WorldWideScience

Sample records for range sound propagation

  1. Sound propagation from a semi-open shooting range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Berg, F. van den

    2011-01-01

    Semi-open shooting ranges, in contrast to a fully open shooting range, are often used in the densely populated area of the Netherlands. The Ministry of Defense operates a number of these ranges. In these shooting ranges above the line of fire a number of screens are situated for safety precautions

  2. Long Range Sound Propagation over Sea: Application to Wind Turbine Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boue, Matieu

    2007-12-13

    The classical theory of spherical wave propagation is not valid at large distances from a sound source due to the influence of wind and temperature gradients that refract, i.e., bend the sound waves. This will in the downwind direction lead to a cylindrical type of wave spreading for large distances (> 1 km). Cylindrical spreading will give a smaller damping with distance as compared to spherical spreading (3 dB/distance doubling instead of 6 dB). But over areas with soft ground, i.e., grass land, the effect of ground reflections will increase the damping so that, if the effect of atmospheric damping is removed, a behavior close to a free field spherical spreading often is observed. This is the standard assumption used in most national recommendations for predicting outdoor sound propagation, e.g., noise from wind turbines. Over areas with hard surfaces, e.g., desserts or the sea, the effect of ground damping is small and therefore cylindrical propagation could be expected in the downwind direction. This observation backed by a limited number of measurements is the background for the Swedish recommendation, which suggests that cylindrical wave spreading should be assumed for distances larger than 200 m for sea based wind turbines. The purpose of this work was to develop measurement procedures for long range sound transmission and to apply this to investigate the occurrence of cylindrical wave spreading in the Baltic Sea. This work has been successfully finished and is described in this report. Another ambition was to develop models for long range sound transmission based on the parabolic equation. Here the work is not finished but must be continued in another project. Long term measurements were performed in the Kalmar strait, Sweden, located between the mainland and Oeland, during 2005 and 2006. Two different directive sound sources placed on a lighthouse in the middle of the strait produced low frequency tones at 80, 200 and 400 Hz. At the reception point on

  3. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  4. Sound Propagation in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith

    Propagation of sound close to the ground outdoors involves geometric spreading, air absorption, interaction with the ground, barriers, vegetation and refraction associated with wind and temperature gradients. After a brief survey of historical aspects of the study of outdoor sound and its applications, this chapter details the physical principles associated with various propagation effects, reviews data that demonstrate them and methods for predicting them. The discussion is concerned primarily with the relatively short ranges and spectra of interest when predicting and assessing community noise rather than the frequencies and long ranges of concern, for example, in infrasonic global monitoring or used for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Specific phenomena that are discussed include spreading losses, atmospheric absorption, diffraction by barriers and buildings, interaction of sound with the ground (ground waves, surface waves, ground impedance associated with porosity and roughness, and elasticity effects), propagation through crops, shrubs and trees, wind and temperature gradient effects, shadow zones and incoherence due to atmospheric turbulence. The chapter concludes by suggesting a few areas that require further research.

  5. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun; Williams, Kevin L; Wang, Zhongkang; Moum, James N

    2008-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an analysis of mid-frequency acoustic transmission data collected at range 550 m during the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment. The acoustic data were collected on a vertical array immediately before, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data collected at a nearby location, a plane-wave model for the nonlinear internal wave's position as a function of time is developed. Experimental results show a new acoustic path is generated as the internal wave passes above the acoustic source.

  6. Simple illustrations of range-dependence and 3-D effects by normal-mode sound propagation modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivansson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, the sound-speed profile has significant effects on underwater acoustic sound propagation. These effects can be quantified by normal-mode models, for example. The basic case is a laterally homogeneous medium, for which the sound speed and the density depend on depth only and not on horizontal position. Effects of horizontal medium-parameter variation can be quantified by coupled-mode models, with coupling between mode expansions for laterally homogeneous parts of the medium. In the present paper, these effects are illustrated for media with a particularly simple horizontal parameter variation such that mode shapes do not vary with horizontal position. The modal wavenumbers depend on horizontal position, however. At a vertical interface between regions with laterally homogeneous medium parameters, each mode is reflected as well as transmitted. For the media considered, reflection and transmission coefficients can be computed separately for each mode without mode coupling, and this is done recu...

  7. Propagation of sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Magnus; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    As an acoustic signal travels from the source to a receiver, it is affected by a variety of physical processes, all dictated by properties of the signal and the environment. The signal energy is weakened by geometric attenuation as well as absorption by the medium. The temporal and spectral prope...... communication sounds for airborne acoustics and bottom and surface effects for underwater sounds. Refraction becomes very important close to shadow zones. For echolocation signals, geometric attenuation and sound absorption have the largest effects on the signals....

  8. Sound propagation in fluids and neutron spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilhof, M.J.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1984-01-01

    Using a model kinetic equation the properties of very short wavelength sound modes in fluids are studied over a wide range of wavenumbers and densities. The main features, in particular propagation gaps at high densities, agree with those found in real fluids and molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  10. Anisotropy and sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    Sound propagation in glass wool is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical computation of attenuation and phase velocity for plane, harmonic waves will be presented. Glass wool is a highly anisotropic material, and sound waves propagating in different directions in the material...... by regarding it as a continuous medium described by its elastic moduli and mass density. The computed attenuation of sound waves, for frequencies 50–5000 Hz, will be compared with experimental results for glass wool with fiber diameters of 6.8 micrometers, mass density of 15 and 30 kg/m3, and elastic moduli...... of 2000 and 16 000 Pa (sound wave vector perpendicular to fibers)....

  11. Benchmark cases for outdoor sound propagation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attenborough, K.; Taherzadeh, S.; Bass, H.E.; Di, X.; Raspet, R.; Becker, G.R.; Gdesen, A.; Chrestman, A.; Daigle, G.A.; Esp‚rance, A. L; Gabillet, Y.; Gilbert, K.E.; Li, Y.L.; White, J.; Naz, P.; Noble, J.M.; Hoof, H.A.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The computational tools available for prediction of sound propagation through the atmosphere have increased dramatically during the past decade. The numerical techniques include analytical solutions for selected index of refraction profiles, ray trace techniques which include interaction with a

  12. Measurements of anisotropic sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    The attenuation coefficient and phase velocity of plane sound waves propagating in three perpendicular directions in glass wool were measured in the frequency range 50–10 000 Hz. For glass wool of mass density 14 kg/m3 at the frequency 1000 Hz, the attenuation constant for propagation perpendicular...

  13. Wind Turbine Noise and Natural Sounds: Masking, Propagation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolin, Karl

    2009-05-15

    Wind turbines are an environmentally friendly and sustainable power source. Unfortunately, the noise impact can cause deteriorated living conditions for nearby residents. The audibility of wind turbine sound is influenced by ambient sound. This thesis deals with some aspects of noise from wind turbines. Ambient sounds influence the audibility of wind turbine noise. Models for assessing two commonly occurring natural ambient sounds namely vegetation sound and sound from breaking waves are presented in paper A and B. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to long range measurements of sound propagation in paper C. Psycho-acoustic tests evaluating the threshold and partial loudness of wind turbine noise when mixed with natural ambient sounds have been performed. These are accounted for in paper D. The main scientific contributions are the following.Paper A: A semi-empiric prediction model for vegetation sound is proposed. This model uses up-to-date simulations of wind profiles and turbulent wind fields to estimate sound from vegetation. The fluctuations due to turbulence are satisfactory estimated by the model. Predictions of vegetation sound also show good agreement to measured spectra. Paper B: A set of measurements of air-borne sound from breaking waves are reported. From these measurements a prediction method of sound from breaking waves is proposed. Third octave spectra from breaking waves are shown to depend on breaker type. Satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements has been achieved. Paper C: Long range sound propagation over a sea surface was investigated. Measurements of sound transmission were coordinated with local meteorological measurements. A sound propagation algorithm has been compared to the measured sound transmission. Satisfactory agreement between measurements and predictions were achieved when turbulence were taken into consideration in the computations. Paper D: The paper investigates the interaction between wind

  14. Sound Propagation An impedance Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-01-01

    In Sound Propagation: An Impedance Based Approach , Professor Yang-Hann Kim introduces acoustics and sound fields by using the concept of impedance. Kim starts with vibrations and waves, demonstrating how vibration can be envisaged as a kind of wave, mathematically and physically. One-dimensional waves are used to convey the fundamental concepts. Readers can then understand wave propagation in terms of characteristic and driving point impedance. The essential measures for acoustic waves, such as dB scale, octave scale, acoustic pressure, energy, and intensity, are explained. These measures are

  15. Sound propagation over rigid porous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorth, Craig

    Two related topics are discussed: (1) the measurement of the acoustical characteristics of rigid porous materials, that is the impedance and propagation constant; and (2) the propagation of sound over the surface of a hard backed layer of such a material. A review of impedance measurement leads to the selection of an indirect method which is employed successfully on a wide range of surfaces. A numerical comparison of impedance models follows including a one-parameter semi-empirical model, a phenomenological model, and a microstructural model which relates several physical parameters of a material to the acoustical properties of a surface. The models differ in their prediction of the acoustical properties of a low porosity material. A numerical comparison of the solutions of point source propagation in the presence of a porous media indicates that the 'extended' Weyl van der Pol approximation is reliable over short source receiver distances. The study is extended to examine the phenomenon of the acoustical surface wave. Three experimental techniques are used to produce new evidence for the existence of such a wave which shows good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The indirect method is used to obtain impedances and model parameters for a wide variety of surfaces varying from soils to fiberglass and which are compared with the results of an impedance technique and with standing wave tube measurements. The indirect method of impedance is employed together with the microstructural model and the propagation model examined earlier in studies of the acoustical properties of porous road surfaces. It proves possible to use the indirect method both to determine the microstructural parameters and to classify the acoustical properties of such a previous surface when the sound source is either a loudspeaker point source or a vehicle. The results of the parameter determination are validated by a series of non-acoustical measurements. With regard only to the excess

  16. Propagation of sound in oceans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Advilkar, P.J.

    to him for motivating me towards new ideas and I take this opportunity to express my indebtedness and respect to him. I would like to thank The Director of NIO, Dr. Satish Shetye for giving me a golden opportunity to carry out my internship in such a.... Thus, there are many reasons to study the oceans and benefit from it. Oceanographers map the sea floor features by using an echo- sounder. It emits sound pulses from the ship towards the bottom from where they are reflected to the surface...

  17. Random matrix theory for underwater sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewisch, K. C.; Tomsovic, S.

    2012-02-01

    Ocean acoustic propagation can be formulated as a wave guide with a weakly random medium generating multiple scattering. Twenty years ago, this was recognized as a quantum chaos problem, and yet random matrix theory, one pillar of quantum or wave chaos studies, has never been introduced into the subject. The modes of the wave guide provide a representation for the propagation, which in the parabolic approximation is unitary. Scattering induced by the ocean's internal waves leads to a power-law random banded unitary matrix ensemble for long-range deep-ocean acoustic propagation. The ensemble has similarities, but differs, from those introduced for studying the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The resulting long-range propagation ensemble statistics agree well with those of full wave propagation using the parabolic equation.

  18. Non-Line of Sight Sound Propagation Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chulsoo

    The parabolic equation (PE) method is a useful tool for describing outdoor sound propagation over flat, open, locally reacting ground with a realistic sound speed variation with altitude. The polar parabolic equation (POPE) method is presented here which is an extension of the PE to allow for propagation over irregular terrain (hills). A coordinate system which uses distance along the ground surface and height perpendicular to the surface is introduced into the PE. To verify the numerical accuracy of POPE, computational results are compared to the residue series solution for propagation over a curved surface with a homogeneous atmosphere and to results from a conformal mapping method. The results agree to within one dB. For sound propagation over a 30 m high smooth hill, POPE has been used to calculate transmission loss (TL) for constant sound speed profiles and for upward and downward refracting sound speed profiles. POPE calculations are compared to the experimental data from the Terrain Masking Experiment performed in the vicinity of Instrument Hill at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. POPE calculations predict a rapidly decreasing sound level along the masked side of the hill. The field far behind the hill becomes almost constant in level or decreases slowly with distance. The calculation predicts that rays shed along the hillside contribute to the sound level behind the hill and shows that the field level along the ground beyond the base of a hill is determined by the superposition of shedding of rays from the creeping wave and a wave along the flat surface. This effect is strongly affected by the hill shape (hillside) and ground impedance of the hill.

  19. Sound propagation in a continuously stratified laboratory ocean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L

    2017-05-01

    The propagation of sound in a density-stratified fluid is examined in an experiment with a tank of salty water whose density increases continuously from the fluid surface to the tank bottom. Measurements of the height dependence of the fluid density are used to calculate the height dependence of the fluid salinity and sound speed. The height-dependent sound speed is then used to calculate the refraction of sound rays. Sound propagation in the fluid is measured in three dimensions and compared with the ray analysis. This study provides a basis for laboratory modeling of underwater sound propagation in the fluctuating stratified oceans.

  20. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraille, O; Luding, S

    2008-11-01

    Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed in dense granular media with a narrow polydisperse size-distribution and a linear contact-force law. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves, is examined. A size variation comparable to the typical contact deformation already changes sound propagation considerably. The transmission spectrum becomes discontinuous, i.e., a lower frequency band is transmitted well, while higher frequencies are not, possibly due to attenuation and scattering. This behaviour is qualitatively reproduced for (i) Hertz non-linear contacts, for (ii) frictional contacts, (iii) for a range of smaller amplitudes, or (iv) for larger systems. This proves that the observed wave propagation and dispersion behaviour is intrinsic and not just an artifact of (i) a linear model, (ii) a frictionless packing, (iii) a large amplitude non-linear wave, or (iv) a finite size effect.

  1. A Nondimensional Parameterization for Sound Propagation in the Atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mungiole, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Parabolic equation (PE) techniques have been successfully used to obtain numerical solutions of sound pressure attenuation in which sound propagation is affected by turbulence and vertical gradients in wind and temperature...

  2. The parabolic equation method for outdoor sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arranz, Marta Galindo

    The parabolic equation method is a versatile tool for outdoor sound propagation. The present study has focused on the Cranck-Nicolson type Parabolic Equation method (CNPE). Three different applications of the CNPE method have been investigated. The first two applications study variations...... of the ground in a homogeneous atmosphere. Propagation of sound above a mixed impedance ground and up-slope sound propagation is investigated. In the third application the influence of the atmosphere is studied, characterized and implemented in the CNPE-model. The refraction of the sound due to the wind...

  3. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  4. The propagation of sound in nonuniform and unsteady flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    Spectral broadening and directivity are studied in sound propagation across turbulent regions and irregular interfaces. The random acoustical field and spectral directivity are calculated. The spectral forms, which depend on the attenuation factor of each acoustic wave component and on the effects of interference, have either a maximum at the frequency source and a continuous band at lower frequencies and ultrasound, or a maximum with side bands in the range of audible frequencies. Based on this analysis, which follows in principle the theory of Campos (1978), it is possible to predict the noise levels of hot high-speed jets, subsonic aircraft, and the supersonic aircraft (e.g., the Concorde).

  5. Sound propagation through a variable area duct - Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of experiment and theory has been made for the propagation of sound through a variable area axisymmetric duct with zero mean flow. Measurement of the acoustic pressure field on both sides of the constricted test section was resolved on a modal basis for various spinning mode sources. Transmitted and reflected modal amplitudes and phase angles were compared with finite element computations. Good agreement between experiment and computation was obtained over a wide range of frequencies and modal transmission variations. The study suggests that modal transmission through a variable area duct is governed by the throat modal cut-off ratio.

  6. An investigation of underwater sound propagation from pile driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The underwater noise from impact pile driving was studied by using a finite element model for the sound generation and a parabolic equation model for propagation. Results were compared with measurements taken with a vertical line array deployed durin...

  7. Time-domain simulations of sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over an impedance ground

    OpenAIRE

    Cotté, Benjamin; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Finite-difference time-domain simulations of broadband sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere are presented. A method recently proposed to obtain an impedance time-domain boundary condition is implemented in a linearized Euler equations solver, which enables to study long range sound propagation over an impedance ground. Some features of the pressure pulse evolution with time are analyzed in both upward-and downward-refracting conditions, and the time-domain simu...

  8. Interactive Sound Propagation using Precomputation and Statistical Approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Lakulish

    Acoustic phenomena such as early reflections, diffraction, and reverberation have been shown to improve the user experience in interactive virtual environments and video games. These effects arise due to repeated interactions between sound waves and objects in the environment. In interactive applications, these effects must be simulated within a prescribed time budget. We present two complementary approaches for computing such acoustic effects in real time, with plausible variation in the sound field throughout the scene. The first approach, Precomputed Acoustic Radiance Transfer, precomputes a matrix that accounts for multiple acoustic interactions between all scene objects. The matrix is used at run time to provide sound propagation effects that vary smoothly as sources and listeners move. The second approach couples two techniques---Ambient Reverberance, and Aural Proxies---to provide approximate sound propagation effects in real time, based on only the portion of the environment immediately visible to the listener. These approaches lie at different ends of a space of interactive sound propagation techniques for modeling sound propagation effects in interactive applications. The first approach emphasizes accuracy by modeling acoustic interactions between all parts of the scene; the second approach emphasizes efficiency by only taking the local environment of the listener into account. These methods have been used to efficiently generate acoustic walkthroughs of architectural models. They have also been integrated into a modern game engine, and can enable realistic, interactive sound propagation on commodity desktop PCs.

  9. Calculation of sound propagation in fibrous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements.......Calculations of attenuation and velocity of audible sound waves in glass wools are presented. The calculations use only the diameters of fibres and the mass density of glass wools as parameters. The calculations are compared with measurements....

  10. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  11. Direct FVM Simulation for Sound Propagation in an Ideal Wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sound propagation in a wedge-shaped waveguide with perfectly reflecting boundaries is one of the few range-dependent problems with an analytical solution. This provides a benchmark for the theoretical and computational studies on the simulation of ocean acoustic applications. We present a direct finite volume method (FVM simulation for the ideal wedge problem, and both time and frequency domain results are analyzed. We also study the broadband problem with large-scale parallel simulations. The results presented in this paper validate the accuracy of the numerical techniques and show that the direct FVM simulation could be applied to large-scale complex acoustic applications with a high performance computing platform.

  12. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  13. Measurement of sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1995-01-01

    A new acoustic method for directly measuring the flow resistance, and the compressibility of fibrous materials such as glass wool, is given. Measured results for monochromatic sound in glass wool are presented and compared with theoretically calculated results. The agreement between experimental...... results and theory is good. Results of measurements of characteristic impedance, attenuation, and phase shift for plane monochromatic traveling waves are presented and compared with theoretically calculated ones. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results was found....

  14. Simulation of sound waves using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid flow: Benchmark cases for outdoor sound propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Lohman, W.J.A.; Zhou, H.

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases:

  15. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  16. Validation of an Efficient Outdoor Sound Propagation Model Using BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirós-Alpera, S.; Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda; Jacobsen, Finn

    2001-01-01

    An approximate, simple and practical model for prediction of outdoor sound propagation exists based on ray theory, diffraction theory and Fresnel-zone considerations [1]. This model, which can predict sound propagation over non-flat terrain, has been validated for combinations of flat ground, hills...... and barriers, but it still needs to be validated for configurations that involve combinations of valleys and barriers. In order to do this a boundary element model has been implemented in MATLAB to serve as a reliable reference....

  17. Improved Green's function parabolic equation method for atmospheric sound propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The numerical implementation of the Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) method for atmospheric sound propagation is discussed. Four types of numerical errors are distinguished: (i) errors in the forward Fourier transform; (ii) errors in the inverse Fourier transform; (iii) errors in the

  18. Noise barriers and the harmonoise sound propagation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Maercke, D. van; Randrianoelina, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Harmonoise sound propagation model ('the Harmonoise engineering model') was developed in the European project Harmonoise (2001-2004) for road and rail traffic noise. In 2008, CSTB Grenoble and TNO Delft have prepared a detailed description of the various steps involved in a calculation with the

  19. On the development of approximate models for outdoor sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1998-01-01

    The suitable prediction model for outdoor sound propagation depends on the situation and the application. Computationally intensive method such as Parabolic Equation methods, FFP methods and Boundary Element Methods all have advantages in certain situations. None of these approaches are at present...

  20. Focused sound from three-dimensional sound propagation effects over a submarine canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Chen, Chi-Fang; Duda, Timothy F; Calder, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Ship noise data reveal an intensification of the near-surface sound field over a submarine canyon. Numerical modeling of sound propagation is used to study the effect. The noise data were collected during an ocean acoustic and physical oceanography experiment northeast of Taiwan in 2009. In situ measurements of water sound-speed profiles and a database of high-resolution bathymetry are used in the modeling study. The model results suggest that the intensification is caused by three-dimensional sound focusing by the concave canyon seafloor. Uncertainties in the model results from unsampled aspects of the environment are discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  1. Time-domain simulations of sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over an impedance ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotté, Benjamin; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    Finite-difference time-domain simulations of broadband sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere are presented. A method recently proposed to obtain an impedance time-domain boundary condition is implemented in a linearized Euler equations solver, which enables to study long range sound propagation over an impedance ground. Some features of the pressure pulse evolution with time are analyzed in both upward-and downward-refracting conditions, and the time-domain simulations are compared to parabolic equation calculations in the frequency domain to show the effectiveness of the proposed impedance boundary condition.

  2. Sound propagation over screened ground under upwind conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1996-01-01

    A screen on an absorbing ground is investigated experimentally and theoretically under upwind conditions. The experimental data are the result of scale model experiments in a 1:25 scale model. The sound propagation is measured using a triggered spark source with signal spectrum averaging...... in the frequency domain. The meteorological data representing the wind conditions have been determined by means of hot-wire anemometry in positions on both sides of the screen as well as directly over the screen. The theoretical model used for comparison is a hybrid approach. The sound field without a barrier...... the calculation model are able to explain the overall tendency in the experimental results....

  3. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Erik M; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing.

  4. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  5. Sound propagation from a ridge wind turbine across a valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Sound propagation outdoors can be strongly affected by ground topography. The existence of hills and valleys between a source and receiver can lead to the shielding or focusing of sound waves. Such effects can result in significant variations in received sound levels. In addition, wind speed and air temperature gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer also play an important role. All of the foregoing factors can become especially important for the case of wind turbines located on a ridge overlooking a valley. Ridges are often selected for wind turbines in order to increase their energy capture potential through the wind speed-up effects often experienced in such locations. In this paper, a hybrid calculation method is presented to model such a case, relying on an analytical solution for sound diffraction around an impedance cylinder and the conformal mapping (CM) Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) technique. The various aspects of the model have been successfully validated against alternative prediction methods. Example calculations with this hybrid analytical-CM-GFPE model show the complex sound pressure level distribution across the valley and the effect of valley ground type. The proposed method has the potential to include the effect of refraction through the inclusion of complex wind and temperature fields, although this aspect has been highly simplified in the current simulations. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  6. Sound propagation from a ridge wind turbine across a valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy

    2017-04-13

    Sound propagation outdoors can be strongly affected by ground topography. The existence of hills and valleys between a source and receiver can lead to the shielding or focusing of sound waves. Such effects can result in significant variations in received sound levels. In addition, wind speed and air temperature gradients in the atmospheric boundary layer also play an important role. All of the foregoing factors can become especially important for the case of wind turbines located on a ridge overlooking a valley. Ridges are often selected for wind turbines in order to increase their energy capture potential through the wind speed-up effects often experienced in such locations. In this paper, a hybrid calculation method is presented to model such a case, relying on an analytical solution for sound diffraction around an impedance cylinder and the conformal mapping (CM) Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) technique. The various aspects of the model have been successfully validated against alternative prediction methods. Example calculations with this hybrid analytical-CM-GFPE model show the complex sound pressure level distribution across the valley and the effect of valley ground type. The proposed method has the potential to include the effect of refraction through the inclusion of complex wind and temperature fields, although this aspect has been highly simplified in the current simulations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Numerical Models for Sound Propagation in Long Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chenly Yuen Cheung

    Both reverberation time and steady-state sound field are the key elements for assessing the acoustic condition in an enclosed space. They affect the noise propagation, speech intelligibility, clarity index, and definition. Since the sound field in a long space is non diffuse, classical room acoustics theory does not apply in this situation. The ray tracing technique and the image source methods are two common models to fathom both reverberation time and steady-state sound field in long enclosures nowadays. Although both models can give an accurate estimate of reverberation times and steady-state sound field directly or indirectly, they often involve time-consuming calculations. In order to simplify the acoustic consideration, a theoretical formulation has been developed for predicting both steady-state sound fields and reverberation times in street canyons. The prediction model is further developed to predict the steady-state sound field in a long enclosure. Apart from the straight long enclosure, there are other variations such as a cross junction, a long enclosure with a T-intersection, an U-turn long enclosure. In the present study, an theoretical and experimental investigations were conducted to develop formulae for predicting reverberation times and steady-state sound fields in a junction of a street canyon and in a long enclosure with T-intersection. The theoretical models are validated by comparing the numerical predictions with published experimental results. The theoretical results are also compared with precise indoor measurements and large-scale outdoor experimental results. In all of previous acoustical studies related to long enclosure, most of the studies are focused on the monopole sound source. Besides non-directional noise source, many noise sources in long enclosure are dipole like, such as train noise and fan noise. In order to study the characteristics of directional noise sources, a review of available dipole source was conducted. A dipole was

  8. Identifying Students' Mental Models of Sound Propagation: The Role of Conceptual Blending in Understanding Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    We investigated introductory physics students' mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the "Entity" model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity,…

  9. Harnessing Deformation to Switch On and Off the Propagation of Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Sahab; Viard, Nicolas; Wang, Pai; Fang, Nicholas X; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-02-24

    A new class of architected materials is designed to control the propagation of sound. The proposed system comprises an array of elastomeric helices in background air and is characterized by frequency ranges of strong wave attenuation (bandgaps) in the undeformed configuration. Upon axially stretching the helices, such bandgaps are suppressed, enabling the design of a new class of acoustic switch. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Comparisons between physics-based, engineering, and statistical learning models for outdoor sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Carl R; Reznicek, Nathan J; Wilson, D Keith; Pettit, Chris L; Nykaza, Edward T

    2016-05-01

    Many outdoor sound propagation models exist, ranging from highly complex physics-based simulations to simplified engineering calculations, and more recently, highly flexible statistical learning methods. Several engineering and statistical learning models are evaluated by using a particular physics-based model, namely, a Crank-Nicholson parabolic equation (CNPE), as a benchmark. Narrowband transmission loss values predicted with the CNPE, based upon a simulated data set of meteorological, boundary, and source conditions, act as simulated observations. In the simulated data set sound propagation conditions span from downward refracting to upward refracting, for acoustically hard and soft boundaries, and low frequencies. Engineering models used in the comparisons include the ISO 9613-2 method, Harmonoise, and Nord2000 propagation models. Statistical learning methods used in the comparisons include bagged decision tree regression, random forest regression, boosting regression, and artificial neural network models. Computed skill scores are relative to sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere over a rigid ground. Overall skill scores for the engineering noise models are 0.6%, -7.1%, and 83.8% for the ISO 9613-2, Harmonoise, and Nord2000 models, respectively. Overall skill scores for the statistical learning models are 99.5%, 99.5%, 99.6%, and 99.6% for bagged decision tree, random forest, boosting, and artificial neural network regression models, respectively.

  11. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    Sound propagation techniques model the effect of the environment on sound waves and predict their behavior from point of emission at the source to the final point of arrival at the listener. Sound is a pressure wave produced by mechanical vibration of a surface that propagates through a medium such as air or water, and the problem of sound propagation can be formulated mathematically as a second-order partial differential equation called the wave equation. Accurate techniques based on solving the wave equation, also called the wave-based techniques, are too expensive computationally and memory-wise. Therefore, these techniques face many challenges in terms of their applicability in interactive applications including sound propagation in large environments, time-varying source and listener directivity, and high simulation cost for mid-frequencies. In this dissertation, we propose a set of efficient wave-based sound propagation techniques that solve these three challenges and enable the use of wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications. Firstly, we propose a novel equivalent source technique for interactive wave-based sound propagation in large scenes spanning hundreds of meters. It is based on the equivalent source theory used for solving radiation and scattering problems in acoustics and electromagnetics. Instead of using a volumetric or surface-based approach, this technique takes an object-centric approach to sound propagation. The proposed equivalent source technique generates realistic acoustic effects and takes orders of magnitude less runtime memory compared to prior wave-based techniques. Secondly, we present an efficient framework for handling time-varying source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation. The source directivity is represented as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic sources. This spherical harmonic-based representation of source directivity can support analytical, data

  12. Identifying students’ mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change

    OpenAIRE

    Zdeslav Hrepic; Zollman, Dean A; N. Sanjay Rebello

    2010-01-01

    We investigated introductory physics students’ mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the “Entity” model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the medium through which it propagates. All other observed alternative models contain elements of both Entity and Wave models, but at the same time are...

  13. Effects of internal waves on sound propagation in the shallow waters of the continental shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Ming Yi

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Sound waves propagating through the oceans are refracted by internal waves. In the shallow waters of the continental shelves, an additional downward refraction of sound waves due to internal waves can cause them to interact more often with the seabed, resulting in additional energy from the sound waves being dissipated into the seabed. This study investigates how internal waves affect sound propagation on the continental shelves. It fi...

  14. Effects of wind turbine wake on atmospheric sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine considering the effects of wake-induced velocity deficit and turbulence. In order to address this issue, an advanced approach was developed in which both scalar and vector parabolic equations in two dimensions are solved. Flow...... source. Unsteady acoustic simulations were carried out with the AL/LES input for three cases with different incoming turbulence intensity, and a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The results show a non-negligible effect of the wake on far-field noise prediction. Particularly...... under stable atmospheric conditions, SPL amplification reaches up to 7.5dB at the wake centre. Furthermore, it was observed that when the turbulence intensity level of the incoming flow is higher, the SPL difference between the moving and the steady source is lower....

  15. On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Pijpers, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the soun...

  16. Nonlinear theory of shocked sound propagation in a nearly choked duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, M. K.; Callegari, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of shocks in the sound field propagating through a nearly choked duct flow is analyzed by extending a quasi-one dimensional theory. The theory is applied to the case in which sound is introduced into the flow by an acoustic source located in the vicinity of a near-sonic throat. Analytical solutions for the field are obtained which illustrate the essential features of the nonlinear interaction between sound and flow. Numerical results are presented covering ranges of variation of source strength, throat Mach number, and frequency. It is found that the development of shocks leads to appreciable attenuation of acoustic power transmitted upstream through the near-sonic flow. It is possible, for example, that the power loss in the fundamental harmonic can be as much as 90% of that introduced at the source.

  17. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  18. Parameter selection in the Green's function parabolic equation for outdoor sound propagation over varied terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    2003-10-01

    There is a need for a method to predict the attenuation of sound over a varied terrain and for realistic weather conditions. Parabolic equation based propagation codes can deal successfully with a sound speed that is a function of height (as could be caused by wind or temperature gradients) as well as varying ground heights and impedances. The ability to predict the received sound levels for a set of digitized terrain and sound speed data is desired. The accuracy of the Green's function parabolic equation (GFPE) has already been confirmed for propagation over flat ground with a slowly varying sound speed profile and/or with atmospheric turbulence. The approach here will be to compare to a benchmark solution for each different kind of terrain (i.e. flat, slope, step, barrier) with constant sound speed to verify the numeric code and to define the limits of accuracy in the GFPE for these situations. The GFPE is based on a one-way wave equation, so the numerical model will not be able to accurately predict the pressure behind multiple barriers or for other situations in which backward reflections can affect the received pressure. We will define the additional limits to the applicability of this model based on many comparisons with analytical solutions for propagation beyond barriers with constant sound speed. The sloping terrain will be treated as a series of stairsteps---a digitized ground height. Buildings and steps will be merely larger stairsteps. Although the GFPE has already been documented, as well as wide angle parabolic equations (PEs) and PEs using conformal mapping or similar rudimentary stair-stepping terrain maps, a PE that works with large discontinuities has not been documented, nor has there been work on a propagation model over complicated terrain profiles (in the past most work has been done in underwater acoustics for oceans with a sloping bottom condition but no variation in the slope was presented). The main emphasis here will be on the assumptions

  19. Wind Turbine Noise and Natural Sounds : Masking, Propagation and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bolin, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbines are an environmentally friendly and sustainable power source. Unfortunately, the noise impact can cause deteriorated living conditions for nearby residents. The audibility of wind turbine sound is influenced by ambient sound. This thesis deals with some aspects of noise from wind turbines. Ambient sounds influence the audibility of wind turbine noise. Models for assessing two commonly occurring natural ambient sounds namely vegetation sound and sound from breaking waves are pres...

  20. An investigation of infrasound propagation over mountain ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Millet, Christophe; Lott, François

    2018-01-01

    Linear theory is used to analyze trapping of infrasound within the lower tropospheric waveguide during propagation above a mountain range. Atmospheric flow produced by the mountains is predicted by a nonlinear mountain gravity wave model. For the infrasound component, this paper solves the wave equation under the effective sound speed approximation using both a finite difference method and a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. It is shown that in realistic configurations, the mountain waves can deeply perturb the low-level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. To interpret these results, each acoustic mode is tracked separately as the horizontal distance increases. It is shown that during statically stable situations, situations that are common during night over land in winter, the mountain waves induce a strong Foehn effect downstream, which shrinks the waveguide significantly. This yields a new form of infrasound absorption that can largely outweigh the direct effect the mountain induces on the low-level waveguide. For the opposite case, when the low-level flow is less statically stable (situations that are more common during day in summer), mountain wave dynamics do not produce dramatic responses downstream. It may even favor the passage of infrasound and mitigate the direct effect of the obstacle.

  1. Molecular hydrodynamics: Vortex formation and sound wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Changho; Talkner, Peter; Karniadakis, George Em; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2018-01-14

    In the present study, quantitative feasibility tests of the hydrodynamic description of a two-dimensional fluid at the molecular level are performed, both with respect to length and time scales. Using high-resolution fluid velocity data obtained from extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the transverse and longitudinal components of the velocity field by the Helmholtz decomposition and compared them with those obtained from the linearized Navier-Stokes (LNS) equations with time-dependent transport coefficients. By investigating the vortex dynamics and the sound wave propagation in terms of these field components, we confirm the validity of the LNS description for times comparable to or larger than several mean collision times. The LNS description still reproduces the transverse velocity field accurately at smaller times, but it fails to predict characteristic patterns of molecular origin visible in the longitudinal velocity field. Based on these observations, we validate the main assumptions of the mode-coupling approach. The assumption that the velocity autocorrelation function can be expressed in terms of the fluid velocity field and the tagged particle distribution is found to be remarkably accurate even for times comparable to or smaller than the mean collision time. This suggests that the hydrodynamic-mode description remains valid down to the molecular scale.

  2. Molecular hydrodynamics: Vortex formation and sound wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Changho; Talkner, Peter; Karniadakis, George Em; Lee, Eok Kyun

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, quantitative feasibility tests of the hydrodynamic description of a two-dimensional fluid at the molecular level are performed, both with respect to length and time scales. Using high-resolution fluid velocity data obtained from extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the transverse and longitudinal components of the velocity field by the Helmholtz decomposition and compared them with those obtained from the linearized Navier-Stokes (LNS) equations with time-dependent transport coefficients. By investigating the vortex dynamics and the sound wave propagation in terms of these field components, we confirm the validity of the LNS description for times comparable to or larger than several mean collision times. The LNS description still reproduces the transverse velocity field accurately at smaller times, but it fails to predict characteristic patterns of molecular origin visible in the longitudinal velocity field. Based on these observations, we validate the main assumptions of the mode-coupling approach. The assumption that the velocity autocorrelation function can be expressed in terms of the fluid velocity field and the tagged particle distribution is found to be remarkably accurate even for times comparable to or smaller than the mean collision time. This suggests that the hydrodynamic-mode description remains valid down to the molecular scale.

  3. Source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Antani, Lakulish; Kim, Sujeong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    We present an approach to model dynamic, data-driven source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation in virtual environments and computer games. Our directional source representation is expressed as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic (SH) sources. In the preprocessing stage, we precompute and encode the propagated sound fields due to each SH source. At runtime, we perform the SH decomposition of the varying source directivity interactively and compute the total sound field at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave decomposition approach based on higher-order derivatives of the sound field that enables dynamic HRTF-based listener directivity at runtime. We provide a generic framework to incorporate our source and listener directivity in any offline or online frequency-domain wave-based sound propagation algorithm. We have integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization, externalization, and spatial sound, generated by wave-based propagation of directional sources and listener in complex scenarios. We also present results from our preliminary user study.

  4. A linearized Eulerian sound propagation model for studies of complex meteorological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Reinhard; Heimann, Dietrich

    2002-08-01

    Outdoor sound propagation is significantly affected by the topography (including ground characteristics) and the state of the atmosphere. The atmosphere on its part is also influenced by the topography. A sound propagation model and a flow model based on a numerical integration of the linearized Euler equations have been developed to take these interactions into account. The output of the flow model enables the calculation of the sound propagation in a three-dimensionally inhomogeneous atmosphere. Rigid, partly reflective, or fully absorptive ground can be considered. The linearized Eulerian (LE) sound propagation model has been validated by means of four different scenarios. Calculations of sound fields above rigid and grass-covered ground including a homogeneous atmosphere deviate from analytic solutions by less-than-or-equal1 dB in most parts of the computed domain. Calculations of sound propagation including wind and temperature gradients above rigid ground agree well with measured scale model data. Calculations of sound propagation over a screen including ground of finite impedance show little deviations to measured scale model data which are probably caused by an insufficient representation of the complex ground impedance. Further calculations included the effect of wind on shading by a screen. The results agree well with the measured scale model data. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  5. Analytical Lie-algebraic solution of a 3D sound propagation problem in the ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, P.S., E-mail: petrov@poi.dvo.ru [Il' ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, 43 Baltiyskaya str., Vladivostok, 690041 (Russian Federation); Prants, S.V., E-mail: prants@poi.dvo.ru [Il' ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, 43 Baltiyskaya str., Vladivostok, 690041 (Russian Federation); Petrova, T.N., E-mail: petrova.tn@dvfu.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova str., 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-21

    The problem of sound propagation in a shallow sea with variable bottom slope is considered. The sound pressure field produced by a time-harmonic point source in such inhomogeneous 3D waveguide is expressed in the form of a modal expansion. The expansion coefficients are computed using the adiabatic mode parabolic equation theory. The mode parabolic equations are solved explicitly, and the analytical expressions for the modal coefficients are obtained using a Lie-algebraic technique. - Highlights: • A group-theoretical approach is applied to a problem of sound propagation in a shallow sea with variable bottom slope. • An analytical solution of this problem is obtained in the form of modal expansion with analytical expressions of the coefficients. • Our result is the only analytical solution of the 3D sound propagation problem with no translational invariance. • This solution can be used for the validation of the numerical propagation models.

  6. Demonstrating Sound Wave Propagation with Candle Flame and Loudspeaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrepic, Zdeslav; Nettles, Corey; Bonilla, Chelsea

    2013-01-01

    The motion of a candle flame in front of a loudspeaker has been suggested as a productive demonstration of the longitudinal wave nature of sound. The demonstration has been used also as a research tool to investigate students' understanding about sound. The underpinning of both applications is the expectation of a horizontal, back-and-forth…

  7. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.; Luding, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed in dense granular media with a narrow polydisperse size-distribution and a linear contact-force law. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves, is examined. A size variation

  8. Sound propagation over ground: Analytical approximations and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habault, D.

    1981-12-01

    Approximations of the sound field emitted by a point source in the presence of the ground have recently been developed [1]. In this paper, these analytical expressions, slightly improved for computation, are compared with an exact representation of the sound pressure and two kinds of experimental results. The approximations, easy to compute, provide a reasonable accuracy for predictions of the sound levels in the asymptotic and intermediate (preceding the asymptotic) regions. Furthermore, numerical techniques (an optimization method) are presented for obtaining the "best value" of the ground normal impedance, from data obtained in Kundt's tube and far field measurements.

  9. Experimental Study on Use of Sound Absorption Treatment for Reduction of Environmental Sound Propagation and Reverberation in Staircases: A Case Study in Housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Matsuda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many open-plan houses have been proposed not only for comfort reasons, but also as a place to engage in family life. However, in contrast to the fact that this kind of plan makes it easy for people to interact, the daily life household sounds that occur inside the home may be perceived as noise. It is especially difficult to suppress the propagation of sound and reverberation in staircase and stairwell areas due to the absence of sound-absorbing furniture. In this study, we focused on addressing sound management within the staircase area in open-plan housing where sound absorption is particularly difficult. In order to suppress sound propagation on the upper and lower floors and the reverberation of sound, we placed a thin sound absorption panel on the wall, ceiling, and riser of the staircase. As a result, we were able to confirm that the propagation of sound on upper and lower floors can be suppressed by carrying out the sound absorption treatment on the staircase. Furthermore, we found that in stairway landing areas, the suppression effect of the propagation of sound varies depending on the position of the sound source and the positioning of the sound absorption panel, and that there is a position for placing the sound absorption panel where the sound-absorbing effect is effective.

  10. Application of the PE method to up-slope sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Arranz, Marta Galindo

    1995-01-01

    The wide-angle PE method is applied to the prediction of sound propagation in a range-dependent environment. The finite-difference model treats the sloping ground by a staircase approximation. The method allows impedance and slope angle variations to be taken into account. The implementation...... velocity at the surface. The staircase PE method approximates the normal at the slope surface with the vertical component at the stair-step surface. A numerical correction can be included. Using a scale model facility [K. B. Rasmussen, 3617–3620 (1994)], a series of measurements is carried out. The results...... of sloping interfaces in one-way PE models introduces a fundamental problem of energy conservation. This is generated at the lower boundary condition. The ground is assumed to be a locally reacting surface where the ground impedance is defined as the ratio of pressure to the normal component of particle...

  11. Variable Phase Propagation Velocity for Long Range Lightning Location System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Koh, K.; Mezentsev, A.; Enno, S. E.; Sugier, J.; Fullekrug, M.

    2016-12-01

    Lightning Location System (LLS) is of key importance to numerous meteorological, industrial and aviation systems worldwide. A crucial input parameter of a LLS which utilizes time-of-arrival (TOA) method is the wave propagation velocity at low frequencies. For example, the WWLLN network use group velocity approach, which is assumed to be constant near the speed of light [e.g. Dowden et al., 2002]. The detected lightning signals are normally a mixture of ground waves and sky waves (i.e. ionospheric hops), which are associated with different elevation angle of the incident wave [e.g., Fullekrug et al., 2015]. In this study, we introduce the new concept of "phase propagation velocity" as observed by the receiver considering the elevation angle. It is found that the radio waves from two submarine communication transmitters at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz exhibit phase propagation velocities that are 0.51% slower and 0.64% faster than the speed of light as a result of sky wave contributions and ground effects. Here, we apply our new technique, using a variable phase propagation velocity, to the TOA method for the first time. This method was applied to electric field recordings from a long range LLS ( 500km) that consists of four radio receivers in Western Europe. The lightning locations inferred from variable velocities improve the accuracy of locations inferred from a fixed velocity by 0.89-1.06 km when compared to the lightning locations reported by the UK Met Office. The observed phase propagation velocities depend on the ground and ionosphere conditions along the propagation paths. The distribution of the observed phase propagation velocities in small geographic areas fit a normal distribution that is not centered at the speed of light. Consequently, representative velocities can be calculated for many small geographic areas to produce a velocity map over central France where numerous lightning discharges occurred. This map reflects the impact of sky waves and ground

  12. Mitigation and propagation of sound generated by heavy weapons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, F. van den; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Much environmental research is performed on predicting the noise impact of heavy weapons or explosives, as the shock waves can propagate over large distances. In the densely populated area of the Netherlands this is of particular interest for the Ministry of Defense. In one research program the

  13. Identifying students’ mental models of sound propagation: The role of conceptual blending in understanding conceptual change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeslav Hrepic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated introductory physics students’ mental models of sound propagation. We used a phenomenographic method to analyze the data in the study. In addition to the scientifically accepted Wave model, students used the “Entity” model to describe the propagation of sound. In this latter model sound is a self-standing entity, different from the medium through which it propagates. All other observed alternative models contain elements of both Entity and Wave models, but at the same time are distinct from each of the constituent models. We called these models “hybrid” or “blend” models. We discuss how students use these models in various contexts before and after instruction and how our findings contribute to the understanding of conceptual change. Implications of our findings for teaching are summarized.

  14. Analytical Lie-algebraic solution of a 3D sound propagation problem in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, P. S.; Prants, S. V.; Petrova, T. N.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of sound propagation in a shallow sea with variable bottom slope is considered. The sound pressure field produced by a time-harmonic point source in such inhomogeneous 3D waveguide is expressed in the form of a modal expansion. The expansion coefficients are computed using the adiabatic mode parabolic equation theory. The mode parabolic equations are solved explicitly, and the analytical expressions for the modal coefficients are obtained using a Lie-algebraic technique.

  15. The effects of sound propagation and avoidance behaviour on naval sonar levels received by cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Wensveen, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of active sonar is deemed to be essential for naval operations, but its potential impact on marine life has raised concerns worldwide. In a risk-assessment framework, characterisation of risk of harm is accomplished by combining exposure assessment and dose−response relationships. The overall topic of this thesis is an evaluation of factors that influence exposure assessment, including analysis of how sound levels received by cetaceans are affected by in-situ sound propagation and the...

  16. Dynamic-range compression affects the lateral position of sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Ian M; Seeber, Bernhard U

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic-range compression acting independently at each ear in a bilateral hearing-aid or cochlear-implant fitting can alter interaural level differences (ILDs) potentially affecting spatial perception. The influence of compression on the lateral position of sounds was studied in normal-hearing listeners using virtual acoustic stimuli. In a lateralization task, listeners indicated the leftmost and rightmost extents of the auditory event and reported whether they heard (1) a single, stationary image, (2) a moving/gradually broadening image, or (3) a split image. Fast-acting compression significantly affected the perceived position of high-pass sounds. For sounds with abrupt onsets and offsets, compression shifted the entire image to a more central position. For sounds containing gradual onsets and offsets, including speech, compression increased the occurrence of moving and split images by up to 57 percentage points and increased the perceived lateral extent of the auditory event. The severity of the effects was reduced when undisturbed low-frequency binaural cues were made available. At high frequencies, listeners gave increased weight to ILDs relative to interaural time differences carried in the envelope when compression caused ILDs to change dynamically at low rates, although individual differences were apparent. Specific conditions are identified in which compression is likely to affect spatial perception. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  17. Application of beamform to sound propagation in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Wiese, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of applying beam-former technology (i.e., the technique that uses the combined signal from an array of sensors as a spatial filter to locate sound sources) in atmospheric acoustics is examined. Special attention is given to the microphone array, data collection, and signal processing technology as well as to an array processing algorithm. It is shown that this algorithm, which incorporates the maximum-likelihood method, is operational. Also discussed is a postprocessing algorithm for eliminating the ghosting sidelobes that arise from the moving sources.

  18. On propagation of sound waves in Q2D conductors in a quantizing magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, O V; Galbova, O; Ivanovski, G; Krstovska, D

    2003-01-01

    The attenuation of sound waves propagating normally to the layers of a Q2D conductor is analysed at low enough temperatures when quantization of the energy of conduction electrons results in an oscillatory dependence of the sound attenuation rate on the inverse magnetic field. The sound wave decrement is found for different orientations of the magnetic field with respect to the layers. A layered conductor is shown to be most transparent in the case when the magnetic field is orthogonal to the layers.

  19. Wave propagation in and sound transmission through sandwich plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A. C.

    1990-04-01

    Some dynamical and acoustical properties of sandwich plates are investigated. The types of sandwich elements discussed are three-layered plates with a thick lightweight core, with thin and comparatively stiff laminates bonded to each side of the core. In the model derived it is assumed that the laminates and core are isotropic. The laminates are treated as thin plates, whereas the deflection in the core is described by means of the general field equations. This means that bending shear and rotation, as well as longitudinal deflection, are considered in the core. Wavenumbers, loss factors and apparent bending stiffness for symmetric and asymmetric plates are derived. In addition, the sound transmission loss for sandwich plates is discussed. Measured and predicted results are compared. It is found that bending stiffness and loss factor not only depend on material parameters and plate geometries but also on frequency. The core thickness is very critical for the sound transmission loss of a sandwich plate. Sandwich plates are frequently used in the shipbuilding industry for light and fast passenger vessels. The effects of a fluid load on a sandwich plate is therefore also included.

  20. Isogeometric analysis of sound propagation through laminar flow in 2-dimensional ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Peter; Gravesen, Jens; Willatzen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We consider the propagation of sound through a slowly moving fluid in a 2-dimensional duct. A detailed description of a flow-acoustic model of the problem using B-spline based isogeometric analysis is given. The model couples the non-linear, steady-state, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation...... in the laminar regime for the flow field, to a linear, time-harmonic acoustic equation in the low Mach number regime for the sound signal. B-splines are used both to represent the duct geometry and to approximate the flow and sound fields. This facilitates an exact representation of complex duct geometries...... are found when the acoustic pressure is approximated by higher order polynomials. Based on the model, we examine how the acoustic signal varies with sound frequency, flow speed and duct geometry. A combination of duct geometry and sound frequency is identified for which the acoustic signal is particularly...

  1. Sound propagation in dry granular materials : discrete element simulations, theory, and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study sound wave propagation through different types of dry confined granular systems is studied. With three-dimensional discrete element simulations, theory and experiments, the influence of several micro-scale properties: friction, dissipation, particle rotation, and contact disorder, on

  2. Effects of Variability Associated with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current on Sound Propagation in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    showing shot locations (circles) and IMS hydrophone station locations ( triangles ), superimposed on a map of group velocities derived using average fall...E. McDonald (1991). Perth- Bermuda sound propagation (1960): Adiabatic mode interpretation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90: 2586–2594. Jensen, F. B., W. A

  3. The energy transport by the propagation of sound waves in wave guides with a moving medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Grand, P.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the propagation of sound waves radiated by a source in a fluid moving with subsonic velocity between two parallel walls or inside a cylindrical tube is considered in [2], The most interesting thing of this problem is that waves may occur with constant amplitude coming from infinity.

  4. Sound propagation in isotropically and uni-axially compressed cohesive, frictional granular solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.; Herbst, O.; Herbst, O.; Luding, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Using an advanced contact model in DEM simulations, involving elasto-plasticity, adhesion, and friction, pressure-sintered tablets are formed from primary particles and prepared for unconfined tests. Sound propagation in such packings is studied under various friction and adhesion conditions. Small

  5. One-dimensional transport equation models for sound energy propagation in long spaces: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Larsen, Edward W; Xiang, Ning

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional transport equation model is developed to describe the sound energy propagation in a long space. Then this model is reduced to a one-dimensional model by approximating the solution using the method of weighted residuals. The one-dimensional transport equation model directly describes the sound energy propagation in the "long" dimension and deals with the sound energy in the "short" dimensions by prescribed functions. Also, the one-dimensional model consists of a coupled set of N transport equations. Only N=1 and N=2 are discussed in this paper. For larger N, although the accuracy could be improved, the calculation time is expected to significantly increase, which diminishes the advantage of the model in terms of its computational efficiency.

  6. Sound Wave Propagation Analysis Using FDTD for Contaminated Insulator Discharge Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takaie; Shimoda, Takeshi

    Discharge noises caused by contaminated insulator string were studied using anechoic room where the difference of the noise waveform due to insulator shape was found. In this study, sound wave propagation of the discharge noises have been simulated using two-dimensional FDTD method to examine the effect of insulator shape on the observed waveform. In the course of the study, the shape data of the insulator was expressed as the set of elements that typify the media (air and solid), directions of air-solid (porcelain) boundary, and directions of ‘Free Space’ boundary by allocating the colors on the corresponding bitmap image file. The source points of the sound were also arranged into the bitmap. Calculated wave propagation for each time step is again expressed in the form of bitmap for visualization. The nature of the calculated sound waveforms for different insulator shapes and discharge positions are compared with that in the experiment.

  7. Nonlocal description of sound propagation through an array of Helmholtz resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Navid; Kumar, Anshuman; Lafarge, Denis; Fang, Nicholas X.

    2015-12-01

    A generalized macroscopic nonlocal theory of sound propagation in rigid-framed porous media saturated with a viscothermal fluid has been recently proposed, which takes into account both temporal and spatial dispersion. Here, we consider applying this theory, which enables the description of resonance effects, to the case of sound propagation through an array of Helmholtz resonators whose unusual metamaterial properties, such as negative bulk moduli, have been experimentally demonstrated. Three different calculations are performed, validating the results of the nonlocal theory, related to the frequency-dependent Bloch wavenumber and bulk modulus of the first normal mode, for 1D propagation in 2D or 3D periodic structures. xml:lang="fr"

  8. Effects of wind shear and temperature inversion on sound propagation from wind turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haan, Henk de [Golder Associates (Canada)], email: Henk_deHaan@golder.com

    2011-07-01

    Noise impact assessment of wind turbines usually takes into account sound speed and propagation at ground level, and those are influenced by wind shear and atmospheric temperature changes. This paper focuses on a week-long monitoring study and presents the observed and anticipated effects of wind shear and temperature on the level of ground sound emitted from a 65m high wind turbine. Working with anemometers at ground level and turbine height, it is shown that wind shear can influence sound propagation, and that atmospheric stability must be taken into account for accurate wind speed calculations to be made. Temperature must also be addressed and the heating of the earth by solar radiation and the re-radiation of that heat in a day-night cycle, resulting in temperature inversion in the atmosphere, must be taken into account. Observations of temperature changes over a week can then yield sound speed and sound power levels with respect to altitude, and show that sound power levels are higher at ground levels during the night.

  9. Numerical and analytical solutions for sound propagation and absorption in porous media at high sound pressure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Tianning; Zhao, Yuyuan; Zhang, Weiyong; Zhu, Jian

    2012-09-01

    On the basis of the work of Wilson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 350-359 (1988)], a more exact numerical approach was constructed for predicting the nonlinear sound propagation and absorption properties of rigid porous media at high sound pressure levels. The numerical solution was validated by the experimental results for sintered fibrous porous steel samples and its predictions were compared with the numerical solution of Wilson et al. An approximate analytical solution was further put forward for the normalized surface acoustic admittance of rigid air-saturated porous materials with infinite thickness, based on the wave perturbation method developed by Lambert and McIntosh [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 1950-1959 (1990)]. Comparisons were made with the numerical results.

  10. Sound wave propagation on the human skull surface with bone conduction stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Stenfelt, Stefan; Ihrle, Sebastian; Gerig, Rahel; Pfiffner, Flurin; Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Röösli, Christof

    2017-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) is an alternative to air conduction to stimulate the inner ear. In general, the stimulation for BC occurs on a specific location directly on the skull bone or through the skin covering the skull bone. The stimulation propagates to the ipsilateral and contralateral cochlea, mainly via the skull bone and possibly via other skull contents. This study aims to investigate the wave propagation on the surface of the skull bone during BC stimulation at the forehead and at ipsilateral mastoid. Measurements were performed in five human cadaveric whole heads. The electro-magnetic transducer from a BCHA (bone conducting hearing aid), a Baha® Cordelle II transducer in particular, was attached to a percutaneously implanted screw or positioned with a 5-Newton steel headband at the mastoid and forehead. The Baha transducer was driven directly with single tone signals in the frequency range of 0.25-8 kHz, while skull bone vibrations were measured at multiple points on the skull using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) system and a 3D LDV system. The 3D velocity components, defined by the 3D LDV measurement coordinate system, have been transformed into tangent (in-plane) and normal (out-of-plane) components in a local intrinsic coordinate system at each measurement point, which is based on the cadaver head's shape, estimated by the spatial locations of all measurement points. Rigid-body-like motion was dominant at low frequencies below 1 kHz, and clear transverse traveling waves were observed at high frequencies above 2 kHz for both measurement systems. The surface waves propagation speeds were approximately 450 m/s at 8 kHz, corresponding trans-cranial time interval of 0.4 ms. The 3D velocity measurements confirmed the complex space and frequency dependent response of the cadaver heads indicated by the 1D data from the SLDV system. Comparison between the tangent and normal motion components, extracted by transforming the 3D velocity components

  11. Analysis of sound propagation in ducts using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a rectangular two-dimensional duct without steady flow for plane wave input. Before the difference equations are formulated, the governing Helmholtz equation is first transformed to a form whose solution does not oscillate along the length of the duct. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude, and the number of grid points becomes independent of the sound frequency. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. Example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a one-dimensional straight hard-wall duct and in a two-dimensional straight soft-wall duct without steady flow. The numerical solutions show evidence of the existence along the duct wall of a developing acoustic pressure diffusion boundary layer which is similar in nature to the conventional viscous flow boundary layer. In order to better illustrate this concept, the wave equation and boundary conditions are written such that the frequency no longer appears explicitly in them. The frequency effects in duct propagation can be visualized solely as an expansion and stretching of the suppressor duct.

  12. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  13. Cruise Report: Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Long-range Owan ACoustic Propagation EXpewbitent LOAPEX L ý ý . OPXSRO So0 SVLAMVLA 40 KAA 20 M0 1 10 170 IN ISO 140 30 1010 Figure 1.2. LOAPEX assets...4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 5000 > -5000 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 20 0 -I -20 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 .• 50001 1 1 1

  14. A BEM approach to validate a model for predicting sound propagation over non-flat terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirós Alpera, Susana; Jacobsen, Finn; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional boundary element model for sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere above non-flat terrain has been constructed. An infinite impedance plane is taken into account in the Green's function in the underlying integral equation, so that only the nonflat parts of the terrain need....... Sound Vibrat. 223 (1999) 355]. The resulting BEM model, which can handle arbitrary combinations of barriers and hollows, has been used for validating a ray model for various difficult configurations, including combinations of valleys and barriers. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. A BEM approach to validate a model for predicting sound propagation over non-flat terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirósy Alpera, S.; Jacobsen, Finn; Juhl, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional boundary element model for sound propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere above non-flat terrain has been constructed. An infinite impedance plane is taken into account in the Green's function in the underlying integral equation, so that only the nonflat parts of the terrain need....... Sound Vibrat. 223 (1999) 355]. The resulting BEM model, which can handle arbitrary combinations of barriers and hollows, has been used for validating a ray model for various difficult configurations, including combinations of valleys and barriers....

  16. Time dependent difference theory for sound propagation in axisymmetric ducts with plug flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    The time dependent governing/acoustic-difference equations and boundary conditions are developed and solved for sound propagation in an axisymmetric (cylindrical) hard wall duct with a plug mean flow and spinning acoustic modes. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in real time to obtain the transient as well as the 'steady' state solutions of the acoustic field. The time dependent finite difference analysis has two advantages over the steady state finite difference and finite element techniques: (1) the elimination of large matrix storage requirements, and (2) shorter solution times under most conditions.

  17. Sonar Performance Estimation Model with Seismo-Acoustic Effects on Underwater Sound Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-27

    a dfluid properties are obtained from Jensen , the properties of clay-silt, sand, 61 and basalt are taken from the paper by Werby and Tango , and the...the power of very loud music may be 30 Watts with a sound pressure of 3 Pascals which corresponds to a sound pressure level near 100dB. The...Underwater Acoustic Propagation, DREA Report 85/105, Sep 1985, Nova Scotia, Canada. 61. Werby, M. F. and Tango , G. J., "Characterization of Average

  18. Channel Sounding System for MM-Wave Bands and Characterization of Indoor Propagation at 28 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejselbæk, Johannes; Ji, Yilin; Fan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a vector network analyzer (VNA) based channel sounding sys- tem capable of performing measurements in the range from 2 to 50 GHz. Further, this paper describes an indoor measurement campaign performed at 26 to 30 GHz. The sounding system is capable of receiving...

  19. Demonstration of slow sound propagation and acoustic transparency with a series of detuned resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results demonstrating the phenomenon of acoustic transparency with a significant slowdown of sound propagation realized with a series of paired detuned acoustic resonators (DAR) side-attached to a waveguide. The phenomenon mimics the electromagnetically induced transparency...... than 20 dB on both sides of the transparency window, and we quantify directly (using a pulse propagation) the acoustic slowdown effect, resulting in the sound group velocity of 9.8 m/s (i.e. in the group refractive index of 35). We find very similar values of the group refractive index by using...... measurements of the phase of the transmitted wave. It is also shown that a direct coupling exists between the DAR in each pair, which cannot be explained by the interference of waves radiated from those resonators. This detrimental coupling becomes noticeable for small values of detuning and also if the cross...

  20. Three-dimensional simulations of sound propagation in a trumpet with accurate mouthpiece shank geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Resch, Janelle; Vanderkooy, John

    2016-01-01

    The length and bore geometry of musical instruments directly influences the quality of sound that can be produced. In brass instruments, nonlinear effects from finite-amplitude wave propagation can lead to wave distortion giving sounds a brassy timbre [3, 5, 14, 20, 26]. In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional model to describe nonlinear wave propagation in a trumpet and investigate the importance of the mouthpiece shank geometry. Time pressure waveforms corresponding to B_3(b) and B_4(b) notes were recorded at the mouthpiece shank and used as inputs for our model. To describe the motion of compressible inviscid fluid, we numerically solved the compressible Euler equations using the discontinuous Galerkin method. To validate our approach, the numerical results were compared to the recorded musical notes outside the bell of the trumpet. Simulations were performed on computational trumpets where different bore geometries were considered. Our results demonstrate that the shape of the narrow region near mou...

  1. Sound propagation in liquid foams: Unraveling the balance between physical and chemical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Juliette; Giraudet, Brice; Chasle, Patrick; Dollet, Benjamin; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    We present experimental results on the propagation of an ultrasonic wave (40 kHz) in liquid foams, as a function of the foam physical and chemical parameters. We have first implemented an original setup, using transducers in a transmission configuration. The foam coarsening was used to vary the bubble size (remaining in the submillimeter range), and we have made foams with various chemical formulations, to investigate the role of the chemicals at the bubble interfaces or in bulk. The results are compared with recently published theoretical works, and good agreements are found. In particular, for all the foams, we have evidenced two asymptotic limits, at small and large bubble size, connected by a nontrivial resonant behavior, associated to an effective negative density. These qualitative features are robust whatever the chemical formulation; we discuss the observed differences between the samples, in relation to the interfacial and bulk viscoelasticity. These results demonstrate the rich and complex acoustic behavior of foams. While the bubble size remain here always smaller than the sound wavelength, it turns out that one must go well beyond mean-field modeling to describe the foam acoustic properties.

  2. Long-range propagation of nonlinear infrasound waves through an absorbing atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, C D

    2016-04-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) approach for axi-symmetric environmental models, allowing three-dimensional acoustic propagation to be simulated using a two-dimensional Cylindrical coordinate system. A method to stabilize the FDTD algorithm in a viscous medium at atmospheric densities characteristic of the lower thermosphere is described. The stabilization scheme slightly alters the governing equations but results in quantifiable dispersion characteristics. It is shown that this method leaves sound speeds and attenuation unchanged at frequencies that are well resolved by the temporal sampling rate but strongly attenuates higher frequencies. Numerical experiments are performed to assess the effect of source strength on the amplitudes and spectral content of signals recorded at ground level at a range of distances from the source. It is shown that the source amplitudes have a stronger effect on a signal's dominant frequency than on its amplitude. Applying the stabilized code to infrasound propagation through realistic atmospheric profiles shows that nonlinear propagation alters the spectral content of low amplitude thermospheric signals, demonstrating that nonlinear effects are significant for all detectable thermospheric returns.

  3. Outdoor Sound Propagation Modelling in Complex Environments: Recent Developments in the Parabolic Equation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    equation for sound waves in inhomogeneous moving media”, Acustica united with Acta Acustica , Vol 83(3), pp 455-460,1997. [3] L. Dallois, Ph. Blanc...propagation in a turbulent atmosphere within the parabolic approximation”, Acustica united with Acta Acustica , Vol 87(1), pp 659-669, 2001 [6] M. Karweit...approaches", Acta Acustica united with Acustica , 89 (6), 980-991, (2003). [40] Ph. Voisin, Ph. Blanc-Benon, "The influence of meteorological

  4. Aural proxies and directionally-varying reverberation for interactive sound propagation in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Lakulish; Manocha, Dinesh

    2013-04-01

    We present an efficient algorithm to compute spatially-varying, direction-dependent artificial reverberation and reflection filters in large dynamic scenes for interactive sound propagation in virtual environments and video games. Our approach performs Monte Carlo integration of local visibility and depth functions to compute directionally-varying reverberation effects. The algorithm also uses a dynamically-generated rectangular aural proxy to efficiently model 2-4 orders of early reflections. These two techniques are combined to generate reflection and reverberation filters which vary with the direction of incidence at the listener. This combination leads to better sound source localization and immersion. The overall algorithm is efficient, easy to implement, and can handle moving sound sources, listeners, and dynamic scenes, with minimal storage overhead. We have integrated our approach with the audio rendering pipeline in Valve's Source game engine, and use it to generate realistic directional sound propagation effects in indoor and outdoor scenes in real-time. We demonstrate, through quantitative comparisons as well as evaluations, that our approach leads to enhanced, immersive multi-modal interaction.

  5. Mode tomography using signals from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.

    Ocean acoustic tomography uses acoustic signals to infer the environmental properties of the ocean. The procedure for tomography consists of low frequency acoustic transmissions at mid-water depths to receivers located at hundreds of kilometer ranges. The arrival times of the signal at the receiver are then inverted for the sound speed of the background environment. Using this principle, experiments such as the 2004 Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment have used acoustic signals recorded across Vertical Line Arrays (VLAs) to infer the Sound Speed Profile (SSP) across depth. The acoustic signals across the VLAs can be represented in terms of orthonormal basis functions called modes. The lower modes of the basis set concentrated around mid-water propagate longer distances and can be inverted for mesoscale effects such as currents and eddies. In spite of these advantages, mode tomography has received less attention. One of the important reasons for this is that internal waves in the ocean cause significant amplitude and travel time fluctuations in the modes. The amplitude and travel time fluctuations cause errors in travel time estimates. The absence of a statistical model and the lack of signal processing techniques for internal wave effects have precluded the modes from being used in tomographic inversions. This thesis estimates a statistical model for modes affected by internal waves and then uses the estimated model to design appropriate signal processing methods to obtain tomographic observables for the low modes. In order to estimate a statistical model, this thesis uses both the LOAPEX signals and also numerical simulations. The statistical model describes the amplitude and phase coherence across different frequencies for modes at different ranges. The model suggests that Matched Subspace Detectors (MSDs) based on the amplitude statistics of the modes are the optimum detectors to make travel time estimates for modes up to 250 km. The mean of the

  6. Sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere near the ground: a parabolic equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, V E; Salomons, E M; Clifford, S F; Lataitis, R J; Wilson, D K; Blanc-Benon, P; Juvé, D

    2001-05-01

    The interference of the direct wave from the point source to the receiver and the wave reflected from the impedance ground in a turbulent atmosphere is studied. A parabolic equation approach for calculating the sound pressure p at the receiver is formulated. Then, the parabolic equation is solved by the Rytov method yielding expressions for the complex phases of direct and ground-reflected waves. Using these expressions, a formula for the mean squared sound pressure [absolute value(p)2] is derived for the case of anisotropic spectra of temperature and wind velocity fluctuations. This formula contains the "coherence factor," which characterizes the coherence between direct and ground-reflected waves. It is shown that the coherence factor is equal to the normalized coherence function of a spherical sound wave for line-of-sight propagation. For the case of isotropic turbulence, this result allows one to obtain analytical formulas for [absolute value(p)2] for the Kolmogorov, Gaussian, and von Karman spectra of temperature and wind velocity fluctuations. Using these formulas, the effects of temperature and wind velocity fluctuations, and the effects of different spectra of these fluctuations on the mean squared sound pressure, are numerically studied. Also the effect of turbulent anisotropy on the interference of direct and ground reflected waves is numerically studied. Finally, it is shown that the mean squared sound pressure [absolute value(p)2] calculated for the von Karman spectrum of temperature fluctuations agrees well with experimental data obtained in a laboratory experiment.

  7. Developing a wind turbine planning platform : Integration of “sound propagation model–GIS-game engine” triplet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafiee, Azarakhsh; Van der Male, Pim; Dias, Eduardo; Scholten, Henk

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we propose an interactive information system for wind turbine siting, considering its visual and sound externalities. This system is an integration of game engine, GIS and analytical sound propagation model in a unified 3D web environment. The game engine–GIS integration provides a 3D

  8. Measurement of Sound Propagation, Down Slope to a Bottom-Limited Sound Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    VERSUS RANGE 11 13 8 - A RAY -DEPTH-RANGE PLOT lb 9 - ROOT-MEAN-SQUARE PRESSURE (dB re l.Pa). P^^^, VERSUS LENGTH . . 17 10 - MAGNITUDE-SQUARE...23 13 - A NORMAL MODE (SNAP) COMPARISON WITH DATA 25 14 - A NORMAL MODE (SNAP/ ASTRAL ) COMPARISON WITH DATA 29 15 - HIGH ANGLE PARABOLIC...with FACT and ray models. 10 LOW ATTENUATION ■o to CO o o CD 10 20 30 40 50 GRAZING ANGLE (DEG.) 60 70 MEDIUM ATTENUATION CD T3 CO CO

  9. Halifax Sound Range Trials (DE0301, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiated sound measurements of vessels are important for monitoring the noise characteristics of fishing and research vessels. A vessel's radiated noise can have...

  10. Development of a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Model for Propagation of Transient Sounds in Very Shallow Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Mark W; Luczkovich, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    This finite-difference time domain (FDTD) model for sound propagation in very shallow water uses pressure and velocity grids with both 3-dimensional Cartesian and 2-dimensional cylindrical implementations. Parameters, including water and sediment properties, can vary in each dimension. Steady-state and transient signals from discrete and distributed sources, such as the surface of a vibrating pile, can be used. The cylindrical implementation uses less computation but requires axial symmetry. The Cartesian implementation allows asymmetry. FDTD calculations compare well with those of a split-step parabolic equation. Applications include modeling the propagation of individual fish sounds, fish aggregation sounds, and distributed sources.

  11. Long-Term Change of Sound Wave Propagation Attenuation Due to the Effects of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Hiyoshi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing due to global warming. And, the ocean acidification advances because this melts into seawater, pH decrease in seawater are concerned. The sound wave to propagate seawater, pH is known to affect absorption loss (α) by chemical buffer effects of the seawater. However, conventionally, α has not been investigated much in the calculation of pH. Therefore, when calculating the propagation distance in the sonar equation, pH =8~8.1 (Weak alkaline) are used empirically. Therefore we used an actual value of pH of 30 years from 1984 in the sea near the Japan, and investigated change over the years of absorption loss (α) at some frequency. As a result, we found that α value decreases gradually in the past 30 years, as high-latitude decreases. Further, the future, assuming that ocean acidification is more advanced, and to simulate a change of the absorption loss and propagation loss in end of this century using the pH value reported from the "Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change" (IPCC). As a result, it was just suggested that α decreased more in the end of this century and affected the submarine detection. In addition, in recent years, we examined the effects of noise that offshore wind power construction proceeds in each country emits gives to the underwater sound. As a result, in the end of this century, an underwater noise increases about 17%, and underwater sound environmental degradation of the sea is concerned.

  12. Sound propagation in a duct of periodic wall structure. [numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurze, U.

    1978-01-01

    A boundary condition, which accounts for the coupling in the sections behind the duct boundary, is given for the sound-absorbing duct with a periodic structure of the wall lining and using regular partition walls. The soundfield in the duct is suitably described by the method of differences. For locally active walls this renders an explicit approximate solution for the propagation constant. Coupling may be accounted for by the method of differences in a clear manner. Numerical results agree with measurements and yield information which has technical applications.

  13. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer: A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis was exact for all frequencies and was developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allowed the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cyclinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number gave expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  14. Propagation of sound waves through a linear shear layer - A closed form solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    Closed form solutions are presented for sound propagation from a line source in or near a shear layer. The analysis is exact for all frequencies and is developed assuming a linear velocity profile in the shear layer. This assumption allows the solution to be expressed in terms of parabolic cylinder functions. The solution is presented for a line monopole source first embedded in the uniform flow and then in the shear layer. Solutions are also discussed for certain types of dipole and quadrupole sources. Asymptotic expansions of the exact solutions for small and large values of Strouhal number give expressions which correspond to solutions previously obtained for these limiting cases.

  15. Eigenvalue Analysis of sound propagation characteristics in a circular duct lined with poroelastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myung Seob; Lee, Seung Yeop; Kang, Yeon June

    2014-03-01

    An effective method for eigenvalue analysis of a circular duct lined with poroelastic foams is presented using axisymmetric finite element models based on Biot's theory and Helmholtz equation. Complex dispersion relations in a cylindrical foam-lined duct are successfully identified using an iterative Prony series method. It is shown that the numerical results obtained by the proposed method agree well with those obtained by measurements and direct forced response simulations. The influences of thickness and boundary conditions of the poroelastic foam on the sound propagation characteristics in a duct are also investigated. Furthermore, the damping effect due to viscosity of the foam on dispersion curves is discussed at a theoretical level.

  16. A time dependent difference theory for sound propagation in ducts with flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A time dependent numerical solution of the linearized continuity and momentum equation is developed for sound propagation in a two-dimensional straight hard or soft wall duct with a sheared mean flow. The time dependent governing acoustic-difference equations and boundary conditions are developed along with a numerical determination of the maximum stable time increments. The analysis begins with a harmonic noise source radiating into a quiescent duct. This explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in real time to obtain the transient as well as the 'steady' state solution of the acoustic field. Example calculations are presented for sound propagation in hard and soft wall ducts, with no flow and with plug flow. Although the problem with sheared flow has been formulated and programmed, sample calculations have not yet been examined. So far, the time dependent finite difference analysis has been found to be superior to the steady state finite difference and finite element techniques because of shorter solution times and the elimination of large matrix storage requirements.

  17. Sound transmission at ground level in a short-grass prairie habitat and its implications for long-range communication in the swift fox Vulpes velox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darden, Safi K; Pedersen, Simon B; Larsen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    seem to persist to at least 400 m. Individual temporal features were very consistent to at least 400 m. The communication range of the barking sequences is likely to be farther than 400 m and it should be considered a long-ranging vocalization. However, relative to the large home ranges of swift foxes......The acoustic environment of swift foxes Vulpes velox vocalizing close to the ground and the effect of propagation on individual identity information in vocalizations were quantified in a transmission experiment in prairie habitat. Sounds were propagated (0.45 m above the ground) at distances up.......2-2.5 kHz propagated the furthest and the latter sweeps exhibited the best transmission properties for long-range propagation. Swift fox barking sequence elements are centered toward the lower end of this frequency range. Nevertheless, measurable individual spectral characteristics of the barking sequence...

  18. Studies of elasticity, sound propagation and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makse, Hernan A. [City College of New York, NY (United States). Levich Inst., Dept. of Physcis; Johnson, David L. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-03

    This is the final report describing the results of DOE Grant # DE-FG02-03ER15458 with original termination date of April 31, 2013, which has been extended to April 31, 2014. The goal of this project is to develop a theoretical and experimental understanding of sound propagation, elasticity and dissipation in granular materials. The topic is relevant for the efficient production of hydrocarbon and for identifying and characterizing the underground formation for storage of either CO2 or nuclear waste material. Furthermore, understanding the basic properties of acoustic propagation in granular media is of importance not only to the energy industry, but also to the pharmaceutical, chemical and agricultural industries. We employ a set of experimental, theoretical and computational tools to develop a study of acoustics and dissipation in granular media. These include the concept effective mass of granular media, normal modes analysis, statistical mechanics frameworks and numerical simulations based on Discrete Element Methods. Effective mass measurements allow us to study the mechanisms of the elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We perform experiments and simulations under varying conditions, including humidity and vacuum, and different interparticle force-laws to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of damping and acoustic propagation in granular media. A theoretical statistical approach studies the necessary phase space of configurations in pressure, volume fraction to classify granular materials.

  19. Verification of an acoustic transmission matrix analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct without flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A predicted standing wave pressure and phase angle profile for a hard wall rectangular duct with a region of converging-diverging area variation is compared to published experimental measurements in a study of sound propagation without flow. The factor of 1/2 area variation used is sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections. The prediction is based on a transmission matrix approach developed for the analysis of sound propagation in a variable area duct with and without flow. The agreement between the measured and predicted results is shown to be excellent.

  20. A comparison between directly measured and inferred wave speeds from an acoustic propagation experiment in Currituck Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Megan S; Costley, R Daniel; Sagers, Jason D; Lee, Kevin M; McNeese, Andrew R; Hathaway, Kent K; Wilson, Preston S; Smith, Eric W

    2018-01-01

    An acoustic propagation experiment was conducted in Currituck Sound to characterize low-frequency propagation in a very-shallow-water estuarine environment. The water column properties were homogeneous over the study area, and the emphasis of this work is on understanding the propagation effects induced by the estuarine bed. During the experiment, low-frequency sound propagation measurements of waterborne sound and interface waves were acquired, and direct measurements of the compressional and shear wave properties were obtained at high frequencies. The propagation data consist of signals from a Combustive Sound Source recorded on bottom mounted geophones and a vertical line array of hydrophones. A statistical inference method was applied to obtain an estimate of the sediment compressional and shear wave speed profiles as a function of depth within the estuarine bed. The direct measurements were obtained in situ by inserting probes 30 cm into the sediment. Sediment acoustics models were fit to the high-frequency in situ data to enable comparison with the inferred low-frequency wave speeds. Overall, good agreement was found between the directly measured and inferred wave speeds for both the compressional and shear wave data.

  1. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  2. Revealing the structure of a granular medium through ballistic sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lherminier, S; Planet, R; Simon, G; Vanel, L; Ramos, O

    2014-08-29

    We study the propagation of sound through a bidimensional granular medium consisting of photoelastic disks, which are packed into different crystalline and disordered structures. Acoustic sensors placed at the boundaries of the system capture the acoustic signal produced by a local and well-controlled mechanical excitation. By compressing the system, we find that the speed of the ballistic part of the acoustic wave behaves as a power law of the applied force with both exponent and prefactor sensitive to the internal geometry of the contact network. This information, which we are able to link to the force-deformation relation of single grains under different contact geometries, provides enough information to reveal the structure of the granular medium.

  3. An extended coupled phase theory for the sound propagation in polydisperse concentrated suspensions of rigid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François; Lhuillier, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    An extension of the classical coupled phase theory is proposed to account for hydrodynamic interactions between neighboring rigid particles, which are essential to describe properly the sound propagation in concentrated suspensions. Rigorous ensemble-averaged equations are derived for each phase and simplified in the case of acoustical wave propagation. Then, closure is achieved by introducing a self-consistent scheme originally developed by Buyevich and Shchelchkova [Prog. Aerosp. Sci. 18, 121-151 (1978)] for incompressible flows, to model the transfer terms between the two phases. This provides an alternative to the effective medium self-consistent theory developed by Spelt et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 430, 51-86 (2001)] in which the suspension is considered as a whole. Here, a significantly simpler formulation is obtained in the long wavelength regime. Predictions of this self-consistent theory are compared with the classical coupled phase theory and with experimental data measuring the attenuation in concentrated suspensions of silica in water. Our calculation is shown to give a good description of the attenuation variation with volume fraction. This theory is also extended to the case of polydisperse suspensions. Finally, the link between the self-consistent theory and the different orders of the multiple scattering theory is clarified.

  4. Ranging in an underwater medium with multiple isogradient sound speed profile layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramezani, H.; Leus, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the problem of acoustic ranging between sensor nodes in an underwater environment. The underwater medium is assumed to be composed of multiple isogradient sound speed profile (SSP) layers where in each layer the sound speed is linearly related to the depth. Furthermore,

  5. Comparison of measurements and predictions of sound propagation in a valley-slope configuration in an inhomogeneous atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, T; Botteldooren, D; Lercher, P

    2007-05-01

    Mountainous areas form a very specific context for sound propagation: There is a particular ground effect and meteorological conditions are often extreme. In this paper, detailed sound propagation calculations are compared to noise measurements accompanied by meteorological observations. The sound source considered is road traffic along the center axis of a valley. Noise levels were measured in two cross sections, at three locations each: one on the valley floor and two on the slopes, up to 166 m above the source. For the numerical calculations, the rotated Green's function parabolic equation method is used, taking into account the undulation of the terrain and an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Typical parameters of this method were optimized for computational efficiency. Predictions agree with measurements to within 3 dBA up to propagation distances of 1 km, in windless conditions. The calculations further show that the terrain profile is responsible for an increase in sound pressure level at distant, elevated points up to 30 dBA compared to a flat ground situation. Complex temperature profiles account for level changes between -3 dBA and +10 dBA relative to a homogeneous atmosphere. This study shows that accurate sound level prediction in a valley-slope configuration requires detailed numerical calculations.

  6. An algorithm for determination of geodetic path for application in long-range acoustic propagation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Navelkar, G.S.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    A computer program has been developed for the construction of geodetic path between two points on the spheroidal surface for application in long range acoustic propagation in the ocean. Geodetic equations have integrated numerically upto...

  7. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  8. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François, E-mail: francois.coulouvrat@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7190, Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  9. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  10. Asymptotic limits of some models for sound propagation in porous media and the assignment of the pore characteristic lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Dazel, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Modeling of sound propagation in porous media requires the knowledge of several intrinsic material parameters, some of which are difficult or impossible to measure directly, particularly in the case of a porous medium which is composed of pores with a wide range of scales and random interconnections. Four particular parameters which are rarely measured non-acoustically, but used extensively in a number of acoustical models, are the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths, thermal permeability, and Pride parameter. The main purpose of this work is to show how these parameters relate to the pore size distribution which is a routine characteristic measured non-acoustically. This is achieved through the analysis of the asymptotic behavior of four analytical models which have been developed previously to predict the dynamic density and/or compressibility of the equivalent fluid in a porous medium. In this work the models proposed by Johnson, Koplik, and Dashn [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379-402 (1987)], Champoux and Allard [J. Appl. Phys. 70(4), 1975-1979 (1991)], Pride, Morgan, and Gangi [Phys. Rev. B 47, 4964-4978 (1993)], and Horoshenkov, Attenborough, and Chandler-Wilde [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 1198-1209 (1998)] are compared. The findings are then used to compare the behavior of the complex dynamic density and compressibility of the fluid in a material pore with uniform and variable cross-sections.

  11. Sound propagation in forests: A comparison of experimental results and values predicted by the Nord 2000 model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarrero, A.I.; Martín, M.A.; González, J.

    2008-01-01

    forests with trees with deciduous and evergreen leaves, different tree density, different trunk diameter, etc. The experimental results indicate that trees have a noticeable effect on sound propagation at medium and high frequencies at distances longer than 40m. The Nord 2000 model uses a simple algorithm...... is allowed to vary with distance. The high frequency effect of trees is in general not predicted very well....

  12. A Hybrid Finite Element/Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Integral Model for Shooting Range Sound Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    National legislation enforces a limit on the Sound Levels of outdoor military shooting ranges observed in nearby residential areas. These restrictions directly influence the number of shots that may be fired at a specific shooting range, which may conflict with the required/ scheduled training

  13. A model for calculating specular and diffuse reflections in outdoor sound propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    In many practical outdoor situations, the direct sound path between a noise source and a receiver is screened by an obstacle. In these situations indirect sound paths become important, in particular reflections of sound waves. Reflections may occur at objects such as a vertical wall, but also at the

  14. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere. 1: Measurement of sound absorption in the air. 2: Measurement of ground impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, J.; Meredith, R. W.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication of parts for the acoustic ground impedance meter was completed, and the instrument tested. Acoustic ground impedance meter, automatic data processing system, cooling system for the resonant tube, and final results of sound absorption in N2-H2O gas mixtures at elevated temperatures are described.

  15. A didactically novel derivation of the telegraph equation to describe sound propagation in rigid tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Bernie C.; Driessen, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    Starting from first principles, we derive the telegraph equation to describe the propagation of sound waves in rigid tubes by using a simple approach that yields a lossy transmission line model with frequency-independent parameters. The approach is novel in the sense that it has not been found in the literature or textbooks. To derive the lossy acoustic telegraph equation from the lossless wave equation, we need only to relax the assumption that the dynamical variables are constant over the entire cross-sectional area of the tube. In this paper, we do this by introducing a relatively narrow boundary layer at the wall of the tube, over which the dynamical variables decrease linearly from the constant value to zero. This allows us to make very simple corrections to the lossless case, and to express them in terms of two parameters, namely the viscous diffusion time constant and the thermal diffusion time constant. The coefficients of the resulting telegraph equation are frequency-independent. A comparison with the telegraph equation for the electrical transmission line establishes precise relationships between the electrical circuit elements and the physical properties of the fluid. These relationships are thus proven a posteriori rather than asserted a priori. In this way, we arrive at an instructive and useful derivation of the acoustic telegraph equation, which takes viscous damping and thermal dissipation into account, and is accessible to students at the undergraduate level. This derivation does not resort to the combined heavy machinery of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics, does not assume that the waveforms are sinusoidal, and does not assume any particular cross-sectional shape of the tube. Surprisingly, we have been unable to find a comparable treatment in the standard introductory physics and acoustics texts, or in the literature.

  16. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  17. Preliminary analysis of measured sound propagation over various seasonal snow covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Donald G.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation in the 5 to 500-Hz frequency band were conducted under various snow cover conditions during the 1989 to 1990 winter in New Hampshire. The objective was to determine the effect of snow cover thickness and other snow properties on the absorption of acoustic pulses. Blank pistol shots were used as the source of the acoustic waves, and geophones and microphones in an 80 m-long linear array served as receivers. Snow thicknesses ranged from 0.05 to 0.35 m, and densities varied from 100 to 350 kg m(sup -3) during the 10 separate measurement days. Preliminary analysis indicates that the peak pulse amplitude decayed in proportion to approx. gamma (sup -1.7) for most conditions and that the acoustic-to-seismic ratios varied from about 4 to 15 x 10(exp -6) m s(sup -1) Pa(sup -1). Theoretical waveforms were calculated for propagation in a homogeneous atmosphere using Attenborough's model of ground impedance. An automatic fitting procedure for the normalized experimental and theoretical waveforms was used to determine the effective flow resistivity of the snow covers, and gave values of 10 to 35 kN s m(sup -4), in agreement with earlier results.

  18. Numerical Experiments in Error Control for Sound Propagation Using a Damping Layer Boundary Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from numerical experiments for controlling the error caused by a damping layer boundary treatment when simulating the propagation of an acoustic signal from a continuous pressure source. The computations are with the 2D Linearized Euler Equations (LEE) for both a uniform mean flow and a steady parallel jet. The numerical experiments are with algorithms that are third, fifth, seventh and ninth order accurate in space and time. The numerical domain is enclosed in a damping layer boundary treatment. The damping is implemented in a time accurate manner, with simple polynomial damping profiles of second, fourth, sixth and eighth power. At the outer boundaries of the damping layer the propagating solution is uniformly set to zero. The complete boundary treatment is remarkably simple and intrinsically independant from the dimension of the spatial domain. The reported results show the relative effect on the error from the boundary treatment by varying the damping layer width, damping profile power, damping amplitude, propagtion time, grid resolution and algorithm order. The issue that is being addressed is not the accuracy of the numerical solution when compared to a mathematical solution, but the effect of the complete boundary treatment on the numerical solution, and to what degree the error in the numerical solution from the complete boundary treatment can be controlled. We report maximum relative absolute errors from just the boundary treatment that range from O[10-2] to O[10-7].

  19. Sound and sound sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Wahlberg, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    There is no difference in principle between the infrasonic and ultrasonic sounds, which are inaudible to humans (or other animals) and the sounds that we can hear. In all cases, sound is a wave of pressure and particle oscillations propagating through an elastic medium, such as air. This chapter...... of these properties are dictated by simple physical relationships between the size of the sound emitter and the wavelength of emitted sound. The wavelengths of the signals need to be sufficiently short in relation to the size of the emitter to allow for the efficient production of propagating sound pressure waves...... is about the physical laws that govern how animals produce sound signals and how physical principles determine the signals’ frequency content and sound level, the nature of the sound field (sound pressure versus particle vibrations) as well as directional properties of the emitted signal. Many...

  20. Propagation Loss Measurements at 400 Hertz in the BIFI Range Using a Towed Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-27

    series using the BIFI Range (Reference 1) located between Block Island, Rhode Island and Fishers Island, New York. Three types of acoustic tests were... Colossus theoretical predictions (Reference 7). The agreement is fairly good; it is apparent, howev er, that the Colossus predictions do not take into...given in reference 11. - Propagation loss was measured as a function of range and the results compared to the Colossus predictions’ (reference 7). The

  1. Application of boost guidance to NASA sounding rocket launch operations at the White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Detwiler, D. F., Jr.; Hall, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique problems associated with launching the Black Brant V, VIII, and IX sounding rocket vehicles at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) and the significance of the introduction of the S19 to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility sounding rocket program in terms of launch flexibility, improved impact dispersion, higher flight reliability, and reduced program costs. This paper also discusses salient flight results from NASA 36.011UL (the first S19 guided Black Brant launched at WSMR) and the NASA Comet Halley missions (36.010DL and 36.017DL).

  2. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos, E-mail: triantafillos.koukoulas@npl.co.uk; Piper, Ben [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  3. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Muddled about what makes music? Stuck on the study of harmonics? Dumbfounded by how sound gets around? Now you no longer have to struggle to teach concepts you really don t grasp yourself. Sound takes an intentionally light touch to help out all those adults science teachers, parents wanting to help with homework, home-schoolers seeking necessary scientific background to teach middle school physics with confidence. The book introduces sound waves and uses that model to explain sound-related occurrences. Starting with the basics of what causes sound and how it travels, you'll learn how musical instruments work, how sound waves add and subtract, how the human ear works, and even why you can sound like a Munchkin when you inhale helium. Sound is the fourth book in the award-winning Stop Faking It! Series, published by NSTA Press. Like the other popular volumes, it is written by irreverent educator Bill Robertson, who offers this Sound recommendation: One of the coolest activities is whacking a spinning metal rod...

  4. Long-range propagation of plasmon and phonon polaritons in hyperbolic-metamaterial waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.

    2017-12-01

    We study photonic multilayer waveguides that include layers of materials and metamaterials with a hyperbolic dispersion (HMM). We consider the long-range propagation of plasmon and phonon polaritons at the dielectric–HMM interface in different waveguide geometries (single boundary or different layers of symmetric cladding). In contrast to the traditional analysis of geometrical parameters, we make an emphasis on the optical properties of constituent materials: solving dispersion equations, we analyze how dielectric and HMM permittivities affect propagation length and mode size of waveguide eigenmodes. We derive figures of merit that should be used for each waveguide in a broad range of permittivity values as well as compare them with plasmonic waveguides. We show that the conventional plasmonic quality factor, which is the ratio of real to imaginary parts of permittivity, is not applicable to the case of waveguides with complex structure. Both telecommunication wavelengths and mid-infrared spectral ranges are of interest considering recent advances in van der Waals materials, such as hexagonal boron nitride. We evaluate the performance of the waveguides with hexagonal boron nitride in the range where it possesses hyperbolic dispersion (wavelength 6.3–7.3 μm), and we show that these waveguides with natural hyperbolic properties have higher propagation lengths than metal-based HMM waveguides.

  5. Using a fast Fourier method to model sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over a stratified porous-elastic ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooms, S.; Attenborough, K.

    1990-01-01

    Using a Fast Fourier integration method and a global matrix method for solution of the boundary condition equations at all interfaces simultaneously, a useful tool for predicting acoustic propagation in a stratified fluid over a stratified porous-elastic solid was developed. The model for the solid is a modified Biot-Stoll model incorporating four parameters describing the pore structure corresponding to the Rayleigh-Attenborough rigid-porous structure model. The method is also compared to another Fast Fourier code (CERL-FFP) which models the ground as an impedance surface under a horizontally stratified air. Agreement with the CERL FFP is good. The effects on sound propagation of a combination of ground elasticity, complex ground structure, and atmospheric conditions are demonstrated by theoretical results over a snow layer, and experimental results over a model ground surface.

  6. Sound

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Sound has the power to soothe, excite, warn, protect, and inform. Indeed, the transmission and reception of audio signals pervade our daily lives. Readers will examine the mechanics and properties of sound and provides an overview of the "interdisciplinary science called acoustics." Also covered are functions and diseases of the human ear.

  7. CFD-DEM Simulation of Propagation of Sound Waves in Fluid Particles Fluidised Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khawaja

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, speed of sound in 2 phase mixture has been explored using CFD-DEM (Computational Fluid Dynamcis - Discrete Element Modelling. In this method volume averaged Navier Stokes, continuity and energy equations are solved for fluid. Particles are simulated as individual entities; their behaviour is captured by Newton's laws of motion and classical contact mechanics. Particle-fluid interaction is captured using drag laws given in literature. The speed of sound in a medium depends on physical properties. It has been found experimentally that speed of sound drops significantly in 2 phase mixture of fluidised particles because of its increased density relative to gas while maintaining its compressibility. Due to the high rate of heat transfer within 2 phase medium as given in Roy et al. (1990, it has been assumed that the fluidised gas-particle medium is isothermal. The similar phenomenon has been tried to be captured using CFD-DEM numerical simulation. The disturbance is introduced and fundamental frequency in the medium is noted to measure the speed of sound for e.g. organ pipe. It has been found that speed of sound is in agreement with the relationship given in Roy et al. (1990. Their assumption that the system is isothermal also appears to be valid.

  8. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  9. Outdoor sound propagation reference model developed in the European harmonoise project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Defrance, J.; Salomons, E.; Noordhoek, I.; Heimann, D.; Plovsing, B.; Watts, G.; Jonasson, H.; Xuetao, Z.; Premat, E.; Schmich, I.; Aballea, F.; Baulac, M.; Roo, F.de

    2007-01-01

    The Harmonoise reference model has been developed in order to predict long-term average sound levels in road and railway situations that are geometrically relatively simple but physically complex. The present paper describes all steps of calculations with this powerful model which includes several

  10. Experimental implementation of a low-frequency global sound equalization method based on free field propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Lydolf, Morten

    2007-01-01

    , which occupies a considerable part of the complete volume of the room. The equalization method, based on the simulation of a progressive plane wave, was implemented in a room with inner dimensions of 2.70 m x 2.74 m x 2.40 m. With this method,the sound was reproduced by a matrix of 4 x 5 loudspeakers...... in one of the walls. After traveling through the room, the sound wave was absorbed on the opposite wall, which had a similar arrangement of loudspeakers, by means of active control. A set of 40 digital FIR filters was used to modify the original input signal before it was fed to the loudspeakers, one......An experimental implementation of a global sound equalization method in a rectangular room using active control is described in this paper. The main purpose of the work has been to provide experimental evidence that sound can be equalized in a continuous three-dimensional region, the listening zone...

  11. Resistance to alveolar shape change limits range of force propagation in lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Smith, Bradford J; Bates, Jason H T

    2015-06-01

    We have recently shown that if the lung parenchyma is modeled in 2 dimensions as a network of springs arranged in a pattern of repeating hexagonal cells, the distortional forces around a contracting airway propagate much further from the airway wall than classic continuum theory predicts. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this occurs because of the negligible shear modulus of a hexagonal spring network. We simulated the narrowing of an airway embedded in a hexagonal network of elastic alveolar walls when the hexagonal cells of the network offered some resistance to a change in shape. We found that as the forces resisting shape change approach about 10% of the forces resisting length change of an individual spring the range of distortional force propagation in the spring network fell of rapidly as in an elastic continuum. We repeated these investigations in a 3-dimensional spring network composed of space-filling polyhedral cells and found similar results. This suggests that force propagation away from a point of local parenchymal distortion also falls off rapidly in real lung tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On horizontal coherence estimates from path integral theory for sound propagation through random ocean sound-speed perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosi, John A

    2013-10-01

    Previously published results from path integral theory for the horizontal coherence length utilized an empirical relation for the phase structure function density that was quite different from path integral results obtained for depth and time coherence where the phase structure function density was expanded to second order in the lag. This letter presents a result for horizontal coherence length which carries out the quadratic expansion and analytically solves the integral equations. Some simple calculations of horizontal coherence length demonstrate the differences between the present and old expressions. In contrast to the empirical result the present expression shows the expected one over square-root range and one over frequency scalings. The results also show more clearly how transverse coherence is sensitive to the space-time scales of internal waves and other environmental parameters.

  13. Observationally constrained modeling of sound in curved ocean internal waves: examination of deep ducting and surface ducting at short range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    A study of 400 Hz sound focusing and ducting effects in a packet of curved nonlinear internal waves in shallow water is presented. Sound propagation roughly along the crests of the waves is simulated with a three-dimensional parabolic equation computational code, and the results are compared to measured propagation along fixed 3 and 6 km source/receiver paths. The measurements were made on the shelf of the South China Sea northeast of Tung-Sha Island. Construction of the time-varying three-dimensional sound-speed fields used in the modeling simulations was guided by environmental data collected concurrently with the acoustic data. Computed three-dimensional propagation results compare well with field observations. The simulations allow identification of time-dependent sound forward scattering and ducting processes within the curved internal gravity waves. Strong acoustic intensity enhancement was observed during passage of high-amplitude nonlinear waves over the source/receiver paths, and is replicated in the model. The waves were typical of the region (35 m vertical displacement). Two types of ducting are found in the model, which occur asynchronously. One type is three-dimensional modal trapping in deep ducts within the wave crests (shallow thermocline zones). The second type is surface ducting within the wave troughs (deep thermocline zones). © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  14. Sound propagation in saturated gas-vapor-droplet suspensions with droplet evaporation and nonlinear relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-06-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson [J. Atmos. Sci. 32(11), 2201-2205 (1975)] to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  15. Coupled systems of fractional equations related to sound propagation: analysis and discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Garra, Roberto; Polito, Federico

    2013-01-01

    In this note we analyse the propagation of a small density perturbation in a one-dimensional compressible fluid by means of fractional calculus modelling, replacing thus the ordinary time derivative with the Caputo fractional derivative in the constitutive equations. By doing so, we embrace a vast phenomenology, including subdiffusive, superdiffusive and also memoryless processes like classical diffusions. From a mathematical point of view, we study systems of coupled fractional equations, le...

  16. Propagation in a shearing plasma. II - Turbulence and the frequency range of pulsar microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.; Tademaru, E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented which explore the propagation of radio waves and pulses through a turbulent shearing plasma. A stochastic model is used to describe the turbulent velocity field, in which random fluctuations are superposed on a mean profile. Both Gaussian wave packets and shot-noise pulses polarized in the plane of shearing acquire quasi-periodic intensity modulations above the rest-frame plasma frequency. The frequency range over which these modulations appear is shown to depend on the spatial correlation length of the turbulent fluctuations and on their standard deviation from the mean velocity. The period of the modulations is variable from one realization of the random process to the next, and the average period is frequency dependent. The results of these calculations lend further support to a model for pulsar microstructure in which periodic micropulses are pure temporal modulations of the emitted radiation due to propagation effects in magnetospheric shearing regions. It is shown that turbulence on a scale of approximately 10 cm can produce these quasi-periodic modulations over a frequency range comparable to that of observed microstructure.

  17. Observation of sound focusing and defocusing due to propagating nonlinear internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J; Badiey, M; Karjadi, E A; Katsnelson, B; Tskhoidze, A; Lynch, J F; Moum, J N

    2008-09-01

    Fluctuations of the low frequency sound field in the presence of an internal solitary wave packet during the Shallow Water '06 experiment are analyzed. Acoustic, environmental, and on-board ship radar image data were collected simultaneously before, during, and after a strong internal solitary wave packet passed through the acoustic track. Preliminary analysis of the acoustic wave temporal intensity fluctuations agrees with previously observed phenomena and the existing theory of the horizontal refraction mechanism, which causes focusing and defocusing when the acoustic track is nearly parallel to the front of the internal waves [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122(2), pp. 747-760 (2007)].

  18. A Variational Formulation for the Finite Element Analysis of Sound Wave Propagation in a Spherical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiedzik, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Development of design tools to furnish optimal acoustic environments for lightweight aircraft demands the ability to simulate the acoustic system on a workstation. In order to form an effective mathematical model of the phenomena at hand, we have begun by studying the propagation of acoustic waves inside closed spherical shells. Using a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction model based upon variational principles, we have written a finite element analysis program and are in the process of examining several test cases. Future investigations are planned to increase model accuracy by incorporating non-linear and viscous effects.

  19. A turbulence spectral model for sound propagation in the atmosphere that incorporates shear and buoyancy forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson

    2000-11-01

    A three-dimensional model for turbulent velocity fluctuations in the atmospheric boundary layer is developed and used to calculate scattering of sound. The model, which is based on von Karman's spectrum, incorporates separate contributions from shear- and buoyancy-forced turbulence. New equations are derived from the model that predict the strength and diffraction parameters for scattering of sound as a function of height from the ground and atmospheric conditions. The need is demonstrated for retaining two distinct scattering length scales, one associated with scattering strength and the other with diffraction. These length scales are height dependent and vary substantially with the relative proportions of shear and buoyancy forcing. The turbulence model predicts that for forward-scattered waves the phase variance is much larger than the log-amplitude variance, a behavior borne out by experimental data. A new method for synthesizing random fields, based on empirical orthogonal functions, is developed to accommodate the height dependence of the turbulence model. The method is applied to numerical calculations of scattering into an acoustic shadow zone, yielding good agreement with previous measurements.

  20. A vertical eigenfunction expansion for the propagation of sound in a downward-refracting atmosphere over a complex impedance plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxler, Roger

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of sound in a stratified downward-refracting atmosphere over a complex impedance plane is studied. The problem is solved by separating the wave equation into vertical and horizontal parts. The vertical part has non-self-adjoint boundary conditions, so that the well-known expansion in orthonormal eigenfunctions cannot be used. Instead, a less widely known eigenfunction expansion for non-self-adjoint ordinary differential operators is employed. As in the self-adjoint case, this expansion separates the acoustic field into a ducted part, expressed as a sum over modes which decrease exponentially with height, and an upwardly propagating part, expressed as an integral over modes which are asymptotically (with height) plane waves. The eigenvalues associated with the modes in this eigenfunction expansion are, in general, complex valued. A technique is introduced which expresses the non-self-adjoint problem as a perturbation of a self-adjoint one, allowing one to efficiently find the complex eigenvalues without having to resort to searches in the complex plane. Finally, an application is made to a model for the nighttime boundary layer.

  1. A comparison of experiment and theory for sound propagation in variable area ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Marshall, R. L.; Hurst, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental and analytical program has been carried out to evaluate sound suppression techniques in ducts that produce refraction effects due to axial velocity gradients. The analytical program employs a computer code based on the method of multiple scales to calculate the influence of axial variations due to slow changes in the cross-sectional area as well as transverse gradients due to the wall boundary layers. Detailed comparisons between the analytical predictions and the experimental measurements have been made. The circumferential variations of pressure amplitudes and phases at several axial positions have been examined in straight and variable area ducts, with hard walls and lined sections, and with and without a mean flow. Reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results has been found.

  2. Dynamic range compression in the honey bee auditory system toward waggle dance sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Tsujiuchi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Honey bee foragers use a "waggle dance" to inform nestmates about direction and distance to locations of attractive food. The sound and air flows generated by dancer's wing and abdominal vibrations have been implicated as important cues, but the decoding mechanisms for these dance messages are poorly understood. To understand the neural mechanisms of honey bee dance communication, we analyzed the anatomy of antenna and Johnston's organ (JO in the pedicel of the antenna, as well as the mechanical and neural response characteristics of antenna and JO to acoustic stimuli, respectively. The honey bee JO consists of about 300-320 scolopidia connected with about 48 cuticular "knobs" around the circumference of the pedicel. Each scolopidium contains bipolar sensory neurons with both type I and II cilia. The mechanical sensitivities of the antennal flagellum are specifically high in response to low but not high intensity stimuli of 265-350 Hz frequencies. The structural characteristics of antenna but not JO neurons seem to be responsible for the non-linear responses of the flagellum in contrast to mosquito and fruit fly. The honey bee flagellum is a sensitive movement detector responding to 20 nm tip displacement, which is comparable to female mosquito. Furthermore, the JO neurons have the ability to preserve both frequency and temporal information of acoustic stimuli including the "waggle dance" sound. Intriguingly, the response of JO neurons was found to be age-dependent, demonstrating that the dance communication is only possible between aged foragers. These results suggest that the matured honey bee antennae and JO neurons are best tuned to detect 250-300 Hz sound generated during "waggle dance" from the distance in a dark hive, and that sufficient responses of the JO neurons are obtained by reducing the mechanical sensitivity of the flagellum in a near-field of dancer. This nonlinear effect brings about dynamic range compression in the honey bee

  3. Normal mode solution for low-frequency sound propagation in a downward refracting atmosphere above a complex impedance plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, R; Baird, G; Wu, W

    1992-03-01

    The development of the fast field and parabolic equation solutions to the wave equation has made it possible to solve for the combined effects of refraction in a layered atmosphere and the interaction of sound with a complex impedance ground surface. In many respects the numerical methods have advanced beyond our understanding of the basic phenomena. In an earlier study [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 89, 107-114 (1991)], the residue series solution for upward refraction was investigated and provided insight into the nature of the interaction of refraction and ground reflection. In this paper results are presented of a similar normal mode solution for downward refraction above a complex impedance ground surface. This model is used to investigate when the surface wave is excited for downward refraction conditions and to develop criteria for the maximum range of cylindrical decay as a function of phase and magnitude of the ground impedance and the magnitude of the sound velocity gradient.

  4. A wave-envelope of sound propagation in nonuniform circular ducts with compressible mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kaiser, J. E.; Shaker, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic theory is developed to determine the sound transmission and attenuation through an infinite, hard-walled or lined circular duct carrying compressible, sheared, mean flows and having a variable cross section. The theory is applicable to large as well as small axial variations, as long as the mean flow does not separate. The technique is based on solving for the envelopes of the quasi-parallel acoustic modes that exist in the duct instead of solving for the actual wave, thereby reducing the computation time and the round-off error encountered in purely numerical techniques. The solution recovers the solution based on the method of multiple scales for slowly varying duct geometry. A computer program was developed based on the wave-envelope analysis for general mean flows. Results are presented for the reflection and transmission coefficients as well as the acoustic pressure distributions for a number of conditions: both straight and variable area ducts with and without liners and mean flows from very low to high subsonic speeds are considered.

  5. Sound propagation in a monodisperse bubble cloud: from the crystal to the glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, M; Hocquet, T; Leroy, V

    2010-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the propagation of a monochromatic pressure wave in an unbounded monodisperse bubbly liquid. We begin with the case of a regular bubble array--a bubble crystal--for which we derive a dispersion relation. In order to interpret the different branches of this relation, we introduce a formalism, the radiative picture, which is the adaptation to acoustics of the standard splitting of the electric field in an electrostatic and a radiative part in Coulomb gauge. In the case of an irregular or completely random array--a bubble glass--and at wavelengths large compared to the size of the bubble array spatial inhomogeneities, the difference between order and disorder is not felt by the pressure wave: a dispersion relation still holds, coinciding with that of a bubble crystal with the same bubble size and air volume fraction at the centre of its first Brillouin zone. This relation is discussed and compared to that obtained by Foldy in the framework of his multiscattering approach.

  6. Preserving spatial perception in rooms using direct-sound driven dynamic range compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; May, Tobias; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-06-01

    Fast-acting hearing-aid compression systems typically distort the auditory cues involved in the spatial perception of sounds in rooms by enhancing low-level reverberant energy portions of the sound relative to the direct sound. The present study investigated the benefit of a direct-sound driven compression system that adaptively selects appropriate time constants to preserve the listener's spatial impression. Specifically, fast-acting compression was maintained for time-frequency units dominated by the direct sound while the processing of the compressor was linearized for time-frequency units dominated by reverberation. This compression scheme was evaluated with normal-hearing listeners who indicated their perceived location and distribution of sound images in the horizontal plane for virtualized speech. The experimental results confirmed that both independent compression at each ear and linked compression across ears resulted in broader, sometimes internalized, sound images as well as image splits. In contrast, the linked direct-sound driven compression system provided the listeners with a spatial perception similar to that obtained with linear processing that served as the reference condition. The independent direct-sound driven compressor created a sense of movement of the sound between the two ears, suggesting that preserving the interaural level differences via linked compression is advantageous with the proposed direct-sound driven compression scheme.

  7. On the effect of topography on surface wave propagation in the ambient noise frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of analyzing empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-period surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 s). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to significantly affect recovered velocity variations in the ambient noise frequency range.

  8. Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    , an optimal frequency range between approximately 500 Hz and 2 kHz. The hearing system of crows enables the most sensitive detection of signals in noise within this range. From modeling, noise measurements, and hearing data we estimate hooded crow active space to be roughly 1 km, but with great variance...... In a study of territorial communication distance of hooded crows we find an excellent correspondence between model predicted crow call transmission and re-recorded crow calls. Modeling average transmission characteristics within a spatial matrix of sender/receiver distances and heights...... representative of crow territorial communication and taking into account ground effect and air turbulence, we predict an optimal transmission frequency range between 0,5-1.6 kHz. In a natural open field crow habitat we measure, with sender and receiver heights of 2.8 m and transmission distances up to 320 m...

  9. Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of spheres: Analytical comparison between coupled phase model and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of small spheres is studied using two models: a hydrodynamic model based on the coupled phase equations and an acoustic model based on the ECAH (ECAH: Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley) multiple scattering theory. The aim is to compare both models through the study of three fundamental kinds of particles: rigid particles, elastic spheres, and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic model is based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation generalized to elastic spheres and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic forces for elastic spheres are introduced by analogy with those of droplets. The ECAH theory is also modified in order to take into account the velocity of rigid particles. Analytical calculations performed for long wavelength, low dilution, and weak absorption in the ambient fluid show that both models are strictly equivalent for the three kinds of particles studied. The analytical calculations show that dilatational and translational mechanisms are modeled in the same way by both models. The effective parameters of dilute suspensions are also calculated.

  10. Sound propagation in a lattice of elastic beads: Time of flight, dispersion relation and time-frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Christophe; Gilles, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We study sound propagation in a model granular medium, which is a triangular array of nominally identical spherical beads under isotropic stress. Because of the point-like nature of the contacts between the beads, the slightest polydispersity makes the lattice of effective contacts random. This randomness evolves with the overall stress applied on the boundaries, and we use detection of longitudinal burst waves, with gaussian envelope, as a probe for the medium. At low and moderate stress, the velocity dependency on the applied stress exhibits clear discrepancies with Hertzian behavior, which shows that the contact lattice is indeed random. Time-frequency analysis gives full access to the dispersion relation of the lattice, both for long and short waves. For long waves, the time-of-flight is shown to be identical to the group delay, as expected. This method also allows measurements for short waves, which probe small-scale heterogeneities in the contact lattice: At high stress, almost all possible contacts are effective, and time-of-flight measurements indicate almost perfect Hertzian behavior. Group delay measurements for short waves, on the contrary, reveal persistent small-scale disorder. We discuss in some details the algorithms used for time-frequency analysis (Wigner-Ville distributions, pseudo Wigner-Ville distributions, reassignment method).

  11. Temperature dependence of sound wave propagation in as a diagnostic tools for healthy and rotten black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.) tree trunks

    OpenAIRE

    Orzechowski, Michał; Budniak, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how thermal conditions affect the speed of sound wave propagation, in trunks of living alder Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. trees. This method in practiced when diagnosing the presence of intern.al decay in standing trees. Field work was carried out four times at different temperatures (+13°C, +3°C, -7°C and -16°C) using an lmpulse Hammer. There was a significant correlation between the thermal conditions and the speed of sound wave propaga...

  12. Application of steady state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable area duct: A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound propagation without flow in a rectangular duct with a converging-diverging area variation was studied experimentally and theoretically. The area variation was of sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections and induce modal scattering. The rms (root-mean-squared) pressure and phase angle on both the flat and curved surface were measured and tabulated. The steady state finite element theory and the transient finite difference theory are in good agreement with the data. It is concluded that numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large area variations.

  13. 78 FR 40196 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... government agencies, and educational institutions have conducted suborbital rocket launches from the PFRR...-latitude, auroral-zone rocket launching facility in the United States where a sounding rocket can readily... environmental consequences of five alternative means for continuing sounding rocket launches at PFRR. The...

  14. A time dependent difference theory for sound propagation in ducts with flow. [characteristic of inlet and exhaust ducts of turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    A time dependent numerical solution of the linearized continuity and momentum equation was developed for sound propagation in a two dimensional straight hard or soft wall duct with a sheared mean flow. The time dependent governing acoustic difference equations and boundary conditions were developed along with a numerical determination of the maximum stable time increments. A harmonic noise source radiating into a quiescent duct was analyzed. This explicit iteration method then calculated stepwise in real time to obtain the transient as well as the steady state solution of the acoustic field. Example calculations were presented for sound propagation in hard and soft wall ducts, with no flow and plug flow. Although the problem with sheared flow was formulated and programmed, sample calculations were not examined. The time dependent finite difference analysis was found to be superior to the steady state finite difference and finite element techniques because of shorter solution times and the elimination of large matrix storage requirements.

  15. Prediction of Sound Waves Propagating Through a Nozzle Without/With a Shock Wave Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The benchmark problems in Category 1 (Internal Propagation) of the third Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) Work-shop sponsored by NASA Glenn Research Center are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The first problem addresses the propagation of sound waves through a nearly choked transonic nozzle. The second one concerns shock-sound interaction in a supersonic nozzle. A quasi one-dimension CE/SE Euler solver for a nonuniform mesh is developed and employed to solve both problems. Numerical solutions are compared with the analytical solution for both problems. It is demonstrated that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple way. Furthermore, the simple nonreflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well.

  16. Fast negative feedback enables mammalian auditory nerve fibers to encode a wide dynamic range of sound intensities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ospeck

    Full Text Available Mammalian auditory nerve fibers (ANF are remarkable for being able to encode a 40 dB, or hundred fold, range of sound pressure levels into their firing rate. Most of the fibers are very sensitive and raise their quiescent spike rate by a small amount for a faint sound at auditory threshold. Then as the sound intensity is increased, they slowly increase their spike rate, with some fibers going up as high as ∼300 Hz. In this way mammals are able to combine sensitivity and wide dynamic range. They are also able to discern sounds embedded within background noise. ANF receive efferent feedback, which suggests that the fibers are readjusted according to the background noise in order to maximize the information content of their auditory spike trains. Inner hair cells activate currents in the unmyelinated distal dendrites of ANF where sound intensity is rate-coded into action potentials. We model this spike generator compartment as an attenuator that employs fast negative feedback. Input current induces rapid and proportional leak currents. This way ANF are able to have a linear frequency to input current (f-I curve that has a wide dynamic range. The ANF spike generator remains very sensitive to threshold currents, but efferent feedback is able to lower its gain in response to noise.

  17. Underwater sound from vessel traffic reduces the effective communication range in Atlantic cod and haddock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jenni A; Van Parijs, Sofie M; Hatch, Leila T

    2017-11-07

    Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary is located in Massachusetts Bay off the densely populated northeast coast of the United States; subsequently, the marine inhabitants of the area are exposed to elevated levels of anthropogenic underwater sound, particularly due to commercial shipping. The current study investigated the alteration of estimated effective communication spaces at three spawning locations for populations of the commercially and ecologically important fishes, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Both the ambient sound pressure levels and the estimated effective vocalization radii, estimated through spherical spreading models, fluctuated dramatically during the three-month recording periods. Increases in sound pressure level appeared to be largely driven by large vessel activity, and accordingly exhibited a significant positive correlation with the number of Automatic Identification System tracked vessels at the two of the three sites. The near constant high levels of low frequency sound and consequential reduction in the communication space observed at these recording sites during times of high vocalization activity raises significant concerns that communication between conspecifics may be compromised during critical biological periods. This study takes the first steps in evaluating these animals' communication spaces and alteration of these spaces due to anthropogenic underwater sound.

  18. Long-Range Transhorizon Lunar Surface Radio Wave Propagation in the Presence of a Regolith and a Sparse Exospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range, over-the-horizon (transhorizon) radio wave propagation is considered for the case of the Moon. In the event that relay satellites are not available or otherwise unwarranted for use, transhorizon communication provides for a contingency or backup option for non line-of-sight lunar surface exploration scenarios. Two potential low-frequency propagation mechanisms characteristic of the lunar landscape are the lunar regolith and the photoelectron induced plasma exosphere enveloping the Moon. Although it was hoped that the regolith would provide for a spherical waveguide which could support a trapped surface wave phenomena, it is found that, in most cases, the regolith is deleterious to long range radio wave propagation. However, the presence of the plasma of the lunar exosphere supports wave propagation and, in fact, surpasses the attenuation of the regolith. Given the models of the regolith and exosphere adopted here, it is recommended that a frequency of 1 MHz be considered for low rate data transmission along the lunar surface. It is also recommended that further research be done to capture the descriptive physics of the regolith and the exospheric plasma so that a more complete model can be obtained. This comprehensive theoretical study is based entirely on first principles and the mathematical techniques needed are developed as required; it is self-contained and should not require the use of outside resources for its understanding.

  19. Parametric decay instability of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave in the electron cyclotron frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of the low-power-threshold parametric decay of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave to an upper hybrid wave and a low-hybrid wave is analysed under conditions of nonmonotonic plasma density profile in a magnetic trap. The instability threshold and growth rate are derived explicitly. The analytical results are illustrated under the conditions typical of the ordinary mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance heating harmonic experiments at the FTU tokamak.

  20. Preserving spatial perception in rooms using direct-sound driven dynamic range compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; May, Tobias; Wiinberg, Alan

    2017-01-01

    compression system that adaptively selects appropriate time constants to preserve the listener’s spatial impression. Specifically, fast-acting compression was maintained for timefrequency units dominated by the direct sound while the processing of the compressor was linearized for time-frequency units...

  1. 77 FR 61642 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ..., and educational institutions have conducted suborbital rocket launches from the PFRR. While the PFRR...-zone rocket launching facility in the United States where a sounding rocket can readily study the... rockets are launched and within which spent stages and payloads impact the ground. Within these flight...

  2. Application of 'steady' state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable duct - A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for sound propagation in a simulated infinite hard wall duct with a large change in duct cross sectional area. The data are conveniently tabulated for further use. The 'steady' state finite element theory of Astley and Eversman (1981) and the transient finite difference theory of White (1981) are in good agreement with the data for both the axial and transverse pressure profiles and the axial phase angle. Therefore, numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear to be ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large axial gradients in acoustic parameters. The measured energy reflection coefficient agrees with the values from the Astley-Eversman modal coupling model.

  3. Effects of dynamic-range compression on the spatial attributes of sounds in normal-hearing listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Ian M; Seeber, Bernhard U

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic-range compression is routinely used in bilaterally fitted hearing devices. The objective of this study was to investigate how compression applied independently at each ear affects spatial perception in normal-hearing listeners and to relate the effects to changes in binaural cues caused by the compression for different types of sound. A semantic-differential method was used to measure the spatial attributes of sounds. Eleven normal-hearing participants responded to questions addressing certainty of location, diffuseness, movement, image splits, and externalization of sounds. Responses were given on seven-point scales between pairs of opposing terms. Stimuli included speech and a range of synthetic sounds with varying characteristics. Head-related transfer functions were used to simulate a source at an azimuth of -60° or +60°. Three processing conditions were compared: (1) an unprocessed reference condition; (2) fast-acting, wide-dynamic-range compression operating independently at each ear; and (3) imposition of a static bias in interaural level difference (ILD) equivalent to that generated by the compression under steady state conditions. All processing was applied in a high-frequency channel above 2 kHz. The three processing conditions were compared separately in two bandwidth conditions: a high-pass condition in which the high-frequency channel was presented to listeners in isolation and a full-bandwidth condition in which the high-frequency channel was recombined with the unprocessed low-frequency channel. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to group related questions based on similarity of participants' responses. This led to the calculation of composite scores for four spatial attributes: "diffuseness," "movement," "image split," and "externalization." Compared with the unprocessed condition, fast-acting compression significantly increased diffuseness, movement, and image-split scores and significantly reduced externalization scores. The effects

  4. Sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere near the ground: an approach based on the spectral representation of refractive-index fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, E M; Ostashev, V E; Clifford, S F; Lataitis, R J

    2001-05-01

    A new, rigorous approach is presented for the computation of the fluctuating field of a monopole source in a nonrefracting, turbulent atmosphere above a ground surface. The time-averaged sound pressure level is considered, as well as statistical distributions of the sound pressure level. The computation is based on the Rytov solution of the wave equation for a turbulent medium, evaluated for the half-space above the ground surface. The solution takes into account the ground reflection of scattered waves, which has been neglected in previous work on this subject. The present approach is based on a Fourier-Stieltjes representation of refractive-index fluctuations, and makes use of a turbulent image atmosphere to account for the ground reflection of scattered waves. This approach is rigorous only for a rigid ground surface, but it is shown that it also yields a good approximation for a finite-impedance ground surface. The accuracy of the solution is demonstrated by comparison with results of numerical computations with the parabolic equation method for a turbulent atmosphere. The assumption of a nonrefracting atmosphere implies that direct application of the solution is limited to propagation over relatively small distances. However, this study can also be considered as a basis for a generalized solution for a downward refracting atmosphere, which can be applied for larger propagation distances.

  5. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  6. Sound limb loading in individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation across a range of walking velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation demonstrate significantly increased rates of osteoarthritis in their sound knee. This increased risk is likely the result of altered knee mechanical loading and gait compensations resulting from limited function in the prosthetic limb. Altered knee loading as calculated using loading rates and peak external knee adduction moments and impulses have been associated with both the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in other populations. The purpose of this study was to determine if young individuals with transfemoral amputation demonstrate biomechanical indicators of increased knee osteoarthritis risk. Fourteen young male Service Members with unilateral transfemoral amputation and 14 able-bodied service members underwent biomechanical gait analysis at three standardized walking velocities. A two-way ANOVA (group × speed) with unpaired comparisons with Bonferroni-Holm post-hoc corrections assessed statistical significance and effect sizes (d) were calculated. Normalized peak external knee adduction moments and impulses were 25.7% (P 0.994) and 27.1% (P 1.019) lower, respectively, in individuals with trans-femoral amputation than controls when averaged across speeds, and effect sizes were large. External knee flexor moments were not, however, different between groups and effect sizes were generally small (P > 0.380, d amputation and effect sizes were large (P 1.644). Individuals with transfemoral amputation did not demonstrate biomechanical risk factors for high medial compartment knee joint loads, but the increased loading rates could place the sound knee at greater risk for cartilage or other tissue damage, even if not localized to the medial compartment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold film embedded...

  8. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold fil embedded ...

  9. Dual, Hyperfast Spectral Decompositions for Sound Propagation on the Continental Shelf: Acoustic Lensing, Imaging, Communication and ’Seeing’ Inside Shadow Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-30

    wave equation (PE) [ Hardin and Tappert, 1970], well known as one of the most important wave-theoretic, range-dependent propagation models [ Jensen ...5- REFERENCES F. B. Jensen , W. A. Kuperman, M. B. Porter and H. Schmidt, Computation Ocean Acoustics, Springer, 2000. PUBLICATIONS A. R

  10. Blue and fin whale call source levels and propagation range in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2007-08-01

    Blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus) produce high-intensity, low-frequency calls, which probably function for communication during mating and feeding. The source levels of blue and fin whale calls off the Western Antarctic Peninsula were calculated using recordings made with calibrated, bottom-moored hydrophones. Blue whales were located up to a range of 200 km using hyperbolic localization and time difference of arrival. The distance to fin whales, estimated using multipath arrivals of their calls, was up to 56 km. The error in range measurements was 3.8 km using hyperbolic localization, and 3.4 km using multipath arrivals. Both species produced high-intensity calls; the average blue whale call source level was 189+/-3 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 25-29 Hz, and the average fin whale call source level was 189+/-4 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 15-28 Hz. Blue and fin whale populations in the Southern Ocean have remained at low numbers for decades since they became protected; using source level and detection range from passive acoustic recordings can help in calculating the relative density of calling whales.

  11. Second Sound in Systems of One-Dimensional Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, K. A.; Andreev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    We study sound in Galilean invariant systems of one-dimensional fermions. At low temperatures, we find a broad range of frequencies in which in addition to the waves of density there is a second sound corresponding to the ballistic propagation of heat in the system. The damping of the second sound mode is weak, provided the frequency is large compared to a relaxation rate that is exponentially small at low temperatures. At lower frequencies, the second sound mode is damped, and the propagation of heat is diffusive.

  12. Acoustical effects of a large ridge on low-frequency sound propagation in stationary and moving atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. S.; Jacobson, M. J.; Siegmann, W. L.; Santandrea, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of a ridge on a low-frequency acoustic propagation in quiescent and windy atmospheres are investigated using a parabolic approximation. A logarithmic wind-speed profile, commonly employed to model atmospheric wind currents, is modified and used to model two-dimensional atmospheric flow over a triangularly-shaped hill. The parabolic equation is solved using an implicit finite-difference algorithm. Several examples are examined to determine the combined effects of source-ridge distance, ridge dimensions, wind-speed profile, and CW source frequency on the received acoustic field.

  13. Sperm whale long-range echolocation sounds revealed by ANTARES, a deep-sea neutrino telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; Caballé, A; van der Schaar, M; Solsona, A; Houégnigan, L; Zaugg, S; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V; Solé, M; Vila, F; Djokic, D; Adrián-Martínez, S; Albert, A; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J-J; Avgitas, T; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Celli, S; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coleiro, A; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Di Palma, I; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; El Bojaddaini, I; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Glotin, H; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; Illuminati, G; James, C W; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lachaud, C; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Melis, K; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Nezri, E; Păvălaş, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Turpin, D; Tönnis, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zuñiga, J

    2017-04-12

    Despite dedicated research has been carried out to adequately map the distribution of the sperm whale in the Mediterranean Sea, unlike other regions of the world, the species population status is still presently uncertain. The analysis of two years of continuous acoustic data provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope revealed the year-round presence of sperm whales in the Ligurian Sea, probably associated with the availability of cephalopods in the region. The presence of the Ligurian Sea sperm whales was demonstrated through the real-time analysis of audio data streamed from a cabled-to-shore deep-sea observatory that allowed the hourly tracking of their long-range echolocation behaviour on the Internet. Interestingly, the same acoustic analysis indicated that the occurrence of surface shipping noise would apparently not condition the foraging behaviour of the sperm whale in the area, since shipping noise was almost always present when sperm whales were acoustically detected. The continuous presence of the sperm whale in the region confirms the ecological value of the Ligurian sea and the importance of ANTARES to help monitoring its ecosystems.

  14. Sperm whale long-range echolocation sounds revealed by ANTARES, a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M.; Caballé, A.; van der Schaar, M.; Solsona, A.; Houégnigan, L.; Zaugg, S.; Sánchez, A. M.; Castell, J. V.; Solé, M.; Vila, F.; Djokic, D.; Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; de Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuñiga, J.

    2017-04-01

    Despite dedicated research has been carried out to adequately map the distribution of the sperm whale in the Mediterranean Sea, unlike other regions of the world, the species population status is still presently uncertain. The analysis of two years of continuous acoustic data provided by the ANTARES neutrino telescope revealed the year-round presence of sperm whales in the Ligurian Sea, probably associated with the availability of cephalopods in the region. The presence of the Ligurian Sea sperm whales was demonstrated through the real-time analysis of audio data streamed from a cabled-to-shore deep-sea observatory that allowed the hourly tracking of their long-range echolocation behaviour on the Internet. Interestingly, the same acoustic analysis indicated that the occurrence of surface shipping noise would apparently not condition the foraging behaviour of the sperm whale in the area, since shipping noise was almost always present when sperm whales were acoustically detected. The continuous presence of the sperm whale in the region confirms the ecological value of the Ligurian sea and the importance of ANTARES to help monitoring its ecosystems.

  15. The Jindalee ionospheric sounding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, G. F.

    The objectives, geometry, and principles of the Jindalee FMCW ionospheric sounding system are described. The system is intended to collect sounding data (backscatter, oblique, vertical incidence) for a synoptic study of propagation conditions; data collection is to operate unattended 24 hours a day; all data are to be calibrated in absolute units; there are to be on-line displays and automated interpretation for real-time frequency management; and data are to be tape-recorded for off-line statistical analysis. The system provides the main radar with real-time propagating advice for the selection of optimum operating frequencies and acquires a synoptic data base for the off-line analysis of propagation conditions. Facilities of the system are located at Mt Everard (20 km northwest of Alice Springs), at Harts Range (100 km northeast of Alice Springs), and at Darwin. Ionograms and ionogram plots after computer cleanup are given.

  16. Dolphin biosonar signals measured at extreme off-axis angles: insights to sound propagation in the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Whitlow W L; Branstetter, Brian; Moore, Patrick W; Finneran, James J

    2012-08-01

    Biosonar signals radiated along the beam axis of an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin resemble short transient oscillations. As the azimuth of the measuring hydrophones in the horizontal plane progressively increases with respect to the beam axis the signals become progressively distorted. At approximately ±45°, the signals begin to divide into two components with the time difference between the components increasing with increasing angles. At ±90° or normal to the longitudinal axis of the animal, the time difference between the two pulses measured by the hydrophone on the right side of the dolphin's head is, on average, ∼11.9 μs larger than the time differences observed by the hydrophone on the left side of the dolphin's head. The center frequency of the first pulse is generally lower, by 33-47 kHz, than the center frequency of the second pulse. When considering the relative locations of the two phonic lips, the data suggest that the signals are being produced by one of the phonic lips and the second pulse resulting from a reflection within the head of the animal. The generation of biosonar signals is a complex process and the propagation pathways through the dolphin's head are not well understood.

  17. The propagation of detonation waves in non-ideal condensed-phase explosives confined by high sound-speed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikolaos; Lee, Bok Jik

    2013-08-01

    Highly non-ideal condensed-phase explosives used by the mining industry have a strong detonation velocity dependence on the charge dimension. Detonation velocities can be as low as one third of the theoretically calculated ideal detonation velocity in charge radii close to the failure radius. Under these detonation conditions the flow in the confiner can become subsonic, a flow condition under which classical shock-polar analysis is not applicable. This restriction prohibits the use of popular engineering models like detonation shock dynamics and Wood-Kirkwood type models under these confinement conditions. In addition, it has been found in the literature that subsonic flow in the confiner will increase the influence of the confining material on the detonation performance. In this work, we use a multi-phase model coupled to an elastic-plastic model (for the representation of a confiner) to explore the interaction of detonations under these confiner conditions. An ammonium nitrate based mining emulsion is investigated in aluminium and steel confinement of finite and infinite thickness representing the confiner as either a fluid or an elastic-plastic material. It is found that the presence of elastic waves is negligible close to ideal detonation conditions, but is important close to the failure radius and in detonation conditions with subsonic flow in the confiner. High sound-speed confiners support the detonation through energy transport ahead of the detonation front if desensitisation effects are negligible. The detonation front profiles are found to remain convex even in the most non-ideal detonation conditions, and the detonation front curvature only becomes concave in a localised region close to the confiner edge.

  18. Acoustic Environment of Haro Strait: Preliminary Propagation Modeling and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher D; Wolfson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements and acoustic propagation modeling for the frequency range 1 10 kHz are combined to analyze the acoustic environment of Haro Strait of Puget Sound, home to the southern resident killer whales...

  19. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  20. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L.; Sherlock, LaGuinn P.; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M.; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J.; Siegle, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy–based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1—full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2—partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3—partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4—a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were

  1. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L; Sherlock, LaGuinn P; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J; Siegle, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy-based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1-full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2-partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3-partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4-a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were significantly

  2. Coupled Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Sound in Coastal Ocean for Renewable Ocean Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Wen; Jung, Ki Won; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An underwater sound model was developed to simulate sound propagation from marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite difference methods were developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation for sound propagation in the coastal environment. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients was formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method was applied to solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model was then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities, such as construction of OSW turbines or tidal stream turbine operations, in a range-dependent setting. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. This sound model can be useful for evaluating impacts on marine mammals due to deployment of MHK devices and OSW energy platforms.

  3. Propagation of Sound in Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    fran those found at lower frequencies. The Landau-Khalatnikov order parameter relaxation mechanism is shown to contribute insignificantly to the...Chernikova. They differ at lower temperatures frcm the results obtained fran Brillouin scattering measurements. This is the doctoral research work of...Film thicknesses are found by measuring the chemical potential of the film at 1.5K. Thickness measurements depend on the van der Waals constants

  4. Satellite sound broadcast propagation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1991-07-01

    Power transmitted from atop a 17.9 m tower in simulation of a satellite signal, emitted by a tone generator sweeping from 700 to 1800 MHz, was received using a 90 deg beamwidth linearly scanning antenna at many locations inside six buildings of solid brick, corrugated sheet-metal, wood-frame, mobile home, and concrete wall construction. The signal levels are found to have much structure in the spatial and frequency domain but were relatively stable in time. Typically, people moving nearby produced less than 0.5 dB variations, whereas a person blocking the transmission path produces 6 to 10 dB fades. Losses, which at an average position in a room increased from 6 to 12 dB over 750 to 1750 MHz, could be mitigated to 2 to 6 dB by moving the antenna typically less than 30 cm. Severe losses (17.5 dB, mitigated to 12.5 dB) were observed in a concrete wall building, which also exhibited the longest multipath delays (greater than 100 ns). Losses inside a mobile home were even larger (greater than 20 dB) and independent of antenna orientation. The losses showed a clear frequency dependence.

  5. Sound Propagation around Underwater Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    5Z3- 6:22 0 726- - 826+ n - ,27+ 4 .5- - 10:26+ 11:21+ 12:25+ 13:24+ - 14:29+ 25 . .. 2 1.5 0 10 20 jarrival angle( degA (a) RAY ray trace...4 4 + 16:21+ 3.5 - 3.5 3.5 + 3 - 3 3 2.5 - 2.5 2.5 2- 2 2 1.5 1.5 1.5 0 10 20 0 10 20 0 10 larrival angle( degA Angle (deg) Corrected angle (deg) (b

  6. Atmospheric Physics and Sound Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-09-01

    eligc»" troacouötic reciprocity theorem holds are diacussod ax^ ajqje^mental evidence is presented to shew that the experi^nlau! arrangement uged...ployed the electroäcoustic reciprocity theorem in. the manner given | by Maclean?:* The reciprocity method has been .successfully applied . | in...132* ’ ~" ’ U. E. Fubini =Ghiron, Alta. Ereq. h, 530 (1935)5 Eer* ~D’ässaatw 6, 118 (1937). o*** _i. -. ^ — •=, . jäS» *k9- . Vŕ"-!1

  7. SPH Simulation of Acoustic Waves: Effects of Frequency, Sound Pressure, and Particle Spacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic problems consisting of multiphase systems or with deformable boundaries are difficult to describe using mesh-based methods, while the meshfree, Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH method can handle such complicated problems. In this paper, after solving linearized acoustic equations with the standard SPH theory, the feasibility of the SPH method in simulating sound propagation in the time domain is validated. The effects of sound frequency, maximum sound pressure amplitude, and particle spacing on numerical error and time cost are then subsequently discussed based on the sound propagation simulation. The discussion based on a limited range of frequency and sound pressure demonstrates that the rising of sound frequency increases simulation error, and the increase is nonlinear, whereas the rising sound pressure has limited effects on the error. In addition, decreasing the particle spacing reduces the numerical error, while simultaneously increasing the CPU time. The trend of both changes is close to linear on a logarithmic scale.

  8. Characterization of the MEMS Directional Sound Sensor in the High Frequency (15-20 kHz) Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    These membranes connect to a pair of auditory sensory organs, the bulbae acusticae , which are located within a common, air-filled chamber. The...bulbae acusticae attach to the membranes via a ridge-like in-growth of the exoskeleton (apodeme), which resembles a stiff rod. In effect, the PTM...receives the signal and transfers the sound energy through the rod activating the bulbae acusticae . Each bulba acustica contains 70–75 auditory receptor

  9. Range-Depth Tracking of Sounds from a Single-Point Deployment by Exploiting the Deep-Water Sound Speed Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    hardware. The four-day data set, sponsored under a separate MURI research thrust, inadvertently collected numerous sperm, humpback, and dolphin calls...remains the same. 9 Figure 9: Evolution of ray arrival angles (top) and relative multipath arrival times (bottom) as a controlled source is winched...from 300 m to 100 m depth at 49.5 km range. Figure 10: Evolution of ray arrival angles (top) and relative arrival times for a sperm whale click train over 20 minutes.

  10. A computer model for estimating microwave propagation characteristics along earth-space paths in the 1-100 GHz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William C.

    A comprehensive, integrated, and transportable software package for the analysis of digital satellite links is presented. The most notable feature of this software is the inclusion of sophisticated models for attenuation and noise sources. The attenuation-source model takes into account losses due to rain, clouds, wet radomes, and multipath fading, as well as atmospheric absorption, defocusing, and scintillation. The noise-source model considers the radio noise due to the above absorptive losses, as well as extraterrestrial and man-made noise. Together, these models provide a fairly accurate representation of microwave propagation characteristics as they relate to satellite links. The software itself is designed to maximize the user's efficiency and minimize confusion. Menus are used extensively to guide the user through the program, and the use of prompting and input validity checking ensure the accuracy of all data entries. Color displays are used to present the data in an organized, easy-to-read format.

  11. Ultrasound propagation measurements and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Papadakis, E. P.; Fowler, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews three systems designed for accurately measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses. The three systems are presented in order of velocity-measuring precision: + or - 100 ns, + or - 1 ns, + or - 0.2 ns. Also included is a brief discussion of phase and group velocities, with reference to dispersive, highly attenuating materials. Measurement of attenuation by pulse-echo buffer rod techniques is described briefly. These techniques and instruments have been used to measure sound velocity and attenuation in a variety of materials and shapes, over a wide temperature range.

  12. Searching Sound with Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Martin; Chapman, A.

    2010-01-01

    A sound installation developed to accompany Anna Chapman's sound installtion "Subjects for Melancholy Retrospection" that was presented t the Edinburgh Art Festrival in August 2010 at the National Trust for Scotland's Newhailes estate.

  13. Application of the Wiener–Hopf method for describing the propagation of sound in cylindrical and rectangular channels with an impedance jump in the presence of a flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, A. F.; Yakovets, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    Exact solutions to problems of the propagation of acoustic modes in lined channels with an impedance jump in the presence of a uniform flow are constructed. Two problems that can be solved by the Wiener- Hopf method—the propagation of acoustic modes in an infinite cylindrical channel with a transverse impedance jump and the propagation of acoustic modes in a rectangular channel with an impedance jump on one of its walls—are considered. On the channel walls, the Ingard-Myers boundary conditions are imposed and, as an additional boundary condition in the vicinity of the junction of the linings, the condition expressing the finiteness of the acoustic energy. Analytical expressions for the amplitudes of the transmitted and reflected fields are obtained.

  14. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects

  15. Influence of life-history parameters on organochlorine concentrations in free-ranging killer whales (Orcinus orca) from Prince William Sound, AK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylitalo, G M; Matkin, C O; Buzitis, J; Krahn, M M; Jones, L L; Rowles, T; Stein, J E

    2001-12-17

    Certain populations of killer whales (Orcinus orca) have been extensively studied over the past 30 years, including populations that use Puget Sound, WA, the inside waters of British Columbia, Southeastern Alaska and Kenai Fjords/Prince William Sound, Alaska. Two eco-types of killer whales, 'transient' and 'resident', occur in all of these regions. These eco-types are genetically distinct and differ in various aspects of morphology, vocalization patterns, diet and habitat use. Various genetic and photo-identification studies of eastern North Pacific killer whales have provided information on the male-female composition of most of these resident pods and transient groups, as well as the approximate ages, reproductive status and putative recruitment order (birth order) of the individual whales. Biopsy blubber samples of free-ranging resident and transient killer whales from the Kenai Fjords/Prince William Sound, AK region were acquired during the 1994-1999 field seasons and analyzed for selected organochlorines (OCs), including dioxin-like CB congeners and DDTs. Concentrations of OCs in transient killer whales (marine mammal-eating) were much higher than those found in resident animals (fish-eating) apparently due to differences in diets of these two killer whale eco-types. Certain life-history parameters such as sex, age and reproductive status also influenced the concentrations of OCs in the Alaskan killer whales. Reproductive female whales contained much lower levels of OCs than sexually immature whales or mature male animals in the same age class likely due to transfer of OCs from the female to her offspring during gestation and lactation. Recruitment order also influenced the concentrations of OCs in the Alaskan killer whales. In adult male residents, first-recruited whales contained much higher OC concentrations than those measured in non-first-recruited (e.g. second recruited, third recruited) resident animals in the same age group. This study provides

  16. Use of the flexion test of the distal forelimb in the sound horse: repeatability and effect of age, gender, weight, height and fetlock joint range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschers, E; van Weeren, P R

    2001-09-01

    The flexion test of the distal limb is a commonly used clinical tool in both lame and sound horses. In the latter use it is given some predictive value. In recent studies it has been shown that examiner-related factors (force, time) may strongly influence the outcome of the test. In the present study, the possible influences of a number of horse-related factors and short- and long-term repeatability were investigated. Flexion tests were performed by the same researcher in 100 clinically sound horses under standardized conditions. The outcome of the test was scored on a 9-point semiquantitative scale. The maximum flexion angles of the fetlock joints were measured and the range of motion (ROM) of the fetlock joint was calculated. In the second part of the study, flexion tests were repeated, at intervals of 10 min, 30 min, 48 h and 6 months in 23 horses to assess repeatability. Over 60% of the 100 sound horses had a positive flexion test. Of these, about 50% showed a slight lameness, 35% a mild lameness, and 15% a distinct lameness. There was no influence of weight, height or ROM on the score of the flexion test. The outcome of the flexion test increased significantly with age and was significantly higher in mares than in geldings. When repeating the flexion test with short intervals of 10 and 30 min, the score increased significantly after the second test. Repeated flexion after 48 h did not result in a significantly different outcome. Over a 6-month period, the outcome of the test decreased significantly and the ROM increased significantly. It is concluded that most clinically sound horses have a (slightly) positive flexion test of the distal limb. This and the lack of long-term consistency of the test cast doubt on the presumption that a positive flexion test may be an indication for subclinical joint disorders and question the possible value of the test as a predictor of future joint-related problems. There exists a wide individual variation in ROM of the fetlock

  17. Geomorphic evidences of lateral propagation and differential uplift of the two segments of frontal Siwalik range, central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, P. K.; Deopa, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Siwalik range forms the southernmost terrane of the Himalaya. The frontal mountains of this range rise abruptly against the vast Indo-Gangetic plains along the range-bounding Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT), which marks the present day principal displacement zone between Indian and Eurasian plates. With an aim of understanding the morphotectonics of different mountain segments in such a zone of intense tectonic activities, we have analyzed geomorphic indices like 'basin asymmetry factor' (AF), 'transverse topography asymmetry factor' (T), 'basin elongation ratio' (BR) and 'hypsometric integral' (HI) of fifty six drainage basins of 3rd streams in conjunction with 'mountain-front sinuosity' (Smf), 'valley-floor width to height ratio' (Vf) and drainage characteristics of the two large, neighboring segments of the frontal Siwalik mountains. Referred to here as the 'eastern segment' and 'western segment', these two mountain-segments are separated from each other and adjoining mountain-segments by antecedent streams of fourth and fifth order. In both the mountain-segments, the Smf values are mostly between 1.0-1.6 and, likewise, the Vf of most of the streams, calculated at a fix distance of 800m from the mountain-front, is invariably drainage basins and 65% of the eastern-segment's drainage basins indicate their down-tilting towards the west. The azimuths of the Ts of theses basins are not always in conformity with AF suggested down-tilting, but the azimuths of the larger magnitude Ts are by and large in conformity with the AF suggested down-tilting. However, the BR and HI values of all the drainage basins of a mountain-segment do not show any spatial variation. These results suggest that both the studied mountain-segments are actively uplifting, but with faster rate in their eastern part. Moreover, the drainage pattern and deflections in and around both the segments reveal their lateral progression from east to west.

  18. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch......Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects...... and in architectural design. Aesthetics, psychoacoustics, perception, and cognition are all present in this expanding field embracing such categories as soundscape composition, sound art, sonic art, sound design, sound studies and auditory culture. Of greatest significance to the overall field is the investigation...

  19. Principles of underwater sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urick, Robert J

    1983-01-01

    ... the immediately useful help they need for sonar problem solving. Its coverage is broad-ranging from the basic concepts of sound in the sea to making performance predictions in such applications as depth sounding, fish finding, and submarine detection...

  20. Use of internal artificial vaginas for breeding soundness evaluation in range bulls: an alternative for electroejaculation allowing observation of sex drive and mating ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Albert D; Arteaga, Andres A; Brito, Leonardo F C; Palmer, Colin W

    2004-09-01

    The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of an inexpensive, reusable internal artificial vagina (IAV) developed for breeding soundness evaluation of range beef bulls. In addition, sexual behavior during semen collection by IAV was compared to behavior during pasture breeding. Breeding soundness exams (BSEs) were conducted on 165 bulls in two consecutive years (96 in Year 1 and 69 in Year 2). In Year 1, BSEs were done twice in all bulls, once by a conventional protocol using electroejaculation (EEJ), followed by the IAV method, one week later. In Year 2, all BSEs were done on one day; 69 bulls by the IAV method followed by EEJ in 21 bulls that failed to serve the IAV. For semen collection using an IAV, mount cows were restrained in breeding crates and an IAV was inserted into the vagina just beyond the depth of the vestibular sphincter. After each copulation, the IAV was replaced for the next bull to be tested. Semen collection by IAV was successful for all bulls that mounted and penetrated cows during the testing period (54.3 and 69.6% of the bulls served the cows with IAVs in Year 1 and 2, respectively). Semen was collected successfully by EEJ from all bulls in both years. Differences were observed between semen collection methods in semen volume and percentage of sperm staining alive; however, the differences were opposite in Year 1 and 2 and, therefore, were probably due to natural variations in time and within bull rather than the method of semen collection. Semen collection by IAV allowed the detection of problems that prevented copulation in 8 bulls (4.8%) that were determined to be satisfactory potential breeders when semen was collected by EEJ. In Year 1, breeding observations were made at pasture for 15 bulls that served, and 15 bulls that did not serve cows with an IAV. Bulls that did not serve the IAV during the test period had fewer mounts, attempts to mount, and completed services at pasture than bulls that had served the IAV, indicating

  1. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with -11 to -13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that -12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  2. A Numerical Study of the Regimes of Weak Fluctuation Theory for Ocean Acoustic Propagation through Random Internal Wave Sound Speed Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    applied to a radio wave propagation problem in the atmosphere ( Jensen , Kuperman, Porter & Schmidt, 2000). The parabolic equation (PE) method has found...wide application in the field of underwater acoustics after Hardin and Tappert (1973) devised an efficient model based on Fourier transforms. The PE...equation follows the treatment by Jensen , Kuperman, Porter & Schmidt (2000). There are different kinds of parabolic equations, but this thesis

  3. Acoustic characteristics of biosonar sounds of free-ranging botos (Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxis (Sotalia fluviatilis) in the Negro River, Amazon, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukiko; Akamatsu, Tomonari; da Silva, Vera M F; Yoshida, Yayoi; Kohshima, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    Odontoceti emit broadband high-frequency clicks on echolocation for orientation or prey detection. In the Amazon Basin, two odontoceti species, boto (Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis), live sympatrically. The acoustic characteristics of the echolocation clicks of free-ranging botos and tucuxis were measured with a hydrophone array consisting of a full-band and an acoustic event recorder (A-tag). The clicks of the two species were short-duration broadband signals. The apparent source level was 201 dB 1 μPa peak-to-peak at 1 m in the botos and 181 dB 1 μPa peak-to-peak at 1 m in the tucuxis, and the centroid frequency was 82.3 kHz in the botos and 93.1 kHz in the tucuxis. The high apparent source level and low centroid frequency are possibly due to the difference in body size or sound production organs, especially the nasal structure, the sound source of clicks in odontoceti.

  4. Tuning sound with soft dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortot, Eliana; Shmuel, Gal

    2017-04-01

    Soft dielectric tubes undergo large deformations when subjected to radial voltage. Using the theory of nonlinear electroelasticity, we investigate how voltage-controlled deformations of these tubes in an array alter acoustic wave propagation through it. We show that the propagation is annihilated across a certain audible frequency range, referred to as a sonic band gap. We carry out a numerical study, to find that the band gap depends nonlinearly on the voltage, owing to geometrical and material nonlinearities. By analyzing different mechanical constraints, we demonstrate that snap-through instabilities resulting from these nonlinearities can be harnessed to achieve sharp transitions in the gap width. Our conclusions hint at a new strategy to adaptively filter sound using a simple control parameter—an applied voltage.

  5. Infrasound data inversion for atmospheric sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, J.-M.; Sèbe, O.; Landès, M.; Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Matoza, R. S.; Le Pichon, A.; Blanc, E.

    2012-07-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) continuously records acoustic waves in the 0.01-10 Hz frequency band, known as infrasound. These waves propagate through the layered structure of the atmosphere. Coherent infrasonic waves are produced by a variety of anthropogenic and natural sources and their propagation is controlled by spatiotemporal variations of temperature and wind velocity. Natural stratification of atmospheric properties (e.g. temperature, density and winds) forms waveguides, allowing long-range propagation of infrasound waves. However, atmospheric specifications used in infrasound propagation modelling suffer from lack and sparsity of available data above an altitude of 50 km. As infrasound can propagate in the upper atmosphere up to 120 km, we assume that infrasonic data could be used for sounding the atmosphere, analogous to the use of seismic data to infer solid Earth structure and the use of hydroacoustic data to infer oceanic structure. We therefore develop an inversion scheme for vertical atmospheric wind profiles in the framework of an iterative linear inversion. The forward problem is treated in the high-frequency approximation using a Hamiltonian formulation and complete first-order ray perturbation theory is developed to construct the Fréchet derivatives matrix. We introduce a specific parametrization for the unknown model parameters based on Principal Component Analysis. Finally, our algorithm is tested on synthetic data cases spanning different seasonal periods and network configurations. The results show that our approach is suitable for infrasound atmospheric sounding on a regional scale.

  6. Scale Model Experiments on Sound Propagation From a Mach 2.5 Cold Nitrogen Jet Flowing Through a Rigid-Walled Duct With a J-Deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The Launch Systems Testbed (LST) represents the evolution of vibroacoustics research and development work performed at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) over the last 15 years. The LST is located at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) in the KSC industrial complex. The LETF is operated by Sierra Lobo, Inc., as a member of University-Affiliated Technology Development Contract (USTDC) to KSC Spaceport and Engineering and Technology Directorate (YA), with ASRC Aerospace Corporation as a the prime contractor. Trajectory Simulation Mechanism (TSM) is a major component of the LST, developed specifically to simulate nonstationary acoustic loads on launch pad structures, vehicles, and payloads. TSM enhances the capabilities within LST for simulating launch environments of future vehicles. The scaled launch environments will be used to predict the full-scale launch environment via an appropriate scaling procedure. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has tasked NASA KSC to perform a basic technology test program in support of developing a low-cost clean pad (incorporating passive mitigation techniques) for future launch vehicles. The overall goal of the program is to develop innovative launch exhaust management systems, which effectively reduce launch acoustic environment with innovative duct designs, while eliminating traditional sound suppression water systems. Passive techniques, such as nontraditional duct geometries, resonators, and diffusers, etc., will be investigated. The overall goals are to advance innovative concepts for a clean pad while developing ideas to reduce transmitted sound via investigation and modeling of jet exhaust acoustic and flow field characteristics. The series of tests outlined in this report represent baseline tests and are geared towards defining the acoustic load environment on the TSM pad for open and closed duct configurations. This report summarizes the cold jet acoustic testing for Mach 2.5 supersonic nitrogen jet issuing

  7. SU-E-J-138: On the Ion Beam Range and Dose Verification in Hadron Therapy Using Sound Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Veltchev, I [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gayou, O [Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nahirnyak, V [Bukovinian State Medical University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate range verification is of great importance to fully exploit the potential benefits of ion beam therapies. Current research efforts on this topic include the use of PET imaging of induced activity, detection of emerging prompt gamma rays or secondary particles. It has also been suggested recently to detect the ultrasound waves emitted through the ion energy absorption process. The energy absorbed in a medium is dissipated as heat, followed by thermal expansion that leads to generation of acoustic waves. By using an array of ultrasound transducers the precise spatial location of the Bragg peak can be obtained. The shape and intensity of the emitted ultrasound pulse depend on several variables including the absorbed energy and the pulse length. The main objective of this work is to understand how the ultrasound wave amplitude and shape depend on the initial ion energy and intensity. This would help guide future experiments in ionoacoustic imaging. Methods: The absorbed energy density for protons and carbon ions of different energy and field sizes were obtained using Fluka Monte Carlo code. Subsequently, the system of coupled equations for temperature and pressure is solved for different ion pulse intensities and lengths to obtain the pressure wave shape, amplitude and spectral distribution. Results: The proposed calculations show that the excited pressure wave amplitude is proportional to the absorbed energy density and for longer ion pulses inversely proportional to the ion pulse duration. It is also shown that the resulting ionoacoustic pressure distribution depends on both ion pulse duration and time between the pulses. Conclusion: The Bragg peak localization using ionoacoustic signal may eventually lead to the development of an alternative imaging method with sub-millimeter resolution. It may also open a way for in-vivo dose verification from the measured acoustic signal.

  8. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  9. Determining the speed of sound in the air by sound wave interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A.

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical waves propagate through material media. Sound is an example of a mechanical wave. In fluids like air, sound waves propagate through successive longitudinal perturbations of compression and decompression. Audible sound frequencies for human ears range from 20 to 20 000 Hz. In this study, the speed of sound v in the air is determined using the identification of maxima of interference from two synchronous waves at frequency f. The values of v were correct to 0 °C. The experimental average value of {\\bar{ν }}\\exp =336 +/- 4 {{m}} {{{s}}}-1 was found. It is 1.5% larger than the reference value. The standard deviation of 4 m s-1 (1.2% of {\\bar{ν }}\\exp ) is an improved value by the use of the concept of the central limit theorem. The proposed procedure to determine the speed of sound in the air aims to be an academic activity for physics classes of scientific and technological courses in college.

  10. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Long-Range Effects Program Puget Sound project from 1979-08-02 to 1980-04-09 (NODC Accession 9600006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from August 2, 1979 to April 9, 1980. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Long-Range Effects Program Puget Sound project from 1983-11-29 to 1984-08-01 (NODC Accession 8800119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from November 29, 1983 to August 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  12. Entropic "sound" in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Apostol, B. -F.; Stefan, S.; Apostol, M.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that small, local disturbances of entropy in the atmosphere may give rise to "sound" waves propagating with a velocity which depends on the amplitude ratio of the local relative variations of temperature and volume. This velocity is much smaller than the mean molecular velocity and the usual, adiabatic sound velocity.

  13. Density, abundance, survival, and ranging patterns of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Mississippi Sound following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Keith D; McDonald, Trent; Wells, Randall S; Balmer, Brian C; Speakman, Todd; Sinclair, Carrie; Zolman, Eric S; Hornsby, Fawn; McBride, Shauna M; Wilkinson, Krystan A; Schwacke, Lori H

    2017-01-01

    After the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill began in April 2010, studies were initiated on northern Gulf of Mexico common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Mississippi Sound (MSS) to determine density, abundance, and survival, during and after the oil spill, and to compare these results to previous research in this region. Seasonal boat-based photo-identification surveys (2010-2012) were conducted in a section of MSS to estimate dolphin density and survival, and satellite-linked telemetry (2013) was used to determine ranging patterns. Telemetry suggested two different ranging patterns in MSS: (1) inshore waters with seasonal movements into mid-MSS, and (2) around the barrier islands exclusively. Based upon these data, dolphin density was estimated in two strata (Inshore and Island) using a spatially-explicit robust-design capture-recapture model. Inshore and Island density varied between 0.77-1.61 dolphins km-2 ([Formula: see text] = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.28-1.53) and 3.32-5.74 dolphins km-2 ([Formula: see text] = 4.43, 95% CI: 2.70-5.63), respectively. The estimated annual survival rate for dolphins with distinctive fins was very low in the year following the spill, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67-0.78), and consistent with the occurrence of a large scale cetacean unusual mortality event that was in part attributed to the DWH oil spill. Fluctuations in density were not as large or seasonally consistent as previously reported. Total abundance for MSS extrapolated from density results ranged from 4,610 in July 2011 to 3,046 in January 2012 ([Formula: see text] = 3,469, 95% CI: 3,113-3,725).

  14. Density, abundance, survival, and ranging patterns of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus in Mississippi Sound following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith D Mullin

    Full Text Available After the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill began in April 2010, studies were initiated on northern Gulf of Mexico common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus in Mississippi Sound (MSS to determine density, abundance, and survival, during and after the oil spill, and to compare these results to previous research in this region. Seasonal boat-based photo-identification surveys (2010-2012 were conducted in a section of MSS to estimate dolphin density and survival, and satellite-linked telemetry (2013 was used to determine ranging patterns. Telemetry suggested two different ranging patterns in MSS: (1 inshore waters with seasonal movements into mid-MSS, and (2 around the barrier islands exclusively. Based upon these data, dolphin density was estimated in two strata (Inshore and Island using a spatially-explicit robust-design capture-recapture model. Inshore and Island density varied between 0.77-1.61 dolphins km-2 ([Formula: see text] = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.28-1.53 and 3.32-5.74 dolphins km-2 ([Formula: see text] = 4.43, 95% CI: 2.70-5.63, respectively. The estimated annual survival rate for dolphins with distinctive fins was very low in the year following the spill, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67-0.78, and consistent with the occurrence of a large scale cetacean unusual mortality event that was in part attributed to the DWH oil spill. Fluctuations in density were not as large or seasonally consistent as previously reported. Total abundance for MSS extrapolated from density results ranged from 4,610 in July 2011 to 3,046 in January 2012 ([Formula: see text] = 3,469, 95% CI: 3,113-3,725.

  15. Density, abundance, survival, and ranging patterns of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Mississippi Sound following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Keith D.; Wells, Randall S.; Balmer, Brian C.; Speakman, Todd; Sinclair, Carrie; Zolman, Eric S.; Hornsby, Fawn; McBride, Shauna M.; Wilkinson, Krystan A.; Schwacke, Lori H.

    2017-01-01

    After the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill began in April 2010, studies were initiated on northern Gulf of Mexico common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Mississippi Sound (MSS) to determine density, abundance, and survival, during and after the oil spill, and to compare these results to previous research in this region. Seasonal boat-based photo-identification surveys (2010–2012) were conducted in a section of MSS to estimate dolphin density and survival, and satellite-linked telemetry (2013) was used to determine ranging patterns. Telemetry suggested two different ranging patterns in MSS: (1) inshore waters with seasonal movements into mid-MSS, and (2) around the barrier islands exclusively. Based upon these data, dolphin density was estimated in two strata (Inshore and Island) using a spatially-explicit robust-design capture-recapture model. Inshore and Island density varied between 0.77–1.61 dolphins km−2 (x¯ = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.28–1.53) and 3.32–5.74 dolphins km−2 (x¯ = 4.43, 95% CI: 2.70–5.63), respectively. The estimated annual survival rate for dolphins with distinctive fins was very low in the year following the spill, 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67–0.78), and consistent with the occurrence of a large scale cetacean unusual mortality event that was in part attributed to the DWH oil spill. Fluctuations in density were not as large or seasonally consistent as previously reported. Total abundance for MSS extrapolated from density results ranged from 4,610 in July 2011 to 3,046 in January 2012 (x¯ = 3,469, 95% CI: 3,113–3,725). PMID:29053728

  16. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine...... generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise...

  17. Infrasound propagation in tropospheric ducts and acoustic shadow zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine D

    2017-10-01

    Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations governing acoustic propagation are performed to investigate infrasound propagation in the troposphere and into acoustic shadow zones. An existing nonlinear finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) solver that constrains input sound speed models to be axisymmetric is expanded to allow for advection and rigid, stair-step topography. The FDTD solver permits realistic computations along a given azimuth. It is applied to several environmental models to examine the effects of nonlinearity, topography, advection, and two-dimensional (2D) variations in wind and sound speeds on the penetration of infrasound into shadow zones. Synthesized waveforms are compared to a recording of a rocket motor fuel elimination event at the Utah Test and Training Range. Results show good agreement in the amplitude, duration, and spectra of synthesized and recorded waveforms for propagation through 2D atmospheric models whether or not topography, advection, or nonlinearity is explicitly included. However, infrasound propagation through a one-dimensional, range-averaged, atmospheric model yields waveforms with lower amplitudes and frequencies, suggesting that small-scale atmospheric variability causes significant scatter within the troposphere, leading to enhanced infrasound penetration into shadow zones. Thus, unresolved fine-scale atmospheric dynamics are not required to explain infrasound propagation into shadow zones.

  18. Spatially extended sound equalisation in rooms at low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco, Arturo

    The thesis describes the results of a theoretical and experimental study of equalisation of the sound field in a room. The theoretical study is based on computer simulations, carried out both in the frequency domain and in the time domain with account taken of the causality of the control filters....... The influence of the number of sources and their position, the number of error sensors and their positions, the frequency range etc. is examined. Among the conclusions can be mentioned that the size of the equalised area can be maximised and the number of loudspeakers can be minimised if the sound field...... that is generated is a propagating plane wave....

  19. A matrix formalism for fluid-borne sound in pipe systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijrath, H.; Åbom, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a general matrix formalism for predicting fluid-borne sound in gas filled pipe systems of arbitrary geometry is presented. Based on the formalism, a code, valid from the low frequency plane wave range up to frequencies where a large number of modes propagate in each pipe, has been

  20. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Dag, Kaya O; Moriarty, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.

  1. Foley Sounds vs Real Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trento, Stefano; Götzen, Amalia De

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an initial attempt to study the world of sound effects for motion pictures, also known as Foley sounds. Throughout several audio and audio-video tests we have compared both Foley and real sounds originated by an identical action. The main purpose was to evaluate if sound effects...

  2. Nonlocal nonlinear coupling of kinetic sound waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Lyubchyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study three-wave resonant interactions among kinetic-scale oblique sound waves in the low-frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived in the framework of a two-fluid plasma model. Because of dispersive modifications at small wavelengths perpendicular to the background magnetic field, these waves become a decay-type mode. We found two decay channels, one into co-propagating product waves (forward decay, and another into counter-propagating product waves (reverse decay. All wavenumbers in the forward decay are similar and hence this decay is local in wavenumber space. On the contrary, the reverse decay generates waves with wavenumbers that are much larger than in the original pump waves and is therefore intrinsically nonlocal. In general, the reverse decay is significantly faster than the forward one, suggesting a nonlocal spectral transport induced by oblique sound waves. Even with low-amplitude sound waves the nonlinear interaction rate is larger than the collisionless dissipation rate. Possible applications regarding acoustic waves observed in the solar corona, solar wind, and topside ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  3. Ultralong-range sounding of the ionospheric HF channel using an ionosonde/direction finder with chirp modulation of the signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Vertogradov, G.; Uryadov, V. P.; Vertogradova, E. G.; Ponyatov, A. A.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of propagation of short radio waves on a long transequatorial path of Laverton (Australia) — Rostov-on-Don, which were obtained with the help of an ionosonde/direction finder with chirp modulation of the signal. It is shown that conditions for propagation of anomalous signals by means of sideband reflection of radio waves from the Himalayan Hills and the Plateau of Iran and also due to scattering of radio waves from the high-latitude ionosphere of the northern hemisphere are realized on the given path. The propagation of radio waves is modeled with allowance for their scattering by anisotropic magnetic field-aligned irregularities of a high-latitude ionosphere, which are located on the northern wall of the main ionospheric trough of the F layer. It is shown that the results of the experiment agree well with the calculated data.

  4. Pseudorapidity Distribution of Charged Particles and Square Speed of Sound Parameter in p-p or p-p- Collisions over an Energy Range from 0.053 to 7 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Qin Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in proton-proton (p-p or proton-antiproton (p-p- collisions over an energy range from 0.053 to 7 TeV are studied by using the four-component Landau hydrodynamic model. The results calculated by the model are in agreement with the experimental data of the UA5, PHOBOS, UA1, P238, CDF, ALICE, and CMS Collaborations which present orderly from low to high energies. According to the distribution widths of different components, the values and some features of square speed of sound parameter cs2 for “participant” and “spectator” quark components are obtained. It is shown that the speed of sound for “participant” quark components agrees approximately with that for “spectator” quark components in the error ranges. The present work is useful for studying nucleus-nucleus collisions in the related energy range.

  5. Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels for Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone and Etymotic Research ER-2 insert earphone in the frequency range 125 Hz to 16 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Loc A; Poulsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Levels (ETSPLs) have been determined for the Sennheiser HDA 200 earphone and the Etymotic Research ER-2insert earphone. Thirty-one young normal-hearing test subjects participated and the thresholds were determined for all recommended frequencies in thefrequency...

  6. Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels (ETSPL) for Sennheiser HDA 280 supra-aural audiometric earphones in the frequency range 125 Hz to 8000 Hz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben; Oakley, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Hearing threshold sound pressure levels were measured for the Sennheiser HDA 280 audiometric earphone. Hearing thresholds were measured for 25 normal hearing test subjects at the 11 audiometric test frequencies from 125 Hz to 8000 Hz. Sennheiser HDA 280 is a supra-aural earphone that may be seen ...

  7. Crova's Disc: A Way to Make Sound Waves "Visible."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Explained are the differences between and offered are examples of longitudinal and transverse sound waves. Described is the construction of the Crova's Disc, a device used in the teaching of the propagation and properties of sound waves. (DS)

  8. Propagation of sound through the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, R. W.; Becher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The data collected at a pressure of one atmosphere for the different temperatures and relative humidities of the air-water vapor mixtures is summarized. The dew point hygrometer used in these measurements did not give reliable results for dew points much above the ambient room temperature. For this reason measurements were not attempted at the higher temperatures and humidities. Viscous wall losses in the resonant tube at 0 C so dominate the molecular relaxation of nitrogen, in the air-water vapor mixture, that reliable data could not be obtained using the free decay method in a resonant tube at one atmosphere. In an effort to obtain viable data at these temperatures, measurements were performed at a pressure of 10 atmospheres. Since the molecular relaxation peak is proportional to the pressure and the viscous losses are proportional to the inverse square root of the pressure the peak height should be measurable at the higher pressure. The tradeoff here is that at 10 atmospheres; the highest relative humidity attainable is 10 percent. The data collected at 10 atmospheres is also summarized.

  9. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances over Taiwan observed with HF Doppler sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, Jiří; Chum, Jaroslav; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2017-09-01

    We analyzed horizontal velocities of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances using HF Doppler sounding over Taiwan from January 2014 to January 2016. Meridional components of the observed horizontal velocities are in most cases larger than zonal components. In summer, poleward propagation prevails, whereas in winter, disturbances primarily propagate southward. Zonal components of the analyzed events are mostly eastward. Seasonal behaviors of the observed propagation directions are similar at other locations with HF Doppler sounding at middle and low latitudes. Horizontal velocities of the observed events are in the 50-400-ms-1 range. The upper limit is determined using the spacing between reflection points, making the uncertainty in velocity very large for events with velocities larger than this limit. The mean horizontal velocity is 210 ms-1. The range between the 20th and 80th percentile of horizontal velocities is 144-281 ms-1. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. ABOUT SOUNDS IN VIDEO GAMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denikin Anton A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the aesthetical and practical possibilities for sounds (sound design in video games and interactive applications. Outlines the key features of the game sound, such as simulation, representativeness, interactivity, immersion, randomization, and audio-visuality. The author defines the basic terminology in study of game audio, as well as identifies significant aesthetic differences between film sounds and sounds in video game projects. It is an attempt to determine the techniques of art analysis for the approaches in study of video games including aesthetics of their sounds. The article offers a range of research methods, considering the video game scoring as a contemporary creative practice.

  11. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of sound fields based on the acousto-optic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    The acousto-optic effect can be used to measure the pressure fluctuations in air created by acoustic disturbances (the propagation of light is affected by changes in the medium due to the presence of sound waves). This makes it possible to measure an arbitrary sound field using acousto...... of sound pressure fields from acousto-optic measurements in the audible frequency range, based on Fourier transforms and elementary wave expansion methods. The present study examines the complete reconstruction of the sound field from acousto-optic measurements, recovering all acoustic quantities......-optic tomography via scanning the field with a laser Doppler vibrometer. Consequently, the spatial characteristics of the sound field are captured in the measurement, implicitly bearing the potential for a full holographic reconstruction in a three-dimensional space. Recent studies have examined the reconstruction...

  13. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  14. Measurement of the sound velocity in fluids using the echo signals from scattering particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Michael; Bock, Martin; Kühnicke, Elfgard; Pal, Josef; Cramer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    With conventional methods the sound velocity c in fluids can be determined using the back wall echo. This paper proposes a novel technique, in which the signals reflected by scattering particles suspended in a fluid are analysed instead. The basic idea is that the particles generate the strongest echo signal when being located in the sound field maximum. Therefore the position of the echo signal maximum is a measure for the propagation time to the sound field maximum. Provided that calibration data or sound field simulations for the ultrasonic transducer are available, this propagation time suffices to determine both sound velocity and the location of the sound field maximum. The feasibility of the new approach is demonstrated by different kinds of experiments: (i) Measurements of the sound velocity c in four fluids covering the wide range between 1116 and 2740m/s. The results show good agreement with values published elsewhere. (ii) Using the dependence of the sound velocity on temperature, it is possible to vary c over the comparatively small range between 1431 and 1555m/s with increments of less than 10m/s. The measured statistical variation of 1.4m/s corresponds to a relative uncertainty not worse than 0.1%. (iii) The focus position, i.e. the distance of the maximum of the sound field from the transducer, was varied by time-shifted superposition of the receive signals belonging to the different elements of an annular array. The results indicate that the novel method is even capable of measuring profiles of the sound velocity along the ultrasonic beam non-invasively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sound art and the annihilation of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Shaun

    This thesis describes the way in which sound is taken up and subsequently suppressed within the visual arts. The idealisation and development of sound as a plastic material is able to be traced within the modernist trajectory, which, reflecting a set of cultural practices and having developed its own specific terminologies, comes to regard any material, or anything conceived of as material, as appropriate and adequate to the expression of its distinctive and guiding concepts and metaphors. These concepts and metaphors are discussed as already having at their bases strongly visualist biases, the genealogies of which are traced within traditional or formal philosophies. Here, the marginalising tendency of ocularcentrism is exposed, but the very nature and contingency of marginalisation is found to work for the sound artist (where the perpetuation of the mythologised 'outsider' figure is desired) but against sound which is positioned in a purely differential and negative relation. In this epistemological and ontological reduction, sound becomes simply a visual metaphor or metonymic contraction which forecloses the possibility of producing other ways of articulating its experience or of producing any markedly alternative 'readings'. Rather than simply attempting to reverse the hierarchisation of the visual over the aural, or of prefacing sound within a range of artistic practices (each which would keep the negative tradition going) sound's ambiguous relation to the binarism of presence/absence, system and margin, is, however oddly, elaborated. The strategy which attempts to suspend sound primarily within and under the mark of the concept is interrogated and its limits exposed. The sound artist, the 'margin surfer' is revealed as a perhaps deeply conservative figure who may in the end desire the suppression of sound, and who, actually rejecting any destabilising and threatening notion of 'radical alterity' anxiously clings to the 'marginalised' modernist pretence. It is

  16. Mapping the sound field of an erupting submarine volcano using an acoustic glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Haru; Haxel, Joseph H; Dziak, Robert P; Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R; Embley, Robert W

    2011-03-01

    An underwater glider with an acoustic data logger flew toward a recently discovered erupting submarine volcano in the northern Lau basin. With the volcano providing a wide-band sound source, recordings from the two-day survey produced a two-dimensional sound level map spanning 1 km (depth) × 40 km(distance). The observed sound field shows depth- and range-dependence, with the first-order spatial pattern being consistent with the predictions of a range-dependent propagation model. The results allow constraining the acoustic source level of the volcanic activity and suggest that the glider provides an effective platform for monitoring natural and anthropogenic ocean sounds. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  17. Unsound Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the change in premise that digitally produced sound brings about and how digital technologies more generally have changed our relationship to the musical artifact, not simply in degree but in kind. It demonstrates how our acoustical conceptions are thoroughly challenged...... by the digital production of sound and, by questioning the ontological basis for digital sound, turns our understanding of the core term substance upside down....

  18. Sound Absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  19. Vector wave propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, M; Brenner, K-H

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the scalar wave propagation method (WPM) to vector fields. The WPM [Appl. Opt.32, 4984 (1993)] was introduced in order to overcome the major limitations of the beam propagation method (BPM). With the WPM, the range of application can be extended from the simulation of waveguides to simulation of other optical elements like lenses, prisms and gratings. In that reference it was demonstrated that the wave propagation scheme provides valid results for propagation angles up to 85 degrees and that it is not limited to small index variations in the axis of propagation. Here, we extend the WPM to three-dimensional vectorial fields (VWPMs) by considering the polarization dependent Fresnel coefficients for transmission in each propagation step. The continuity of the electric field is maintained in all three dimensions by an enhanced propagation vector and the transfer matrix. We verify the validity of the method by transmission through a prism and by comparison with the focal distribution from vectorial Debye theory. Furthermore, a two-dimensional grating is simulated and compared with the results from three-dimensional RCWA. Especially for 3D problems, the runtime of the VWPM exhibits special advantage over the RCWA.

  20. Sound radiation contrast in MR phase images. Method for the representation of elasticity, sound damping, and sound impedance changes; Schallstrahlungskontrast in MR-Phasenbildern. Methode zur Darstellung von Elastizitaets-, Schalldaempfungs- und Schallimpedanzaenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radicke, Marcus

    2009-12-18

    The method presented in this thesis combines ultrasound techniques with the magnetic-resonance tomography (MRT). An ultrasonic wave generates in absorbing media a static force in sound-propagation direction. The force leads at sound intensities of some W/cm{sup 2} and a sound frequency in the lower MHz range to a tissue shift in the micrometer range. This tissue shift depends on the sound power, the sound frequency, the sound absorption, and the elastic properties of the tissue. A MRT sequence of the Siemens Healthcare AG was modified so that it measures (indirectly) the tissue shift, codes as grey values, and presents as 2D picture. By means of the grey values the sound-beam slope in the tissue can be visualized, and so additionally sound obstacles (changes of the sound impedance) can be detected. By the MRT images token up spatial changes of the tissue parameters sound absorption and elasticity can be detected. In this thesis measurements are presented, which show the feasibility and future chances of this method especially for the mammary-cancer diagnostics. [German] Die in dieser Arbeit praesentierte Methode kombiniert Ultraschalltechniken mit der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT). Eine Ultraschallwelle ruft in absorbierenden Medien eine statische Kraft in Schallausbreitungsrichtung hervor. Die Kraft fuehrt bei Schallintensitaeten von einigen W/cm{sup 2} und einer Schallfrequenz im niederen MHz-Bereich zu einer Gewebeverschiebung im Mikrometerbereich. Diese Gewebeverschiebung haengt ab von der Schallleistung, der Schallfrequenz, der Schallabsorption und den elastischen Eigenschaften des Gewebes. Es wurde eine MRT-Sequenz der Siemens Healthcare AG modifiziert, so dass sie (indirekt) die Gewebeverschiebung misst, als Grauwerte kodiert und als 2D-Bild darstellt. Anhand der Grauwerte kann der Schallstrahlverlauf in dem Gewebe visualisiert werden, und so koennen zusaetzlich Schallhindernisse (Aenderungen der Schallkennimpedanz) aufgespuert werden. Mit den

  1. Monaural Sound Localization Based on Reflective Structure and Homomorphic Deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonseok; Choi, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric structure around the receiver provides a particular time delay for the specific incoming propagation. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on the reflective structure around the microphone. The reflective plates are placed to present the direction-wise time delay, which is naturally processed by convolutional operation with a sound source. The received signal is separated for estimating the dominant time delay by using homomorphic deconvolution, which utilizes the real cepstrum and inverse cepstrum sequentially to derive the propagation response’s autocorrelation. Once the localization system accurately estimates the information, the time delay model computes the corresponding reflection for localization. Because of the structure limitation, two stages of the localization process perform the estimation procedure as range and angle. The software toolchain from propagation physics and algorithm simulation realizes the optimal 3D-printed structure. The acoustic experiments in the anechoic chamber denote that 79.0% of the study range data from the isotropic signal is properly detected by the response value, and 87.5% of the specific direction data from the study range signal is properly estimated by the response time. The product of both rates shows the overall hit rate to be 69.1%. PMID:28946625

  2. Auditory Brainstem and Middle Latency Responses Measured Pre- and Posttreatment for Hyperacusic Hearing-Impaired Persons Successfully Treated to Improve Sound Tolerance and to Expand the Dynamic Range for Loudness: Case Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, Craig; Korczak, Peggy; Sherlock, LaGuinn P; Hawley, Monica L; Gold, Susan

    2017-02-01

    In this report of three cases, we consider electrophysiologic measures from three hyperacusic hearing-impaired individuals who, prior to treatment to expand their dynamic ranges for loudness, were problematic hearing aid candidates because of their diminished sound tolerance and reduced dynamic ranges. Two of these individuals were treated with structured counseling combined with low-level broadband sound therapy from bilateral sound generators and the third case received structured counseling in combination with a short-acting placebo sound therapy. Each individual was highly responsive to his or her assigned treatment as revealed by expansion of the dynamic range by at least 20 dB at one or more frequencies posttreatment. Of specific interest in this report are their latency and amplitude measures taken from tone burst-evoked auditory brainstem response (ABR) and cortically derived middle latency response (MLR) recordings, measured as a function of increasing loudness at 500 and 2,000 Hz pre- and posttreatment. The resulting ABR and MLR latency and amplitude measures for each case are considered here in terms of pre- and posttreatment predictions. The respective pre- and posttreatment predictions anticipated larger pretreatment response amplitudes and shorter pretreatment response latencies relative to typical normal control values and smaller normative-like posttreatment response amplitudes and longer posttreatment response latencies relative to the corresponding pretreatment values for each individual. From these results and predictions, we conjecture about the neural origins of the hyperacusis conditions (i.e., brainstem versus cortical) and the neuronal sites responsive to treatment. The only consistent finding in support of the pre- and posttreatment predictions and, thus, the strongest index of hyperacusis and positive treatment-related effects was measured for MLR latency responses for wave Pa at 2,000 Hz. Other response indices, including ABR wave V

  3. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  4. Sound as Popular Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant’s gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems...... in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material......, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider...

  5. Sound Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Sound zones, i.e. spatially confined regions of individual audio content, can be created by appropriate filtering of the desired audio signals reproduced by an array of loudspeakers. The challenge of designing filters for sound zones is twofold: First, the filtered responses should generate...... an acoustic separation between the control regions. Secondly, the pre- and post-ringing as well as spectral deterioration introduced by the filters should be minimized. The tradeoff between acoustic separation and filter ringing is the focus of this paper. A weighted L2-norm penalty is introduced in the sound...

  6. Sound intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  7. Sound Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crocker, M.J.; Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique.......This chapter is an overview, intended for readers with no special knowledge about this particular topic. The chapter deals with all aspects of sound intensity and its measurement from the fundamental theoretical background to practical applications of the measurement technique....

  8. Broadband sound pressure enhancement in passive metafluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Bogdan-Ioan

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic sensors operating in lossy environments, such as water, require significant sensitivity to overcome the sound attenuation in the environment and thus see farther. We show here that a surprisingly large class of passive fluids has the ability to enhance the sound pressure propagating inside them without employing active actuation. Specifically, the general requirements for this remarkable property are fluid impedance higher than the impedance of the environment and negligible insertion loss as sound propagates from the environment into the high impedance fluid. We demonstrate the pressure enhancing effect by designing a broadband isotropic metafluid that increases the pressure of sound waves impinging from water. We validate the design in numerical simulations showing that significant sound pressure level increases are achievable in realistic metafluid structures in large bandwidths covering several octaves. Our approach opens up unexplored avenues towards improving acoustic transducer sensitivity, which is critical in applications, such as medical ultrasound imaging, sonar, and acoustic communications.

  9. Sound Clocks and Sonic Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Scott L.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2017-10-01

    Sound propagation within certain non-relativistic condensed matter models obeys a relativistic wave equation despite such systems admitting entirely non-relativistic descriptions. A natural question that arises upon consideration of this is, "do devices exist that will experience the relativity in these systems?" We describe a thought experiment in which `acoustic observers' possess devices called sound clocks that can be connected to form chains. Careful investigation shows that appropriately constructed chains of stationary and moving sound clocks are perceived by observers on the other chain as undergoing the relativistic phenomena of length contraction and time dilation by the Lorentz factor, γ , with c the speed of sound. Sound clocks within moving chains actually tick less frequently than stationary ones and must be separated by a shorter distance than when stationary to satisfy simultaneity conditions. Stationary sound clocks appear to be length contracted and time dilated to moving observers due to their misunderstanding of their own state of motion with respect to the laboratory. Observers restricted to using sound clocks describe a universe kinematically consistent with the theory of special relativity, despite the preferred frame of their universe in the laboratory. Such devices show promise in further probing analogue relativity models, for example in investigating phenomena that require careful consideration of the proper time elapsed for observers.

  10. Acoustic characteristics of biossonar sounds of free-ranging botos (Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxis (Sotalia fluviatilis) in the Negro River, Amazon, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Yukiko Yamamoto; Tomonari Akamatso; Vera Maria Ferreira da Silva; Yayoi Yoshida; Shiro Kohshima

    2015-01-01

    Odontoceti emit broadband high-frequency clicks on echolocation for orientation or prey detection. In the Amazon Basin, two odontoceti species, boto (Amazon River dolphin, Inia geoffrensis) and tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis), live sympatrically. The acoustic characteristics of the echolocation clicks of free-ranging botos and tucuxis were measured with a hydrophone array consisting of a full-band and an acoustic event recorder (A-tag). The clicks of the two species were short-duration broadband...

  11. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  12. An aerodynamic noise propagation model for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2005-01-01

    A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from temperat......A model based on 2-D sound ray theory for aerodynamic noise propagation from wind turbine rotating blades is introduced. The model includes attenuation factors from geometric spreading, sound directivity of source, air absorption, ground deflection and reflection, as well as effects from...

  13. Sound settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder

    2013-01-01

    Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice......Præsentation af projektresultater fra Interreg forskningen Sound Settlements om udvikling af bæredygtighed i det almene boligbyggerier i København, Malmø, Helsingborg og Lund samt europæiske eksempler på best practice...

  14. Discovery of Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances by the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in one or both of the chromosphere or transition region at a speed much higher than the sound speed. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of 2D images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly(alpha) line at a 0.6 s cadence. The fast propagating intensity disturbances are detected in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and at least 20 events are clearly detected in the field of view of 527'' x 527'' during the 5-minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km/s, and they are comparable to the local Alfven speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is of about 10'', and the widths are a few arcseconds, which is almost determined by the pixel size of 1.''03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation of the fast propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magneto-hydrodynamic fast mode waves.

  15. An analysis of the Infrasound Atmospheric Sounding problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, J.; Sebe, O. G.; Landes, M.; Matoza, R. S.; Le Pichon, A.; Blanc, E.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2011-12-01

    The increasing number of infrasound arrays deployed worldwide have significantly enlarge the scope of infrasound studies. Infrasonic waves are low frequencies sound waves (0.01-20 Hz) which propagate over long range with low attenuation through atmospheric waveguides. Thus, they provide a valuable information for understanding the atmospheric dynamics and improving current atmospheric specifications. Infrasound atmospheric sounding can be objectively treated using inverse methods theory. We develop an iterative linear inversion algorithm to retrieve vertical atmospheric profiles from infrasonic observations. The forward problem is treated in the high-frequency approximation using the Hamiltonian formulation and complete first-order ray perturbation theory is developed in order to construct the Frechet derivatives matrix. We introduce a specific regularization and give a detail analysis of this inverse problem. Our algorithm is compared with results from global optimization methods and validated through realistic experiments.

  16. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  17. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 6. Second Sound - The Role of Elastic Waves. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 6 June 1999 pp 15-19. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/06/0015-0019 ...

  18. Second Sound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 3. Second Sound - Waves of Entropy and Temperature. R Srinivasan. General Article Volume 4 Issue 3 March 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/03/0016-0024 ...

  19. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise...... measurements are used to predict an optimal frequency range for communication ("sound communication window") from an average of crow call spectra predicted for every possible combination of the sender/receiver separations 300, 600, 900, and 1200  m and heights 3,6,9  m thereby creating a matrix assumed...... relevant to crow interterritorial communication. These predictions indicate an optimal frequency range for sound communication between 500  Hz and 2  kHz. Since this corresponds to the frequency range in which crow calls have their main energy and crow hearing in noise is particularly sensitive...

  20. Modal expansions for infrasound propagation and their implications for ground-to-ground propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle; Velea, Doru

    2017-02-01

    The use of expansions in vertical eigenmodes for long range infrasound propagation modeling in the effective sound speed approximation is investigated. The question of convergence of such expansions is related to the maximum elevation angles that are required. Including atmospheric attenuation leads to a non-self-adjoint vertical eigenvalue problem. The use of leading order perturbation theory for the modal attenuation is compared to the results of numerical solutions to the non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem and conditions under which the perturbative result is expected to be valid are obtained. Modal expansions are obtained in the frequency domain; broadband signals must be modeled through Fourier reconstruction. Such broadband signal reconstruction is investigated and the relation between bandwidth, wavetrain duration, and frequency sampling is discussed.

  1. Caractérisation et modélisation du canal de propagation radio en contexte Ultra Large Bande

    OpenAIRE

    Pagani, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band (UWB) is a high rate, short range radio communication technique using frequency bands in the order of 500 MHz to several GHz. This thesis presents an experimental characterisation of the UWB propagation channel in order to propose models for the development of such systems.Two proposed sounding techniques enable the measurement of the static channel in the 3.1 – 11.1 GHz band and real time channel sounding in the 4 – 5 GHz band. Several measurement campaigns performed in the i...

  2. Unidentified Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    , contextualised and conceptualised in an era of transmission. Observing that urban sounds until late 1930es are rarely heard in Danish radio compared to German and English broadcasting, I argue that an urban and auditory aesthetics incorporating noise, heterogeneity and unpredictability did not really develop......This article investigates how urban spaces and its noises are approached by radio reporters in the first decades of public radio production in Denmark. Focussing on the period before reel tape was incorporated in production by late 1940es, I ask how urban space and urban sounds are heard...... in Danish radio until early post-war years. Yet I trace early attempts at managing noisy urban conditions and demonstrate how reporters experimented with available technological repositories and developed techniques in order to make sense in and through urban environments. Inspired by Michel Serres idea...

  3. Atmospheric effects on microphone array analysis of aircraft vortex sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-08

    This paper provides the basis of a comprehensive analysis of vortex sound propagation : through the atmosphere in order to assess real atmospheric effects on acoustic array : processing. Such effects may impact vortex localization accuracy and detect...

  4. Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances in Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Winebarger, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment "the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP)" reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere, transition region, or both at a speed much higher than the sound speed.

  5. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ryżak

    Full Text Available The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa. We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop. The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  6. Sound Wave Energy Resulting from the Impact of Water Drops on the Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryżak, Magdalena; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The splashing of water drops on a soil surface is the first step of water erosion. There have been many investigations into splashing-most are based on recording and analysing images taken with high-speed cameras, or measuring the mass of the soil moved by splashing. Here, we present a new aspect of the splash phenomenon's characterization the measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out for 10 consecutive water drop impacts on the soil surface. Three soils were tested (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa and 16 kPa). We found that the values of the sound pressure and sound wave energy were dependent on the particle size distribution of the soil, less dependent on the initial pressure head, and practically the same for subsequent water drops (from the first to the tenth drop). The highest sound pressure level (and the greatest variability) was for Endogleyic Umbrisol, which had the highest sand fraction content. The sound pressure for this soil increased from 29 dB to 42 dB with the next incidence of drops falling on the sample The smallest (and the lowest variability) was for Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol which had the highest clay fraction. For all experiments the sound pressure level ranged from ~27 to ~42 dB and the energy emitted in the form of sound waves was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ. This was from 0.03 to 1.07% of the energy of the incident drops.

  7. Tables of the velocity of sound in sea water

    CERN Document Server

    Bark, L S; Meister, N A

    1964-01-01

    Tables of the Velocity of Sound in Sea Water contains tables of the velocity of sound in sea water computed on a ""Strela-3"" high-speed electronic computer and a T-5 tabulator at the Computational Center of the Academy of Sciences. Knowledge of the precise velocity of sound in sea water is of great importance when investigating sound propagations in the ocean and when solving practical problems involving the use of hydro-acoustic devices. This book demonstrates the computations made for the velocity of sound in sea water, which can be found in two ways: by direct measurement with the aid of s

  8. HF propagation results from the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dev; Groves, Keith M.; McNeil, William; Carrano, Charles; Caton, Ronald G.; Parris, Richard T.; Pederson, Todd R.; Cannon, Paul S.; Angling, Matthew; Jackson-Booth, Natasha

    2017-06-01

    With support from the NASA sounding rocket program, the Air Force Research Laboratory launched two sounding rockets in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands in May 2013 known as the Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment. The rockets released samarium metal vapor at preselected altitudes in the lower F region that ionized forming a plasma cloud. Data from Advanced Research Project Agency Long-range Tracking and Identification Radar incoherent scatter radar and high-frequency (HF) radio links have been analyzed to understand the impacts of the artificial ionization on radio wave propagation. The HF radio wave ray-tracing toolbox PHaRLAP along with ionospheric models constrained by electron density profiles measured with the ALTAIR radar have been used to successfully model the effects of the cloud on HF propagation. Up to three new propagation paths were created by the artificial plasma injections. Observations and modeling confirm that the small amounts of ionized material injected in the lower F region resulted in significant changes to the natural HF propagation environment.

  9. Shock wave evolution and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics with spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sun, E-mail: szhang@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology (J-CPNPC), PMO-NJU, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-02-05

    In this Letter, we have studied the shock wave and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid with spontaneous U(1) symmetry breaking in the framework of hydrodynamics. General features of shock waves are provided, the propagation of discontinuity and the sound modes of shock waves are also presented. The first sound and the second sound are identified as the propagation of discontinuity, and the results are in agreement with earlier theoretical studies. Moreover, a differential equation, called the growth equation, is obtained to describe the decay and growth of the discontinuity propagating along its normal trajectory. The solution is in an integral form and special cases of diverging waves are also discussed.

  10. Estimating the diffuseness of sound fields: A wavenumber analysis method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Melanie; Davy, John L.; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    The concept of a diffuse sound field is widely used in the analysis of sound in enclosures. The diffuse sound field is generally described as composed of plane waves with random phases, which wave number vectors are uniformly distributed over all angles of incidence. In this study...... investigates how the results relate to the modal theory of room acoustics, based on the conception that any mode, also in non-rectangular rooms, can be expanded into a number of propagating waves....

  11. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  12. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  13. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line.

  14. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  15. Synchronization of sound sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-11

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)10.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization-the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  16. Synchronization of Sound Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-01

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)JASMAN0001-496610.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization—the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  17. Theoretical assessment of sound absorption coefficient for anisotropic nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Kalinova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The anisotropy factor as a function of fiber arrangement, fiber fineness and sample thickness has been derived from the theories of soundwave transformation due to phase changing. The sound absorption coefficient of the anisotropic fibrous material is then theoretically calculated. The fibrous materials were prepared so that the fibers are arranged parallel (perpendicularly laid fiber web called STRUTO technology in the direction of soundwave propagation or perpendicularly (longitudinally laid fiber web to the direction of sound propagation. The sound absorption coefficient was measured due to the Impedance tube. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  18. NASA Space Sounds API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has released a series of space sounds via sound cloud. We have abstracted away some of the hassle in accessing these sounds, so that developers can play with...

  19. Sound knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim of the res......The thesis is about the conceptualisation of knowledge associated with ‘evidence’. In the Danish society, there is a proliferating demand for ‘evidence’, which started as the basis of practices in medicine and has spread into social work, education and most policymaking arenas. The aim...... of the research is to investigate what is considered to ‘work as evidence’ in health promotion and how the ‘evidence discourse’ influences social practices in policymaking and in research. From investigating knowledge practices in the field of health promotion, I develop the concept of sound knowledge...... as knowledge based on reflexive practices. I chose ‘health promotion’ as the field for my research as it utilises knowledge produced in several research disciplines, among these both quantitative and qualitative. I mapped out the institutions, actors, events, and documents that constituted the field of health...

  20. Sound ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about what constitutes ‘the rural’ invariably focus on notions of spatial location – of inhabiting spaces apart from that of the metropolitan. Deeply embedded in our images of what it means to be Australian, nonetheless our intellectual framing of ‘the rural’ as something outback and beyond has significant implications for our relations with these spaces. The relatively recent phenomenon of sea- and tree-changes has struck many unawares, and not simply because a good latté is so hard to find. Although a frivolous remark, such an apparent lack does shift our focus to a bodily scale of the rural; how is rural place re/made through our experiences of it? This article originates out of on-going research that explores the practice of listening and sound and the ways in which the body can draw attention to the intuitive, emotional, and psychoanalytical processes of subjectivity and place-making. Drawing on Nigel Thrift’s concept of an ecology of place, I suggest that contemporary heightened concerns with regards to loss and lack in rural Australia has led to a nascent emotional economy – one in which individual and intimate connections to the rural require a rethinking of how we live community and belonging. In such a terrain, what does it mean to be rural?

  1. From Pythagoras to Sauveur: Tracing the History of Ideas about the Nature of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleon, Imelda S.; Subramaniam, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to supplement the scant literature on the history of ideas about the nature of sound. It presents how notions about the production and propagation of sound developed from antiquity up to the 17th century, i.e. from the time of Pythagoras to the time of Sauveur. It will highlight and examine the principles of sound that were…

  2. Propagation phenomena in real world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Damien; Gabryś, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Propagation, which looks at spreading in complex networks, can be seen from many viewpoints; it is undesirable, or desirable, controllable, the mechanisms generating that propagation can be the topic of interest, but in the end all depends on the setting. This book covers leading research on a wide spectrum of propagation phenomenon and the techniques currently used in its modelling, prediction, analysis and control. Fourteen papers range over topics including epidemic models, models for trust inference, coverage strategies for networks, vehicle flow propagation, bio-inspired routing algorithms, P2P botnet attacks and defences, fault propagation in gene-cellular networks, malware propagation for mobile networks, information propagation in crisis situations, financial contagion in interbank networks, and finally how to maximize the spread of influence in social networks. The compendium will be of interest to researchers, those working in social networking, communications and finance and is aimed at providin...

  3. Single Neurons in the Avian Auditory Cortex Encode Individual Identity and Propagation Distance in Naturally Degraded Communication Calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Solveig C; Elie, Julie E; Mathevon, Nicolas; Theunissen, Frédéric E

    2017-03-29

    One of the most complex tasks performed by sensory systems is "scene analysis": the interpretation of complex signals as behaviorally relevant objects. The study of this problem, universal to species and sensory modalities, is particularly challenging in audition, where sounds from various sources and localizations, degraded by propagation through the environment, sum to form a single acoustical signal. Here we investigated in a songbird model, the zebra finch, the neural substrate for ranging and identifying a single source. We relied on ecologically and behaviorally relevant stimuli, contact calls, to investigate the neural discrimination of individual vocal signature as well as sound source distance when calls have been degraded through propagation in a natural environment. Performing electrophysiological recordings in anesthetized birds, we found neurons in the auditory forebrain that discriminate individual vocal signatures despite long-range degradation, as well as neurons discriminating propagation distance, with varying degrees of multiplexing between both information types. Moreover, the neural discrimination performance of individual identity was not affected by propagation-induced degradation beyond what was induced by the decreased intensity. For the first time, neurons with distance-invariant identity discrimination properties as well as distance-discriminant neurons are revealed in the avian auditory cortex. Because these neurons were recorded in animals that had prior experience neither with the vocalizers of the stimuli nor with long-range propagation of calls, we suggest that this neural population is part of a general-purpose system for vocalizer discrimination and ranging.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding how the brain makes sense of the multitude of stimuli that it continually receives in natural conditions is a challenge for scientists. Here we provide a new understanding of how the auditory system extracts behaviorally relevant information

  4. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  5. Calculating Speed of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  6. Making Sound Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  7. Multichannel Sound Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkki, Ville

    Spatial reproduction of sound is a field in which the spatial attributes of a real recording room or a virtual space are reproduced to the listener. Spatial attributes include for example directions of sound sources, directions of reflections and envelopment by reverberation. Many such systems employ more than two loudspeakers to create virtual sources. This is called multichannel sound or spatial sound reproduction.

  8. The Sound of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  9. Prediction of far-field wind turbine noise propagation with parabolic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seongkyu; Lee, Dongjai; Honhoff, Saskia

    2016-08-01

    Sound propagation of wind farms is typically simulated by the use of engineering tools that are neglecting some atmospheric conditions and terrain effects. Wind and temperature profiles, however, can affect the propagation of sound and thus the perceived sound in the far field. A better understanding and application of those effects would allow a more optimized farm operation towards meeting noise regulations and optimizing energy yield. This paper presents the parabolic equation (PE) model development for accurate wind turbine noise propagation. The model is validated against analytic solutions for a uniform sound speed profile, benchmark problems for nonuniform sound speed profiles, and field sound test data for real environmental acoustics. It is shown that PE provides good agreement with the measured data, except upwind propagation cases in which turbulence scattering is important. Finally, the PE model uses computational fluid dynamics results as input to accurately predict sound propagation for complex flows such as wake flows. It is demonstrated that wake flows significantly modify the sound propagation characteristics.

  10. Erratum: Correction to Table 3, in: Equivalent threshold sound pressure levels (ETSPL) for Sennheiser HDA 280 supra-aural audiometric earphones in the frequency range 125 Hz to 8000 Hz (International Journal of Audiology (2009) 48 (271-276))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    The main results in Poulsen & Oakley (2009) are given as the equivalent threshold sound pressure level, ETSPL, measured in an acoustic coupler specifi ed in IEC 60318-3. These results are all correct. The ETSPL values for the ear simulator specifi ed in IEC 60318-1 were calculated from acoustic l...

  11. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  12. The anomalous tides near Broad Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jason H.; Buchwald, V. T.; Huthnance, John M.

    Observations of tidal current and height, in conjunction with theoretical mathematical models are used to investigate the propagation of the tide near Broad Sound, a narrowing estuary situated on a wide section of continental shelf toward the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef. The observations indicate that the dense offshore reefs severely inhibit tidal flow, with the result that tides flood toward Broad Sound from the north and from the south, along the main lagoon. There is a local magnification of the semi-diurnal tides within Broad Sound itself. Models of flow across reefs confirm the effectiveness of dense, shallow, and broad reefs in acting as a barrier to the tide. The diffraction of tides through large gaps in the reef is modelled using conformal mapping techniques and with the inclusion of energy leakage, the diffraction model predicts magnification of the semi-diurnal tidal heights by a factor of about 4 and a phase lag of 3 h on the shelf near Broad Sound, these values being consistent with observation. The observed convergence of the tide close to, and within Broad Sound itself is consistent with the proximity of the semi-diurnal tidal period to the natural period for flow in Broad Sound, considered as a narrowing estuary. This results in further amplification, by an additional factor of about 1.5, so that the tides in Broad Sound are increased by a factor of between 5 and 6, altogether, compared with those elsewhere on the east Australian coast.

  13. Little Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker M. Bani-Khair

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Spider and the Fly   You little spider, To death you aspire... Or seeking a web wider, To death all walking, No escape you all fighters… Weak and fragile in shape and might, Whatever you see in the horizon, That is destiny whatever sight. And tomorrow the spring comes, And the flowers bloom, And the grasshopper leaps high, And the frogs happily cry, And the flies smile nearby, To that end, The spider has a plot, To catch the flies by his net, A mosquito has fallen down in his net, Begging him to set her free, Out of that prison, To her freedom she aspires, Begging...Imploring...crying,  That is all what she requires, But the spider vows never let her free, His power he admires, Turning blind to light, And with his teeth he shall bite, Leaving her in desperate might, Unable to move from site to site, Tied up with strings in white, Wrapped up like a dead man, Waiting for his grave at night,   The mosquito says, Oh little spider, A stronger you are than me in power, But listen to my words before death hour, Today is mine and tomorrow is yours, No escape from death... Whatever the color of your flower…     Little sounds The Ant The ant is a little creature with a ferocious soul, Looking and looking for more and more, You can simply crush it like dead mold, Or you can simply leave it alone, I wonder how strong and strong they are! Working day and night in a small hole, Their motto is work or whatever you call… A big boon they have and joy in fall, Because they found what they store, A lesson to learn and memorize all in all, Work is something that you should not ignore!   The butterfly: I’m the butterfly Beautiful like a blue clear sky, Or sometimes look like snow, Different in colors, shapes and might, But something to know that we always die, So fragile, weak and thin, Lighter than a glimpse and delicate as light, Something to know for sure… Whatever you have in life and all these fields, You are not happier than a butterfly

  14. DISCOVERY OF UBIQUITOUS FAST-PROPAGATING INTENSITY DISTURBANCES BY THE CHROMOSPHERIC LYMAN ALPHA SPECTROPOLARIMETER (CLASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Champey, P. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio, E-mail: masahito.kubo@nao.ac.jp [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2016-12-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly α line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s{sup −1}, and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  15. Sounds of a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    colours show element displacements in opposite directions. Geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth, and thus learn about the inner structure of our planet. The same technique works for stars. The Sun, our nearest star and a typical middle-age member of its class, has been investigated in this way since the 1960's. With "solar seismology" , astronomers have been able to learn much about the inner parts of the star, and not only the outer layers normally visible to the telescopes. In the Sun, heat is bubbling up from the central regions where enormous amount of energy is created by nuclear reactions . In the so-called convective zone , the gas is virtually boiling, and hot gas-bubbles are rising with a speed that is close to that of sound. Much like you can hear when water starts to boil, the turbulent convection in the Sun creates noise . These sound waves then propagate through the solar interior and are reflected on the surface, making it oscillate. This "ringing" is well observed in the Sun, where the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations provide astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the solar interior. From the Sun to the stars There is every reason to believe that our Sun is a quite normal star of its type. Other stars that are similar to the Sun are therefore likely to pulsate in much the same way as the Sun. The search for such oscillations in other solar-like stars has, however, been a long and difficult one. The problem is simply that the pulsations are tiny, so very great precision is needed in the measurements. However, the last few years have seen considerable progress in asteroseismology, and François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory have now been able to detect unambiguous acoustic oscillations in the Solar-twin star, Alpha Centauri A. The bright and nearby star Alpha Centauri Alpha Centauri (Alpha Cen) [1] is the brightest star in the constellation

  16. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Feng [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics & Electronic Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  17. Coherence of Sound and Understanding Where it is Influenced in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Coherence of Sound and Understanding Where it is...and spatial coherence of sound in the ocean due to influences from the sub-bottom, bottom, surface, and the sound speed and current fields in the...propagation of sound between a source and receiver in the ocean. Recent studies indicate that in some circumstances accurate predictions of temporal

  18. Cosmic Ray Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, I. V.

    2004-01-01

    Astrophysics of cosmic rays and gamma rays depends very much on the quality of the data, which become increasingly accurate each year and therefore more constraining. While direct measurements of cosmic rays are possible in only one location on the outskirts of the Milky Way, the Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission provides insights into the spectra of cosmic rays in distant locations, therefore complementing the local cosmic-ray studies. This connection, however, requires extensive modeling and is yet to be explored in detail. The GUST mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2007 and is capable of measuring gamma-rays in the range 20 MeV - 300 GeV, will change the status quo dramatically. Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission gathered by GUST will require adequate theoretical models. The efforts will be rewarded by the wealth of information on cosmic ray spectra and fluxes in remote locations. In its turn, a detailed cosmic ray propagation model will provide a reliable basis for other studies such as search for dark matter signals in cosmic rays and diffuse gamma rays, spectrum and origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission, theories of nucleosynthesis and evolution of elements etc. In this talk, I will discuss what we can learn studying the cosmic ray propagation and diffuse gamma-ray emission.

  19. Epileptiform discharge propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mălîia, Mihai Dragos; Meritam, Pirgit; Scherg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    propagation was analyzed using sequential voltage-maps of the averaged spikes, and principal components analysis. When propagation was detected, sources were modeled both at onset and peak. RESULTS: Propagation occurred in half of the patients. The median time of propagation between onset and peak was 17 ms......OBJECTIVE: To investigate how often discharge propagation occurs within the spikes recorded in patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery, and to assess its impact on the accuracy of source imaging. METHODS: Data were analyzed from 50 consecutive patients who had presurgical workup. Discharge....... In 60% of the cases with propagation (15/25 patients) this remained in the same sub-lobar area where onset occurred. The accuracy of source imaging in cases of propagating spikes was 67% when only analyzing onset or peak. This was lower as compared to cases without propagation (79%). Combining source...

  20. Mode propagation and attenuation in lined ducts

    CERN Document Server

    BI, Wenping

    2014-01-01

    Optimal impedance for each mode is an important concept in an infinitely long duct lined with uniform absorption material. However it is not valid for finite length linings. This is because that the modes in lined ducts are not power-orthogonal; the total sound power is not equal to the sum of the sound power of each mode; cross-power terms may play important roles. In this paper, we study sound propagation and attenuation in an infinite rigid duct lined with a finite length of lining impedance. The lining impedance may be axial segments and circumferentially non-uniform. We propose two new physical quantities Kp and S to describe the self-overlap of the left eigenfunction and right eigenfunction of one mode and the normalized overlap between modes, respectively. The two new physical quantities describe totally the mode behaviors in lined ducts.

  1. Lattice photon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P.; Hey, A.; Mandula, J.; Ogilvie, M.

    1987-10-22

    The fermion propagator in the Landau gauge is calculated for a U(1) lattice gauge theory. In the confined, strong coupling phase, the propagator resembles that of a massive particle. In the weak coupling phase, the propagator is that of a massless particle. An abrupt change occurs at the transition point. The results are compared to simulations of the gluon propagator in SU(3) lattice gauge theory.

  2. The lattice photon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, P.; Hey, A.; Mandula, J.; Ogilvie, M.

    1987-10-01

    The photon propagator in the Landau gauge is calculated for a U(1) lattice gauge theory. In the confined, strong coupling phase, the propagator resembles that of a massive particle. In the weak coupling phase, the propagator is that of a massless particle. An abrupt change occurs at the transition point. The results are compared to simulations of the gluon propagator in SU(3) lattice gauge theory.

  3. Acoustic propagation in fluids: an unexpected example of Lorentzian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, Matt

    2016-01-01

    It is a deceptively simple question to ask how acoustic disturbances propagate in a non--homogeneous flowing fluid. If the fluid is barotropic and inviscid, and the flow is irrotational (though it may have an arbitrary time dependence), then the equation of motion for the velocity potential describing a sound wave can be put in the (3+1)--dimensional form: d'Alembertian psi = 0. That is partial_mu(sqrt{-g} g^{mu nu} partial_nu psi)/sqrt{-g} = 0. The acoustic metric --- g_{mu nu}(t,x) --- governing the propagation of sound depends algebraically on the density, flow velocity, and local speed of sound. Even though the underlying fluid dynamics is Newtonian, non--relativistic, and takes place in flat space + time, the fluctuations (sound waves) are governed by a Lorentzian spacetime geometry.

  4. Assessment of Modeled Received Sound Pressure Levels and Movements of Satellite-Tagged Odontocetes Exposed to Mid-Frequency Active Sonar at the Pacific Missile Range Facility: February 2011 Through February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-30

    acoustic instrumentation which allows for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) capabilities to detect and localize sounds such as vocalizing marine...the islands of Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau. Satellite-tagged animals were exposed to estimated received levels of: 130 to 144 decibels for two rough-toothed...acoustic monitoring (PAM) capabilities in real-time and/or with recorded acoustic data, to detect and localize vocalizing marine mammals or other

  5. Wave propagation in ballistic gelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarayan, Srinivasan S; Subhash, Ghatu

    2017-04-01

    Wave propagation characteristics in long cylindrical specimens of ballistic gelatine have been investigated using a high speed digital camera and hyper elastic constitutive models. The induced transient deformation is modelled with strain rate dependent Mooney-Rivlin parameters which are determined by modelling the stress-strain response of gelatine at a range of strain rates. The varying velocity of wave propagation through the gelatine cylinder is derived as a function of prestress or stretch in the gelatine specimen. A finite element analysis is conducted using the above constitutive model by suitably defining the impulse imparted by the polymer bar into the gelatine specimen. The model results are found to capture the experimentally observed wave propagation characteristics in gelatine effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Atmospheric infrasound propagation modelling using the reflectivity method with a direct formulation of the wind effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valerie; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Schweitzer, Johannes; Gibbons, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    We recently advocated using the reflectivity method, also known as the wavenumber integration method or fast-field program, to model atmospheric infrasound propagation at regional distances. The advantage of the reflectivity method is its ability to model the full wavefield, including diffractive effects with head waves and shadow zone arrivals, in a broad frequency range but still at a relatively low computational cost. Attenuation can easily be included, giving the possibility to analyse relative amplitudes and frequency content of the different arrivals. It has clear advantages compared with ray theory in terms of predicting phases considering the particular frequent occurrence of shadow zone arrivals in infrasound observations. Its main limitation, at least in the traditional form of the method, lies in the fact that it can only handle range-independent models. We presented earlier some reflectivity method simulations of an observed accidental explosion in Norway. Wind intensity and direction are non-negligible parameters for infrasound propagation and these are appropriately taken into account in most infrasound ray-tracing codes. On the other hand, in the previous reflectivity simulations wind was taken into account only through the effective sound speed approximation where the horizontal projection of the wind field is added to the adiabatic sound speed profiles. This approximation is appropriate for dominantly horizontal propagation but can give incorrect arrival times and shadow zone locations for waves which have a significant portion of their propagation path at more vertical incidence, like thermospheric arrivals. We present here how we have modified the original reflectivity algorithm in order to take the wind into account in a more correct fashion, and how this improvement influences the synthetics.

  7. Patterns of fish sound production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David A.

    2003-04-01

    While vocalization and chorusing behavior has been intensively studied in frogs and birds, little has been done with fishes. This paper presents patterns of sound production in damselfish, toadfish, and spotted seatrout on seasonal, daily, and subdaily time scales. Chorus behavior ranges from highly coordinated behavior between neighboring toadfish to uncoordinated behavior in spotted seatrout. Differences in coordination of sound production (i.e., the degree of overlap in calls) can be related to differences in territoriality and modes of reproduction. Toadfish and damselfish are territorial fishes in which males guard benthic eggs laid in nests. Sciaenids (croakers and drums) spawn planktonic eggs, and form temporary aggregations of calling males.

  8. Synthesized size-sound sound symbolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockwood, G.F.; Hagoort, P.; Dingemanse, M.; Papafragou, A.; Grodner, D.; Mirman, D.; Trueswell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of sound symbolism have shown that people can associate sound and meaning in consistent ways when presented with maximally contrastive stimulus pairs of nonwords such as bouba/kiki (rounded/sharp) or mil/mal (small/big). Recent work has shown the effect extends to antonymic words from

  9. Study of Sound Attenuation in Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    experimental difficulties. In the ocean, the sediment is inaccesible , the propagation path is inhomoveneonis, and information on lavering usually has to... STANDARDS 1963 A RFPRODUCED AT GOVERNMENT EXPENSE Ln ~STUDY OF SOUND ATTENUATION IN SEDIMENTS Stephen R. Addison and Henry F. Bass PARGUM Report 84-03*A 4*I...measured porosity decreased to 0.39. The standard deviation in all these porosity measurements was 0.01. A porosity of 0.40 is used in all subsequent

  10. Thermal and viscous effects on sound waves: revised classical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony M J; Brenner, Howard

    2012-11-01

    In this paper the recently developed, bi-velocity model of fluid mechanics based on the principles of linear irreversible thermodynamics (LIT) is applied to sound propagation in gases taking account of first-order thermal and viscous dissipation effects. The results are compared and contrasted with the classical Navier-Stokes-Fourier results of Pierce for this same situation cited in his textbook. Comparisons are also made with the recent analyses of Dadzie and Reese, whose molecularly based sound propagation calculations furnish results virtually identical with the purely macroscopic LIT-based bi-velocity results below, as well as being well-supported by experimental data. Illustrative dissipative sound propagation examples involving application of the bi-velocity model to several elementary situations are also provided, showing the disjoint entropy mode and the additional, evanescent viscous mode.

  11. A sound future for acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven

    2017-05-01

    The field of acoustic metamaterials borrowed ideas from electromagnetics and optics to create engineered structures that exhibit desired fluid or fluid-like properties for the propagation of sound. These metamaterials offer the possibility of manipulating and controlling sound waves in ways that are challenging or impossible with conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. And active acoustic metamaterials use external control and power to create effective material properties that are fundamentally not possible with passive structures. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and, critically, converting exciting laboratory experiments into practically useful devices. In this presentation, I will outline the recent history of the field, describe some of the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters, discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound, and finally, provide a personal perspective on future directions in the field.

  12. Sound wave transmission (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  13. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  14. Probabilistic infrasound propagation using realistic atmospheric perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, P.S.M.; Evers, L.G.; Näsholm, S.P.; Gibbons, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates probabilistic infrasound propagation modeling using realistic perturbations. The ensembles of perturbed analyses, provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), include error variances of both model and assimilated observations. Ensemble spread

  15. PROPAGATION OF CYLINDRICAL WAVES IN POROELASTIC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorona Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the harmonic axisymmetric wave propagation in poroelastic media. The computational formulas for the study of displacements and stresses that occur during vibrations in a wide frequency range are proposed.

  16. Modeling Propagation of Gas Path Damage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be tracked and modeled for a range of fault modes in some modules of commercial high bypass aircraft engines. To that...

  17. Handbook for the Calculation of Sound Propagation Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-11-01

    calculation is substantially simplified when the radiators are uniform (so that each radiator by itself would produce tiie same idirectional characturistic...is small c~x~.e6to tiie wave length while the other side (c) is arbitrary 4 (Fig. 30/)) tho radiation factor 6 /T~ sin yd y-2 ()Jn (70) 0 - (/n2+ c nit

  18. Production Data - North Puget Sound Chinook salmon captive propagation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries is a cooperator with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Lummi, Nooksack, and Stillaguamish Tribes in a 10-year program to rebuild...

  19. Water quality data - North Puget Sound Chinook salmon captive propagation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries is a cooperator with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Lummi, Nooksack, and Stillaguamish Tribes in a 10-year program to rebuild...

  20. Growth Data - North Puget Sound Chinook salmon captive propagation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries is a cooperator with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Lummi, Nooksack, and Stillaguamish Tribes in a 10-year program to rebuild...

  1. Nonlinear Acoustics in Cicada Mating Calls Enhance Sound Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    components yi(«)= 2 h.(*)a(n-A)+ 2 h„(*)b(n-*). i=0 M) (7) K2-\\ K2-\\ y2(n)- 2 2 baa(kj)a(n-k)a(n-j) *=0 j=k K2-\\ K2-\\ + 22 hbb (kj)b(n-k)b(n-j) k...yi(u)= 2 ha(k)a(n-Mk)+ 2 hb(k)b(n-Mk) A=0 *=0 (9) •y«(n)+yb("). K2-\\ K2-l y2(n) =22 hm(kj)a(n - Mk)a(n - Mj) k=0 j=k K2-\\ K2-\\ + 22 hbb ...of the three second-order kernels haa(Jt,./’), hbb (/c,y), and hab(fc,y) is inadequate because the estimate does not decay sufficiently by the edges

  2. Sound Propagation in Shallow Water. Volume 2. Unclassified Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-15

    a base line D, The frequency response of a target looks slightly different on the two hydrophones. It can be measured either by using a FM -sweep...signals with a spectrum extending over several octaves would obviously constitute a considerable improvement with respect to the FM pulses normally used... EMETTEUR & RECEPTEUR A1!-DESS0US CROISES NON PRECISE TYPES DE SOURCE SOURCES IMPULSIVES SOURCE SONAR 4. RESULTATS PERTE DE

  3. Sound Propagation South of Martha’s Vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-30

    the hydrophone was determined to be -194 dBV for an applied pressure of IpPa . The -43 dBV calibration signal is equivalent to an acoustic plane wave...pressure of 151 dB// IpPa or 51 dB//1 dyne/cm2 , which is equal to Di for the hydrophone channel. The calibration constant together with the values of

  4. Fish Culture - North Puget Sound Chinook salmon captive propagation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries is a cooperator with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Lummi, Nooksack, and Stillaguamish Tribes in a 10-year program to rebuild...

  5. Modeling Sound Propagation Through Non-Axisymmetric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Stewart J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for computing the far-field adjoint Green's function of the generalized acoustic analogy equations under a locally parallel mean flow approximation is presented. The method is based on expanding the mean-flow-dependent coefficients in the governing equation and the scalar Green's function in truncated Fourier series in the azimuthal direction and a finite difference approximation in the radial direction in circular cylindrical coordinates. The combined spectral/finite difference method yields a highly banded system of algebraic equations that can be efficiently solved using a standard sparse system solver. The method is applied to test cases, with mean flow specified by analytical functions, corresponding to two noise reduction concepts of current interest: the offset jet and the fluid shield. Sample results for the Green's function are given for these two test cases and recommendations made as to the use of the method as part of a RANS-based jet noise prediction code.

  6. Propagation of Sound Through the Atmosphere: Effects of Ground Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-06-19

    temperature and wind velocity was monitored using a Wallac GGA23S Thermo-Anes~meter with a Nil25ANE probe. A log was kept of these variables during...RETURN rND FUNCION EAST611101,D31*1 DIME~ýIOW 11M(4 LEAST52 =IS MAE IS BXZST QUALITY FRLI=40 C D)UNA4I𔃻 AS TEVFITF 1,FD)AN4fN C(~r PHECTLO T( US AI

  7. Broadcast sound technology

    CERN Document Server

    Talbot-Smith, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Broadcast Sound Technology provides an explanation of the underlying principles of modern audio technology. Organized into 21 chapters, the book first describes the basic sound; behavior of sound waves; aspects of hearing, harming, and charming the ear; room acoustics; reverberation; microphones; phantom power; loudspeakers; basic stereo; and monitoring of audio signal. Subsequent chapters explore the processing of audio signal, sockets, sound desks, and digital audio. Analogue and digital tape recording and reproduction, as well as noise reduction, are also explained.

  8. An Antropologist of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2015-01-01

    PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology.......PROFESSOR PORTRAIT: Sanne Krogh Groth met Holger Schulze, newly appointed professor in Musicology at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, to a talk about anthropology of sound, sound studies, musical canons and ideology....

  9. Form Follows Sound

    OpenAIRE

    Caramiaux, Baptiste; Altavilla, Alessandro; Pobiner, Scott G.; Tanaka, Atau

    2015-01-01

    Sonic interaction is the continuous relationship between user actions and sound, mediated by some technology. Because interaction with sound may be task oriented or experience-based it is important to understand the nature of action-sound relationships in order to design rich sonic interactions. We propose a participatory approach to sonic interaction design that first considers the affordances of sounds in order to imagine embodied interaction, and based on this, generates interaction models...

  10. Underwater Sound Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutger van Aalst; Ines Simic

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a possible solution to the underwater sound filtering problem, using Blind Source Separation. The problem regards splitting sound from a boat engine and the water waves to prove the possibility to extract one sound fragment from the other on the open sea. The illustrations shown

  11. Testing Cosmology with Cosmic Sound Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Corasaniti, Pier Stefano

    2008-01-01

    WMAP observations have accurately determined the position of the first two peaks and dips in the CMB temperature power spectrum. These encode information on the ratio of the distance to the last scattering surface to the sound horizon at decoupling. However pre-recombination processes can contaminate this distance information. In order to assess the amplitude of these effects we use the WMAP data and evaluate the relative differences of the CMB peaks and dips multipoles. We find that the position of the first peak is largely displaced with the respect to the expected position of the sound horizon scale at decoupling. In contrast the relative spacings of the higher extrema are statistically consistent with those expected from perfect harmonic oscillations. This provides evidence for a scale dependent phase shift of the CMB oscillations which is caused by gravitational driving forces affecting the propagation of sound waves before recombination. By accounting for these effects we have performed a MCMC likelihoo...

  12. 33 CFR 67.25-10 - Sound signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.25-10 Section 67... signal. (a) The owner of a Class “B” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated range...) Operate the sound signal when the visibility in any direction is less than 3 miles, unless the District...

  13. 33 CFR 67.20-10 - Sound signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound signal. 67.20-10 Section 67... signal. (a) The owner of a Class “A” structure shall: (1) Install a sound signal that has a rated range of at least 2 miles; and, (2) Operate the sound signal when the visibility in any direction is less...

  14. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of Duct Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses conducted to assess the relative merits of three duct propagation codes. Results from this study are intended to support identification of a "working envelope" within which to use the various approaches underlying these propagation codes. This investigation considers a segmented liner configuration that models the NASA Langley Grazing Incidence Tube, for which a large set of measured data was available. For the uncertainty analysis, the selected input parameters (source sound pressure level, average Mach number, liner impedance, exit impedance, static pressure and static temperature) are randomly varied over a range of values. Uncertainty limits (95% confidence levels) are computed for the predicted values from each code, and are compared with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals in the measured data. Generally, the mean values of the predicted attenuation are observed to track the mean values of the measured attenuation quite well and predicted confidence intervals tend to be larger in the presence of mean flow. A two-level, six factor sensitivity study is also conducted in which the six inputs are varied one at a time to assess their effect on the predicted attenuation. As expected, the results demonstrate the liner resistance and reactance to be the most important input parameters. They also indicate the exit impedance is a significant contributor to uncertainty in the predicted attenuation.

  15. Laser Schlieren System Detects Sounds Of Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy P.; Alwar, A. Vijayaragavan

    1990-01-01

    Hostile environments monitored safely and noninvasively. Modified laser schlieren system acts as microphone to detect sounds of leaks remotely. Sensitive to acoustical frequencies above audible range and especially suited for monitoring leaks of high-pressure steam from boilers or chemical vapors from processing equipment. Does not require placement of delicate equipment in harsh environment monitored, and no contact needed with boiler or other unit being monitored. Detects sound waves via variation of index of refraction of air at acoustical frequencies. Used to monitor sound frequencies beyond range of human hearing.

  16. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...... both physical and digital models at three distinct scales. The results suggest hyperboloid geometry, while difficult to fabricate, facilitates sound scattering.......The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  17. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  18. Sound insulation properties of structure designed from apparel cutting waste

    OpenAIRE

    Jordeva, Sonja; Tomovska, Elena; Trajković, Dušan; Popeski-Dimovski, Riste; Zafirova, Koleta

    2015-01-01

    In this paper an insulation structure from apparel cutting waste was designed and its sound insulation properties were investigated. Shredded polyester apparel cuttings were used as the raw material for an insulation structure. The obtained results show that the insulation structure made from apparel cutting waste has good sound absorption compared to standard sound and thermal insulators. The average sound absorption of the samples was from 54.7% to 74.7%, for a frequency range of 250-2000Hz...

  19. A wide-angle high Mach number modal expansion for infrasound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assink, Jelle; Waxler, Roger; Velea, Doru

    2017-03-01

    The use of modal expansions to solve the problem of atmospheric infrasound propagation is revisited. A different form of the associated modal equation is introduced, valid for wide-angle propagation in atmospheres with high Mach number flow. The modal equation can be formulated as a quadratic eigenvalue problem for which there are simple and efficient numerical implementations. A perturbation expansion for the treatment of attenuation, valid for stratified media with background flow, is derived as well. Comparisons are carried out between the proposed algorithm and a modal algorithm assuming an effective sound speed, including a real data case study. The comparisons show that the effective sound speed approximation overestimates the effect of horizontal wind on sound propagation, leading to errors in traveltime, propagation path, trace velocity, and absorption. The error is found to be dependent on propagation angle and Mach number.

  20. Priming Gestures with Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge.

  1. Bubbles effect on sound dispersion in thin-walled tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, S. P.; Bergman, R. M.; Haddad, J.

    2011-06-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of fine air bubbles effect on sound propagation in thin-walled elastic tube with compressible polymeric liquid and cylindrical elastic rod in the central part of the tube. The problem formulation and solution method follow the previous paper of the authors (S.P. Levitsky, R.M. Bergman, J. Haddad, Sound dispersion in deformable tube with polymeric liquid and elastic central rod, Journal of Sound and Vibration 275 (1-2) (2004) 267-281). In order to account for the bubbles' influence on sound dispersion and attenuation, dynamic equation of state of the mixture, formulated within homogeneous approximation, is used. It is assumed that the volume gas concentration is small. The resulting dispersion equation for the waveguide with viscoelastic liquid-gas mixture is studied in a long-wave range. Results of simulations illustrate the influence of free gas concentration, bubble radius and rheological properties of the liquid on sound dispersion and attenuation in the system.

  2. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bersain A. Reyes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds’ amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63 breaths-per-minute (bpm for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57 bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  3. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  4. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...

  5. Generation of sound zones in 2.5 dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Olsen, Martin; Møller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Amethod for generating sound zones with different acoustic properties in a room is presented. The method is an extension of the two-dimensional multi-zone sound field synthesis technique recently developed by Wu and Abhayapala; the goal is, for example, to generate a plane wave that propagates...... in a certain direction within a certain region of a room and at the same time suppress sound in another region. The method is examined through simulations and experiments. For comparison a simpler method based on the idea of maximising the ratio of the potential acoustic energy in an ensonified zone...

  6. FEA of the Variations in Sound Insulation in Nominally Identical Prefabricated Lightweight Timber Panel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The measurements of sound propagation in buildings usually show a variation between nominally identical constructed structures. These variations can be due to variations in structural properties, measurement uncertainties or workmanship related factors. Better knowledge about the source...... for these variations can lead to lowered production costs. The present paper presents a numerical analysis of the variations in sound propagation of norminally identical prefabricated lightweight timber panel structues. By using the commercial FEA software ABAQUS, a parameter study is carried out regarding variation...

  7. Sound a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Sound is integral to how we experience the world, in the form of noise as well as music. But what is sound? What is the physical basis of pitch and harmony? And how are sound waves exploited in musical instruments? Sound: A Very Short Introduction looks at the science of sound and the behaviour of sound waves with their different frequencies. It also explores sound in different contexts, covering the audible and inaudible, sound underground and underwater, acoustic and electronic sound, and hearing in humans and animals. It concludes with the problem of sound out of place—noise and its reduction.

  8. Sound wave energy emitted by water drop during the splash on the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena; Korbiel, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    A drop of rain falling on the surface of bare soil not only moisturizes but also can cause splash or compaction, depending on the energy of incident drops and the condition of the surface on which it falls. The splash phenomenon can be characterized by the weight of detached soil material (using splash cups) as well as the number and trajectory of splashed particles (using high-speed cameras). The study presents a new aspect of the analysis of the splash phenomenon by measurement of the sound pressure level and the sound energy of the wave that propagates in the air. The measurements were carried out in an anechoic chamber. Three soils (Endogleyic Umbrisol, Fluvic Endogleyic Cambisol, and Haplic Chernozem) with four initial moisture levels (pressure heads: 0.1 kPa, 1 kPa, 3.16 kPa, and 16 kPa) were tested. Drops of 4.2 mm diameter were falling from a height of 1.5m. The sound pressure level was recorded after 10 consecutive water drop impacts using a special set of microphones. In all measuring conditions with 1m distance, the sound pressure level ranged from 27 to 42dB. The impact of water drops on the ground created sound pulses, which were recalculated to the energy emitted in the form of sound waves. For all soil samples, the sound wave energy was within the range of 0.14 μJ to 5.26 μJ, which corresponds to 0.03-1.07% of the energy of the incident drops (Ryżak et al., 2016). This work was partly financed from the National Science Centre, Poland; project no. 2014/14/E/ST10/00851. References Ryżak M., Bieganowski A., Korbiel T.: Sound wave Energy resulting from the impact of water drops on the soil surface. PLoS One 11(7):e0158472. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158472, 2016

  9. Water content and its effect on ultrasound propagation in concrete--the possibility of NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohdaira; Masuzawa

    2000-03-01

    It is known that water content or moisture affects the strength of concrete. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of the NDE of concrete from a knowledge of the relationship between water content and ultrasonic propagation in concrete. The results of measurements made on the ultrasound velocity and the frequency component on ultrasonic propagation as a function of the water content in concrete are reported. Test pieces of concrete made from common materials were made for the fundamental studies. The test piece dimensions were 10 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length. Test pieces were immersed in water for about 50 days to saturate them. To measure the effect of different water contents, test pieces were put in a drying chamber to change the amount of water between measurements. This procedure was repeated until the concrete was completely dried and the weight no longer changed. Water contents were defined as weight percentage to full dried state. Thus water content could be changed from 8% to 0%. Using the pulse transmission method, ultrasonic propagation in the frequency range 20 to 100 kHz was measured as a function of water content. The sound velocity varied gradually from 3000 m/s to 4500 m/s according to the water content. The frequency of maximum transmission also depended on the water content in this frequency range. It is considered that the ultrasonic NDE of concrete strength is feasible.

  10. Spread spectrum propagation prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbers, Raymond

    1989-02-01

    In order to efficiently model effects of terrain on wideband radio signals, several basic improvements to the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) propagation model were made. As a result of this effort a terrain sensitive propagation model capable of predicting the wideband channel transfer function, including the important channel characterization parameters, has been developed and validated against measurements.

  11. Propagation of Significant Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lowell M.

    1985-01-01

    Shows that the rules of thumb for propagating significant figures through arithmetic calculations frequently yield misleading results. Also describes two procedures for performing this propagation more reliably than the rules of thumb. However, both require considerably more calculational effort than do the rules. (JN)

  12. Sound field reconstruction based on the acousto-optic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic measurements are usually carried out with transducers that interact mechanically with the sound field under investigation. The goal of this work is to employ a completely different measurement principle, the determination of sound pressure based on the interaction between sound and light......, namely the acousto-optic effect. When sound propagates through a medium, it gives rise to pressure fluctuations that change the instantaneous density of the medium. Under such circumstances, the speed of light is not constant, but changed by the acoustic field. This acousto-optic interaction can...... be measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer; furthermore, it can be exploited to characterize an arbitrary sound field using tomographic techniques. This paper briefly reviews the fundamental principles governing the acousto-optic effect in air, and presents an investigation of the tomographic reconstruction...

  13. The sound of distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sound insulation between dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  15. Sound Insulation between Dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory sound insulation requirements for dwellings exist in more than 30 countries in Europe. In some countries, requirements have existed since the 1950s. Findings from comparative studies show that sound insulation descriptors and requirements represent a high degree of diversity...... and initiate – where needed – improvement of sound insulation of new and existing dwellings in Europe to the benefit of the inhabitants and the society. A European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs...... 2009-2013. The main objectives of TU0901 are to prepare proposals for harmonized sound insulation descriptors and for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality classes for dwellings. Findings from the studies provide input for the discussions in COST TU0901. Data collected from 24...

  16. Scattering of coherent sound waves by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P. L.; Liu, C. H.; Maestrello, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study of the propagation of coherent sound waves through an atmosphere containing both mean and fluctuating flow variables is presented. The general flow problem is formulated as a time-dependent wave propagation in a half-space containing the turbulent medium. The coherent acoustic waves are analyzed by a smoothing technique, assuming that mean flow variables vary with the height only. The general equations for the coherent waves are derived, and then applied to two special cases, corresponding to uniform and shear mean flow, respectively. The results show that mean shear and turbulence introduce pronounced effects on the propagation of coherent acoustic disturbances.

  17. Orcas in Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Washington. Mumford, T.F. 2007. Kelp and Eelgrass in Puget Sound. Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Report No. 2007-05. Published by Seattle District, U.S...2006). Wild Chinook populations continue to decline due to dam con- struction, overall habitat loss , loss of prey and historical over-fishing...Sanford (2006) pointed out that current mean weight of adult Chinook salmon returning to their spawn- ing grounds in Puget Sound is only 56 percent of

  18. Locating far-field impulsive sound sources in air by triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Brian G.; Criswick, Lionel G.; Lo, Kam W.

    2002-01-01

    The firing of a gun generates an acoustic impulse that propagates radially outwards from the source. Acoustic gun-ranging systems estimate the source position by measuring the relative time of arrival of the impulse at a number of spatially distributed acoustic sensors. The sound-ranging problem is revisited here using improved time-delay estimation methods to refine the source position estimates. The time difference for the acoustic wavefront to arrive at two spatially separated sensors is estimated by cross correlating the digitized outputs of the sensors. The time-delay estimate is used to calculate the source bearing, and the source position is cross fixed by triangulation using the bearings from two widely separated receiving nodes. The variability in the bearing and position estimates is quantified by processing acoustic sensor data recorded during field experiments for a variety of impulsive sound sources: artillery guns, mortars, and grenades. Imperfect knowledge of the effective speed of sound travel results in bias errors in the source bearing estimates, which are found to depend on the orientation of the sensor pair axis with respect to the source direction. Combining the time-delay estimates from two orthogonal pairs of sensors reduces these bias errors.

  19. Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyan, D [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2013-04-01

    The Interpolated Sounding (INTERPSONDE) value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), and surface meteorological instruments in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of at least 266 altitude levels. This VAP is part of the Merged Sounding (MERGESONDE) suite of VAPs. INTERPSONDE is the profile of the atmospheric thermodynamic state created using the algorithms of MERGESONDE without including the model data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). More specifically, INTERPSONDE VAP represents an intermediate step within the larger MERGESONDE process.

  20. A computational method of evaluating noncompact sound based on vortex sound theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, T; Miyazawa, M; Kato, C

    2007-03-01

    A numerical investigation is made of the production of sound by turbulence interacting with a noncompact body. The problem is formulated in the frequency domain by extending the theory of vortex sound proposed by Howe. The anomalous "numerical" generation of sound by the sudden termination of Lighthill's stress tensor at the outer boundary of a finite computational domain is avoided by identification of "scattered" sound sources that generate sound principally by interaction with the solid surface. It is argued that the boundary element method is the most efficient means of computing the aeroacoustic Green's function for the problem, because it requires a minimum of CPU time, is not prone to numerical errors such as dispersion and dissipation during propagation, and the radiation condition is easily applied at the outer boundary. The method is applied to the problem of sound generation by high Reynolds number flow past a circular cylinder. The "scattered" sources are shown to be confined to the vicinity of the cylinder surface. At low frequencies the radiation has a dipole-like directivity in agreement with the compact approximation. However, the directivity is quite different at high frequencies, where our noncompact method predicts a more complicated "leaf-like" radiation pattern.

  1. Nonlinear effects in infrasound propagation simulations

    OpenAIRE

    GAINVILLE, Olaf; Marsden, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, long range propagation of infrasound through the atmosphere is investigated using numerical models. The study problem is a cylindrical blast in an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Vertical profiles of temperature, wind and density obtained during the Misty Picture High explosive experiment conducted in May 1987 are used. The propagation is modeled using two codes. First, the full 2-D Navier-Stokes equations are so...

  2. Spark channel propagation in a microbubble liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya.; Son, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Experimental study on the development of the spark channel from the anode needle under pulsed electrical breakdown of isopropyl alcohol solution in water with air microbubbles has been performed. The presence of the microbubbles increases the velocity of the spark channel propagation and increases the current in the discharge gap circuit. The observed rate of spark channel propagation in microbubble liquid ranges from 4 to 12 m/s, indicating the thermal mechanism of the spark channel development in a microbubble liquid.

  3. Effect of disorder on bulk sound wave speed : A multiscale spectral analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Disorder of size (polydispersity) and mass of discrete elements or particles in randomly structured media (e.g., granular matter such as soil) has numerous effects on the materials' sound propagation characteristics. The influence of disorder on energy and momentum transport, the sound wave speed

  4. How to take absorptive surfaces into account when designing outdoor sound reinforcement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten bo

    1996-01-01

    When sound reinforcement systems are used outdoors, absorptive surfaces are usually present along the propagation path of the sound. This may lead to a very significant colouration of the spectrum received by the audience. The colouration depends on the location and directivity of the loudspeaker...

  5. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Signal Propagating Through the South China Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    ANALYSIS OF ACOUSTIC SIGNAL PROPAGATING THROUGH THE SOUTH CHINA SEA BASIN by Meihuei Chen March 2016 Thesis Advisor...ACOUSTIC SIGNAL PROPAGATING THROUGH THE SOUTH CHINA SEA BASIN 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Meihuei Chen 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...acoustics, South China Sea , statistics, sound propagation variability 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 43 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT

  6. Acoustic Wave Propagation Modeling by a Two-dimensional Finite-difference Summation-by-parts Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Petersson, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rodgers, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Acoustic waveform modeling is a computationally intensive task and full three-dimensional simulations are often impractical for some geophysical applications such as long-range wave propagation and high-frequency sound simulation. In this study, we develop a two-dimensional high-order accurate finite-difference code for acoustic wave modeling. We solve the linearized Euler equations by discretizing them with the sixth order accurate finite difference stencils away from the boundary and the third order summation-by-parts (SBP) closure near the boundary. Non-planar topographic boundary is resolved by formulating the governing equation in curvilinear coordinates following the interface. We verify the implementation of the algorithm by numerical examples and demonstrate the capability of the proposed method for practical acoustic wave propagation problems in the atmosphere.

  7. 2005 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: North Puget Sound Lowlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data contributing to the Puget Sound Lowlands project of 2005. Arlington, City of Snohomish, Snohomish...

  8. On the excess attenuation of sound in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, R.

    1975-01-01

    The attenuation suffered by an acoustic plane wave propagating from an elevated source to the ground, in excess of absorption losses, was studied. Reported discrepancies between attenuation measurements made in the field and theories which only account for absorption losses are discussed. It was concluded that the scattering of sound by turbulence results in a nonnegligible contribution to the total attenuation.

  9. Regularity extraction from non-adjacent sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Alexandra; Schröger, Erich; Ritter, Walter; Winkler, István

    2012-01-01

    The regular behavior of sound sources helps us to make sense of the auditory environment. Regular patterns may, for instance, convey information on the identity of a sound source (such as the acoustic signature of a train moving on the rails). Yet typically, this signature overlaps in time with signals emitted from other sound sources. It is generally assumed that auditory regularity extraction cannot operate upon this mixture of signals because it only finds regularities between adjacent sounds. In this view, the auditory environment would be grouped into separate entities by means of readily available acoustic cues such as separation in frequency and location. Regularity extraction processes would then operate upon the resulting groups. Our new experimental evidence challenges this view. We presented two interleaved sound sequences which overlapped in frequency range and shared all acoustic parameters. The sequences only differed in their underlying regular patterns. We inserted deviants into one of the sequences to probe whether the regularity was extracted. In the first experiment, we found that these deviants elicited the mismatch negativity (MMN) component. Thus the auditory system was able to find the regularity between the non-adjacent sounds. Regularity extraction was not influenced by sequence cohesiveness as manipulated by the relative duration of tones and silent inter-tone-intervals. In the second experiment, we showed that a regularity connecting non-adjacent sounds was discovered only when the intervening sequence also contained a regular pattern, but not when the intervening sounds were randomly varying. This suggests that separate regular patterns are available to the auditory system as a cue for identifying signals coming from distinct sound sources. Thus auditory regularity extraction is not necessarily confined to a processing stage after initial sound grouping, but may precede grouping when other acoustic cues are unavailable.

  10. SoundCompass: A Distributed MEMS Microphone Array-Based Sensor for Sound Source Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer Tiete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA. This article presents the SoundCompass’s hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field.

  11. The gluon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E.

    1999-07-01

    We discuss the current state of what is known non-perturbatively about the gluon propagator in QCD, with emphasis on the information coming from lattice simulations. We review specification of the lattice Landau gauge and the procedure for calculating the gluon propagator on the lattice. We also discuss some of the difficulties in non-perturbative calculations - especially Gribov copy issues. We trace the evolution of lattice simulations over the past dozen years, emphasizing how the improvement in computations has led not only to more precise determinations of the propagator, but has allowed more detailed information about it to be extracted.

  12. Teaching about Mechanical Waves and Sound with a Tuning Fork and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leccia, Silvio; Colantonio, Arturo; Puddu, Emanuella; Galano, Silvia; Testa, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Literature in "Physics Education" has shown that students encounter many difficulties in understanding wave propagation. Such difficulties lead to misconceptions also in understanding sound, often used as context to teach wave propagation. To address these issues, we present in this paper a module in which the students are engaged in…

  13. Notes on Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bonnie Jones creates improvised and composed text-sound performances that explore the fluidity and function of electronic noise (field recordings, circuit bending and text (poetry, found, spoken. She is interested in how people perceive, “read” and interact with these sounds and texts given our current technological moment.

  14. Shadow of sound

    OpenAIRE

    Prvacki, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: "Shadow of sound is a musical flip book, an attempt to move sound through pages and to measure music visually. Prvacki demonstrates that 40 seconds of Bach's Minuet in G Major fit on 150 pages.".

  15. InfoSound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Gopinath, B.; Haberman, Gary O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors explore ways to enhance users' comprehension of complex applications using music and sound effects to present application-program events that are difficult to detect visually. A prototype system, Infosound, allows developers to create and store musical sequences and sound effects with...

  16. The sounds of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norah; Deane, Cormac; Murphy, Padraig

    2017-07-01

    Public perceptions of nanotechnology are shaped by sound in surprising ways. Our analysis of the audiovisual techniques employed by nanotechnology stakeholders shows that well-chosen sounds can help to win public trust, create value and convey the weird reality of objects on the nanoscale.

  17. OMNIDIRECTIONAL SOUND SOURCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    A sound source comprising a loudspeaker (6) and a hollow coupler (4) with an open inlet which communicates with and is closed by the loudspeaker (6) and an open outlet, said coupler (4) comprising rigid walls which cannot respond to the sound pressures produced by the loudspeaker (6). According...

  18. Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    大矢, 健一

    2013-01-01

    Hamiltonian Algorithm (HA) is an algorithm for searching solutions is optimization problems. This paper introduces a sound synthesis technique using Hamiltonian Algorithm and shows a simple example. "Hamiltonian Algorithm Sound Synthesis" uses phase transition effect in HA. Because of this transition effect, totally new waveforms are produced.

  19. Sound oscillation of dropwise cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A.V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V.A.; Romanyuk, S.N. [Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian Branch, P.O. 1230, 625000 Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-04

    There was registered sound oscillation of a dropwise cluster formed over the warmed-up water surface. We have calculated the electrical charge of drops on the basis of experimental data on ion-sound oscillation. It was demonstrated that the charge is proportional to surface area of the drops and does not depend on intensity of their evaporation (condensation) in the range of 60–100 °C. The charge of drops reaches 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} units of elementary charge and coincides on magnitude order with the literary value of a charge calculated by another method. -- Highlights: ► The present investigation registered short-wave sound oscillations of water drops in a dropwise cluster in the range of 60–100 °C. ► We have found autocorrelation functions and Fourier transforms of time series of interdroplet distance; defined oscillation frequencies. ► Calculated electrical charge of drops and specified that the charge is proportional to the drop surface area.

  20. Sound field reconstruction using acousto-optic tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    When sound propagates through a medium, it results in pressure fluctuations that change the instantaneous density of the medium. Under such circumstances, the refractive index that characterizes the propagation of light is not constant, but influenced by the acoustic field. This kind of interaction...... is known as the acousto-optic effect. The formulation of this physical phenomenon into a mathematical problem can be described in terms of the Radon transform, which makes it possible to reconstruct an arbitrary sound field using tomography. The present work derives the fundamental equations governing...... in the experimental results. The effectiveness of the tomographic reconstruction is further confirmed with representations of the very same sound field measured with a traditional microphone array....

  1. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  2. Sound classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    National schemes for sound classification of dwellings exist in more than ten countries in Europe, typically published as national standards. The schemes define quality classes reflecting different levels of acoustical comfort. Main criteria concern airborne and impact sound insulation between...... dwellings, facade sound insulation and installation noise. The schemes have been developed, implemented and revised gradually since the early 1990s. However, due to lack of coordination between countries, there are significant discrepancies, and new standards and revisions continue to increase the diversity...... is needed, and a European COST Action TU0901 "Integrating and Harmonizing Sound Insulation Aspects in Sustainable Urban Housing Constructions", has been established and runs 2009-2013, one of the main objectives being to prepare a proposal for a European sound classification scheme with a number of quality...

  3. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    share the characteristics of site specificity. However, this article will consider the artwork in a broader context by re-examining how sound installations relate to the urban environment. For that purpose, this article brings together ecology terms from acoustic ecology of the sound theories...... of the 1970s while developing them into recent definitions of ecology in urban studies. Finally, we unfold our framing of urban sound ecologies with three case analyses: a sound intervention in Berlin, a symphony for wind instruments in Copenhagen and a video walk in a former railway station in Kassel....... The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  4. Acoustic pathways revealed: simulated sound transmission and reception in Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Ted W; Krysl, Petr; Hildebrand, John A

    2008-03-01

    The finite element modeling (FEM) space reported here contains the head of a simulated whale based on CT data sets as well as physical measurements of sound-propagation characteristics of actual tissue samples. Simulated sound sources placed inside and outside of an adult male Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) reveal likely sound propagation pathways into and out of the head. Two separate virtual sound sources that were located at the left and right phonic lips produced beams that converged just outside the head. This result supports the notion that dual sound sources can interfere constructively to form a biologically useful and, in fact, excellent sonar beam in front of the animal. The most intriguing FEM results concern pathways by which sounds reach the ears. The simulations reveal a previously undescribed 'gular pathway' for sound reception in Ziphius. Propagated sound pressure waves enter the head from below and between the lower jaws, pass through an opening created by the absence of the medial bony wall of the posterior mandibles, and continue toward the bony ear complexes through the internal mandibular fat bodies. This new pathway has implications for understanding the evolution of underwater hearing in odontocetes. Our model also provides evidence for receive beam directionality, off-axis acoustic shadowing and a plausible mechanism for the long-standing orthodox sound reception pathway in odontocetes. The techniques developed for this study can be used to study acoustic perturbation in a wide variety of marine organisms.

  5. Bamboo in vitro propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yudith García- Ramírez; Marisol Freire-Seijo; Ortelio Hurtado

    2011-01-01

    ... the social problems of the countryside in Cuba. Traditional bamboo propagation is affected by long intervals of flowering, the limited stock of plant material, the low percentages of rooting and the limited existence of propagules...

  6. Sound radiation around a flying fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Jérôme; Tuck, Elizabeth J.; Robert, Daniel

    2005-07-01

    Many insects produce sounds during flight. These acoustic emissions result from the oscillation of the wings in air. To date, most studies have measured the frequency characteristics of flight sounds, leaving other acoustic characteristics-and their possible biological functions-unexplored. Here, using close-range acoustic recording, we describe both the directional radiation pattern and the detailed frequency composition of the sound produced by a tethered flying (Lucilia sericata). The flapping wings produce a sound wave consisting of a series of harmonics, the first harmonic occurring around 190 Hz. In the horizontal plane of the fly, the first harmonic shows a dipolelike amplitude distribution whereas the second harmonic shows a monopolelike radiation pattern. The first frequency component is dominant in front of the fly while the second harmonic is dominant at the sides. Sound with a broad frequency content, typical of that produced by wind, is also recorded at the back of the fly. This sound qualifies as pseudo-sound and results from the vortices generated during wing kinematics. Frequency and amplitude features may be used by flies in different behavioral contexts such as sexual communication, competitive communication, or navigation within the environment.

  7. The Textile Form of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Cecilie

    of sound. This issue is a part of a Ph.D. study at The Danish Design School in Copenhagen. Sound diffusion in architecture is a complex phenomenon. From the sound source the sound spreads in all directions as a sphere of wave fronts. When the sound is reflected from room boundaries or furniture, complex...... goemetry by analysing the sound pattern at a specific spot. This analysis is done theoretically with algorithmic systems and practical with waves in water. The paper describes the experiments and the findings, and explains how an analysis of sound can be catched in a textile form.......Sound is a part of architecture, and sound is complex. Upon this, sound is invisible. How is it then possible to design visual objects that interact with the sound? This paper addresses the problem of how to get access to the complexity of sound and how to make textile material revealing the form...

  8. Automatic speed of sound correction with photoacoustic image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Meng; Cao, Meng; Feng, Ting; Yuan, Jie; Cheng, Qian; Liu, XIaojun; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Sound velocity measurement is of great importance to the application of biomedical especially in the research of acoustic detection and acoustic tomography. Using correct sound velocities in each medium other than one unified sound propagation speed, we can effectively enhance sound based imaging resolution. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), is defined as cross-sectional or three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a material based on the photoacoustic effect and it is a developing, non-invasive imaging method in biomedical research. This contribution proposes a method to concurrently calculate multiple acoustic speeds in different mediums. Firstly, we get the size of infra-structure of the target by B-mode ultrasonic imaging method. Then we build the photoacoustic (PA) image of the same target with different acoustic speed in different medium. By repeatedly evaluate the quality of reconstruct PA image, we dynamically calibrate the acoustic speeds in different medium to build a finest PA image. Thus, we take these speeds of sound as the correct acoustic propagation velocities in according mediums. Experiments show that our non-invasive method can yield correct speed of sound with less than 0.3% error which might benefit future research in biomedical science.

  9. Frequency Dynamics of the First Heart Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John Charles

    Cardiac auscultation is a fundamental clinical tool but first heart sound origins and significance remain controversial. Previous clinical studies have implicated resonant vibrations of both the myocardium and the valves. Accordingly, the goals of this thesis were threefold, (1) to characterize the frequency dynamics of the first heart sound, (2) to determine the relative contribution of the myocardium and the valves in determining first heart sound frequency, and (3) to develop new tools for non-stationary signal analysis. A resonant origin for first heart sound generation was tested through two studies in an open-chest canine preparation. Heart sounds were recorded using ultralight acceleration transducers cemented directly to the epicardium. The first heart sound was observed to be non-stationary and multicomponent. The most dominant feature was a powerful, rapidly-rising frequency component that preceded mitral valve closure. Two broadband components were observed; the first coincided with mitral valve closure while the second significantly preceded aortic valve opening. The spatial frequency of left ventricular vibrations was both high and non-stationary which indicated that the left ventricle was not vibrating passively in response to intracardiac pressure fluctuations but suggested instead that the first heart sound is a propagating transient. In the second study, regional myocardial ischemia was induced by left coronary circumflex arterial occlusion. Acceleration transducers were placed on the ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium to determine whether ischemia produced local or global changes in first heart sound amplitude and frequency. The two zones exhibited disparate amplitude and frequency behavior indicating that the first heart sound is not a resonant phenomenon. To objectively quantify the presence and orientation of signal components, Radon transformation of the time -frequency plane was performed and found to have considerable potential for pattern

  10. Categorization of environmental sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastavino, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    This paper investigates the way in which people categorize environmental sounds in their everyday lives. Previous research has shown that isolated environmental sounds are categorized on the basis of high-level semantic features when the sounds can be attributed to specific sound sources. However, in the presence of numerous sound sources, as occur in most real-world situations, the process of source identification is often hindered. In the present study, a free categorization task with open-ended verbal descriptions was used to investigate auditory categories for environmental sounds in complex real-world sonic environments. Two main categories emerged from the free-sort, reflecting the absence or presence of human activity in relation to hedonic judgments. At a subordinate level, subcategories were mediated by the participant's reported interactions with the environment through socialized activities. The spontaneous verbal descriptors collected were successful in discriminating categories. These findings indicate that complex environmental sounds are processed and categorized as meaningful events providing relevant information about the environment. The relevance of situational factors in categorization and the notion of auditory category in its relation to linguistic labeling are then discussed.

  11. Sound as artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  12. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  13. Effect of Sound Waves on Decarburization Rate of Fe-C Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey V.; Sano, Masamichi

    2018-02-01

    Sound waves have the ability to propagate through a gas phase and, thus, to supply the acoustic energy from a sound generator to materials being processed. This offers an attractive tool, for example, for controlling the rates of interfacial reactions in steelmaking processes. This study investigates the kinetics of decarburization in molten Fe-C alloys, the surface of which was exposed to sound waves and Ar-O2 gas blown onto the melt surface. The main emphasis is placed on clarifying effects of sound frequency, sound pressure, and gas flow rate. A series of water model experiments and numerical simulations are also performed to explain the results of high-temperature experiments and to elucidate the mechanism of sound wave application. This is explained by two phenomena that occur simultaneously: (1) turbulization of Ar-O2 gas flow by sound wave above the melt surface and (2) motion and agitation of the melt surface when exposed to sound wave. It is found that sound waves can both accelerate and inhibit the decarburization rate depending on the Ar-O2 gas flow rate and the presence of oxide film on the melt surface. The effect of sound waves is clearly observed only at higher sound pressures on resonance frequencies, which are defined by geometrical features of the experimental setup. The resonance phenomenon makes it difficult to separate the effect of sound frequency from that of sound pressure under the present experimental conditions.

  14. Effect of Sound Waves on Decarburization Rate of Fe-C Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Sergey V.; Sano, Masamichi

    2017-11-01

    Sound waves have the ability to propagate through a gas phase and, thus, to supply the acoustic energy from a sound generator to materials being processed. This offers an attractive tool, for example, for controlling the rates of interfacial reactions in steelmaking processes. This study investigates the kinetics of decarburization in molten Fe-C alloys, the surface of which was exposed to sound waves and Ar-O2 gas blown onto the melt surface. The main emphasis is placed on clarifying effects of sound frequency, sound pressure, and gas flow rate. A series of water model experiments and numerical simulations are also performed to explain the results of high-temperature experiments and to elucidate the mechanism of sound wave application. This is explained by two phenomena that occur simultaneously: (1) turbulization of Ar-O2 gas flow by sound wave above the melt surface and (2) motion and agitation of the melt surface when exposed to sound wave. It is found that sound waves can both accelerate and inhibit the decarburization rate depending on the Ar-O2 gas flow rate and the presence of oxide film on the melt surface. The effect of sound waves is clearly observed only at higher sound pressures on resonance frequencies, which are defined by geometrical features of the experimental setup. The resonance phenomenon makes it difficult to separate the effect of sound frequency from that of sound pressure under the present experimental conditions.

  15. Propagation Loss Assessment of the BEARING STAKE Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-28

    propagation loss models ( ASTRAL , RAY WAVE, and FACT) indicate that with some minor modifications the ASTRAL model is well suited for the prediction of... ASTRAL and RAY WAVE models. (C) ... 136 71. Propagation loss at 25 Hz as a function of range for a source depth of 91 in at Site 4. Also shown are...the corresponding propagation losses from the ASTRAL and RAY WAVE models. (C)... 137 72. Propagation loss at 39 Hz as a function of range at Site 4. (C

  16. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the productions of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...... and combine theories from several fields. Aspects of sound art studies, performance studies and contemporary art studies are presented in order to theoretically explore the very diverse dimensions of the two sound art pieces. Visual, auditory, performative, social, spatial and durational dimensions become...

  17. Sounds of Web Advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Iben Bredahl; Graakjær, Nicolai Jørgensgaard

    2010-01-01

    Sound seems to be a neglected issue in the study of web ads. Web advertising is predominantly regarded as visual phenomena–commercial messages, as for instance banner ads that we watch, read, and eventually click on–but only rarely as something that we listen to. The present chapter presents...... an overview of the auditory dimensions in web advertising: Which kinds of sounds do we hear in web ads? What are the conditions and functions of sound in web ads? Moreover, the chapter proposes a theoretical framework in order to analyse the communicative functions of sound in web advertising. The main...... argument is that an understanding of the auditory dimensions in web advertising must include a reflection on the hypertextual settings of the web ad as well as a perspective on how users engage with web content....

  18. It sounds good!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Both the atmosphere and we ourselves are hit by hundreds of particles every second and yet nobody has ever heard a sound coming from these processes. Like cosmic rays, particles interacting inside the detectors at the LHC do not make any noise…unless you've decided to use the ‘sonification’ technique, in which case you might even hear the Higgs boson sound like music. Screenshot of the first page of the "LHC sound" site. A group of particle physicists, composers, software developers and artists recently got involved in the ‘LHC sound’ project to make the particles at the LHC produce music. Yes…music! The ‘sonification’ technique converts data into sound. “In this way, if you implement the right software you can get really nice music out of the particle tracks”, says Lily Asquith, a member of the ATLAS collaboration and one of the initiators of the project. The ‘LHC...

  19. Sound Art Situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh Groth, Sanne; Samson, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    and combine theories from several fields. Aspects of sound art studies, performance studies and contemporary art studies are presented in order to theoretically explore the very diverse dimensions of the two sound art pieces: Visual, auditory, performative, social, spatial and durational dimensions become......This article is an analysis of two sound art performances that took place June 2015 in outdoor public spaces in the social housing area Urbanplanen in Copenhagen, Denmark. The two performances were On the production of a poor acoustics by Brandon LaBelle and Green Interactive Biofeedback...... Environments (GIBE) by Jeremy Woodruff. In order to investigate the complex situation that arises when sound art is staged in such contexts, the authors of this article suggest exploring the events through approaching them as ‘situations’ (Doherty 2009). With this approach it becomes possible to engage...

  20. Effect of inter- and intra-annual thermohaline variability on acoustic propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Peter C.; McDonald, Colleen M.; Kucukosmanoglu, Murat; Judono, Albert; Margolina, Tetyana; Fan, Chenwu

    2017-05-01

    This paper is to answer the question "How can inter- and intra-annual variability in the ocean be leveraged by the submarine Force?" through quantifying inter- and intra-annual variability in (T, S) fields and in turn underwater acoustic characteristics such as transmission loss, signal excess, and range of detection. The Navy's Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) is the climatological monthly mean data and represents mean annual variability. An optimal spectral decomposition method is used to produce a synoptic monthly gridded (SMG) (T, S) dataset for the world oceans with 1° ×1° horizontal resolution, 28 vertical levels (surface to 3,000 m depth), monthly time increment from January 1945 to December 2014 now available at the NOAA/NCEI website: http://data.nodc.noaa.gov/cgibin/iso?id=gov.noaa.nodc:0140938. The sound velocity decreases from 1945 to 1975 and increases afterwards due to global climate change. Effect of the inter- and intra-annual (T, S) variability on acoustic propagation in the Yellow Sea is investigated using a well-developed acoustic model (Bellhop) in frequencies from 3.5 kHz to 5 kHz with sound velocity profile (SVP) calculated from GDEM and SMG datasets, various bottom types (silty clay, fine sand, gravelly mud, sandy mud, and cobble or gravel) from the NAVOCEANO`s High Frequency Environmental Algorithms (HFEVA), source and receiver depths. Acoustic propagation ranges are extended drastically due to the inter-annual variability in comparison with the climatological SVP (from GDEM). Submarines' vulnerability of detection as its depth varies and avoidance of short acoustic range due to inter-annual variability are also discussed.

  1. Sound field in long rooms with diffusely reflecting boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picaut, Judicaël; Simon, Laurent; Polack, Jean-Dominique

    1999-01-01

    A diffusion equation is used to predict the sound propagation in long rooms with diffusely reflecting boundaries. The model is defined by two parameters, the coefficient of diffusion depending on the mean free path, and an exchange coefficient expressing wall absorption. The diffusion equation...... is solved for time-varying sources and in stationary state. Analytical expressions of the sound attenuation and reverberation in infinite, semi-infinite and finite long rooms are quite in accordance with numerical simulations of diffuse sound field. It is also shown that the diffusion model allows...... to predict experimental observations: the decay curves are not linear, the reverberation time increases with the source-receiver distance, and sound attenuation is linear along corridors. The dependence of the coefficient of diffusion with the degree of wall diffusion is also discussed....

  2. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio, the basic idea to precisely estimate the true sound speed for real time system sound speed was proposed. Algorithms have been verified both in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known sound speeds and in vivo ultrasound images, compared with other existing method. The testing results showed that this new method not only produced accurate sound speed for ultrasound image optimization, but also finely met the critical computation requirement for real time applications.

  3. Wind turbine noise propagation modelling: An unsteady approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    of unsteady flow around it and time dependent source characteristics. For the acoustics modelling we employ the Parabolic Equation (PE) method while Large Eddy Simulation (LES) as well as synthetically generated turbulence fields are used to generate the medium flow upon which sound propagates. Unsteady...... acoustic simulations are carried out for three incoming wind shear and various turbulence intensities, using a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The focus of the present paper is to study the near and far field amplitude modulation characteristics and time evolution of Sound...

  4. Some aspects of coupling-induced sound absorption in enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sum, K S; Pan, J

    2003-08-01

    It is known that the coupling between a modally reactive boundary structure of an enclosure and the enclosed sound field induces absorption in the sound field. However, the effect of this absorption on the sound-field response can vary significantly, even when material properties of the structure and dimensions of the coupled system are not changed. Although there have been numerous investigations of coupling between a structure and an enclosed sound field, little work has been done in the area of sound absorption induced by the coupling. Therefore, characteristics of the absorption are not well understood and the extent of its influence on the behavior of the sound-field response is not clearly known. In this paper, the coupling of a boundary structure and an enclosed sound field in frequency bands above the low-frequency range is considered. Three aspects of the coupling-induced sound absorption are studied namely, the effects of exciting either the structure or the sound field directly, damping in the uncoupled sound field and damping in the uncoupled structure. The results provide an understanding of some features of the coupling-induced absorption and its significance to the sound-field response.

  5. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  6. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  7. Propagation characteristics of thunderstorms in southern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, M.; Bartenschlager, B.; Finke, U.

    1998-05-01

    The propagation of thunderstorms in southern Germany was investigated. The thunderstorms were observed by a lightning position system during the summer months of the years 1992 to 1996. On average every second day thunderstorms were observed anywhere in southern Germany. In general thunderstorms approach from westerly and south-westerly directions. The average speed is 13 m/s. No significant relation between the occurrence of thunderstorms and the large scale synoptic pattern described by the Grosswetterlagen (large scale weather pattern) was found. Thunderstorms were observed during almost all Grosswetterlagen. The reduction to 8 weather pattern based on the low-level flow in southern Germany showed that thunderstorms are likely when the flow has westerly directions (43%) or easterly directions (20%). Three distinct groups of different lightning patterns could be identified; stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the wind shear were retrieved from the radio soundings from Muenchen and Stuttgart. On average CAPE was 583 J/kg for stationary, 701 J/kg for moving thunderstorms, and 876 J/kg for thunderstorm lines. The average bulk Richardson numbers are 152, 80 and 52 for stationary, moving thunderstorms and thunderstorm lines, respectively. The steering level was found to be at about 3 and 6 km m.s.l. However, it should be noted, that in most cases the soundings do not completely describe the local environment of thunderstorms, since radio soundings are only available twice a day. (orig.)

  8. Seismic and Biological Sources of Ambient Ocean Sound /

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Simon Eric

    2013-01-01

    Sound is the most efficient radiation in the ocean. Sounds of seismic and biological origin contain information regarding the underlying processes that created them. A single hydrophone records summary time-frequency information from the volume within acoustic range. Beamforming using a hydrophone array additionally produces azimuthal estimates of sound sources. A two-dimensional array and acoustic focusing produce an unambiguous two- dimensional `image' of sources. This dissertation describe...

  9. Propagation Of Dense Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Peter J.; Davis, John F.

    1988-05-01

    A variety of schemes have been proposed over the last two decades for delivering lethal amounts of energy and/or momentum to targets such as missiles and high speed aircraft. Techniques have ranged from high energy lasers and high voltage charged-particle accelerators to less exotic but still challenging devices such as electromagnetic railguns. One class of technology involves the use of high speed plasmas. The primary attraction of such technology is the possibility of utilizing relatively compact accelerators and electrical power systems that could allow highly mobile and agile operation from rocket or aircraft platforms, or in special ordnance. Three years ago, R & D Associates examined the possibility of plasma propagation for military applications and concluded that the only viable approach consisted of long dense plasma jets, contained in radial equilibrium by the atmosphere, while propagating at speeds of about 10 km/s. Without atmospheric confinement the plasma density would diminish too rapidly for adequate range and lethality. Propagation of atmospherically-confined jets at speeds much greater than 10 km/s required significant increases in power levels and/or operating altitudes to achieve useful ranges. The present research effort has been developing the experimental conditions necessary to achieve reasonable comparison with theoretical predictions for plasma jet propagation in the atmosphere. Time-resolved measurements have been made of high speed argon plasma jets penetrating a helium background (simulating xenon jets propagating into air). Basic radial confinement of the jet has been observed by photography and spectroscopy and structures in the flow field resemble those predicted by numerical calculations. Results from our successful initial experiments have been used to design improved diagnostic procedures and arcjet source characteristics for further experiments. In experiments with a modified arcjet source, radial confinement of the jet is again

  10. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 5. Flood Wave Propagation-The Saint Venant Equations. P P Mujumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 5 May 2001 pp 66-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/05/0066-0073 ...

  11. Uncertainty Propagation in OMFIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Meneghini, Orso; Sung, Choongki

    2017-10-01

    A rigorous comparison of power balance fluxes and turbulent model fluxes requires the propagation of uncertainties in the kinetic profiles and their derivatives. Making extensive use of the python uncertainties package, the OMFIT framework has been used to propagate covariant uncertainties to provide an uncertainty in the power balance calculation from the ONETWO code, as well as through the turbulent fluxes calculated by the TGLF code. The covariant uncertainties arise from fitting 1D (constant on flux surface) density and temperature profiles and associated random errors with parameterized functions such as a modified tanh. The power balance and model fluxes can then be compared with quantification of the uncertainties. No effort is made at propagating systematic errors. A case study will be shown for the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations on the kinetic profiles and fluxes at the top of the pedestal. A separate attempt at modeling the random errors with Monte Carlo sampling will be compared to the method of propagating the fitting function parameter covariant uncertainties. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG2-95ER-54309, DE-SC 0012656.

  12. Airway inflammation phenotype prediction in asthma patients using lung sound analysis with fractional exhaled nitric oxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terufumi Shimoda; Yasushi Obase; Yukio Nagasaka; Hiroshi Nakano; Reiko Kishikawa; Tomoaki Iwanaga

    2017-01-01

    Background: We previously reported the results of lung sound analysis in patients with bronchial asthma and demonstrated that the exhalation-to-inhalation sound pressure ratio in the low frequency range between 100 and 200 Hz (E/I LF...

  13. Changes in lung sounds during asthma progression in a guinea pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizu Habukawa

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Lung sound intensity in the middle frequency range from 501 to 1000 Hz correlated with peripheral airway wall thickness. Inspiratory sound intensity appeared to be an indicator of morphological changes in small airways in asthma.

  14. SOUND MORPHING BY FEATURE INTERPOLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas Caetano, Marcelo; Rodet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The goal of sound morphing by feature interpolation is to obtain sounds whose values of features are intermediate between those of the source and target sounds. In order to do this, we should be able to resynthesize sounds that present a set of predefined feature values, a notoriously difficult problem. In this work, we present morphing techniques to obtain hybrid musical instrument sounds whose feature values correspond as close as possible to the ideal interpolated v...

  15. Sound transmission in porcine thorax through airway insonification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Dai, Zoujun; Mansy, Hansen A; Henry, Brian M; Sandler, Richard H; Balk, Robert A; Royston, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Many pulmonary injuries and pathologies may lead to structural and functional changes in the lungs resulting in measurable sound transmission changes on the chest surface. Additionally, noninvasive imaging of externally driven mechanical wave motion in the chest (e.g., using magnetic resonance elastography) can provide information about lung structural property changes and, hence, may be of diagnostic value. In the present study, a comprehensive computational simulation (in silico) model was developed to simulate sound wave propagation in the airways, lung, and chest wall under normal and pneumothorax conditions. Experiments were carried out to validate the model. Here, sound waves with frequency content from 50 to 700 Hz were introduced into airways of five porcine subjects via an endotracheal tube, and transmitted waves were measured by scanning laser Doppler vibrometry at the chest wall surface. The computational model predictions of decreased sound transmission with pneumothorax were consistent with experimental measurements. The in silico model can also be used to visualize wave propagation inside and on the chest wall surface for other pulmonary pathologies, which may help in developing and interpreting diagnostic procedures that utilize sound and vibration.

  16. A Database for Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James

    1997-01-01

    The Propagation Models Database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The database is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a database of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The database not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  17. Wind turbine sound pressure level calculations at dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Stephen E; Feder, Katya; Voicescu, Sonia A; Soukhovtsev, Victor; Denning, Allison; Tsang, Jason; Broner, Norm; Leroux, Tony; Richarz, Werner; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides calculations of outdoor sound pressure levels (SPLs) at dwellings for 10 wind turbine models, to support Health Canada's Community Noise and Health Study. Manufacturer supplied and measured wind turbine sound power levels were used to calculate outdoor SPL at 1238 dwellings using ISO [(1996). ISO 9613-2-Acoustics] and a Swedish noise propagation method. Both methods yielded statistically equivalent results. The A- and C-weighted results were highly correlated over the 1238 dwellings (Pearson's linear correlation coefficient r > 0.8). Calculated wind turbine SPLs were compared to ambient SPLs from other sources, estimated using guidance documents from the United States and Alberta, Canada.

  18. Regularization in global sound equalization based on effort variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanakis, Nick; Sarris, John; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Sound equalization in closed spaces can be significantly improved by generating propagating waves that are naturally associated with the geometry, as, for example, plane waves in rectangular enclosures. This paper presents a control approach termed effort variation regularization based on this idea....... Effort variation equalization involves modifying the conventional cost function in sound equalization, which is based on minimizing least-squares reproduction errors, by adding a term that is proportional to the squared deviations between complex source strengths, calculated independently for the sources...

  19. Investigation of Sound Speed Errors in Adaptive Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    and the amplitude and phase (APES) beamformer. Simulations of a single point target are carried out in Field II, and a percentage error is applied on the speed of sound. As the error increases, MV and APES provide amplitude drops of 17 dB and 3 dB on the signal strength. Two approaches to overcome this amplitude......Previous studies have shown that adaptive beam-formers provide a significant increase of resolution and contrast, when the propagation speed is known precisely. This paper demonstrates the influence of sound speed errors on two adaptive beamformers; the minimum variance (MV) beamformer...

  20. Propagation of Regional Phases in the Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    tamped [09 Mo-1n (dvnn-m) cx phi sri , at %h allow depthis and high frequeinc ies. that tile pres- Fig. 1 c 25 WALTrm A..: OsB3vSAoT op Ha I.Fw vcYP...with the latter having about 3 times Berger, J.. I.. N. Baker, J. N. Brune, J. 11. Iletcher, T. C. lanks , and F. L. Vernon, The Anza array: a high...tmotioni, J. G..ophys. Res , 84, underground tntclear explosionis, 1961-1970, Bull. Seisrnol. Sue It 2235-2242. 1979. 61, 1073-1098, 1971. f lanks , T. C

  1. Memoir of the Long Range Acoustic Propagation Program (LRAPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    developed by Dr. John Hanna for interpolating velocity profiles that worked very well. An interesting issue grew within the surveillance community...destroyer escorts), that the ambient noise was directional, showing some 10–15 dB variation with different azi- muths . This result proved to OPNAV and to

  2. Features of the propagation of pseudorandom pulse signals from the shelf to deep water in the presence of gyre formation on the acoustic track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akulichev, V. A.; Burenin, A. V.; Ladychenko, S. Yu.; Lobanov, V. B.; Morgunov, Yu. N.

    2017-08-01

    The paper discusses the results of an experiment conducted in the Sea of Japan in March 2016 on an acoustic track 194 km long in winter hydrological conditions. The most complex case of propagation of pseudorandom pulse signals from the shelf to deep water in the presence of gyre formation on the acoustic track. An analysis of the experimentally obtained pulse characteristics show that at all points, a maximum, in terms of amplitude, first arrival of acoustic energy is recorded. This is evidence that at a given depth horizon, pulses that have passed the shortest distance through a near-surface sound channel at small angles close to zero are received first. The calculation method of mean sound velocity on the track, based on the satellite data of surface temperature monitoring, is proposed. We expect that the results obtained with this method can be successfully used for the purposes of acoustic range finding and navigation.

  3. On underwater sound reflection from layered ice sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Hobæk, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    Reflection of sound from ice sheets floating on water is simulated using Thomson and Haskell's method of matrix propagation. The reflection coefficient is computed as a function of incidence angle and frequency for selected ice parameters of a uniform sheet and two layered ice sheets. At some incidence angles and frequencies the reflection coefficient has very low values. It is shown that this is related to generation of Lamb waves in the ice. The matrix propagation method also provides a dispersion equation for a plate loaded with fluid on one side and vacuum on the other. Finally the concept of beam displacement is briefly discussed.

  4. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  5. Sound velocity during solidification in binary eutectic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Hideaki; Kyoden, Tomoaki; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-12-01

    We applied an ultrasound technique to an advanced material process by investigating the behavior of sound velocity during solidification of binary alloy melts over a wide range of temperatures and compositions. To gain a basic understanding of the relationship between the sound velocity and phase change in binary eutectic systems, the sound velocity was measured in Pb-Sn and Bi-Sn alloys by the pulse transmission method. Based on the measurement results, we established a link between the sound velocity variation and the complex solidification process, including the initial appearance of undercooling and eutectic reaction. During solidification, alloys usually pass through a transient mushy state between the liquid and solid phases. Since the solid fraction is uniquely related to the sound velocity, we demonstrate that it is possible to identify the solid fraction in the mushy state using the sound velocity. At the eutectic point, a sudden change was observed in relation to the eutectic reaction, in which the sound velocity exhibited an abrupt transition under isothermal conditions. This sudden change in the sound velocity was evident even when the initial composition was below the maximum solid-solution limit, such as when the solute distribution coefficient was relatively large. This result suggests that the presence of a eutectic in the final solidified texture can be predicted using our sound velocity measurement system. Finally, we present a novel sound velocity phase diagram that provides a real-time state determination system using ultrasound during solidification process, such as casting.

  6. Handbook for sound engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ballou, Glen

    2013-01-01

    Handbook for Sound Engineers is the most comprehensive reference available for audio engineers. All audio topics are explored: if you work on anything related to audio you should not be without this book! The 4th edition of this trusted reference has been updated to reflect changes in the industry since the publication of the 3rd edition in 2002 -- including new technologies like software-based recording systems such as Pro Tools and Sound Forge; digital recording using MP3, wave files and others; mobile audio devices such as iPods and MP3 players. Over 40 topic

  7. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  8. Sound & The Senses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now technically generated and post-produced, how are they aesthetically conceptualized and how culturally dependant are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with all the other senses and their cultural, biographical and technological construction...... over time? And how is listening and sounding a deeply social activity – constructing our way of living together in cities as well as in apartment houses? A radio feature with Jonathan Sterne, AGF a.k.a Antye Greie, Jens Gerrit Papenburg & Holger Schulze....

  9. Beacons of Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knakkergaard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    The chapter discusses expectations and imaginations vis-à-vis the concert hall of the twenty-first century. It outlines some of the central historical implications of western culture’s haven for sounding music. Based on the author’s study of the Icelandic concert-house Harpa, the chapter considers...... how these implications, together with the prime mover’s visions, have been transformed as private investors and politicians took over. The chapter furthermore investigates the objectives regarding musical sound and the far-reaching demands concerning acoustics that modern concert halls are required...

  10. Topology optimization for transient wave propagation problems in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jonas; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Structures exhibiting band gap properties, i.e., having frequency ranges for which the structure attenuates propagating waves, have applications in damping of acoustic and elastic wave propagation and in optical communication. A topology optimization method for synthesis of such structures......, employing a time domain formulation, is developed. The method is extended to synthesis of pulse converting structures with possible applications in optical communication....

  11. Heat-pulse propagation along nonequilibrium nanowires in thermomass theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellitto Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the consequences of the nonlinear terms in the heat-transport equation of the thermomass theory on heat pulses propagating in a nanowire in nonequilibrium situations. As a consequence of the temperature dependence of the speeds of propagation, in temperature ranges wherein the specific heat shows negligible variations, heat pulses will shrink (or extend spatially, and will increase (or decrease their average temperature when propagating along a temperature gradient. A comparison with the results predicted by a different theoretical proposal on the shape of a propagating heat pulse is made, too.

  12. Rg propagation: Scatter versus Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M.; Phillips, W. S.; MacCarthy, J.

    2016-12-01

    At near local distances, the Rg seismic phase is often the largest seismic arrival for shallow sources. While Rg is classically defined for the period range of 8-12 s, we use the term generically to refer to short-period observations of Rayleigh waves from shallow sources [e.g. Langston, 1987; Bonner and Russell, 2013]. There is significant interest in using Rg as a basis for seismic discrimination and magnitude (e.g. Bonner and Russell, 2013). However, the propagation of this phase is poorly understood. At Nevada National Security Site, while Rg is well observed near the source, it quickly disappears at greater distances. This observation raises the fundamental question of how much of the Rg energy is simply attenuating versus scattering into other seismic phases. Understanding this is critical to interpreting not only the observed Rg seismic energy, but also the possible enrichment of other seismic phases resulting from Rg scattering. In this study, we use waveform data from the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) and Source Physics Experiment (SPE) to investigate Rg propagation, looking to identify how much energy from the phase attenuates with distance and how much scatters into other seismic phases.

  13. Preventing Unofficial Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Zhengyi; Ouyang, Yi; Xu, Yurong; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia

    Digital copies are susceptible to theft and vulnerable to leakage, copying, or manipulation. When someone (or some group), who has stolen, leaked, copied, or manipulated digital documents propagates the documents over the Internet and/or distributes those through physical distribution channels many challenges arise which document holders must overcome in order to mitigate the impact to their privacy or business. This paper focuses on the propagation problem of digital credentials, which may contain sensitive information about a credential holder. Existing work such as access control policies and the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) assumes that qualified or certified credential viewers are honest and reliable. The proposed approach in this paper uses short-lived credentials based on reverse forward secure signatures to remove this assumption and mitigate the damage caused by a dishonest or honest but compromised viewer.

  14. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Kelley, Thomas A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of VHF signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in FORTRAN 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, delta times of arrival (DTOA) study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of DTOAs vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  15. Superluminal graviton propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Karim; Chapman, Shira; Darmé, Luc; Oz, Yaron

    2016-10-01

    We use the method of characteristics to study superluminal graviton (which we call the swift graviton) propagation in theories of higher-curvature gravity of the form (Riemann)2 , (Riemann)3 , ∇2(Riemann)2 and (Riemann)4 . We consider a p p -wave background. When probed by gravitons with an appropriate polarization, several of the gravitational theories under consideration exhibit characteristic hypersurfaces outside the flat spacetime light cone.

  16. Beam Propagation Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Kiuttu C. A. Ekdahl N. F. Roderick F49620-81-C-0016 B. A. Sabol L. A. Wright D. J. Sullivan______________ 3 P;ERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS...pulse * transmission through the atmosphere remain unresolved. The complexity of beam propagation physics and air chemistry makes the prediction of beam...higher front velocities than predicted by Eq. (27). Fessenden et al. 1 6 measured vf - 0.77 v in a detailed series of experiments utilizing the FX-25

  17. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  18. Image Reconstruction in Magnetoacoustic Tomography With Magnetic Induction With Variable Sound Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ma, Ren; Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic and electrical characteristics of biological tissue are important factors in magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI). Acoustic inhomogeneity significantly affects the propagations of sound waves. Differences in sound speed lead to distortions of the sound sources in the reconstruction process. The objective of this study is to develop a novel algorithm to reconstruct the sound source distribution in an acoustically inhomogeneous medium. The proposed algorithm is developed on the basis of the finite-difference time-domain method and time-reversal acoustic theory; it combines the relationship among symmetrical transducers with the back-projection algorithm. An acoustically inhomogeneous model with different regions of variable sound speeds is established to validate the proposed algorithm. From the data collected by a rotated focused transducer, first, the sound speed distribution is reconstructed, and then, the sound sources of the model are reconstructed. The reconstructed sound sources are obviously distorted when the speed differences are not considered. In contrast, the proposed algorithm yields reconstructed sound sources that are consistent with the model in terms of shape and size. Thus, the proposed algorithm is capable of accurately reconstructing the acoustic sources distribution in an acoustically inhomogeneous medium. This method provides a solution reducing the influence of acoustic inhomogeneity in MAT-MI. The distributions of sound speed can be obtained during the process of reconstructing the sound source. Consequently, the imaging of the acoustic speed and the electrical conductivity of biological tissues can be implemented simultaneously in MAT-MI.

  19. Heavy fields, reduced speeds of sound and decoupling during inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Achucarro, Ana; Cespedes, Sebastian; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Palma, Gonzalo A; Patil, Subodh P

    2012-01-01

    We discuss and clarify the validity of effective single field theories of inflation obtained by integrating out heavy degrees of freedom in the regime where adiabatic perturbations propagate with a suppressed speed of sound. We show by construction that it is indeed possible to have inflationary backgrounds where the speed of sound remains suppressed and slow-roll persists for long enough. In this class of models, heavy fields influence the evolution of adiabatic modes in a manner that is consistent with decoupling of physical low and high energy degrees of freedom. We emphasize the distinction between the effective masses of the isocurvature modes and the eigenfrequencies of the propagating high energy modes. Crucially, we find that the mass gap that defines the high frequency modes increases with the strength of the turn, even as the naive heavy (isocurvature) and light (curvature) modes become more strongly coupled. Adiabaticity is preserved throughout, and the derived effective field theory remains in the...

  20. Fiber movements and sound attenuation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    Propagation of a plane harmonic sound wave in fiber materials such as glass wool is studied theoretically and experimentally. Wave equations are set up that take into account the movement of the fiber skeleton. The attenuation of the sound wave in slabs of glass wool was calculated and measured....... The main new result is that the experimental attenuation at low-frequency propagating wave is lower when the fibers move. For wave with frequency 100 Hz in glass wool of density 20 kg/m3, the attenuation of a layer of thickness 0.20 m is 4 dB if the fibers move, and 12 dB if they do not move...

  1. Sounds in context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weed, Ethan

    are colored by contextual information. This can be longterm contextual information, such as knowledge of phonological or emotional categories, but can also be short-term local expectancies, such as the previous sound heard. In this paper, I present original electrophysiological data illustrating the early...

  2. Exploring Sound with Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  3. See This Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af udstillingen See This Sound på Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Østrig, som markerer den foreløbige kulmination på et samarbejde mellem Lentos Kunstmuseum og Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Media.Art.Research. Udover den konkrete udstilling er samarbejdet tænkt som en ambitiøs, tværfaglig unders...

  4. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  5. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ...

  6. Neurobiology: Sounding the Alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin, Pascal; Zatorre, Robert J

    2015-09-21

    Acoustical analysis has revealed a peculiar pattern of energy distribution in human screams; behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that this pattern is associated with rapid and enhanced processing of sound cues signalling fear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sounds of the Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough-Brabson, Ellen; Achilles, Elayne; Ashcraft, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the program called "Sounds of the Desert" that celebrates the Southwest indigenous culture and focuses on understanding music in relation to history and culture. Emphasizes the study of Mariachi music that is being taught alongside band, orchestra, and chorus from the third grade to senior high in many Tucson (Arizona) schools.…

  8. Urban Sound Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theories of Michel de Certeau and Gaston Bachelard to discuss how media architecture, in the form of urban sound interfaces, can help us perceive the complexity of the spaces we inhabit, by exploring the history and the narratives of the places in which we live...

  9. Urban Sound Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    . The article concludes that the ways in which recent sound installations work with urban ecologies vary. While two of the examples blend into the urban environment, the other transfers the concert format and its mode of listening to urban space. Last, and in accordance with recent soundscape research, we point...

  10. Second sound tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihee; Ihas, Gary G.; Ekdahl, Dan

    2017-10-01

    It is common that a physical system resonates at a particular frequency, whose frequency depends on physical parameters which may change in time. Often, one would like to automatically track this signal as the frequency changes, measuring, for example, its amplitude. In scientific research, one would also like to utilize the standard methods, such as lock-in amplifiers, to improve the signal to noise ratio. We present a complete He ii second sound system that uses positive feedback to generate a sinusoidal signal of constant amplitude via automatic gain control. This signal is used to produce temperature/entropy waves (second sound) in superfluid helium-4 (He ii). A lock-in amplifier limits the oscillation to a desirable frequency and demodulates the received sound signal. Using this tracking system, a second sound signal probed turbulent decay in He ii. We present results showing that the tracking system is more reliable than those of a conventional fixed frequency method; there is less correlation with temperature (frequency) fluctuation when the tracking system is used.

  11. Making Sense of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Lankford, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    From the earliest days of their lives, children are exposed to all kinds of sound, from soft, comforting voices to the frightening rumble of thunder. Consequently, children develop their own naïve explanations largely based upon their experiences with phenomena encountered every day. When new information does not support existing conceptions,…

  12. Sound of Stockholm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Med sine kun 4 år bag sig er Sound of Stockholm relativt ny i det internationale festival-landskab. Festivalen er efter sigende udsprunget af en større eller mindre frustration over, at den svenske eksperimentelle musikscenes forskellige foreninger og organisationer gik hinanden bedene, og...

  13. The Universe of Sound

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Sound Scultor, Bill Fontana, the second winner of the Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN residency award, and his science inspiration partner, CERN cosmologist Subodh Patil, present their work in art and science at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 July 2013 at 19:00.

  14. MULTIMEDIA CARTOGRAPHY: MAPS WITH SOUND DESIGN AND SOUND MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

     Today,sound maps is not so popular like other and not so interested for social oriented projects. Basically only these typesof thematic maps are use sound like the way of representation: political, zoogeographical, vegetation, ethnographic isthe most meeting application of sound registration to maps. In this article a new way of presenting the terrain with sound that is designed for interactive maps with audio support for disabled people is described. The method is based on a comparison betw...

  15. Extension of Hybrid Scintillation Propagation Model to the case of field propagation in the ionosphere with highly anisotropic irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherm, Vadim E.; Zernov, Nikolay N.

    2017-07-01

    The detailed effects of the high-frequency radio wave propagation in a stochastic transionospheric propagation channel are discussed. This is a special case of propagation along or almost along the lines of the Earth's magnetic field. In this case, the ionospheric random irregularities of the electron density of the ionosphere may have very high values of the aspect ratio, which stands beyond the range of validity of the traditional analytical approaches utilized to treat the appropriate transionospheric propagation problems. In the consideration presented here, new analytical results are obtained for treating the problem under consideration. Based on the analytical results obtained, the previously developed Hybrid Scintillation Propagation Model is further extended, which also includes the software simulator of the signals propagating on the transionospheric paths with the random electron density irregularities highly elongated in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field.

  16. Eigenbeamforming array systems for sound source localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    D study aims at enhancing the performance of uniform circular ar- rays, and to a lesser extent, spherical arrays, for two- and three-dimensional localization problems, respectively. These array geometries allow to perform eigenbeamforming, beamforming based on the decomposition of the sound field......Microphone array technology has been widely used for the localization of sound sources. In particular, beamforming is a well-established signal processing method that maps the position of acoustic sources by steering the array transducers toward different directions electronically. The present Ph...... scatterer is recommended instead. A better visualization in the entire frequency range can be achieved with deconvo- lution methods, as they allow the recovery of the sound source distribution from a given beamformed map. Three efficient methods based on spectral procedures, originally conceived for planar...

  17. Atmospheric ducts can transport sound in two directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-07-01

    When conditions are right, temperature gradients and fast jets of wind can help to establish atmospheric ducts—pathways in the atmosphere that promote the propagation of low-frequency acoustic waves (infrasound)—across long distances. Atmospheric ducts are part of the basis behind over-the-horizon radar, the source of some particularly clear mirages, and a channel through which sounds can travel relatively unperturbed across vast distances.

  18. Optical sound wave recording by digital holography with heterodyne technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Rajput, Sudheesh; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2017-06-01

    A visualization technique of sound wave propagation using digital holography with heterodyne technique is presented. In the proposed method, the frequency of the interference pattern in an off-axis digital holography is down converted into the detectable frequency in an image sensor operated at the video frame rate by using the heterodyne interferometer. We present the principle of the recording technique and experimental results are described.

  19. Sound field computations in the Bay of Bengal using parabolic equation method

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Navelkar, G.S.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Effect of the cold core eddy in the Bay of Bengal on acoustic propagation was analysed by parabolic equation (PE) method. Source depth, frequency and propagation range considered respectively for the two numerical experiments are 150 m, 400 Hz, 650...

  20. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  1. Stochastic model in microwave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Mugnai, D., E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-11-28

    Further experimental results of delay time in microwave propagation are reported in the presence of a lossy medium (wood). The measurements show that the presence of a lossy medium makes the propagation slightly superluminal. The results are interpreted on the basis of a stochastic (or path integral) model, showing how this model is able to describe each kind of physical system in which multi-path trajectories are present. -- Highlights: ► We present new experimental results on electromagnetic “anomalous” propagation. ► We apply a path integral theoretical model to wave propagation. ► Stochastic processes and multi-path trajectories in propagation are considered.

  2. The effect of scattering on sound field control with a circular double-layer array of loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Jiho; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    A recent study has shown that a circular double-layer array of loudspeakers makes it possible to achieve a sound field control that can generate a controlled field inside the array and reduce sound waves propagating outside the array. This is useful if it is desirable not to disturb people outside...... the array or to prevent the effect of reflections from the room. The study assumed free field condition, however in practice a listener will be located inside the array. The listener scatters sound waves, which propagate outward. Consequently, the scattering effect can be expected to degrade the performance...

  3. Discovery of Sound in the Sea: Resources for Educators, Students, the Public, and Policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigness-Raposa, Kathleen J; Scowcroft, Gail; Miller, James H; Ketten, Darlene R; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the effects of underwater sound on marine life. However, the science of sound is challenging. The Discovery of Sound in the Sea (DOSITS) Web site ( http://www.dosits.org ) was designed to provide comprehensive scientific information on underwater sound for the public and educational and media professionals. It covers the physical science of underwater sound and its use by people and marine animals for a range of tasks. Celebrating 10 years of online resources, DOSITS continues to develop new material and improvements, providing the best resource for the most up-to-date information on underwater sound and its potential effects.

  4. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-18

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  5. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  6. Just How Does Sound Wave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    When children first hear the term "sound wave" perhaps they might associate it with the way a hand waves or perhaps the squiggly line image on a television monitor when sound recordings are being made. Research suggests that children tend to think sound somehow travels as a discrete package, a fast-moving invisible thing, and not something that…

  7. Product sounds : Fundamentals and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan-Vieira, E.

    2008-01-01

    Products are ubiquitous, so are the sounds emitted by products. Product sounds influence our reasoning, emotional state, purchase decisions, preference, and expectations regarding the product and the product's performance. Thus, auditory experience elicited by product sounds may not be just about

  8. Data sonification and sound visualization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wiebel, E.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois

    1999-07-01

    Sound can help us explore and analyze complex data sets in scientific computing. The authors describe a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis (Diass) and a program to visualize sounds in a virtual reality environment (M4Cave). Both are part of a comprehensive music composition environment that includes additional software for computer-assisted composition and automatic music notation.

  9. Sonic mediations: body, sound, technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdsall, C.; Enns, A.

    2008-01-01

    Sonic Mediations: Body, Sound, Technology is a collection of original essays that represents an invaluable contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. While sound is often posited as having a bridging function, as a passive in-between, this volume invites readers to rethink the concept of

  10. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  11. Acoustical Wave Propagation in Sonic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Girip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss the technique of controlling the mechanical properties of sonic composites. The idea is to architecture the scatterers and material from which they are made, their number and geometry in order to obtain special features in their response to external waves. We refer to perfectly reflecting of acoustical waves over a desired range of frequencies or to prohibit their propagation in certain directions, or confining the waves within specified volumes. The internal structure of the material has to be chosen in such a way that to avoid the scattering of acoustical waves inside the material. This is possible if certain band-gaps of frequencies can be generated for which the waves are forbidden to propagate in certain directions. These bandgaps can be extended to cover all possible directions of propagation by resulting a full band-gap. If the band-gaps are not wide enough, their frequency ranges do not overlap. These band-gaps can overlap due to reflections on the surface of thick scatterers, as well as due to wave propagation inside them. growth.

  12. Sound spectral analysis of voice-transmitted sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, R P; Loudon, R G

    1986-07-01

    There is a change in voice-generated sound heard over an area of pulmonary consolidation described as the "e" to "a" change. The lung may act as a low pass filter with properties that are changed by consolidation. We studied 5 patients with pneumonia. Using an electronic stethoscope, we recorded the voice-generated sounds "e" and "9-9-9." Sound spectral analysis using the fast Fourier transformation technique was used to characterize the frequency spectrum of the recorded sound. This technique allowed us to evaluate the filter properties of the normal and consolidated lung. We found that the normal lung allowed transmission of sound as high as 250 Hz with a gradual cutoff by 400 Hz. The consolidated lung allowed transmission of sound of a higher frequency; however, there was no significant transmission of sound with a frequency higher than 1,000 Hz.

  13. The suitability of internal combustion engine sounds as artificial warning sounds for electric and hybrid vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bolkovac

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issue of adding artificial warning sounds to hybrid and fully electric vehicles, in order to increase traffic safety by making these vehicles audible at low speeds. The goal of this modification is to enable the pedestrians to perceive possible danger coming from such a vehicle in time to respond accordingly. Following the results of previous research which state that the sounds of internal combustion engines are valid candidates for artificial warning sounds to be added to hybrid or fully electric vehicles, a preliminary examination of the suitability and acceptability of different engine sounds in various modes of operation has been conducted. The chosen modes of operation are running in idle, at 2000 rpm and 3000 rpm with the vehicle stopped. Both gasoline and diesel engines were investigated. To expand the range of engine sounds, the type of vehicles was not limited to personal cars. The results show significant differences in suitability of engine sounds for the stated purpose, with vehicle type being the main differentiating factor.

  14. Sound for Health

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    From astronomy to biomedical sciences: music and sound as tools for scientific investigation Music and science are probably two of the most intrinsically linked disciplines in the spectrum of human knowledge. Science and technology have revolutionised the way artists work, interact, and create. The impact of innovative materials, new communication media, more powerful computers, and faster networks on the creative process is evident: we all can become artists in the digital era. What is less known, is that arts, and music in particular, are having a profound impact the way scientists operate, and think. From the early experiments by Kepler to the modern data sonification applications in medicine – sound and music are playing an increasingly crucial role in supporting science and driving innovation. In this talk. Dr. Domenico Vicinanza will be highlighting the complementarity and the natural synergy between music and science, with specific reference to biomedical sciences. Dr. Vicinanza will take t...

  15. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    -max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  16. Optimal Sound Absorbing Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Min; Fu, Caixing; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Causal nature of the acoustic response, for any materials or structures, dictates an inequality that relates the absorption spectrum of the sample to its thickness. We present a general recipe for constructing sound-absorbing structures that can attain near-equality for the causal relation with very high absorption performance; such structures are denoted optimal. Our strategy involves using carefully designed acoustic metamaterials as backing to a thin layer of conventional sound absorbing material, e.g., acoustic sponge. By using this design approach, we have realized a 12 cm-thick structure that exhibits broadband, near-perfect flat absorption spectrum starting at around 400 Hz. From the causal relation, the calculated minimum sample thickness is 11.5 cm for the observed absorption spectrum. We present the theory that underlies such absorption performance, involving the evanescent waves and their interaction with a dissipative medium, and show the excellent agreement with the experiment.

  17. Sound in Ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebreil Seraji

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The word of “Ergonomics “is composed of two separate parts: “Ergo” and” Nomos” and means the Human Factors Engineering. Indeed, Ergonomics (or human factors is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance. It has applied different sciences such as Anatomy and physiology, anthropometry, engineering, psychology, biophysics and biochemistry from different ergonomics purposes. Sound when is referred as noise pollution can affect such balance in human life. The industrial noise caused by factories, traffic jam, media, and modern human activity can affect the health of the society.Here we are aimed at discussing sound from an ergonomic point of view.

  18. Modelling Nonlinear Ultrasound Propagation in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Robin O.; Johnson, Paul A.; Muller, Marie; Talmant, Maryline; Padilla, Frederic; Laugier, Pascal

    2006-05-01

    Simulations have been carried out to assess the possibility for detecting the nonlinear properties of bone in vivo. We employed a time domain solution to the KZK equation to determine the nonlinear field generated by an unfocussed circular transducer in both cancellous and cortical bone. The results indicate that determining nonlinear properties from the generation of higher harmonics is challenging in both bone types (for propagation distances and source amplitudes appropriate in the body). In cancellous bone this is because the attenuation length scale is very short (about 5 mm) and in cortical bone because the high sound speed and density result in long nonlinear length scales (hundreds of millimeters). An alternative approach to determine the nonlinear properties was considered using self-demodulation of sound. For cancellous bone this may result in a detectable signal although the predicted amplitude of the self-demodulation signal was almost 90 dB below the source level (1 MPa). In cortical bone the self-demodulated signal was even weaker that in cancellous bone (˜110 dB down) and, for a practical length signal, was not easy to separate from the components associated with the source.

  19. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats,viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N2-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  20. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.