exchange coefficient, which depend on the external parameters Ro and S — Rossby number and stratification parameter. The model performance is investigated by special test runs. The dependence of the pollution field on source height, stability conditions and vertical motions is shown.

  9. Particle dynamics in self-generated dunes over a range of hydraulic and sediment transport conditions using LES--DEM

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Rui; Strom, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurement of vertical and longitudinal sediment fluxes on migrating sandy bedforms are extremely difficult to perform in both the field and laboratory. In this study we use the LES--DEM (large eddy simulation--discrete element method) solver SediFoam to examine the individual particle motions and resulting fluxes in a domain of self-generated dunes. In SediFoam, the motions of, and collisions among, the sediment grains as well as their interactions with surrounding turbulent flows are resolved. The numerical simulations are performed over a range of transport settings, spanning bedform inception through washout conditions, to examine the individual particle dynamics. The space-time evolution of dune surfaces is demonstrated. The self-generated dunes are stable at relatively low Reynolds numbers, but then become increasingly unstable at higher Reynolds numbers; eventually washing out as the number of bypass grains and particles in suspension increase. Data from the simulation are used to examine the v...

  10. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  11. Evaluation of long range transport of fossil fuel originated organic aerosol at a background site in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Jin; Lee, Ji Yi; Park, Jin Soo; Lee, Seok Jo; Kim, Hyun Jae; Jeon, Ha Eun; Sung, Min Young

    2013-04-01

    Northeast Asia is heavy air pollution region due to usage of large amounts of fossil fuel. In addition, meteorological conditions represented as prevailing westerlies in Northeast Asia region causes long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants emitted from China to Korea and Japan and even the United States across the Pacific Ocean (Bey et al., 2001). The Baengnyeong Island of Korea is located at the northwestern part of the Korean peninsula and close by North Korea and China, thus this site is regarded as an ideal place for background air measurements in Northeast Asia. Also, it has low local anthropogenic emissions and is frequently influenced by various air masses from China and North Korea in the Island. In this study, we performed intensive sampling during summer and winter in the Baengnyeong Island and analyzed various organic compounds including fossil fuel originated organic markers such as hopanes and PAHs using thermal desorption two dimensional gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOFMS). We also analyzed ~20 urban aerosol samples collected at Seoul, a representative urban site in Northeast Asia region to compare organic compounds distributions of aerosol samples at the Baengnyeong Island. By applying air mass back trajectory analysis and comparing organic compounds distributions in aerosol samples of the Baengnyeong Island and Seoul, the impact of long-range transport of fossil fuel originated organic pollutants at a background site in Northeast Asia were evaluated. (References) Bey, I., Jacob, D.J., Logan, J.A., Yantosca, R.M., 2001. Asian chemical outflow to the Pacific in spring: origins, pathways, and budgets. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmosphere 106, 23097-23113.

  12. An Overview of the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS): Impact of stratospheric intrusions and long-range transport on surface air quality

    OpenAIRE

    A. O. Langford; C. J. Senff; R.J., Alvarez; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; J. S. Holloway; M. Lin; R. D. Marchbanks; Pierce, R. B.; Sandberg, S.P.; Weickmann, A.M.; Williams, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was conducted in the late spring and early summer of 2013 to assess the seasonal contribution of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport to surface ozone in Clark County, Nevada and determine if these processes directly contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) in this area. Secondary goals included the characterization of local ozone production, regional transport f...

  13. Forecasting the northern African dust outbreak towards Europe in April 2011: a model intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huneeus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the World Meteorological Organisation's Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System, we evaluated the predictions of five state-of-the-art dust forecast models during an intense Saharan dust outbreak affecting western and northern Europe in April 2011. We assessed the capacity of the models to predict the evolution of the dust cloud with lead times of up to 72 h using observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and dust surface concentrations from a ground-based measurement network. In addition, the predicted vertical dust distribution was evaluated with vertical extinction profiles from the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP. To assess the diversity in forecast capability among the models, the analysis was extended to wind field (both surface and profile, synoptic conditions, emissions and deposition fluxes. Models predict the onset and evolution of the AOD for all analysed lead times. On average, differences among the models are larger than differences among lead times for each individual model. In spite of large differences in emission and deposition, the models present comparable skill for AOD. In general, models are better in predicting AOD than near-surface dust concentration over the Iberian Peninsula. Models tend to underestimate the long-range transport towards northern Europe. Our analysis suggests that this is partly due to difficulties in simulating the vertical distribution dust and horizontal wind. Differences in the size distribution and wet scavenging efficiency may also account for model diversity in long-range transport.

  14. Dust deposition: the best way to constrain the simulated dust mass budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergametti, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    Dust deposition is a key process of the dust cycle. In term of mass, deposition is equal to emissions and dust deposition being a size dependent process, the evolution of the size distribution during transport is in a large part controlled by the intensity of the deposition pathways. Moreover, the dust material removed from the atmosphere is a key component of many biogeochemical cycles: far from the source regions, atmospheric dust deposition supplies surface seawater with soil-derived elements, many of them (Fe, P. . .) being suspected to be limiting nutrients for oceanic ecosystems while in the continental areas, deposition contributes to soil formation in many surrounding desert areas. Finally, dust archives from deep ocean sediments, ice cores, lakes or continental loess deposits are used as proxies of past environmental and climate conditions. Thus, dust deposition is of high environmental interest and a special attention should be given to properly assess its intensity and spatio-temporal fields. Despite the major role and the various impacts of dust deposition, little attention was given to both deposition measurements and modelling. However, a better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of the deposition field would greatly help to better constrain the dust cycle. Indeed, even if recent progresses have been made in dust emission modelling, it could remain large uncertainties on the intensity of the simulated dust emissions. Having a good estimate of the deposition will contribute to better assess the relevance of simulated dust emissions.

  15. Long-Term Variability of Airborne Asian Dust Observed from TOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. R.; Hsu, N. C.; Seftor, C. J.; Holben, B. N.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that airborne Asian dust may not only play an important role in the regional radiation budget, but also influence the air quality over North America through long-range transport. In this paper, we use satellite data to investigate the long-term variability of airborne Asian dust as well as the daily variation of the dust aerosol distribution. By combining the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aerosol index with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) wind data, our analysis shows a strong correlation between the generation of dust storms in the region and the passage of springtime weather fronts. This is consistent with earlier studies performed by other researchers. According to both the Nimbus-7 and Earth-Probe TOMS data the Takla Makan desert, the Gobi desert, and the and region of Inner Mongolia are major sources of the eastward-flowing airborne Asian dust. Heavily populated areas in eastern China (e.g., Beijing) are often on the primary path of the dust storms originating in these desert regions. The increasing desertification north of the Beijing region has served to exacerbate problems stemming from these storms. The time series derived from 20 years of TOMS aerosol index data shows the first significant satellite evidence of the atmospheric effect of increasing desertification, indicating that the amount of dust blown eastward has increased strongly during the past few years including the year 2000.

  16. A Sr-Nd-Hf isotope characterization of dust source areas in Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the geographical provenance of dust provides crucial insight into the global dust cycle. For the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), the importance of Southern hemisphere potential dust sources has been thoroughly investigated using radiogenic isotopes, whereas proximal dust source areas located on the periphery of the ice sheet remain poorly documented from a geochemical standpoint. In this work, we expand the existing isotopic (Srsbnd Nd) catalogue of dust and sand-sized sediments from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, and incorporate Hf isotopic data to place additional constraints on dust source identification. The isotopic field for materials considered in this study is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.703 to 0.783, εNd between -12.01 and 6.36, and εHf from -16.77 to 6.89. As reported in previous works, the data reveal close relationships between Antarctic sediments and distinct parent lithologies; in addition, our findings emphasize the background presence of very fine dusts originating from dominant global sources and regional volcanic activity as barriers to direct source-to-sink comparison of isotopic signatures. Thus, geochemical characterizations of dust sources to the Antarctic ice sheet involving multiple size fractions, including coarser-grained particles more susceptible to short-range transport, can help us to rule out global sources of dust when examining local sediment cores and ice cores.

  17. Evaluation of long-range transport potential of selected brominated flame retardants with measured 1-octanol-air partition coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwon, Jung Hwan [Div. of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Various alternative flame retardants are used in many countries since polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were classified as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). However, difficulties in the evaluation of the long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the alternatives are related to the lack of information on their physicochemical properties, which govern their environmental fates and transport. Based on the simulation of LRTP using OECD P{sub OV} and LRTP Screening Tool, five alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) (hexabromobenzene [HBB], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene [PBT], 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromoethylbenzene [PBEB], 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate [TBB], and 1,2,4,5-tetrabromo-3,6-dimethylbenzene [TBX]), and 3 PBDEs (BDE-28, BDE-47, and BDE-99) were chosen to perform a refined assessment. This was done using an experimentally measured 1-octanol–air partition coefficient (K{sub OA}) for the calculation of the air–water partition coefficient (K{sub AW}) required for the model. The four selected alternative BFRs (HBB, PBT, PBEB, TBX) have K{sub OA} values close to the in silico estimation used in the screening evaluation. On the other hand, the measured K{sub OA} value for TBB was two orders of magnitude lower than the estimated value used in the screening simulation. The refined simulation showed that characteristic travel distance (CTD) and transfer efficiency (TE) for HBB, PBT, PBEB, and TBX were greater than those for BDE-28, whereas CTD and TE for TBB were lower than those for BDE-28. This suggested that TBB has a lower LRTP than BDE-28, considering the refined partition coefficients.

  18. Microphysical characterization of long-range transported biomass burning particles from North America at three EARLINET stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Benavent-Oltra, José Antonio; Böckmann, Christine; Samaras, Stefanos; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Janicka, Łucja; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-05-01

    Strong events of long-range transported biomass burning aerosol were detected during July 2013 at three EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) stations, namely Granada (Spain), Leipzig (Germany) and Warsaw (Poland). Satellite observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instruments, as well as modeling tools such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System), have been used to estimate the sources and transport paths of those North American forest fire smoke particles. A multiwavelength Raman lidar technique was applied to obtain vertically resolved particle optical properties, and further inversion of those properties with a regularization algorithm allowed for retrieving microphysical information on the studied particles. The results highlight the presence of smoke layers of 1-2 km thickness, located at about 5 km a.s.l. altitude over Granada and Leipzig and around 2.5 km a.s.l. at Warsaw. These layers were intense, as they accounted for more than 30 % of the total AOD (aerosol optical depth) in all cases, and presented optical and microphysical features typical for different aging degrees: color ratio of lidar ratios (LR532 / LR355) around 2, α-related ångström exponents of less than 1, effective radii of 0.3 µm and large values of single scattering albedos (SSA), nearly spectrally independent. The intensive microphysical properties were compared with columnar retrievals form co-located AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations. The intensity of the layers was also characterized in terms of particle volume concentration, and then an experimental relationship between this magnitude and the particle extinction coefficient was established.

  19. Variability in the Correlation between Asian Dust Storms and Chlorophyll a Concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997–2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54–0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32–0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas. PMID:23460892

  20. Quantification of chemical and physical processes influencing ozone during long-range transport using a trajectory ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cain

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available During long-range transport, many distinct processes – including photochemistry, deposition, emissions and mixing – contribute to the transformation of air mass composition. Partitioning the effects of different processes can be useful when considering the sensitivity of chemical transformation to, for example, a changing environment or anthropogenic influence. However, transformation is not observed directly, since mixing ratios are measured, and models must be used to relate changes to processes. Here, four cases from the ITCT-Lagrangian 2004 experiment are studied. In each case, aircraft intercepted a distinct air mass several times during transport over the North Atlantic, providing a unique dataset and quantifying the net changes in composition from all processes. A new framework is presented to deconstruct the change in O3 mixing ratio (Δ O3 into its component processes, which were not measured directly, taking into account the uncertainty in measurements, initial air mass variability and its time evolution.

    The results show that the net chemical processing (Δ O3chem over the whole simulation is greater than net physical processing (Δ O3phys in all cases. This is in part explained by cancellation effects associated with mixing. In contrast, each case is in a regime of either net photochemical destruction (lower tropospheric transport or production (an upper tropospheric biomass burning case. However, physical processes influence O3 indirectly through addition or removal of precursor gases, so that changes to physical parameters in a model can have a larger effect on Δ O3chem than Δ O3phys. Despite its smaller magnitude, the physical processing distinguishes the lower tropospheric export cases, since the net photochemical O3 change is −5 ppbv per day in all three cases.

    Processing is quantified using a Lagrangian

  1. Saharan dust storms: nature and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, A. S.; Middleton, N. J.

    2001-12-01

    This paper reviews recent work on the role of Saharan dust in environmental change, the location and strength of source areas, the transport paths of material away from the desert, the rates of Saharan dust deposition, the nature of that material (including PeriSaharan loess) and the changing rates of dust activity in response to long and short-term climatic changes. The Sahara produces more aeolian soil dust than any other world desert, and Saharan dust has an important impact on climatic processes, nutrient cycles, soil formation and sediment cycles. These influences spread far beyond Africa, thanks to the great distances over which Saharan dust is transported. The precise locations of Saharan dust source areas are not well known, but data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) suggest two major source areas: the Bodélé depression and an area covering eastern Mauritania, western Mali and southern Algeria. Trajectories of long-distance transport are relatively well documented, but the links between source areas and seasonal Saharan dust pathways are not. However, it is possible that Harmattan dust from the Bodélé depression may not be the source of the prominent winter plume over the tropical North Atlantic, as is often suggested in the literature. Few of the data on particle size characteristics of Saharan dust are derived from major source areas or from Africa itself. Saharan dusts sampled from the Harmattan plume and over Europe are dominated by SiO 2 and Al 2O 3, a characteristic they share with North American and Chinese dusts. The concentrations of these two major elements are similar to those found in world rocks. PeriSaharan loess is conspicuous by its relative absence, considering the Sahara's dominance of the global desert dust cycle both in the contemporary era and through the geological past. In recent decades, the frequency of Saharan dust events has varied markedly in response to climatic factors such as drought and anthropogenic

  2. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  3. COAL DUST EMISSION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article aims to develop 2D numerical models for the prediction of atmospheric pollution during transportation of coal in the railway car, as well as the ways to protect the environment and the areas near to the mainline from the dust emission due to the air injection installation. Methodology. To solve this problem there were developed numerical models based on the use of the equations of motion of an inviscid incompressible fluid and mass transfer. For the numerical integration of the transport equation of the pollutant the implicit alternating-triangular difference scheme was used. For numerical integration of the 2D equation for the velocity potential the method of total approximation was used. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package. On the basis of the constructed numerical models it was carried out a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution when transporting bulk cargo by rail when the railway car has the air injection. Findings. 2D numerical models that belong to the class «diagnostic models» were developed. These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of dust pollution in the atmosphere during transportation of bulk cargo. The developed numerical models make it possible to calculate the dust loss process, taking into account the use of the air injection of the car. They require a small cost of the computer time during practical realization at the low and medium power machines. There were submitted computational calculations to determine pollutant concentrations and the formation of the zone of pollution near the train with bulk cargo in «microscale» scale taking into account the air curtains. Originality. 2D numerical models taking into account the relevant factors influencing the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, and the formation of the zone of pollution during transportation of bulk cargo by

  4. Observation and simulation of dust aerosol cycle and impact on radiative fluxes during the FENNEC campaign in summer 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Fanny; Derimian, Yevgeny; Pere, Jean-Christophe; Flamant, Cyrille; Brogniez, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    The Sahara desert is one of the principal worldwide sources of dust aerosol emissions that play significant role in the climatic system. In the framework of the FENNEC campaign, conducted during the summer 2011, we focus on dust radiative effect and impact on the atmospheric dynamics and profile structure. We study the variability of the measured radiative parameters and model atmospheric dynamics during dust plume observations at the FENNEC sites, therefore, trying to understand the link between the Saharan heat low system and dust aerosols. Due to its large size the airborne dust can absorb and scatter not only solar, but also thermal infrared radiation, which requires consideration of both spectral ranges. Analysis of AERONET and other optical observations during the period of intensive campaign in summer 2011 provides information on variability of aerosol optical characteristics and perturbation of solar and TIR flux. We use these observations in conjunction with the meso-scale model RAMS to understand the impact of the dust plumes on the atmospheric dynamics. We also simulate the dust cycle in order to find the contribution of the different emission sources and identify structure of transport over an extended domain. Then, coupling the radiative code (GAME) we calculate the radiative forcing of dust and compare it to the radiative flux observed and computed based on the AERONET observations. Validation of simulations is made using measurements from space-borne CALIOP lidar, SEVIRI and OMI satellites, AERONET ground-based stations and observations acquired onboard the SAFIRE Falcon 20 research aircraft.

  5. Dust agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  6. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound range and emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, L A; Gorgo, Yu P; Dirckx, J J J; Bogdanov, V B; Buytaert, J A N; Lysenko, V A; Didyk, N P; Vershygora, A V; Erygina, V T

    2008-09-01

    This study examines whether a relation exists between rapid atmospheric pressure fluctuations, attributed to the far infrasound frequency range (APF), and a number of emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases (EEC). Over an entire year, the average integral amplitudes of APF in the range of periods from 3 s to 120 s over each hour (HA) were measured. Daily dynamics of HA averaged over the year revealed a wave shape with smooth increase from night to day followed by decrease from day to night. The total daily number of EEC within the city of Kiev, Ukraine, was related to the daily mean of HA (DHA) and to the ratio of HA averaged over the day time to HA averaged over the night time (Rdn), and was checked for confounding effects of classical meteorological variables through non-parametric regression algorithms. The number of EEC were significantly higher on days with high DHA (3.72-11.07 Pa, n = 87) compared to the low DHA (0.7-3.62 Pa, n = 260, p = 0.01), as well at days with low Rdn (0.21-1.64, n = 229) compared to the high Rdn (1.65-7.2, n = 118, p = 0.03). A difference between DHA and Rdn effects on the emergency events related to different categories of circulatory diseases points to a higher sensitivity of rheumatic and cerebro-vascular diseases to DHA, and ischaemic and hypertensive diseases to Rdn. Results suggest that APF could be considered as a meteorotropic factor capable of influencing circulatory system diseases.

  7. Fault-related dolomitization in the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain): reactive transport simulations and field data constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Martin-Martin, J. D.; Corbella, M.; Teixell, A.

    2009-04-01

    The relationships between hydrothermal fluid circulation and fracturing that lead to mineral dissolution and/or precipitation in carbonate rocks have direct impacts on the evolution and final distribution of hydrocarbon reservoir permeability. Understanding the coupling between these processes is important for predicting permeability and improving hydrocarbon recovery. We present a case study of dolomitization processes in Cretaceous limestone from the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain). Extending over part of the Maestrat Cretaceous Basin, the Orpesa area is deformed by extensional faults. These faults accommodated thick sequences of shallow marine limestone, mainly during Aptian times. The syn-rift carbonates are partially dolomitized due to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids along normal faults and bedding. Both Aptian and later Neogene extensional faults must have served as conduits for the circulation of fluids. MVT deposits of Paleocene age are well documented in the Maestrat basin and may also be related to dolomitization. Samples of host rocks and vein fillings have been collected along strike and analyzed in different fault sections to characterize fluid and rock composition, track flow pathways and map the relationships of fluid flow with respect to the main normal faults in the area. Using field and geochemical data from the Orpesa Ranges carbonates, we have developed reactive-transport models to study the influence of different parameters in the dolomitization of carbonates related to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids at the outcrop scale. We present results from models that were run with constant and non-constant permeability. The main parameters analyzed include: initial porosity and permeability of layers and fractures, composition of fluids, groundwater and brines flux, composition of layers, reactive surface of minerals, differences in vertical and horizontal permeability, and presence or absence of stratigraphic

  8. Global long-range transport and lung cancer risk from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons shielded by coatings of organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Lou, Sijia; Zelenyuk-Imre, Alla; Easter, Richard C.; Corley, Richard A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Massey Simonich, Staci L.; Shen, Huizhong; Tao, Shu

    2017-01-23

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have toxic impacts on ecosystems and human health. Laboratory measurements show that one of the most carcinogenic PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene, which is adsorbed on surfaces of soot particles, reacts very quickly with atmospheric oxidants like ozone within ~2 hours. Yet, field observations indicate that it actually persists for much longer periods in the atmosphere, and this large discrepancy is not well understood. Driven by novel experimental understanding, we develop a new modelling approach, whereby particle-bound BaP is shielded from oxidation by a coating of viscous organic aerosol (OA). We show that application of this new approach in a global climate model leads to higher atmospheric BaP concentrations that agree much better with measurements, compared to the default model, as well as stronger long-range transport and greater deposition fluxes. This new approach also predicts elevated lung-cancer risk from PAHs. Predicted oxidation of BaP is highest over a tropical belt where OA is liquid-like.

  9. Development of a dust collector inlet hood for enhanced surface mine drill dust capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Organiscak; Steven J. Page [National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    2005-03-01

    Surface mine drill operators have the highest frequency of overexposure to quartz dust, and drilling is one of the occupations associated with the highest incidence of silicosis. Previous field assessment studies of drilling machines indicate that they can emit some of the highest airborne respirable quartz dust concentrations found at surface mining operations. Typically, the surface mine drills are equipped with dry dust collector systems to capture the dust being flushed with compressed air from the hole during the drilling process. The overall control effectiveness of the dust collector system is initially dependent on capturing the dust cloud at the source via the collector inlet. To assist the initial capture of the dust being flushed from the drill hole, the bottom of the drill deck is typically shrouded or enclosed on all sides to help contain the dust for the collector inlet plenum located on the underside perimeter of the drill deck. Openings, gaps and breaches in the shroud enclosure permit dust to escape dust collector capture. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed a collector inlet hood that reconfigures the inlet plenum around the drill steel and above the hole to enhance dust capture. Laboratory development and testing show that this inlet hood improves dust capture by an average of nearly 50% over a wide range of collector flows and shroud leakage areas. This report describes the laboratory and subsequent field testing of this inlet hood concept.

  10. Triple-wavelength depolarization-ratio profiling of Saharan dust over Barbados during SALTRACE in 2013 and 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haarig

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Triple-wavelength polarization lidar measurements in Saharan dust layers were performed at Barbados (13.1° N, 59.6° W, 5000–8000 km west of the Saharan dust sources, in the framework of the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE-1, June–July 2013, SALTRACE-3, June–July 2014. Three case studies are discussed. High quality was achieved by comparing the dust linear depolarization ratio profiles measured at 355, 532, and 1064 nm with respective dual-wavelength (355, 532 nm depolarization ratio profiles measured with a reference lidar. A unique case of long-range transported dust over more than 12 000 km is presented. Saharan dust plumes crossing Barbados were measured with an airborne triple-wavelength polarization lidar over Missouri in the midwestern United States 7 days later. Similar dust optical properties and depolarization features were observed over both sites indicating almost unchanged dust properties within this 1 week of travel from the Caribbean to the United States. The main results of the triple-wavelength polarization lidar observations in the Caribbean in the summer seasons of 2013 and 2014 are summarized. On average, the particle linear depolarization ratios for aged Saharan dust were found to be 0.252 ± 0.030 at 355 nm, 0.280 ± 0.020 at 532 nm, and 0.225 ± 0.022 at 1064 nm after approximately 1 week of transport over the tropical Atlantic. Based on published simulation studies we present an attempt to explain the spectral features of the depolarization ratio of irregularly shaped mineral dust particles, and conclude that most of the irregularly shaped coarse-mode dust particles (particles with diameters > 1 µm have sizes around 1.5–2 µm. The SALTRACE results are also set into the context of the SAMUM-1 (Morocco, 2006 and SAMUM-2 (Cabo Verde, 2008 depolarization ratio studies. Again, only minor changes in the dust depolarization

  11. Reply to Comment by Xu et al. on "Sr-Nd isotope composition and clay mineral assemblages in eolian dust from the central Philippine Sea over the last 600 kyr: Implications for the transport mechanism of Asian dust" by Seo et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Inah; Lee, Yong Il; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyung Jeek; Hyeong, Kiseong

    2016-12-01

    Against Xu et al. (2016), who argued that East Asian Desert (EAD) dust that traveled on East Asian Winter Monsoon winds dominates over Central Asian Desert (CAD) dust in the Philippine Sea with presentation of additional data, we reconfirm Seo et al.'s (2014) conclusion that CAD dust carried on the Prevailing Westerlies and Trade Winds dominates over EAD dust in overall dust budget of the central Philippine Sea. The relative contribution of dust from EADs and CADs using clay mineral composition should be evaluated with elimination of mineralogical contribution from the volcanic end-member which is enriched in kaolinite and overestimate the contribution of EAD dust.

  12. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model – Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Haustein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Pérez et al., 2011 develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6–0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1 in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are

  13. Atmospheric Dust Modeling from Meso to Global Scales with the Online NMMB/BSC-Dust Model Part 2: Experimental Campaigns in Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K.; Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Perez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodele Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  14. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in Ile-de-France: Local contribution and Long range transport; Caracteisation des aeosols atmospheiques en Ile-de-France: contribution locale et transport a longues distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta, J.E

    2006-06-15

    Atmospheric aerosols interact directly in a great number of processes related to climate change and public health, modifying the energy budget and partly determining the quality of the air we breathe. In my PhD, I chose to study the perturbation, if not the aggravation, of the living conditions in Ile-de-France associated to aerosol transport episodes in the free troposphere. This situation is rather frequent and still badly known. To achieve my study, I developed the observation platform 'TReSS' Transportable Remote Sensing Station, whose instruments were developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorology Dynamique by the LiMAG team. 'TReSS' consists of a new high-performance 'Mini-Lidar' and of two standard radiometers: a sun photometer and a thermal infrared radiometer. The principle of my experimental approach is the synergy of the vertical Lidar profiles and the particle size distributions over the column, obtained by the 'Almucantar' inversion of sun photometer data. The new 'Lidar and Almucantar' method characterizes the vertical distribution by layer and the optical micro-physical properties of the local and transported aerosols. Firstly, I undertook the characterization of the Paris aerosol, mainly of anthropogenic origin. Their radiative properties were analyzed in the daily and yearly scales. Then, I conducted a statistical multi-year study of transport episodes and a two-week study case, representative of a succession of desert dust intrusion in Ile-de-France. My PhD work concludes by a study on the impact of biomass burning aerosols during the heat wave on August 2003. I study the impact of the transported aerosols into the local radiative budget and the possible consequences on the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. (author)

  15. The impact of local winds and long-range transport on the continuous carbon dioxide record at Mount Waliguan, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingxi Zhou; Jie Tang; Yupu Wen; Peng Yan [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (China); Jinlong Li [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). Center of Environmental Sciences; Xiaochun Zhang [Qinghai Meteorological Bureau, Xining (China)

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the continuous measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mt. Waliguan (36 deg 17 min N, 100 deg 54 min E, 3816 m asl) in western China over the period 1994-2000. The CO{sub 2} hourly mixing ratios were segregated by horizontal wind direction/speed and vertical winds, respectively, merged by season over the entire measurement period. The short-term variability in CO{sub 2} was examined mainly from the point of view of local winds observed at this station and isobaric back trajectory cluster-concentration analysis as for local and long-range transport influence, to permit the selection of hourly average data that is representative of background conditions. From the selected hourly data, daily, monthly and annual averages that are not influenced by local CO{sub 2} sources and sinks be computed by discriminating the local and regional impact on the Waliguan CO{sub 2} records. On the basis of these results, background CO{sub 2} data were then analyzed to evaluate the averaged diurnal variation, monthly mean time series, CO{sub 2} mixing ratio distribution in different seasons as well as averaged seasonal cycle. Annual mean and growth rate of CO{sub 2} at Waliguan during the period of 1991 to 2000 were further discussed by supplement with NOAA/CMDL flask air sampling records at this station and other monitoring stations located at similar latitudinal band in the Northern Hemisphere. The results from this study can provide atmospheric CO{sub 2} characteristics in Asian inland regions, and be used in other studies to improve the understanding of carbon source and sink distributions.

  16. Injection in the lower stratosphere of biomass fire emissions followed by long-range transport: a MOZAIC case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Cammas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a stratospheric injection by deep convection of biomass fire emissions over North America (Alaska, Yukon and Northwest Territories on 24 June 2004 and its long-range transport over the eastern coast of the United States and the eastern Atlantic. The case study is based on airborne MOZAIC observations of ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and water vapour during the crossing of the southernmost tip of an upper level trough over the Eastern Atlantic on 30 June and on a vertical profile over Washington DC on 30 June, and on lidar observations of aerosol backscattering at Madison (University of Wisconsin on 28 June. Attribution of the observed CO plumes to the boreal fires is achieved by backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART. A simulation with the Meso-NH model for the source region shows that a boundary layer tracer, mimicking the boreal forest fire smoke, is lofted into the lowermost stratosphere (2–5 pvu layer during the diurnal convective cycle at isentropic levels (above 335 K corresponding to those of the downstream MOZAIC observations. It is shown that the order of magnitude of the time needed by the parameterized convective detrainment flux to fill the volume of a model mesh (20 km horizontal, 500 m vertical above the tropopause with pure boundary layer air would be about 7.5 h, i.e. a time period compatible with the convective diurnal cycle. Over the area of interest, the maximum instantaneous detrainment fluxes deposited about 15 to 20% of the initial boundary layer tracer concentration at 335 K. According to the 275-ppbv carbon monoxide maximum mixing ratio observed by MOZAIC over Eastern Atlantic, such detrainment fluxes would be associated with a 1.4–1.8 ppmv carbon monoxide mixing ratio in the boundary layer over the source region.

  17. Estimation of the effect of long-range transport on seasonal variation of aerosols over northeastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Gogoi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD at ten discrete channels in the visible and near IR regions were estimated over Dibrugarh, located in the northeastern part of India, using a ground-based multi-wavelength solar radiometer (MWR from October 2001 to February 2006. The observations reveal seasonal variations with low values of AODs in retreating monsoon and high values in the pre-monsoon season. Generally the AODs are high at shorter wavelengths and low at longer wavelengths. AOD spectra are relatively steep in winter compared to that in the monsoon period. The average value of AOD lies between 0.44±0.07 and 0.56±0.07 at 500 nm during the pre-monsoon season and between 0.19±0.02 and 0.22±0.02 during re-treating monsoon at the same wavelength. Comparison of MWR observation on Dibrugarh with satellite (MODIS observation indicates a good correspondence between ground-based and satellite derived AODs. The synoptic wind pattern obtained from National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF, India and back trajectory analysis using the NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT4 Model indicates that maximum contribution to aerosol extinction could be due to transport of pollutants from the industrialized and urban regions of India and large amounts of desert and mineral aerosols from the west Asian and Indian desert. Equal contributions from Bay-of-Bengal (BoB, in addition to that from the Indian landmass and west Asian desert leads to a further increase of AOD over the region of interest in the pre-monsoon seasons.

  18. Natural Radioactivity Accumulated in the Arctic from Long-range Atmospheric Transport - Observations in Canadian Monitoring Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Weihua [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa K1A 1C1 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the environment, the main sources of naturally occurring radionuclides come from radionuclides in the uranium decay series. Activity concentrations of uranium decay series radionuclides may vary considerably from place to place depending on the geological characteristics at the location. Their releases to the atmosphere are mainly through radon ({sup 222}Rn), a radioactive noble gas occurring naturally as an indirect decay product of uranium in soils and rocks. Due to the abundance of uranium, radon continuously emanates from continental land masses. With radon as the main source of naturally occurring radioactivity in the environment, one would think that the Arctic should be an area of low background radiation, because a considerable area of the Arctic is covered by glaciers and permafrost, and radon emanation rate has been reported to be negligible from those glacier and permafrost areas. However, available data have shown the opposite. The elevated level of naturally occurring radioactivity in the Arctic is due to natural sources outside of the Arctic, mainly through long-range atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny. In some cases, natural radioactivity can accumulate to relatively high levels and become a health concern or a limiting factor of country food consumption. By definition, contaminants are undesirable substances which can cause harm to the environment, the biota, and humans. We can call these naturally accumulating radiological burdens to the Arctic 'natural contaminants' to distinguish them from the traditional meaning of contamination, the 'artificial contaminants' which are attributable to industrial or man-made sources. This paper reviews information available in the literature, analyses long-term atmospheric monitoring data in the Canadian high Arctic, sub-Arctic and mid-latitude sites, and provides discussion on research needed to address questions, such as how heavily the Arctic has been impacted by the

  19. 76 FR 64376 - Long Range Transportation Plan for Fish and Wildlife Service Lands in Hawai`i, Idaho, Northern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... principles have shaped the development, conclusions, and recommendations of the Draft LRTP. The mission of... Resources and Develop Integrated Transportation Solutions Objective 1: To the extent authorized by law... and Promote Sustainable Transportation Practices Objective 1: Address climate change and other...

  20. Long-range volcanic ash transport and fallout during the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam J.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Rose, William I.; Delmelle, Pierre; Prata, Alfred J.; Viramonte, José G.

    2012-01-01

    The May 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile, provided a rare opportunity to measure the long-range transport of volcanic emissions and characteristics of a widely-dispersed terrestrial ash deposit. Airborne ash mass, quantified using thermal infrared satellite remote sensing, ranged between 0.2 and 0.4 Tg during the period 3-7 May 2008. A high level of spatiotemporal correspondence was observed between cloud trajectories and changes in surface reflectivity, which was inferred to indicate ash deposition. The evolution of the deposit was mapped for the first time using satellite-based observations of surface reflectivity. The distal (>80 km) ash deposit was poorly sorted and fine grained, and mean particle size varied very little beyond a distance >300 km. There were three particle size subpopulations in fallout at distances >300 km which mirror those identified in fallout from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, known to have a high propensity for aggregation. Discrete temporal sampling and characterisation of fallout demonstrated contributions from specific eruptive phases. Samples collected at the time of deposition were compared to bulk samples collected months after deposition and provided some evidence for winnowing. Experimentally-derived ash leachates had near-neutral pH values and charge balance which indicates minimal quantities of adsorbed acids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed surface enrichments in Ca, Na and Fe and the presence of coatings of mixed Ca-, Na- and Fe-rich salts on ash particles prior to deposition. Low S:Cl ratios in leachates indicate that the eruption had a low S content, and high Cl:F ratios imply gas-ash interaction within a Cl-rich environment. We estimate that ash fallout had potential to scavenge ∼42% of total S released into the atmosphere prior to deposition. XPS analyses also revealed ash particle surfaces were strongly enriched in Fe (in contrast to the results from bulk leachate

  1. Adsorption equilibrium and transport kinetics for a range of probe gases in Takeda 3A carbon molecular sieve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, S W; Coons, J E

    2005-04-15

    Measurements of adsorption equilibria and transport kinetics for argon, oxygen and nitrogen at 20, 50, and 80 degrees C on commercially derived Takeda carbon molecular sieve (CMS) employed for air separation have been undertaken in an effort to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of transport. Results indicate that micropore diffusion which is modeled by a Fickian diffusion process, governs the transport of oxygen molecules and the pore mouth barrier controls argon and nitrogen transport which is characterized by a linear driving force (LDF) model. For the three temperatures studied, the pressure dependence of the diffusivity and the LDF rate constant appear to be well characterized by a formulation based on the chemical potential as the driving force for transport. Isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading and activation energy measurements are compared with predictions made from a previously proposed molecular model for characterizing CMS.

  2. Dust evolution with active galactic nucleus feedback in elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nozawa, Takaya

    2017-12-01

    We have recently suggested that dust growth in the cold gas phase dominates the dust abundance in elliptical galaxies while dust is efficiently destroyed in the hot X-ray emitting plasma (hot gas). In order to understand the dust evolution in elliptical galaxies, we construct a simple model that includes dust growth in the cold gas and dust destruction in the hot gas. We also take into account the effect of mass exchange between these two gas components induced by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We survey reasonable ranges of the relevant parameters in the model and find that AGN feedback cycles actually produce a variety in cold gas mass and dust-to-gas ratio. By comparing with an observational sample of nearby elliptical galaxies, we find that, although the dust-to-gas ratio varies by an order of magnitude in our model, the entire range of the observed dust-to-gas ratios is difficult to be reproduced under a single parameter set. Variation of the dust growth efficiency is the most probable solution to explain the large variety in dust-to-gas ratio of the observational sample. Therefore, dust growth can play a central role in creating the variation in dust-to-gas ratio through the AGN feedback cycle and through the variation in dust growth efficiency.

  3. Assimilation of MODIS Dark Target and Deep Blue Observations in the Dust Aerosol Component of NMMB-MONARCH version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tomaso, Enza; Schutgens, Nick A. J.; Jorba, Oriol; Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    A data assimilation capability has been built for the NMMB-MONARCH chemical weather prediction system, with a focus on mineral dust, a prominent type of aerosol. An ensemble-based Kalman filter technique (namely the local ensemble transform Kalman filter - LETKF) has been utilized to optimally combine model background and satellite retrievals. Our implementation of the ensemble is based on known uncertainties in the physical parametrizations of the dust emission scheme. Experiments showed that MODIS AOD retrievals using the Dark Target algorithm can help NMMB-MONARCH to better characterize atmospheric dust. This is particularly true for the analysis of the dust outflow in the Sahel region and over the African Atlantic coast. The assimilation of MODIS AOD retrievals based on the Deep Blue algorithm has a further positive impact in the analysis downwind from the strongest dust sources of the Sahara and in the Arabian Peninsula. An analysis-initialized forecast performs better (lower forecast error and higher correlation with observations) than a standard forecast, with the exception of underestimating dust in the long-range Atlantic transport and degradation of the temporal evolution of dust in some regions after day 1. Particularly relevant is the improved forecast over the Sahara throughout the forecast range thanks to the assimilation of Deep Blue retrievals over areas not easily covered by other observational datasets.The present study on mineral dust is a first step towards data assimilation with a complete aerosol prediction system that includes multiple aerosol species.

  4. Break down of asian dust particle on wet surface and their possibilities of cause of respiratory health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Sakotani, Akiko; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Kenzaka, Takehiko; Tani, Katsuji; Baba, Takashi; Nasu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Asian dust (called 'Kosa' in Japan) is comprised of a large number of soil particles originating from the arid regions and deserts of China and Mongolia and dispersed long-range to Japan. A major public concern about Asian dust is its impact on human health. We collected Asian dust particles over the Japan Sea at an altitude of 900 m to directly estimate their effects on health. We examined the properties of the collected particles on wet surfaces. Through size distribution measurements and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis, we demonstrated that small dust particles (less than 1 µm) form aggregations with water-soluble salts such as calcium and sodium and they are transported to Japan as aggregates. These aggregates probably break down into small particles on nasal mucous membranes and may cause adverse respiratory health effects.

  5. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2007-05-01

    Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

  7. Processes Influencing Ozone Levels in Alaskan Forest Fires Plumes during Long-Range Transport over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, E.; Law, K. S.; Wienzierl, B.; Fiebig, M.; Petzold, A.; Wild, O.; Methven, J.; Arnold, S.; Stohl, A.; Huntrieser, H.; hide

    2006-01-01

    A case of long-range transport of a biomass burning plume from Alaska to Europe is analyzed using a Lagrangian approach. This plume was sampled several times in the free troposphere over North America, the North Atlantic and Europe by 3 different aircraft during the IGAC Lagrangian 2K4 experiment which was part of the ICARTT/ITOP measurement intensive in summer 2004. Measurements in the plume showed enhanced values of CO, VOCs and NOy, mainly in form of PAN. Observed O3 levels increased by 17 ppbv over 5 days. A photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, is used to examine processes responsible for the chemical evolution of the plume. The model was initialized with upwind data, and compared with downwind measurements. The influence of high aerosol loading on photolysis rates in the plume is investigated using in-situ aerosol measurements in the plume and lidar retrievals of optical depth as input into a photolysis code (Fast-J), run in the model. Significant impacts on photochemistry are found with a decrease of 18 percent in O3 production and 24 percent in O3 destruction over 5 days when including aerosols. The plume is found to be chemically active with large O3 increases attributed primarily to PAN decomposition during descent of the plume towards Europe. The predicted O3 changes are very dependent on temperature changes during transport, and also, on water vapor levels in the lower troposphere which can lead to O3 destruction. Simulation of mixing/dilution was necessary to reproduce observed pollutants level in the plume. Mixing was simulated using background concentrations from measurements in air masses in close proximity to the plume, and mixing timescales (averaging 6.25 days) were derived from CO changes. Observed and simulated O3/CO correlations in the plume are also compared in order to evaluate the photochemistry in the model. Observed slopes changed from negative to positive over 5 days. This change, which can be attributed largely to photochemistry, is

  8. Validation of the Saharan Dust Plume Conceptual Model Using Lidar, Meteosat, and ECMWF Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Karyampudi, V.; Palm, Stephen P.; Reagen, John A.; Fang, Hui; Grant, William B.; Hoff, Raymond M.; Moulin, Cyril; Pierce, Harold F.; Torres, Omar; Browell, Edward V.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-06-01

    Lidar observations collected during the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment experiment in conjunction with the Meteosat and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data have been used not only to validate the Saharan dust plume conceptual model constructed from the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Programme) Atlantic Tropical Experiment data, but also to examine the vicissitudes of the Saharan aerosol including their optical depths across the west Africa and east Atlantic regions. Optical depths were evaluated from both the Meteosat and lidar data. Back trajectory calculations were also made along selected lidar orbits to verify the characteristic anticyclonic rotation of the dust plume over the eastern Atlantic as well as to trace the origin of a dust outbreak over West Africa.A detailed synoptic analysis including the satellite-derived optical depths, vertical lidar backscattering cross section profiles, and back trajectories of the 16-19 September 1994 Saharan dust outbreak over the eastern Atlantic and its origin over West Africa during the 12-15 September period have been presented. In addition, lidar-derived backscattering profiles and optical depths were objectively analyzed to investigate the general features of the dust plume and its geographical variations in optical thickness. These analyses validated many of the familiar characteristic features of the Saharan dust plume conceptual model such as (i) the lifting of the aerosol over central Sahara and its subsequent transport to the top of the Saharan air layer (SAL), (ii) the westward rise of the dust layer above the gradually deepening marine mixed layer and the sinking of the dust-layer top, (iii) the anticyclonic gyration of the dust pulse between two consecutive trough axes, (iv) the dome-shaped structure of the dust-layer top and bottom, (v) occurrence of a middle-level jet near the southern boundary of the SAL, (vi) transverse-vertical circulations across the SAL front including their

  9. Effect of windblown dust from local and regional sources on the air quality of the central district in Jinan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Hong; Wang, Wenxing; Bai, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhongliang; Sun, Fengjuan; Hou, Lujian; Liu, Guanghui; Shi, Mengshuang; Miao, Yunge

    2017-03-01

    Windblown dust is a major source of PM10 in Jinan, China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of windblown dust on the air quality of the central district in Jinan, which has high population density. In this study, PM10 emissions from the suburbs of Jinan (local source) were estimated using the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) model; and the PM10 emissions from Shandong province, excluding Jinan (regional source), were estimated based on an empirical formula. In this study, the heating period includes January, February, November, and December; the non-heating period includes June, July and August; and the sand period includes March, April, May, September, and October. The WEPS-simulated annual PM10 emission was 9.90 × 104 tons (3.22 × 104 tons during the heating period, 5.53 × 104 tons during the sand period, and 1.16 × 104 tons during the non-heating period) in suburban Jinan in 2012. The PM10 emission was 9.17 × 105 tons in Shandong province, excluding Jinan, in 2012. Good correlations between the PM10 concentrations of windblown dust simulated by the chemical mass balance (CMB) model and the PM10 concentrations of windblown dust from local and regional sources were shown in this study. R2 were equal to 0.95, 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92, respectively, for the entire year, the heating, non-heating and sand period. For the entire year, the contributions of windblown dust from the local sources, regional sources, and long-range dust transport sources to PM10 were 73.0%, 12.8%, 14.2%, respectively. The windblown dust was mainly from local area. The contribution of the regional source was the greatest in the sand period, and the contribution of long-range dust transport was greatest in the heating period.

  10. Survivability of Microbes in Mars Wind Blown Dust Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Klovstad, Melisa R.; Fonda, Mark L.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Although the probability of Earth microbes growing (dividing) in the Martian environment is extremely low, the probability of their survival on the Martian surface is unknown. During the course of landed missions to Mars terrestrial microbes may reach the surface of Mars via inadequately sterilized spacecraft landers, rovers, or through accidental impact of orbiters. This investigation studied the potential for Earth microbes to survive in the windblown dust on the surface of Mars. The rationale for the study comes from the fact that Mars regularly has huge dust storms that engulf the planet, shading the surface from solar UV radiation. These storms serve as a mechanism for global transfer of dust particles. If live organisms were to be transported to the surface of Mars they could be picked up with the dust during a dust storm and transported across the planet. Washed, dried spores of Bacillus subtilis strain HA 101 were aseptically mixed with sterile sieved (size range of 1-5microns) Mars soil standard (obtained from NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA), or Fe-montmorillonite such that the number of microbes equals 5 x 10(exp 6)/g dry wt soil. The microbe soil mixture was placed in a spherical 8 L Mars simulation chamber equipped with a variable speed rotor, gas ports and an Oriel deuterium UV lamp emitting light of wave lengths 180-400 nm. The chamber was sealed, flushed with a simulated Martian atmosphere (96.9% CO2, 3% O2, 0.1% H2O), and the pressure brought to 10 torr. The lamp and rotor were switched on to begin the experiment. Periodically samples were collected from the chamber, and the numbers of microbial survivors g soil was determined using plate counts and the most probable number method (MPN). The data indicate that Bacillus subtilis spores dispersed with Mars analog soil in a Mars atmosphere (wind blown dust) survive exposure to 5.13 KJ m-2 UV radiation, suggesting that Mars wind blown dust has potential to the protect microbes from solar

  11. Implementation of dust emission and chemistry into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system and initial application to an Asian dust storm episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wang

    2012-11-01

    long-range transport of Asian pollutants can enhance the surface concentrations of gases by up to 3% and aerosol species by up to 20% in the Western US.

  12. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    container. It now permits free transit of shipping containers from their western ports, if transported by rail directly to the U.S. ( Mireles , 2005, p...Transportation Industry Study Seminar. Mireles , Richard, Castillo. (2005, January). A Cure for West Coast Congestion. Logistics Today, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 1

  13. Effects of long-range transported acidification on the bio-diversity in terrestrial ecosystems; Effekter av langtransporterte forsuringer paa biodiversitet i terrestriske oekosystemer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeiland, K. [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the environmental effects of long-range transported pollutants on the biodiversity in the terrestrial ecosystems. The paper discusses different chemical substances existing in the atmosphere and their influence on vegetation together with the effects on biodiversity from acidification. 4 refs.

  14. Correlation between Yellow Dust and Radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AIZaabia, Mouza A [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Jik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In East Asia, yellow dust or Asian Dust (AD) outbreaks are among the largest contributors of wind-blown dust that carry natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and subsequently alter their concentration and distribution throughout the environment. Although the Korean Peninsula has been experiencing AD events since ancient times, the research has tended to focus on the transport routes and characteristics of AD, rather than on its impact on radionuclide activity levels. This paper examines the relationship between radionuclide concentration in the air and the frequency of dusty days in South Korea during AD intrusion events. It also investigates whether increased radionuclide concentration is a function of either more mass or more dust contamination. In this study, significant linear correlations of gamma-emitting radionuclides were found with mass of dust and occurrence frequency of AD. Regardless of the source origin of the dust, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 7}Be concentration primarily depended on dust mass in the filter. Nonetheless, the correlations were greatly distorted in 2011 and in the spring season, particularly the correlations with AD days that were far below that of the correlations obtained for the whole study period. A possible explanation of these conflicting results is that a change in the dust source could appreciably alter the concentration, deposition, and distribution of airborne radionuclides.

  15. Systematic Relationships Between Lidar Observables and Sizes And Mineral Composition Of Dust Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Stangl, Alexander; Perlwitz, Jan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Cairns, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of soil dust aerosol particles fundamentally affect their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates on the surface of dust particles, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Lidar measurements, such as extinction-to-backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, are frequently used to distinguish between aerosol types with different physical and chemical properties. The chemical composition of aerosol particles determines their complex refractive index, hence affecting their backscattering properties. Here we present a study on how dust aerosol backscattering and depolarization properties at wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm are related to size and complex refractive index, which varies with the mineral composition of the dust. Dust aerosols are represented by collections of spheroids with a range of prolate and oblate aspect ratios and their optical properties are obtained using T-matrix calculations. We find simple, systematic relationships between lidar observables and the dust size and complex refractive index that may aid the use of space-based or airborne lidars for direct retrieval of dust properties or for the evaluation of chemical transport models using forward simulated lidar variables. In addition, we present first results on the spatial variation of forward-simulated lidar variables based on a dust model that accounts for the atmospheric cycle of eight different mineral types plus internal mixtures of seven mineral types with iron oxides, which was recently implemented in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE2.

  16. Chemical characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols during dust storms over Xi'an in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuxiang; Cao, Junji; Chow, Judith; Han, Yongming; Lee, Shuncheng; Watson, John

    2008-09-01

    Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols including CC (carbonate carbon), OC (organic carbon), and EC (elemental carbon) were investigated at Xi’an, China, near Asian dust source regions in spring 2002. OC varied between 8.2 and 63.7 µg m-3, while EC ranged between 2.4 and 17.2 µ m-3 during the observation period. OC variations followed a similar pattern to EC and the correlation coefficient between OC and EC is 0.89 ( n=31). The average percentage of total carbon (TC, sum of CC, OC, and EC) in PM2.5 during dust storm (DS) events was 13.6%, which is lower than that during non-dust storm (NDS) periods (22.7%). CC, OC, and EC accounted for 12.9%, 70.7%, and 16.4% of TC during DS events, respectively. The average ratio of OC/EC was 5.0 in DS events and 3.3 in NDS periods. The OC-EC correlation ( R 2=0.76, n=6) was good in DS events, while it was stronger ( R 2=0.90, n=25) in NDS periods. The percentage of water-soluble OC (WSOC) in TC accounted for 15.7%, and varied between 13.3% and 22.3% during DS events. The distribution of eight carbon fractions indicated that local emissions such as motor vehicle exhaust were the dominant contributors to carbonaceous particles. During DS events, soil dust dominated the chemical composition, contributing 69% to the PM2.5 mass, followed by organic matter (12.8%), sulfate (4%), EC (2.2%), and chloride (1.6%). Consequently, CC was mainly entrained by Asian dust. However, even in the atmosphere near Asian dust source regions, OC and EC in atmospheric dust were controlled by local emission rather than the transport of Asian dust.

  17. A review of heavy metals in indoor dust and its human health-risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sock Yin; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Abidin, Emilia Zainal; Cheema, Manraj Singh

    2016-12-01

    Indoor dust acts as a media for heavy metal deposition. Past studies have shown that heavy metal concentration in indoor dust is affected by local human activities and atmospheric transport can have harmful effects on human health. Additionally, children are more sensitive to heavy metals due to their hand-to-mouth behaviour and rapid body development. However, limited information on health risks were found in past dust studies as these studies aimed to identify heavy metal concentrations and sources of indoor dust. The objective of this review is to discuss heavy metal concentration and sources influencing its concentration in indoor dust. Accordingly, high lead (Pb) concentration (639.10 μg/g) has been reported in heavy traffic areas. In addition, this review paper aims to estimate the health risk to children from heavy metals in indoor dust via multiple exposure pathways using the health-risk assessment (HRA). Urban areas and industrial sites have revealed high heavy metal concentration in comparison to rural areas. Hazard index (HI) values found in arsenic (As), chromium (Cr) and Pb were 21.30, 1.10 and 2.40, respectively, indicate that non-carcinogenic elements are found in children. Furthermore, most of the past studies have found that carcinogenic risks for As, cadmium (Cd), Cr and Pb were below the acceptable total lifetime cancer risk (TLCR) range (1×10-6-1×10-4). The results of health risk assessment in this review show that carcinogenic risk exists among children. Hence, this proves that future studies need to focus on children's carcinogenic risk in indoor dust studies in order to find out the sources of heavy metals in indoor dust. This review highlights the importance of having the HRA application using bioavailable heavy metal concentration as it provides more accurate health-risk estimation. Moreover, this review is also useful as a reference for policy decision making in protecting children's health.

  18. Seasonal provenance changes in present-day Saharan dust collected in and off Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Carmen A.; van Hateren, Johannes A.; Vogt, Christoph; Fischer, Gerhard; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2017-08-01

    Saharan dust has a crucial influence on the earth climate system and its emission, transport and deposition are intimately related to, e.g., wind speed, precipitation, temperature and vegetation cover. The alteration in the physical and chemical properties of Saharan dust due to environmental changes is often used to reconstruct the climate of the past. However, to better interpret possible climate changes the dust source regions need to be known. By analysing the mineralogical composition of transported or deposited dust, potential dust source areas can be inferred. Summer dust transport off northwest Africa occurs in the Saharan air layer (SAL). In continental dust source areas, dust is also transported in the SAL; however, the predominant dust input occurs from nearby dust sources with the low-level trade winds. Hence, the source regions and related mineralogical tracers differ with season and sampling location. To test this, dust collected in traps onshore and in oceanic sediment traps off Mauritania during 2013 to 2015 was analysed. Meteorological data, particle-size distributions, back-trajectory and mineralogical analyses were compared to derive the dust provenance and dispersal. For the onshore dust samples, the source regions varied according to the seasonal changes in trade-wind direction. Gibbsite and dolomite indicated a Western Saharan and local source during summer, while chlorite, serpentine and rutile indicated a source in Mauritania and Mali during winter. In contrast, for the samples that were collected offshore, dust sources varied according to the seasonal change in the dust transporting air layer. In summer, dust was transported in the SAL from Mauritania, Mali and Libya as indicated by ferroglaucophane and zeolite. In winter, dust was transported with the trades from Western Sahara as indicated by, e.g., fluellite.

  19. Seasonal provenance changes in present-day Saharan dust collected in and off Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Friese

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Saharan dust has a crucial influence on the earth climate system and its emission, transport and deposition are intimately related to, e.g., wind speed, precipitation, temperature and vegetation cover. The alteration in the physical and chemical properties of Saharan dust due to environmental changes is often used to reconstruct the climate of the past. However, to better interpret possible climate changes the dust source regions need to be known. By analysing the mineralogical composition of transported or deposited dust, potential dust source areas can be inferred. Summer dust transport off northwest Africa occurs in the Saharan air layer (SAL. In continental dust source areas, dust is also transported in the SAL; however, the predominant dust input occurs from nearby dust sources with the low-level trade winds. Hence, the source regions and related mineralogical tracers differ with season and sampling location. To test this, dust collected in traps onshore and in oceanic sediment traps off Mauritania during 2013 to 2015 was analysed. Meteorological data, particle-size distributions, back-trajectory and mineralogical analyses were compared to derive the dust provenance and dispersal. For the onshore dust samples, the source regions varied according to the seasonal changes in trade-wind direction. Gibbsite and dolomite indicated a Western Saharan and local source during summer, while chlorite, serpentine and rutile indicated a source in Mauritania and Mali during winter. In contrast, for the samples that were collected offshore, dust sources varied according to the seasonal change in the dust transporting air layer. In summer, dust was transported in the SAL from Mauritania, Mali and Libya as indicated by ferroglaucophane and zeolite. In winter, dust was transported with the trades from Western Sahara as indicated by, e.g., fluellite.

  20. Saharan dust levels in Greece and received inhalation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsakou, C.; Kallos, G.; Papantoniou, N.; Spyrou, C.; Solomos, S.; Astitha, M.; Housiadas, C.

    2008-12-01

    The desert of Sahara is one of the major sources of mineral dust on Earth, producing around 2×108 tons/yr. Under certain weather conditions, dust particles from Saharan desert get transported over the Mediterranean Sea and most of Europe. The limiting values set by the directive EC/30/1999 of European Union can easily be exceeded by the transport of desert dust particles in the south European Region and especially in urban areas, where there is also significant contribution from anthropogenic sources. In this study, the effects of dust transport on air quality in several Greek urban areas are quantified. PM10 concentration values from stationary monitoring stations are compared to dust concentrations for the 4-year period 2003-2006. The dust concentration values in the Greek areas were estimated by the SKIRON modelling system coupled with embedded algorithms describing the dust cycle. The mean annual dust contribution to daily-averaged PM10 concentration values was found to be around or even greater than 10% in the urban areas throughout the years examined. Natural dust transport may contribute by more than 20% to the annual number of exceedances - PM10 values greater than EU limits - depending on the specific monitoring location. In a second stage of the study, the inhaled lung dose received by the residents in various Greek locations is calculated. The particle deposition efficiency of mineral dust at the different parts of the human respiratory tract is determined by applying a lung dosimetry numerical model, which incorporates inhalation dynamics and aerosol physical processes. The inhalation dose from mineral dust particles was greater in the upper respiratory system (extrathoracic region) and less significant in the lungs, especially in the sensitive alveolar region. However, in cases of dust episodes, the amounts of mineral dust deposited along the human lung are comparable to those received during exposure in heavily polluted urban or smoking areas.

  1. The geologic records of dust in the Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Daniel R.

    2013-06-01

    Study of geologic records of dust composition, sources and deposition rates is important for understanding the role of dust in the overall planetary radiation balance, fertilization of organisms in the world's oceans, nutrient additions to the terrestrial biosphere and soils, and for paleoclimatic reconstructions. Both glacial and non-glacial processes produce fine-grained particles that can be transported by the wind. Geologic records of dust flux occur in a number of depositional archives for sediments: (1) loess deposits; (2) lake sediments; (3) soils; (4) deep-ocean basins; and (5) ice sheets and smaller glaciers. These archives have several characteristics that make them highly suitable for understanding the dynamics of dust entrainment, transport, and deposition. First, they are often distributed over wide geographic areas, which permits reconstruction of spatial variation of dust flux. Second, a number of dating methods can be applied to sediment archives, which allows identification of specific periods of greater or lesser dust flux. Third, aeolian sediment particle size and composition can be determined so that dust source areas can be ascertained and dust transport pathways can be reconstructed. Over much of the Earth's surface, dust deposition rates were greater during the last glacial period than during the present interglacial period. A dustier Earth during glacial periods is likely due to increased source areas, greater aridity, less vegetation, lower soil moisture, possibly stronger winds, a decreased intensity of the hydrologic cycle, and greater production of dust-sized particles from expanded ice sheets and glaciers.

  2. Variations in airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes over the Noto Peninsula (Japan) in response to Asian dust events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Hara, Kazutaka; Iwata, Ayumu; Lee, Kevin C.; Kawai, Kei; Kai, Kenji; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Pointing, Stephen B.; Archer, Stephen; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2017-10-01

    Aerosol particles, including airborne microorganisms, are transported through the free troposphere from the Asian continental area to the downwind area in East Asia and can influence climate changes, ecosystem dynamics, and human health. However, the variations present in airborne bacterial communities in the free troposphere over downwind areas are poorly understood, and there are few studies that provide an in-depth examination of the effects of long-range transport of aerosols (natural and anthropogenic particles) on bacterial variations. In this study, the vertical distributions of airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes were investigated and the bacterial variations were compared between dust events and non-dust events.Aerosols were collected at three altitudes from ground level to the free troposphere (upper level: 3000 or 2500 m; middle level: 1200 or 500 m; and low level: 10 m) during Asian dust events and non-dust events over the Noto Peninsula, Japan, where westerly winds carry aerosols from the Asian continental areas. During Asian dust events, air masses at high altitudes were transported from the Asian continental area by westerly winds, and laser imaging detection and ranging (lidar) data indicated high concentrations of non-spherical particles, suggesting that dust-sand particles were transported from the central desert regions of Asia. The air samples collected during the dust events contained 10-100 times higher concentrations of microscopic fluorescent particles and optical particle counter (OPC) measured particles than in non-dust events. The air masses of non-dust events contained lower amounts of dust-sand particles. Additionally, some air samples showed relatively high levels of black carbon, which were likely transported from the Asian continental coasts. Moreover, during the dust events, microbial particles at altitudes of > 1200 m increased to the concentrations ranging from 1. 2 × 106 to 6. 6 × 106 particles m-3. In contrast

  3. Variations in airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes over the Noto Peninsula (Japan in response to Asian dust events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles, including airborne microorganisms, are transported through the free troposphere from the Asian continental area to the downwind area in East Asia and can influence climate changes, ecosystem dynamics, and human health. However, the variations present in airborne bacterial communities in the free troposphere over downwind areas are poorly understood, and there are few studies that provide an in-depth examination of the effects of long-range transport of aerosols (natural and anthropogenic particles on bacterial variations. In this study, the vertical distributions of airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes were investigated and the bacterial variations were compared between dust events and non-dust events.Aerosols were collected at three altitudes from ground level to the free troposphere (upper level: 3000 or 2500 m; middle level: 1200 or 500 m; and low level: 10 m during Asian dust events and non-dust events over the Noto Peninsula, Japan, where westerly winds carry aerosols from the Asian continental areas. During Asian dust events, air masses at high altitudes were transported from the Asian continental area by westerly winds, and laser imaging detection and ranging (lidar data indicated high concentrations of non-spherical particles, suggesting that dust-sand particles were transported from the central desert regions of Asia. The air samples collected during the dust events contained 10–100 times higher concentrations of microscopic fluorescent particles and optical particle counter (OPC measured particles than in non-dust events. The air masses of non-dust events contained lower amounts of dust-sand particles. Additionally, some air samples showed relatively high levels of black carbon, which were likely transported from the Asian continental coasts. Moreover, during the dust events, microbial particles at altitudes of  >  1200 m increased to the concentrations ranging from 1. 2 × 106 to 6

  4. Integrated Study of Dust-air Pollution Interaction over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A.; Metzger, S. M.; Klingmüller, K.; Mamouri, R. E.; Astitha, M.; Ansmann, A.; Hadjimitsis, D.; Barrie, L. A.; Levin, Z.; Lelieveld, J.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of desert dust and air pollution over the Eastern Mediterranean (EM) have been studied, focusing on two distinct dust transport events on 22 and 28 September 2011. The atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC has been used at about 50 km grid spacing on global scale, applying an online dust emission scheme and calcium as a proxy for dust reactivity. EMAC includes a detailed tropospheric chemistry mechanism, aerosol microphysics and thermodynamics schemes to describe dust "aging''. The model is evaluated using ground-based observations for aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth, LIDAR as well as satellite observations. Simulation results and back trajectory analysis show that the development of synoptic disturbances over the EM can enhance dust transport from the Sahara and Arabian deserts in frontal systems that also carry air pollution to the EM. The frontal systems are associated with precipitation that control the dust removal. Our results show the importance of chemical aging of dust, which increases particles size, dust deposition and scavenging efficiency during transport, overall reducing the life-time relative to non-aged dust particles. The relatively long travel periods of Saharan dust result in more sustained aging compared to Arabian dust. Sensitivity simulations indicate three times more dust deposition of aged relative to pristine dust, which significantly decreases the dust lifetime and loading.

  5. Towards numerical forecasting of long-range air transport of birch pollen: theoretical considerations and a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofiev, M; Siljamo, P; Ranta, H; Rantio-Lehtimäki, A

    2006-07-01

    This paper considers the feasibility of numerical simulation of large-scale atmospheric transport of allergenic pollen. It is shown that at least small grains, such as birch pollen, can stay in the air for a few days, which leads to a characteristic scale for their transport of approximately 10(3) km. The analytical consideration confirmed the applicability of existing dispersion models to the pollen transport task and provided some reference parameterizations of the key processes, including dry and wet deposition. The results were applied to the Finnish Emergency Dispersion Modelling System (SILAM), which was then used to analyze pollen transport to Finland during spring time in 2002-2004. Solutions of the inverse problems (source apportionment) showed that the main source areas, from which the birch flowering can affect Finnish territory, are the Baltic States, Russia, Germany, Poland, and Sweden-depending on the particular meteorological situation. Actual forecasting of pollen dispersion required a birch forest map of Europe and a unified European model for birch flowering, both of which were nonexistent before this study. A map was compiled from the national forest inventories of Western Europe and satellite images of broadleaf forests. The flowering model was based on the mean climatological dates for the onset of birch forests rather than conditions of any specific year. Utilization of probability forecasting somewhat alleviated the problem, but the development of a European-wide flowering model remains the main obstacle for real-time forecasting of large-scale pollen distribution.

  6. On the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in the sub-1 keV energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rowan M; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2011-08-01

    The validity of "classic" Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron and positron transport at sub-1 keV energies is investigated in the context of quantum theory. Quantum theory dictates that uncertainties on the position and energy-momentum four-vectors of radiation quanta obey Heisenberg's uncertainty relation; however, these uncertainties are neglected in "classical" MC simulations of radiation transport in which position and momentum are known precisely. Using the quantum uncertainty relation and electron mean free path, the magnitudes of uncertainties on electron position and momentum are calculated for different kinetic energies; a validity bound on the classical simulation of electron transport is derived. In order to satisfy the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, uncertainties of 5% must be assigned to position and momentum for 1 keV electrons in water; at 100 eV, these uncertainties are 17 to 20% and are even larger at lower energies. In gaseous media such as air, these uncertainties are much smaller (less than 1% for electrons with energy 20 eV or greater). The classical Monte Carlo transport treatment is questionable for sub-1 keV electrons in condensed water as uncertainties on position and momentum must be large (relative to electron momentum and mean free path) to satisfy the quantum uncertainty principle. Simulations which do not account for these uncertainties are not faithful representations of the physical processes, calling into question the results of MC track structure codes simulating sub-1 keV electron transport. Further, the large difference in the scale at which quantum effects are important in gaseous and condensed media suggests that track structure measurements in gases are not necessarily representative of track structure in condensed materials on a micrometer or a nanometer scale.

  7. Abundance and Community Structure of Bacteria on Asian Dust Particles Collected in Beijing, China, during the Asian Dust Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Baba, Takashi; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Himezawa, Yuka; Enoki, Kanami; Saraya, Makoto; Li, Pin-Fang; Nasu, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 180 t/km(2) of Asian dust particles are estimated to fall annually on Beijing, China, and there is significant concern about the influence of microbes transported by Asian dust events on human health and downwind ecosystems. In this study, we collected Asian dust particles in Beijing, and analyzed the bacterial communities on these particles by culture-independent methods. Bacterial cells on Asian dust particles were visualized first by laser scanning microscopy, which demonstrated that Asian dust particles carry bacterial cells to Beijing. Bacterial abundance, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was 10(8) to 10(9) cells/g, a value about 10 times higher than that in Asian dust source soils. Inter-seasonal variability of bacterial community structures among Asian dust samples, as compared by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), was low during the Asian dust season. Several viable bacteria, including intestinal bacteria, were found in Asian dust samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Clone library analysis targeting 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences demonstrated that bacterial phylogenetic diversity was high in the dust samples, and most of these were environmental bacteria distributed in soil and air. The dominant species in the clone library was Segetibacter aerophilus (Bacteroidetes), which was first isolated from an Asian dust sample collected in Korea. Our results also indicate the possibility of a change in the bacterial community structure during transportation and increases in desiccation-tolerant bacteria such as Firmicutes.

  8. Clustered long-range transport routes and potential sources of PM2.5 and their chemical characteristics around the Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the spatiotemporal variation, chemical characteristics, source apportionment, and their contribution for clustered transport routes of atmospheric fine particle (PM2.5) around the Taiwan Strait. Atmospheric PM2.5 was simultaneously collected at three selected sampling sites around the Taiwan Strait in the years of 2013-2015. Field sampling results showed that atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations varied with the clustered transport routes. Backward trajectory analyses suggested that PM2.5 concentrations under the northerly wind conditions were generally higher than those under the southerly wind conditions. Chemical analysis results showed that the most abundant chemical composition were secondary inorganic aerosols (SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+), natural crustal materials (Mg, Ca, AL, K, and Fe), and anthropogenic metals (Pb, Ni, and Zn). Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side site located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Furthermore, primary organic carbons (POC) were always higher than secondary organic carbons (SOC) on both sides of the Taiwan Strait. The concentrations of chemical species from the trajectory NWW (southern China) were much higher than other trajectories. Integrating the results obtained from receptor modeling and backward trajectory simulation indicated that high PM2.5 concentrations were transported from North China, the eastern coast of China, Korea Peninsula, and South Japan. It was mainly attributed to the combination of the relatively elevated emissions from coal burning for space heating, and long-range transport (LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT) of PM2.5 from upwind sources. The source apportionment of secondary aerosols were in order of east-side site > offshore site > west-side site, suggesting that aged secondary particles could be formed during the transportation process by longer range and duration toward the east-side site of Taiwan Strait and the offshore site.

  9. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES ( Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  10. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J J.; Deprez, G.; Farrell, William M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m(exp. -1) to 100 kV m(exp. -1) have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m(exp. -1) can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface) MicroARES (Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) Instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  11. Interplanetary transport of solar near-relativistic electrons on 2014 August 1 over a narrow range of heliolongitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study two consecutive solar near-relativistic (>50 keV electron events observed on 2014 August 1 by both STEREO spacecraft with a longitudinal separation of only about 35°. The events were unambiguously associated with a solar source location and not accompanied by type II radio bursts or coronal mass ejections. Despite their close location, the two spacecraft were embedded in different solar wind streams and the electron intensities observed by the two STEREOs showed clear differences in onset times, peak intensities and pitch-angle distributions. The apparently better connected spacecraft, STEREO B, observed a smaller and more isotropic intensity increase and a later event onset time than STEREO A. Since the interplanetary transport conditions of solar energetic particles (SEPs have a direct influence on the characteristics of the observed temporal profiles and the particle anisotropies at the spacecraft location, our aim is to understand if the observations on 2014 August 1 could be explained by different interplanetary transport conditions along each flux tube connecting the spacecraft with the solar source. For that purpose, we use a Monte Carlo interplanetary transport model combined with an inversion procedure to fit the in-situ observations of the two near-relativistic multi-spacecraft electron events. This allows us to obtain the injection profiles at the Sun and infer the transport conditions, which are characterized by the electron radial mean free path, λr. We obtain an almost simultaneous release of electrons for both spacecraft in both events. The release is consistent with the timing and duration of the type III radio burst emission and it is larger for STEREO B, the better connected spacecraft. In addition, we obtain different transport conditions in different solar wind streams. We find that the stream in which STEREO B was embedded was more diffusive (λr = 0.1AU for Event I and λr = 0.06AU for Event II than the

  12. Interplanetary transport of solar near-relativistic electrons on 2014 August 1 over a narrow range of heliolongitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Daniel; Agueda, Neus; Gómez-Herrero, Raúl; Aran, Angels

    2017-11-01

    We study two consecutive solar near-relativistic (>50 keV) electron events observed on 2014 August 1 by both STEREO spacecraft with a longitudinal separation of only about 35°. The events were unambiguously associated with a solar source location and not accompanied by type II radio bursts or coronal mass ejections. Despite their close location, the two spacecraft were embedded in different solar wind streams and the electron intensities observed by the two STEREOs showed clear differences in onset times, peak intensities and pitch-angle distributions. The apparently better connected spacecraft, STEREO B, observed a smaller and more isotropic intensity increase and a later event onset time than STEREO A. Since the interplanetary transport conditions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have a direct influence on the characteristics of the observed temporal profiles and the particle anisotropies at the spacecraft location, our aim is to understand if the observations on 2014 August 1 could be explained by different interplanetary transport conditions along each flux tube connecting the spacecraft with the solar source. For that purpose, we use a Monte Carlo interplanetary transport model combined with an inversion procedure to fit the in-situ observations of the two near-relativistic multi-spacecraft electron events. This allows us to obtain the injection profiles at the Sun and infer the transport conditions, which are characterized by the electron radial mean free path, λr. We obtain an almost simultaneous release of electrons for both spacecraft in both events. The release is consistent with the timing and duration of the type III radio burst emission and it is larger for STEREO B, the better connected spacecraft. In addition, we obtain different transport conditions in different solar wind streams. We find that the stream in which STEREO B was embedded was more diffusive (λr = 0.1AU for Event I and λr = 0.06AU for Event II) than the stream in which STEREO A

  13. Optical characteristics of desert dust over the East Mediterranean during summer: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balis, D.; Amiridis, V.; Kazadzis, S. [Lab. of Atmospheric Physics, Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece); Papayannis, A.; Tsaknakis, G.; Tzortzakis, S. [Lab. of Lasers and Applications, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Kalivitis, N.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N. [Environmental Chemical Processes Lab., Univ. of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Chourdakis, G. [Raymetries SA, Athens (Greece); Nickovic, S. [Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Insular Coastal Dynamics (ICoD), Univ. of Malta (Malta); World Meteorological Organization, Geneva (Switzerland); Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. [Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputacion (BSC-CNS), Earth Sciences Div., Edificio Nexus II, Barcelona (Spain); Drakakis, M. [FORTH-Crete, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2006-07-01

    High aerosol optical depth (AOD) values, larger than 0.6, are systematically observed in the ultraviolet (UV) region both by sunphotometers and lidar systems over Greece during summertime. To study in more detail the characteristics and the origin of these high AOD values, a campaign took place in Greece in the frame of the PHOENICS (particles of human origin extinguishing natural solar radiation in climate systems) and EARLINET (European aerosol lidar network) projects during August-September of 2003, which included simultaneous sunphotometric and lidar measurements at three sites covering the north-south axis of Greece: Thessaloniki, Athens and Finokalia, Crete. Several events with high AOD values have been observed over the measuring sites during the campaign period, many of them corresponding to Saharan dust. In this paper we focused on the event of 30 and 31 August 2003, when a dust layer in the height range of 2000-5000 m, progressively affected all three stations. This layer showed a complex behavior concerning its spatial evolution and allowed us to study the changes in the optical properties of the desert dust particles along their transport due to aging and mixing with other types of aerosol. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio determined on the 30 August 2003 at Thessaloniki was approximately 50 sr, characteristic for rather spherical mineral particles, and the measured color index of 0.4 was within the typical range of values for desert dust. Mixing of the desert dust with other sources of aerosols resulted the next day in overall smaller and less absorbing population of particles with a lidar ratio of 20 sr. Mixing of polluted air-masses originating from northern Greece and Crete and Saharan dust result in very high aerosol backscatter values reaching 7 Mm{sup -1}sr{sup -1} over Finokalia. The Saharan dust observed over Athens followed a different spatial evolution and was not mixed with the boundary layer aerosols mainly originating from local

  14. Optical characteristics of desert dust over the East Mediterranean during summer: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available High aerosol optical depth (AOD values, larger than 0.6, are systematically observed in the Ultraviolet (UV region both by sunphotometers and lidar systems over Greece during summertime. To study in more detail the characteristics and the origin of these high AOD values, a campaign took place in Greece in the frame of the PHOENICS (Particles of Human Origin Extinguishing Natural solar radiation In Climate Systems and EARLINET (European Aerosol Lidar Network projects during August–September of 2003, which included simultaneous sunphotometric and lidar measurements at three sites covering the north-south axis of Greece: Thessaloniki, Athens and Finokalia, Crete. Several events with high AOD values have been observed over the measuring sites during the campaign period, many of them corresponding to Saharan dust. In this paper we focused on the event of 30 and 31 August 2003, when a dust layer in the height range of 2000-5000 m, progressively affected all three stations. This layer showed a complex behavior concerning its spatial evolution and allowed us to study the changes in the optical properties of the desert dust particles along their transport due to aging and mixing with other types of aerosol. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio determined on the 30 August 2003 at Thessaloniki was approximately 50 sr, characteristic for rather spherical mineral particles, and the measured color index of 0.4 was within the typical range of values for desert dust. Mixing of the desert dust with other sources of aerosols resulted the next day in overall smaller and less absorbing population of particles with a lidar ratio of 20 sr. Mixing of polluted air-masses originating from Northern Greece and Crete and Saharan dust result in very high aerosol backscatter values reaching 7 Mm-1 sr-1 over Finokalia. The Saharan dust observed over Athens followed a different spatial evolution and was not mixed with the boundary layer aerosols mainly originating from

  15. Assessing the effect of long-range pollutant transportation on air quality in Seoul using the conditional potential source contribution function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ukkyo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Lee, Yun Gon

    2017-02-01

    It is important to estimate the effects of the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants for efficient and effective strategies to control air quality. In this study, the contributions of trans-boundary transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul, Korea from 2001 to 2014 were estimated based on the conditional potential source contribution function (CPSCF) method. Eastern China was found to be the major source of trans-boundary pollution in Seoul, but moderate sources were also located in northeastern China. The contribution of long-range transport from Japan was negligible. The spatial distributions of the potential source contribution function (PSCF) values of each pollutant showed reasonable consistency with their emission inventory and satellite products. The PSCF values of SO2 and PM10 from eastern China were higher than those of NO2 and CO. The mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul for the period from 2001 to 2014 were 5.34, 37.0, and 619.1 ppb, and 57.4 4 μg/m3, respectively. The contributions of long-range transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul were 0.74, 3.4, and 39.0 ppb, and 12.1 μg/m3, respectively, which are 14%, 9%, 6%, and 21% of the mean concentrations, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of SO2 and NO2 followed statistically significant increasing linear trends (0.5 and 1.6 ppb per decade, respectively), whereas the trends in the annual mean concentrations of CO and PM10 were statistically insignificant. The trends in the ratio of the increased concentrations associated with long-range transport to the annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were statistically insignificant. However, the results indicate that the trans-boundary transport of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 from eastern China consistently affected air quality in Seoul over the study period (2001-2014). Regionally, the effects of the long-range transport of pollutants from Beijing and Harbin

  16. LADEE LUNAR DUST EXPERIMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive bundle includes data taken by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) instrument aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft....

  17. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... furnace filters frequently. Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. When cleaning: Wipe away dust with a damp ... a week. Use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter to help control the dust that vacuuming stirs ...

  18. Construction dust amelioration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Dust produced on seasonal road construction sites in Alaska is both a traffic safety and environmental concern. Dust emanating from : unpaved road surfaces during construction severely reduces visibility and impacts stopping sight distance, and contr...

  19. Impacts of the East Asian Monsoon on springtime dust concentrations over China: IMPACTS OF MONSOON ON DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Sijia [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Yang, Yang [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Xu, Li [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Lamjiri, Maryam A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; DeFlorio, Michael J. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Miller, Arthur J. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Now at Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Liu, Ying [Now at Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Singh, Balwinder [Now at Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-07-12

    We use 150 year preindustrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model to quantify the impacts of the East Asian Monsoon strength on interannual variations of springtime dust concentrations over China. The simulated interannual variations in March-April-May (MAM) dust column concentrations range between 20–40% and 10–60% over eastern and western China, respectively. The dust concentrations over eastern China correlate negatively with the East Asian Monsoon (EAM) index, which represents the strength of monsoon, with a regionally averaged correlation coefficient of 0.64. Relative to the strongest EAM years, MAMdust concentrations in the weakest EAM years are higher over China, with regional relative differences of 55.6%, 29.6%, and 13.9% in the run with emissions calculated interactively and of 33.8%, 10.3%, and 8.2% over eastern, central, and western China, respectively, in the run with prescribed emissions. Both interactive run and prescribed emission run show the similar pattern of climate change between the weakest and strongest EAM years. Strong anomalous northwesterly and westerly winds over the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts during the weakest EAM years result in larger transport fluxes, and thereby increase the dust concentrations over China. These differences in dust concentrations between the weakest and strongest EAM years (weakest-strongest) lead to the change in the net radiative forcing by up to 8 and 3Wm2 at the surface, compared to 2.4 and +1.2Wm2 at the top of the atmosphere over eastern and western China, respectively.

  20. The Fertilizing Role of African Dust in the Amazon Rainforest: A First Multiyear Assessment Based on CALIPSO Lidar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine A.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Omar, Ali; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; hide

    2015-01-01

    The productivity of the Amazon rainforest is constrained by the availability of nutrients, in particular phosphorus (P). Deposition of long-range transported African dust is recognized as a potentially important but poorly quantified source of phosphorus. This study provides a first multiyear satellite-based estimate of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin using three dimensional (3D) aerosol measurements over 2007-2013 from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 to approximately 48) Tg a(exp -1) or 29 (8 to approximately 50) kg ha(exp -1) a(exp -1). The dust deposition shows significant interannual variation that is negatively correlated with the prior-year rainfall in the Sahel. The CALIOP-based multi-year mean estimate of dust deposition matches better with estimates from in-situ measurements and model simulations than a previous satellite-based estimate does. The closer agreement benefits from a more realistic geographic definition of the Amazon Basin and inclusion of meridional dust transport calculation in addition to the 3D nature of CALIOP aerosol measurements. The imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.0060.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 to approximately 39) g P ha(exp -1) a(exp -1) to fertilize the Amazon rainforest. This out-of-Basin P input largely compensates the hydrological loss of P from the Basin, suggesting an important role of African dust in preventing phosphorus depletion on time scales of decades to centuries.

  1. Parameterization of dust emissions in the global atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC: impact of nudging and soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne desert dust influences radiative transfer, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, as well as nutrient transport and deposition. It directly and indirectly affects climate on regional and global scales. Two versions of a parameterization scheme to compute desert dust emissions are incorporated into the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy2.41 Atmospheric Chemistry. One uses a globally uniform soil particle size distribution, whereas the other explicitly accounts for different soil textures worldwide. We have tested these two versions and investigated the sensitivity to input parameters, using remote sensing data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET and dust concentrations and deposition measurements from the AeroCom dust benchmark database (and others. The two versions are shown to produce similar atmospheric dust loads in the N-African region, while they deviate in the Asian, Middle Eastern and S-American regions. The dust outflow from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean is accurately simulated by both schemes, in magnitude, location and seasonality. Approximately 70% of the modelled annual deposition data and 70–75% of the modelled monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD in the Atlantic Ocean stations lay in the range 0.5 to 2 times the observations for all simulations. The two versions have similar performance, even though the total annual source differs by ~50%, which underscores the importance of transport and deposition processes (being the same for both versions. Even though the explicit soil particle size distribution is considered more realistic, the simpler scheme appears to perform better in several locations. This paper discusses the differences between the two versions of the dust emission scheme, focusing on their limitations and strengths in describing the global dust cycle and suggests possible future improvements.

  2. An overview of mineral dust modeling over East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, Jianping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Kang, Litai; Yang, Ben; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yuzhi; Yuan, Tiangang; Wang, Tianhe; Ma, Xiaojun; Zhang, Guolong

    2017-08-01

    Dust aerosol, one of the most abundant aerosol species in the atmosphere, has significant impacts on the energy balance and climatic feedback of the Earth system through its influence on solar and terrestrial radiation as well as clouds. East Asia is the one of prominent regions of dust generation. The East Asia dust life cycle and associated radiative and climatic effects are the outstanding science issues in understanding climate change at regional and even global scale. In the past decades, numerous dust models have been developed and applied to comprehend a series of dust-related processes studies, including emission, transport, and deposition, and to understand the effects of dust aerosol on the radiation and climate over East Asian. In this paper, we review the recent achievements and progresses in East Asian dust modeling research and discuss the potential challenges in future studies.

  3. House-Dust Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C A

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial.

  4. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  5. A SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM SURVEY OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chul [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gwang-Ho, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    We conduct a 350 μ m dust continuum emission survey of 17 dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) at z = 0.05–0.08 with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We detect 14 DOGs with S{sub 350μm} = 114–650 mJy and signal-to-noise > 3. By including two additional DOGs with submillimeter data in the literature, we are able to study dust content for a sample of 16 local DOGs, which consist of 12 bump and four power-law types. We determine their physical parameters with a two-component modified blackbody function model. The derived dust temperatures are in the range 57–122 K and 22–35 K for the warm and cold dust components, respectively. The total dust mass and the mass fraction of the warm dust component are 3–34 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ⊙} and 0.03%–2.52%, respectively. We compare these results with those of other submillimeter-detected infrared luminous galaxies. The bump DOGs, the majority of the DOG sample, show similar distributions of dust temperatures and total dust mass to the comparison sample. The power-law DOGs show a hint of smaller dust masses than other samples, but need to be tested with a larger sample. These findings support that the reason DOGs show heavy dust obscuration is not an overall amount of dust content, but probably the spatial distribution of dust therein.

  6. Investigating Sources of Ozone over California Using AJAX Airborne Measurements and Models: Assessing the Contribution from Long Range Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren

    2017-01-01

    High ozone (O3) concentrations at low altitudes (1.5e4 km) were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on 30 May 2012 off the coast of California (CA). We investigate the causes of those elevated O3 concentrations using airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-Chem simulation shows that the contribution from local sources is likely small. A back trajectory model was used to determine the air mass origins and how much they contributed to the O3 over CA. Low-level potential vorticity (PV) from Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data appears to be a result of the diabatic heating and mixing of airs in the lower altitudes, rather than be a result of direct transport from stratospheric intrusion. The Q diagnostic, which is a measure of the mixing of the air masses, indicates that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that O3 from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S.The back-trajectory model simulation demonstrates the air masses of interest came mostly from the mid troposphere (MT, 76), but the contribution of the lower troposphere (LT, 19) is also significant compared to those from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS, 5). Air coming from the LT appears to be mostly originating over Asia. The possible surface impact of the high O3 transported aloft on the surface O3 concentration through vertical and horizontal transport within a few days is substantiated by the influence maps determined from the Weather Research and Forecasting Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (WRF-STILT) model and the observed increases in surface ozone mixing ratios. Contrasting this complex case with a stratospheric-dominant event emphasizes the contribution of each source to the high O3 concentration in the lower altitudes over CA. Integrated analyses using models, reanalysis, and diagnostic tools, allows high ozone values

  7. On the long-range offshore transport of organic carbon from the Canary Upwelling System to the open North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovecchio, Elisa; Gruber, Nicolas; Münnich, Matthias; Lachkar, Zouhair

    2017-07-01

    A compilation of measurements of net community production (NCP) in the upper waters of the eastern subtropical North Atlantic had suggested net heterotrophic conditions, purportedly supported by the lateral export of organic carbon from the adjacent, highly productive Canary Upwelling System (CanUS). Here, we quantify and assess this lateral export using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) coupled to a nutrient, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model. We employ a new Atlantic telescopic grid with a strong refinement towards the northwestern African shelf to combine an eddy-resolving resolution in the CanUS with a full Atlantic basin perspective. Our climatologically forced simulation reveals an intense offshore flux of organic carbon that transports about 19 Tg C yr-1 away from the nearshore 100 km over the whole CanUS, amounting to more than a third of the NCP in this region. The offshore transport extends beyond 1500 km into the subtropical North Atlantic, adding organic carbon along the way to the upper 100 m at rates of between 8 and 34 % of the alongshore average NCP as a function of offshore distance. Although the divergence of this lateral export of organic carbon enhances local respiration, the upper 100 m layer in our model remains net autotrophic in the entire eastern subtropical North Atlantic. However, the vertical export of this organic carbon and its subsequent remineralization at depth makes the vertically integrated NCP strongly negative throughout this region, with the exception of a narrow band along the northwestern African shelf. The magnitude and efficiency of the lateral export varies substantially between the different subregions. In particular, the central coast near Cape Blanc is particularly efficient in collecting organic carbon on the shelf and subsequently transporting it offshore. In this central subregion, the offshore transport adds as much organic carbon as nearly 60 % of the local NCP to the upper 100

  8. Investigating sources of ozone over California using AJAX airborne measurements and models: Assessing the contribution from long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren

    2017-04-01

    High ozone (O3) concentrations at low altitudes (1.5-4 km) were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on 30 May 2012 off the coast of California (CA). We investigate the causes of those elevated O3 concentrations using airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-Chem simulation shows that the contribution from local sources is likely small. A back-trajectory model was used to determine the air mass origins and how much they contributed to the O3 over CA. Low-level potential vorticity (PV) from Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data appears to be a result of the diabatic heating and mixing of airs in the lower altitudes, rather than be a result of direct transport from stratospheric intrusion. The Q diagnostic, which is a measure of the mixing of the air masses, indicates that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that O3 from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. The back-trajectory model simulation demonstrates the air masses of interest came mostly from the mid troposphere (MT, 76%), but the contribution of the lower troposphere (LT, 19%) is also significant compared to those from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS, 5%). Air coming from the LT appears to be mostly originating over Asia. The possible surface impact of the high O3 transported aloft on the surface O3 concentration through vertical and horizontal transport within a few days is substantiated by the influence maps determined from the Weather Research and Forecasting-Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (WRF-STILT) model and the observed increases in surface ozone mixing ratios. Contrasting this complex case with a stratospheric-dominant event emphasizes the contribution of each source to the high O3 concentration in the lower altitudes over CA. Integrated analyses using models, reanalysis, and diagnostic tools, allows high ozone values

  9. Galaxy simulation with dust formation and destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Hou, Kuan-Chou; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Todoroki, Keita; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2017-04-01

    We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isolated galaxy with a new treatment for dust formation and destruction. To this aim, we treat dust and metal production self-consistently with star formation and supernova (SN) feedback. For dust, we consider a simplified model of grain size distribution by representing the entire range of grain sizes with large and small grains. We include dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by SN shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation and grain disruption by shattering. We find that the assumption of fixed dust-to-metal mass ratio becomes no longer valid when the galaxy is older than 0.2 Gyr, at which point the grain growth by accretion starts to contribute to the non-linear rise of dust-to-gas ratio. As expected in our previous one-zone model, shattering triggers grain growth by accretion since it increases the total surface area of grains. Coagulation becomes significant when the galaxy age is greater than ˜ 1 Gyr; at this epoch, the abundance of small grains becomes high enough to raise the coagulation rate of small grains. We further compare the radial profiles of dust-to-gas ratio (D) and dust-to-metal ratio (D/Z, I.e. depletion) at various ages with observational data. We find that our simulations broadly reproduce the radial gradients of dust-to-gas ratio and depletion. In the early epoch (≲ 0.3 Gyr), the radial gradient of D follows the metallicity gradient with D/Z determined by the dust condensation efficiency in stellar ejecta, while the D gradient is steeper than the Z gradient at the later epochs because of grain growth by accretion. The framework developed in this paper is applicable to any SPH-based galaxy evolution simulations including cosmological ones.

  10. Self-attenuation artifacts and correction factors of light element measurements by X-ray analysis: Implication for mineral dust composition studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Formenti, P; Nava, S; Prati, P; Chevaillier, S; Klaver, A; Lafon, S; Mazzei, F; Calzolai, G; Chiari, M

    2010-01-01

    ...]. This is related to the extension of its size distribution. Dust particles have diameters ranging from fractions to tens of microns, changing in proportion during transport as a result of dry and wet deposition. Various measurements [Schütz, 1987; Formenti et al., 2001; Maring et al., 2003; Garrett et al., 2003] have shown how the coarse fraction gets deple...

  11. Trace gas composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia: Examining the influence of long-range transport and convection of local pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Traud, S.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Hoor, P. M.; Neumaier, M.; Oram, D.; Rauthe-Schöch, A.; Schloegl, S.; Sprung, D.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Wernli, H.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2013-12-01

    Between May 2005 and March 2008 the CARIBIC observatory (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) was deployed to make atmospheric observations during 21 round-trip flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Manila, the Philippines with a stopover in Guangzhou, China. This nearly 3 year flight series provides us with information about atmospheric composition in the free and upper troposphere over Asia during all seasons and was used to investigate seasonal and regional differences in trace gas distributions and the relative influences of long range transport and convected local air masses on composition. The flight route was separated into three different regions having unique characteristics in transport and composition; these were Western Asia (5°E to 70°E), Central Asia (70°E to 100°E) and East Asia (100°E to 125°E). The region over Western Asia was heavily influenced by long range transport of air masses from North America and had elevated levels of NOy and acetone, while the region over East Asia was mostly influenced by convected local (South East Asian) pollution, particularly from biomass/biofuel burning as indicated by high levels of acetonitrile and carbon monoxide. Air masses over Central Asia were found to be influenced by both recently convected air masses from the Indian subcontinent and mid-range transport from Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Elevated levels of propane and other non-methane hydrocarbons, both with and without concommitant elevations in other trace gases (i.e. carbon monoxide, acetonitrile) were a persisent feature of this region in all seasons except summer, and were particularly prominent in fall. Influences on composition over Central Asia were investigated more thoroughly in a case study from a series of flights in October 2006, and elevated levels of pollutants were found to be the result of convective transport of both biomass/biofuel burning and urban emissions from

  12. Long-term variability of dust-storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Ólafur

    2013-04-01

    Iceland is a volcanic island in the North Atlantic Ocean with maritime climate. In spite of moist climate, large areas are with limited vegetation cover where >40% of Iceland is classified with considerable to very severe erosion and 21% of Iceland are volcanic sandy deserts. Natural emissions from these sources influenced by strong winds affect not only regional air quality in Iceland ("Reykjavik haze") but dust particles are transported over the Atlantic ocean and Arctic Ocean > 1000 km at times. The study places Icelandic dust production area into international perspective, present long term frequency of dust storm events in NE Iceland, and estimate dust aerosol concentrations during reported dust events. Meteorological observations with dust presence codes and related visibility were used to identify the frequency and the long-term changes in dust production in NE Iceland. There were annually 16.4 days on average with reported dust observations on weather stations within the NE erosion area, indicating extreme dust plume activity and erosion within the NE deserts, even though the area is covered with snow during the major part of winter. During the 2000s the highest occurrence of dust events in six decades was reported. We have measured saltation and aeolian transport during dust/volcanic ash storms in Iceland which give some of the most intense wind erosion events ever measured. Icelandic dust affects the ecosystems over much of Iceland and causes regional haze. It is likely to affect the ecosystems of the oceans around Iceland, and it brings dust that lowers the albedo of the Icelandic glaciers, increasing melt-off due to global warming. The study indicates that Icelandic dust is not only a substantial source for regional air pollution, but may be considered to contribute to the Arctic haze phenomena and Arctic air pollution.

  13. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV to S(VI by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g, prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous

  14. Climate of Earth-Like Planets With and Without Ocean Heat Transport Orbiting a Range of M and K Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Jablonski, Emma R.; Way, Michael J.; Del Genio, Anthony; Roberge, Aki

    2015-01-01

    The mean surface temperature of a planet is now acknowledged as insufficient to surmise its full potential habitability. Advancing our understanding requires exploration with 3D general circulation models (GCMs), which can take into account how gradients and fluxes across a planet's surface influence the distribution of heat, clouds, and the potential for heterogeneous distribution of liquid water. Here we present 3D GCM simulations of the effects of alternative stellar spectra, instellation, model resolution, and ocean heat transport, on the simulated distribution of heat and moisture of an Earth-like planet (ELP).

  15. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kan; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George; Zhang, Jiachen; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Yanli; Tao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    The response of surface ozone (O3) concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR) analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage between basin-scale SST

  16. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of surface ozone (O3 concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage

  17. Discrimination between long-range transport and local pollution sources and precise delineation of polluted soil layers using integrated geophysical-geochemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, Tadeusz; Szuszkiewisz, Marcin; Szuszkiewicz, Maria; Żogała, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    The primary goal of this work was to distinguish between soil pollution from long-range and local transport of atmospheric pollutants using soil magnetometry in combination with geochemical analyses and precise delineation of polluted soil layers by using integrated magnetic (surface susceptibility, gradiometric measurement) and other geophysical techniques (conductivity and electrical resistivity tomography). The study area was located in the Izery region of Poland (within the "Black Triangle" region, which is the nickname for one of Europe's most polluted areas, where Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic meet). The study area was located in the Forest Glade where the historical local pollution source (glass factory) was active since and of 18th until the end of 19th century. The magnetic signal here was the combination of long-range transport of magnetic particles, local deposition and anthropogenic layers containing ashes and slags and partly comprising the subsoil of modern soil. Application of the set of different geophysical techniques enabled the precise location of these layers. The effect of the long-range pollution transport was observed on a neighboring hill (Granicznik) of which the western, northwestern and southwestern parts of the slope were exposed to the transport of atmospheric pollutants from the Czech Republic and Germany and Poland. Using soil magnetometry, it was possible to discriminate between long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants and anthropogenic pollution related to the former glasswork located in the Forest Glade. The magnetic susceptibility values (κ) as well as the number of "hot-spots" of volume magnetic susceptibility is significantly larger in the Forest Glade than on the Granicznik Hill where the κ is pollution originating from lignite power plants along the Polish border, while the southeastern part of the hill was shielded by crag and tail formation. Also the set of chemical elements connected with magnetic particles

  18. Large Contribution of Coarse Mode to Aerosol Microphysical and Optical Properties: Evidence from Ground-Based Observations of a Transpacific Dust Outbreak at a High-Elevation North American Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Pekour, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Flynn, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Berg, L. K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Beranek, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Zelenyuk, A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Zhao, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Leung, L. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Ma, P. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Riihimaki, L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Fast, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Barnard, J. [University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada; Hallar, A. G. [Storm Peak Laboratory, Desert Research Institute, Steamboat Springs, Colorado; McCubbin, I. B. [Storm Peak Laboratory, Desert Research Institute, Steamboat Springs, Colorado; Eloranta, E. W. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; McComiskey, A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, Colorado; Rasch, P. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-05-01

    Our work is motivated by previous studies of the long-range trans-Atlantic transport of Saharan dust and the observed quasi-static nature of coarse mode aerosol with a volume median diameter (VMD) of approximately 3.5 µm. We examine coarse mode contributions from the trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust to North American aerosol microphysical and optical properties using a dataset collected at the high-elevation, mountain-top Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL, 3.22 km above sea level [ASL]) and the nearby Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF, 2.76 km ASL). Data collected during the SPL Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX, March 2011) are complemented by quasi-global high-resolution model simulations coupled with aerosol chemistry. We identify dust event associated mostly with Asian plume (about 70% of dust mass) where the coarse mode with moderate (~4 µm) VMD is distinct and contributes substantially to aerosol microphysical (up to 70% for total volume) and optical (up to 45% for total scattering and aerosol optical depth) properties. Our results, when compared with previous Saharan dust studies, suggest a fairly invariant behavior of coarse mode dust aerosols. If confirmed in additional studies, this invariant behavior may simplify considerably model parameterizations for complex and size-dependent processes associated with dust transport and removal.

  19. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  20. Ten-year chemical signatures associated with long-range transport observed in the free troposphere over the central North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ten-year observations of trace gases at Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO, a free troposphere site in the central North Atlantic, were classified by transport patterns using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART. The classification enabled identifying trace gas mixing ratios associated with background air and long- range transport of continental emissions, which were defined as chemical signatures. Comparison between the chemical signatures revealed the impacts of natural and anthropogenic sources, as well as chemical and physical processes during long transport, on air composition in the remote North Atlantic. Transport of North American anthropogenic emissions (NA-Anthro and summertime wildfire plumes (Fire significantly enhanced CO and O3 at PMO. Summertime CO enhancements caused by NA-Anthro were found to have been decreasing by a rate of 0.67 ± 0.60 ppbv/year in the ten-year period, due possibly to reduction of emissions in North America. Downward mixing from the upper troposphere and stratosphere due to the persistent Azores-Bermuda anticyclone causes enhanced O3 and nitrogen oxides. The 'd' [O3]/'d' [CO] value was used to investigate O3 sources and chemistry in different transport patterns. The transport pattern affected by Fire had the lowest 'd' [O3]/'d' [CO], which was likely due to intense CO production and depressed O3 production in wildfire plumes. Slightly enhanced O3 and 'd' [O3]/'d' [CO] were found in the background air, suggesting that weak downward mixing from the upper troposphere is common at PMO. Enhancements of both butane isomers were found during upslope flow periods, indicating contributions from local sources. The consistent ratio of butane isomers associated with the background air and NA-anthro implies no clear difference in the oxidation rates of the butane isomers during long transport. Based on observed relationships between non-methane hydrocarbons, the averaged photochemical age of the air masses at

  1. Modeling of long range transport pathways for radionuclides to Korea during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident and their association with meteorological circulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Hong; Yun, Ju-Yong; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-10-01

    The Lagrangian FLEXible PARTicle (FLEXPART) dispersion model and National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Global Forecast System (NCEP/GFS) meteorological data were used to simulate the long range transport pathways of three artificial radionuclides: (131)I, (137)Cs, and (133)Xe, coming into Korean Peninsula during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident. Using emission rates of these radionuclides estimated from previous studies, three distinctive transport routes of these radionuclides toward the Korean Peninsula for a period from 10 March to 20 April 2011 were exploited by three spatial scales: 1) intercontinental scale - plume released since mid-March 2011 and transported to the North to arrive Korea on 23 March 2011, 2) global (hemispherical) scale - plume traveling over the whole northern hemisphere passing through the Pacific Ocean/Europe to reach the Korean Peninsula with relatively low concentrations in late March 2011 and, 3) regional scale - plume released on early April 2011 arrived at the Korean Peninsula via southwest sea of Japan influenced directly by veering mesoscale wind circulations. Our identification of these transport routes at three different scales of meteorological circulations suggests the feasibility of a multi-scale approach for more accurate prediction of radionuclide transport in the study area. In light of the fact that the observed arrival/duration time of peaks were explained well by the FLEXPART model coupled with NCEP/GFS input data, our approach can be used meaningfully as a decision support model for radiation emergency situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Accurate transport simulation of electron tracks in the energy range 1 keV-4 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, V. E-mail: vincent.cobut@chim.u-cergy.fr; Cirioni, L.; Patau, J.P

    2004-01-01

    Multipurpose electron transport simulation codes are widely used in the fields of radiation protection and dosimetry. Broadly based on multiple scattering theories and continuous energy loss stopping powers with some mechanism taking straggling into account, they give reliable answers to many problems. However they may be unsuitable in some specific situations. In fact, many of them are not able to accurately describe particle transport through very thin slabs and/or in high atomic number materials, or also when knowledge of high-resolution depth dose distributions is required. To circumvent these deficiencies, we developed a Monte Carlo code simulating each interaction along electron tracks. Gas phase elastic cross sections are corrected to take into account solid state effects. Inelastic interactions are described within the framework of the Martinez et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 67 (1990) 2955] theory intended to deal with energy deposition in both condensed insulators and conductors. The model described in this paper is validated for some materials as aluminium and silicon, encountered in spectrometric and dosimetric devices. Comparisons with experimental, theoretical and other simulation results are made for angular distributions and energy spectra of transmitted electrons through slabs of different thicknesses and for depth energy distributions in semi-infinite media. These comparisons are quite satisfactory.

  3. Transportes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo Fernández-Cano, Amalio

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available El movimiento de materiales dentro de la Factoría está atendido por tres principales medios de transporte, en consonancia con las características del material y de los desplazamientos. Así se han establecido: sistemas de cintas transportadoras, una red ferroviaria de ancho normal y una completa malla de caminos enlazando funcionalmente las instalaciones.

  4. Quantitative detection of settled coal dust over green canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Sahar, Nir

    2017-04-01

    The main task of environmental and geoscience applications are efficient and accurate quantitative classification of earth surfaces and spatial phenomena. In the past decade, there has been a significant interest in employing spectral unmixing in order to retrieve accurate quantitative information latent in in situ data. Recently, the ground-truth and laboratory measured spectral signatures promoted by advanced algorithms are proposed as a new path toward solving the unmixing problem in semi-supervised fashion. This study presents a practical implementation of field spectroscopy as a quantitative tool to detect settled coal dust over green canopy in free/open environment. Coal dust is a fine powdered form of coal, which is created by the crushing, grinding, and pulverizing of coal. Since the inelastic nature of coal, coal dust can be created during transportation, or by mechanically handling coal. Coal dust, categorized at silt-clay particle size, of particular concern due to heavy metals (lead, mercury, nickel, tin, cadmium, mercury, antimony, arsenic, isotopes of thorium and strontium) which are toxic also at low concentrations. This hazard exposes risk on both environment and public health. It has been identified by medical scientist around the world as causing a range of diseases and health problems, mainly heart and respiratory diseases like asthma and lung cancer. It is due to the fact that the fine invisible coal dust particles (less than 2.5 microns) long lodge in the lungs and are not naturally expelled, so long-term exposure increases the risk of health problems. Numerus studies reported that data to conduct study of geographic distribution of the very fine coal dust (smaller than PM 2.5) and related health impacts from coal exports, is not being collected. Sediment dust load in an indoor environment can be spectrally assessed using reflectance spectroscopy (Chudnovsky and Ben-Dor, 2009). Small amounts of particulate pollution that may carry a signature

  5. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Mohammed, Azad; Massey Simonich, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9–126 ng/m3 (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05–0.71 ng/m3 (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1–3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  6. Simulation of electron transport in GaAs/AlAs superlattices with a small number of periods for the THz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavelyev, D. G., E-mail: pavelev@rf.unn.ru, E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Vasilev, A. P., E-mail: vasiljev@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics, Research and Engineering Center (Russian Federation); Kozlov, V. A., E-mail: kozlov@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Koschurinov, Yu. I.; Obolenskaya, E. S.; Obolensky, S. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M., E-mail: vmust@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The electron transport in superlattices based on GaAs/AlAs heterostructures with a small number of periods (6 periods) is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. These superlattices are used in terahertz diodes for the frequency stabilization of quantum cascade lasers in the range up to 4.7 THz. The band structure of superlattices with different numbers of AlAs monolayers is considered and their current–voltage characteristics are calculated. The calculated current–voltage characteristics are compared with the experimental data. The possibility of the efficient application of these superlattices in the THz frequency range is established both theoretically and experimentally.

  7. Analysis of Long-Range Transport of Carbon Dioxide and Its High Concentration Events over East Asian Region Using GOSAT Data and GEOS-Chem Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Yeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the long-range transport of CO2 in East Asian region, using concentration data in a surface measurement site (Gosan Station, column averaged concentration data of satellite-borne instrument (GOSAT, and GEOS-Chem modeling results for the period of June 2009 to May 2011. We perform a validation of the data from GOSAT and GEOS-Chem with total column observations (TCCON. The analysis of the long-range transport and high concentration (HC events using surface/satellite observations and modeling results is conducted. During the HC events, the concentrations in CO2 and other air pollutants such as SO2 and CO are higher than that of all episodes. It means that CO2, known as a globally well-mixed gas, may also act as a fingerprint of human activity with unique regional characteristics like other air pollutants. This comprehensive analysis, in particular with GOSAT CO2 observation data, shows that CO2 plume with high concentration can be long-range transported with 1-2 days’ duration with regional scale. We can find out with GEOS-Chem tagging simulation that more than 45% of the elevated CO2 concentration over central/eastern China, Korea, and Japan on high concentration days can be explained by emission sources of East Asia mainland.

  8. Cosmic Dust and the Earth's Atmosphere (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s-1), and ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metallic vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke particles (MSPs)". MSPs are too small to sediment downwards and so are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 4 years to reach the surface. Smoke particles play a potentially important role as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere, where they also facilitate freezing of the clouds. There are also potential implications for climate, as the input of bio-available cosmic Fe in the Southern Ocean can increase biological productivity and stimulate CO2 drawdown from the atmosphere. However, current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust mass input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to over 200 tonnes per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there must be serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Furthermore, given this degree of uncertainty, the significance of these potential atmospheric impacts remains speculative. In this lecture I will describe the results of a large study designed to determine the size of the cosmic dust input rate using a self-consistent treatment of cosmic dust from the outer solar system to the Earth's surface. An astronomical model which tracks the evolution of dust from various sources into the inner solar system was combined with a

  9. Laboratory Measurement of the Optical Properties of Hematite and Desert Dust Aerosols to Assess Their Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmuller, H.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Frey, G.; Garro, B.; Engelbrecht, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Globally, aerosol mass emissions and optical depths are dominated by entrained mineral dust. While most minerals occurring in dust aerosols do not absorb solar radiation, some minerals cause significant absorption, thereby lowering the single scatter albedo (SSA) significantly below one, potentially contributing to a warmer and drier atmosphere. Therefore, the optical properties of globally relevant dust aerosols need to be characterized to reduce uncertainties in their radiative forcings. A well-known absorbing component found in dust aerosols is hematite, Fe2O3, which absorbs strongly in the blue-green spectral region, giving some soils, rocks, and dust aerosols their characteristic red color. We discuss measurements of the optical properties of ~30 dust aerosols, including a pure hematite standard, hematite-containing mineral dust standards ranging from 9-34% hematite by mass, and various dust samples collected from around the world. Samples are suspended from aqueous solution and/or from dry atomization with a cyclone re-suspension chamber yielding the fine fraction relevant for long-range transport. Size distributions were characterized with an optical aerosol spectrometer; absorption and scattering coefficients were measured with a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm and with an ultraviolet photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-UV) at 375 nm yielding wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MAC's), SSA's, and wavelength dependent Angstrom exponents. Hematite MAC's are an order of magnitude smaller than those of black carbon (BC) at 405 nm and 532 nm and