WorldWideScience

Sample records for range size shape

  1. Phagocytosis of environmental or metabolic crystalline particles induces cytotoxicity by triggering necroptosis across a broad range of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Foresto-Neto, Orestes; Desai, Jyaysi; Steiger, Stefanie; Gómez, Lidia Anguiano; Popper, Bastian; Boor, Peter; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2017-11-14

    In crystallopathies, crystals or crystalline particles of environmental and metabolic origin deposit within tissues, induce inflammation, injury and cell death and eventually lead to organ-failure. The NLRP3-inflammasome is involved in mediating crystalline particles-induced inflammation, but pathways leading to cell death are still unknown. Here, we have used broad range of intrinsic and extrinsic crystal- or crystalline particle-sizes and shapes, e.g. calcium phosphate, silica, titanium dioxide, cholesterol, calcium oxalate, and monosodium urate. As kidney is commonly affected by crystallopathies, we used human and murine renal tubular cells as a model system. We showed that all of the analysed crystalline particles induce caspase-independent cell death. Deficiency of MLKL, siRNA knockdown of RIPK3, or inhibitors of necroptosis signaling e.g. RIPK-1 inhibitor necrostatin-1s, RIPK3 inhibitor dabrafenib, and MLKL inhibitor necrosulfonamide, partially protected tubular cells from crystalline particles cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we identify phagocytosis of crystalline particles as an upstream event in their cytotoxicity since a phagocytosis inhibitor, cytochalasin D, prevented their cytotoxicity. Taken together, our data confirmed the involvement of necroptosis as one of the pathways leading to cell death in crystallopathies. Our data identified RIPK-1, RIPK3, and MLKL as molecular targets to limit tissue injury and organ failure in crystallopathies.

  2. Shape and Size from the Mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Gundu, Phanindra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    Process optimization often depends on the correct estimation of particle size, their shape and their concentration. In case of the backlight microscopic system, which we investigate here, particle images suffer from out-of-focus blur. This gives a bias towards overestimating the particle size whe...... with ground truth depth, shape and size information. The outcome of our approach is a reliable particle analysis obtained from shorter sampling time.......Process optimization often depends on the correct estimation of particle size, their shape and their concentration. In case of the backlight microscopic system, which we investigate here, particle images suffer from out-of-focus blur. This gives a bias towards overestimating the particle size when...... particles are behind or in front of the focus plane. In most applications only in-focus particles get analyzed, but this weakens the statistical basis and requires either particle sampling over longer time or results in uncertain predictions. We propose a new method for estimating the size and the shape...

  3. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  4. The size, scale, and shape of cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, Michael

    2008-02-08

    Despite a century of effort, our understanding of how cities evolve is still woefully inadequate. Recent research, however, suggests that cities are complex systems that mainly grow from the bottom up, their size and shape following well-defined scaling laws that result from intense competition for space. An integrated theory of how cities evolve, linking urban economics and transportation behavior to developments in network science, allometric growth, and fractal geometry, is being slowly developed. This science provides new insights into the resource limits facing cities in terms of the meaning of density, compactness, and sprawl, and related questions of sustainability. It has the potential to enrich current approaches to city planning and replace traditional top-down strategies with realistic city plans that benefit all city dwellers.

  5. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  6. Extended range interferometry based on wavefront shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczupak, M. L.; Salbut, L.

    2007-09-01

    There are many cases when absolute measurements of objects with large height differences or height discontinuity is needed. These measurements can not be covered by classical interferometry since the range of non-ambiguity is limited to half the optical wavelength. Several techniques have been already developed for extending of non-ambiguity range. However most of them is based on multi-wavelength methods which demands expensive light sources and special environment conditions. In this work the new interferometric technique for absolute measurements of large steps discontinuities is proposed. Variable wavefront of the illuminating beam and special procedure for calibration of the measurement volume are used for extending of the measurement range without using multispectral sources. Additionally, calibration of the measurement area simplifies fringe processing and quicken measures. Theoretical analysis of this technique, its numerical simulations and experimental verification are presented and discussed.

  7. Particle size and shape of calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; D'souza, Rena N; Dechow, Paul C; Safavi, Kamran E; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio of calcium hydroxide powder using a flow particle image analyzer (FPIA). Five sample groups each with 10 mg of calcium hydroxide were mixed with 15 mL of alcohol and sonicated. Digital images of the particle samples were taken using the FPIA and analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance. The overall averages +/- standard deviation among the five groups for particle length (microm), width (microm), perimeter (microm), and aspect ratio were 2.255 +/- 1.994, 1.620 +/- 1.464, 6.699 +/- 5.598, and 0.737 +/- 0.149, respectively. No statistical significance was observed among the groups for all parameters. When the total of 46,818 particles from all five groups were classified into the five length categories of 0.5-microm increments, there were significant differences in width, perimeter, and aspect ratio (all p values particles have a size and shape that may allow direct penetration into open dentin tubules.

  8. Splenic Anomalies of Shape, Size, and Location: Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Elcin Yildiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spleen can have a wide range of anomalies including its shape, location, number, and size. Although most of these anomalies are congenital, there are also acquired types. Congenital anomalies affecting the shape of spleen are lobulations, notches, and clefts; the fusion and location anomalies of spleen are accessory spleen, splenopancreatic fusion, and wandering spleen; polysplenia can be associated with a syndrome. Splenosis and small spleen are acquired anomalies which are caused by trauma and sickle cell disease, respectively. These anomalies can be detected easily by using different imaging modalities including ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and also Tc-99m scintigraphy. In this pictorial essay, we review the imaging findings of these anomalies which can cause diagnostic pitfalls and be interpreted as pathologic processes.

  9. Splenic Anomalies of Shape, Size, and Location: Pictorial Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Adalet Elcin; Ariyurek, Macit Orhan; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2013-01-01

    Spleen can have a wide range of anomalies including its shape, location, number, and size. Although most of these anomalies are congenital, there are also acquired types. Congenital anomalies affecting the shape of spleen are lobulations, notches, and clefts; the fusion and location anomalies of spleen are accessory spleen, splenopancreatic fusion, and wandering spleen; polysplenia can be associated with a syndrome. Splenosis and small spleen are acquired anomalies which are caused by trauma and sickle cell disease, respectively. These anomalies can be detected easily by using different imaging modalities including ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and also Tc-99m scintigraphy. In this pictorial essay, we review the imaging findings of these anomalies which can cause diagnostic pitfalls and be interpreted as pathologic processes. PMID:23710135

  10. Shape, size, and distribution of magnetic particles in Bjurbole chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules from the Bjurbole chondritic meteorite (L4) exhibit saturation remanence magnetization (SIRM) values which vary over three orders of magnitude. REM values (Natural Remanence Magnetization/SIRM) for Allende (C3V) and Chainpur (LL3) are less than 0.01 but in Bjurbole some chondrules were found to have REM values greater than 0.1 with several greater than 0.2. REM values greater than 0.1 are abnormal and cannot be acquired during weak field cooling. If exposure to a strong field (whatever the source) during the chondrules' history is responsible for the high REM values, was such history associated with a different processing which might have resulted in different shape, size, and distribution of metal particles compared to chondrules having REM values of less than 0.01? Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis results show a broad range of magnetic hardness and other intrinsic magnetic properties. These features must be related to (1) size and amount of metal; and (2) properties of, and amount of, tetrataenite in the chondrules (all chondrules thus far subjected to thermomagnetic analysis show the presence of tetrataenite). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study is underway to determine the relationship between the shape, size, and distribution of metal particles within individual chondrules and the magnetic properties of these chondrules. Results from the SEM study in conjunction with magnetic property data may also help to discern effects from possible lightning strikes in the nebula prior to incorporation of the chondrules into the parent body.

  11. Shaping micron-sized cold neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Frédéric, E-mail: Frederic.Ott@cea.fr [CEA, IRAMIS, Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); CNRS, IRAMIS, Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kozhevnikov, Sergey [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, ul. Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, Moscow oblast 141980 (Russian Federation); Thiaville, André [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Univ. Paris—Sud, CNRS UMR 8502, 91405 Orsay (France); Torrejón, Jacob [Unité Mixte de Physique, CNRS/Thales, Campus de l’Ecole Polytechnique, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Vázquez, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-11

    In the field of neutron scattering, the need for micro-sized (1–50 µm) thermal or cold neutron beams has recently appeared, typically in the field of neutron imaging to probe samples with a high spatial resolution. We discuss various possibilities of producing such micro-sized neutron beams. The advantages and drawbacks of the different techniques are discussed. We show that reflective optics offers the most flexible way of producing tiny neutron beams together with an enhanced signal to background ratio. The use of such micro beams is illustrated by the study of micrometric diameter magnetic wires.

  12. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  13. Are range-size distributions consistent with species-level heritability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Gotelli, Nicholas; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The concept of species-level heritability is widely contested. Because it is most likely to apply to emergent, species-level traits, one of the central discussions has focused on the potential heritability of geographic range size. However, a central argument against range-size heritability has...... been that it is not compatible with the observed shape of present-day species range-size distributions (SRDs), a claim that has never been tested. To assess this claim, we used forward simulation of range-size evolution in clades with varying degrees of range-size heritability, and compared the output...

  14. The effect of particle shape and size on cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Particle shape and size have been well-recognized to exhibit important effect on drug delivery and as an excellent candidate for drug delivery applications. The recent advances in the "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches make it possible to develop different shaped and sized polymeric nanostructures, which provide a chance to tailor the shape of the nanostructures as a drug carrier. Presently, a large amount of cellular uptake data is available for particle shape and size effect on drug delivery. However, the effect has not been well formulated or described quantitatively. In the present paper, the dynamic process of the effects of particle shape and size on cellular uptake is analyzed, quantitative expression for the influence of particle shape and size on cellular uptake is proposed on the basis of local geometric feature of particle shape and diffusion approach of a particle in a medium rationally, and the relevant parameters in the formulation are determined by the available test data. The results indicate the validity of the present formulations.

  15. The size and shape of the foramen magnum in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Zdilla

    2017-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: The study demonstrates that, within each distinct population, the size of the FM is significantly larger in males than in females; however, there are no significant differences in the shapes of the foramina between sexes. However, when comparing different populations to one another, there are significant differences with regard to both the size and shape of the FM. This study also presents a new model of FM ontogeny. Specifically, the growth occurring between the anterior and posterior foraminal boundaries before 5 years of age predicts the ultimate shape of the adult FM.

  16. Effect of Lithium Ions on Copper Nanoparticle Size, Shape, and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Deok Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper nanoparticles were synthesized using lithium ions to increase the aqueous electrical conductivity of the solution and precisely control the size, shape, and size distribution of the particles. In this study, the conventional approach of increasing particle size by the concentration of copper ions and PGPPE in a copper chloride solution was compared to increasing the concentration of lithium chloride when the copper chloride concentration was held constant. Particle size and shape were characterized by TEM, and the size distribution of the particles at different concentrations was obtained by particle size analysis. Increasing the concentration of copper ion in the solution greatly increased the aqueous electric conductivity and the size of the particles but led to a wide size distribution ranging from 150 nm to 400 nm and rough particle morphology. The addition of lithium ions increased the size of the particles, but maintains them in a range of 250 nm. In addition the particles exhibited spherical shape as determined by TEM. The addition of lithium ions to the solution has the potential to synthesize nanoparticles with optimal characteristics for printing applications by maintaining a narrow size range and spherical shape.

  17. Potato Size and Shape Detection Using Machine Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Guiping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the error and faster classification by mechanizing in classifying the potato shape and size through machine vision using the extraction of characters procedure to identify the size, and using the shape detection procedure to identify the shape. Test results in potato size detection revealed 40/191 = 0.210mm/pixel as length scale or calibration factor (40/M where 40 is the table tennis ball size (40mm and 191 as image pixels table tennis (M; measurement results revealed that between the algorithm results and the manual measurements, the absolute error was <3mm, while the relative error rate was <4%; and the measurement results based on the ellipse axis length can accurately calculate the actual long axis and short axis of potato. Potato shape detection revealed the analysis of 228 images composed of 114 positive and 114 negatives side, only 2 have been incorrectly classified, mainly because the Extracted ratio (R of the potato image of those two positive and negative images are near 0.67, respectively 0.671887, 0.661063, 0.667604, and 0.67193. The comparison to establish a calibration system method using both basic rectangle and ellipse R ratio methods to detect the potato size and shape, revealed that the basic rectangle method has better effect in the case of fixed place. Moreover, the ellipse axis method was observed to be more stable with an error rate of 7%. Therefore it is recommended that the ellipse axis method should be used to detect the shape of potato for differentiation into round, long cylindrical, and oval shapes, with the accuracy level of 98.8%.

  18. Apparatus for handling micron size range particulate material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    An apparatus for handling, transporting, or size classifying comminuted material was described in detail. Electrostatic acceleration techniques for classifying particles as to size in the particle range from 0.1 to about 100 microns diameter were employed.

  19. Shape Separation of Colloidal Metal Nanoparticles via Size Exclusion Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Marvi, Sarrah

    2016-01-01

    The inherent polydispersity of solution-based, colloidal nanoparticle syntheses has necessitated the development of facile post-processing methods for the purification of anisotropic nanoparticles. Here, the use of size exclusion chromatography is explored for the shape separation of colloidal silver nanocube and colloidal gold bipyramid solutions. Multiple column packing materials, pore sizes, and mobile phases were tested to address the prevalent issues of metal adsorption to the high surfa...

  20. Size, shape, and form: concepts of allometry in geometric morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Christian Peter

    2016-06-01

    Allometry refers to the size-related changes of morphological traits and remains an essential concept for the study of evolution and development. This review is the first systematic comparison of allometric methods in the context of geometric morphometrics that considers the structure of morphological spaces and their implications for characterizing allometry and performing size correction. The distinction of two main schools of thought is useful for understanding the differences and relationships between alternative methods for studying allometry. The Gould-Mosimann school defines allometry as the covariation of shape with size. This concept of allometry is implemented in geometric morphometrics through the multivariate regression of shape variables on a measure of size. In the Huxley-Jolicoeur school, allometry is the covariation among morphological features that all contain size information. In this framework, allometric trajectories are characterized by the first principal component, which is a line of best fit to the data points. In geometric morphometrics, this concept is implemented in analyses using either Procrustes form space or conformation space (the latter also known as size-and-shape space). Whereas these spaces differ substantially in their global structure, there are also close connections in their localized geometry. For the model of small isotropic variation of landmark positions, they are equivalent up to scaling. The methods differ in their emphasis and thus provide investigators with flexible tools to address specific questions concerning evolution and development, but all frameworks are logically compatible with each other and therefore unlikely to yield contradictory results.

  1. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and urea denaturation ... Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a homotetrameric protein with a unique open quaternary structure. PNA shows non-two state profile in chaotrope induced denaturation. It passes ...

  2. Shape- and size-controlled nanomaterials for artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke

    2013-10-01

    Nanomaterials with various shapes and sizes have been developed to mimic functions of photosynthesis in which solar energy conversion is achieved by using nanosized proteins with controlled shapes and sizes. Artificial photosynthesis consists of light-harvesting and charge-separation processes together with catalytic units of water oxidation and reduction. Nanosized mesoporous silica-alumina was utilized to encapsulate organic charge-separation molecules inside the nanospace to elongate the lifetimes of the charge-separated states, as observed in the photosynthetic reaction centers. Metal nanoparticles with controlled shapes and sizes have also been utilized as efficient catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water with reductants by using electron donor-acceptor organic molecules as photocatalysts. The control of the shape and size of metal nanoparticles plays a very important role in achieving high catalytic performance in catalytic hydrogen evolution in water reduction and also in catalytic oxygen evolution in water oxidation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Size- and shape-selective isostructural microporous metal-organic frameworks with different effective aperture sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfang; Oh, Minhak; Lah, Myoung Soo

    2011-06-06

    Two isostructural metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) having micropores of the same "static aperture size" but different "effective aperture size" have been prepared using 5-(pyridin-3-ylethynyl)isophthalic acid as a ligand having two different types of functional units, an isophthalate (iph) unit and a pyridyl unit, simultaneously in a single ligand. The combination of iph unit and Cu (or Zn) ion led to two-dimensional layers of Kagomé (kgm) net topology, the layers being further pillared by the internal auxiliary pyridyl unit to form a three-dimensional microporous framework having two different types of cage-like pores, cage A and cage B, with different aperture sizes and shapes. (1) The MOFs can distinguish the adsorbates (N(2)/Ar) not based on the widely used kinetic diameters of the adsorbates but based on the minimum diameters of the adsorbates, which are more shape dependent. While cage A with a sufficiently large aperture size compared with the size of the adsorbates does not show any size selectivity, cage B with an approximate size match between the adsorbates and the pore apertures shows shape selectivity for the adsorbates. The smaller but spherically shaped Ar atom is not allowed into the pore with the oval-shaped aperture; however, the larger linear N(2) molecule is allowed into the pore with the oval-shaped aperture. (2) Even though the two isostructural MOFs have the same static aperture size of cage B, they show different size selectivity for the adsorbates based on the effective aperture size, which reflects the different extents of the framework flexibility. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Home range sizes for burchell's zebra equus burchelli antiquorum from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.L. Smuts

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available Annual home range sizes were determined for 49 marked zebra family groups in the Kruger National Park. Sizes varied from 49 to 566 sq. km, the mean for the Park being 164 square kilometre. Mean home range sizes for different zebra sub-populations and biotic areas were found to differ considerably. Present herbivore densities have not influenced intra- and inter-specific tolerance levels to the extent that home range sizes have increased. Local habitat conditions, and particularly seasonal vegetational changes, were found to have the most profound influence on the shape and mean size of home ranges. The large home range sizes obtained in the Kruger Park, when compared to an area such as the Ngorongoro Crater, can be ascribed to a lower carrying capacity with respect to zebra, large portions of the habitat being sub-optimal, either seasonally or annually.

  5. Size, Shape, and Sequence-Dependent Immunogenicity of RNA Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijin Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA molecules have emerged as promising therapeutics. Like all other drugs, the safety profile and immune response are important criteria for drug evaluation. However, the literature on RNA immunogenicity has been controversial. Here, we used the approach of RNA nanotechnology to demonstrate that the immune response of RNA nanoparticles is size, shape, and sequence dependent. RNA triangle, square, pentagon, and tetrahedron with same shape but different sizes, or same size but different shapes were used as models to investigate the immune response. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by these RNA nanoarchitectures were assessed in macrophage-like cells and animals. It was found that RNA polygons without extension at the vertexes were immune inert. However, when single-stranded RNA with a specific sequence was extended from the vertexes of RNA polygons, strong immune responses were detected. These immunostimulations are sequence specific, because some other extended sequences induced little or no immune response. Additionally, larger-size RNA square induced stronger cytokine secretion. 3D RNA tetrahedron showed stronger immunostimulation than planar RNA triangle. These results suggest that the immunogenicity of RNA nanoparticles is tunable to produce either a minimal immune response that can serve as safe therapeutic vectors, or a strong immune response for cancer immunotherapy or vaccine adjuvants.

  6. Particle shape effects on subvisible particle sizing measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Richard E; Carrier, Michael J; Cohen, Joshua B; Boger, Shir; Montgomery, Christopher B; Hu, Zhishang; Ripple, Dean C

    2015-03-01

    Particle analysis tools for the subvisible (shape in comparison studies, we have used the methods of photolithography to create rods and disks. Although the rods are highly monodisperse, the instruments produce broadened peaks and report mean size parameters that are different for different instruments. We have fabricated a microfluidic device that simultaneously performs ESZ and FI measurements on each particle to elucidate the causes of discrepancies and broadening. Alignment of the rods with flow causes an oversizing by FI and undersizing by ESZ. FI also oversizes rods because of the incorrect edge definition that results from diffraction and imperfect focus. We present an improved correction algorithm for this effect that reduces discrepancies for rod-shaped particles. Tumbling of particles is observed in the microfluidic ESZ/FI and results in particle oversizing and breadth of size distribution for the monodisperse rods. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Morphogenesis of simple leaves: regulation of leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce new organs throughout their life span. Leaves first initiate as rod-like structures protruding from the shoot apical meristem, while they need to pass through different developmental stages to become the flat organ specialized in photosynthesis. Leaf morphogenesis is an active process regulated by many genes and pathways that can generate organs with a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Important differences in leaf architecture can be seen among different species, but also in single individuals. A key aspect of leaf morphogenesis is the precise control of cell proliferation. Modification or manipulation of this process may lead to leaves with different sizes and shapes, and changes in the organ margins and curvature. Many genes required for leaf development have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, and the mechanisms underlying leaf morphogenesis are starting to be unraveled at the molecular level. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Size and shape variability in human molars during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, W; Yano, W; Nagaoka, T; Abe, M; Nakatsukasa, M

    2014-03-01

    Under the patterning cascade model (PCM) of cusp development inspired by developmental genetic studies, it is predicted that the location and the size of later-forming cusps are more variable than those of earlier-forming ones. Here we assessed whether differences in the variability among cusps in total and each particular crown component (enamel-dentin junction [EDJ], outer enamel surface [OES], and cement-enamel junction [CEJ]) could be explained by the PCM, using human maxillary permanent first molars (UM1) and second deciduous molars (um2). Specimens were µCT-scanned, and 3D models of EDJ and OES were reconstructed. Based on these models, landmark-based 3D geometric morphometric analyses were conducted. Size variability in both tooth types was generally consistent with the above prediction, and the differences in size variation among cusps were smaller for the crown components completed in later stages of odontogenesis. With a few exceptions, however, the prediction was unsupported regarding shape variability, and UM1 and um2 showed different patterns. Our findings suggested that the pattern of size variability would be caused by temporal factors such as the order of cusp initiation and the duration from the beginning of mineralization to the completion of crown formation, whereas shape variability may be affected by both topographic and temporal factors.

  9. Determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range for wood dust collected by air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S; Bartolucci, Al

    2002-10-01

    In the absence of methods for determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range with good discrimination, the samples collected by personal air sampling devices can only be characterized by their total mass. This parameter gives no information regarding the size distribution of the aerosol or the size-selection characteristics of different samplers in field use conditions. A method is described where the particles collected by a sampler are removed, suspended, and re-deposited on a mixed cellulose-ester filter, and examined by optical microscopy to determine particle aerodynamic diameters. This method is particularly appropriate to wood dust particles which are generally large and close to rectangular prisms in shape. Over 200 wood dust samples have been collected in three different wood-products industries, using the traditional closed-face polystyrene/acrylonitrile cassette, the Institute of Occupational Medicine inhalable sampler, and the Button sampler developed by the University of Cincinnati. A portion of these samples has been analyzed to determine the limitations of this method. Extensive quality control measures are being developed to improve the robustness of the procedure, and preliminary results suggest the method has an accuracy similar to that required of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods. The results should provide valuable insights into the collection characteristics of the samplers and the impact of these characteristics on comparison of sampler results to present and potential future limit values. The NIOSH Deep South Education and Research Center has a focus on research into hazards of the forestry and associated wood-products industry, and it is hoped to expand this activity in the future.

  10. Geographic range size and extinction risk assessment in nomadic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Claire A; Tulloch, Ayesha; Hammill, Edd; Possingham, Hugh P; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-06-01

    Geographic range size is often conceptualized as a fixed attribute of a species and treated as such for the purposes of quantification of extinction risk; species occupying smaller geographic ranges are assumed to have a higher risk of extinction, all else being equal. However many species are mobile, and their movements range from relatively predictable to-and-fro migrations to complex irregular movements shown by nomadic species. These movements can lead to substantial temporary expansion and contraction of geographic ranges, potentially to levels which may pose an extinction risk. By linking occurrence data with environmental conditions at the time of observations of nomadic species, we modeled the dynamic distributions of 43 arid-zone nomadic bird species across the Australian continent for each month over 11 years and calculated minimum range size and extent of fluctuation in geographic range size from these models. There was enormous variability in predicted spatial distribution over time; 10 species varied in estimated geographic range size by more than an order of magnitude, and 2 species varied by >2 orders of magnitude. During times of poor environmental conditions, several species not currently classified as globally threatened contracted their ranges to very small areas, despite their normally large geographic range size. This finding raises questions about the adequacy of conventional assessments of extinction risk based on static geographic range size (e.g., IUCN Red Listing). Climate change is predicted to affect the pattern of resource fluctuations across much of the southern hemisphere, where nomadism is the dominant form of animal movement, so it is critical we begin to understand the consequences of this for accurate threat assessment of nomadic species. Our approach provides a tool for discovering spatial dynamics in highly mobile species and can be used to unlock valuable information for improved extinction risk assessment and conservation

  11. Comparing apples and pears: women's perceptions of their body size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Marie E; Hediger, Mary L; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Stanford, Joseph B; Peterson, C Matthew; Croughan, Mary S; Chen, Zhen; Buck Louis, Germaine M

    2012-10-01

    Obesity is a growing public health problem among reproductive-aged women, with consequences for chronic disease risk and reproductive and obstetric morbidities. Evidence also suggests that body shape (i.e., regional fat distribution) may be independently associated with risk, yet it is not known if women adequately perceive their shape. This study aimed to assess the validity of self-reported body size and shape figure drawings when compared to anthropometric measures among reproductive-aged women. Self-reported body size was ascertained using the Stunkard nine-level figures and self-reported body shape using stylized pear, hourglass, rectangle, and apple figures. Anthropometry was performed by trained researchers. Body size and body mass index (BMI) were compared using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Fat distribution indicators were compared across body shapes for nonobese and obese women using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's exact test. Percent agreement and kappa statistics were computed for apple and pear body shapes. The 131 women studied were primarily Caucasian (81%), aged 32 years, with a mean BMI of 27.1 kg/m(2) (range 16.6-52.8 kg/m(2)). The correlation between body size and BMI was 0.85 (p<0.001). Among nonobese women, waist-to-hip ratios (WHR) were 0.75, 0.75, 0.80, and 0.82 for pear, hourglass, rectangle, and apple, respectively (p<0.001). Comparing apples and pears, the percent agreement (kappa) for WHR≥0.80 was 83% (0.55). Self-reported size and shape were consistent with anthropometric measures commonly used to assess obesity and fat distribution, respectively. Self-reported body shape may be a useful proxy measure in addition to body size in large-scale surveys.

  12. Size and Shape Dependence on Melting Temperature of Gallium Nitride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneerselvam Antoniammal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of variation of the size and shape effect on the melting property of gallium nitride nanoparticles with their spherical and cylindrical geometrical feature is theoretically explored. A numerical thermodynamical model has been devoted for the study. A comparative investigation is made between the two shapes, at the range of ~3 nm dia. The cylindrical GaN nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is in line with the function of radius of curvature.

  13. Global patterns of geographic range size in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C David L Orme

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of spatial variation in species geographic range size are central to many fundamental questions in macroecology and conservation biology. However, the global nature of these patterns has remained contentious, since previous studies have been geographically restricted and/or based on small taxonomic groups. Here, using a database on the breeding distributions of birds, we report the first (to our knowledge global maps of variation in species range sizes for an entire taxonomic class. We show that range area does not follow a simple latitudinal pattern. Instead, the smallest range areas are attained on islands, in mountainous areas, and largely in the southern hemisphere. In contrast, bird species richness peaks around the equator, and towards higher latitudes. Despite these profoundly different latitudinal patterns, spatially explicit models reveal a weak tendency for areas with high species richness to house species with significantly smaller median range area. Taken together, these results show that for birds many spatial patterns in range size described in geographically restricted analyses do not reflect global rules. It remains to be discovered whether global patterns in geographic range size are best interpreted in terms of geographical variation in species assemblage packing, or in the rates of speciation, extinction, and dispersal that ultimately underlie biodiversity.

  14. A Macrophysiological Analysis of Energetic Constraints on Geographic Range Size in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Steele, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological processes are essential for understanding the distribution and abundance of organisms, and recently, with widespread attention to climate change, physiology has been ushered back to the forefront of ecological thinking. We present a macrophysiological analysis of the energetics of geographic range size using combined data on body size, basal metabolic rate (BMR), phylogeny and range properties for 574 species of mammals. We propose three mechanisms by which interspecific variation in BMR should relate positively to geographic range size: (i) Thermal Plasticity Hypothesis, (ii) Activity Levels/Dispersal Hypothesis, and (iii) Energy Constraint Hypothesis. Although each mechanism predicts a positive correlation between BMR and range size, they can be further distinguished based on the shape of the relationship they predict. We found evidence for the predicted positive relationship in two dimensions of energetics: (i) the absolute, mass-dependent dimension (BMR) and (ii) the relative, mass-independent dimension (MIBMR). The shapes of both relationships were similar and most consistent with that expected from the Energy Constraint Hypothesis, which was proposed previously to explain the classic macroecological relationship between range size and body size in mammals and birds. The fact that this pattern holds in the MIBMR dimension indicates that species with supra-allometric metabolic rates require among the largest ranges, above and beyond the increasing energy demands that accrue as an allometric consequence of large body size. The relationship is most evident at high latitudes north of the Tropics, where large ranges and elevated MIBMR are most common. Our results suggest that species that are most vulnerable to extinction from range size reductions are both large-bodied and have elevated MIBMR, but also, that smaller species with elevated MIBMR are at heightened risk. We also provide insights into the global latitudinal trends in range size and MIBMR

  15. Grain Constraint and Size Effects in Shape Memory Alloy Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on copper are interesting because they are relatively inexpensive and show excellent properties when made as single crystals. However, the performance ofthese alloys is severely compromised by the introduction of grain boundaries, to the point where they are too poor for commercial applications. This thesis studies the mechanical properties of fine Cobased wires with a bamboo microstructure, i.e., where triple junctions are absent and grain boundaries run perpendicular to the wire axis. These microwires are not single crystals, but their microstructure is not as complex as that of polycrystals either: we call this new class of shape memory alloys oligocrystals. This thesis seeks to better understand the relationship between microstructure and properties in these alloys through a combination of mechanical testing, in situ experiments and modeling. First, in situ scanning electron microscopy, together with finite element modeling, is used to understand the role of grain constraint on the martensitic transformation. Grain constraints are observed to be much less severe in oligocrystalline wires as compared to polycrystals. Oligocrystalline microwires are then thermomechanically tested and shown to exhibit excellent properties that approach those of single crystals. Next, property evolution during cycling is investigated, revealing training effects as well as fatigue life and fracture. Finally, size effects in damping and transformation morphology are studied and it is shown that a transition from a many-domain to a single domain martensite morphology takes place when the wire diameter is decreased. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  16. Shape and size effects in π-π interactions: face-to-face dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoyang

    2011-01-15

    The shape and size effects in π–π interactions of face-to-face dimers are discussed, by taking three typical groups of π-systems with different shapes (wave-linear, WL; ladder-shaped, LS; and regular-hexagonal, RH) and sizes (2 to 216 π-electrons) as samples, and carrying out a series of static scanning forcefield calculations. These effects are: (1) for differently shaped π-systems with a same quantity of π-electrons, the denser π-electrons lead to the stronger π–π interactions; (2) the interaction orientation, such as the interplanar distance, is controlled by not only van der Waals (vdW) but also electrostatic potential, even though the former is much stronger and has more contributions to total interaction energy than the latter. Furthermore, these interplanar distances are in a range determined by only monomer shapes, i.e., 3.6–4.1 Å for WL, 3.5–3.7 Å for LS, and 3.4–3.7 Å for RH; (3) a centroid-centroid distance corresponding to the global lowest vdW potential point of a dimer with two identical monomers is only determined by the monomer shape, i.e., 3.6, 3.5, and 3.4 Å, for WL, LS, and RH, respectively; (4) rotation will change the interaction energy when both two monomers with big sizes and low symmetries, and vice versa.

  17. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  18. Indetermination of particle sizing by laser diffraction in the anomalous size ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Linchao; Ge, Baozhen; Zhang, Fugen

    2017-09-01

    The laser diffraction method is widely used to measure particle size distributions. It is generally accepted that the scattering angle becomes smaller and the angles to the location of the main peak of scattered energy distributions in laser diffraction instruments shift to smaller values with increasing particle size. This specific principle forms the foundation of the laser diffraction method. However, this principle is not entirely correct for non-absorbing particles in certain size ranges and these particle size ranges are called anomalous size ranges. Here, we derive the analytical formulae for the bounds of the anomalous size ranges and discuss the influence of the width of the size segments on the signature of the Mie scattering kernel. This anomalous signature of the Mie scattering kernel will result in an indetermination of the particle size distribution when measured by laser diffraction instruments in the anomalous size ranges. By using the singular-value decomposition method we interpret the mechanism of occurrence of this indetermination in detail and then validate its existence by using inversion simulations.

  19. Geographic range size and determinants of avian species richness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jetz, Walter; Rahbek, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    Geographic patterns in species richness are mainly based on wide-ranging species because their larger number of distribution records has a disproportionate contribution to the species richness counts. Here we demonstrate how this effect strongly influences our understanding of what determines...... species richness. Using both conventional and spatial regression models, we show that for sub-Saharan African birds, the apparent role of productivity diminishes with decreasing range size, whereas the significance of topographic heterogeneity increases. The relative importance of geometric constraints...... from the continental edge is moderate. Our findings highlight the failure of traditional species richness models to account for narrow-ranging species that frequently are also threatened....

  20. Powerful New Technique to Measure Asteroids' Sizes and Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    A team of French and Italian astronomers have devised a new method for measuring the size and shape of asteroids that are too small or too far away for traditional techniques, increasing the number of asteroids that can be measured by a factor of several hundred. This method takes advantage of the unique capabilities of ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). ESO PR Photo 04a/09 Asteroid Barbara (artist's impression) "Knowledge of the sizes and shapes of asteroids is crucial to understanding how, in the early days of our Solar System, dust and pebbles collected together to form larger bodies and how collisions and re-accumulation have since modified them," says Marco Delbo from the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France, who led the study. Direct imaging with adaptive optics on the largest ground-based telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile (see ESO 21/05 and 18/07), and space telescopes, or radar measurements (ESO 11/07) are the currently favoured methods of asteroid measurement. However, direct imaging, even with adaptive optics, is generally limited to the one hundred largest asteroids of the main belt, while radar measurements are mostly constrained to observations of near-Earth asteroids that experience close encounters with our planet. Delbo and his colleagues have devised a new method that uses interferometry to resolve asteroids as small as about 15 km in diameter located in the main asteroid belt, 200 million kilometres away. This is equivalent to being able to measure the size of a tennis ball a distance of a thousand kilometres. This technique will not only increase the number of objects that can be measured dramatically, but, more importantly, bring small asteroids that are physically very different from the well studied larger ones into reach. The interferometric technique combines the light from two or more telescopes. Astronomers proved their method using ESO's VLTI, combining the light of two of the VLT's 8.2-metre

  1. Shape effects and size distributions of astrophysical dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rakesh K.; Botet, Robert

    2017-05-01

    In the infrared and visible wavelength ranges, the extinction cross-sections of small irregular particles are essentially proportional to the corresponding cross-sections for spheres of the same volume, which confirms a previous statement by Mathis. The situation differs for large disordered particles because of the contribution of large surface areas. The differences between irregular particles and homogeneous spheres of the same mass might depend on the material. For example, graphite particles are less sensitive to surface shapes than silicate particles. As a consequence, the successful fit of the average galactic extinction curve by an ensemble of graphite + silicate spherical particles, can also be replaced by a fit using an ensemble of irregular particles, including a smaller amount of silicate. Because the interstellar dust particles are expected to be generally of irregular shapes, the former fit with spherical particles could have overestimated the relative amount of silicate in the interstellar medium (ISM). In the same spirit, we discuss various interpretations of the remarkable stability of the 217.5-nm peak in the ISM extinction.

  2. Calibration of aerosol instruments in a wide particle size range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yli-Ojanpera, J.

    2012-07-01

    Aerosol particles have an important role in many scientific and technological issues. Aerosol particle measurements are widely applied for example in clean room technology, in atmospheric measurements and in studying the Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from traffic and industry. This thesis concentrates on developing new aerosol instrumentation both for measurement and calibration purposes. On the measurement side, the driving force has been the urgent need for instruments that have a fast time response and are able to measure nanoparticles with reasonable accuracy. In this respect, the nanoparticle resolution of the Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI, Dekati Ltd.) was improved by designing, manufacturing and implementing a new impactor stage (cutpoint 16.7 nm) to the ELPI cascade impactor. The new impactor stage divides the particle size range measured by the filter stage (7-30 nm) between the new stage and the filter stage. As a result, the nanoparticle resolution of the ELPI was improved. This made the device more suitable, for example, for vehicle engine emission measurements. The new stage is currently being sold as a part of the new ELPI+ instrument, which is an improved version of the original ELPI. On the calibration side, the main driving force behind aerosol instrument development has been the lack of calibration standards available for calibrating the number concentration responses of the instruments in the sub-micrometer size range. In this size range, the most common method to calibrate an instrument is to use a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), for obtaining monodisperse particles for the calibration, and a Faraday cup aerosol electrometer (FCAE), for measuring the reference number concentration. Even though, in principle, the DMA allows size selection up to 1 {mu}m in diameter, the calibrations are usually limited to particles below 100 nm because of the multiple charging of particles. To solve this problem, a new concept for realizing a

  3. Understanding the shape of the Earth and measuring its size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatzis, Evangelos; Galanaki, Angeliki

    2016-04-01

    Most elementary students have problems and misconceptions regarding the shape of the Earth. Teachers often contribute to this confusion telling the students that the Earth is almost spherical, but not explaining to them, how the Earth can be spherical while it appears. It would be helpful for students to understand how humanity came with the idea of the spherical Earth (to be precise the Earth is ellipsoid). Historically, most cultures describe the Earth as flat. That changes with the ancient Greek culture. We don't know exactly how the Greeks first understood the spherical shape of the Earth, but some Greek philosophers give some arguments why the Earth must be a sphere. We can discuss these arguments and observations with the students. First, if someone travels in the south, he can see the southern constellations rise higher above the horizon. We can give students pictures of the night sky in southern regions and compare them with observations of ''their'' night sky. Second, in the lunar eclipse we can see the round shadow of the Earth. Third, whenever a ship is on the horizon, his low part is invisible . This is known as "hull-down". Moreover, the low part of mountains is invisible from the sea, due to the curvature of the Earth. It is always better to make these observations in real life but it can also be done via videos and pictures. The realization of the spherical shape of the Earth was sine qua non for the first good measurement of its size. In the second part of the project, following the ancient mathematician Eratosthenes's steps, students can measure the size of the Earth, , find pleasure in doing experimental work and realize how important mathematics is in everyday life. Two sticks, situated a long distance away from each other, can give us approximately the circumference , the radius and the diameter of the Earth. Eratosthenes used geometry combined to the knowledge of ancient Greek culture that the Earth is spherical (360°). He knew the distance

  4. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  5. Consistent size-independent harvest selection on fish body shape in two recreationally exploited marine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Linde-Medina, Marta; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Harvesting wild animals may exert size-independent selection pressures on a range of morphological, life history, and behavioral traits. Most work so far has focused on selection pressures on life history traits and body size as morphological trait. We studied here how recreational fishing selects for morphological traits related to body shape, which may correlate with underlying swimming behavior. Using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, we found consistent recreational fishing-induced selection pressures on body shape in two recreationally exploited marine fish species. We show that individuals with larger-sized mouths and more streamlined and elongated bodies were more vulnerable to passively operated hook-and-line fishing independent of the individual's body size or condition. While the greater vulnerability of individuals with larger mouth gapes can be explained by the direct physical interaction with hooks, selection against streamlined and elongated individuals could either involve a specific foraging mode or relate to underlying elevated swimming behavior. Harvesting using passive gear is common around the globe, and thus, size-independent selection on body shape is expected to be widespread potentially leaving behind individuals with smaller oral gapes and more compact bodies. This might have repercussions for food webs by altering foraging and predation.

  6. Abundance-range size relationships in stream vegetation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    and compositionof vegetation among stream localities and are likely to promote a positiveinterspecific relationship between abundance and range size through mechanismsof metapopulation dynamics and use of common widely distributed resources.Usingdata from 206 localities in 29 stream systems distributed throughout...... such asobligatory submerged or amphibious species. The amphibious species, which caneasily disperse by seeds between stream systems and by vegetative growth frompermanent bank populations to the open streambed, had a significantly strongerabundance-range relationship than obligatory submerged species probably due...... streamhabitattypes of the same width and lengthwise locations in different stream systemsdidnot show a stronger positive relationship than the overall relationship. Thefewobligatory submerged species having a high local abundance and low range sizecould not be regarded as specialist species on narrowly distributed...

  7. Geographic range size and extinction risk assessment in nomadic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Claire A; Tulloch, Ayesha; Hammill, Edd; Possingham, Hugh P; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Geographic range size is often conceptualized as a fixed attribute of a species and treated as such for the purposes of quantification of extinction risk; species occupying smaller geographic ranges are assumed to have a higher risk of extinction, all else being equal. However many species are mobile, and their movements range from relatively predictable to-and-fro migrations to complex irregular movements shown by nomadic species. These movements can lead to substantial temporary expansion and contraction of geographic ranges, potentially to levels which may pose an extinction risk. By linking occurrence data with environmental conditions at the time of observations of nomadic species, we modeled the dynamic distributions of 43 arid-zone nomadic bird species across the Australian continent for each month over 11 years and calculated minimum range size and extent of fluctuation in geographic range size from these models. There was enormous variability in predicted spatial distribution over time; 10 species varied in estimated geographic range size by more than an order of magnitude, and 2 species varied by >2 orders of magnitude. During times of poor environmental conditions, several species not currently classified as globally threatened contracted their ranges to very small areas, despite their normally large geographic range size. This finding raises questions about the adequacy of conventional assessments of extinction risk based on static geographic range size (e.g., IUCN Red Listing). Climate change is predicted to affect the pattern of resource fluctuations across much of the southern hemisphere, where nomadism is the dominant form of animal movement, so it is critical we begin to understand the consequences of this for accurate threat assessment of nomadic species. Our approach provides a tool for discovering spatial dynamics in highly mobile species and can be used to unlock valuable information for improved extinction risk assessment and conservation

  8. Size- and shape-dependent effects of microplastic particles on adult daggerblade grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Austin D; Weinstein, John E

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of microplastics in marine environments has been increasing over the past several decades. The objective of the present study was to characterize the size- and shape-dependent effects of microplastic particles (spheres, fibers, and fragments) on the adult daggerblade grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). Grass shrimp were exposed to 11 sizes of plastic: spheres (30, 35, 59, 75, 83, 116, and 165 μm), fragments (34 and 93 μm), and fibers (34 and 93 μm) at a concentration of 2000 particles/400 mL (= 50 000 particles/L) for 3 h. Following exposure, grass shrimp were monitored for survival, ingested and ventilated microplastics, and residence time. Mortality ranged from 0% to 55%. Spheres and fragments 50 μm ranged from 5% to 40%. Mortality was significantly higher in the exposure to 93-μm fibers than other sizes tested (p microplastic particles of various sizes and shapes can be ingested and ventilated by adult daggerblade grass shrimp, resulting in acute toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3074-3080. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  9. Diversification Rates and the Evolution of Species Range Size Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Castiglione

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The geographic range sizes frequency distribution (RFD within clades is typically right-skewed with untransformed data, and bell-shaped or slightly left-skewed under the log-transformation. This means that most species within clades occupy diminutive ranges, whereas just a few species are truly widespread. A number of ecological and evolutionary explanations have been proposed to account for this pattern. Among the latter, much attention has been given to the issue of how extinction and speciation probabilities influence RFD. Numerous accounts now convincingly demonstrate that extinction rate decreases with range size, both in living and extinct taxa. The relationship between range size and speciation rate, though, is much less obvious, with either small or large ranged species being proposed to originate more daughter taxa. Herein, we used a large fossil database including 21 animal clades and more than 80,000 fossil occurrences distributed over more than 400 million years of marine metazoans (exclusive of vertebrates evolution, to test the relationship between extinction rate, speciation rate, and range size. As expected, we found that extinction rate almost linearly decreases with range size. In contrast, speciation rate peaks at the large (but not the largest end of the range size spectrum. This is consistent with the peripheral isolation mode of allopatric speciation being the main mechanism of species origination. The huge variation in phylogeny, fossilization potential, time of fossilization, and the overarching effect of mass extinctions suggest caution must be posed at generalizing our results, as individual clades may deviate significantly from the general pattern.

  10. Size- and Shape-Controlled Synthesis and Properties of Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwizera, Elyahb Allie; Chaffin, Elise; Shen, Xiao; Chen, Jingyi; Zou, Qiang; Wu, Zhiming; Gai, Zheng; Bhana, Saheel; O'Connor, Ryan; Wang, Lijia; Adhikari, Hitesh; Mishra, Sanjay R; Wang, Yongmei; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-19

    Magnetic-plasmonic core-shell nanomaterials offer a wide range of applications across science, engineering and biomedical disciplines. However, the ability to synthesize and understand magnetic-plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles with tunable sizes and shapes remains very limited. This work reports experimental and computational studies on the synthesis and properties of iron oxide-gold core-shell nanoparticles of three different shapes (sphere, popcorn and star) with controllable sizes (70 to 250 nm). The nanoparticles were synthesized via a seed-mediated growth method in which newly formed gold atoms were added onto gold-seeded iron oxide octahedrons to form gold shell. The evolution of the shell into different shapes was found to occur after the coalescence of gold seeds, which was achieved by controlling the amount of additive (silver nitrate) and reducing agent (ascorbic acid) in the growth solution. First principles calculation, together with experimental results, elucidated the intimate roles of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in the shape-controlled synthesis. Both discrete dipole approximation calculation and experimental results showed that the nanopopcorns and nanostars exhibited red-shifted plasmon resonance compared with the nanospheres, with the nanostars giving multispectral feature. This research has made a great step further in manipulating and understanding magnetic-plasmonic hybrid nanostructures and will make important impact in many different fields.

  11. Size- and Shape-Dependent Antibacterial Studies of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by Wet Chemical Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Muhammad Akram; Kanwal, Zakia; Rauf, Anum; Sabri, Anjum Nasim; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of different shapes and sizes were prepared by solution-based chemical reduction routes. Silver nitrate was used as a precursor, tri-sodium citrate (TSC) and sodium borohydride as reducing agents, while polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a stabilizing agent. The morphology, size, and structural properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Spherical AgNPs, as depicted by SEM, were found to have diameters in the range of 15 to 90 nm while lengths of the edges of the triangular particles were about 150 nm. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of different spherical silver colloids occurring in the wavelength range of 397 to 504 nm, whereas triangular particles showed two peaks, first at 392 nm and second at 789 nm as measured by UV-VIS. The XRD spectra of the prepared samples indicated the face-centered cubic crystalline structure of metallic AgNPs. The in vitro antibacterial properties of all synthesized AgNPs against two types of Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were examined by Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility method. It was noticed that the smallest-sized spherical AgNPs demonstrated a better antibacterial activity against both bacterial strains as compared to the triangular and larger spherical shaped AgNPs. PMID:28335201

  12. Evolutionary patterns of range size, abundance and species richness in Amazonian angiosperm trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Dexter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amazonian tree species vary enormously in their total abundance and range size, while Amazonian tree genera vary greatly in species richness. The drivers of this variation are not well understood. Here, we construct a phylogenetic hypothesis that represents half of Amazonian tree genera in order to contribute to explaining the variation. We find several clear, broad-scale patterns. Firstly, there is significant phylogenetic signal for all three characteristics; closely related genera tend to have similar numbers of species and similar mean range size and abundance. Additionally, the species richness of genera shows a significant, negative relationship with the mean range size and abundance of their constituent species. Our results suggest that phylogenetically correlated intrinsic factors, namely traits of the genera themselves, shape among lineage variation in range size, abundance and species richness. We postulate that tree stature may be one particularly relevant trait. However, other traits may also be relevant, and our study reinforces the need for ambitious compilations of trait data for Amazonian trees. In the meantime, our study shows how large-scale phylogenies can help to elucidate, and contribute to explaining, macroecological and macroevolutionary patterns in hyperdiverse, yet poorly understood regions like the Amazon Basin.

  13. Beyond Magic Numbers: Atomic Scale Equilibrium Nanoparticle Shapes for Any Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, J Magnus; Erhart, Paul

    2017-09-13

    In the pursuit of complete control over morphology in nanoparticle synthesis, knowledge of the thermodynamic equilibrium shapes is a key ingredient. While approaches exist to determine the equilibrium shape in the large size limit (≳10-20 nm) as well as for very small particles (≲2 nm), the experimentally increasingly important intermediate size regime has largely remained elusive. Here, we present an algorithm, based on atomistic simulations in a constrained thermodynamic ensemble, that efficiently predicts equilibrium shapes for any number of atoms in the range from a few tens to many thousands of atoms. We apply the algorithm to Cu, Ag, Au, and Pd particles with diameters between approximately 1 and 7 nm and reveal an energy landscape that is more intricate than previously suggested. The thus obtained particle type distributions demonstrate that the transition from icosahedral particles to decahedral and further into truncated octahedral particles occurs only very gradually, which has implications for the interpretation of experimental data. The approach presented here is extensible to alloys and can in principle also be adapted to represent different chemical environments.

  14. Size and shape control in the overgrowth of gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    We report on a new sustainable approach to manipulate the optical behaviour and geometrical properties of gold nanorods in aqueous solutions by fine control of their overgrowth. In our approach, the overgrowth is realized by modulation of the reduction of the gold ions which are left as Au1+ after the primary step of the synthesis (typically as much as 80% of the gold ions available in the growth solution). The progress of the reduction requires the gradual addition of ascorbic acid, which transforms the Au1+ into Au0 and may be performed in the original growth solution with no need for any further manipulation. By control of the total amount and rate of administration of the ascorbic acid, we prove the possibility to realize a systematic modulation of the average lengths, diameters, shapes (rod or dog-bone like), and light extinction of the nanoparticles. A slow overgrowth leads to a gradual enlargement of the lengths and diameters at almost constant shape. In contrast, a faster overgrowth results into a more complex modification of the overall shape of the gold nanorods.

  15. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ferrite nanoparticles with proper surface coating having uniform particle size distribution and definite shape; this is because physical, chemical and magnetic properties, in particular, of these nanomaterials are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the particles. Here, we report the synthesis of well dispersed ...

  16. Preadolescents' Perceptions of Females' Body Size and Shape: Evolutionary and Social Learning Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Charlotte N.; Tinsley, Barbara J.; Ericksen, Andrea J.; Ozer, Daniel J.; Markey, Patrick M.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the perceptions of 165 Mexican American and Euro-American adolescents and their parents about healthy and attractive female body sizes and shapes using a pictorial measure. Results suggest that Euro-American and Mexican American participants report similar preferences for females' body sizes and shapes, but little agreement was found…

  17. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Justice, Anne E; Graff, Mariaelisa

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially b...

  18. Preparation of artificial kidney stones of reproducible size, shape, and mass by precision injection molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Robert I; Kyle, Christopher C; Carey, Donna L; Leveillee, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    To prepare artificial kidney stones of defined shape, size, mass, and material composition via precision injection molding of Ultracal 30 cement slurries into an inexpensive biodegradable mold. A calcium alginate and silica-based mold was used to prepare casts of varying shapes in a reproducible manner. Ultracal 30 cement slurries mixed 1:1 with water were injected into these casts and allowed to harden. The artificial stones were recovered and their physical properties determined. Ex-vivo and in-vivo responses to holmium laser lithotripsy were examined. Spheres, half spheres, cylinders, cubes, tapered conical structures, and flat angulated structures were prepared with high precision without post-molding manipulations. Large spheres of average mass 0.661 g (+/- 0.037), small spheres of average mass 0.046 g (+/- 0.0026), and hexagons of average mass 0.752 g (+/- 0.0180) were found to have densities (1610-1687 kg/m(3)) within the expected range for Ultracal 30 cement stones. Ex-vivo holmium laser lithotripsy of small spheres in saline showed uniformly reproducible efficiencies of comminution. Implantation of a tapered conical stone into the ureter of a porcine model demonstrated stone comminution in vivo consistent with that seen in the ex-vivo models. We present an environmentally safe, technically simple procedure for the formation of artificial kidney stones of predetermined size and shape. The technique does not require the use of hazardous solvents or postprocedural processing of the stones. These stones are intended for use in standardized experiments of lithotripsy efficiency in which the shape of the stone as well as the mass can be predetermined and precisely controlled.

  19. Effects of particle shape and size on nanofluid properties for potential Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Mohd Tengku Amran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR in oil and gas industry is very important to increase oil recovery and prolong the lifetime of a reservoir but it has been very costly and losing properties of EOR agent due to harsh condition. Nanoparticles have been used in EOR application since they are not degradable in reservoir condition and used in smaller amount compared to polymer usage. Commonly, EOR techniques are focusing on increasing the sweep efficiency by controlling the mobility ratio between reservoir fluid and injected fluid. Thus, this research aimed to analyze the nanofluid viscosity at different particle size and shape, volumetric concentration and types of dispersing fluid, as well as to determine the oil recovery performance at different nanofluid concentration. The nanofluid viscosity was investigated at nanoparticle sizes of 15nm and 60nm and shapes of 15nm spherical-solid and porous. Five nanofluid samples with concentration ranging from 0.1wt.% to 7wt.% were used to investigate the effect of volumetric concentration. Distilled water, ethanol, ethylene glycol (EG and brine were used for the effect of dispersing fluids. Oil recovery was investigated at five different concentrations of nanofluid samples through flooding test. It was found that viscosity of nanofluid increased with decreasing particle size and increasing volumetric concentration. Solid shape particle and increasing dispersing fluid viscosity resulted in higher nanofluid viscosity. The higher the nanofluid concentration, the higher the oil recovery obtained. It can be concluded that nanofluid properties have been significantly affected by the environment and the particle used for potential EOR application.

  20. Size and shape in Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides Lepeletier, 1836 (Hymenoptera; Meliponini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LA Nunes

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify differences in wing shape among populations of Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides obtained in 23 locations in the semi-arid region of Bahia state (Brazil. Analysis of the Procrustes distances among mean wing shapes indicated that population structure did not determine shape variation. Instead, populations were structured geographically according to wing size. The Partial Mantel Test between morphometric (shape and size distance matrices and altitude, taking geographic distances into account, was used for a more detailed understanding of size and shape determinants. A partial Mantel test between morphometris (shape and size variation and altitude, taking geographic distances into account, revealed that size (but not shape is largely influenced by altitude (r = 0.54 p < 0.01. These results indicate greater evolutionary constraints for the shape variation, which must be directly associated with aerodynamic issues in this structure. The size, however, indicates that the bees tend to have larger wings in populations located at higher altitudes.

  1. Functional links between Pt single crystal morphology and nanoparticles with different size and shape: the oxygen reduction reaction case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongguo; Wang, Chao; Strmcnik, Dusan S.; Tripkovic, Dusan V.; Sun, Xiaolian; Kang, Yijin; Chi, Miaofang; Snyder, Joshua D.; van der Vliet, Dennis; Tsai, Yifen; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Sun, Shouheng; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2014-01-01

    Design of active and stable Pt-based nanoscale electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) will be the key to improving the efficiency of fuel cells that are needed to deliver reliable, affordable and environmentally friendly energy. Here, by exploring the ORR on Pt single crystals, cubo-octahedral (polyhedral) Pt NPs with different sizes (ranging from 2 to 7 nm), and 7–8 nm Pt NPs with different shapes (cubo-octahedral vs. cube vs. octahedral), we presented a surface science approach capable of rationalizing, and ultimately understanding, fundamental relationships between stability of Pt NPs and activity of the ORR in acidic media. By exploring the potential induced dissolution/re-deposition of Pt between 0.05 and 1.3 V, we found that concomitant variations in morphology of Pt(111) and Pt(100) lead to narrowing differences in activity between Pt single crystal surfaces. We also found that regardless of an initial size or shape, NPs are metastable and easily evolve to thermodynamically equilibrated shape and size with very similar activity for the ORR. We concluded that while initially clearly observed, the particle size and shape effects diminish as the particles age to the point that it may appear that the ORR depends neither on the particle size nor particle shape.

  2. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  3. The size and shape of gas-focused viscous micro-jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, C.; Ganan-Calvo, A. M.; Montanero, J. M.; Vega, E. J.; Herrada, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The size and shape of gas-focused viscous micro-jets are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. These micro-jets are shaped by the action of a co-flowing gas stream due to both the pressure drop in the axial direction occurring in front of the discharge orifice, and the tangential viscous stress caused by the difference between the velocities of the gas and jet behind the orifice. The slender approximation is used to describing the shape of the tapering meniscus and the emitted liquid ligament. Assuming that the driving force takes a uniform value over the entire liquid domain, a universal (self-similar) solution of the momentum equation can be obtained. Experiments were conducted to assess the validity of that solution for a wide range of liquid viscosities. A remarkable collapse into a single curve is obtained for of all jet diameters measured beyond the orifice. This result shows that the driving force mentioned above attains a rather homogeneous value at the region where the micro-jet develops. The universal solution also provides satisfactory results in front of the orifice for sufficiently slender liquid meniscus, provided that the ratio capillary-to-orifice distance to orifice diameter takes sufficiently small values. The approach used in this work can also be applied to study other microjet generation means (co-flowing, electrospray, electrospinning...).

  4. Physical manipulation of biological and chemical syntheses for nanoparticle shape and size control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogale, S. B.; Ahmad, A.; Pasricha, R.; Dhas, V. V.; Syed, A.

    2006-12-01

    A nanosynthesis scheme is demonstrated which renders excellent control of nanoparticle shape, size, and dispersity in a solution based synthesis process. The scheme, termed as percolative microcavity synthesis, involves the use of a granular medium with percolative microcavities which facilitate nearly similar grain size/shape dependent reaction zones limiting intrinsic growth inhomogeneities, enabling particle size/shape control. The viability of the process is demonstrated for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by a plant extract based biological method as well as a chemical method.

  5. New Atrophic Acne Scar Classification: Reliability of Assessments Based on Size, Shape, and Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Tan, Jerry; Rueda, Maria Jose; Layton, Alison; Petit, Lauren; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Post-acne atrophic scarring is a major concern for which standardized outcome measures are needed. Traditionally, this type of scar has been classified based on shape; but survey of practicing dermatologists has shown that atrophic scar morphology has not been well enough defined to allow good agreement in clinical classification. Reliance on clinical assessment is still needed at the current time, since objective tools are not yet available in routine practice. Evaluate classification for atrophic acne scars by shape, size, and facial location and establish reliability in assessments. We conducted a non-interventional study with dermatologists performing live clinical assessments of atrophic acne scars. To objectively compare identification of lesions, individual lesions were marked on a high-resolution photo of the patient that was displayed on a computer during the clinical evaluation. The Jacob clinical classification system was used to define three primary shapes of scars 1) icepick, 2) boxcar, and 3) rolling. To determine agreement for classification by size, independent technicians assessed the investigators' markings on digital images. Identical localization of scars was denoted if the maximal distance between their centers was ≤ 60 pixels (approximately 3 mm). Raters assessed scars on the same patients twice (morning/afternoon). Aggregate models of rater assessments were created and analyzed for agreement. Raters counted a mean scar count per subject ranging from 15.75 to 40.25 scars. Approximately 50% of scars were identified by all raters and ~75% of scars were identified by at least 2 of 3 raters (weak agreement, Kappa pairwise agreement 0.30). Agreement between consecutive counts was moderate, with Kappa index ranging from 0.26 to 0.47 (after exclusion of one outlier investigator who had significantly higher counts than all others). Shape classifications of icepick, boxcar, and rolling differed significantly between raters and even for same raters at

  6. The impact of cigarette pack shape, size and opening: evidence from tobacco company documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnowski, Kathy; Hammond, David

    2013-09-01

    To use tobacco industry documents on cigarette pack shape, size and openings to identify industry findings on associations with brand imagery, product attributes, consumer perceptions and behaviour. Internal tobacco industry research and marketing documents obtained through court disclosure contained in the Legacy Tobacco Documents Library were searched using keywords related to pack shapes, sizes and opening methods. The search identified 66 documents related to consumer research and marketing plans on pack shape, size and openings, drawn from 1973 to 2002. Industry research consistently found that packs that deviated from the traditional flip-top box projected impressions of 'modern', 'elegant' and 'unique' brand imagery. Alternative pack shape and openings were identified as an effective means to communicate product attributes, particularly with regard to premium quality and smooth taste. Consumer studies consistently found that pack shape, size and opening style influenced perceptions of reduced product harm, and were often used to communicate a 'lighter' product. Slim, rounded, oval and booklet packs were found to be particularly appealing among young adults, and several studies demonstrated increased purchase interest for tobacco products presented in novel packaging shape or opening. Evidence from consumer tracking reports and company presentations indicate that pack innovations in shape or opening method increased market share of brands. Consumer research by the tobacco industry between 1973 and 2002 found that variations in packaging shape, size and opening method could influence brand appeal and risk perceptions and increase cigarette sales. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Size and refinement edge-shape effects of graphene quantum dots on UV–visible absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruiqiang; Qi, Shifei; Jia, Jianfeng [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China); Torre, Bryna [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Zeng, Hao [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Wu, Haishun [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohong_ly@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen 041004 (China); Key Laboratory of Magnetic Molecules and Magnetic Information Materials, Ministry of Education, Linfen 041004 (China)

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • The size effect affects both the visible light absorption and the zigzag edge state. • Zigzag edge state is important than armchair edge state for visible light absorption. • The Seam atoms should be noted for the randomly shaped GQDs. - Abstract: Using the ab initio density-functional theory method, we calculated the size effect and edge shape effect on UV–visible light absorption of different shapes of graphene quantum dots (GQDs). There are two interesting findings in this study. First, the edge shape effect increase with increasing the size of square GQDs. Second, the Seam atoms, located at the boundary between zigzag and armchair edges, hardly contribute to the strongest visible light absorption. This refinement of the edge-shape effect can be found in rectangular, triangular and hexagonal GQDs. This new finding will be useful in applications of GQDs in the visible light absorption nanodevices.

  8. Simple one-step synthesis of water and organic media soluble gold nanoparticles with various shapes and sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sook Young; Sekino, Tohru; Kusunose, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with an average diameter in the range 1-100 nm have been synthesized from hydrogen tetrachloroaureate (III) hydrate (HAuCl 4·3H 2O) in didodecyldimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) aqueous solutions at room temperature. The particle size could be controlled by the concentration of DDAB and HAuCl 4·3H 2O, and reaction temperature. An increase in DDAB concentration caused a change in the particle shape from spherical to triangular, rectangular or various shapes. Until critical concentration of DDAB, where the size of gold nanoparticles seemed to prevent particle growth from aggregation, and resulted in small particle size and narrow size distribution. And DDAB-coated nanoparticles can be dispersed well in both water and organic solvent with high colloidal stability.

  9. Shape and size effects in the optical properties of metallic nanorod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst S.; Poelsema, Bene

    2006-01-01

    The influence of size and geometrical shape on the optical properties of randomly oriented metallic nanorods is investigated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). Our calculations provide a benchmark for an accurate characterisation of nanorod suspensions by frequently used optical

  10. SHAPE AND SIZE IN MEDICINE, BIOTECHNOLOGY, MATERIALS SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Bongiorno, Enea G.; Alessandra Micheletti; Giovanni Naldi; Davide La Torre

    2011-01-01

    This special issue gathers together papers presented during the workshop Shape and Size in Medicine, Biotechnology, Materials Science and Social Sciences, Milano, Italy, 16-17 February 2011, https://sites.google.com/site/shapemilan/home

  11. Controlling the Size, Shape and Stability of Supramolecular Polymers in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Besenius, Pol; de Feijter, Isja; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Palmans, Anja R. A.

    2012-01-01

    For aqueous based supramolecular polymers, the simultaneous control over shape, size and stability is very difficult1. At the same time, the ability to do so is highly important in view of a number of applications in functional soft matter including electronics, biomedical engineering, and sensors. In the past, successful strategies to control the size and shape of supramolecular polymers typically focused on the use of templates2,3, end cappers4 or selective solvent techniques5. Here we disc...

  12. Optimal electrode shape and size for shear mode thin film acoustic wave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L. M.; Tang, B. B.; Hu, Y. T.; Fan, H.; Yang, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    We study electrode shape and size for plates of hexagonal crystals or polarized ceramics with the sixfold axis or the poling direction parallel to the plate surfaces so that they can be excited into thickness-shear vibration by an electric field in the plate thickness direction. Electrode size and shape optimal in the sense that they satisfy the criterion of Bechmann's number in every direction are determined.

  13. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Iestyn Woolway

    Full Text Available Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored.

  14. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Maberly, Stephen C; French, Jon R; Livingstone, David M; Monteith, Donald T; Simpson, Gavin L; Thackeray, Stephen J; Andersen, Mikkel R; Battarbee, Richard W; DeGasperi, Curtis L; Evans, Christopher D; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C; Rusak, James A; Ryves, David B; Scott, Daniel R; Shilland, Ewan M; Smyth, Robyn L; Staehr, Peter A; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored.

  15. Size and shape variation in the proximal femur of Australopithecus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01

    Aside from use as estimates of body mass dimorphism and fore to hind limb joint size comparisons, postcranial elements have not often contributed to assessments of variation in Australopithecus africanus. Meanwhile, cranial, facial, and dental size variation is interpreted to be high or moderately high. Further, the cranial base and face express patterns of structural (shape) variation, which are interpreted by some as evidence for the presence of multiple species. Here, the proximal femur is used to consider postcranial size and shape variation in A. africanus. Original fossils from Makapansgat and Sterkfontein, and samples from Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo were measured. Size variation was assessed by comparing the A. africanus coefficient of variation to bootstrapped distributions of coefficient of variation samples for each taxon. Shape variation was assessed from isometrically adjusted shape variables. First, the A. africanus standard deviation of log transformed shape variables was compared to bootstrapped distributions of logged standard deviations in each taxon. Second, shape variable based Euclidean distances between fossil pairs were compared to pairwise Euclidean distance distributions in each reference taxon. The degree of size variation in the A. africanus proximal femur is consistent with that of a single species, and is most comparable to Homo and Pan, lower than A. afarensis, and lower than some estimates of cranial and dental variation. Some, but not all, shape variables show more variation in A. africanus than in extant taxa. The degree of shape difference between some fossils exceeds the majority of pairwise differences in the reference taxa. Proximal femoral shape, but not size, variation is consistent with high estimates of A. africanus cranial variation.

  16. Body shape and size depictions of African American women in JET magazine, 1953-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Andoh, Nana A; Gray, James J; Soto, José A; Parker, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Depictions of Caucasian women in the mainstream media have become increasingly thinner in size and straighter in shape. These changes may be inconsistent with the growing influence of African American beauty ideals, which research has established as more accepting of larger body sizes and more curvaceous body types than Caucasians. The present study looked at trends in the portrayal of African American women featured in JET magazine from 1953 to 2006. Beauty of the Week (BOW) images were collected and analyzed to examine body size (estimated by independent judges) and body shape (estimated by waist-to-hip ratio). We expected body sizes to increase and body shapes to become more curvaceous. Results revealed a rise in models' body size consistent with expectations, but an increase in waist-to-hip ratio, contrary to prediction. Our findings suggest that the African American feminine beauty ideal reflects both consistencies with and departures from mainstream cultural ideals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Variability in body size and shape of UK offshore workers: A cluster analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Arthur; Ledingham, Robert; Williams, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Male UK offshore workers have enlarged dimensions compared with UK norms and knowledge of specific sizes and shapes typifying their physiques will assist a range of functions related to health and ergonomics. A representative sample of the UK offshore workforce (n = 588) underwent 3D photonic scanning, from which 19 extracted dimensional measures were used in k-means cluster analysis to characterise physique groups. Of the 11 resulting clusters four somatotype groups were expressed: one cluster was muscular and lean, four had greater muscularity than adiposity, three had equal adiposity and muscularity and three had greater adiposity than muscularity. Some clusters appeared constitutionally similar to others, differing only in absolute size. These cluster centroids represent an evidence-base for future designs in apparel and other applications where body size and proportions affect functional performance. They also constitute phenotypic evidence providing insight into the 'offshore culture' which may underpin the enlarged dimensions of offshore workers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Size and shape dependence study of magnetization reversal in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, Sougata; Bedanta, Subhankar, E-mail: sbedanta@niser.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic Antidot Lattice (MAL) arrays of Co have been prepared in micron range using ultraviolet (UV) lithography technique with different shapes and sizes. Magnetization reversal in such MAL systems has been studied by magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) based microscopy by varying the angle between the easy axis and the external magnetic field. The domain images evidence that the magnetization reversal along easy axis is highly dominated by nucleation of domains which is subsequently accompanied by domain wall motion. We have observed that with increase in active magnetic area domain size increases but on the contrary coercivity decreases. The presence of periodic holes turns the MALs magnetically hard when compared to similar thickness of continuous thin film. The magnetization relaxation along easy axis for the Co MAL at constant dc field fits very well with the exponential law of Fatuzzo–Labrune indicating domain nucleated dominant process. - Highlights: • The periodic holes act as pinning center and make the domains to follow a zigzag path. • Domain size for different magnetic antidot lattice arrays (MALs) has been studied. • The relaxation behavior of MALs under constant magnetic field has been studied.

  19. Size dependent magnetic and optical properties in diamond shaped graphene quantum dots: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritwika; Dhar, Namrata; Bandyopadhyay, Arka; Jana, Debnarayan

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic and optical properties of diamond shaped graphene quantum dots (DSGQDs) have been investigated by varying their sizes with the help of density functional theory (DFT). The study of density of states (DOS) has revealed that the Fermi energy decreases with increase in sizes (number of carbon atoms). The intermediate structure with 30 carbon atoms shows the highest magnetic moment (8 μB, μB being the Bohr magneton). The shifting of optical transitions to higher energy in smallest DSGQD (16 carbon atoms) bears the signature of stronger quantum confinement. However, for the largest structure (48 carbon atoms) multiple broad peaks appear in case of parallel polarization and in this case electron energy loss spectra (EELS) peak (in the energy range 0-5 eV) is sharp in nature (compared to high energy peak). This may be attributed to π plasmon and the broad peak (in the range 10-16 eV) corresponds to π + σ plasmon. A detail calculation of the Raman spectra has indicated some prominent mode of vibrations which can be used to characterize these structures (with hydrogen terminated dangling bonds). We think that these theoretical observations can be utilized for novel device designs involving DSGQDs.

  20. Body size and body shape: perceptions of black women with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liburd, L C; Anderson, L A; Edgar, T; Jack, L

    1999-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to explore perceptions of body size and shape in a group of black women with Type 2 diabetes. Thirty-three black women with Type 2 diabetes participated in one of three focus groups to discuss perceptions about body size and body shape. Transcriptions of the discussion were analyzed for themes of participants' perceptions about their bodies, their ideas about body size and body shape, and personal and environmental influences on their preferences about size and shape. Participants preferred a middle-to-small body size but indicated that a middle-to-large body size was healthier. They also said that a large body size did result in some untoward social consequences. Participants preferred a pear-shaped body (a figure without abdominal adiposity). The three major influences on body image perceptions were children, parents, and the media. With these findings in mind, diabetes education programs that are geared for black women may benefit from the inclusion of key family members. Additionally, the importance of body image perceptions should be recognized in the design and implementation of weight-related diabetes education programs.

  1. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  2. A horse's eye view: size and shape discrimination compared with other mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, Masaki; Kumazaki, Kiyonori; Camus, Florine; Nicod, Sophie; Pereira, Carlos; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Mammals have adapted to a variety of natural environments from underwater to aerial and these different adaptations have affected their specific perceptive and cognitive abilities. This study used a computer-controlled touchscreen system to examine the visual discrimination abilities of horses, particularly regarding size and shape, and compared the results with those from chimpanzee, human and dolphin studies. Horses were able to discriminate a difference of 14% in circle size but showed worse discrimination thresholds than chimpanzees and humans; these differences cannot be explained by visual acuity. Furthermore, the present findings indicate that all species use length cues rather than area cues to discriminate size. In terms of shape discrimination, horses exhibited perceptual similarities among shapes with curvatures, vertical/horizontal lines and diagonal lines, and the relative contributions of each feature to perceptual similarity in horses differed from those for chimpanzees, humans and dolphins. Horses pay more attention to local components than to global shapes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Influences of Substrate Adhesion and Particle Size on the Shape Memory Effect of Polystyrene Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lewis M; Killgore, Jason P; Li, Zhengwei; Long, Rong; Sanders, Aric W; Xiao, Jianliang; Ding, Yifu

    2016-04-19

    Formulations and applications of micro- and nanoscale polymer particles have proliferated rapidly in recent years, yet knowledge of their mechanical behavior has not grown accordingly. In this study, we examine the ways that compressive strain, substrate surface energy, and particle size influence the shape memory cycle of polystyrene particles. Using nanoimprint lithography, differently sized particles are programmed into highly deformed, temporary shapes in contact with substrates of differing surface energies. Atomic force microscopy is used to obtain in situ measurements of particle shape recovery kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy is employed to assess differences in the profiles of particles at the conclusion of the shape memory cycle. Finally, finite element models are used to investigate the growing impact of surface energies at smaller length scales. Results reveal that the influence of substrate adhesion on particle recovery is size-dependent and can become dominating at submicron length scales.

  4. Multi-particle long-range rapidity correlations from fluctuation of the fireball longitudinal shape

    OpenAIRE

    Bzdak, Adam; Bozek, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the genuine long-range multi-particle rapidity correlation functions, $C_{n}(y_1,...,y_n)$ for $n=3,4,5,6$, originating from fluctuations of the fireball longitudinal shape. In these correlation functions any contribution from the short-range two-particle correlations, and in general up to $(n-1)$-particle in $C_n$, is suppressed. The information about the fluctuating fireball shape in rapidity is encoded in the cumulants of coefficients of the orthogonal polynomial expansion of ...

  5. Bat distribution size or shape as determinant of viral richness in african bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël D Maganga

    Full Text Available The rising incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EID is mostly linked to biodiversity loss, changes in habitat use and increasing habitat fragmentation. Bats are linked to a growing number of EID but few studies have explored the factors of viral richness in bats. These may have implications for role of bats as potential reservoirs. We investigated the determinants of viral richness in 15 species of African bats (8 Pteropodidae and 7 microchiroptera in Central and West Africa for which we provide new information on virus infection and bat phylogeny. We performed the first comparative analysis testing the correlation of the fragmented geographical distribution (defined as the perimeter to area ratio with viral richness in bats. Because of their potential effect, sampling effort, host body weight, ecological and behavioural traits such as roosting behaviour, migration and geographical range, were included into the analysis as variables. The results showed that the geographical distribution size, shape and host body weight have significant effects on viral richness in bats. Viral richness was higher in large-bodied bats which had larger and more fragmented distribution areas. Accumulation of viruses may be related to the historical expansion and contraction of bat species distribution range, with potentially strong effects of distribution edges on virus transmission. Two potential explanations may explain these results. A positive distribution edge effect on the abundance or distribution of some bat species could have facilitated host switches. Alternatively, parasitism could play a direct role in shaping the distribution range of hosts through host local extinction by virulent parasites. This study highlights the importance of considering the fragmentation of bat species geographical distribution in order to understand their role in the circulation of viruses in Africa.

  6. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2017-02-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  7. Heat stress and age induced maternal effects on wing size and shape in parthenogenetic Drosophila mercatorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, DH; Pertoldi, C; Scali, V

    2005-01-01

    Maternal effects on progeny wing size and shape in a homozygous parthenogenetic strain of Drosophila mercatorum were investigated. The impact of external maternal factors (heat stress) and the impact of internal maternal factors (different maternal and grand maternal age) were studied. The offspr......Maternal effects on progeny wing size and shape in a homozygous parthenogenetic strain of Drosophila mercatorum were investigated. The impact of external maternal factors (heat stress) and the impact of internal maternal factors (different maternal and grand maternal age) were studied....... The offspring developed under identical environmental conditions, and due to lack of genetic variation any phenotypic difference among offspring could be ascribed to maternal effects. Wing size was estimated by centroid size, shape was analysed with the Procrustes geometric morphometric method and variation...... in landmark displacement was visualized by principal component analysis. Both kinds of maternal effects had a significant impact on progeny wing size and shape. Maternal heat stress led to the same pattern of response in size and shape among the progeny, with increased difference between the control group...

  8. Optimum Shapes and Sizes on Torsion Behaviour of I-Beam with Web Opening

    OpenAIRE

    De’nan F.; Hashim N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical study on torsion behaviour of I-beam with web opening was carried out and presented in this paper. Optimum shapes and sizes which enhance the torsion behaviour of the I-beam with web opening as well as lead to economic design in terms of both manufacture and usage.Comparison is made between I-beam without web opening and I-beam with various shapes and sizes of web opening. Different types of finite elements model, sizes and types of web opening were used to investigate the effect of...

  9. Thermal plasticity of wing size and shape in Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans and their hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trotta, V.; Pertoldi, C.; Rudoy, A.

    2010-01-01

    of developmental perturbation. The allometric relationship between size and shape changed among temperatures and among species, suggesting that the wing development is differently regulated in the 2 species and can be altered by natural selection. The allometry changed between populations of different geographic......Populations of Drosophila melanogaster, as well as of other Drosophila species, show body size differences according to their geographic origin. Thermal selection is considered to be the most likely cause explaining these differences. We investigated wing size, wing shape and their relationship...

  10. The Role of Grain Size and Shape on the Electrical Conductivity of Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.; Cloer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common, yet understudied, phenomenon. The exact mechanisms of electric charge generation and transmission in explosive eruption plumes are poorly understood. Ash is a probable charge carrier, and thus, the physical properties of ash may factor into charge generation and transmission. Specifically, the shape and size of ash grains, volatiles bound within the grains, and the efficiency of grains to act as ice nuclei may be contributing factors. To examine the relationship between conductivity and grain size/shape, this research compares conductivity measurements to grain size distribution and shape from five minimally processed ash samples collected from explosive eruptions in Alaska, U.S.A. (Katmai, 1912; Crater Peak, 1992; Augustine, 2006; Okmok, 2008; Redoubt, 2009) that produced volcanic lightning and a set of homogenized (with respect to grain size and shape) ash samples from Lathrop Wells (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and the Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.). Grain size distribution was measured using a laser diffractometer particle size analyzer and grain shapes (aspect ratios, concavity indices) were characterized using backscattered electron images that were processed with ImageJ freeware. The resistance of minimally compressed samples was measured using a current amplifier and converted to conductivity. A general effective media (GEM) equation was then applied using the assumption that the grains are oblate ellipsoids under the influence of minimal compaction. Preliminary analyses suggest that compaction, and therefore shape and contact points, controls ash conductivity and not bulk composition, as homogenized samples provide variable resistance measurements from 1.6 x 10-3 to 9.9 x 10-1 S/m. Non-homogenized Alaskan samples are hypothesized to have higher concavity indices and conductivities when compared to the homogenized samples, due to wider variations in grain size and shape, and these data will be presented.

  11. Sexual size and shape dimorphism in Salamandra salamandra (Amphibia, Caudata, Salamandridae from the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual size dimorphism is one of the key evolutionary features that has been studied in many organisms. On the other hand, sexual shape dimorphism has not been examined as well despite being as important as size dimorphism. Therefore, we analyzed the sexual size and shape dimorphism (SSSD of Salamandra salamandra from the territory of the central Balkans. In addition, we wanted to reconsider if there is some regularity in the geographical distribution of SSSD in the investigated area. Significant differences in size and shape between the sexes were found for the whole sample and among the analyzed groups. Females were larger than males and had bigger heads, interlimb distances and a parotid gland, while males had bigger tails, forelimbs, hindlimbs, and forefoot and hindfoot length. Our results reveal a strong effect of locality on trait variation. This variation from the general pattern of SSSD is not substantial but still has to be considered.

  12. Phenotypic plasticity influences the size, shape and dynamics of the geographic distribution of an invasive plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity has long been suspected to allow invasive species to expand their geographic range across large-scale environmental gradients. We tested this possibility in Australia using a continental scale survey of the invasive tree Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae in twenty-three sites distributed across four climate regions and three habitat types. Using tree-level responses, we detected a trade-off between seed mass and seed number across the moisture gradient. Individual trees plastically and reversibly produced many small seeds at dry sites or years, and few big seeds at wet sites and years. Bigger seeds were positively correlated with higher seed and seedling survival rates. The trade-off, the relation between seed mass, seed and seedling survival, and other fitness components of the plant life-cycle were integrated within a matrix population model. The model confirms that the plastic response resulted in average fitness benefits across the life-cycle. Plasticity resulted in average fitness being positively maintained at the wet and dry range margins where extinction risks would otherwise have been high ("Jack-of-all-Trades" strategy JT, and fitness being maximized at the species range centre where extinction risks were already low ("Master-of-Some" strategy MS. The resulting hybrid "Jack-and-Master" strategy (JM broadened the geographic range and amplified average fitness in the range centre. Our study provides the first empirical evidence for a JM species. It also confirms mechanistically the importance of phenotypic plasticity in determining the size, the shape and the dynamic of a species distribution. The JM allows rapid and reversible phenotypic responses to new or changing moisture conditions at different scales, providing the species with definite advantages over genetic adaptation when invading diverse and variable environments. Furthermore, natural selection pressure acting on phenotypic plasticity is predicted to result

  13. ACCURACY RESEARCH OF THE DIAMETRICAL SIZES FORMING AT GEAR SHAPING BY STEPPED CUTTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Rasulov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research results of forming accuracy for diametrical sizes at gear shaping with stepped cutter and the traditional method. Analysis of static technological dimensional pitch size chain of wheels being cut is performed. It was revealed that the most of transmission errors of the wheels, formed by the traditional gear-shaped cutter are caused by manufacturing and installation error of the cutter and result from the formation of each tooth of the wheel with a certain tool. This is not the case with gear shaping by step cutter since at that, the profiles of all gear teeth are formed by means of tooth profile mostly remote from the tool rotation axis. Analysis of occurrence of setting-up errors typical for the above gear shaping methods has been performed. At gear shaping with stepped cutter there are no setting-up error components. It was revealed that this fact causes the absence of errors in the tool position before its each double motion. The accuracy of diametrical sizes increases. Formation mechanism of tool installation errors and workpiece are also given and their analysis is presented. Findings in the field of gear shaping with stepped cutter comply with results of research carried out by the other authors in the field of traditional gear shaping.

  14. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers' vocabulary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Kristina; Torkildsen, Janne von Koss; Lindgren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds' (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24) ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development. PMID:25762957

  15. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers' vocabulary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Kristina; Torkildsen, Janne von Koss; Lindgren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds' (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24) ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development.

  16. Event-related potentials during word mapping to object shape predict toddlers’ vocabulary size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eBorgström

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available What role does attention to different object properties play in early vocabulary development? This longitudinal study using event-related potentials in combination with behavioral measures investigated 20- and 24-month-olds’ (n = 38; n = 34; overlapping n = 24 ability to use object shape and object part information in word-object mapping. The N400 component was used to measure semantic priming by images containing shape or detail information. At 20 months, the N400 to words primed by object shape varied in topography and amplitude depending on vocabulary size, and these differences predicted productive vocabulary size at 24 months. At 24 months, when most of the children had vocabularies of several hundred words, the relation between vocabulary size and the N400 effect in a shape context was weaker. Detached object parts did not function as word primes regardless of age or vocabulary size, although the part-objects were identified behaviorally. The behavioral measure, however, also showed relatively poor recognition of the part-objects compared to the shape-objects. These three findings provide new support for the link between shape recognition and early vocabulary development.

  17. Automated particle identification through regression analysis of size, shape and colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Luna, J. C.; Cooper, J. M.; Neale, S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Rapid point of care diagnostic tests and tests to provide therapeutic information are now available for a range of specific conditions from the measurement of blood glucose levels for diabetes to card agglutination tests for parasitic infections. Due to a lack of specificity these test are often then backed up by more conventional lab based diagnostic methods for example a card agglutination test may be carried out for a suspected parasitic infection in the field and if positive a blood sample can then be sent to a lab for confirmation. The eventual diagnosis is often achieved by microscopic examination of the sample. In this paper we propose a computerized vision system for aiding in the diagnostic process; this system used a novel particle recognition algorithm to improve specificity and speed during the diagnostic process. We will show the detection and classification of different types of cells in a diluted blood sample using regression analysis of their size, shape and colour. The first step is to define the objects to be tracked by a Gaussian Mixture Model for background subtraction and binary opening and closing for noise suppression. After subtracting the objects of interest from the background the next challenge is to predict if a given object belongs to a certain category or not. This is a classification problem, and the output of the algorithm is a Boolean value (true/false). As such the computer program should be able to "predict" with reasonable level of confidence if a given particle belongs to the kind we are looking for or not. We show the use of a binary logistic regression analysis with three continuous predictors: size, shape and color histogram. The results suggest this variables could be very useful in a logistic regression equation as they proved to have a relatively high predictive value on their own.

  18. Allometry and morphometrics of clypeal membrane size and shape in Nicrophorus (Coleoptera: Silphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormington, Jillian D; Luttbeg, Barney

    2017-12-01

    Contests between same-sex opponents over resources necessary for reproduction, as well interactions used to discern mate quality, often involve exaggerated traits wherein large individuals have disproportionately larger traits. This positive allometric scaling of weapons or signals facilitates communication during social interactions by accentuating body size differences between individuals. Typically, males carry these exaggerated traits, as males must compete over limited female gametes. However, in Nicrophorus beetles both males and females engage in physical contests over the vertebrate carcasses they need to provision and raise offspring. Male and female Nicrophorus beetles have extended clypeal membranes directly above their mandibles, which could serve as signals. We investigated the scaling relationships between clypeal membrane size and shape and body size for five species of North American burying beetle to determine whether clypeal membranes contain exaggerated body size information. We found that clypeal membranes for both sexes of all species scaled positively with body size (slope > 1). Three of the five species also displayed sexual dimorphism in aspects of clypeal membrane size and shape allometry despite lack of dimorphism in body size. In two dimorphic species, small male clypeal membranes were statistically indistinguishable from the female form. We conclude that colored clypeal membranes in Nicrophorus beetles do contain exaggerated body size information. Observed patterns of dimorphism suggest that males sometimes experience stronger selection on marking size and shape, which might be explained by life history differences among species. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Leaf N and P stoichiometry in relation to leaf shape and plant size for Quercus acutissima provenances across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jingyuan; Wang, G Geoff; Yu, Mukui; Wu, Tonggui

    2017-04-10

    Plant stoichiometry in relation to the structure and function of biological systems has been investigated at multiple scales. However, few studies have focused on the roles of stoichiometry for a given species. In this study, we determined leaf N and P stoichiometry, leaf shape and plant size in three Quercus acutissima common gardens with different climatic and site conditions. In the three common gardens, leaf N and P stoichiometry was significantly correlated with leaf shape and plant size, suggesting that leaf N and P stoichiometry affects the morphological performance of the leaves and stem. The scaling slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and leaf shape ranged from |0.12| to |1.00|, while the slopes of the relationships between leaf N and P stoichiometry and plant size ranged from |0.95| to |2.66|. These results suggest that non-functional tissues (stem) are more susceptible to leaf nutrition than functional tissues (leaves), and leaf stoichiometry is more important in the construction of non-functional tissues (stem). Between the northernmost and southernmost common gardens, leaf N and leaf width (W), N:P and stem height (H), and N:P and stem diameter (D) showed significant covariations, which indicates that leaf N and W, N:P and plant size exhibit similar plastic responses to environmental change.

  20. Prediction of bulk powder flow performance using comprehensive particle size and particle shape distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weili; Muteki, Koji; Zhang, Lin; Kim, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a modeling approach that can be used to predict bulk powder flowability of pharmaceutical materials from their particle size and shape distributions. To build and validate the model, 23 commonly used pharmaceutical excipients and 38 binary blends were fully characterized for their particle size and shape distributions. The particle size and shape of each sample was characterized by multiple descriptors to fully reflect their morphological characteristics. The flow properties of these materials were analyzed using the Schulze Ring Shear Tester at a fixed humidity condition. A partial least squares (PLS) approach was used to build the mathematical model. Several different modeling approaches were attempted and the best method was identified as using a combination of formulation composition and particle size and shape distributions of single-component powder systems. The PLS model was shown to provide excellent predictions of powder flow function coefficient (FFC) of up to approximately 20. The results also revealed that both particle size and shape play an important role in determining the powder flow behavior. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  1. Commercial reference shape standards use in the study of particle shape effect on laser diffraction particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Richard N; Kazanjian, Jacqueline

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of LGC Promochem AEA 1001 to AEA 1003 monosized fiber-analog shape standards in the study of the effect of particle shape on laser diffraction (LD) particle size analysis (psa). The psa of the AEA standards was conducted using LD psa systems from Beckman Coulter, Horiba, and Malvern Instruments. Flow speed settings, sample refractive index values, and sample cell types were varied to examine the extent to which the shape effect on LD psa results is modified by these variables. The volume and number probability plots resulting from these measurements were each characterized by a spread in the particle size distribution that roughly extended from the breadth to the longest dimension of the particles. For most of the selected sample refractive index values, the volume probability plots were characterized by apparent bimodal distributions. The results, therefore, provide experimental verification of the conclusions from theoretical studies of LD psa system response to monosized elliptical particles in which this apparent bimodality was the predicted result in the case of flow-oriented particles. The data support the findings from previous studies conducted over the past 10 years that have called into question the verity of the tenets of, and therefore the value of the application of, the equivalent spherical volume diameter theory and the random particle orientation model to the interpretation of LD psa results from measurements made on nonspherical particles.

  2. What determines a species' geographical range? Thermal biology and latitudinal range size relationships in European diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calosi, Piero; Bilton, David T; Spicer, John I; Votier, Stephen C; Atfield, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    1. The geographical range sizes of individual species vary considerably in extent, although the factors underlying this variation remain poorly understood, and could include a number of ecological and evolutionary processes. A favoured explanation for range size variation is that this result from differences in fundamental niche breadths, suggesting a key role for physiology in determining range size, although to date empirical tests of these ideas remain limited. 2. Here we explore relationships between thermal physiology and biogeography, whilst controlling for possible differences in dispersal ability and phylogenetic relatedness, across 14 ecologically similar congeners which differ in geographical range extent; European diving beetles of the genus Deronectes Sharp (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae). Absolute upper and lower temperature tolerance and acclimatory abilities are determined for populations of each species, following acclimation in the laboratory. 3. Absolute thermal tolerance range is the best predictor of both species' latitudinal range extent and position, differences in dispersal ability (based on wing size) apparently being less important in this group. In addition, species' northern and southern range limits are related to their tolerance of low and high temperatures respectively. In all cases, absolute temperature tolerances, rather than acclimatory abilities are the best predictors of range parameters, whilst the use of independent contrasts suggested that species' thermal acclimation abilities may also relate to biogeography, although increased acclimatory ability does not appear to be associated with increased range size. 4. Our study is the first to provide empirical support for a relationship between thermal physiology and range size variation in widespread and restricted species, conducted using the same experimental design, within a phylogenetically and ecologically controlled framework.

  3. Common Noctule Bats Are Sexually Dimorphic in Migratory Behaviour and Body Size but Not Wing Shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Teague O'Mara

    Full Text Available Within the large order of bats, sexual size dimorphism measured by forearm length and body mass is often female-biased. Several studies have explained this through the effects on load carrying during pregnancy, intrasexual competition, as well as the fecundity and thermoregulation advantages of increased female body size. We hypothesized that wing shape should differ along with size and be under variable selection pressure in a species where there are large differences in flight behaviour. We tested whether load carrying, sex differential migration, or reproductive advantages of large females affect size and wing shape dimorphism in the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula, in which females are typically larger than males and only females migrate long distances each year. We tested for univariate and multivariate size and shape dimorphism using data sets derived from wing photos and biometric data collected during pre-migratory spring captures in Switzerland. Females had forearms that are on average 1% longer than males and are 1% heavier than males after emerging from hibernation, but we found no sex differences in other size, shape, or other functional characters in any wing parameters during this pre-migratory period. Female-biased size dimorphism without wing shape differences indicates that reproductive advantages of big mothers are most likely responsible for sexual dimorphism in this species, not load compensation or shape differences favouring aerodynamic efficiency during pregnancy or migration. Despite large behavioural and ecological sex differences, morphology associated with a specialized feeding niche may limit potential dimorphism in narrow-winged bats such as common noctules and the dramatic differences in migratory behaviour may then be accomplished through plasticity in wing kinematics.

  4. Effect of size polydispersity versus particle shape in dense granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Emilien; Radjai, Farhang; Sornay, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the morphology of granular systems composed of frictionless pentagonal particles by varying systematically both the size span and particle shape irregularity, which represent two polydispersity parameters of the system. The microstructure is characterized in terms of various statistical descriptors such as global and local packing fractions, radial distribution functions, coordination number, and fraction of floating particles. We find that the packing fraction increases with the two parameters of polydispersity, but the effect of shape polydispersity for all the investigated structural properties is significant only at low size polydispersity where the positional and/or orientational ordering of the particles prevail. We focus in more detail on the class of side/side contacts, which is the interesting feature of our system as compared to a packing of disks. We show that the proportion of such contacts has weak dependence on the polydispersity parameters. The side- side contacts do not percolate but they define clusters of increasing size as a function of size polydispersity and decreasing size as a function of shape polydispersity. The clusters have anisotropic shapes but with a decreasing aspect ratio as polydispersity increases. This feature is argued to be a consequence of strong force chains (forces above the mean), which are mainly captured by side-side contacts. Finally, the force transmission is intrinsically multiscale, with a mean force increasing linearly with particle size.

  5. Optimum Shapes and Sizes on Torsion Behaviour of I-Beam with Web Opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De’nan F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical study on torsion behaviour of I-beam with web opening was carried out and presented in this paper. Optimum shapes and sizes which enhance the torsion behaviour of the I-beam with web opening as well as lead to economic design in terms of both manufacture and usage.Comparison is made between I-beam without web opening and I-beam with various shapes and sizes of web opening. Different types of finite elements model, sizes and types of web opening were used to investigate the effect of various shapes and sizes of web opening on the torsion behaviour. The results are expressed in terms of torsional rotation. It is concluded that I-beam without web opening has lower torsional resistance compared to that of I-beam with various shapes of web opening. Meanwhile, the model 2 is the optimum model compare to model 1.The size of opening has slightly effect on the torsional angles values. It was noted that the optimum web opening size is 0.5D due to the low values of the torsional angle values compared with 0.6D and 0.7D.

  6. Microscopic characterization of particle size and shape: an inexpensive and versatile method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, M E; Amidon, G E

    1992-07-01

    A variety of methods exists for measuring individual particle dimensions as a means of characterizing particle size, size distribution, and shape. The equipment described in this report belongs to the class of semiautomatic non-TV-interfaced analyzers. Unlike many existing image analysis systems, three-dimensional form measurements and texture data for the calculation of particle size and shape parameters can be determined easily and directly from each particle profile using this system. Essentially all data are collected directly from the particle and recorded by the computer with no intermediate steps. Much of the system consists of general-purpose and relatively inexpensive, commercially available hardware and software. Using this method, particle size, size distribution, and qualitative or quantitative shape information can easily and rapidly be obtained simultaneously. Particle length and width characterization, for example, can take less than 15 min. The equipment is versatile and flexible in measurements and calculations. The size and shape parameters to be measured are determined by the researcher and not the instrument. The ease with which this information can be obtained from small samples early in the development process makes it a valuable tool for the formulator.

  7. Evolution of the size and shape of 2D nanosheets during ultrasonic fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, Andrea; Kouroupis-Agalou, Konstantinos; Diez Betriu, Xavier; Kovtun, Alessandro; Treossi, Emanuele; Pugno, Nicola Maria; De Luca, Giovanna; Giorgini, Loris; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    2-dimensional (2D) nanosheets such as graphene, graphene oxide, boron nitride or transition metal dichalcogenides can be produced on a large scale by exfoliation techniques. The lateral shape of these 2D materials is typically considered random and irregular, and their average size is often estimated using techniques characterized by strong approximations or poor statistical significance. Here we measure in a quantitative, objective way the size and shape of 2D monoatomic nanosheets using a combination of optical, electronic and scanning probe techniques. We measure, one by one, the size and shape of thousands of sheets of graphene oxide as they undergo a standard ultrasonication treatment. Using automatic image processing and statistical modelling we identify two different fragmentation processes in 2D at the nanoscale, related to two populations of nanosheets described by gamma and exponential size distributions respectively. The two populations of sheets coexist during the fragmentation process, each one retaining its average size and shape. Our results explain the size reduction commonly observed in nanosheets upon sonication as an effect of changes in the respective weights of the two populations of nanosheets present in the material.

  8. Shear strength and microstructure of polydisperse packings: The effect of size span and shape of particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azéma, Emilien; Linero, Sandra; Estrada, Nicolas; Lizcano, Arcesio

    2017-08-01

    By means of extensive contact dynamics simulations, we analyzed the effect of particle size distribution (PSD) on the strength and microstructure of sheared granular materials composed of frictional disks. The PSDs are built by means of a normalized β function, which allows the systematic investigation of the effects of both, the size span (from almost monodisperse to highly polydisperse) and the shape of the PSD (from linear to pronouncedly curved). We show that the shear strength is independent of the size span, which substantiates previous results obtained for uniform distributions by packing fraction. Notably, the shear strength is also independent of the shape of the PSD, as shown previously for systems composed of frictionless disks. In contrast, the packing fraction increases with the size span, but decreases with more pronounced PSD curvature. At the microscale, we analyzed the connectivity and anisotropies of the contacts and forces networks. We show that the invariance of the shear strength with the PSD is due to a compensation mechanism which involves both geometrical sources of anisotropy. In particular, contact orientation anisotropy decreases with the size span and increases with PSD curvature, while the branch length anisotropy behaves inversely.

  9. Simultaneous Topology, Shape, and Sizing Optimisation of Plane Trusses with Adaptive Ground Finite Elements Using MOEAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norapat Noilublao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel integrated design strategy to accomplish simultaneous topology shape and sizing optimisation of a two-dimensional (2D truss. An optimisation problem is posed to find a structural topology, shape, and element sizes of the truss such that two objective functions, mass and compliance, are minimised. Design constraints include stress, buckling, and compliance. The procedure for an adaptive ground elements approach is proposed and its encoding/decoding process is detailed. Two sets of design variables defining truss layout, shape, and element sizes at the same time are applied. A number of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs are implemented to solve the design problem. Comparative performance based on a hypervolume indicator shows that multiobjective population-based incremental learning (PBIL is the best performer. Optimising three design variable types simultaneously is more efficient and effective.

  10. Geographic location and phylogeny are the main determinants of the size of the geographical range in aquatic beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abellán Pedro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Why some species are widespread while others are very restricted geographically is one of the most basic questions in biology, although it remains largely unanswered. This is particularly the case for groups of closely related species, which often display large differences in the size of the geographical range despite sharing many other factors due to their common phylogenetic inheritance. We used ten lineages of aquatic Coleoptera from the western Palearctic to test in a comparative framework a broad set of possible determinants of range size: species' age, differences in ecological tolerance, dispersal ability and geographic location. Results When all factors were combined in multiple regression models between 60-98% of the variance was explained by geographic location and phylogenetic signal. Maximum latitudinal and longitudinal limits were positively correlated with range size, with species at the most northern latitudes and eastern longitudes displaying the largest ranges. In lineages with lotic and lentic species, the lentic (better dispersers display larger distributional ranges than the lotic species (worse dispersers. The size of the geographical range was also positively correlated with the extent of the biomes in which the species is found, but we did not find evidence of a clear relationship between range size and age of the species. Conclusions Our findings show that range size of a species is shaped by an interplay of geographic and ecological factors, with a phylogenetic component affecting both of them. The understanding of the factors that determine the size and geographical location of the distributional range of species is fundamental to the study of the origin and assemblage of the current biota. Our results show that for this purpose the most relevant data may be the phylogenetic history of the species and its geographical location.

  11. Home ranges of Ishasha lions: size and location in relation to habitat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sizes of African lion home ranges vary widely but tend to correlate with characteristics of the prey populations (e.g. prey density and preferred prey weight). Lion home ranges should be expected to temporally fluctuate according to changes in prey biomass. Here we quantified and compared the home range sizes of ...

  12. Drop sizes and particle coverage in emulsions stabilised solely by silica nanoparticles of irregular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Parker, James; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-10-14

    We have investigated emulsions stabilised solely by partially-hydrophobised fumed silica particles which consist of a mixture of primary particles and irregularly-shaped fused aggregates and larger agglomerates. The particle wettability is controlled by varying the extent of hydrophobisation of their surfaces. This, in turn, controls the contact angle between the oil-water interface and the particle surface (θ(ow)) which affects the particle adsorption energy and the type of emulsion formed (oil-in-water, o/w or water-in-oil, w/o). Progressive particle hydrophobisation causes transitional phase inversion of the emulsions from o/w to w/o which occurs when θ(ow) = 90° and the energy of particle adsorption to the oil-water interface is maximally favourable. The key problem addressed here is to understand why the emulsion drop size passes through a minimum at the point of emulsion phase inversion. In principle, this effect could be the result of particle desorption, changes in the extent of close-packing of the adsorbed particle film (at constant particle orientation), particle re-orientation or a combination of these processes. Using measurements of emulsion drop size and the extent of particle desorption, we have derived adsorbed particle surface concentrations as a function of the energy of desorption of the particles from the oil-water interface for a range of particle concentrations and different oil-water systems. The main conclusion is that the minimum in emulsion drop size through phase inversion is mainly caused by re-orientation of the particles from a high surface area orientation when the energy of desorption is high to a low surface area orientation when the energy of desorption is low. Some particle desorption occurs but this is a secondary effect.

  13. Prediction of granule packing and flow behavior based on particle size and shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Niklas; Wilson, David

    2010-02-01

    Packing behavior and flowability of particulate material have long been acknowledged as important parameters for the processing of pharmaceutical materials. When properly understood, these properties can provide insight into weight uniformity, tableting performance and process design. The aim of this study was to measure particle size and shape distributions of different granular intermediates with a dynamic particle size image analyzer, and then use these distributions to predict packing efficiency and different metrics of flowability by employing partial least squares (PLS) modeling. From measurements of size and shape, a model was constructed that allowed for the prediction of flowability indices, bulk and tap densities with a high degree of accuracy for the granular materials used. In this study the use of size and shape distributions in the construction of a model providing both accurate flowability indices and bulk and tap density estimates has been demonstrated for example granular materials in which cohesive forces did not dominate powder behavior. It is believed that the continued application of the outlined experimental design would eventually lead to the fundamental understanding of how size and shape characteristics of materials influence particle behavior including downstream processibility. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as a structure with at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm, have the potential to be used in a variety of consumer products due to their improved functionality compared to similar particles of larger size. Their small size is associated with increased strength, improved catalytic properties, and increased reactivity; however, their size is also associated with increased toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Numerous toxicological studies have been conducted to determine the properties of nanomaterials that increase their toxicity in order to manufacture new nanomaterials with decreased toxicity. Data indicates that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can dramatically alter their toxicity profile. Therefore, the purpose of this dissertation was to determine how altering the shape, size, and chemical composition of various metal oxide nanoparticles would affect their toxicity. Metal oxides are used in variety of consumer products, from spray-sun screens, to food coloring agents; thus, understanding the toxicity of metal oxides and determining which aspects affect their toxicity may provide safe alternatives nanomaterials for continued use in manufacturing. Tungstate nanoparticles toxicity was assessed in an in vitro model using RAW 264.7 cells. The size, shape, and chemical composition of these nanomaterials were altered and the effect on reactive oxygen species and general cytotoxicity was determined using a variety of techniques. Results demonstrate that shape was important in reactive oxygen species production as wires were able to induce significant reactive oxygen species compared to spheres. Shape, size, and chemical composition did not have much effect on the overall toxicity of these nanoparticles in RAW 264.7 cells over a 72 hour time course, implicating that the base material of the nanoparticles was not toxic in these cells. To further assess how chemical composition can affect toxicity

  15. Study of identification of geometrically shaped solids using colour and range information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebihara, Kenichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-05-01

    This report is the revision of the Technical Report (MECSE 1996-7) of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia which has been distributed to the Department Library in this University. The main work which is described in this report was carried out at Intelligent Robotics Research Center (IRRC) in the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering of Monash University from March in 1995 to March in 1996 and was be supported by a grant from Research Development Corporation of Japan (JRDC). This report describes the study of identification of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour using colour and range information. This study aims at recognition of equipment in nuclear plants. For this purpose, it is hypothesized that equipment in nuclear plants can be represented by combination of geometrically shaped solids with unique colour, such as a sphere, an ellipsoid, a cone, a cylinder, a rectangular solid and a pyramid. In this report, the colour image of geometrically shaped solids could be segmented comparatively easily and effectively into regions of each solid by using colour and range information. The range data of each solid was extracted using the segmented colour image. Thus the extracted range data could be classified into a plane surface or a curved surface by checking its spatial distribution. (author)

  16. Process Design by FEM Simulation for Shape Ring Rolling of Large-Sized Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Lee, M. W.; Park, S. S.; Lee, I.; Moon, Y. H.

    2010-06-01

    Ring rolling process is usually used to fabricate large-sized ring, such as, tower flange for wind power electric generator. Many kinds of seamless ring are used in wind power electric generator and manufactured by ring rolling process. In general, final part is machined after forming with shape of plain square section. Since interests for near net shaping of seamless ring have been increased gradually because of green energy, it is necessary to develop the technology for shape ring rolling with respect to the market demands and cost. Therefore, we studied the process and die design for shape ring rolling of large sized ring over 3,500 mm out diameter by experiment and FEM simulation. Ring rolling process is very difficult to solve by FEM method because of equilibrium state and size effect, etc. Moreover, shape ring rolling is more difficult to solve the problem that two plastic deformation zones are different each other, that is main roll and conical roll. Also since conical roll has a shape, deformation velocity field is very much complex and the deformed section passed axial roll is different section and velocity field. The FE simulations are performed to analyze process variables affected in forming of profiled ring. Therefore, the main features of used FE model are: (1) it adopts a transient or unsteady state full ring mesh to model the deformation processes and shape development; (2) the mandrel and conical rolls are modeled using coupled heat-transfer elements; (3) the model involves the full process from blank through perform to final profiled ring. From these calculated results, we have proposed the mechanisms of various tools, such as mandrel and conical roll. The calculated results are compared experimental results. Calculated results can predict the tilting of profiled ring and then process variables to form large sized ring.

  17. Control of shape and size of polymer nanoparticles aggregates in a single-step microcontinuous flow process: a case of flower and spherical shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visaveliya, Nikunjkumar; Köhler, J Michael

    2014-10-21

    Controlled aggregation of polymer nanoparticles for building anisotropic nano- and microstructures via a self-assembling bottom-up process is an important strategy. Therefore, in this work, the formation of structured poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles with diameters between lower micrometer and submicrometer range by use of a microcontinuous flow arrangement was investigated in the presence of nonionic water-soluble polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The investigations show that the microreaction strategy is well applicable and allows a tuning of size and shape of nanoparticles in dependence on reactant concentrations and flow rate ratios. Larger and complex structured polymer particles have been found at lower PVP concentration, whereas more compact submicron-sized particles were formed at higher PVP concentrations. The addition of ionic surfactants modulates the generation of characteristic particle shapes. The observation of intermediate states between complex flowerlike particles and simple spheres in dependence on the applied concentration of low molecular weight surfactants supports the explanation of particle formation by a mechanism with superposition of particle growth and assembling. When mixed surfactants (PVP-SDS or PVP-CTAB) are used, the final particles shape depends on the concentration of individual concentrations of surfactants and on the competition between mobility, solvation, and micelle formations.

  18. Habitat area and climate stability determine geographical variation in plant species range sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morueta-Holme, Naia; Enquist, Brian J.; McGill, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being a fundamental aspect of biodiversity, little is known about what controls species range sizes. This is especially the case for hyperdiverse organisms such as plants. We use the largest botanical data set assembled to date to quantify geographical variation in range size for ~85,000 ...... concerns over the potential effects of future climate change and habitat loss on biodiversity.......Despite being a fundamental aspect of biodiversity, little is known about what controls species range sizes. This is especially the case for hyperdiverse organisms such as plants. We use the largest botanical data set assembled to date to quantify geographical variation in range size for ~85...

  19. The effects of particle shape and size on T2 relaxation in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Joseph N; Albanese, Christopher; Rodriguez, Olga; Le, Yi-Chien; Ackun-Farmmer, Marian; Van Keuren, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have recently been developed as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Here we report the dependence of the phase relaxivity, r2, on the particle shape. We show that the size dependence of the relaxivity for spherical particles can be generalized to spheroidal particles. In addition, we show that the saturation of relaxivity above a certain size observed in spherical particles does not occur in the spheroidal particles investigated.

  20. Speciation in little: the role of range and body size in the diversification of Malagasy mantellid frogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vences Miguel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate and mode of lineage diversification might be shaped by clade-specific traits. In Madagascar, many groups of organisms are characterized by tiny distribution ranges and small body sizes, and this high degree of microendemism and miniaturization parallels a high species diversity in some of these groups. We here investigate the geographic patterns characterizing the radiation of the frog family Mantellidae that is virtually endemic to Madagascar. We integrate a newly reconstructed near-complete species-level timetree of the Mantellidae with georeferenced distribution records and maximum male body size data to infer the influence of these life-history traits on each other and on mantellid diversification. Results We reconstructed a molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA for 257 species and candidate species of the mantellid frog radiation. Based on this phylogeny we identified 53 well-supported pairs of sister species that we used for phylogenetic comparative analyses, along with whole tree-based phylogenetic comparative methods. Sister species within the Mantellidae diverged at 0.2-14.4 million years ago and more recently diverged sister species had geographical range centroids more proximate to each other, independently of their current sympatric or allopatric occurrence. The largest number of sister species pairs had non-overlapping ranges, but several examples of young microendemic sister species occurring in full sympatry suggest the possibility of non-allopatric speciation. Range sizes of species included in the sister species comparisons increased with evolutionary age, as did range size differences between sister species, which rejects peripatric speciation. For the majority of mantellid sister species and the whole mantellid radiation, range and body sizes were associated with each other and small body sizes were linked to higher mitochondrial nucleotide substitution rates and higher clade

  1. Band gap dependence of semiconducting nano-wires on cross-sectional shape and size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Neha; Joshi, Deepika P.

    2017-12-01

    Applicability of three different thermodynamic models based on classical (Qi model) as well as quantum approach (Lu et al. and Jiang et al. models) have been discussed to search out the exact description of band gap variation with size in semiconducting nanowires. All considered models showed an increment in the band gap as diametric size of the wire decreases. To study band gap and the band edge shift of nanowires, a novel approach has been proposed by incorporating shape effect with size in Jiang et al. model due to its accuracy or consistency with the experimental results. Hence a unified model without any adjustable parameter has been established for studying the combined effect of size and shape on band edges shift [ΔEc (D), ΔEv (D)] and the band gap expansion [ΔEG (D)] of the semiconducting nanowires. Present study reveals that for small-sized nanowires band gap expansion and edge shift is not only governed by size but also varies with the cross-sectional shape. Band gap expansion and edge shift showed rising behavior due to the enhancement in surface area.

  2. Brassinosteroid Regulates Seed Size and Shape in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Bo; Huang, Hui-Ya; Hu, Yu-Wei; Zhu, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Seed development is important for agriculture productivity. We demonstrate that brassinosteroid (BR) plays crucial roles in determining the size, mass, and shape of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. The seeds of the BR-deficient mutant de-etiolated2 (det2) are smaller and less elongated than those of wild-type plants due to a decreased seed cavity, reduced endosperm volume, and integument cell length. The det2 mutant also showed delay in embryo development, with reduction in both the size and number of embryo cells. Pollination of det2 flowers with wild-type pollen yielded seeds of normal size but still shortened shape, indicating that the BR produced by the zygotic embryo and endosperm is sufficient for increasing seed volume but not for seed elongation, which apparently requires BR produced from maternal tissues. BR activates expression of SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1, MINISEED3, and HAIKU2, which are known positive regulators of seed size, but represses APETALA2 and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2, which are negative regulators of seed size. These genes are bound in vivo by the BR-activated transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1), and they are known to influence specific processes of integument, endosperm, and embryo development. Our results demonstrate that BR regulates seed size and seed shape by transcriptionally modulating specific seed developmental pathways. PMID:23771896

  3. Separation of plastics by froth flotation. The role of size, shape and density of the particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2017-02-01

    Over the last few years, new methods for plastic separation in mining have been developed. Froth flotation is one of these techniques, which is based on hydrophobicity differences between particles. Unlike minerals, most of the plastics are naturally hydrophobic, thus requiring the addition of chemicals that promote the selective wettability of one of its components, for a flotation separation. The floatability of six granulated post-consumer plastic - Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D) - in the presence of tannic acid (wetting agent), and the performance of the flotation separation of five bi-component plastic mixtures - PS/PMMA, PS/PET-S, PS/PET-D, PS/PVC-M and PS/PVC-D - were evaluated. Moreover, the effect of the contact angle, density, size and shape of the particles was also analysed. Results showed that all plastics were naturally hydrophobic, with PS exhibiting the highest floatability. The contact angle and the flotation recovery of six plastics decreased with increasing tannic acid concentration, occurring depression of plastics at very low concentrations. Floatability differed also with the size and shape of plastic particles. For regular-shaped plastics (PS, PMMA and PVC-D) floatability decreased with the increase of particle size, while for lamellar-shaped particles (PET-D) floatability was slightly greater for coarser particles. Thus, plastic particles with small size, lamellar shape and low density present a greater floatability. The quality of separation varied with the mixture type, depending not only on the plastics hydrophobicity, but also on the size, density and shape of the particles, i.e. the particle weight. Flotation separation of plastics can be enhanced by differences in hydrophobicity. In addition, flotation separation improves if the most hydrophobic plastic, that floats, has a lamellar shape and lower density and if the most hydrophilic

  4. Biofilter media gas pressure loss as related to media particle size and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe G.; Røjgaard Andreasen, Rune

    2013-01-01

    and shape on the V - ΔP relationship. V - ΔP measurements were performed using three commercially available materials with different particle shapes: crushed granite (very angular particles), gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and Leca® (almost spherical particles). A total of 21 different...... containing smaller particles. A new model concept for estimating V - ΔP across different particle size fractions and shapes was proposed. This model yielded improved prediction accuracy in comparison with existing prediction approaches.......Pressure loss (ΔP) is a key parameter for estimating biofilter energy consumption. Accurate predictions of ΔP as a function of air velocity (V) are therefore essential, to assess energy consumption and minimize operation costs. This paper investigates the combined impact of medium particle size...

  5. Lower Bounds on Q for Finite Size Antennas of Arbitrary Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of the lower bound on the radiation Q for an arbitrarily shaped finite size antenna of non-zero volume is formulated in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic currents densities distributed on a closed surface coinciding with antenna exterior surface. When these equivalent currents...

  6. General classification of maturation reaction-norm shape from size-based processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2011-01-01

    for growth and mortality is based on processes at the level of the individual, and is motivated by the energy budget of fish. MRN shape is a balance between opposing factors and depends on subtle details of size dependence of growth and mortality. MRNs with both positive and negative slopes are predicted...

  7. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  8. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models…

  9. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautz, Brian S; Wong, Bob B M; Peters, Richard A; Jennions, Michael D

    2013-04-23

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male's relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. Here we show, based upon female assessment of digitally projected life-size, computer-generated images, that penis size interacts with body shape and height to determine male sexual attractiveness. Positive linear selection was detected for penis size, but the marginal increase in attractiveness eventually declined with greater penis size (i.e., quadratic selection). Penis size had a stronger effect on attractiveness in taller men than in shorter men. There was a similar increase in the positive effect of penis size on attractiveness with a more masculine body shape (i.e., greater shoulder-to-hip ratio). Surprisingly, larger penis size and greater height had almost equivalent positive effects on male attractiveness. Our results support the hypothesis that female mate choice could have driven the evolution of larger penises in humans. More broadly, our results show that precopulatory sexual selection can play a role in the evolution of genital traits.

  10. Performance of diethylene glycol-based particle counters in the sub-3 nm size range

    CERN Document Server

    Wimmer, D; Franchin, A; Kangasluoma, J; Kreissl, F; Kürten, A; Kupc, A; Metzger, A; Mikkilä, J; Petäjä, J; Riccobono, F; Vanhanen, J; Kulmala, M; Curtius, J

    2013-01-01

    When studying new particle formation, the uncertainty in determining the "true" nucleation rate is considerably reduced when using condensation particle counters (CPCs) capable of measuring concentrations of aerosol particles at sizes close to or even at the critical cluster size (1–2 nm). Recently, CPCs able to reliably detect particles below 2 nm in size and even close to 1 nm became available. Using these instruments, the corrections needed for calculating nucleation rates are substantially reduced compared to scaling the observed formation rate to the nucleation rate at the critical cluster size. However, this improved instrumentation requires a careful characterization of their cut-off size and the shape of the detection efficiency curve because relatively small shifts in the cut-off size can translate into larger relative errors when measuring particles close to the cut-off size. Here we describe the development of two continuous-flow CPCs using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid. The desig...

  11. Sex differences in spatial ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order Carnivora

    OpenAIRE

    Perdue, Bonnie M.; Snyder, Rebecca J.; Zhihe, Zhang; Marr, M. Jackson; Maple, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in spatial cognition have been reported for many species ranging from voles to humans. The range size hypothesis predicts that sex differences in spatial ability will only occur in species in which the mating system selects for differential range size. Consistent with this prediction, we observed sex differences in spatial ability in giant pandas, a promiscuous species in which males inhabit larger ranges than females, but did not observe sex differences in Asian small-clawed ...

  12. Shape--but not size--codivergence between male and female copulatory structures in Onthophagus beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L M Macagno

    Full Text Available Genitalia are among the fastest evolving morphological traits in arthropods. Among the many hypotheses aimed at explaining this observation, some explicitly or implicitly predict concomitant male and female changes of genital traits that interact during copulation (i.e., lock and key, sexual conflict, cryptic female choice and pleiotropy. Testing these hypotheses requires insights into whether male and female copulatory structures that physically interact during mating also affect each other's evolution and patterns of diversification. Here we compare and contrast size and shape evolution of male and female structures that are known to interact tightly during copulation using two model systems: (a the sister species O. taurus (1 native, 3 recently established populations and O. illyricus, and (b the species-complex O. fracticornis-similis-opacicollis. Partial Least Squares analyses indicated very little to no correlation between size and shape of copulatory structures, both in males and females. Accordingly, comparing shape and size diversification patterns of genitalia within each sex showed that the two components diversify readily--though largely independently of each other--within and between species. Similarly, comparing patterns of divergence across sexes showed that relative sizes of male and female copulatory organs diversify largely independent of each other. However, performing this analysis for genital shape revealed a signature of parallel divergence. Our results therefore suggest that male and female copulatory structures that are linked mechanically during copulation may diverge in concert with respect to their shapes. Furthermore, our results suggest that genital divergence in general, and co-divergence of male and female genital shape in particular, can evolve over an extraordinarily short time frame. Results are discussed in the framework of the hypotheses that assume or predict concomitant evolutionary changes in male and

  13. Particle size, shape and activity for photocatalysis on titania anatase nanoparticles in aqueous surroundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye-Fei; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2011-10-05

    TiO(2) nanoparticles have been widely utilized in photocatalysis, but the atomic level understanding on their working mechanism falls much short of expectations. In particular, the correlation between the particle structure and the photocatalytic activity is not established yet, although it was observed that the activity is sensitive to the particle size and shape. This work, by investigating a series of TiO(2) anatase nanoparticles with different size and shape as the photocatalyst for water oxidation, correlates quantitatively the particle size and shape with the photocatalytic activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the periodic continuum solvation model have been utilized to compute the electronic structure of nanoparticles in aqueous solution and provide the reaction energetics for the key elementary reaction. We demonstrate that the equilibrium shape of nanoparticle is sensitive to its size from 1 to 30 nm, and the sharp crystals possess much higher activity than the flat crystals in OER, which in combination lead to the morphology dependence of photocatalytic activity. The conventionally regarded quantum size effect is excluded as the major cause. The physical origin for the shape-activity relationship is identified to be the unique spatial separation/localization of the frontier orbitals in the sharp nanoparticles, which benefits the adsorption of the key reaction intermediate (i.e., OH) in OER on the exposed five-coordinated Ti of {101} facet. The theoretical results here provide a firm basis for maximizing photocatalytic activity via nanostructure engineering and are also of significance for understanding photocatalysis on nanomaterials in general.

  14. Effect of resin-composite filler particle size and shape on shrinkage-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D; Maisuria, Amit; Vogel, Karin; Watts, David C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of variations in filler particle size and shape on the polymerization shrinkage-stress kinetics of resin-composites. A model series of 12 VLC resin-composites were studied. The particulate dispersed phase volume fraction was 56.7%: these filler particles were systematically graded in size, and further were either spherical or irregular. A Bioman instrument (cantilever beam method) was employed to determine the shrinkage-stress kinetics following 40s irradiation (600 mW/cm(2)) at 23°C (n=3). All data were captured for 60 min and the final shrinkage-stress calculated. Shrinkage-stress varied between 3.86 MPa (SD 0.14) for S3 (spherical filler particles of 500 nm) and 8.44 MPa (SD 0.41) for I1 (irregular filler particles of 450 nm). The shrinkage-stress values were generally lower for those composites with spherical filler particles than those with irregular filler particles. The differences in shrinkage-stress with filler particle size and shape were statistically significant (pparticles exhibit lower shrinkage-stress values compared to those with irregular filler particles. Shrinkage-stress and shrinkage-stress rate vary in a complex manner with variations in the size of the dispersed phase particles: a hypothesized explanation for the effect of filler particle size and shape is presented. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent Evolution in Rattus norvegicus Is Shaped by Declining Effective Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinum, Eva E; Halligan, Daniel L; Ness, Rob W; Zhang, Yao-Hua; Cong, Lin; Zhang, Jian-Xu; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    The brown rat, Rattus norvegicus, is both a notorious pest and a frequently used model in biomedical research. By analyzing genome sequences of 12 wild-caught brown rats from their presumed ancestral range in NE China, along with the sequence of a black rat, Rattus rattus, we investigate the selective and demographic forces shaping variation in the genome. We estimate that the recent effective population size (Ne) of this species = [Formula: see text], based on silent site diversity. We compare patterns of diversity in these genomes with patterns in multiple genome sequences of the house mouse (Mus musculus castaneus), which has a much larger Ne. This reveals an important role for variation in the strength of genetic drift in mammalian genome evolution. By a Pairwise Sequentially Markovian Coalescent analysis of demographic history, we infer that there has been a recent population size bottleneck in wild rats, which we date to approximately 20,000 years ago. Consistent with this, wild rat populations have experienced an increased flux of mildly deleterious mutations, which segregate at higher frequencies in protein-coding genes and conserved noncoding elements. This leads to negative estimates of the rate of adaptive evolution (α) in proteins and conserved noncoding elements, a result which we discuss in relation to the strongly positive estimates observed in wild house mice. As a consequence of the population bottleneck, wild rats also show a markedly slower decay of linkage disequilibrium with physical distance than wild house mice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. On computational approaches for size-and-shape distributions from sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation has become a very popular technique to study size distributions and interactions of macromolecules. Recently, a method termed two-dimensional spectrum analysis (2DSA) for the determination of size-and-shape distributions was described by Demeler and colleagues (Eur Biophys J 2009). It is based on novel ideas conceived for fitting the integral equations of the size-and-shape distribution to experimental data, illustrated with an example but provided without proof of the principle of the algorithm. In the present work, we examine the 2DSA algorithm by comparison with the mathematical reference frame and simple well-known numerical concepts for solving Fredholm integral equations, and test the key assumptions underlying the 2DSA method in an example application. While the 2DSA appears computationally excessively wasteful, key elements also appear to be in conflict with mathematical results. This raises doubts about the correctness of the results from 2DSA analysis.

  17. Size, shape and temperature dependent surface energy of binary alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbareh, Mohammad Amin

    2017-12-01

    Surface energy has an important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles. Even though, extensive research has been done on the surface energy of pure nanoparticles, the surface energy of alloy nanoparticles has not been considered enough. In this work, based on the liquid drop model for surface energy of pure nanoparticles and Butler's equation, a model for size dependent surface energy of alloy nanoparticles has been developed. In addition to size and concentration, the model can describe the effects of shape and temperature on surface energy of alloy nanoparticles. Cu - Ag and Cu - Au systems have been studied as two examples and the results have been compared with other theoretical models and available simulated data. Reasonable agreements between the results were observed. The results show that the decreasing particle size decreases surface energy of alloy nanoparticles but decreasing temperature and shape factor increases the value of surface energy.

  18. Free-Ranging Farm Cats: Home Range Size and Predation on a Livestock Unit In Northwest Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E.; Caires, Kyle C.; Bohannon, Lisa A.; Parsons, Elizabeth I.; Hilburn, Katharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  19. Size and shape effect of specimen on the compressive strength of HPLWFC reinforced with glass fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jihad Hamad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available High performance lightweight foamed concrete (HPLWFC have a structural strength with low density and high flowability. HPLWFC is used in modern concrete technology and extensively in the construction applications of high-rise buildings, long-span concrete structures and road sub-bases among others. This present work investigated the effect of size and shape specimen on the compressive strength of HPLWFC reinforced with glass fibres. Foam agent (organic material was used to obtain lightweight concrete. The volume fractions of the glass fibres used were: 0.0%, 0.06%, 0.2%, 0.4%, and 0.6% by total volume of concrete. The fresh properties of HPLWFC were measured by flowability and fresh density tests. In this study, the size and shape of specimens used for compressive strength were cubes by size (150 × 150 × 150, 100 × 100 × 100 and 50 × 50 × 50 mm and cylinders by size (150 × 300 and 100 × 200 mm. The results of HPLWFC mixes showed the increase in the compressive strength for all sizes of specimens with glass fibre content. The small size of specimens gave higher compressive strength in comparison with other sizes. The disparity in the compressive strength for two sizes and shapes (cubes and cylinders were reduced with a rise in the volume fraction of the glass fibres.

  20. [MORF method for assessment of the size and shape of UHMWPE wear microparticles and nanoparticles in periprosthetic tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulín, P; Pokorný, D; Slouf, M; Lapčíková, M; Pavlova, E; Zolotarevová, E

    2011-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of total joint replacement (TJR) due to wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is regarded as one of the major problems in the field of arthroplasty. This work describes a newly developed method, called MORF, which completely describes the morphology of UHMWPE wear particles. The differences in wear particle morphology may help to elucidate individual differences in TJR failures. During the years 2002-2010, a set of 47 typical damaged periprosthetic tissues, coming from 16 TJR revisions, was collected. Isolated on polycarbonate (PC) filters were quantified. Quantification of the particles consisted in determination of their concentration and description of their morphology by means of the newly developed MORF method. Firstly, the micrographs of isolated UHMWPE particles were obtained with a scanning electron microscope (Quanta 200 FEG; FEI) at two magnifications: x1200 and x6000. Secondly, both high- and low-magnification micrographs were processed by a standard image analysis software (program NIS Elements; Laboratory Imaging) in order to obtain basic morphological descriptors. Finally, the results from image analysis of high- and low- magnification micrographs were combined by means of our own program MDISTR in order to obtain correct particle sizes and shapes. In the first stage, the method was applied to 25 samples and yielded an average particle size of 0.51 µm. In the second stage, the method was further improved in order to calculate not only the size of particles but also the shape of descriptors. The improved method was applied to eight samples and gave an average size of particles (equivalent diameter, D) in the range of 0.27 - 0.60 µm, circularity (C) of 0.66-0.85 and elongation (E) of 1.75-1.79, suggesting that the great majority of particles were approximately spherical. Finally, in the third stage, the MORF method was applied to two exceptional samples which contained extremely small wear particles (D = 18.5 nm

  1. Survival and home-range size of Northern Spotted Owls in southwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Jason W.; Dugger, Katie M.; Anthony, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    In the Klamath province of southwestern Oregon, Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) occur in complex, productive forests that historically supported frequent fires of variable severity. However, little is known about the relationships between Spotted Owl survival and home-range size and the characteristics of fire-prone, mixed-conifer forests of the Klamath province. Thus, the objectives of this study were to estimate monthly survival rates and home-range size in relation to habitat characteristics for Northern Spotted Owls in southwestern Oregon. Home-range size and survival of 15 Northern Spotted Owls was monitored using radiotelemetry in the Ashland Ranger District of the Rogue River–Siskiyou National Forest from September 2006 to October 2008. Habitat classes within Spotted Owl home ranges were characterized using a remote-sensed vegetation map of the study area. Estimates of monthly survival ranged from 0.89 to 1.0 and were positively correlated with the number of late-seral habitat patches and the amount of edge, and negatively correlated with the mean nearest neighbor distance between late-seral habitats. Annual home-range size varied from to 189 to 894 ha ( x =  576; SE  =  75), with little difference between breeding and nonbreeding home ranges. Breeding-season home-range size increased with the amount of hard edge, and the amount of old and mature forest combined. Core area, annual and nonbreeding season home-range sizes all increased with increased amounts of hard edge, suggesting that increased fragmentation is associated with larger core and home-range sizes. Although no effect of the amount of late-seral stage forest on either survival or home-range size was detected, these results are the first to concurrently demonstrate increased forest fragmentation with decreased survival and increased home-range size of Northern Spotted Owls.

  2. Causes and consequences of range size variation: the influence of traits, speciation, and extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Vamosi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous variation in species richness observed among related clades across the tree of life has long caught the imagination of biologists. Recently, there has been growing attention paid to the possible contribution of range size variation, either alone or in combination with putative key innovations, to these patterns. Here, we review three related topics relevant to range size evolution, speciation, and extinction. First, we provide a brief overview of the debate surrounding patterns and mechanisms for phylogenetic signal in range size. Second, we discuss some recent findings regarding the joint influence of traits and range size on diversification. Finally, we present the preliminary results of a study investigating whether range size is negatively correlated with contemporary extinction risk in flowering plants.

  3. Shape and size controlled synthesis of Au nanorods: H{sub 2}S gas-sensing characterizations and antibacterial application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanh, Le Thi [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Hoa, Tran Thai, E-mail: trthaihoa@yahoo.com [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Cuong, Nguyen Duc [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism, Hue University, 22 Lam Hoang, Hue City (Viet Nam); Khieu, Dinh Quang [College of Sciences, Hue University, 77 Nguyen Hue, Hue City (Viet Nam); Quang, Duong Tuan [College of Education, Hue University, 34 Le Loi, Hue City (Viet Nam); Van Duy, Nguyen; Hoa, Nguyen Duc [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Van Hieu, Nguyen, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-06-25

    Highlights: • We have demonstrated a facile method to prepare colloid Au nanorods. • The size and shape of Au nanorods can be controlled via seed-mediated growth method. • The H{sub 2}S gas-sensing properties have been investigated. • The antibacterial application has been conducted. - Abstract: Controlling their size and shape is one of the important issues in the fundamental study and application of colloidal metal nanoparticles. In the current study, different sizes and shapes of Au nanorods were fabricated using a seed-mediated growth method. Material characterization by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the obtained products were made of single-crystal Au nanorods with an average diameter and length of 10 nm and 40 nm, respectively. The Au nanorod-based sensor exhibited significantly high sensitivity and fast response/recovery time to low concentrations (2.5–10 ppm) of H{sub 2}S at temperatures ranging from 300 °C to 400 °C. Additionally, they exhibited antibacterial effect at low concentration. These results suggested that the fabricated Au nanorods have excellent potential for practical application in air pollution monitoring and biomedicine.

  4. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Elucidating Complicated Assembling Systems in Biology Using Size-and-Shape Analysis of Sedimentation Velocity Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaton, Catherine T; Herr, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (SV-AUC) has seen a resurgence in popularity as a technique for characterizing macromolecules and complexes in solution. SV-AUC is a particularly powerful tool for studying protein conformation, complex stoichiometry, and interacting systems in general. Deconvoluting velocity data to determine a sedimentation coefficient distribution c(s) allows for the study of either individual proteins or multicomponent mixtures. The standard c(s) approach estimates molar masses of the sedimenting species based on determination of the frictional ratio (f/f0) from boundary shapes. The frictional ratio in this case is a weight-averaged parameter, which can lead to distortion of mass estimates and loss of information when attempting to analyze mixtures of macromolecules with different shapes. A two-dimensional extension of the c(s) analysis approach provides size-and-shape distributions that describe the data in terms of a sedimentation coefficient and frictional ratio grid. This allows for better resolution of species with very distinct shapes that may co-sediment and provides better molar mass determinations for multicomponent mixtures. An example case is illustrated using globular and nonglobular proteins of different masses with nearly identical sedimentation coefficients that could only be resolved using the size-and-shape distribution. Other applications of this analytical approach to complex biological systems are presented, focusing on proteins involved in the innate immune response to cytosolic microbial DNA. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Size Variation under Domestication: Conservatism in the inner ear shape of wolves, dogs and dingoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Anita V; Lebrun, Renaud; Wilson, Laura A B; Costeur, Loïc; Schmelzle, Thomas; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2017-10-17

    A broad sample of wolves, dingoes, and domesticated dogs of different kinds and time periods was used to identify changes in size and shape of the organs of balance and hearing related to domestication and to evaluate the potential utility of uncovered patterns as markers of domestication. Using geometric morphometrics coupled with non-invasive imaging and three-dimensional reconstructions, we exposed and compared complex structures that remain largely conserved. There is no statistically significant difference in the levels of shape variation between prehistoric and modern dogs. Shape variance is slightly higher for the different components of the inner ear in modern dogs than in wolves, but these differences are not significant. Wolves express a significantly greater level of variance in the angle between the lateral and the posterior canal than domestic dog breeds. Wolves have smaller levels of size variation than dogs. In terms of the shape of the semicircular canals, dingoes reflect the mean shape in the context of variation in the sample. This mirrors the condition of feral forms in other organs, in which there is an incomplete return to the characteristics of the ancestor. In general, morphological diversity or disparity in the inner ear is generated by scaling.

  7. Toward Understanding the Size Dependence of Shape Features for Predicting Spiculation in Lung Nodules for Computer-Aided Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Ron; Raicu, Daniela Stan; Furst, Jacob; Armato, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the importance of shape features for predicting spiculation ratings assigned by radiologists to lung nodules in computed tomography (CT) scans. Using the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) data and classification models based on decision trees, we demonstrate that the importance of several shape features increases disproportionately relative to other image features with increasing size of the nodule. Our shaped-based classification results show an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.65 when classifying spiculation for small nodules and an area of 0.91 for large nodules, resulting in a 26% difference in classification performance using shape features. An analysis of the results illustrates that this change in performance is driven by features that measure boundary complexity, which perform well for large nodules but perform relatively poorly and do no better than other features for small nodules. For large nodules, the roughness of the segmented boundary maps well to the semantic concept of spiculation. For small nodules, measuring directly the complexity of hard segmentations does not yield good results for predicting spiculation due to limits imposed by spatial resolution and the uncertainty in boundary location. Therefore, a wider range of features, including shape, texture, and intensity features, are needed to predict spiculation ratings for small nodules. A further implication is that the efficacy of shape features for a particular classifier used to create computer-aided diagnosis systems depends on the distribution of nodule sizes in the training and testing sets, which may not be consistent across different research studies.

  8. Demographic aspects in cervical vertebral bodies' size and shape (C3-C7): a skeletal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra, David; Masharawi, Youssef; Salame, Khalil; Slon, Viviane; Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted on the skeletal remains of individuals of known sex, age, and ethnic origin. The vertebral bodies of levels C3-C7 were measured and analyzed. Whereas many studies were performed on the size and shape of the vertebral bodies in the thoracic and lumbar spines, few have focused on the cervical vertebral bodies. Thus, there is insufficient data in the literature on the anatomy of the cervical spine, especially based on large study populations. To establish a large database on cervical vertebral bodies' size and shape and analyze their association with demographic parameters. The population studied was composed of 277 individuals, adult males and females of African American (AA) and European American (EA) origin. The skeletal remains are housed at the Hamman-Todd Osteological collection (Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH). A 3-D digitizer was used to measure the size and shape of the C3-C7 vertebral bodies. Descriptive statistics were carried out for all measurements. t Test and one-way analysis of variance were performed to assess differences in vertebral bodies' size and shape between different demographical groups (by age, sex, and ethnicity). The vertebral bodies and foramina are significantly wider, more elongated, and higher in males compared to females. AA females and males manifest significantly greater vertebral bodies (width and length) in the upper and midcervical region (vertebrae C3-C5) than EA females and males. Nevertheless, the heights of the C3 and C4 vertebral bodies are significantly smaller among the AA population, regardless of sex. The vertebral foramina's width does not differ significantly between the two ethnic groups, independent of sex, whereas they tend to be elongated in the EA group (significant for C3, C5, C7). For most vertebrae, no significant differences were found in the superior facets' length between AA and EA males and females. Cervical vertebral bodies become wider and more

  9. Size and shape distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in disordered systems: computer simulations of superparamagnetic resonance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliava, Janis; Berger, René

    1999-11-01

    A new model is proposed in order to account for the superparamagnetic resonance spectra arising from the ferromagnetic particles dispersed in a diamagnetic matrix (e.g., ferrofluids, partially devitrified glasses). The model explicitly takes into account non-sphericity of magnetic nanoparticles in a joint distribution density of sizes and demagnetising factors. The distribution in particle shapes is shown to take an important part in determining the superparamagnetic resonance spectra. By computer simulating the resonance spectra of annealed iron-containing borate and sol-gel silica glasses, characteristics of size and shape distributions of magnetic nanoparticles are evaluated. As the anneal temperature is increased from 456°C to 480°C, the most probable diameter of the magnetic particles formed in the borate glass is increased from 3.4 to 4.7 nm, while their shapes become better ordered. The mean size of particles formed in the sol-gel silica glass is small, ca. 3.0 nm, and their shapes are less ordered in comparison with the borate glass.

  10. Influence of reducing agents and surfactants on size and shape of silver fine powder particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan P. Dimitrijević

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Silver fine powder with different shapes and sizes were prepared by chemical reduction and characterized by scanning electron microscope. In this paper was presented the method for the preparation of the fine Ag powder with particles size smaller than 2.5 µm with suitability for the mass-production scale. Reduction was performed from nitrate solution directly by vigorous stirring at room temperature by three different reduction agents, with and without presence of two dispersants. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the preferred size of the particles obtained in all experiments with aim of the protecting agent. Larger particles and wider size distribution were obtained without surfactants although with average size of about 1 µm and small quantity of larger clusters of primary particles that is out of the fine powder classification. High purity, 99.999%, of silver was obtained in every experiment.

  11. An Update on Using the Range to Estimate σ When Determining Sample Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiel, George Steven; Markowski, Edward

    2017-04-01

    In this research, we develop a strategy for using a range estimator of σ when determining a sample size for estimating a mean. Previous research by Rhiel is extended to provide dn values for use in calculating a range estimate of σ when working with sampling frames up to size 1,000,000. This allows the use of the range estimator of σ with "big data." A strategy is presented for using the range estimator of σ for determining sample sizes based on the dn values developed in this study.

  12. Shapes displayed with durations in the microsecond range do not obey Bloch's law of temporal summation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ernest; Ogden, R Todd

    2013-01-01

    Shape patterns were displayed with simultaneous brief flashes from a light-emitting diode array. Flash durations in the microsecond range and luminous intensities were adjusted to vary the degree of successful shape recognition. Four experiments were conducted to test whether Bloch's law would apply in this task. Bloch's law holds that for very brief flashes the perceptual threshold is determined by the total number of photons being delivered, i.e., there is reciprocity of intensity and duration. The present results did not find that effectiveness of flashes was based on the total quantity of photons, as predicted by Bloch's law. Additionally, the evidence points to a visual mechanism that has ultra-high temporal precision that either registers the rate of photon flux or the duration of flashes.

  13. Shapes Displayed with Durations in the Microsecond Range Do Not Obey Bloch's Law of Temporal Summation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Greene

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Shape patterns were displayed with simultaneous brief flashes from a light-emitting diode array. Flash durations in the microsecond range and luminous intensities were adjusted to vary the degree of successful shape recognition. Four experiments were conducted to test whether Bloch's law would apply in this task. Bloch's law holds that for very brief flashes the perceptual threshold is determined by the total number of photons being delivered, i.e., there is reciprocity of intensity and duration. The present results did not find that effectiveness of flashes was based on the total quantity of photons, as predicted by Bloch's law. Additionally, the evidence points to a visual mechanism that has ultra-high temporal precision that either registers the rate of photon flux or the duration of flashes.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study on Male Genital Shape and Size in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baku Takahara

    Full Text Available Male genital morphology of animals with internal fertilization and promiscuous mating systems have been one of the most diverse and rapidly evolving morphological traits. The male genital morphology in general is known to have low phenotypic and genetic variations, but the genetic basis of the male genital variation remains unclear. Drosophila melanogaster and its closely related species are morphologically very similar, but the shapes of the posterior lobe, a cuticular projection on the male genital arch are distinct from each other, representing a model system for studying the genetic basis of male genital morphology. In this study, we used highly inbred whole genome sequenced strains of D. melanogaster to perform genome wide association analysis on posterior lobe morphology. We quantified the outline shape of posterior lobes with Fourier coefficients obtained from elliptic Fourier analysis and performed principal component analysis, and posterior lobe size. The first and second principal components (PC1 and PC2 explained approximately 88% of the total variation of the posterior lobe shape. We then examined the association between the principal component scores and posterior lobe size and 1902142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. As a result, we obtained 15, 14 and 15 SNPs for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size with P-values smaller than 10(-5. Based on the location of the SNPs, 13, 13 and six protein coding genes were identified as potential candidates for PC1, PC2 and posterior lobe size, respectively. In addition to the previous findings showing that the intraspecific posterior shape variation are regulated by multiple QTL with strong effects, the present study suggests that the intraspecific variation may be under polygenic regulation with a number of loci with small effects. Further studies are required for investigating whether these candidate genes are responsible for the intraspecific posterior lobe shape variation.

  15. Children's Concepts of the Shape and Size of the Earth, Sun and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.; Blown, E. J.

    2013-02-01

    Children's understandings of the shape and relative sizes of the Earth, Sun and Moon have been extensively researched and in a variety of ways. Much is known about the confusions which arise as young people try to grasp ideas about the world and our neighbouring celestial bodies. Despite this, there remain uncertainties about the conceptual models which young people use and how they theorise in the process of acquiring more scientific conceptions. In this article, the relevant published research is reviewed critically and in-depth in order to frame a series of investigations using semi-structured interviews carried out with 248 participants aged 3-18 years from China and New Zealand. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data concerning the reasoning of these subjects (involving cognitive categorisations and their rank ordering) confirmed that (a) concepts of Earth shape and size are embedded in a 'super-concept' or 'Earth notion' embracing ideas of physical shape, 'ground' and 'sky', habitation of and identity with Earth; (b) conceptual development is similar in cultures where teachers hold a scientific world view and (c) children's concepts of shape and size of the Earth, Sun and Moon can be usefully explored within an ethnological approach using multi-media interviews combined with observational astronomy. For these young people, concepts of the shape and size of the Moon and Sun were closely correlated with their Earth notion concepts and there were few differences between the cultures despite their contrasts. Analysis of the statistical data used Kolmogorov-Smirnov Two-Sample Tests with hypotheses confirmed at K-S alpha level 0.05; rs : p < 0.01.

  16. Linking seasonal home range size with habitat selection and movement in a mountain ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Granados, José Enrique; Fandos, Paulino; Pérez, Jesús M; Cano-Manuel, Francisco Javier; Burón, Daniel; Fandos, Guillermo; Aguado, María Ángeles Párraga; Figuerola, Jordi; Soriguer, Ramón C

    2018-01-01

    Space use by animals is determined by the interplay between movement and the environment, and is thus mediated by habitat selection, biotic interactions and intrinsic factors of moving individuals. These processes ultimately determine home range size, but their relative contributions and dynamic nature remain less explored. We investigated the role of habitat selection, movement unrelated to habitat selection and intrinsic factors related to sex in driving space use and home range size in Iberian ibex, Capra pyrenaica . We used GPS collars to track ibex across the year in two different geographical areas of Sierra Nevada, Spain, and measured habitat variables related to forage and roost availability. By using integrated step selection analysis (iSSA), we show that habitat selection was important to explain space use by ibex. As a consequence, movement was constrained by habitat selection, as observed displacement rate was shorter than expected under null selection. Selection-independent movement, selection strength and resource availability were important drivers of seasonal home range size. Both displacement rate and directional persistence had a positive relationship with home range size while accounting for habitat selection, suggesting that individual characteristics and state may also affect home range size. Ibex living at higher altitudes, where resource availability shows stronger altitudinal gradients across the year, had larger home ranges. Home range size was larger in spring and autumn, when ibex ascend and descend back, and smaller in summer and winter, when resources are more stable. Therefore, home range size decreased with resource availability. Finally, males had larger home ranges than females, which might be explained by differences in body size and reproductive behaviour. Movement, selection strength, resource availability and intrinsic factors related to sex determined home range size of Iberian ibex. Our results highlight the need to integrate

  17. Effects of buffer size and shape on associations between the built environment and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Berrigan, David; Hart, Jaime E; Hipp, J Aaron; Hoehner, Christine M; Kerr, Jacqueline; Major, Jacqueline M; Oka, Masayoshi; Laden, Francine

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty in the relevant spatial context may drive heterogeneity in findings on the built environment and energy balance. To estimate the effect of this uncertainty, we conducted a sensitivity analysis defining intersection and business densities and counts within different buffer sizes and shapes on associations with self-reported walking and body mass index. Linear regression results indicated that the scale and shape of buffers influenced study results and may partly explain the inconsistent findings in the built environment and energy balance literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and Optical Properties of CuO Nanocrystals with Controllable Shapes and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goraya Neelinder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly dispersed copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles had been successfully prepared by a hydrothermal technique where different adding temperatures of NaOH were taken. The as-prepared CuO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the adding temperature of NaOH has an important influence on the shape and size of CuO nanocrystals The influence of reaction conditions on morphology of CuO nanocrystals was discussed. Furthermore, different shapes of obtained CuO nanocrystals exhibit different Raman properties.

  19. Correlates of research effort in carnivores: body size, range size and diet matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe M Brooke

    Full Text Available Given the budgetary restrictions on scientific research and the increasing need to better inform conservation actions, it is important to identify the patterns and causes of biases in research effort. We combine bibliometric information from a literature review of almost 16,500 peer-reviewed publications on a well-known group of 286 species, the Order Carnivora, with global datasets on species' life history and ecological traits to explore patterns in research effort. Our study explores how species' characteristics influenced the degree to which they were studied (measured as the number of publications. We identified a wide variation in intensity of research effort at both Family and Species levels, with some of the least studied being those which may need protection in future. Our findings hint at the complex role of human perspectives in setting research agendas. We found that better-studied species tended to be large-bodied and have a large geographic range whilst omnivory had a negative relationship with research effort. IUCN threat status did not exhibit a strong relationship with research effort which suggests that the conservation needs of individual species are not major drivers of research interest. This work is the first to use a combination of bibliometric analysis and biological data to quantify and interpret gaps in research knowledge across an entire Order. Our results could be combined with other resources, such as Biodiversity Action Plans, to prioritise and co-ordinate future research effort, whilst our methods can be applied across many scientific disciplines to describe knowledge gaps.

  20. Correlates of research effort in carnivores: body size, range size and diet matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Zoe M; Bielby, Jon; Nambiar, Kate; Carbone, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Given the budgetary restrictions on scientific research and the increasing need to better inform conservation actions, it is important to identify the patterns and causes of biases in research effort. We combine bibliometric information from a literature review of almost 16,500 peer-reviewed publications on a well-known group of 286 species, the Order Carnivora, with global datasets on species' life history and ecological traits to explore patterns in research effort. Our study explores how species' characteristics influenced the degree to which they were studied (measured as the number of publications). We identified a wide variation in intensity of research effort at both Family and Species levels, with some of the least studied being those which may need protection in future. Our findings hint at the complex role of human perspectives in setting research agendas. We found that better-studied species tended to be large-bodied and have a large geographic range whilst omnivory had a negative relationship with research effort. IUCN threat status did not exhibit a strong relationship with research effort which suggests that the conservation needs of individual species are not major drivers of research interest. This work is the first to use a combination of bibliometric analysis and biological data to quantify and interpret gaps in research knowledge across an entire Order. Our results could be combined with other resources, such as Biodiversity Action Plans, to prioritise and co-ordinate future research effort, whilst our methods can be applied across many scientific disciplines to describe knowledge gaps.

  1. The evolution of body size and shape in the human career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, William L; Grabowski, Mark; Hatala, Kevin G; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-07-05

    Body size is a fundamental biological property of organisms, and documenting body size variation in hominin evolution is an important goal of palaeoanthropology. Estimating body mass appears deceptively simple but is laden with theoretical and pragmatic assumptions about best predictors and the most appropriate reference samples. Modern human training samples with known masses are arguably the 'best' for estimating size in early bipedal hominins such as the australopiths and all members of the genus Homo, but it is not clear if they are the most appropriate priors for reconstructing the size of the earliest putative hominins such as Orrorin and Ardipithecus The trajectory of body size evolution in the early part of the human career is reviewed here and found to be complex and nonlinear. Australopith body size varies enormously across both space and time. The pre-erectus early Homo fossil record from Africa is poor and dominated by relatively small-bodied individuals, implying that the emergence of the genus Homo is probably not linked to an increase in body size or unprecedented increases in size variation. Body size differences alone cannot explain the observed variation in hominin body shape, especially when examined in the context of small fossil hominins and pygmy modern humans.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, M [ohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazmara, H [KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sefidgar, M [IKI University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm{sup 3}, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm{sup 3}, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic

  3. Broadband beam shaping using two cascaded diffractive optical elements with different sizes of effective phase region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Cao, Guowei; Guo, Jin; Wang, Jun; Huang, Kun; Li, Yongping; Kang, Xueliang; Wang, Liang

    2017-10-01

    A unique design method of two cascaded diffractive optical elements (DOEs) with different sizes of effective phase region to modulate broadband beam is presented with consideration of single production material and low relief height on DOE. The iterative algorithm to calculate the relief heights on these DOEs is introduced at first. Where after, a broadband beam at wavelength from 500nm to 600nm propagates through the designed DOEs and is focused on the target plane in the simulation part. The shaping results demonstrate the excellent shaping ability of this unique design method. The shaping system proposed in this paper is significant for nonmonochromatic light modulation and has many applications such as graphic encryption, three-dimensional color display and multi wavelength division multiplexing.

  4. Urban Skylines: building heights and shapes as measures of city size

    CERN Document Server

    Schläpfer, Markus; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2015-01-01

    The shape of buildings plays a critical role in the energy efficiency, lifestyles, land use and infrastructure systems of cities. Thus, as most of the world's cities continue to grow and develop, understanding the interplay between the characteristics of urban environments and the built form of cities is essential to achieve local and global sustainability goals. Here, we compile and analyze the most extensive data set of building shapes to date, covering more than 4.8 million individual buildings across several major cities in North America. We show that average building height increases systematically with city size and follows theoretical predictions derived from urban scaling theory. We also study the allometric relationship between surface area and volume of buildings in terms of characteristic shape parameters. This allows us to demonstrate that the reported trend towards higher (and more voluminous) buildings effectively decreases the average surface-to-volume ratio, suggesting potentially significant ...

  5. Shape and Size Characteristics of Bedload Transported During Winter Storm Events in the Cwm Treweryn Stream, Brecon Beacons, South Wales

    OpenAIRE

    WALSH, TUNCER DEMİR & RORY PETER DOMINIC

    2005-01-01

    Bedload transport in the Cwm Treweryn stream, a tributary of the Usk in the Brecon Beacons, South Wales, was investigated during a wet winter period in early 1995 using basket-type bedload traps and the tracing of painted clasts. The Cwm Treweryn is a typical mountain stream of the region with its gravel-bedload, flashy regime, high gradient and pool-riffle sequences. In particular, the study explored - for a range of categories of clast size - the nature of any influence of clast shape on be...

  6. Size, shape and age-related changes of the mandibular condyle during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph A. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Stolzmann, Paul [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Habernig, Sandra; Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Mueller, Lukas [University of Zurich, Clinics for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Zurich (Switzerland); Saurenmann, Traudel [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    To determine age-related differences in the size and shape of the mandibular condyle in children to establish anatomical reference values. A total of 420 mandibular condyles in 210 children (mean age, 7 years) were retrospectively analysed by using computed tomography (CT) imaging. The greatest left-right (LRD) and anterior-posterior (APD) diameters and the anteversion angles (AA) were measured by two readers. An APD/LRD ratio was calculated. The shape of the condyles was graded into three types on sagittal images. Correlations of parameters with the children's age were assessed by using Pearson's correlation analyses. The LRD (mean, 14.1 {+-} 2.4 mm), APD (mean, 7.3 {+-} 1.0 mm) and LRD/APD ratio (mean, 1.9 {+-} 0.3) increased (r{sub LRD} = 0.70, p < 0.01; r{sub APD} = 0.56, p < 0.01; r{sub rat} = 0.28, p < 0.01) while the AA (mean, 27 {+-} 7 ) decreased significantly (r{sub antang} = -0.26, p < 0.001) with age. The condylar shape as determined on sagittal images correlated significantly with age (r = 0.69, p < 0.05). Boys had significantly higher anteversion angles (p < 0.01), greater LRDs (p < 0.05) and greater mean ratios (p < 0.05). The mandibular condyle is subject to significant age-related changes in size and shape during childhood. As the size of the condyles increases with age, the anteversion angles decrease and the shape of the condyle turns from round to oval. (orig.)

  7. Differences in caste dimorphism among three hornet species (Hymenoptera: Vespidae): forewing size, shape and allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, A; Villemant, C; Carpenter, J M; Baylac, M

    2012-07-01

    Caste shape dimorphism (CShD) has previously been studied in wasps through comparison of different body parts, originating from different imaginal discs. Using geometric morphometrics with a new protocol for measuring wings of pinned specimens from natural history collections, we tested CShD of three hornet species in an organ developed from a single imaginal disc: the forewing. Gaussian mixture models retrieved most castes and species levels, confirming that caste is an important component of wing variations in females of these hornets. Size and allometry - the influence of size on shape - contribution to wing dimorphism between castes was major, but failed to explain the entire shape dimorphism. This deviation from simple allometric scaling was not similar in the three species: in Vespa tropica, allometric directions in the shape space differed between castes, whereas in V. crabro and V. velutina, they were similar but a significant part of CShD resulted from lateral transpositions. These results clearly indicate that queens are not just enlarged workers. They also support that the different patterns of CShD may result from different developmental mechanisms. Finally, they highlight that even in a highly social group like hornets, there is still variation in caste dimorphism among species. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  8. Patients' evaluation of shape, size and colour of solid dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, A.B.A.; Møller-Sonnergaard, J.; Christrup, L.L.

    2001-01-01

    visually assessed. They were asked to indicate their preferences. Results: Gelatine capsules were found easier to swallow than tablets and coated tablets were found easier than uncoated normal tablets. The preferred colour was white both for tables and capsules, and the most disliked colours were purple...... tablets and brown capsules. The preferred shape was strongly arched circular for small tablets, oval for medium sized and big tablets. The difficulty to swallow tablets increased with increasing size. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the ideal tablet is small and white, strongly arched...

  9. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2017-09-12

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  10. Influence of preservative and mounting media on the size and shape of monogenean sclerites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fankoua, Severin-Oscar; Bitja Nyom, Arnold R; Bahanak, Dieu Ne Dort; Bilong Bilong, Charles F; Pariselle, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Based on Cichlidogyrus sp. (Monogenea, Ancyrocephalidae) specimens from Hemichromis sp. hosts, we tested the influence of different methods to fix/preserve samples/specimens [frozen material, alcohol or formalin preserved, museum process for fish preservation (fixed in formalin and preserved in alcohol)] and different media used to mount the slides [tap water, glycerin ammonium picrate (GAP), Hoyer's one (HM)] on the size/shape of sclerotized parts of monogenean specimens. The results show that the use of HM significantly increases the size of haptoral sclerites [marginal hooks I, II, IV, V, and VI; dorsal bar length, width, distance between auricles and auricle length, ventral bar length and width], and changes their shape [angle opening between shaft and guard (outer and inner roots) in both ventral and dorsal anchors, ventral bar much wider, dorsal one less curved]. This influence seems to be reduced when specimens/samples are fixed in formalin. The systematics of Monogenea being based on the size and shape of their sclerotized parts, to prevent misidentifications or description of invalid new species, we recommend the use of GAP as mounting medium; Hoyer's one should be restricted to monogenean specimens fixed for a long time which are more shrunken.

  11. Dynamic X-ray radiography reveals particle size and shape orientation fields during granular flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, François; Marks, Benjy; Einav, Itai

    2017-08-15

    When granular materials flow, the constituent particles segregate by size and align by shape. The impacts of these changes in fabric on the flow itself are not well understood, and thus novel non-invasive means are needed to observe the interior of the material. Here, we propose a new experimental technique using dynamic X-ray radiography to make such measurements possible. The technique is based on Fourier transformation to extract spatiotemporal fields of internal particle size and shape orientation distributions during flow, in addition to complementary measurements of velocity fields through image correlation. We show X-ray radiography captures the bulk flow properties, in contrast to optical methods which typically measure flow within boundary layers, as these are adjacent to any walls. Our results reveal the rich dynamic alignment of particles with respect to streamlines in the bulk during silo discharge, the understanding of which is critical to preventing destructive instabilities and undesirable clogging. The ideas developed in this paper are directly applicable to many other open questions in granular and soft matter systems, such as the evolution of size and shape distributions in foams and biological materials.

  12. Evaluation of Decontamination Factor of Aerosol in Pool Scrubber according to Bubble Shape and Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyun Joung; Ha, Kwang Soon; Jang, Dong Soon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The scrubbing pool could play an important role in the wet type FCVS because a large amount of aerosol is captured in the water pool. The pool scrubbing phenomena have been modelled and embedded in several computer codes, such as SPARC (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code), BUSCA (BUbble Scrubbing Algorithm) and SUPRA (Suppression Pool Retention Analysis). These codes aim at simulating the pool scrubbing process and estimating the decontamination factors (DFs) of the radioactive aerosol and iodine gas in the water pool, which is defined as the ratio of initial mass of the specific radioactive material to final massy after passing through the water pool. The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the pool. The developed code has been verified using the experimental results and parametric studies the decontamination factor according to bubble shape and size. To evaluate the decontamination factor more accurate whole pool scrubber phenomena, the code was improved to consider the variety shape and size of bubbles. The decontamination factor were largely evaluated in ellipsoid bubble rather than in sphere bubble. The pool scrubbing models will be enhanced to apply more various model such as aerosol condensation of hygroscopic. And, it is need to experiment to measure to bubble shape and size distribution in pool to improve bubble model.

  13. Identifying the ideal body size and shape characteristics associated with children's physical performance tests in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante Valdivia, A; Maia, J; Nevill, A

    2015-04-01

    We used allometric models to identify the optimal body size/shape characteristics associated with physical and motor performance tests in Peruvian schoolchildren. The sample consisted of 3624 subjects (1669 boys and 1955 girls) aged 11-17 years from 31 public schools belonging to four cities located in the three natural regions in central Peru. Motor performance included 12-min run, standing long jump, grip strength, curl-ups, shuttle run, and sit and reach. The reciprocal Ponderal index (RPI), a characteristic sometimes referred to as the somatotype "ectomorphy," was found to be the most suitable body shape indicator associated with 12-min run, standing long jump, curl-up, and shuttle run performance. A positive maturation offset parameter was also associated with greater standing long jump, grip strength, shuttle run, and sit-and-reach performances. With the exception of the sit-and-reach flexibility, sex differences are pervasive in all tests favoring boys. Rainforest schoolchildren are best performers in the power and flexibility tests, whereas those from high altitude were superior in the 12-min endurance test even after taking their much lighter body size characteristics into account. This latter finding suggests that living at high altitude in Peru benefits children's endurance performance both before and even after controlling for differences in the confounding variable of body size/shape. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The shape and size effects of polycation functionalized silica nanoparticles on gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinyi; Zhao, Nana; Yan, Peng; Hu, Hao; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles are attractive candidates for the development of safe and efficient non-viral gene carriers, owing to their controlled morphologies, potential of facile surface modification and excellent biocompatibility as well as in vivo biodegradability. Conversely, the size and shape of nanoparticles are considered to have an intense influence on their interaction with cells and biological systems, but the effects of particle size and shape on gene transfection are poorly understood. In this work, a series of novel gene carriers were designed employing polycation modified silica nanoparticles with five different morphologies, while keeping uniform zeta potential and surface functionality. Then the effects of particle size and shape of these five different carriers on gene transfection were investigated. The morphology of silica nanoparticles is demonstrated to play an important role in gene transfection, especially when the amount of polycation is low. Chiral nanorods with larger aspect ratio were found to fabricate the most efficient gene carriers with compromised cytotoxicity. It was also noted that hollow nanosphere-based carriers exhibited better gene transfection performance than did solid counterparts. These results may provide new strategies to develop promising gene carriers and useful information for the application of nanoparticles in biomedical areas. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of size and shape distributions on the electron charge transfer properties of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baichuan; Barnard, Amanda S

    2017-08-31

    Many applications of silver nanoparticles are moderated by the electron charge transfer properties, such as the ionization potential, electron affinity and Fermi energy, which may be tuned by controlling the size and shape of individual particles. However, since producing samples of silver nanoparticles that are perfectly monodispersed in terms of both size and shape can be prohibitive, it is important to understand how these properties are impacted by polydispersivity, and ideally be able to predict the tolerance for variation of different geometric features. In this study, we use straightforward statistical methods, together with electronic structure simulations, to predict the electron charge transfer properties of different types of ensembles of silver nanoparticles and how restricting the structural diversity in different ways can improve or retard performance. In agreement with previous reports, we confirm that restricting the shape distribution will tune the charge transfer properties toward specific reactions, but by including the quality factors for each case we go beyond this assessment and show how targeting specific classes of morphologies and restricting the distribution of size can impact sensitivity.

  16. 3D analysis of sexual dimorphism in size, shape and breathing kinematics of human lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Tamayo, Nicole; García-Martínez, Daniel; Lois Zlolniski, Stephanie; Torres-Sánchez, Isabel; García-Río, Francisco; Bastir, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the human respiratory system has been previously reported at the skeletal (cranial and thoracic) level, but also at the pulmonary level. Regarding lungs, foregoing studies have yielded sex-related differences in pulmonary size as well as lung shape details, but different methodological approaches have led to discrepant results on differences in respiratory patterns between males and females. The purpose of this study is to analyse sexual dimorphism in human lungs during forced respiration using 3D geometric morphometrics. Eighty computed tomographies (19 males and 21 females) were taken in maximal forced inspiration (FI) and expiration (FE), and 415 (semi)landmarks were digitized on 80 virtual lung models for the 3D quantification of pulmonary size, shape and kinematic differences. We found that males showed larger lungs than females (P 3D approach shows sexual dimorphism in human lungs likely due to a greater diaphragmatic action in males and a predominant intercostal muscle action in females during breathing. These size and shape differences would lead to different respiratory patterns between sexes, whose physiological implications need to be studied in future research. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  17. Sex differences in spatial ability: a test of the range size hypothesis in the order Carnivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Bonnie M; Snyder, Rebecca J; Zhihe, Zhang; Marr, M Jackson; Maple, Terry L

    2011-06-23

    Sex differences in spatial cognition have been reported for many species ranging from voles to humans. The range size hypothesis predicts that sex differences in spatial ability will only occur in species in which the mating system selects for differential range size. Consistent with this prediction, we observed sex differences in spatial ability in giant pandas, a promiscuous species in which males inhabit larger ranges than females, but did not observe sex differences in Asian small-clawed otters, a related monogamous species in which males and females share home ranges. These results provide the first evidence of sex differences in spatial ability in the order Carnivora, and are consistent with the range size hypothesis.

  18. The sensitivity of cartilage contact pressures in the knee joint to the size and shape of an anatomically shaped meniscal implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Vrancken, A.C.T.; Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; Janssen, D.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Since meniscal geometry affects the cartilage contact pressures, it is essential to carefully define the geometry of the synthetic meniscal implant that we developed. Recently, six independent modes of size- and shape-related geometry variation were identified through 3D statistical shape modeling

  19. Shape and size control of nano dispersed Mg/Al layered double hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, H S; Srivastava, R; Bahadur, D

    2008-08-01

    Controlling the shape and size of the layered inorganic-organic hybrid particles is a challenge with conventional methods of synthesis. The co-precipitation method has been modified to synthesize Mg/Al Layered double hydroxide by controlling the particle growth using ultrasonic wave at the time of nucleation. In this project, magnesium and aluminum ions were considered as model systems with carbonate anion as intercalating agent. The resulting particles are compared with those of LDHs produced by conventional co-precipitation method at constant pH. Powder X-ray diffraction confirmed formation of the layered double hydroxide phases having crystallite size 19-20 nm in both 'a' and 'c' crystallographic directions. Transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering revealed nano disperse hexagonal platelets with narrow size distribution and average size was around 48 nm. The modified method reduces the particle size, increases the surface charge, narrows down the size distribution and also reduces the aspect ratio of the particles. Therefore, it is suggested that low amplitude ultrasonic wave prevents the aggregation of the nuclei, thus restricting the particle growth and results in uniform size particles.

  20. Fractal geometry predicts varying body size scaling relationships for mammal and bird home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, John P.; Ritchie, Mark E.; Olff, Han

    2002-01-01

    Scaling laws that describe complex interactions between organisms and their environment as a function of body size offer exciting potential for synthesis in biology. Home range size, or the area used by individual organisms, is a critical ecological variable that integrates behaviour, physiology and

  1. Fractal geometry predicts varying body size scaling relationships for mammal and bird home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, J.P.; Ritchie, M.E.; Olff, H.

    2002-01-01

    Scaling laws that describe complex interactions between organisms and their environment as a function of body size offer exciting potential for synthesis in biology(1-4). Home range size, or the area used by individual organisms, is a critical ecological variable that integrates behaviour,

  2. Evolutionary morphology in shape and size of haptoral anchors in 14 Ligophorus spp. (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abril Rodríguez-González

    Full Text Available The search for phylogenetic signal in morphological traits using geometric morphometrics represents a powerful approach to estimate the relative weights of convergence and shared evolutionary history in shaping organismal form. We assessed phylogenetic signal in the form of ventral and dorsal haptoral anchors of 14 species of Ligophorus occurring on grey mullets (Osteichthyes: Mugilidae from the Mediterranean, the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. The phylogenetic relationships among these species were mapped onto the morphospaces of shape and size of dorsal and ventral anchors and two different tests were applied to establish whether the spatial positions in the morphospace were dictated by chance. Overall significant phylogenetic signal was found in the data. Allometric effects on anchor shape were moderate or non-significant in the case of evolutionary allometry. Relatively phylogenetically distant species occurring on the same host differed markedly in anchor morphology indicating little influence of host species on anchor form. Our results suggest that common descent and shared evolutionary history play a major role in determining the shape and, to a lesser degree in the size of haptoral anchors in Ligophorus spp. The present approach allowed tracing paths of morphological evolution in anchor shape. Species with narrow anchors and long shafts were associated predominately with Liza saliens. This morphology was considered to be ancestral relative to anchors of species occurring on Liza haematocheila and M. cephalus possessing shorter shafts and longer roots. Evidence for phylogenetic signal was more compelling for the ventral anchors, than for the dorsal ones, which could reflect different functional roles in attachment to the gills. Although phylogeny and homoplasy may act differently in other monogeneans, the present study delivers a common framework to address effectively the relationships among morphology, phylogeny and other traits, such

  3. An analysis of monthly home range size in the critically endangered California Condor Gymnogyps californianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, James W.; Johnson, Matthew J.; Haig, Susan M.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Burnett, Joseph; Brandt, Joseph; George, Daniel; Grantham, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Condors and vultures comprise the only group of terrestrial vertebrates in the world that are obligate scavengers, and these species move widely to locate ephemeral, unpredictable, and patchily-distributed food resources. In this study, we used high-resolution GPS location data to quantify monthly home range size of the critically endangered California Condor Gymnogyps californianus throughout the annual cycle in California. We assessed whether individual-level characteristics (age, sex and breeding status) and factors related to endangered species recovery program efforts (rearing method, release site) were linked to variation in monthly home range size. We found that monthly home range size varied across the annual cycle, with the largest monthly home ranges observed during late summer and early fall (July–October), a pattern that may be linked to seasonal changes in thermals that facilitate movement. Monthly home ranges of adults were significantly larger than those of immatures, but males and females used monthly home ranges of similar size throughout the year and breeding adults did not differ from non-breeding adults in their average monthly home range size. Individuals from each of three release sites differed significantly in the size of their monthly home ranges, and no differences in monthly home range size were detected between condors reared under captive conditions relative to those reared in the wild. Our study provides an important foundation for understanding the movement ecology of the California Condor and it highlights the importance of seasonal variation in space use for effective conservation planning for this critically endangered species.

  4. A rapid method of fruit cell isolation for cell size and shape measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell size is a structural component of fleshy fruit, contributing to important traits such as fruit size and texture. There are currently a number of methods for measuring cell size; most rely either on tissue sectioning or digestion of the tissue with cell wall degrading enzymes or chemicals to release single cells. Neither of these approaches is ideal for assaying large fruit numbers as both require a considerable time to prepare the tissue, with current methods of cell wall digestions taking 24 to 48 hours. Additionally, sectioning can lead to a measurement of a plane that does not represent the widest point of the cell. Results To develop a more rapid way of measuring fruit cell size we have developed a protocol that solubilises pectin in the middle lamella of the plant cell wall releasing single cells into a buffered solution. Gently boiling small fruit samples in a 0.05 M Na2CO3 solution, osmotically balanced with 0.3 M mannitol, produced good cell separation with little cellular damage in less than 30 minutes. The advantage of combining a chemical treatment with boiling is that the cells are rapidly killed. This stopped cell shape changes that could potentially occur during separation. With this method both the rounded and angular cells of the apple cultivars SciRos 'Pacific Rose' and SciFresh 'Jazz'™ were observed in the separated cells. Using this technique, an in-depth analysis was performed measuring cell size from 5 different apple cultivars. Cell size was measured using the public domain ImageJ software. For each cultivar a minimum of 1000 cells were measured and it was found that each cultivar displayed a different distribution of cell size. Cell size within cultivars was similar and there was no correlation between flesh firmness and cell size. This protocol was tested on tissue from other fleshy fruit including tomato, rock melon and kiwifruit. It was found that good cell separation was achieved with flesh

  5. Effect of grain size on superelasticity in Fe-Mn-Al-Ni shape memory alloy wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Omori

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of grain size on superelastic properties in Fe-34Mn-15Al-7.5Ni alloy wires with a ⟨110⟩ fiber-texture were investigated by cyclic tensile tests. It was confirmed that the critical stress for induced martensitic transformation and the superelastic strain are functions of relative grain size d/D (d: mean grain diameter, D: wire diameter, and that the critical stress is proportional to (1–d/D2 as well as in Cu-based shape memory alloys. A large superelastic strain of about 5% was obtained in the specimen with a large relative grain size over d/D = 1.

  6. Particle size-shape distributions: the general spheroid problem. I. Mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orive, L M

    1976-08-01

    The development of stereological methods for the study of dilute phases of particles, voids or organelles embedded in a matrix, from measurements made on plane or linear intercepts through the aggregate, has deserved a great deal of effort. With almost no exception, the problem of describing the particulate phase is reduced to that of identifying the statistical distribution--histogram in practice--of a relevant size parameter, with the previous assumption that the particles are modelled by geometrical objects of a constant shape (e.g. spheres). Therefore, particles exhibiting a random variation about a given type of shape as well as a random variation in size, escape previous analyses. Such is the case of unequiaxed particles modelled by triaxial ellipsoids of variable size and eccentricity parameters. It has been conjectured (Moran, 1972) that this problem is indetermined in its generally (i.e. the elliptical sections do not furnish a sufficient information which permits a complete description of the ellipsoids). A proof of this conjecture is given in the Appendix. When the ellipsoids are biaxial (spheroids) and of the same type (prolate or oblate), the problem is identifiable. Previous attempts to solve it assume statistical independence between size and shape. A complete, theoretical solution of the spheroids problem--with the independence condition relaxed--is presented. A number of exact relationships--some of them of a striking simplicity--linking particle properties (e.g. mean-mean caliper length, mean axial ratio, correlation coefficient between principal diameters, etc.) on the one hand, with the major and minor dimensions of the ellipses of section on the other, emerge, and natural, consistent estimators of the mentioned properties are made easily accessible for practical computation. Finally, the scope and limitations of the mathematical model are discussed.

  7. The Effect of Stimulus Size on the Reliable Stimulus Range of Perimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Stuart K; Demirel, Shaban; Goren, Deborah; Mansberger, Steven L; Swanson, William H

    2015-03-01

    Automated perimetry uses a 3.5 log unit (35dB) range of stimulus contrasts to assess function within the visual field. Using 'Size III' stimuli (0.43°), presenting stimuli within the highest 15dB of available contrast may not increase the response probability at locations damaged by glaucoma, due to retinal ganglion cell response saturation. This experiment examines the effect of instead using 'Size V' (1.72°) stimuli. Luminance increment thresholds for circular spot stimuli of each stimulus size were measured in 35 participants (mean deviation -20.9 to -3.4 dB, ages 52-87) using the method of constant stimuli, at four locations per participant. Frequency-of-seeing curves were fit at each size and location, with three free parameters: mean, standard deviation, and asymptotic maximum response probability. These were used to estimate the contrasts to which each participant would respond on 25% of presentations (c25). Using segmented orthogonal regression, the maximum observed response probabilities for size III stimuli began to decline at c25 = 25.2 dB (95% confidence interval 23.3-29.0 dB from bootstrap resampling). This decline started at similar contrast for the size V stimulus: c25 = 25.0dB (22.0-26.8 dB). Among locations at which the sensitivity was above these split-points for both stimulus sizes, c25 averaged 5.6 dB higher for size V than size III stimuli. The lower limit of the reliable stimulus range did not differ significantly between stimulus sizes. However, more locations remained within the reliable stimulus range when using the size V stimulus. Size V stimuli enable reliable clinical testing later into the glaucomatous disease process.

  8. Controlling the size, shape and stability of supramolecular polymers in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besenius, Pol; de Feijter, Isja; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Bomans, Paul H H; Palmans, Anja R A

    2012-08-02

    For aqueous based supramolecular polymers, the simultaneous control over shape, size and stability is very difficult. At the same time, the ability to do so is highly important in view of a number of applications in functional soft matter including electronics, biomedical engineering, and sensors. In the past, successful strategies to control the size and shape of supramolecular polymers typically focused on the use of templates, end cappers or selective solvent techniques. Here we disclose a strategy based on self-assembling discotic amphiphiles that leads to the control over stack length and shape of ordered, chiral columnar aggregates. By balancing electrostatic repulsive interactions on the hydrophilic rim and attractive non-covalent forces within the hydrophobic core of the polymerizing building block, we manage to create small and discrete spherical objects. Increasing the salt concentration to screen the charges induces a sphere-to-rod transition. Intriguingly, this transition is expressed in an increase of cooperativity in the temperature-dependent self-assembly mechanism, and more stable aggregates are obtained. For our study we select a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) core connected to a hydrophilic metal chelate via a hydrophobic, fluorinated L-phenylalanine based spacer (Scheme 1). The metal chelate selected is a Gd(III)-DTPA complex that contains two overall remaining charges per complex and necessarily two counter ions. The one-dimensional growth of the aggregate is directed by π-π stacking and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. However, the electrostatic, repulsive forces that arise from the charges on the Gd(III)-DTPA complex start limiting the one-dimensional growth of the BTA-based discotic once a certain size is reached. At millimolar concentrations the formed aggregate has a spherical shape and a diameter of around 5 nm as inferred from (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, small angle X-ray scattering, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo

  9. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Biochar particle size, shape, and porosity act together to influence soil water properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon; Masiello, Caroline A; Gonnermann, Helge M

    2017-01-01

    Many studies report that, under some circumstances, amending soil with biochar can improve field capacity and plant-available water. However, little is known about the mechanisms that control these improvements, making it challenging to predict when biochar will improve soil water properties. To develop a conceptual model explaining biochar's effects on soil hydrologic processes, we conducted a series of well constrained laboratory experiments using a sand matrix to test the effects of biochar particle size and porosity on soil water retention curves. We showed that biochar particle size affects soil water storage through changing pore space between particles (interpores) and by adding pores that are part of the biochar (intrapores). We used these experimental results to better understand how biochar intrapores and biochar particle shape control the observed changes in water retention when capillary pressure is the main component of soil water potential. We propose that biochar's intrapores increase water content of biochar-sand mixtures when soils are drier. When biochar-sand mixtures are wetter, biochar particles' elongated shape disrupts the packing of grains in the sandy matrix, increasing the volume between grains (interpores) available for water storage. These results imply that biochars with a high intraporosity and irregular shapes will most effectively increase water storage in coarse soils.

  11. Resistance to alveolar shape change limits range of force propagation in lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Smith, Bradford J; Bates, Jason H T

    2015-06-01

    We have recently shown that if the lung parenchyma is modeled in 2 dimensions as a network of springs arranged in a pattern of repeating hexagonal cells, the distortional forces around a contracting airway propagate much further from the airway wall than classic continuum theory predicts. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this occurs because of the negligible shear modulus of a hexagonal spring network. We simulated the narrowing of an airway embedded in a hexagonal network of elastic alveolar walls when the hexagonal cells of the network offered some resistance to a change in shape. We found that as the forces resisting shape change approach about 10% of the forces resisting length change of an individual spring the range of distortional force propagation in the spring network fell of rapidly as in an elastic continuum. We repeated these investigations in a 3-dimensional spring network composed of space-filling polyhedral cells and found similar results. This suggests that force propagation away from a point of local parenchymal distortion also falls off rapidly in real lung tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct observation of enhanced magnetism in individual size- and shape-selected 3 d transition metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibert, Armin; Balan, Ana; Yanes, Rocio; Derlet, Peter M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Timm, Martin; Fraile Rodríguez, Arantxa; Béché, Armand; Verbeeck, Jo; Dhaka, R. S.; Radovic, Milan; Nowak, Ulrich; Nolting, Frithjof

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are critical building blocks for future technologies ranging from nanomedicine to spintronics. Many related applications require nanoparticles with tailored magnetic properties. However, despite significant efforts undertaken towards this goal, a broad and poorly understood dispersion of magnetic properties is reported, even within monodisperse samples of the canonical ferromagnetic 3 d transition metals. We address this issue by investigating the magnetism of a large number of size- and shape-selected, individual nanoparticles of Fe, Co, and Ni using a unique set of complementary characterization techniques. At room temperature, only superparamagnetic behavior is observed in our experiments for all Ni nanoparticles within the investigated sizes, which range from 8 to 20 nm. However, Fe and Co nanoparticles can exist in two distinct magnetic states at any size in this range: (i) a superparamagnetic state, as expected from the bulk and surface anisotropies known for the respective materials and as observed for Ni, and (ii) a state with unexpected stable magnetization at room temperature. This striking state is assigned to significant modifications of the magnetic properties arising from metastable lattice defects in the core of the nanoparticles, as concluded by calculations and atomic structural characterization. Also related with the structural defects, we find that the magnetic state of Fe and Co nanoparticles can be tuned by thermal treatment enabling one to tailor their magnetic properties for applications. This paper demonstrates the importance of complementary single particle investigations for a better understanding of nanoparticle magnetism and for full exploration of their potential for applications.

  13. Three-dimensional hard tissue palatal size and shape in Down syndrome subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavia, Claudia; Sforza, Chiarella; Orlando, Fabiana; Ottolina, Paolo; Pregliasco, Fabrizio; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate palatal morphology in Down syndrome (Ds) subjects, focusing on the effect of dental formula on the hard palate to assist clinicians when planning dental rehabilitation. Palatal landmarks were digitized with a three-dimensional (3D) computerized digitizer on the dental casts of 47 Ds subjects (23 dentate males, 9 edentulous males, and 15 dentate females) aged 20-45 years, 37 dentate reference individuals (20 males and 17 females) aged 30-39 years, and 14 edentulous reference males aged 55-72 years. The co-ordinates of the palatal landmarks were used to construct a mathematical equation of palatal shape, independent of dimensions. Palatal length, slope, width, and maximum palatal height in both the sagittal and frontal planes were measured. In males, palatal length, width, and height were significantly influenced by both the syndrome and edentulism (analysis of variance, P plane, Ds did not modify palatal shape; in the frontal plane, Ds individuals showed a higher palate. Overall, palatal shape was influenced by both Ds and edentulousness. Therefore, Ds seems to alter the normal palatal size and shape, although verification on larger samples is required. The findings of the present study may encourage more interdisciplinary dentofacial therapy in the dental and orthodontic care of Ds subjects.

  14. Prevalence of intraspecific relationships between range size and abundance in Danish birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Rahbek, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigate patterns in the prevalence of dynamic range-abundance relationships of the Danish avifauna, using breeding bird atlases from 1971 to 1974 and from 1993 to 1996. We focus on differences between common and rare species by dividing the assemblage into range-size quartiles...

  15. Home range size variation in female arctic grizzly bears relative to reproductive status and resource availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark A; Derocher, Andrew E; Nagy, John A

    2013-01-01

    The area traversed in pursuit of resources defines the size of an animal's home range. For females, the home range is presumed to be a function of forage availability. However, the presence of offspring may also influence home range size due to reduced mobility, increased nutritional need, and behavioral adaptations of mothers to increase offspring survival. Here, we examine the relationship between resource use and variation in home range size for female barren-ground grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) of the Mackenzie Delta region in Arctic Canada. We develop methods to test hypotheses of home range size that address selection of cover where cover heterogeneity is low, using generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information-theoretic approach. We found that the reproductive status of female grizzlies affected home range size but individually-based spatial availability of highly selected cover in spring and early summer was a stronger correlate. If these preferred covers in spring and early summer, a period of low resource availability for grizzly bears following den-emergence, were patchy and highly dispersed, females travelled farther regardless of the presence or absence of offspring. Increased movement to preferred covers, however, may result in greater risk to the individual or family.

  16. Home range size variation in female arctic grizzly bears relative to reproductive status and resource availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Edwards

    Full Text Available The area traversed in pursuit of resources defines the size of an animal's home range. For females, the home range is presumed to be a function of forage availability. However, the presence of offspring may also influence home range size due to reduced mobility, increased nutritional need, and behavioral adaptations of mothers to increase offspring survival. Here, we examine the relationship between resource use and variation in home range size for female barren-ground grizzly bears (Ursus arctos of the Mackenzie Delta region in Arctic Canada. We develop methods to test hypotheses of home range size that address selection of cover where cover heterogeneity is low, using generalized linear mixed-effects models and an information-theoretic approach. We found that the reproductive status of female grizzlies affected home range size but individually-based spatial availability of highly selected cover in spring and early summer was a stronger correlate. If these preferred covers in spring and early summer, a period of low resource availability for grizzly bears following den-emergence, were patchy and highly dispersed, females travelled farther regardless of the presence or absence of offspring. Increased movement to preferred covers, however, may result in greater risk to the individual or family.

  17. High Damping of Lightweight TiNi-Ti2Ni Shape Memory Composites for Wide Temperature Range Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Luo, Zheng; Yuan, Bin; Liu, Jiangwen; Gao, Yan

    2017-10-01

    A bimodal porous TiNi-Ti2Ni shape memory alloy composite (SMAC) with 59% porosity was fabricated by sintering Ti-46at.%Ni elemental powders with pore-forming agent. The porous TiNi-Ti2Ni SMAC contains two irregular pores of about 400 and 120 μm. We investigated the microstructure and pore morphology correlated with the mechanical properties and damping capacities of the SMAC. Ti2Ni intermetallic phases with size of 1-3 μm were homogeneously distributed in the TiNi matrix. The porous TiNi-Ti2Ni SMAC exhibits exceptionally high inverse mechanical quality factor ( Q -1) of 0.25 at < 40 °C, which is among the highest value reported for porous/dense shape memory alloys or composites to best of our knowledge, and it shows very high compressive fracture strain of about 25%. Moreover, the fabricated porous SMAC at relatively low strain amplitude can exhibit considerable high Q -1 of 0.06 0.11 for a wide range of temperature between - 90 and 200 °C, which is attributed to the stress concentration distribution provided by the bimodal structure of pores and the massive interfaces between pore/matrix and TiNi/Ti2Ni. These porous SMACs can be an ideal candidate for using as a lightweight damping material in the energy-saving applications.

  18. Hydration, charge, size, and shape characteristics of peptides from their CZE analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V; Deiber, Julio A

    2008-02-01

    A CZE model is presented for peptide characterization on the basis of well-established physicochemical equations. The effective mobility is used as basic data in the model to estimate relevant peptide properties such as, for instance, hydration, net and total electrical charge numbers, hydrodynamic size and shape, particle average orientation, and pH-microenvironment from the charge regulation phenomenon. Therefore 102 experimental effective mobilities of different peptides are studied and discussed in relation to previous work. An equation for the estimation of peptide hydration as a function of ionizing, polar, and non-polar amino acid residues is included in the model. It is also shown that the shape-orientation factor of peptides may be either lower or higher than one, and its value depends on a complex interplay among total charge number, molar mass, hydration, and amino acid sequence.

  19. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Optical monitoring of bubble size and shape in a pulsating bubble surfactometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seurynck, Shannon L; Brown, Nathan J; Wu, Cindy W; Germino, Kevin W; Kohlmeir, Ellen K; Ingenito, Edward P; Glucksberg, Matthew R; Barron, Annelise E; Johnson, Mark

    2005-08-01

    The pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) is often used for in vitro characterization of exogenous lung surfactant replacements and lung surfactant components. However, the commercially available PBS is not able to dynamically track bubble size and shape. The PBS therefore does not account for bubble growth or elliptical bubble shape that frequently occur during device use. More importantly, the oscillatory volume changes of the pulsating bubble are different than those assumed by the software of the commercial unit. This leads to errors in both surface area and surface tension measurements. We have modified a commercial PBS through the addition of an image-acquisition system, allowing real-time determination of bubble size and shape and hence the accurate tracking of surface area and surface tension. Compression-expansion loops obtained with the commercially available PBS software were compared with those provided by the image-analysis system for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, Infasurf, and Tanaka lipids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyloleoylphosphatidyl-glycerol-palmitic acid, 68:22:9) at concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/ml and at frequencies of 1 and 20 cycles/min. Whereas minimum surface tension as determined by the image-analysis system is similar to that measured by the commercially available software, the maximum surface tension and the shapes of the interfacial area-surface tension loops are quite different. Differences are attributable to bubble drift, nonsinusoidal volume changes, and variable volume excursions seen with the modified system but neglected by the original system. Image analysis reveals that the extent of loop hysteresis is greatly overestimated by the commercial device and that an apparent, rapid increase in surface tension upon film expansion seen in PBS loops is not observed with the image-analysis system. The modified PBS system reveals new dynamic characteristics of lung surfactant preparations that have not previously been

  1. Hedgehogs on the move: Testing the effects of land use change on home range size and movement patterns of free-ranging Ethiopian hedgehogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Abu Baker

    Full Text Available Degradation and alteration of natural environments because of agriculture and other land uses have major consequences on vertebrate populations, particularly on spatial organization and movement patterns. We used GPS tracking to study the effect of land use and sex on the home range size and movement of a typical model species, the Ethiopian hedgehogs. We used free-ranging hedgehogs from two areas with different land use practices: 24 from an area dominated by irrigated farms (12 ♂♂, 12 ♀♀ and 22 from a natural desert environment within a biosphere reserve (12 ♂♂, 10 ♀♀. Animals were significantly heavier in the resource-rich irrigated farms area (417.71 ±12.77SE g in comparison to the natural desert area (376.37±12.71SE g. Both habitat and sex significantly influenced the home range size of hedgehogs. Home ranges were larger in the reserve than in the farms area. Total home ranges averaged 103 ha (±17 SE for males and 42 ha (±11SE for females in the farms area, but were much larger in the reserve averaging 230 ha (±33 SE for males and 150 ha (±29 SE for females. The home ranges of individuals of both sexes overlapped. Although females were heavier than males, body weight had no effect on home range size. The results suggest that resources provided in the farms (e.g. food, water, and shelters influenced animal density and space use. Females aggregated around high-resource areas (either farms or rawdhats, whereas males roamed over greater distances, likely in search of mating opportunities to maximize reproductive success. Most individual home ranges overlapped with many other individuals of either sex, suggesting a non-territorial, promiscuous mating. Patterns of space use and habitat utilization are key factors in shaping aspects of reproductive biology and mating system. To minimize the impacts of agriculture on local wildlife, we recommend that biodiversity-friendly agro-environmental schemes be introduced in the Middle

  2. Hedgehogs on the move: Testing the effects of land use change on home range size and movement patterns of free-ranging Ethiopian hedgehogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A; Reeve, Nigel; Conkey, April A T; Macdonald, David W; Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Degradation and alteration of natural environments because of agriculture and other land uses have major consequences on vertebrate populations, particularly on spatial organization and movement patterns. We used GPS tracking to study the effect of land use and sex on the home range size and movement of a typical model species, the Ethiopian hedgehogs. We used free-ranging hedgehogs from two areas with different land use practices: 24 from an area dominated by irrigated farms (12 ♂♂, 12 ♀♀) and 22 from a natural desert environment within a biosphere reserve (12 ♂♂, 10 ♀♀). Animals were significantly heavier in the resource-rich irrigated farms area (417.71 ±12.77SE g) in comparison to the natural desert area (376.37±12.71SE g). Both habitat and sex significantly influenced the home range size of hedgehogs. Home ranges were larger in the reserve than in the farms area. Total home ranges averaged 103 ha (±17 SE) for males and 42 ha (±11SE) for females in the farms area, but were much larger in the reserve averaging 230 ha (±33 SE) for males and 150 ha (±29 SE) for females. The home ranges of individuals of both sexes overlapped. Although females were heavier than males, body weight had no effect on home range size. The results suggest that resources provided in the farms (e.g. food, water, and shelters) influenced animal density and space use. Females aggregated around high-resource areas (either farms or rawdhats), whereas males roamed over greater distances, likely in search of mating opportunities to maximize reproductive success. Most individual home ranges overlapped with many other individuals of either sex, suggesting a non-territorial, promiscuous mating. Patterns of space use and habitat utilization are key factors in shaping aspects of reproductive biology and mating system. To minimize the impacts of agriculture on local wildlife, we recommend that biodiversity-friendly agro-environmental schemes be introduced in the Middle East where

  3. Optimal trajectory and heat load analysis of different shape lifting reentry vehicles for medium range application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tauqeer ul Islam Rizvi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to compute the optimal burn-out conditions and control requirements that would result in maximum down-range/cross-range performance of a waverider type hypersonic boost-glide (HBG vehicle within the medium and intermediate ranges, and compare its performance with the performances of wing-body and lifting-body vehicles vis-à-vis the g-load and the integrated heat load experienced by vehicles for the medium-sized launch vehicle under study. Trajectory optimization studies were carried out by considering the heat rate and dynamic pressure constraints. The trajectory optimization problem is modeled as a nonlinear, multiphase, constraint optimal control problem and is solved using a hp-adaptive pseudospectral method. Detail modeling aspects of mass, aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics for the launch and glide vehicles have been discussed. It was found that the optimal burn-out angles for waverider and wing-body configurations are approximately 5° and 14.8°, respectively, for maximum down-range performance under the constraint heat rate environment. The down-range and cross-range performance of HBG waverider configuration is nearly 1.3 and 2 times that of wing-body configuration respectively. The integrated heat load experienced by the HBG waverider was found to be approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of a lifting-body configuration and 5 times that of a wing-body configuration. The footprints and corresponding heat loads and control requirements for the three types of glide vehicles are discussed for the medium range launch vehicle under consideration.

  4. WormSizer: high-throughput analysis of nematode size and shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Moore

    Full Text Available The fundamental phenotypes of growth rate, size and morphology are the result of complex interactions between genotype and environment. We developed a high-throughput software application, WormSizer, which computes size and shape of nematodes from brightfield images. Existing methods for estimating volume either coarsely model the nematode as a cylinder or assume the worm shape or opacity is invariant. Our estimate is more robust to changes in morphology or optical density as it only assumes radial symmetry. This open source software is written as a plugin for the well-known image-processing framework Fiji/ImageJ. It may therefore be extended easily. We evaluated the technical performance of this framework, and we used it to analyze growth and shape of several canonical Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in a developmental time series. We confirm quantitatively that a Dumpy (Dpy mutant is short and fat and that a Long (Lon mutant is long and thin. We show that daf-2 insulin-like receptor mutants are larger than wild-type upon hatching but grow slow, and WormSizer can distinguish dauer larvae from normal larvae. We also show that a Small (Sma mutant is actually smaller than wild-type at all stages of larval development. WormSizer works with Uncoordinated (Unc and Roller (Rol mutants as well, indicating that it can be used with mutants despite behavioral phenotypes. We used our complete data set to perform a power analysis, giving users a sense of how many images are needed to detect different effect sizes. Our analysis confirms and extends on existing phenotypic characterization of well-characterized mutants, demonstrating the utility and robustness of WormSizer.

  5. Influence of shape and size of the particles on jigging separation of plastics mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Fernando; Castilho, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Plastics are popular for numerous applications due to their high versatility and favourable properties such as endurance, lightness and cheapness. Therefore the generation of plastic waste is constantly increasing, becoming one of the larger categories in municipal solid waste. Almost all plastic materials are recyclable, but for the recycling to be possible it is necessary to separate the different types of plastics. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the jig separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. For this study six granulated plastics had been used: Polystyrene (PS), Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET-S, PET-D) and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC-M, PVC-D). Plastics mixtures were subjected to jigging in a laboratorial Denver mineral jig. The results showed that the quality of the jigging separation varies with the mixture, the density differences and with the size and shape of the particles. In the case of particles with more regular shapes the quality of separation of bi-component plastic mixtures improved with the increase of the particle size. For lamellar particles the influence of particle size was minimal. In general, the beneficiation of plastics with similar densities was not effective, since the separation efficiency was lower than 25%. However, in bi-component plastic mixtures that join a low density plastic (PS) with a high density one (PMMA, PET-S, PET-D, PVC-M and PVC-D), the quality of the jigging separation was greatly improved. The PS grade in the sunk was less than 1% for all the plastic mixtures. Jigging proved to be an effective method for the separation of bi-component plastic mixtures. Jigging separation will be enhanced if the less dense plastic, that overflows, has a lamellar shape and if the denser plastic, that sinks, has a regular one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SERS Properties of Different Sized and Shaped Gold Nanoparticles Biosynthesized under Different Environmental Conditions by Neurospora crassa Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quester, Katrin; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Vilchis-Nestor, Alfredo Rafael; Camacho-López, Marco Antonio; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive technique that enhances Raman scattering by molecules adsorbed on rough metal surfaces. It is known that metal nanoparticles, especially gold and silver nanoparticles, exhibit great SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. On the other hand, the development of ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanostructures has become the focus of research in several countries, and many microorganisms and plants have already been used to biosynthesize metallic nanostructures. However, the majority of these are pathogenic to plants or humans. Here, we report gold nanoparticles with good SERS properties, biosynthesized by Neurospora crassa extract under different environmental conditions, increasing Raman signals up to 40 times using methylene blue as a target molecule. Incubation of tetrachloroauric acid solution with the fungal extract at 60°C and a pH value of a) 3, b) 5.5, and c) 10 resulted in the formation of gold nanoparticles of a) different shapes like triangles, hexagons, pentagons etc. in a broad size range of about 10-200 nm, b) mostly quasi-spheres with some different shapes in a main size range of 6-23 nm, and c) only quasi-spheres of 3-12 nm. Analyses included TEM, HRTEM, and EDS in order to corroborate the shape and the elemental character of the gold nanoparticles, respectively. The results presented here show that these ‘green’ synthesized gold nanoparticles might have potential applicability in the field of biological sensing. PMID:24130891

  7. Mountain gorilla ranging patterns: influence of group size and group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillaud, Damien; Ndagijimana, Felix; Giarrusso, Anthony J; Vecellio, Veronica; Stoinski, Tara S

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1980s, the Virunga mountain gorilla population has almost doubled, now reaching 480 individuals living in a 430-km(2) protected area. Analysis of the gorillas' ranging patterns can provide critical information on the extent and possible effects of competition for food and space. We analyzed 12 years of daily ranging data and inter-group encounter data collected on 11 gorilla groups monitored by the Karisoke Research Center in Rwanda. During that period, the study population increased in size by almost 50% and the number of groups tripled. Groups had small yearly home ranges compared to other known gorilla populations, with an average 90% kernel density estimate of 8.07 km2 and large between-group variations (3.17-23.59 km2). Most groups had consistent home range location over the course of the study but for some, we observed gradual range shifts of up to 4 km. Neighboring groups displayed high home range overlap, which increased dramatically after the formation of new groups. On average, each group used only 28.6% of its 90% kernel home range exclusively, and in some areas up to six different groups had overlapping home ranges with little or no exclusive areas. We found a significant intra-group positive relationship between the number of weaned individuals in a group and the home range size, but the fitted models only explained 17.5% and 13.7% of the variance in 50% and 90% kernel home range size estimates, respectively. This suggests that despite the increase in size, the study population is not yet experiencing marked effects of feeding competition. However, the increase in home range overlap resulting from the formation of new groups led to a sixfold increase in the frequency of inter-group encounters, which exposes the population to elevated risks of fight-related injuries and infanticide. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Size effects on magnetic actuation in Ni-Mn-Ga shape-memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunand, David C; Müllner, Peter

    2011-01-11

    The off-stoichiometric Ni(2)MnGa Heusler alloy is a magnetic shape-memory alloy capable of reversible magnetic-field-induced strains (MFIS). These are generated by twin boundaries moving under the influence of an internal stress produced by a magnetic field through the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. While MFIS are very large (up to 10%) for monocrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga, they are near zero (textiles, foams and composites). Various strategies are proposed to accentuate this geometric effect which enables large MFIS in polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga by matching grain and sample sizes.

  9. Body size and shape misperception and visual adaptation: An overview of an emerging research paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challinor, Kirsten L; Mond, Jonathan; Stephen, Ian D; Mitchison, Deborah; Stevenson, Richard J; Hay, Phillipa; Brooks, Kevin R

    2017-12-01

    Although body size and shape misperception (BSSM) is a common feature of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and muscle dysmorphia, little is known about its underlying neural mechanisms. Recently, a new approach has emerged, based on the long-established non-invasive technique of perceptual adaptation, which allows for inferences about the structure of the neural apparatus responsible for alterations in visual appearance. Here, we describe several recent experimental examples of BSSM, wherein exposure to "extreme" body stimuli causes visual aftereffects of biased perception. The implications of these studies for our understanding of the neural and cognitive representation of human bodies, along with their implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  10. Mean latitudinal range sizes of bird assemblages in six Neotropical forest chronosequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Robert R.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund

    2005-01-01

    of early successional species was as a result in part of the tendency of early successional species to have ranges that extend beyond the Neotropical forest biome. Conclusions Our analysis of chronosequences suggests that as early successional habitats mature, a consistent shift from large-ranged species...... understood. We examined how the mean latitudinal range sizes of species in Neotropical bird species assemblages shift during forest clearance and subsequent regeneration. We tested the hypothesis that bird species assemblages in early successional habitats tend to have larger latitudinal ranges than those...... in more mature forests. Location We considered breeding bird chronosequence data from six Neotropical forests. Results Breeding bird assemblages were found to have the species with the largest average latitudinal range sizes in cleared areas, intermediate in young secondary forests and smallest in old...

  11. Online Gait Learning for Modular Robots with Arbitrary Shapes and Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, Berend; D'Angelo, M; Haasdijk, Evert; Eiben, A E

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary robotics using real hardware is currently restricted to evolving robot controllers, but the technology for evolvable morphologies is advancing quickly. Rapid prototyping (3D printing) and automated assembly are the main enablers of robotic systems where robot offspring can be produced based on a blueprint that specifies the morphologies and the controllers of the parents. This article addresses the problem of gait learning in newborn robots whose morphology is unknown in advance. We investigate a reinforcement learning method and conduct simulation experiments using robot morphologies with different size and complexity. We establish that reinforcement learning does the job well and that it outperforms two alternative algorithms. The experiments also give insights into the online dynamics of gait learning and into the influence of the size, shape, and morphological complexity of the modular robots. These insights can potentially be used to predict the viability of modular robotic organisms before they are constructed.

  12. The impact of size and shape of particles of undergrowth and herbs mixtures on aerodynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Panasiewicz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the size and shape of a selected group of herbs (dried juniper berries Juniperus communis, dry blueberries Vaccinium myrtillus, petals of cornflower Centaurea cyanus on the value of the volatility coefficient, the coefficient of sphericity and the critical speed was analysed in the presented research. A laboratory anemometer to measure the speed of air was used. The determination of the volatility coefficient of particular size fractions was conducted on the basis of critical speed values, calculated as an average established after five measurements. The established aerodynamic properties of particular mixtures allow the determination and the assessment of differences among fractions of valuable resources and different impurities. The presented data might constitute a basis to determine the scope of differences among them and establish interrelations which allow the application of proper parameters for the pneumatic separation process in practice.

  13. Finite element model of size, shape and blood pressure on rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rica Nabong, Jennica; David, Guido

    2017-10-01

    Rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms is a primary concern for neurologists and patients because it leads to stroke and permanent disability. This paper examines the role of blood pressure, in connection with size of and wall thickness, in the rupture of saccular aneurysms. A bulb-shaped geometry of a saccular aneurysm is obtained from angiographic images of a patient and modeled using Finite Elements based on the principle of virtual work under the Fung stress-strain relationship. The numerical model is subjected to varying levels of systolic blood pressure. Rupture is assumed to occur when the wall stress exceeded its mechanical strength. The results show which sizes of this class of aneurysms are at high risk of rupture for varying levels of blood pressure.

  14. Optical properties of mineral dust aerosol including analysis of particle size, composition, and shape effects, and the impact of physical and chemical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jennifer Mary

    distributions. The next goal of this work is to investigate if modeling methods developed in the studies of single mineral components can be generalized to predict the optical properties of more authentic aerosol samples which are complex mixtures of different minerals. Samples of Saharan sand, Iowa loess, and Arizona road dust are used here as test cases. T-matrix based simulations of the authentic samples, using measured particle size distributions, empirical mineralogies, and a priori particle shape models for each mineral component are directly compared with the measured IR extinction spectra and visible scattering profiles. This modeling approach offers a significant improvement over more commonly applied models that ignore variations in particle shape with size or mineralogy and include only a moderate range of shape parameters. Mineral dust samples processed with organic acids and humic material are also studied in order to explore how the optical properties of dust can change after being aged in the atmosphere. Processed samples include quartz mixed with humic material, and calcite reacted with acetic and oxalic acid. Clear differences in the light scattering properties are observed for all three processed mineral dust samples when compared to the unprocessed mineral dust or organic salt products. These interactions result in both internal and external mixtures depending on the sample. In addition, the presence of these organic materials can alter the mineral dust particle shape. Overall, however, these results demonstrate the need to account for the effects of atmospheric aging of mineral dust on aerosol optical properties. Particle shape can also affect the aerodynamic properties of mineral dust aerosol. In order to account for these effects, the dynamic shape factor is used to give a measure of particle asphericity. Dynamic shape factors of quartz are measured by mass and mobility selecting particles and measuring their vacuum aerodynamic diameter. From this, dynamic

  15. The effect of alumina nanofillers size and shape on mechanical behavior of PMMA matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hasan Somaya Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites with the addition of alumina nanofillers show improvement in mechanical properties. The PMMA polymer was used as a matrix and two different types of nanofillers, having extremely different shapes were added in the matrix to form the composite. Reinforcements were based on alumina nanoparticles having either spherical shape or whiskers having the length to diameter ratio of 100. The influence of alumina fillers size, shape and fillers loading on mechanical properties of prepared composite were studied using the nanoindentation measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis. It was observed that both alumina whiskers and alumina spherical nanoparticles added in the PMMA matrix improved the mechanical properties of the composite but the improvement was significantly higher with alumina whisker reinforcement. The concentration of the reinforcing alumina spherical nanoparticles and alumina whiskers in PMMA matrix varied up to 5 wt. %. The best performance was obtained by the addition of 3 wt. % of alumina whiskers in the PMMA matrix with regard to mechanical properties of the obtained composite.

  16. Size and shape variations of the bony components of sperm whale cochleae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Joseph G.; Frédérich, Bruno; Früchtnicht, Sven; Schaffeld, Tobias; Baltzer, Johannes; Ruser, Andreas; Siebert, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Several mass strandings of sperm whales occurred in the North Sea during January and February 2016. Twelve animals were necropsied and sampled around 48 h after their discovery on German coasts of Schleswig Holstein. The present study aims to explore the morphological variation of the primary sensory organ of sperm whales, the left and right auditory system, using high-resolution computerised tomography imaging. We performed a quantitative analysis of size and shape of cochleae using landmark-based geometric morphometrics to reveal inter-individual anatomical variations. A hierarchical cluster analysis based on thirty-one external morphometric characters classified these 12 individuals in two stranding clusters. A relative amount of shape variation could be attributable to geographical differences among stranding locations and clusters. Our geometric data allowed the discrimination of distinct bachelor schools among sperm whales that stranded on German coasts. We argue that the cochleae are individually shaped, varying greatly in dimensions and that the intra-specific variation observed in the morphology of the cochleae may partially reflect their affiliation to their bachelor school. There are increasing concerns about the impact of noise on cetaceans and describing the auditory periphery of odontocetes is a key conservation issue to further assess the effect of noise pollution. PMID:28440286

  17. Following Rapoport's Rule: the geographic range and genome size of bacterial taxa decline at warmer latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Gavin; Lau, Kelvin; Perchec, Anne-Marie; Buckley, Hannah L; Case, Bradley S; Neale, Martin; Fierer, Noah; Leff, Jonathan W; Handley, Kim M; Lewis, Gillian

    2017-08-01

    We sought to test whether stream bacterial communities conform to Rapoport's Rule, a pattern commonly observed for plants and animals whereby taxa exhibit decreased latitudinal range sizes closer to the equator. Using a DNA sequencing approach, we explored the biogeography of biofilm bacterial communities in 204 streams across a ∼1000 km latitudinal gradient. The range sizes of bacterial taxa were strongly correlated with latitude, decreasing closer to the equator, which coincided with a greater than fivefold increase in bacterial taxonomic richness. The relative richness and range size of bacteria were associated with spatially correlated variation in temperature and rainfall. These patterns were observed despite enormous variability in catchment environmental characteristics. Similar results were obtained when restricting the same analyses to native forest catchments, thereby controlling for spatial biases in land use. We analysed genomic data from ∼500 taxa detected in this study, for which data were available and found that bacterial communities at cooler latitudes also tended to possess greater potential metabolic potential. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence of latitudinal variation in the range size distributions of freshwater bacteria, a trend which may be determined, in part, by a trade-off between bacterial genome size and local variation in climatic conditions. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The size and range effect: lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager-Wick Ellingsen, Linda; Singh, Bhawna; Hammer Strømman, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of this study is to investigate the effect of increasing battery size and driving range to the environmental impact of electric vehicles (EVs). To this end, we compile cradle-to-grave inventories for EVs in four size segments to determine their climate change potential. A second objective is to compare the lifecycle emissions of EVs to those of conventional vehicles. For this purpose, we collect lifecycle emissions for conventional vehicles reported by automobile manufacturers. The lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions are calculated per vehicle and over a total driving range of 180 000 km using the average European electricity mix. Process-based attributional LCA and the ReCiPe characterisation method are used to estimate the climate change potential from the hierarchical perspective. The differently sized EVs are compared to one another to find the effect of increasing the size and range of EVs. We also point out the sources of differences in lifecycle emissions between conventional- and electric vehicles. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis assesses the change in lifecycle emissions when electricity with various energy sources power the EVs. The sensitivity analysis also examines how the use phase electricity sources influences the size and range effect.

  19. Remote estimation of phytoplankton size fractions using the spectral shape of light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengqiang; Ishizaka, Joji; Hirawake, Toru; Watanabe, Yuji; Zhu, Yuanli; Hayashi, Masataka; Yoo, Sinjae

    2015-04-20

    Phytoplankton size structure plays an important role in ocean biogeochemical processes. The light absorption spectra of phytoplankton provide a great potential for retrieving phytoplankton size structure because of the strong dependence on the packaging effect caused by phytoplankton cell size and on different pigment compositions related to phytoplankton taxonomy. In this study, we investigated the variability in light absorption spectra of phytoplankton in relation to the size structure. Based on this, a new approach was proposed for estimating phytoplankton size fractions. Our approach use the spectral shape of the normalized phytoplankton absorption coefficient (a(ph)(λ)) through principal component analysis (PCA). Values of a(ph)(λ) were normalized to remove biomass effects, and PCA was conducted to separate the spectral variance of normalized a(ph)(λ) into uncorrelated principal components (PCs). Spectral variations captured by the first four PC modes were used to build relationships with phytoplankton size fractions. The results showed that PCA had powerful ability to capture spectral variations in normalized a(ph)(λ), which were significantly related to phytoplankton size fractions. For both hyperspectral a(ph)(λ) and multiband a(ph)(λ), our approach is applicable. We evaluated our approach using wide in situ data collected from coastal waters and the global ocean, and the results demonstrated a good and robust performance in estimating phytoplankton size fractions in various regions. The model performance was further evaluated by a(ph)(λ) derived from in situ remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ)) with a quasi-analytical algorithm. Using R(rs)(λ) only at six bands, accurate estimations of phytoplankton size fractions were obtained, with R(2) values of 0.85, 0.61, and 0.76, and root mean-square errors of 0.130, 0.126, and 0.112 for micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton, respectively. Our approach provides practical basis for remote estimation of

  20. Tailoring shape and size of biogenic silver nanoparticles to enhance antimicrobial efficacy against MDR bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Madhuree; Pandey, Shipra; Giri, Ved Prakash; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Shukla, Richa; Mishra, Aradhana; Nautiyal, C S

    2017-04-01

    Spherical, rectangular, penta, and hexagonal silver nanoparticles of different dimensions were biosynthesized in an eco-friendly manner by biocontrol agent, Trichoderma viride by manipulating physical parameters, pH, temperature, and reaction time. The particles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy; Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR). Shape and size dependent antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles against human pathogens was observed. Maximum inhibition was found with spherical nanoparticles (2-5 nm) showing 40, 51, 43, 53.9 and 55.8% against Shigella sonnei, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively, where as pentagonal and hexagonal nanoparticles (50-100 nm) demonstrated 32, 41, 31, 42.84 and 42.80% of inhibition as compared to control. Nanoparticles of different geometry and dimension established enhanced antagonistic activity against pathogens with all the tested antibiotics. Excellent antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with spherical nanoparticles of 2-5 nm with ampicillin and penicillin. Shape and size played major role in enhancing antimicrobial potential of silver nanoparticles, both singly and synergistically with antibiotics which can be exploited to combat the spread of multidrug resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effect of Specimen Shape and Size on the Compressive Strength of Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin M.A.S.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concrete, in the form of foamed concrete, is a versatile material that primarily consists of a cement based mortar, mixed with at least 20% volume of air. Its dry density is typically below 1600 kg/m3 with a maximum compressive strength of 15MPa. The ASTM standard provision specifies a correction factor for concrete strength of between 14 and 42Mpa, in order to compensate for a reduced strength, when the aspect height-to-diameter ratio of a specimen is less than 2.0. However, the CEB-FIP provision specifically mentions a ratio of 150mm dia. × 300mm cylinder strength to 150 mm cube strength; though, both provision requirements do not specifically clarify the applicability and/or modification of the correction factors for the compressive strength to lightweight concrete (in this case, foamed concrete. The focus of this work is to study the effect of specimen size and shape on the axial compressive strength of concrete. Specimens of various sizes and shapes were cast with square and circular cross-sections i.e., cubes, prisms, and cylinders. Their compression strength behaviours at 7 and 28 days were investigated. The results indicate that, as the CEB-FIP provision specified, even for foamed concrete, 100mm cubes (l/d = 1.0 produce a comparable compressive strength with 100mm dia. × 200mm cylinders (l/d = 2.0.

  2. Biosynthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles: A Fresh Look at the Control of Shape, Size and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Amar Dahoumane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies have been devised for the design of nanomaterials. The “Holy Grail” for materials scientists is the cost-effective, eco-friendly synthesis of nanomaterials with controlled sizes, shapes and compositions, as these features confer to the as-produced nanocrystals unique properties making them appropriate candidates for valuable bio-applications. The present review summarizes published data regarding the production of nanomaterials with special features via sustainable methodologies based on the utilization of natural bioresources. The richness of the latter, the diversity of the routes adopted and the tuned experimental parameters have led to the fabrication of nanomaterials belonging to different chemical families with appropriate compositions and displaying interesting sizes and shapes. It is expected that these outstanding findings will encourage researchers and attract newcomers to continue and extend the exploration of possibilities offered by nature and the design of innovative and safer methodologies towards the synthesis of unique nanomaterials, possessing desired features and exhibiting valuable properties that can be exploited in a profusion of fields.

  3. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  4. Bioactivity of nanosilver in Caenorhabditis elegans: Effects of size, coat, and shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piper Reid Hunt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo toxicity to eukaryotes of nanosilver (AgNP spheres and plates in two sizes each was assessed using the simple model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. For each shape, smaller AgNP size correlated with higher toxicity, as indicated by reduced larval growth. Smaller size also correlated with significant increases in silver uptake for silver nanospheres. Citrate coated silver spheres of 20 nm diameter induced an innate immune response that increased or held steady over 24 h, while regulation of genes involved in metal metabolism peaked at 4 h and subsequently decreased. For AgNP spheres, coating altered bioactivity, with a toxicity ranking of polyethylene glycol (PEG > polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP ≅ branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI > citrate, but silver uptake ranking of PEG > PVP > citrate > BPEI. Our findings in C. elegans correlate well with findings in rodents for AgNP size vs. uptake and toxicity, as well as for induction of immune effectors, while using methods that are faster and far less expensive, supporting the use of C. elegans as an alternative model for early toxicity screening.

  5. The sensitivity of cartilage contact pressures in the knee joint to the size and shape of an anatomically shaped meniscal implant

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Vrancken, A.C.T.; Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; D. Janssen; Verdonschot, N.

    2015-01-01

    Since meniscal geometry affects the cartilage contact pressures, it is essential to carefully define the geometry of the synthetic meniscal implant that we developed. Recently, six independent modes of size- and shape-related geometry variation were identified through 3D statistical shape modeling (SSM) of the medial meniscus. However, this model did not provide information on the functional importance of these geometry characteristics. Therefore, in this study finite element simulations were...

  6. Effects of Shapes of Solute Molecules on Diffusion: A Study of Dependences on Solute Size, Solvent, and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T C; Li, H T; Li, K Y

    2015-12-24

    Diffusivities of basically linear, planar, and spherical solutes at infinite dilution in various solvents are studied to unravel the effects of solute shapes on diffusion. On the basis of the relationship between the reciprocal of diffusivity and the molecular volume of solute molecules with similar shape in a given solvent at constant temperature, the diffusivities of solutes of equal molecular volume but different shapes are evaluated and the effects due to different shapes of two equal-sized solute molecules on diffusion are determined. It is found that the effects are dependent on the size of the solute pairs studied. Evidence of the dependence of the solute-shape effects on solvent properties is also demonstrated and discussed. Here, some new diffusion data of aromatic compounds in methanol at different temperatures are reported. The result for methanol in this study indicates that the effects of solute shape on diffusivity are only weakly dependent on temperature.

  7. Phase, size and shape controlled formation of aerosol generated nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, D., E-mail: d.ponce@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, WC1H 0AH London (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, M.V. [N.P. Ogarev Mordovian State University, Saransk, Republic of Mordovia 430005 (Russian Federation); Morozov, Yu.G.; Belousova, O.V. [Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region 142432 (Russian Federation); Parkin, I.P. [Department of Chemistry, Materials Chemistry Centre, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, WC1H 0AJ London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Structural and magnetic characterization of aerosol Ni nanoparticles. •Experimental parameters affecting size, shape and composition are discussed. •Larger spherical particles with the highest Ni content are produced by using an Ar flow. •Coalescence rate of primary particles is accelerated by increasing Ni feeding rate. •Ni nanoparticles show bulk-like saturation magnetization values. -- Abstract: Ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles were formed by a levitation-jet aerosol synthesis under different gas environments and metal precursor feed rates. At a constant background gas inlet temperature, it was found that a higher Ni loading resulted in enhanced particle growth through coalescence. He partial atmosphere favors surface condensation of evaporated Ni atoms over coalescence as the surface area reduction mechanism in the nanoparticles. A flow of 2.5% air in the background gas mixture was enough to oxidize 75% of the initial Ni load, inducing a drastic destabilization of particle size and shape distribution. Regardless of the background inert gas composition, necked nanoparticles were observed in samples prepared with a 1 g/h Ni feed rate, whereas discrete nanoparticles resulted from a higher feed rate of ca. 4 g/h, confirming the key role of Ni loading on the rate of coalescence. The highest saturation magnetization (51.75 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1} measured at 300 K) and the lowest coercivity (0.008 T) were obtained under an Ar flow. Zero-field cooled and field-cooled magnetization curves measured under an applied field of 10{sup −2} T revealed that the blocking processes of nanoparticles are dominated by their particle size distributions, with some features attributable to interparticle interactions.

  8. An Improved Method for Including Upper Size Range Plasmids in Metamobilomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Anders; Riber, Leise; Luo, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    cloning vector (pBR322), and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10), to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose...... the addition of an electroelution step that separates different plasmid size ranges prior to MDA in order to reduce size-dependent competition during incubation. Subsequent analyses of metamobilome data from wastewater spiked with the model plasmids showed in silica recovery of pKJK10 to be very poor...... with the established method and a 1,300-fold overrepresentation of pBR322. Conversely, complete recovery of pKJK10 was enabled with the new modified protocol although considerable care must be taken during electroelution to minimize cross-contamination between samples. For further validation, non-spiked wastewater...

  9. Investigating the effect of particle size and shape on high speed tableting through radial die-wall pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Sameh; Alshihabi, Firas; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-07-15

    Investigating particle properties such as shape and size is important in understanding the deformation behavior of powder under compression during tableting. Particle shape and size control the pattern of powder rearrangement and interaction in the die and so the final properties of the compact. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of particle size and shape on compactability. Particle friction and adhesion were investigated through radial die-wall (RDW) pressure monitoring. To fulfill this aim, powders and granules of different sizes and shapes of materials with different compaction behaviors were used. Compaction simulation using the Presster with an instrumented die was applied. Small particle size increased residual die-wall pressure (RDP) and maximum die-wall pressure (MDP) (pparticle size had an opposite effect. No effect was found on brittle material, however big particle size showed higher friction for such materials. Regarding morphology, fibrous elongated particles of microcrystalline cellulose had less friction tendency to the die-wall in comparison to rugged surface mannitol particles. RDW pressure monitoring is a useful tool to understand the compactability of particles in respect to size and shape. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare ecomorphological convergence on a complex adaptive landscape: Body size and diet mediate evolution of jaw shape in squirrels (Sciuridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelditch, Miriam Leah; Ye, Ji; Mitchell, Jonathan S; Swiderski, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    Convergence is widely regarded as compelling evidence for adaptation, often being portrayed as evidence that phenotypic outcomes are predictable from ecology, overriding contingencies of history. However, repeated outcomes may be very rare unless adaptive landscapes are simple, structured by strong ecological and functional constraints. One such constraint may be a limitation on body size because performance often scales with size, allowing species to adapt to challenging functions by modifying only size. When size is constrained, species might adapt by changing shape; convergent shapes may therefore be common when size is limiting and functions are challenging. We examine the roles of size and diet as determinants of jaw shape in Sciuridae. As expected, size and diet have significant interdependent effects on jaw shape and ecomorphological convergence is rare, typically involving demanding diets and limiting sizes. More surprising is morphological without ecological convergence, which is equally common between and within dietary classes. Those cases, like rare ecomorphological convergence, may be consequences of evolving on an adaptive landscape shaped by many-to-many relationships between ecology and function, many-to-one relationships between form and performance, and one-to-many relationships between functionally versatile morphologies and ecology. On complex adaptive landscapes, ecological selection can yield different outcomes. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Negative range size-abundance relationships in Indo-Pacific bird communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart Reeve, Andrew; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Fjeldså, Jon

    2016-01-01

    and environmental stability create selection pressures that favor narrowly specialized species, which could drive these non-positive relationships. To test this idea, we measured the range size-abundance relationships of eleven bird communities in mature and degraded forest on four islands in the Indo...... the evolution of species that are simultaneously broad-niched, small-ranged, and abundant, as water barriers limit the range expansions that would typically accompany species' attainment of high local population densities. The consistently negative relationships found across Indo-Pacific islands represent...

  12. Combined emulsifying capacity of polysaccharide particles of different size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, María; Marefati, Ali; Bordes, Romain; Gutiérrez, Gemma; Rayner, Marilyn

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study is to understand mixed systems of two types of particles with different size and shape, quinoa starch granules (NQ) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), to stabilize oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. This study considers the extent of Pickering stabilization with respect to which particle type dominates at droplet interfaces and how stability is affected by the addition of one particle type to already formed emulsions, or combining both, simultaneously. Results demonstrate that the order of addition has an influence allowing to predominantly have NQ particles at the interface when both types are added simultaneously. However when CNC is added first, both types are responsible for emulsion stabilization leading to a system with an intermediate droplet size yet with a higher stability compared to single particle formulations. A dual stabilization mechanism is observed, large particles prevent coalescence and small particles regulate the curvature of the interface and govern the droplet size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of daylight performance of solar light pipes influenced by size and shape of sunlight captures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanpeng; Jin, Rendong; Zhang, Wenming; Liu, Li; Zou, Dachao

    2009-11-01

    Experimental investigations on three different sunlight captures with diameter 150mm, 212mm, 300mm were carried out under different conditions such as sunny conditions, cloudy conditions and overcast conditions and the two different size solar light pipes with diameter 360mm and 160mm under sunny conditions. The illuminance in the middle of the sunlight capture have relationship with its size, but not linear. To improve the efficiency of the solar light pipes, the structure and the performance of the sunlight capture must be enhanced. For example, University of Science and Technology Beijing Gymnasium, Beijing 2008 Olympic events of Judo and Taekwondo, 148 solar light pipes were installed with the diameter 530mm for each light pipe. Two sunlight captures with different shape were installed and tested. From the measuring results of the illuminance on the work plane of the gymnasium, the improvement sunlight captures have better effects with the size of augmenting and the machining of the internal surface at the same time, so that the refraction increased and the efficiency of solar light pipes improved. The better effects of supplementary lighting for the gymnasium have been achieved.

  14. The Resolved Asteroid Program - Size, shape, and pole of (52) Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Carry, B.; Conrad, A.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Dumas, C.; Kaasalainen, M.; Erikson, A.; Mottola, S.; Ďurech, J.; Rousseau, G.; Behrend, R.; Casalnuovo, G. B.; Chinaglia, B.; Christou, J. C.; Chapman, C. R.; Neyman, C.

    2013-07-01

    With the adaptive optics (AO) system on the 10 m Keck-II telescope, we acquired a high quality set of 84 images at 14 epochs of asteroid (52) Europa on 2005 January 20, when it was near opposition. The epochs covered its 5.63 h rotation period and, by following its changing shape and orientation on the plane of sky, we obtained its triaxial ellipsoid dimensions and spin pole location. An independent determination from images at three epochs obtained in 2007 is in good agreement with these results. By combining these two data sets, along with a single epoch data set obtained in 2003, we have derived a global fit for (52) Europa of diameters a × b × c = (379 × 330 × 249) ± (16 × 8 × 10) km, yielding a volume-equivalent spherical-diameter of √abc3 =315±7km, and a prograde rotational pole within 7° of [RA; Dec] = [257°; +12°] in an Equatorial J2000 reference frame (Ecliptic: 255°; +35°). Using the average of all mass determinations available for (52) Europa, we derive a density of 1.5 ± 0.4 g cm-3, typical of C-type asteroids. Comparing our images with the shape model of Michalowski et al. (2004, Astron. Astrophys. 416, 353), derived from optical lightcurves, illustrates excellent agreement, although several edge features visible in the images are not rendered by the model. We therefore derived a complete 3-D description of (52) Europa's shape using the KOALA algorithm by combining our 18 AO imaging epochs with 4 stellar occultations and 49 lightcurves. We use this 3-D shape model to assess these departures from ellipsoidal shape. Flat facets (possible giant craters) appear to be less distinct on (52) Europa than on other C-types that have been imaged in detail, (253) Mathilde and (511) Davida. We show that fewer giant craters, or smaller largest-sized craters, is consistent with its expected impact history. Overall, asteroid (52) Europa is still well modeled as a smooth triaxial ellipsoid with dimensions constrained by observations obtained over

  15. Determining the dynamic range of MCPs based on pore size and strip current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C.; Adrian, M. L.; Herrero, F.; James, P.; Jones, H. H.; Rodriguez, M.; Roman, P.; Shappirio, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) are used as detectors for almost all detectors measuring particles (both ions, electrons and neutrals) below 30 keV. Recent advances in the manufacturing technology of the MCPs have increased the number of options one has when selecting plates for an instrument. But it is not clear how many of these options affect the performance of the MCPs. In particular the dynamic range is not a clear cut calculation to make from the strip current. There is also some evidence that pore size and coating play a role. We measured the dynamic range and pulse height distribution of MCPs detector chevron stacks with a wide variety of strip currents from the low “normal” range in the EDR range. We also looked at the effects of varying the pore size from 25 microns to 10 microns, partial plating of the MCP surface and coating one surface on each MCP with gold rather than the standard zinc chromium. We will show how the dynamic range and pulse height distributions vary vs. strip current, pore size, and surface plating configurations.

  16. It's just sand between the toes: how particle size and shape variation affect running performance and kinematics in a generalist lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Philip J; Pettinelli, Kyle J; Crockett, Marian E; Schaper, Erika G

    2017-10-15

    Animals must cope with and be able to move effectively on a variety of substrates. Substrates composed of granular media, such as sand and gravel, are extremely common in nature, and vary tremendously in particle size and shape. Despite many studies of the properties of granular media and comparisons of locomotion between granular and solid substrates, the effects of systematically manipulating these media on locomotion is poorly understood. We studied granular media ranging over four orders of magnitude in particle size, and differing in the amount of particle shape variation, to determine how these factors affected substrate physical properties and sprinting in the generalist lizard Eremias arguta We found that media with intermediate particle sizes had high bulk densities, low angles of stability and low load-bearing capacities. Rock substrates with high shape variation had higher values for all three properties than glass bead substrates with low shape variation. We found that E. arguta had the highest maximum velocities and accelerations on intermediate size particles, and higher velocities on rock than glass beads. Lizards had higher stride frequencies and lower duty factors on intermediate particle size substrates, but their stride lengths did not change with substrate. Our findings suggest that sand and gravel may represent different locomotor challenges for animals. Sand substrates provide animals with an even surface for running, but particles shift underfoot. In contrast, gravel particles are heavy, so move far less underfoot, yet provide the animal with an uneven substrate. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the size and shape of protein microcrystals using Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Kirkwood, H. J.; Phillips, N. W.; Hoxley, D.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Maxey, E.; Abbey, B.

    2016-03-14

    Three-dimensional imaging of protein crystals during X-ray diffraction experiments opens up a range of possibilities for optimising crystal quality and gaining new insights into the fundamental processes that drive radiation damage. Obtaining this information at the appropriate lengthscales however is extremely challenging. One approach that has been recently demonstrated as a promising avenue for charactering the size and shape of protein crystals at nanometre lengthscales is Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (BCDI). BCDI is a recently developed technique that is able to recover the phase of the continuous diffraction intensity signal around individual Bragg peaks. When data is collected at multiple points on a rocking curve a Reciprocal Space Map (RSM) can be assembled and then inverted using BCDI to obtain a three-dimensional image of the crystal. The first demonstration of two-dimensional BCDI of protein crystals was reported by Boutet at al., recently this work was extended to the study of radiation damage of micron-sized crystals. Here we present the first three-dimensional reconstructions of a Lysozyme protein crystal using BDI. The results are validated against RSM and TEM data and have implications for both radiation damage studies and for developing new approaches to structure retrieval from micron-sized protein crystals.

  18. Fourier-based quantification of renal glomeruli size using Hough transform and shape descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafian, Sohrab; Beigzadeh, Borhan; Riahi, Mohammad; Khadir Chamazkoti, Fatemeh; Pouramir, Mahdi

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of glomeruli geometry is important in histopathological evaluation of renal microscopic images. Due to the shape and size disparity of even glomeruli of same kidney, automatic detection of these renal objects is not an easy task. Although manual measurements are time consuming and at times are not very accurate, it is commonly used in medical centers. In this paper, a new method based on Fourier transform following usage of some shape descriptors is proposed to detect these objects and their geometrical parameters. Reaching the goal, a database of 400 regions are selected randomly. 200 regions of which are part of glomeruli and the other 200 regions are not belong to renal corpuscles. ROC curve is used to decide which descriptor could classify two groups better. f_measure, which is a combination of both tpr (true positive rate) and fpr (false positive rate), is also proposed to select optimal threshold for descriptors. Combination of three parameters (solidity, eccentricity, and also mean squared error of fitted ellipse) provided better result in terms of f_measure to distinguish desired regions. Then, Fourier transform of outer edges is calculated to form a complete curve out of separated region(s). The generality of proposed model is verified by use of cross validation method, which resulted tpr of 94%, and fpr of 5%. Calculation of glomerulus' and Bowman's space with use of the algorithm are also compared with a non-automatic measurement done by a renal pathologist, and errors of 5.9%, 5.4%, and 6.26% are resulted in calculation of Capsule area, Bowman space, and glomeruli area, respectively. Having tested different glomeruli with various shapes, the experimental consequences show robustness and reliability of our method. Therefore, it could be used to illustrate renal diseases and glomerular disorders by measuring the morphological changes accurately and expeditiously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Size And Shape of Detergent Micelles Determined By Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Columbus, Linda; Chu, Vincent B.; Lesley, Scott A.; Doniach, Sebastian; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Pasteur Inst., Paris /Scripps Res. Inst. /Novartis Res. Found.

    2009-04-29

    We present a systematic analysis of the aggregation number and shape of micelles formed by nine detergents commonly used in the study of membrane proteins. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements are reported for glucosides with 8 and 9 alkyl carbons (OG/NG), maltosides and phosphocholines with 10 and 12 alkyl carbons (DM/DDM and FC-10/FC-12), 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS). The SAXS intensities are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with a dense outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core. These models provide an intermediate resolution view of micelle size and shape. In addition, we show that Guinier analysis of the forward scattering intensity can be used to obtain an independent and model-free measurement of the micelle aggregation number and radius of gyration. This approach has the advantage of being easily generalizable to protein-detergent complexes, where simple geometric models are inapplicable. Furthermore, we have discovered that the position of the second maximum in the scattering intensity provides a direct measurement of the characteristic head group-head group spacing across the micelle core. Our results for the micellar aggregation numbers and dimensions agree favorably with literature values as far as they are available. We de novo determine the shape of FC-10, FC-12, DM, LPPG, and CHAPS micelles and the aggregation numbers of FC-10 and OG to be ca. 50 and 250, respectively. Combined, these data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle formation and serve as a starting point to correlate detergent properties with detergent-protein interactions.

  20. The size, shape, density and ring of the dwarf planet Haumea from a stellar occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Sicardy, B.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Bérard, D.; Morales, N.; Duffard, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Hopp, U.; Ries, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Marzari, F.; Granata, V.; Pál, A.; Kiss, C.; Pribulla, T.; Komžík, R.; Hornoch, K.; Pravec, P.; Bacci, P.; Maestripieri, M.; Nerli, L.; Mazzei, L.; Bachini, M.; Martinelli, F.; Succi, G.; Ciabattari, F.; Mikuz, H.; Carbognani, A.; Gaehrken, B.; Mottola, S.; Hellmich, S.; Rommel, F. L.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Bagatin, A. Campo; Cikota, S.; Cikota, A.; Lecacheux, J.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Assafin, M.; Colas, F.; Behrend, R.; Desmars, J.; Meza, E.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Beisker, W.; Gomes-Junior, A. R.; Morgado, B. E.; Roques, F.; Vachier, F.; Berthier, J.; Mueller, T. G.; Madiedo, J. M.; Unsalan, O.; Sonbas, E.; Karaman, N.; Erece, O.; Koseoglu, D. T.; Ozisik, T.; Kalkan, S.; Guney, Y.; Niaei, M. S.; Satir, O.; Yesilyaprak, C.; Puskullu, C.; Kabas, A.; Demircan, O.; Alikakos, J.; Charmandaris, V.; Leto, G.; Ohlert, J.; Christille, J. M.; Szakáts, R.; Farkas, A. Takácsné; Varga-Verebélyi, E.; Marton, G.; Marciniak, A.; Bartczak, P.; Santana-Ros, T.; Butkiewicz-Bąk, M.; Dudziński, G.; Alí-Lagoa, V.; Gazeas, K.; Tzouganatos, L.; Paschalis, N.; Tsamis, V.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.; Guirado, J. C.; Peris, V.; Iglesias-Marzoa, R.

    2017-10-01

    Haumea—one of the four known trans-Neptunian dwarf planets—is a very elongated and rapidly rotating body. In contrast to other dwarf planets, its size, shape, albedo and density are not well constrained. The Centaur Chariklo was the first body other than a giant planet known to have a ring system, and the Centaur Chiron was later found to possess something similar to Chariklo’s rings. Here we report observations from multiple Earth-based observatories of Haumea passing in front of a distant star (a multi-chord stellar occultation). Secondary events observed around the main body of Haumea are consistent with the presence of a ring with an opacity of 0.5, width of 70 kilometres and radius of about 2,287 kilometres. The ring is coplanar with both Haumea’s equator and the orbit of its satellite Hi’iaka. The radius of the ring places it close to the 3:1 mean-motion resonance with Haumea’s spin period—that is, Haumea rotates three times on its axis in the time that a ring particle completes one revolution. The occultation by the main body provides an instantaneous elliptical projected shape with axes of about 1,704 kilometres and 1,138 kilometres. Combined with rotational light curves, the occultation constrains the three-dimensional orientation of Haumea and its triaxial shape, which is inconsistent with a homogeneous body in hydrostatic equilibrium. Haumea’s largest axis is at least 2,322 kilometres, larger than previously thought, implying an upper limit for its density of 1,885 kilograms per cubic metre and a geometric albedo of 0.51, both smaller than previous estimates. In addition, this estimate of the density of Haumea is closer to that of Pluto than are previous estimates, in line with expectations. No global nitrogen- or methane-dominated atmosphere was detected.

  1. Scalable shape- and size-controlled synthesis of metal nano-alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-21

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a continuous-flow reactor, methods of making metal nano-alloys, and metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the continuous-flow reactor includes a first tubular component having a tubular inlet and a tubular outlet, and a heated tube-in-tube gas reactor fluidly connected to the first tubular component, wherein the heated tube-in-tube gas reactor comprises an inner tube having a gas permeable surface and an outer tube. An embodiment of the method of producing metal nano-alloys, includes contacting a reducible metal precursor and a reducing fluid in a continuous-flow reactor to form a mixed solution; and flowing the mixed solution through the continuous-flow reactor for a residence time to form the metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the composition includes a plurality of metal nano-alloys having a monodisperse size distribution and a uniform shape distribution.

  2. Twin study of genetic and environmental influences on adult body size, shape, and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, K; Visscher, P M; Erbas, B

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic and environmental influences on adult body size, shape, and composition in women and men, and to assess the impact of age. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study of 325 female and 299 male like-sex healthy twin pairs, on average 38 y old (18-67 y......), we determined zygosity by DNA similarity, and performed anthropometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. The contribution to the total phenotypic variance of genetic, common environment, and individual environment was estimated in multivariate analysis using the FISHER program....... Further, these variance components were analysed as linear functions of age. RESULTS: In both women and men genetic contributions were significant for all phenotypes. Heritability for body mass index was 0.58 and 0.63; for body fat%, 0.59 and 0.63; for total skinfolds, 0.61 and 0.65; for extremity...

  3. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Scafidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained for a panel with internal defects, and are used to build an image of the cross section of the panel. The proposed automatic procedure allows the definition of size, position and shape of defects in panels of known thickness

  4. Influence of grain size, shape and compaction on georadar waves: example of an Aeolian dune

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Dujardin, Jean-Rémi; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05577.x

    2012-01-01

    Many Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles acquired in dry aeolian environment have shown good reflectivity inside present-day dunes. We show that the origin of this reflectivity is related to changes in grain size distribution, packing and/or grain shape in a sandy material. We integrate these three parameters into analytical models for bulk permittivity in order to predict the reflections and the velocity of GPR waves. We consider two GPR cross-sections acquired over Aeolian dunes in the Chadian desert. The 2D migration of GPR data suggests that dunes contain different kinds of bounding surfaces. We discuss and model three kinds of reflections using reasonable geological hypothesis about Aeolian sedimentation processes. The propagation and the reflection of radar waves are calculated using the 1D wavelet modelling method in spectral domain. The results of the forward modelling are in good accordance with real observed data.

  5. Solvent-Free Strategy Yields Size and Shape-Uniform Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana M S; Mano, João F

    2017-01-25

    Capsules with a liquefied core were fabricated via the assembly of polymeric droplets induced by superamphiphobic surfaces. These highly repellent substrates exhibit distinct features such as (i) an easy and precise control over the particle size and shape, (ii) a high encapsulation efficiency, (iii) mild processing conditions, and (iv) the possibility to include any object in either a water or oil-based liquid core, which are not found on the current available strategies. As proof of concept, a photo-cross-linkable derivative of chitosan was used to produce the polymeric shell while a wealth variety of template cores were tested using a reversible cross-linking mechanism, interfacial gelation process or ice. Owing to the widespread application of polymeric capsules, the developed strategy is poised to usher the development of the next generation of materials not only for biomedical purposes but also for cosmetics, agriculture and electronics.

  6. Penetration of nanoparticles in 5 nm to 400 nm size range through two selected fibrous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochot, C.; Mouret, G.; Michielsen, N.; Chazelet, S.; Thomas, D.

    2011-07-01

    Due to the strong development of nanotechnologies, ultrafine particles could represent a growing hazard for workers health. When it is not possible to reduce the risk at its source, filtration systems are one of the means used to limit the exposure to hazardous substances such as airborne particles. The aim of this study is to measure the penetration of nanoparticles on a very large diameter range, from the nanometer size to the most penetrating particle size (MPPS). Here we present experimental results obtained for three different types of nanoparticles. Measurements of nanoparticle penetration through two low efficiency fiberglass media are carried out using two test benches presented in this article. Penetration values for carbon, copper and NaCl nanoparticles decreases with particle size, as predicted by theory. The value of the most penetrating particle size is situated between 100 and 300 nm. No thermal rebound was observed in this particle size range. The penetration values will be used, in further studies, to determine a global penetration model.

  7. Penetration of nanoparticles in 5 nm to 400 nm size range through two selected fibrous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochot, C; Michielsen, N [Aerosol Physics and Metrology Laboratory, Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, BP68 - 91192, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Mouret, G; Thomas, D [Laboratoire Reactions et Genie des Procedes, Nancy Universite, BP 20451 - 54001 Nancy (France); Chazelet, S, E-mail: clothilde.brochot@irsn.fr [Laboratory of polluant and air cleaning process, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Rue du Morvan CS 60027 - 54519 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France)

    2011-07-06

    Due to the strong development of nanotechnologies, ultrafine particles could represent a growing hazard for workers health. When it is not possible to reduce the risk at its source, filtration systems are one of the means used to limit the exposure to hazardous substances such as airborne particles. The aim of this study is to measure the penetration of nanoparticles on a very large diameter range, from the nanometer size to the most penetrating particle size (MPPS). Here we present experimental results obtained for three different types of nanoparticles. Measurements of nanoparticle penetration through two low efficiency fiberglass media are carried out using two test benches presented in this article. Penetration values for carbon, copper and NaCl nanoparticles decreases with particle size, as predicted by theory. The value of the most penetrating particle size is situated between 100 and 300 nm. No thermal rebound was observed in this particle size range. The penetration values will be used, in further studies, to determine a global penetration model.

  8. Biotemplating pores with size and shape diversity for Li-oxygen Battery Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dahyun; Ozgit-Akgun, Çagla; Akca, Esin; Thompson, Leslie E.; Tadesse, Loza F.; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Demirci, Gökhan; Miller, Robert D.; Maune, Hareem

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic porogens provide an easy way to create porous structures, but their usage is limited due to synthetic difficulties, process complexities and prohibitive costs. Here we investigate the use of bacteria, sustainable and naturally abundant materials, as a pore template. The bacteria require no chemical synthesis, come in variable sizes and shapes, degrade easier and are approximately a million times cheaper than conventional porogens. We fabricate free standing porous multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films using cultured, harmless bacteria as porogens, and demonstrate substantial Li-oxygen battery performance improvement by porosity control. Pore volume as well as shape in the cathodes were easily tuned to improve oxygen evolution efficiency by 30% and double the full discharge capacity in repeated cycles compared to the compact MWCNT electrode films. The interconnected pores produced by the templates greatly improve the accessibility of reactants allowing the achievement of 4,942 W/kg (8,649 Wh/kg) at 2 A/ge (1.7 mA/cm2).

  9. Shape and Size of the Fission Yeast Nucleus are governed by Equilibrium Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Gerald; Huber, Greg; Miller, Jonathan; Sazer, Shelley

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear morphogenesis in the asexual reproduction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) consists of two stages: (i) volume-doubling growth, in which a round nucleus inflates uniformly, and (ii) division, in which the nucleus undergoes shape changes from round to oblong to peanut to dumbbell before it resolves into two smaller, round daughter nuclei, driven by the formation and elongation of a microtubule-based spindle within the nucleus. The combined volume of the daughter nuclei immediately after division is the same as the volume of the single nucleus at the onset of division. Consequently, the nuclear envelope (NE) area must increase by 26% during division. We are developing a model in order to determine the mechanics governing these shape and size changes. It is based on current knowledge of the nuclear structure, insight from normal and abnormal nuclei, and concepts from the mechanics governing lipid-bilayer membranes. We predict that (a) the NE prefers to be flat, (b) the NE is under tension, (c) the nucleus has an internal pressure, (d) nuclear growth is governed by the Law of Laplace, and (e) some abnormal nuclei behave like vesicles with encapsulated microtubules.

  10. Effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltani M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor shape and size effect on drug delivery to solid tumors are studied, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for predefined tumor geometries. The governing equations are solved using a numerical method, the element-based finite volume method. Interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are used to show the details of drug delivery in a solid tumor, under an assumption that drug particles flow with the interstitial fluid. Drug delivery problems have been most extensively researched in spherical tumors, which have been the simplest to examine with the analytical methods. With our numerical method, however, more complex shapes of the tumor can be studied. The numerical model of fluid flow in solid tumors previously introduced by our group is further developed to incorporate and investigate non-spherical tumors such as prolate and oblate ones. Also the effects of the surface area per unit volume of the tissue, vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivity on drug delivery are investigated.

  11. Dependence of micelle size and shape on detergent alkyl chain length and head group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Oliver

    Full Text Available Micelle-forming detergents provide an amphipathic environment that can mimic lipid bilayers and are important tools for solubilizing membrane proteins for functional and structural investigations in vitro. However, the formation of a soluble protein-detergent complex (PDC currently relies on empirical screening of detergents, and a stable and functional PDC is often not obtained. To provide a foundation for systematic comparisons between the properties of the detergent micelle and the resulting PDC, a comprehensive set of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies are systematically investigated. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, micelle shapes and sizes are determined for phosphocholines with 10, 12, and 14 alkyl carbons, glucosides with 8, 9, and 10 alkyl carbons, maltosides with 8, 10, and 12 alkyl carbons, and lysophosphatidyl glycerols with 14 and 16 alkyl carbons. The SAXS profiles are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with an electron rich outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains. The minor axis of the elliptical micelle core from these models is constrained by the length of the alkyl chain, and increases by 1.2-1.5 Å per carbon addition to the alkyl chain. The major elliptical axis also increases with chain length; however, the ellipticity remains approximately constant for each detergent series. In addition, the aggregation number of these detergents increases by ∼16 monomers per micelle for each alkyl carbon added. The data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle shape and size and provide a baseline for correlating micelle properties with protein-detergent interactions.

  12. Hoof size, shape, and balance as possible risk factors for catastrophic musculoskeletal injury of Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, A J; Stover, S M; Gardner, I A; Bock, K B; Case, J T; Johnson, B J; Anderson, M L; Barr, B C; Daft, B M; Kinde, H; Larochelle, D; Moore, J; Mysore, J; Stoltz, J; Woods, L; Read, D H; Ardans, A A

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate hoof size, shape, and balance as risk factors for catastrophic musculoskeletal injuries (CMI), including suspensory apparatus failure (SAF) and cannon bone condylar fracture (CDY) in Thoroughbred racehorses. 95 Thoroughbred racehorses that died between 1994 and 1996. 38 quantitative measures of hoof size, shape, and balance were obtained from orthogonal digital images of the hoof and were compared between case horses with forelimb CMI (70), SAF (43), and CDY (10) injuries and control horses whose death was unrelated to the musculoskeletal system (non-CMI, 25). Comparison of group means between cases and controls was done using ANOVA, and multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Odds of CMI were 0.62 times lower for a 5mm increase in ground surface width difference and 0.49 times lower for a 100-mm2 increase in sole area difference. Odds of SAF were 6.75 times greater with a 10 degrees increase in toe-heel angle difference and 0.58 times lower with a 100-mm2 increase in sole area difference. Odds of CDY were 0.26 times lower with a 3 degrees increase in toe angle, 0.15 times lower with a 5-mm increase in lateral ground surface width, and 0.35 times lower with a 100-mm2 increase in sole area difference. Decreasing the difference between toe and heel angles should decrease risk of SAF for Thoroughbred racehorses and should be considered in addition to increasing toe angle alone to help prevent catastrophic injury. Trimming the hoof to perfect mediolateral symmetry may not be a sound approach to avoiding injury.

  13. Correlating particle size and shape of supported Ru/gamma-Al2O3 catalysts with NH3 decomposition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ayman M; Prasad, Vinay; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Lonergan, William W; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Chen, Jingguang G; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2009-09-02

    While ammonia synthesis and decomposition on Ru are known to be structure-sensitive reactions, the effect of particle shape on controlling the particle size giving maximum turnover frequency (TOF) is not understood. By controlling the catalyst pretreatment conditions, we have varied the particle size and shape of supported Ru/gamma-Al(2)O(3) catalysts. The Ru particle shape was reconstructed by combining microscopy, chemisorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. We show that the particle shape can change from a round one, for smaller particles, to an elongated, flat one, for larger particles, with suitable pretreatment. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the calcination most likely leads to planar structures. We show for the first time that the number of active (here B(5)) sites is highly dependent on particle shape and increases with particle size up to 7 nm for flat nanoparticles. The maximum TOF (based on total exposed Ru atoms) and number of active (B(5)) sites occur at approximately 7 nm for elongated nanoparticles compared to at approximately 1.8-3 nm for hemispherical nanoparticles. A complete, first-principles based microkinetic model is constructed that can quantitatively describe for the first time the effect of varying particle size and shape on Ru activity and provide further support of the characterization results. In very small nanoparticles, particle size polydispersity (due to the presence of larger particles) appears to be responsible for the observed activity.

  14. Pose and Shape Reconstruction of a Noncooperative Spacecraft Using Camera and Range Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renato Volpe; Marco Sabatini; Giovanni B. Palmerini

    2017-01-01

    .... Various mission architectures have been either tested in space or studied on Earth. The present study deals with on-orbit relative pose and shape estimation with the use of a monocular camera and a distance sensor...

  15. Microstructure as a function of the grain size distribution for packings of frictionless disks: Effects of the size span and the shape of the distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nicolas; Oquendo, W. F.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents a numerical study of the effects of grain size distribution (GSD) on the microstructure of two-dimensional packings of frictionless disks. The GSD is described by a power law with two parameters controlling the size span and the shape of the distribution. First, several samples are built for each combination of these parameters. Then, by means of contact dynamics simulations, the samples are densified in oedometric conditions and sheared in a simple shear configuration. The microstructure is analyzed in terms of packing fraction, local ordering, connectivity, and force transmission properties. It is shown that the microstructure is notoriously affected by both the size span and the shape of the GSD. These findings confirm recent observations regarding the size span of the GSD and extend previous works by describing the effects of the GSD shape. Specifically, we find that if the GSD shape is varied by increasing the proportion of small grains by a certain amount, it is possible to increase the packing fraction, increase coordination, and decrease the proportion of floating particles. Thus, by carefully controlling the GSD shape, it is possible to obtain systems that are denser and better connected, probably increasing the system's robustness and optimizing important strength properties such as stiffness, cohesion, and fragmentation susceptibility.

  16. Plastic superconductor bearings any size, any shape, 77 k and up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reick, Franklin G.

    1990-01-01

    Friction free bearings at 77 k or higher are possible using the high T(sub c) copper oxide ceramic superconductors. The conventional method for making such bearings is to use a sintered ceramic monolith. This puts great restraints on size, shape and postforming machining. The material is hard and abrasive. It's possible to grind up ceramic superconductors and suspend the granules in a suitable matrix. Mechanical properties improve and are largely dependent on the binder. The Meissner effect is confined to individual grains containing electron vortices. Tracks, rails, levitation areas and bearings can be made this way with conventional plastic molding and extruding machines or by painting. The parts are easily machined. The sacrifice is in bulk electrical conductivity. A percolating wick feel for LN2 can be used to cool remote superconductors and large areas quite effectively. A hollow spheroid or cylinder of superconductor material can be molded with the internal surfaces shielded by the Meissner effect. It might be thought of as the dc magnetic analogue of the Faraday cage and the inside can be called the Meissner space. It's selective. The ac fields are transmitted with minor attenuation. Particle size and distribution have a profound effect on final magnetic and electrical characteristics.

  17. Plastic superconductor bearings any size-any shape: 77 K and up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reick, Franklin G.

    1991-01-01

    'Friction free' bearings at 77 K or higher are possible using the high T(sub c) copper oxide ceramic superconductors. The conventional method for making such bearings is to use a sintered ceramic monolith. This puts great restraints on size, shape, and postforming machining. The material is hard and abrasive. It is possible to grind up ceramic superconductors and suspend the granules in a suitable matrix. Mechanical properties improve and are largely dependent on the binder. The Meissner effect is confined to individual grains containing electron vortices. Tracks, rails, levitation areas, and bearings can be made this way with conventional plastic molding and extruding machines or by painting. The parts are easily machined. The sacrifice is in bulk electrical conductivity. A percolating wick feed for LN2 is used to cool remote superconductors and large areas quite effectively. A hollow spheroid or cylinder of superconductor material is molded with the internal surfaces shielded by the Meissner effect. It can be thought of as the DC magnetic analog of the Faraday cage and the inside is the 'Meissner space'. It is selective. The AC fields are transmitted with minor attenuation. Particle size and distribution have a profound effect on final magnetic and electrical characteristics.

  18. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Eason, Perri K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders.

  19. Junior High School Students' Ideas about the Shape and Size of the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2012-08-01

    The concept of the atom is one of the building blocks of science education. Although the concept is a foundation for students' subsequent learning experiences, it is difficult for students to comprehend because of common misconceptions and its abstractness. The purpose of this study is to examine junior high school students' (ages 12-13) ideas about the shape and size of the atom and the evolution of these ideas over 2 years. The study's sample size was 126 students, including 76 sixth-grade and 50 seventh-grade students. The educational curriculum and relevant literature guided the development of a questionnaire that consisted of three open-ended questions intended to determine students' knowledge of the structure and physical properties of the atom. After administering the questionnaire, collected data were analysed qualitatively. The study shows that students had difficulty developing a mental image of the atom, and contrary to the conclusions of other studies, students demonstrated a preference for working with complex and abstract models.

  20. Effect of pore size and shape on the thermal conductivity of metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hasan; McGaughey, Alan J H; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pore size and shape on the thermal conductivity of a series of idealized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) containing adsorbed gas using molecular simulations. With no gas present, the thermal conductivity decreases with increasing pore size. In the presence of adsorbed gas, MOFs with smaller pores experience reduced thermal conductivity due to phonon scattering introduced by gas-crystal interactions. In contrast, for larger pores (>1.7 nm), the adsorbed gas does not significantly affect thermal conductivity. This difference is due to the decreased probability of gas-crystal collisions in larger pore structures. In contrast to MOFs with simple cubic pores, the thermal conductivity in structures with triangular and hexagonal pore channels exhibits significant anisotropy. For different pore geometries at the same atomic density, hexagonal channel MOFs have both the highest and lowest thermal conductivities, along and across the channel direction, respectively. In the triangular and hexagonal channeled structures, the presence of gas molecules has different effects on thermal conductivity along different crystallographic directions.

  1. An improved method for including upper size range plasmids in metamobilomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Norman

    Full Text Available Two recently developed isolation methods have shown promise when recovering pure community plasmid DNA (metamobilomes/plasmidomes, which is useful in conducting culture-independent investigations into plasmid ecology. However, both methods employ multiple displacement amplification (MDA to ensure suitable quantities of plasmid DNA for high-throughput sequencing. This study demonstrates that MDA greatly favors smaller circular DNA elements (10 Kbp. Throughout the study, we used two model plasmids, a 4.4 Kbp cloning vector (pBR322, and a 56 Kbp conjugative plasmid (pKJK10, to represent lower- and upper plasmid size ranges, respectively. Subjecting a mixture of these plasmids to the overall isolation protocol revealed a 34-fold over-amplification of pBR322 after MDA. To address this bias, we propose the addition of an electroelution step that separates different plasmid size ranges prior to MDA in order to reduce size-dependent competition during incubation. Subsequent analyses of metamobilome data from wastewater spiked with the model plasmids showed in silica recovery of pKJK10 to be very poor with the established method and a 1,300-fold overrepresentation of pBR322. Conversely, complete recovery of pKJK10 was enabled with the new modified protocol although considerable care must be taken during electroelution to minimize cross-contamination between samples. For further validation, non-spiked wastewater metamobilomes were mapped to more than 2,500 known plasmid genomes. This displayed an overall recovery of plasmids well into the upper size range (median size: 30 kilobases with the modified protocol. Analysis of de novo assembled metamobilome data also suggested distinctly better recovery of larger plasmids, as gene functions associated with these plasmids, such as conjugation, was exclusively encoded in the data output generated through the modified protocol. Thus, with the suggested modification, access to a large uncharacterized pool of

  2. High throughput holographic imaging-in-flow for the analysis of a wide plankton size range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourassowsky, Catherine; Dubois, Frank

    2014-03-24

    We developed a Digital Holographic Microscope (DHM) working with a partial coherent source specifically adapted to perform high throughput recording of holograms of plankton organisms in-flow, in a size range of 3 µm-300 µm, which is of importance for this kind of applications. This wide size range is achieved with the same flow cell and with the same microscope magnification. The DHM configuration combines a high magnification with a large field of view and provides high-resolution intensity and quantitative phase images refocusing on high sample flow rate. Specific algorithms were developed to detect and extract automatically the particles and organisms present in the samples in order to build holograms of each one that are used for holographic refocusing and quantitative phase contrast imaging. Experimental results are shown and discussed.

  3. Self-supporting nanopore membranes with controlled pore size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe-Xue; Namboodiri, Arya; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2008-05-01

    Self-supporting membranes containing either isolated or organized arrays of nanosized pores have been prepared using a nonlithographic approach by coupling sol-gel processing, thin film preparation, and templating. Specifically, polystyrene latex spheres were doped into a hybrid sol prepared from tetraethoxysilane and dimethyldiethoxysilane and the resultant sol spin cast on a sacrificial support. Upon removal of the template and the sacrificial support, the self-supporting nanopore membranes were transferred to glass for characterization by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Through variations in the thickness of the membranes and the size of the polystyrene latex spheres, the geometry (cylinder-like to asymmetric-like) and the dimensions of the nanopores were altered. Pores with diameters that range from 35 to 2100 nm, aspect ratios (defined as the top pore diameter divided by the bottom pore diameter) from 1-4, and depths (effective film thickness) from 50 to 1500 nms have been prepared using templates that range in diameter from 100 to 3100 nm. The method described employs "wet-chemistry", is highly versatile, and is easily amenable to modification by utilizing templates of different sizes and geometries to create stable membranes with different pore geometries and sizes that can be used as platforms for nanofiltration and/or chemical sensors.

  4. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  5. Estimating the sample mean and standard deviation from the sample size, median, range and/or interquartile range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Wang, Wenqian; Liu, Jiming; Tong, Tiejun

    2014-12-19

    In systematic reviews and meta-analysis, researchers often pool the results of the sample mean and standard deviation from a set of similar clinical trials. A number of the trials, however, reported the study using the median, the minimum and maximum values, and/or the first and third quartiles. Hence, in order to combine results, one may have to estimate the sample mean and standard deviation for such trials. In this paper, we propose to improve the existing literature in several directions. First, we show that the sample standard deviation estimation in Hozo et al.'s method (BMC Med Res Methodol 5:13, 2005) has some serious limitations and is always less satisfactory in practice. Inspired by this, we propose a new estimation method by incorporating the sample size. Second, we systematically study the sample mean and standard deviation estimation problem under several other interesting settings where the interquartile range is also available for the trials. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed methods through simulation studies for the three frequently encountered scenarios, respectively. For the first two scenarios, our method greatly improves existing methods and provides a nearly unbiased estimate of the true sample standard deviation for normal data and a slightly biased estimate for skewed data. For the third scenario, our method still performs very well for both normal data and skewed data. Furthermore, we compare the estimators of the sample mean and standard deviation under all three scenarios and present some suggestions on which scenario is preferred in real-world applications. In this paper, we discuss different approximation methods in the estimation of the sample mean and standard deviation and propose some new estimation methods to improve the existing literature. We conclude our work with a summary table (an Excel spread sheet including all formulas) that serves as a comprehensive guidance for performing meta-analysis in different

  6. Sexual size and shape dimorphism and allometric scaling patterns in head traits in the New Zealand common gecko Woodworthia maculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Clint D

    2015-08-01

    Sexual dimorphism in shape and size is widespread across animal taxa and arises when natural or sexual selection operates differently on the sexes. Male and female common geckos (Woodworthia maculatus; formerly Hoplodactylus maculatus) in New Zealand do not appear to experience different viability selection pressure, nor do males appear to be under intense pre-copulatory sexual selection. It was therefore predicted that this species would be sexually monomorphic with regard to body size and the size and shape of the head. In line with the prediction, there was no sexual difference in head width, depth, or length or in lateral head shape. However, contrary to prediction, males had a larger body and lateral head size than females. This study suggests that males, at least on Maud Island, NZ, might be under stronger pre-copulatory sexual selection than previously recognized and thus have evolved larger heads (i.e. lateral head size) for use in male combat for females. Allometric scaling patterns do not differ between the sexes and suggest that head width and depth are under directional selection whereas lateral head size is under stabilizing selection. Diet ecology - an agent of natural selection common to both sexes - is likely largely responsible for the observed patterns of head size and shape and the lack of sexual dimorphism in them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Morpho morphometrics: Shared ancestry and selection drive the evolution of wing size and shape in Morpho butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Nicolas; Panara, Stephen; Zilbermann, Nicolas; Blandin, Patrick; Le Poul, Yann; Cornette, Raphaël; Elias, Marianne; Debat, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wings harbor highly diverse phenotypes and are involved in many functions. Wing size and shape result from interactions between adaptive processes, phylogenetic history, and developmental constraints, which are complex to disentangle. Here, we focus on the genus Morpho (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, 30 species), which presents a high diversity of sizes, shapes, and color patterns. First, we generate a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of these 30 species. Next, using 911 collection specimens, we quantify the variation of wing size and shape across species, to assess the importance of shared ancestry, microhabitat use, and sexual selection in the evolution of the wings. While accounting for phylogenetic and allometric effects, we detect a significant difference in wing shape but not size among microhabitats. Fore and hindwings covary at the individual and species levels, and the covariation differs among microhabitats. However, the microhabitat structure in covariation disappears when phylogenetic relationships are taken into account. Our results demonstrate that microhabitat has driven wing shape evolution, although it has not strongly affected forewing and hindwing integration. We also found that sexual dimorphism of forewing shape and color pattern are coupled, suggesting a common selective force. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Improvement of Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Jiang, Pengzhi; Xu, Xiaojun; Du, Shaojun

    2011-07-04

    We propose and demonstrate the improvement of conventional Galilean refractive beam shaping system for accurately generating near-diffraction-limited flattop beam with arbitrary beam size. Based on the detailed study of the refractive beam shaping system, we found that the conventional Galilean beam shaper can only work well for the magnifying beam shaping. Taking the transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with high order Fermi-Dirac flattop profile as an example, the shaper can only work well at the condition that the size of input and target beam meets R(0) ≥ 1.3 w(0). For the improvement, the shaper is regarded as the combination of magnifying and demagnifying beam shaping system. The surface and phase distributions of the improved Galilean beam shaping system are derived based on Geometric and Fourier Optics. By using the improved Galilean beam shaper, the accurate transformation of input beam with Gaussian irradiance distribution into target beam with flattop irradiance distribution is realized. The irradiance distribution of the output beam is coincident with that of the target beam and the corresponding phase distribution is maintained. The propagation performance of the output beam is greatly improved. Studies of the influences of beam size and beam order on the improved Galilean beam shaping system show that restriction of beam size has been greatly reduced. This improvement can also be used to redistribute the input beam with complicated irradiance distribution into output beam with complicated irradiance distribution.

  9. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Otto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006, dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  10. Home range size and choice of management strategy for lynx in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, J D; Andersen, R; Kvam, T; Andrén, H; Liberg, O; Odden, J; Moa, P F

    2001-06-01

    Annual and seasonal home ranges were calculated for 47 Eurasian lynx in four Scandinavian study sites (two in Sweden and two in Norway). The observed home ranges were the largest reported for the species, with study site averages ranging from 600 to 1,400 km2 for resident males and from 300 to 800 km2 for resident females. When home range sizes were compared to the size of protected areas (national parks and nature reserves) in Scandinavia, it was concluded that very few protected areas contained sufficient forest to provide space for more than a few individuals. As a direct consequence of this, most lynx need to be conserved in the multiuse semi-natural forest habitats that cover large areas in Scandinavia. This conservation strategy leads to a number of conflicts with some land uses (sheep and semidomestic reindeer herding, and roe deer hunters), but not all (forestry and moose harvest). Accordingly research must be aimed at understanding the ecology of these conflicts, and finding solutions.

  11. Does Glass Size and Shape Influence Judgements of the Volume of Wine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechey, Rachel; Attwood, Angela S; Couturier, Dominique-Laurent; Munafò, Marcus R; Scott-Samuel, Nicholas E; Woods, Andy; Marteau, Theresa M

    2015-01-01

    Judgements of volume may influence the rate of consumption of alcohol and, in turn, the amount consumed. The aim of the current study was to examine the impact of the size and shape of wine glasses on perceptions of wine volume. Online experiment: Participants (n = 360; recruited via Mechanical Turk) were asked to match the volume of wine in two wine glasses, specifically: 1. the Reference glass holding a fixed reference volume, and 2. the Comparison glass, for which the volume could be altered until participants perceived it matched the reference volume. One of three comparison glasses was shown in each trial: 'wider' (20% wider but same capacity); 'larger' (same width but 25% greater capacity); or 'wider-and-larger' (20% wider and 25% greater capacity). Reference volumes were 125 ml, 175 ml and 250 ml, in a fully factorial within-subjects design: 3 (comparison glass) x 3 (reference volume). Non-zero differences between the volumes with which participants filled comparison glasses and the corresponding reference volumes were identified using sign-rank tests. Participants under-filled the wider glass relative to the reference glass for larger reference volumes, and over-filled the larger glass relative to the reference glass for all reference volumes. Results for the wider-and-larger glass showed a mixed pattern across reference volume. For all comparison glasses, in trials with larger reference volumes participants tended to fill the comparison glass less, relative to trials with smaller reference volumes for the same comparison glass. These results are broadly consistent with people using the relative fullness of glasses to judge volume, and suggest both the shape and capacity of wine glasses may influence perceived volume. Perceptions that smaller glasses contain more than larger ones (despite containing the same volume), could slow drinking speed and overall consumption by serving standard portions in smaller glasses. This hypothesis awaits testing.

  12. The investigation of spectrum shape of atmospheric inhomogeneities over an extended dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovadlo, P. G.; Shihovtsev, A. Y.; Kochetkova, O. S.

    2012-11-01

    Energy spectra of wind speed fluctuations and temperature fluctuations are calculated at altitudes between 2 and 301 m for the period from January 1, 2008 to 31 December, 2008 by using results of numerical analysis of high-altitude meteorological mast data. Comparison of the shape of the calculated spectra with known shapes has confirmed presence of two basic regions of wavenumbers with an approximate "-3" dependence and "-5/3" dependence. The result obtained has been used for estimating of high-frequency characteristics of atmospheric turbulence using network meteorological data.

  13. The size, shape and orientation of the asteroid Vesta based on data from the Dawn mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Roohollah; Azmoudeh Ardalan, Alireza; Vasheghani Farahani, Soheil

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the size, shape, and orientation of the asteroid Vesta based on the Dawn spacecraft observations. In this line, three main reference surfaces are defined; the geoid, reference ellipsoid, and best-fit ellipsoid. To be consistent with International Astronomical Union (IAU) standards, all the computations are done in the Claudia Double-Prime coordinate system. The geoid and its potential value W0 are computed by fitting an equipotential surface to the shape of Vesta in a least-squares sense regarding the topographic bias effect. We find that the topographic bias effect on the geoid potential value as well as the geoidal and topographic heights is significant. The geoid potential value W0 is estimated equal to 68709 ± 24 m2/s2. The reference ellipsoid is defined as an equipotential ellipsoid which best fits the geoid. The reference ellipsoid is computed based on the fundamental geodetic constants which define a geodetic reference system (GRS). The semi-axes of the triaxial reference ellipsoid are found to be equal to 280413 ± 104 m, 274572 ± 102 m, and 231253 ± 86 m with the equatorial semi-major axis longitude 8.29°E, while the semi-axes of the biaxial reference ellipsoid are 278556 ± 117 m and 229921 ± 76 m. The results show that the geoidal heights with respect to the triaxial reference ellipsoid are significantly different from the geoidal heights with respect to the biaxial reference ellipsoid. The parameters of the best-fit ellipsoid are estimated by fitting geometrical ellipsoids with various degrees of freedom to Vesta's shape in a least-squares sense. We report the semi-axes of the general best-fit ellipsoid with 9 degrees of freedom equal to 284562 ± 75 m, 277248 ± 73 m, and 226405 ± 57 m. Regarding the orientation of Vesta, we find that the angle between the equatorial semi-major axis of the general best-fit ellipsoid and the X-axis of the coordinate system is 9.17∘ ± 0.47, and the angle between its polar axis

  14. Costs of storing colour and complex shape in visual working memory: Insights from pupil size and slow waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursawe, Michael A; Zimmer, Hubert D

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the impact of perceptual processing demands on visual working memory of coloured complex random polygons during change detection. Processing load was assessed by pupil size (Exp. 1) and additionally slow wave potentials (Exp. 2). Task difficulty was manipulated by presenting different set sizes (1, 2, 4 items) and by making different features (colour, shape, or both) task-relevant. Memory performance in the colour condition was better than in the shape and both condition which did not differ. Pupil dilation and the posterior N1 increased with set size independent of type of feature. In contrast, slow waves and a posterior P2 component showed set size effects but only if shape was task-relevant. In the colour condition slow waves did not vary with set size. We suggest that pupil size and N1 indicates different states of attentional effort corresponding to the number of presented items. In contrast, slow waves reflect processes related to encoding and maintenance strategies. The observation that their potentials vary with the type of feature (simple colour versus complex shape) indicates that perceptual complexity already influences encoding and storage and not only comparison of targets with memory entries at the moment of testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Review on Anatomical Variations of Mental Foramen (Number, Location, Shape, Symmetry, Direction and Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ezoddini-Ardakani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental foramen is located on the anterior aspect of the mandible that permits the terminal branch of the inferior alveolar nerve and blood vessels to exit. The anatomical variations of mental foramen are of considerable importance in local anesthesia, treatment of the fractures in the parasymphysis area, orthognatic surgeries, implant placement, etc. Regarding the importance of mental foramen in dentistry (from local anesthesia to invasive surgical procedures, this study intends to review the anatomical variations of mental foramen in this study. Absence of mental foramen is rare. On the other hand, prevalence of accessory mental foramen has been estimated lower than 15% in the most studies. The position of mental foramen is normally between first and second premolar teeth or under second premolar tooth in different ethnic groups and bilateral symmetry exists in regard with location in most cases. In most studies, the ratio of distance from mental foramen to symphysis to distance from symphysis to posterior border of ramus has been reported about 1/3.5 to 1/3. Mental foramen is oval or circular in shape and its most common direction is usually posterosuperior. Its size in different studies has been estimated about 2 to 5 millimeters and asymmetry in size is possible on both sides of mandible. Due to variations of mental foramen between various ethnic groups and even different individuals in the same ethnic group, using advanced imaging techniques such as CBCT is recommended in order to gain detailed knowledge of anatomy and morphology of mental foramen before applying invasive surgeries.

  16. Size and shape effects on diffusion and absorption of colloidal particles near a partially absorbing sphere: Implications for uptake of nanoparticles in animal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wendong; Wang, Jizeng; Fan, Xiaojun; Gao, Huajian

    2008-12-01

    A mechanics model describing how a cell membrane with diffusive mobile receptors wraps around a ligand-coated cylindrical or spherical particle has been recently developed to model the role of particle size in receptor-mediated endocytosis. The results show that particles in the size range of tens to hundreds of nanometers can enter cells even in the absence of clathrin or caveolin coats. Here we report further progress on modeling the effects of size and shape in diffusion, interaction, and absorption of finite-sized colloidal particles near a partially absorbing sphere. Our analysis indicates that, from the diffusion and interaction point of view, there exists an optimal hydrodynamic size of particles, typically in the nanometer regime, for the maximum rate of particle absorption. Such optimal size arises as a result of balance between the diffusion constant of the particles and the interaction energy between the particles and the absorbing sphere relative to the thermal energy. Particles with a smaller hydrodynamic radius have larger diffusion constant but weaker interaction with the sphere while larger particles have smaller diffusion constant but stronger interaction with the sphere. Since the hydrodynamic radius is also determined by the particle shape, an optimal hydrodynamic radius implies an optimal size as well as an optimal aspect ratio for a nonspherical particle. These results show broad agreement with experimental observations and may have general implications on interaction between nanoparticles and animal cells.

  17. A new versatile electrochemical etching chamber (VECEC) system for multi-size and multi-shape detector processing

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrabi, M

    1999-01-01

    A new versatile electrochemical etching ECE chamber (VECE) system is introduced in which the effective electrochemically etched area can have variable sizes and/or shapes required using templet etching. The flat rubber washers act as templets and holders of the etchant, and control the size and shape of the effective etched area of the detector which can be of various shapes and sizes desired. The system was operated in two operation modes A and B in which the both sides and one side of the detector were etched respectively. Detectors with etched areas having diameters from 1 to 18 cm have also been successfully etched by this system. Multi-chambers have been also designed using this principle for larger-scale multi-detector processing. The effects of etching area and time on the current through the detector have also been studied.

  18. Density-dependent home-range size revealed by spatially explicit capture–recapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efford, M.G.; Dawson, Deanna K.; Jhala, Y.V.; Qureshi, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The size of animal home ranges often varies inversely with population density among populations of a species. This fact has implications for population monitoring using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR) models, in which both the scale of home-range movements σ and population density D usually appear as parameters, and both may vary among populations. It will often be appropriate to model a structural relationship between population-specific values of these parameters, rather than to assume independence. We suggest re-parameterizing the SECR model using kp = σp √Dp, where kp relates to the degree of overlap between home ranges and the subscript p distinguishes populations. We observe that kp is often nearly constant for populations spanning a range of densities. This justifies fitting a model in which the separate kp are replaced by the single parameter k and σp is a density-dependent derived parameter. Continuous density-dependent spatial variation in σ may also be modelled, using a scaled non-Euclidean distance between detectors and the locations of animals. We illustrate these methods with data from automatic photography of tigers (Panthera tigris) across India, in which the variation is among populations, from mist-netting of ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) in Maryland, USA, in which the variation is within a single population over time, and from live-trapping of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, modelling spatial variation within one population. Possible applications and limitations of the methods are discussed. A model in which kp is constant, while density varies, provides a parsimonious null model for SECR. The parameter k of the null model is a concise summary of the empirical relationship between home-range size and density that is useful in comparative studies. We expect deviations from this model, particularly the dependence of kp on covariates, to be biologically interesting.

  19. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  20. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  1. Optical properties of truncated Au nanocages with different size and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qin; Qi, Hong; Ren, Ya-Tao; Sun, Jian-Ping; Ruan, Li-Ming

    2017-06-01

    The hollow nanostructures are conducive to applications including drug delivery, energy storage and conversion, and catalysis. In the present work, a versatile type of Au nanoparticles, i.e. nanocage with hollow interior, was studied thoroughly. Simulation of the optical properties of nanocages with different sizes and shapes was presented, which is essential for tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance peak. The edge length, side length of triangle, and wall thickness were used as structural parameters of truncated Au nanocage. The dependence of absorption efficiency, resonant wavelength, and absorption quantum yield on the structural parameters were discussed. Meanwhile, the applications of absorption quantum yield in biomedical imaging and laser induced thermal therapy were investigated. It was found that the phenomenon of multipolar plasmon resonances exists on truncated Au nanocage. Furthermore, the electric field distribution at different resonant wavelengths was also investigated. It is found that the electromagnetic field corresponds to the dipolar mode in an individual nanocage is largely distributed at the corners. Whereas, the electromagnetic field corresponds to the multipolar region is mainly located in the internal corners and edges.

  2. Shape and size of jatropha beans (Jatropha curcas L. during drying at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdiney Cambuy Siqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to study the physical properties of the jatropha beans over the drying under six air conditions, based on measurements of roundness, sphericity, volume, superficial area, projected area and surface/volume ratio. Jatropha beans with moisture content around 0.61 (decimal d.b. were subjected to thin-layer drying in oven with forced-air circulation under six temperature conditions (36, 45, 60, 75, 90 and 105 °C and relative humidity of 31.7; 19.6; 9.4; 4.8; 2.6 and 1.5% respectively, until reaching the moisture content of 0.11 ± 0.006 (decimal d. b.. The results showed that the necessary time for jatropha beans to reach the moisture content of 0.11 ± 0.006 (decimal d.b. were 1.5; 2.25; 3.0; 4.75; 6.75 and 12.0 h for the drying temperatures of 105, 90, 75, 60, 45 and 36 °C, respectively; and the reduction in the moisture content as well as the drying conditions promoted changes in the shape and reduced the size of the jatropha beans.

  3. Genetic, environmental and epigenetic influences on variation in human tooth number, size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Grant; Bockmann, Michelle; Hughes, Toby; Brook, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to highlight some key recent developments in studies of tooth number, size and shape that are providing better insights into the roles of genetic, environmental and epigenetic factors in the process of dental development. Advances in molecular genetics are helping to clarify how epigenetic factors influence the spatial and temporal regulation of the complex processes involved in odontogenesis. At the phenotypic level, the development of sophisticated systems for image analysis is enabling new dental phenotypes to be defined. The 2D and 3D data that are generated by these imaging systems can then be analysed with mathematical approaches, such as geometric morphometric analysis. By gathering phenotypic data and DNA from twins, it is now possible to use 'genome-wide' association studies and the monozygotic co-twin design to identify important genes in odontogenesis and also to clarify how epigenetic and environmental factors can affect this process. Given that many of the common dental anomalies affecting the human dentition are interrelated, apparently reflecting pleiotropic genetic effects, the discoveries and new directions described in this paper should have important implications for clinical dental practice in the future.

  4. Modulation of size and shape of Au nanoparticles using amino-X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goy-López, Sonia; Taboada, Pablo; Cambón, Adriana; Juárez, Josué; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel; Mosquera, Víctor

    2010-01-14

    In the present work, the formation and stabilization of gold nanoparticles in a one-pot water-based synthesis has been achieved in the presence of a four-arm, star-shaped polyoxyethyelene-polyoxypropylene (PEO-PPO) block copolymer, Tetronic T904, which acts as both reductant and stabilizer. The influence of several parameters such as copolymer and gold salt concentration, reaction temperature, and solution pH on both the size and shape of the resulting nanocrystals has been established. Low copolymer/gold salt molar ratios favor the formation of either triangular or hexagonal planar nanostructures due to a low reduction rate which turns the reaction into kinetic control. As the molar ratio increases, reduction becomes faster with the subsequent increase in the number of crystal seeds and, thus, the decrease in particle size. In addition, there is an increase in the reduction rate which causes the reduction reaction to be governed by thermodynamics, and consequently, spherical geometries are favored. A particle spherical shape can also be promoted as a consequence of the accumulation of block copolymer molecules on different crystallographic planes, homogenizing the metal surface structure and disabling the growth in different crystallographic directions. The same behavior was observed when the reaction temperature was raised. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles could also be controlled by varying the pH of the medium. As the pH becomes more acidic, protons prevent the oxyethylene part of the copolymer from the reduction of metal ions, and consequently, the number of nuclei decreases. This explains the overall increase in the particle size and the change in shape when the synthesis is carried out in acid medium. Finally, comparison with nanoparticles obtained in the presence of a structurally related linear block copolymer Pluronic P105, with a similar number of EO and PO units as T904, denoted an important incidence of the arrangement of PEO and PPO blocks on

  5. Eye size and shape in newborn children and their relation to axial length and refraction at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Laurence Shen; Chua, Sharon; Tan, Pei Ting; Cai, Shirong; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Ngo, Cheryl; Qiu, Anqi; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-07-01

    To determine if eye size and shape at birth are associated with eye size and refractive error 3 years later. A subset of 173 full-term newborn infants from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the dimensions of the internal eye. Eye shape was assessed by an oblateness index, calculated as 1 - (axial length/width) or 1 - (axial length/height). Cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1) and optical biometry (IOLMaster) were performed 3 years later. Both eyes of 173 children were analysed. Eyes with longer axial length at birth had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes with larger baseline volumes and surface areas had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes which were more oblate at birth had greater increases in axial length at 3 years (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eye size and shape at birth and refraction, corneal curvature or myopia at 3 years. Eyes that are larger and have prolate or spherical shapes at birth exhibit smaller increases in axial length over the first 3 years of life. Eye size and shape at birth influence subsequent eye growth but not refractive error development. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  6. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  7. Influence of the particle size on polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of size of the scatterer on the image contrast for polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media is investigated here by Monte Carlo method. Circularly polarized light would be more efficient to eliminate the noise photons for both the isotropic medium as well as the anisotropic medium, as compared with linearly polarized light. The improvement in contrast is pronounced for isotropic medium using either linear or circular polarization. The plausible explanations for these observations are also presented.

  8. Pose and Shape Reconstruction of a Noncooperative Spacecraft Using Camera and Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Volpe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in on-orbit proximity operations has pushed towards the development of autonomous GNC strategies. In this sense, optical navigation enables a wide variety of possibilities as it can provide information not only about the kinematic state but also about the shape of the observed object. Various mission architectures have been either tested in space or studied on Earth. The present study deals with on-orbit relative pose and shape estimation with the use of a monocular camera and a distance sensor. The goal is to develop a filter which estimates an observed satellite’s relative position, velocity, attitude, and angular velocity, along with its shape, with the measurements obtained by a camera and a distance sensor mounted on board a chaser which is on a relative trajectory around the target. The filter’s efficiency is proved with a simulation on a virtual target object. The results of the simulation, even though relevant to a simplified scenario, show that the estimation process is successful and can be considered a promising strategy for a correct and safe docking maneuver.

  9. Microhabitat selection, demography, and correlates of home range size for the King Rail (Rallus elegans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Bradley A.; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Animal movements and habitat selection within the home range, or microhabitat selection, can provide insights into habitat requirements, such as foraging and area requirements. The King Rail (Rallus elegans) is a wetland bird of high conservation concern in the United States, but little is known about its movements, habitats, or demography. King Rails (n = 34) were captured during the 2010–2011 breeding seasons in the coastal marshes of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas. Radio telemetry and direct habitat surveys of King Rail locations were conducted to estimate home ranges and microhabitat selection. Within home ranges, King Rails selected for greater plant species richness and comparatively greater coverage of Phragmites australis, Typha spp., and Schoenoplectus robustus. King Rails were found closer to open water compared to random locations placed 50 m from King Rail locations. Home ranges (n = 22) varied from 0.8–32.8 ha and differed greatly among sites. Home range size did not vary by year or sex; however, increased open water, with a maximum of 29% observed in the study, was correlated with smaller home ranges. Breeding season cumulative survivorship was 89% ± 22% in 2010 and 61% ± 43% in 2011, which coincided with a drought. With an equal search effort, King Rail chicks and juveniles observed in May-June decreased from 110 in 2010 to only 16 in the drier year of 2011. The findings show King Rail used marsh with ≤ 29% open water and had smaller home ranges when open water was more abundant.

  10. Home-range Size and Habitat Used by the Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S.F.; Menzel, M.A.; Ford, W.M.; Chapman, B.R.; Miller, K.V.; Edwards, J.W.; Wood, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    We examined home range size and habitat use of nine female northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) within an intensively managed forest in the central Appalachians of West Virginia. Using the 95% adaptive kernel method, we calculated a mean home range of 65 ha. Northern myotis used recent diameter-limit harvests and road corridors more than expected based on availability of these habitats. Intact forest stands and more open deferment harvested stands were used less than expected based on the availability of these habitats, although intact forest stands still constituted the overall majority of habitat used. Partial timber harvests that leave a relatively closed canopy appear to promote or improve northern myotis foraging habitat in heavily forested landscapes. However, the long-term ecological impacts on bats and other biota from this silviculturally unacceptable practice are unclear.

  11. Spatial Autocorrelation Can Generate Stronger Correlations between Range Size and Climatic Niches Than the Biological Signal - A Demonstration Using Bird and Mammal Range Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Currie, David J

    2016-01-01

    Species' geographic ranges could primarily be physiological tolerances drawn in space. Alternatively, geographic ranges could be only broadly constrained by physiological climatic tolerances: there could generally be much more proximate constraints on species' ranges (dispersal limitation, biotic interactions, etc.) such that species often occupy a small and unpredictable subset of tolerable climates. In the literature, species' climatic tolerances are typically estimated from the set of conditions observed within their geographic range. Using this method, studies have concluded that broader climatic niches permit larger ranges. Similarly, other studies have investigated the biological causes of incomplete range filling. But, when climatic constraints are measured directly from species' ranges, are correlations between species' range size and climate necessarily consistent with a causal link? We evaluated the extent to which variation in range size among 3277 bird and 1659 mammal species occurring in the Americas is statistically related to characteristics of species' realized climatic niches. We then compared how these relationships differed from the ones expected in the absence of a causal link. We used a null model that randomizes the predictor variables (climate), while retaining their broad spatial autocorrelation structure, thereby removing any causal relationship between range size and climate. We found that, although range size is strongly positively related to climatic niche breadth, range filling and, to a lesser extent, niche position in nature, the observed relationships are not always stronger than expected from spatial autocorrelation alone. Thus, we conclude that equally strong relationships between range size and climate would result from any processes causing ranges to be highly spatially autocorrelated.

  12. Spatial Autocorrelation Can Generate Stronger Correlations between Range Size and Climatic Niches Than the Biological Signal — A Demonstration Using Bird and Mammal Range Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher-Lalonde, Véronique; Currie, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Species’ geographic ranges could primarily be physiological tolerances drawn in space. Alternatively, geographic ranges could be only broadly constrained by physiological climatic tolerances: there could generally be much more proximate constraints on species’ ranges (dispersal limitation, biotic interactions, etc.) such that species often occupy a small and unpredictable subset of tolerable climates. In the literature, species’ climatic tolerances are typically estimated from the set of conditions observed within their geographic range. Using this method, studies have concluded that broader climatic niches permit larger ranges. Similarly, other studies have investigated the biological causes of incomplete range filling. But, when climatic constraints are measured directly from species’ ranges, are correlations between species’ range size and climate necessarily consistent with a causal link? We evaluated the extent to which variation in range size among 3277 bird and 1659 mammal species occurring in the Americas is statistically related to characteristics of species’ realized climatic niches. We then compared how these relationships differed from the ones expected in the absence of a causal link. We used a null model that randomizes the predictor variables (climate), while retaining their broad spatial autocorrelation structure, thereby removing any causal relationship between range size and climate. We found that, although range size is strongly positively related to climatic niche breadth, range filling and, to a lesser extent, niche position in nature, the observed relationships are not always stronger than expected from spatial autocorrelation alone. Thus, we conclude that equally strong relationships between range size and climate would result from any processes causing ranges to be highly spatially autocorrelated. PMID:27855201

  13. Size and Shape of Chariklo from Multi-epoch Stellar Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, R.; Sicardy, B.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Ortiz, J.-L.; Desmars, J.; Bérard, D.; Lellouch, E.; Meza, E.; Kervella, P.; Snodgrass, C.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Gomes-Júnior, A. R.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Braga-Ribas, F.; Assafin, M.; Morgado, B. E.; Colas, F.; De Witt, C.; Sickafoose, A. A.; Breytenbach, H.; Dauvergne, J.-L.; Schoenau, P.; Maquet, L.; Bath, K.-L.; Bode, H.-J.; Cool, A.; Lade, B.; Kerr, S.; Herald, D.

    2017-10-01

    We use data from five stellar occultations observed between 2013 and 2016 to constrain Chariklo’s size and shape, and the ring reflectivity. We consider four possible models for Chariklo (sphere, Maclaurin spheroid, triaxial ellipsoid, and Jacobi ellipsoid), and we use a Bayesian approach to estimate the corresponding parameters. The spherical model has a radius R = 129 ± 3 km. The Maclaurin model has equatorial and polar radii a=b={143}-6+3 {km} and c={96}-4+14 {km}, respectively, with density {970}-180+300 {kg} {{{m}}}-3. The ellipsoidal model has semiaxes a={148}-4+6 {km}, b={132}-5+6 {km}, and c={102}-8+10 {km}. Finally, the Jacobi model has semiaxes a = 157 ± 4 km, b = 139 ± 4 km, and c = 86 ± 1 km, and density {796}-4+2 {kg} {{{m}}}-3. Depending on the model, we obtain topographic features of 6-11 km, typical of Saturn icy satellites with similar size and density. We constrain Chariklo’s geometric albedo between 3.1% (sphere) and 4.9% (ellipsoid), while the ring I/F reflectivity is less constrained between 0.6% (Jacobi) and 8.9% (sphere). The ellipsoid model explains both the optical light curve and the long-term photometry variation of the system, giving a plausible value for the geometric albedo of the ring particles of 10%-15%. The derived mass of Chariklo of 6-8 × 1018 kg places the rings close to 3:1 resonance between the ring mean motion and Chariklo’s rotation period. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  14. Decoupling of size and shape fluctuations in heteropolymeric sequences reconciles discrepancies in SAXS vs. FRET measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Gustavo; Banterle, Niccolò; Ruff, Kiersten M; Chowdhury, Aritra; Mercadante, Davide; Koehler, Christine; Kachala, Michael; Estrada Girona, Gemma; Milles, Sigrid; Mishra, Ankur; Onck, Patrick R; Gräter, Frauke; Esteban-Martín, Santiago; Pappu, Rohit V; Svergun, Dmitri I; Lemke, Edward A

    2017-08-01

    Unfolded states of proteins and native states of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) populate heterogeneous conformational ensembles in solution. The average sizes of these heterogeneous systems, quantified by the radius of gyration (RG ), can be measured by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Another parameter, the mean dye-to-dye distance (RE ) for proteins with fluorescently labeled termini, can be estimated using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). A number of studies have reported inconsistencies in inferences drawn from the two sets of measurements for the dimensions of unfolded proteins and IDPs in the absence of chemical denaturants. These differences are typically attributed to the influence of fluorescent labels used in smFRET and to the impact of high concentrations and averaging features of SAXS. By measuring the dimensions of a collection of labeled and unlabeled polypeptides using smFRET and SAXS, we directly assessed the contributions of dyes to the experimental values RG and RE For chemically denatured proteins we obtain mutual consistency in our inferences based on RG and RE , whereas for IDPs under native conditions, we find substantial deviations. Using computations, we show that discrepant inferences are neither due to methodological shortcomings of specific measurements nor due to artifacts of dyes. Instead, our analysis suggests that chemical heterogeneity in heteropolymeric systems leads to a decoupling between RE and RG that is amplified in the absence of denaturants. Therefore, joint assessments of RG and RE combined with measurements of polymer shapes should provide a consistent and complete picture of the underlying ensembles.

  15. Standardization of size, shape and internal structure of spinal cord images: comparison of three transformation methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fujiki

    Full Text Available Functional fluorescence imaging has been widely applied to analyze spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics in the brain and spinal cord. However, it is difficult to integrate spatial information obtained from imaging data in specific regions of interest across multiple samples, due to large variability in the size, shape and internal structure of samples. To solve this problem, we attempted to standardize transversely sectioned spinal cord images focusing on the laminar structure in the gray matter. We employed three standardization methods, the affine transformation (AT, the angle-dependent transformation (ADT and the combination of these two methods (AT+ADT. The ADT is a novel non-linear transformation method developed in this study to adjust an individual image onto the template image in the polar coordinate system. We next compared the accuracy of these three standardization methods. We evaluated two indices, i.e., the spatial distribution of pixels that are not categorized to any layer and the error ratio by the leave-one-out cross validation method. In this study, we used neuron-specific marker (NeuN-stained histological images of transversely sectioned cervical spinal cord slices (21 images obtained from 4 rats to create the standard atlas and also to serve for benchmark tests. We found that the AT+ADT outperformed other two methods, though the accuracy of each method varied depending on the layer. This novel image standardization technique would be applicable to optical recording such as voltage-sensitive dye imaging, and will enable statistical evaluations of neural activation across multiple samples.

  16. Reconstructing grassland fire history using sedimentary charcoal: Considering count, size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Berangere A; Commerford, Julie L; McLauchlan, Kendra K

    2017-01-01

    Fire is a key Earth system process, with 80% of annual fire activity taking place in grassland areas. However, past fire regimes in grassland systems have been difficult to quantify due to challenges in interpreting the charcoal signal in depositional environments. To improve reconstructions of grassland fire regimes, it is essential to assess two key traits: (1) charcoal count, and (2) charcoal shape. In this study, we quantified the number of charcoal pieces in 51 sediment samples of ponds in the Great Plains and tested its relevance as a proxy for the fire regime by examining 13 potential factors influencing charcoal count, including various fire regime components (e.g. the fire frequency, the area burned, and the fire season), vegetation cover and pollen assemblages, and climate variables. We also quantified the width to length (W:L) ratio of charcoal particles, to assess its utility as a proxy of fuel types in grassland environments by direct comparison with vegetation cover and pollen assemblages. Our first conclusion is that charcoal particles produced by grassland fires are smaller than those produced by forest fires. Thus, a mesh size of 120μm as used in forested environments is too large for grassland ecosystems. We recommend counting all charcoal particles over 60μm in grasslands and mixed grass-forest environments to increase the number of samples with useful data. Second, a W:L ratio of 0.5 or smaller appears to be an indicator for fuel types, when vegetation surrounding the site is before composed of at least 40% grassland vegetation. Third, the area burned within 1060m of the depositional environments explained both the count and the area of charcoal particles. Therefore, changes in charcoal count or charcoal area through time indicate a change in area burned. The fire regimes of grassland systems, including both human and climatic influences on fire behavior, can be characterized by long-term charcoal records.

  17. Shape optimization of blended-wing-body underwater glider by using gliding range as the optimization target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended-Wing-Body Underwater Glider (BWBUG, which has excellent hydrodynamic performance, is a new kind of underwater glider in recent years. In the shape optimization of BWBUG, the lift to drag ratio is often used as the optimization target. However this results in lose of internal space. In this paper, the energy reserve is defined as the direct proportional function of the internal space of BWBUG. A motion model, which relates gliding range to steady gliding motion parameters as well as energy consumption, is established by analyzing the steady-state gliding motion. The maximum gliding range is used as the optimization target instead of the lift to drag ratio to optimizing the shape of BWBUG. The result of optimization shows that the maximum gliding range of initial design is increased by 32.1% though an Efficient Global Optimization (EGO process. Keywords: Blended-wing-body underwater glider, Shape optimization, Gliding range, Energy consumption model, Lift to drag ratio

  18. The effect of particle shape and size distribution on the acoustical properties of mixtures of hemp particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glé, Philippe; Gourdon, Emmanuel; Arnaud, Laurent; Horoshenkov, Kirill-V; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Hemp concrete is an attractive alternative to traditional materials used in building construction. It has a very low environmental impact, and it is characterized by high thermal insulation. Hemp aggregate particles are parallelepiped in shape and can be organized in a plurality of ways to create a considerable proportion of open pores with a complex connectivity pattern, the acoustical properties of which have never been examined systematically. Therefore this paper is focused on the fundamental understanding of the relations between the particle shape and size distribution, pore size distribution, and the acoustical properties of the resultant porous material mixture. The sound absorption and the transmission loss of various hemp aggregates is characterized using laboratory experiments and three theoretical models. These models are used to relate the particle size distribution to the pore size distribution. It is shown that the shape of particles and particle size control the pore size distribution and tortuosity in shiv. These properties in turn relate directly to the observed acoustical behavior.

  19. Tailoring on the nanoscale : Control over size, shape, composition and self-assembly of copper chalcogenide nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, W.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials are commonplace in everyday life and most people could not live without them. Recently, colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have gained a lot of interest, due to the possibility to precisely tune their optoelectronic properties by tuning the size and shape of the

  20. Home range sizes of Cape Mountain Zebras Equus Zebra Zebra in the Mountain Zebra National Park

    OpenAIRE

    Penzhorn, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    The mean home range size of Cape mountain zebra breeding herds was 9,4 km2 (range 3,1 @ 16,0 km2). In two herds which split up, the home ranges of the resultant herds included the original home ranges, but were larger.

  1. Dependence of simulations of long range transport on meteorology, model and dust size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Smith, M.; Losno, R.; Marticorena, B.; Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.; Qu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral aerosols interact with radiation directly, as well as modifying climate, and provide important micronutrients to ocean and land ecosystems. Mineral aerosols are transported long distances from the source regions to remote regions, but the rates at which this occurs can be difficult to deduce from either observations or models. Here we consider interactions between the details of the simulation of dust size and long-range transport. In addition, we compare simulations of dust using multiple reanalysis datasets, as well as different model basis to understand how robust the mean, seasonality and interannual variability are in models. Models can provide insight into how long observations are required in order to characterize the atmospheric concentration and deposition to remote regions.

  2. Finite-size effects on long-range correlations: implications for analyzing DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze the fluctuations in the correlation exponents obtained for noncoding DNA sequences. We find prominent sample-to-sample variations as well as variations within a single sample in the scaling exponent. To determine if these fluctuations may result from finite system size, we generate correlated random sequences of comparable length and study the fluctuations in this control system. We find that the DNA exponent fluctuations are consistent with those obtained from the control sequences having long-range power-law correlations. Finally, we compare our exponents for the DNA sequences with the exponents obtained from power-spectrum analysis and correlation-function techniques, and demonstrate that the original "DNA-walk" method is intrinsically more accurate due to reduced noise.

  3. Scaling Laws at the Nano Size: The Effect of Particle Size and Shape on the Magnetism and Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Eric D; Park, Hee-Yun E; Zhou, Yue; Rolla, Gabriele A; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Botta, Mauro; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-06-14

    The magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles govern their relaxivities and efficacy as contrast agents for MRI. These properties are in turn determined by their composition, size and morphology. Herein we present a systematic study of the effect of particle size and shape of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decompositions of iron salts on both their magnetism and their longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r 1 and r 2 , respectively. Faceted nanoparticles demonstrate superior magnetism and relaxivities than spherical nanoparticles of similar size. For faceted nanoparticles, but not for spherical ones, r 1 and r 2 further increase with increasing particle size up to a size of 18 nm. This observation is in accordance with increasing saturation magnetization for nanoparticles increasing in size up to 12 nm, above which a plateau is observed. The NMRD (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion) profiles of MIONs (Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles) display an increase in longitudinal relaxivity with decreasing magnetic field strength with a plateau below 1 MHz. The transverse relaxivity shows no dependence on the magnetic field strength between 20 MHz and 500 MHz. These observations translate to phantom MR images: in T 1 -weighted SWIFT (SWeep imaging with Fourier Transform) images MIONs have a positive contrast with little dependence on particle size, whereas in T 2 -weighted gradient-echo images MIONs create a negative contrast which increases in magnitude with increasing particle size. Altogether, these results will enable the development of particulate MRI contrast agents with enhanced efficacy for biomedical and clinical applications.

  4. Influences of landscape heterogeneity on home-range sizes of brown bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangipane, Lindsey S.; Belant, Jerrold L.; Hiller, Tim L.; Colvin, Michael E.; Gustine, David; Mangipane, Buck A.; Hilderbrand, Grant

    2018-01-01

    Animal space use is influenced by many factors and can affect individual survival and fitness. Under optimal foraging theory, individuals use landscapes to optimize high-quality resources while minimizing the amount of energy used to acquire them. The spatial resource variability hypothesis states that as patchiness of resources increases, individuals use larger areas to obtain the resources necessary to meet energetic requirements. Additionally, under the temporal resource variability hypothesis, seasonal variation in available resources can reduce distances moved while providing a variety of food sources. Our objective was to determine if seasonal home ranges of brown bears (Ursus arctos) were influenced by temporal availability and spatial distribution of resources and whether individual reproductive status, sex, or size (i.e., body mass) mediated space use. To test our hypotheses, we radio collared brown bears (n = 32 [9 male, 23 female]) in 2014–2016 and used 18 a prioriselected linear models to evaluate seasonal utilization distributions (UD) in relation to our hypotheses. Our top-ranked model by AICc, supported the spatial resource variability hypothesis and included percentage of like adjacency (PLADJ) of all cover types (P  0.17 for males, solitary females, and females with dependent young), and body mass (kg; P = 0.66). Based on this model, for every percentage increase in PLADJ, UD area was predicted to increase 1.16 times for all sex and reproductive classes. Our results suggest that landscape heterogeneity influences brown bear space use; however, we found that bears used larger areas when landscape homogeneity increased, presumably to gain a diversity of food resources. Our results did not support the temporal resource variability hypothesis, suggesting that the spatial distribution of food was more important than seasonal availability in relation to brown bear home range size.

  5. Dynamics of soil biogeochemical gas emissions shaped by remolded aggregate sizes and carbon configurations under hydration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-10-13

    Changes in soil hydration status affect microbial community dynamics and shape key biogeochemical processes. Evidence suggests that local anoxic conditions may persist and support anaerobic microbial activity in soil aggregates (or in similar hot spots) long after the bulk soil becomes aerated. To facilitate systematic studies of interactions among environmental factors with biogeochemical emissions of CO2 , N2 O and CH4 from soil aggregates, we remolded silt soil aggregates to different sizes and incorporated carbon at different configurations (core, mixed, no addition). Assemblies of remolded soil aggregates of three sizes (18, 12, and 6 mm) and equal volumetric proportions were embedded in sand columns at four distinct layers. The water table level in each column varied periodically while obtaining measurements of soil GHG emissions for the different aggregate carbon configurations. Experimental results illustrate that methane production required prolonged inundation and highly anoxic conditions for inducing measurable fluxes. The onset of unsaturated conditions (lowering water table) resulted in a decrease in CH4 emissions while temporarily increasing N2 O fluxes. Interestingly, N2 O fluxes were about 80% higher form aggregates with carbon placement in center (anoxic) core compared to mixed carbon within aggregates. The fluxes of CO2 were comparable for both scenarios of carbon sources. These experimental results highlight the importance of hydration dynamics in activating different GHG production and affecting various transport mechanisms about 80% of total methane emissions during lowering water table level are attributed to physical storage (rather than production), whereas CO2 emissions (~80%) are attributed to biological activity. A biophysical model for microbial activity within soil aggregates and profiles provides a means for results interpretation and prediction of trends within natural soils under a wide range of conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  6. Hydrodynamic discrimination of wakes caused by objects of different size or shape in a harbour seal (Phoca vitulina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieskotten, S.; Mauck, B.; Miersch, L.

    2011-01-01

    Harbour seals can use their mystacial vibrissae to detect and track hydrodynamic wakes. We investigated the ability of a harbour seal to discriminate objects of different size or shape by their hydrodynamic signature and used particle image velocimetry to identify the hydrodynamic parameters...... that a seal may be using to do so. Hydrodynamic trails were generated by different sized or shaped paddles that were moved in the calm water of an experimental box to produce a characteristic signal. In a two-alternative forced-choice procedure the blindfolded subject was able to discriminate size differences...... of down to 3.6. cm (Weber fraction 0.6) when paddles were moved at the same speed. Furthermore the subject distinguished hydrodynamic signals generated by flat, cylindrical, triangular or undulated paddles of the same width. Particle image velocimetry measurements demonstrated that the seal could have...

  7. Mechanism and controlled growth of shape and size variant core/shell FeO/Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Li, Wanfeng; Chandra, Sayan; Phan, Manh-Huong; Hadjipanayis, George C; Mukherjee, Pritish; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2013-09-07

    We report a novel synthesis approach for the growth of core/shell FeO/Fe3O4 nanoparticles with controlled shape and size. FeO particles were partially oxidized to form core/shell FeO/Fe3O4 structures, as evidenced from transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and magnetometry analysis. We find that the molar ratios and concentrations of surfactants are the key parameters in controlling the particle size. The particles can grow in either isotropic or anisotropic shapes, depending upon a chemical reaction scheme that is controlled kinetically or thermodynamically. The competitive growth rates of {111} and {100} facets can be used to tune the final shape of nanoparticles to spherical, cubic, octahedral, octopod, and cuboctahedral geometries. FeO particles can also be oxidized chemically or thermally to form Fe3O4 nanoparticles. By following the same synthesis technique, it is possible to synthesize rods and triangles of Fe3O4 by introducing twinnings and defects into the crystal structure of the seed. The thermally activated first-order Verwey transition at ~120 K has been observed in all the synthesized FeO/Fe3O4 nanoparticles, indicating its independence from the particle shape. These core/shell nanoparticles exhibit a strong shift in field-cooled hysteresis loops accompanied by an increase in coercivity (the so-called exchange bias effect), but the low field-switching behavior appears to vary with the particle shape.

  8. Optimal size, shape, and control design in dynamics of planar frame structures under large displacements and rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gams, M.; Saje, M.; Planinc, I.; Kegl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Size, shape, and drive optimization procedures are combined with an energy-conserving time-integration scheme for the dynamic analysis of planar geometrically non-linear frame structures undergoing large overall motions. The solution method is based on the finite-element formulation, employing the classical displacement-based planar beam finite elements described in an inertial frame. Finite axial, bending, and shear strains are taken into account. If the system is conservative, the energy and momenta conservation in the discrete system during motion is guaranteed. Size, shape, and drive design variables are introduced into the model. Shape parameterization is achieved by the design element technique, using Bezier patches. The sensitivity analysis is performed by the discrete approach and the analytical direct differentiation method. A gradient-based optimization method, using an automatically adjustable convex approximation technique, is employed. The efficiency and the applicability of the approach are demonstrated via numerical examples. The shape and the driving function of a load-moving robot arm are optimized to reduce oscillations in its final position. The shape of a steel frame is optimized to reduce oscillations after an idealized ground motion jerk.

  9. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Gopinath, Subash C B; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-12-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and further supported by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/Raman scattering (SERS) study. UV-visible spectrum has shown a sharp peak at 420 nm and further evidenced by FTIR peak profile (at 1587.6, 1386.4, and 1076 cm -1 with corresponding compounds). The main band position with SERS was noticed at 1594 cm -1 (C-C stretching vibration). When samples were heated under microwave radiation, AgNP with octahedron shapes with 5-50 nm were found and this method can be one of the easier ways to synthesis anisotropic AgNP, in which the plant extract plays a vital role to regulate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Enhanced antibacterial effects (two- to fourfold) were observed in the case of Aloe vera plant protected AgNP than the routinely synthesized antibiotic drugs. Shape and size-controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Aloe vera plant extract.

  10. Effect of particle shape and structure on the results of single-particle light-scattering size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhauer, H; Bottlinger, M

    1991-11-20

    To evaluate quantitatively the influence exerted by the shape and structure of nonspherical, nonideal particles on the results of single-particle scattered-light size analysis, measurements were conducted with individual particles of different materials (glass, limestone, and quartz). For this purpose, the particles were suspended in an electrodynamic balance and repeatedly passed through the analyzer's measuring volume with a continually changing random orientation. The scattered-light signal spectra thus obtained specify the probability with which a certain pulse height is induced when the particle passes once through the measuring volume at a given coincidental orientation. The spectra reflect the material-characteristic influence. They allow the loss of resolution of common scattered-light size analyses to be assessed and algorithms (matrices) to be compiled with which the shape and structure influence may be mathematically eliminated. Because a shape and structure independent size parameter is also determined from the individual particles, exact calibration curves can be derived in which the shape and structure influence are incorporated.

  11. Patriline Differences Reveal Genetic Influence on Forewing Size and Shape in a Yellowjacket Wasp (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Vespula flavopilosa Jacobson, 1978.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Perrard

    Full Text Available The wing venation is frequently used as a morphological marker to distinguish biological groups among insects. With geometric morphometrics, minute shape differences can be detected between closely related species or populations, making this technique useful for taxonomy. However, the direct influence of genetic differences on wing morphology has not been explored within colonies of social insects. Here, we show that the father's genotype has a direct effect on wing morphology in colonies of social wasps. Using geometric morphometrics on the venation pattern, we found significant differences in wing size and shape between patrilines of yellowjackets, taking allometry and measurement error into account. The genetic influence on wing size accounted for a small part of the overall size variation, but venation shape was highly structured by the differences between patrilines. Overall, our results showed a strong genetic influence on wing morphology likely acting at multiple levels of venation pattern development. This confirmed the pertinence of this marker for taxonomic purposes and suggests this phenotype as a potentially useful marker for phylogenies. This also raises doubts about the strength of selective pressures on this phenotype, which highlights the need to understand better the role of wing venation shape in insect flight.

  12. A multidimensional stability model for predicting shallow landslide size and shape across landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Milledge; Dino Bellugi; Jim A. McKean; Alexander L. Densmore; William E. Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The size of a shallow landslide is a fundamental control on both its hazard and geomorphic importance. Existing models are either unable to predict landslide size or are computationally intensive such that they cannot practically be applied across landscapes. We derive a model appropriate for natural slopes that is capable of predicting shallow landslide size but...

  13. The sex-limited effects of mutations in the EGFR and TGF-β signaling pathways on shape and size sexual dimorphism and allometry in the Drosophila wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Nicholas D; Dworkin, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Much of the morphological diversity in nature-including among sexes within a species-is a direct consequence of variation in size and shape. However, disentangling variation in sexual dimorphism for both shape (SShD), size (SSD), and their relationship with one another remains complex. Understanding how genetic variation influences both size and shape together, and how this in turn influences SSD and SShD, is challenging. In this study, we utilize Drosophila wing size and shape as a model system to investigate how mutations influence size and shape as modulated by sex. Previous work has demonstrated that mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling components can influence both wing size and shape. In this study, we re-analyze this data to specifically address how they impact the relationship between size and shape in a sex-specific manner, in turn altering the pattern of sexual dimorphism. While most mutations influence shape overall, only a subset have a genotypic specific effect that influences SShD. Furthermore, while we observe sex-specific patterns of allometric shape variation, the effects of most mutations on allometry tend to be small. We discuss this within the context of using mutational analysis to understand sexual size and shape dimorphism.

  14. Contrasting accounts of direction and shape perception in short-range motion: Counterchange compared with motion energy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Joseph; Hock, Howard; Schöner, Gregor

    2014-07-01

    It has long been thought (e.g., Cavanagh & Mather, 1989) that first-order motion-energy extraction via space-time comparator-type models (e.g., the elaborated Reichardt detector) is sufficient to account for human performance in the short-range motion paradigm (Braddick, 1974), including the perception of reverse-phi motion when the luminance polarity of the visual elements is inverted during successive frames. Human observers' ability to discriminate motion direction and use coherent motion information to segregate a region of a random cinematogram and determine its shape was tested; they performed better in the same-, as compared with the inverted-, polarity condition. Computational analyses of short-range motion perception based on the elaborated Reichardt motion energy detector (van Santen & Sperling, 1985) predict, incorrectly, that symmetrical results will be obtained for the same- and inverted-polarity conditions. In contrast, the counterchange detector (Hock, Schöner, & Gilroy, 2009) predicts an asymmetry quite similar to that of human observers in both motion direction and shape discrimination. The further advantage of counterchange, as compared with motion energy, detection for the perception of spatial shape- and depth-from-motion is discussed.

  15. Effects of range bin shape and Doppler filter response in a digital SAR data processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    In calibrating the backscatter coefficient obtained with an imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system to determine absolute values of radar cross-section and reflectivity it is common practice to use a target of known radar cross-section placed within the scene. A corner reflector acts as a point target, but the return from it may not be centered in the resolution cell. It is important, for accurate calibration, to perform straddling corrections based on the range bin and Doppler filter response curves.

  16. Application of image-based particle size and shape characterization systems in the development of small molecule pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Tobyn, Mike; Hamey, Rhye

    2015-05-01

    With the introduction of Quality by Design (QbD) to the pharmaceutical industry, there has been an increased focus on understanding the nature of particles and composites, with the aim of understanding and modeling how they interact in complex systems, leading to robust dosage forms. Particle characterization tools have evolved and now enable a greater level of understanding of powder systems and blends. Tools that can elucidate the size and shape of particulate systems can provide significantly more information about the nature of the particles being analyzed, than a conventional particle size measurement. Although accurate size and shape analysis has always been regarded as the "gold standard" in understanding the nature of particulate systems, neither imaging systems nor IT infrastructure was sufficiently developed to allow this to be performed with sufficient accuracy in a timely manner. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into developments in the field of size and shape analysis of pharmaceutical systems, and how these can now realistically be used as robust development tools. Examples of current uses of such technologies will be explored as well as investigating future applications such as combined image/spectroscopic analyses to track single components within blended systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Ontogenetic modulation of branch size, shape, and biomechanics produces diversity across habitats in the Bursera simaruba clade of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Julieta A; Olson, Mark E; Aguirre-Hernández, Rebeca; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    Organismal size and shape inseparably interact with tissue biomechanical properties. It is therefore essential to understand how size, shape, and biomechanics interact in ontogeny to produce morphological diversity. We estimated within species branch length-diameter allometries and reconstructed the rates of ontogenetic change along the stem in mechanical properties across the simaruba clade in the tropical tree genus Bursera, measuring 376 segments from 97 branches in nine species in neotropical dry to rain forest. In general, species with stiffer materials had longer, thinner branches, which became stiffer more quickly in ontogeny than their counterparts with more flexible materials. We found a trend from short stature and flexible tissues to tall statures and stiff tissues across an environmental gradient of increasing water availability, likely reflecting a water storage-mechanical support tradeoff. Ontogenetic variation in size, shape, and mechanics results in diversity of habits, for example, rapid length extension, sluggish diameter expansion, and flexible tissues results in a liana, as in Bursera instabilis. Even species of similar habit exhibited notable changes in tissue mechanical properties with increasing size, illustrating the inseparable relationship between organismal proportions and their tissue mechanics in the ontogeny and evolution of morphological diversity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sample size and the detection of a hump-shaped relationship between biomass and species richness in Mediterranean wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Questions: What is the observed relationship between biomass and species richness across both spatial and temporal scales in communities of submerged annual macrophytes? Does the number of plots sampled affect detection of hump-shaped pattern? Location: Don??ana National Park, southwestern Spain. Methods: A total of 102 plots were sampled during four hydrological cycles. In each hydrological cycle, the plots were distributed randomly along an environmental flooding gradient in three contrasted microhabitats located in the transition zone just below the upper marsh. In each plot (0.5 m x 0.5 m), plant density and above- and below-ground biomass of submerged vegetation were measured. The hump-shaped model was tested by using a generalized linear model (GLM). A bootstrap procedure was used to test the effect of the number of plots on the ability to detect hump-shaped patterns. Result: The area exhibited low species density with a range of 1 - 9 species and low values of biomass with a range of 0.2 - 87.6 g-DW / 0.25 m2. When data from all years and all microhabitats were combined, the relationships between biomass and species richness showed a hump-shaped pattern. The number of plots was large enough to allow detection of the hump-shaped pattern across microhabitats but it was too small to confirm the hump-shaped pattern within each individual microhabitat. Conclusion: This study provides evidence of hump-shaped patterns across microhabitats when GLM analysis is used. In communities of submerged annual macrophytes in Mediterranean wetlands, the highest species density occurs in intermediate values of biomass. The bootstrap procedure indicates that the number of plots affects the detection of hump-shaped patterns. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  19. Variation in home range size of red foxes Vulpes vulpes along a gradient of productivity and human landscape alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Home range size is a fundamental concept for understanding animal dispersion and ecological needs, and it is one of the most commonly reported ecological attributes of free-ranging mammals. Previous studies indicate that red foxes Vulpes vulpes display great variability in home range size. Yet, there has been little consensus regarding the reasons why home range sizes of red foxes vary so extensively. In this study, we examine possible causes of variation in red fox home range sizes using data from 52 GPS collared red foxes from four study areas representing a gradient of landscape productivity and human landscape alteration in Norway and Sweden. Using 90% Local Convex Hull home range estimates, we examined how red fox home range size varied in relation to latitude, elevation, vegetation zone, proportion of agricultural land and human settlement within a home range, and sex and age. We found considerable variation in red fox home range sizes, ranging between 0.95 km2 to 44 km2 (LoCoH 90%) and 2.4 km2 to 358 km2 (MCP 100%). Elevation, proportion of agricultural land and sex accounted for 50% of the variation in home range size found amongst foxes, with elevation having the strongest effect. Red foxes residing in more productive landscapes (those in more southern vegetation zones), had home ranges approximately four times smaller than the home ranges of foxes in the northern boreal vegetation zone. Our results indicate that home range size was influenced by a productivity gradient at both the landscape (latitude) and the local (elevation) scale. The influence of the proportion of agriculture land on home range size of foxes illustrates how human landscape alteration can affect the space use and distribution of red foxes. Further, the variation in home range size found in this study demonstrates the plasticity of red foxes to respond to changing human landscape alteration as well as changes in landscape productivity, which may be contributing to red fox population

  20. Predictable variation of range-sizes across an extreme environmental gradient in a lizard adaptive radiation: evolutionary and ecological inferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses, such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations.

  1. Shape and size measurements of asteroids by the HST Fine Guidance Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, Paolo; Hestroffer, D.; Cellino, A.; Lattanzi, M.; di Martino, M.; Zappalá, V.

    2002-11-01

    For the first time an observing program based upon the use of the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has successfully provided precise measurements of asteroid diameters and shapes. Six objects, suspected to be binary bodies, have been observed. We will give a short overview of the FGS interferometer and of the results obtained. Some bodies are generally close in shape to three axis ellipsoid; others, such as (216) Kleopatra, clearly show the hints of complex structures. The suspected duplicity of Hektor cannot be ruled out or confirmed due to the low S/N ratio.

  2. Nanoscale Design of Nano-Sized Particles in Shape-Memory Polymer Nanocomposites Driven by Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min; Liang, Fei; Yu, Kai

    2013-09-02

    In the last few years, we have witnessed significant progress in developing high performance shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites, in particular, for shape recovery activated by indirect heating in the presence of electricity, magnetism, light, radio frequency, microwave and radiation, etc. In this paper, we critically review recent findings in Joule heating of SMP nanocomposites incorporated with nanosized conductive electromagnetic particles by means of nanoscale control via applying an electro- and/or magnetic field. A few different nanoscale design principles to form one-/two-/three- dimensional conductive networks are discussed.

  3. Heat conduction in metal-filled polymers - The role of particle size, shape, and orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D.; Tomkiewicz, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of analysis for predicting the thermal conductivity of disperse composites from the properties of the component phases and elementary characterizations of particle shapes and orientation. This analysis successfully predicted the sensitivity to particle shape which was confirmed by experiments also reported in this paper. These results suggest that highly elongated particles may be used to achieve dramatic modifications of thermal conductivity and the analysis presented here may be a useful tool in the design or development of disperse composites of specific thermal conductivity. The analysis may also apply to other properties such as electrical conductivity or magnetic permeability.

  4. Estimation of the Shape Parameter of Ged Distribution for a Small Sample Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purczyński Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method of estimating the shape parameter of generalized error distribution (GED, called ‘approximated moment method’, was proposed. The following estimators were considered: the one obtained through the maximum likelihood method (MLM, approximated fast estimator (AFE, and approximated moment method (AMM. The quality of estimator was evaluated on the basis of the value of the relative mean square error. Computer simulations were conducted using random number generators for the following shape parameters: s = 0.5, s = 1.0 (Laplace distribution s = 2.0 (Gaussian distribution and s = 3.0.

  5. Finite-size and shape effects on vortex configurations in superconducting isosceles right triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, H. J.; Li, B.; Shi, Z. X.

    2017-12-01

    We numerically studied vortex configurations in superconducting isosceles right triangles. We found the solution of the London equation using Green’s function method. Then the Gibbs free energy for an arbitrary configuration was obtained. Using molecular dynamic simulation, we calculated the stable configurations for specific vorticities. The filling rulers were revealed by analyzing these states. Moreover, by changing the sample size, we found that many configurations are sensitive to sample size, which shows a very strong size effect. Lastly, general rules of the size effect were summarized.

  6. Physiological, ecological, and behavioural correlates of the size of the geographic ranges of sea kraits (Laticauda; Elapidae, Serpentes): A critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatwole, Harold; Lillywhite, Harvey; Grech, Alana

    2016-09-01

    Recent, more accurate delineation of the distributions of sea kraits and prior dubious use of proxy temperatures and mean values in correlative studies requires re-assessment of the relationships of temperature and salinity as determinants of the size of the geographic ranges of sea kraits. Correcting the sizes of geographic ranges resolved the paradox of lack of correspondence of size of range with degree of terrestrialism, but did not form a definitive test of the theory. Recent ecological, physiological, and behavioural studies provide an example of the kind of approach likely to either validate or refute present theory.

  7. A linear piezoelectric stepper motor with submicrometer step size and centimeter travel range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, J W; Polla, D L; Robbins, W P

    1990-01-01

    A linear stepper motor capable of submicrometer controlled movement has been constructed using the piezoelectric material lead zirconate titanate (PZT). This motor consists of a 25.4-mmx12.7-mmx1.6-mm piezoelectric driving element connected between a glider base and an attached load. The device is inset in a trench to constrain motion to one dimension. An electrode on the bottom of the glider is used with an electrode on the top of the trench to implement an electrostatic clamp. This clamp enables the stepper motor to climb slopes of up to 12 degrees , whereas without the clamp only slopes of 6 degrees or less are tolerated. A linear inertial sliding motion can be achieved by expanding and contracting the piezoelectric bar, but the addition of the electrostatic clamp enhances the movement capabilities of the glider by the periodic clamping and unclamping of the glider. Glider velocities of 5.7-476 mum/s are measured by timing the movement of the glider over a 1.0-mm portion of the track through an optical microscope. Displacement steps of 0.07-1.1 mum are calculated by dividing the measured glider velocity by the frequency of the applied voltage pulses. Displacement step size and glider velocity are controlled by the application of PZT extension voltages ranging from +/-(60-340) V.

  8. Effect of size and shape dependent anisotropy on superparamagnetic property of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandekar, Kamlesh V.; Kant, K. Mohan

    2017-09-01

    Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) spherical nanoparticles and rhomboidal nanoplatelets were synthesized by co-precipitation at 80 °C (S1) and hydrothermal route at 150 °C (S2). X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirms formation of cubic inverse spinel structure of as prepared cobalt ferrite samples (S1 and S2) with average crystallite size of 13 nm and 18.7 nm for S1 and S2 respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals spherical and rhomboidal shaped with average particle size 16.7 nm (S1) and 19.8 nm (S2). The zero field cooled magnetization MZFCvs. T exhibit a broad maxima at 400 K and 510 K for S1 and S2 respectively. The blocking temperature TB is obtained as 310 K and 341 K for S1 and S2 respectively, by fitting coercive field at different temperatures to T 1 / 2 law. The morphology of S1 and S2 corresponds to shape dependence of continuum approach. The effective demagnetization factors estimated as ΔN1 = 0 and ΔN2 = 0 . 749 for S1 and S2 samples respectively. The uniaxial anisotropy and shape anisotropy observed to be dominant in spherical shaped and rhomboidal shaped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles respectively. The uniaxial anisotropy constant of S1 sample is estimated as 56 (kJ/m3) at TB = 310 K whereas the effective anisotropy constant for S2 sample is 627 (kJ/m3) at TB = 341 K , in which shape anisotropy constant 605 (kJ/m3) dominates over contribution from uniaxial anisotropy constant 22 (kJ/m3) in S2 sample.

  9. Effect of Powder Size and Shape on the SLS Processability and Mechanical Properties of a TPU Elastomer

    OpenAIRE

    Dadbakhsh, Sasan; Verbelen, Leander; Vandeputte, Tom; Strobbe, Dieter; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Kruth, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the influence of powder size/shape on selective laser sintering (SLS) of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) elastomer. It examines a TPU powder which had been cryogenically milled in two different sizes; coarse powder (D50∼200μm) with rough surfaces in comparison with a fine powder (D50∼63μm) with extremely fine flow additives. It is found that the coarse powder coalesces at lower temperatures and excessively smokes during the SLS processing. In comparison, the fine pow...

  10. Particle counting and numerical models: Effect of instrumental size resolution and particle shapes on optical cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamaillard, Karine; Jennings, S. G.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of instrumental size resolution measurements on numerical calculations of optical cross-sections is investigated. The particle counting instruments considered are a FSSP-300, a large scattering angle probe instrument similar to a ASASP-X, and, an aerodynamical system ELPI instrument. The scattering and hemispheric backscattering cross-sections, Csca and Cbk, are calculated on the basis that the full width of the instrumental size bin should be considered in modeling. An average process is applied on these quantities over the full size bin of the instrument; they are then compared to their usual estimation on the single mean diameter Dp per channel. The effect of particle shape is investigated with ellipsoids and spheres. Results show sensitivity of the optical cross-sections to the shape of the particles as well as position of the mean geometrical diameter Dp of the channels within the interferences modes of the scattering efficiencies. The value of the width of the size bins, d log D, of each channel is crucial in the results. This comparison gives a useful estimation of error important in optical particle counting instruments based on inversion process of optical quantities. In addition, accuracy of size distribution measurements is found not to be representative of accuracy in the calculations of optical cross-sections.

  11. Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron in continuous-flow system. Part 2: Effect of scrap iron shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheju, M; Balcu, I

    2010-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium reduction with scrap iron has the advantage that two wastes are treated simultaneously. The reduction of hexavalent chromium by scrap iron was investigated in continuous system, using as reducing agent the following scrap iron shapes and sizes: (1) spiral fibers, (2) shavings, and (3) powder. The shape and size of scrap iron were found to have a significant influence on chromium and iron species concentration in column effluent, on column effluent pH and on Cr(VI) reduction mechanism. While for large scrap iron particles (spiral fibers) homogeneous reduction is the dominant Cr(VI) reduction process, for small scrap iron particles (powder) heterogeneous reduction appears to be the dominant reaction contributing to Cr(VI) reduction. All three shapes and sizes investigated in this work have both advantages and disadvantages. If found in sufficient quantities, scrap iron powder seem to be the optimum shape and size for the continuous reduction of Cr(VI), due to the following advantages: (1) the greatest reduction capacity, (2) the most important pH increase in column effluent (up to 6.3), (3) no chromium was detected in the column effluent during the first 60 h of the experiment, and (4) the lowest steady-state Cr(VI) concentration observed in column effluent (3.7 mg/L). But, despite of a lower reduction capacity in comparison with powder particles, spiral fibers and shavings have the advantage to result in large quantities from the mechanic processing of steel. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Shape and Size Control of Substrate Grown Gold Nanoparticles for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Detection of Chemical Analytes (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-12

    surfactants (such as cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB, or cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) that coat and block access to the nanoparticle surface... nanoparticles of controlled shape and size can be grown from spherical seeds coated on the fibrous three-dimensional network that comprises filter paper...exhibits little SERS activity, both with and without exposure to serotonin (Figure 4a). At this point, nanoparticles are coated with CPC; weak peaks are

  13. Effect of kibble size, shape and additives on plaque in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, D.E.; Servet, E.; Hendriks, W.H.; Thomas, D.G.; Weidgraaf, K.; Biourge, V.C.

    2010-01-01

    Forty mixed-breed cats completed a parallel-group, clinical study to compare supragingival plaque accumulation using a triangular or rectangular shaped dry-expanded diet, with or without an anti-calculus agent (sodium tripolyphosphate) or an anti-plaque agent (plaquereducing nutrient). The cats were

  14. Mechanisms shaping size structure and functional diversity of phytoplankton communities in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Brandt, Gunnar; Bruggeman, Jorn; Merico, Agostino

    2015-01-01

    The factors regulating phytoplankton community composition play a crucial role in structuring aquatic food webs. However, consensus is still lacking about the mechanisms underlying the observed biogeographical differences in cell size composition of phytoplankton communities. Here we use a trait-based model to disentangle these mechanisms in two contrasting regions of the Atlantic Ocean. In our model, the phytoplankton community can self-assemble based on a trade-off emerging from relationships between cell size and (1) nutrient uptake, (2) zooplankton grazing, and (3) phytoplankton sinking. Grazing ‘pushes’ the community towards larger cell sizes, whereas nutrient uptake and sinking ‘pull’ the community towards smaller cell sizes. We find that the stable environmental conditions of the tropics strongly balance these forces leading to persistently small cell sizes and reduced size diversity. In contrast, the seasonality of the temperate region causes the community to regularly reorganize via shifts in species composition and to exhibit, on average, bigger cell sizes and higher size diversity than in the tropics. Our results raise the importance of environmental variability as a key structuring mechanism of plankton communities in the ocean and call for a reassessment of the current understanding of phytoplankton diversity patterns across latitudinal gradients. PMID:25747280

  15. Relative foot size and shape to general body size in Javanese, Filipinas and Japanese with special reference to habitual footwear types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, K; Kumakura, C; Kusumoto, A; Narasaki, S

    1997-01-01

    Stature, body weight, left foot length and breadth were measured on East Javanese, Filipinas in Northern Luzon, and Japanese in Tokyo. No footwear is used by the Javanese, rubber sandals are used by the Filipinas, and sneakers or leather shoes by the Japanese group. Regression lines regardless of age were obtained among these four measurements, body mass index (BMI), and relative foot breadth to foot length. The relationships between general body size and foot size/shape were examined with regard to footwear. The results can be summarized as follows: (1) in either sex, compared with the Japanese, the East Javanese have a longer foot for the same stature and body weight, and a wider foot for the same BMI and the same foot length; (2) the relationship between BMI and foot shape (breadth/length) is nearly the same in the Filipinas and the Japanese females, (3) sexual dimorphism of the foot is greater among the East Javanese than among the Japanese; (4) as body size/weight increases sexual dimorphism diminishes among the East Javanese, whereas it is more emphasized among the Japanese; (5) the appropriateness of the regression equation obtained from measurements of present-day barefoot peoples for estimation of the stature of prehistoric humans is supported.

  16. Characterizing the size, shape, and compactness of a polydisperse prolate ellipsoidal particle via quadruple-detector hydrodynamic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-02-07

    A detailed quantitative description of particle size, shape, and their distributions is essential for understanding and optimization of the solid-, solution-, and melt-state properties of materials. Here, we employ quadruple-detector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC) with multi-angle static light scattering, quasi-elastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry detection as a method for characterizing three important physical properties of materials, namely the molar mass, size, and shape of a polydisperse, non-spherical colloidal silica sample. These properties and their distributions were measured continuously across the HDC elution profile of the sample. By combining information from the various parameters determined, we were also able to obtain quantitative knowledge regarding the compactness or denseness of the sample. The applicability of multi-detector HDC to characterize polydisperse, non-spherical analytes was shown to be rapid, accurate, and precise. An advantage over traditional characterization methods is the ability of multi-detector HDC to determine particle size, shape, compactness, and their distributions simultaneously in a single analysis.

  17. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S. [Department of Radiology-JPP 3889, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246 (United States); Luisiri, A. [Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Garibaldi, L.R. [Children' s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey (United States); St. Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  18. The effects of particle size, shape, density and flow characteristics on particle margination to vascular walls in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Hang T; Truong, Nghia P; Whittaker, Andrew K; Davis, Thomas P; Peter, Karlheinz

    2018-01-01

    Vascular-targeted drug delivery is a promising approach for the treatment of atherosclerosis, due to the vast involvement of endothelium in the initiation and growth of plaque, a characteristic of atherosclerosis. One of the major challenges in carrier design for targeting cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is that carriers must be able to navigate the circulation system and efficiently marginate to the endothelium in order to interact with the target receptors. Areas covered: This review draws on studies that have focused on the role of particle size, shape, and density (along with flow hemodynamics and hemorheology) on the localization of the particles to activated endothelial cell surfaces and vascular walls under different flow conditions, especially those relevant to atherosclerosis. Expert opinion: Generally, the size, shape, and density of a particle affect its adhesion to vascular walls synergistically, and these three factors should be considered simultaneously when designing an optimal carrier for targeting CVD. Available preliminary data should encourage more studies to be conducted to investigate the use of nano-constructs, characterized by a sub-micrometer size, a non-spherical shape, and a high material density to maximize vascular wall margination and minimize capillary entrapment, as carriers for targeting CVD.

  19. Sub-10 nm Platinum Nanocrystals with Size and Shape Control: Catalytic Study for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Huang, Wenyu; Aliaga, Cesar; Hung, Ling-I; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-03-02

    Platinum nanocubes and nanopolyhedra with tunable size from 5 to 9 nm were synthesized by controlling the reducing rate of metal precursor ions in a one-pot polyol synthesis. A two-stage process is proposed for the simultaneous control of size and shape. In the first stage, the oxidation state of the metal ion precursors determined the nucleation rate and consequently the number of nuclei. The reaction temperature controlled the shape in the second stage by regulation of the growth kinetics. These well-defined nanocrystals were loaded into MCF-17 mesoporous silica for examination of catalytic properties. Pt loadings and dispersions of the supported catalysts were determined by elemental analysis (ICP-MS) and H2 chemisorption isotherms, respectively. Ethylene hydrogenation rates over the Pt nanocrystals were independent of both size and shape and comparable to Pt single crystals. For pyrrole hydrogenation, the nanocubes enhanced ring-opening ability and thus showed a higher selectivity to n-butylamine as compared to nanopolyhedra.

  20. Whitebark pine, population density, and home-range size of grizzly bears in the greater yellowstone ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Bjornlie

    Full Text Available Changes in life history traits of species can be an important indicator of potential factors influencing populations. For grizzly bears (Ursus arctos in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE, recent decline of whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis, an important fall food resource, has been paired with a slowing of population growth following two decades of robust population increase. These observations have raised questions whether resource decline or density-dependent processes may be associated with changes in population growth. Distinguishing these effects based on changes in demographic rates can be difficult. However, unlike the parallel demographic responses expected from both decreasing food availability and increasing population density, we hypothesized opposing behavioral responses of grizzly bears with regard to changes in home-range size. We used the dynamic changes in food resources and population density of grizzly bears as a natural experiment to examine hypotheses regarding these potentially competing influences on grizzly bear home-range size. We found that home-range size did not increase during the period of whitebark pine decline and was not related to proportion of whitebark pine in home ranges. However, female home-range size was negatively associated with an index of population density. Our data indicate that home-range size of grizzly bears in the GYE is not associated with availability of WBP, and, for female grizzly bears, increasing population density may constrain home-range size.

  1. Whitebark pine, population density, and home-range size of grizzly bears in the greater yellowstone ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornlie, Daniel D; Van Manen, Frank T; Ebinger, Michael R; Haroldson, Mark A; Thompson, Daniel J; Costello, Cecily M

    2014-01-01

    Changes in life history traits of species can be an important indicator of potential factors influencing populations. For grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), recent decline of whitebark pine (WBP; Pinus albicaulis), an important fall food resource, has been paired with a slowing of population growth following two decades of robust population increase. These observations have raised questions whether resource decline or density-dependent processes may be associated with changes in population growth. Distinguishing these effects based on changes in demographic rates can be difficult. However, unlike the parallel demographic responses expected from both decreasing food availability and increasing population density, we hypothesized opposing behavioral responses of grizzly bears with regard to changes in home-range size. We used the dynamic changes in food resources and population density of grizzly bears as a natural experiment to examine hypotheses regarding these potentially competing influences on grizzly bear home-range size. We found that home-range size did not increase during the period of whitebark pine decline and was not related to proportion of whitebark pine in home ranges. However, female home-range size was negatively associated with an index of population density. Our data indicate that home-range size of grizzly bears in the GYE is not associated with availability of WBP, and, for female grizzly bears, increasing population density may constrain home-range size.

  2. Dip TIPS as a facile and versatile method for fabrication of polymer foams with controlled shape, size and pore architecture for bioengineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Kumorek, Marta M; Kříž, Jan; Fábryová, Eva; Machová, Lud'ka; Kovářová, Jana; Rypáček, František

    2014-01-01

    The porous polymer foams act as a template for neotissuegenesis in tissue engineering, and, as a reservoir for cell transplants such as pancreatic islets while simultaneously providing a functional interface with the host body. The fabrication of foams with the controlled shape, size and pore structure is of prime importance in various bioengineering applications. To this end, here we demonstrate a thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) based facile process for the fabrication of polymer foams with a controlled architecture. The setup comprises of a metallic template bar (T), a metallic conducting block (C) and a non-metallic reservoir tube (R), connected in sequence T-C-R. The process hereinafter termed as Dip TIPS, involves the dipping of the T-bar into a polymer solution, followed by filling of the R-tube with a freezing mixture to induce the phase separation of a polymer solution in the immediate vicinity of T-bar; Subsequent free-drying or freeze-extraction steps produced the polymer foams. An easy exchange of the T-bar of a spherical or rectangular shape allowed the fabrication of tubular, open- capsular and flat-sheet shaped foams. A mere change in the quenching time produced the foams with a thickness ranging from hundreds of microns to several millimeters. And, the pore size was conveniently controlled by varying either the polymer concentration or the quenching temperature. Subsequent in vivo studies in brown Norway rats for 4-weeks demonstrated the guided cell infiltration and homogenous cell distribution through the polymer matrix, without any fibrous capsule and necrotic core. In conclusion, the results show the "Dip TIPS" as a facile and adaptable process for the fabrication of anisotropic channeled porous polymer foams of various shapes and sizes for potential applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation and other related fields.

  3. Dip TIPS as a facile and versatile method for fabrication of polymer foams with controlled shape, size and pore architecture for bioengineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kasoju

    Full Text Available The porous polymer foams act as a template for neotissuegenesis in tissue engineering, and, as a reservoir for cell transplants such as pancreatic islets while simultaneously providing a functional interface with the host body. The fabrication of foams with the controlled shape, size and pore structure is of prime importance in various bioengineering applications. To this end, here we demonstrate a thermally induced phase separation (TIPS based facile process for the fabrication of polymer foams with a controlled architecture. The setup comprises of a metallic template bar (T, a metallic conducting block (C and a non-metallic reservoir tube (R, connected in sequence T-C-R. The process hereinafter termed as Dip TIPS, involves the dipping of the T-bar into a polymer solution, followed by filling of the R-tube with a freezing mixture to induce the phase separation of a polymer solution in the immediate vicinity of T-bar; Subsequent free-drying or freeze-extraction steps produced the polymer foams. An easy exchange of the T-bar of a spherical or rectangular shape allowed the fabrication of tubular, open- capsular and flat-sheet shaped foams. A mere change in the quenching time produced the foams with a thickness ranging from hundreds of microns to several millimeters. And, the pore size was conveniently controlled by varying either the polymer concentration or the quenching temperature. Subsequent in vivo studies in brown Norway rats for 4-weeks demonstrated the guided cell infiltration and homogenous cell distribution through the polymer matrix, without any fibrous capsule and necrotic core. In conclusion, the results show the "Dip TIPS" as a facile and adaptable process for the fabrication of anisotropic channeled porous polymer foams of various shapes and sizes for potential applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation and other related fields.

  4. Hemicellulose block copolymers made from woods for wide-range directed self-assembly lithography enabling wider range of applicable patterning size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kazuyo; Yamamoto, Kimiko

    2017-03-01

    Xylan, one of hemicellulose family, block copolymer was newly developed for wide-range directed self-assembly lithography (DSA). Xylan is higher hydrophilic material because of having many hydroxy groups in one molecule. It means that xylan block copolymer has a possibility of high-chi block copolymer. Generally, DSA is focused on microphase separation for smaller size with high-chi block copolymer and not well known for larger size. In this study, xylan block copolymer was confirmed enabling wider range of patterning size, from smaller size to larger size. The key of xylan block copolymer is a new molecular structure of block copolymer and sugar chain control technology. Sugar content is the important parameter for not only micro-phase separation property but also line edge roughness (LER) and defects. Based on the sugar control technology, wide-range (hp 8.3nm to 26nm L/S and CD 10nm to 51nm hole) DSA patterning was demonstrated. Additionally it was confirmed that xylan block copolymer is suitable for sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS) process.

  5. Gas-solute dispersivity ratio in granular porous media as related to particle size distribution and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Straface, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    different, granular porous materials were used: (1) crushed granite (very angular particles), (2) gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and (3) Leca® (almost spherical particles). For each material, 21 different particle size fractions were used. Gas and solute dispersion coefficients were determined...... by fitting the advection-dispersion equation to the measured breakthrough curves and in turn used to calculate gas and solute dispersivities as a function of mean particle size (Dm) and particle size range (R) for the 63 particle size fractions considered. The results show that solute and gas dispersivities...

  6. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Owens, Ian P F; Orme, C David L

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  7. Speciation and Extinction Drive the Appearance of Directional Range Size Evolution in Phylogenies and the Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L.; Owens, Ian P. F.; Orme, C. David L.

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age–area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time. PMID:22371689

  8. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex L Pigot

    Full Text Available While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  9. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  10. Shape and Size of Initial Geometrical Imperfections of Structural Glass Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešek Ondřej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper measuring and determining of initial geometrical imperfections of set of glass members are presented. Measured specimens had the different dimensions and different composition – monolithic glass or laminated glass using different types of interlayer foils and glass panes. The shape of initial overall bow was measured using different methods and results were statistically evaluated and compared with allowable values defined in standards.

  11. Effect of Gravity Level on the Particle Shape and Size During Zeolite Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hong-Wei; Ilebusi, Olusegun J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A microscopic diffusion model is developed to represent solute transport in the boundary layer of a growing zeolite crystal. This model is used to describe the effect of gravity on particle shape and solute distribution. Particle dynamics and crystal growth kinetics serve as the boundary conditions of flow and convection-diffusion equations. A statistical rate theory is used to obtain the rate of solute transport across the growing interface, which is expressed in terms of concentration and velocity of solute species. Microgravity can significantly decrease the solute velocity across the growing interface compared to its earth-based counterpart. The extent of this reduction highly depends on solute diffusion constant in solution. Under gravity, the flow towards the crystal enhances solute transport rate across the growing interface while the flow away from crystals reduces this rate, suggesting a non-uniform growth rate and thus an elliptic final shape. However, microgravity can significantly reduce the influence of flow and obtain a final product with perfect spherical shape. The model predictions compare favorably with the data of space experiment of zeolites grown in space.

  12. Cell-sized liposomes reveal how actomyosin cortical tension drives shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kevin; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Feng C; Lees, Edouard; Voituriez, Raphaël; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Sykes, Cecile

    2013-10-08

    Animal cells actively generate contractile stress in the actin cortex, a thin actin network beneath the cell membrane, to facilitate shape changes during processes like cytokinesis and motility. On the microscopic scale, this stress is generated by myosin molecular motors, which bind to actin cytoskeletal filaments and use chemical energy to exert pulling forces. To decipher the physical basis for the regulation of cell shape changes, here, we use a cell-like system with a cortex anchored to the outside or inside of a liposome membrane. This system enables us to dissect the interplay between motor pulling forces, cortex-membrane anchoring, and network connectivity. We show that cortices on the outside of liposomes either spontaneously rupture and relax built-up mechanical stress by peeling away around the liposome or actively compress and crush the liposome. The decision between peeling and crushing depends on the cortical tension determined by the amount of motors and also on the connectivity of the cortex and its attachment to the membrane. Membrane anchoring strongly affects the morphology of cortex contraction inside liposomes: cortices contract inward when weakly attached, whereas they contract toward the membrane when strongly attached. We propose a physical model based on a balance of active tension and mechanical resistance to rupture. Our findings show how membrane attachment and network connectivity are able to regulate actin cortex remodeling and membrane-shape changes for cell polarization.

  13. Shape and size variation: growth and development of the dusky grouper (Epinephelus marginatus Lowe, 1834).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Tommaso; Pulcini, Domitilla; Bruner, Emiliano; Cataudella, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Demersal fishes have complex life cycles that involve an ontogenetic change in morphology, physiology, and behavior, as their pelagic larval stages colonize benthic habitats. The developmental transition between larvae and juveniles leads to very complex processes of morphogenesis and differentiation. These processes primarily determine changes in external morphology, which is shaped by selective pressures to optimize performance for basic activities such as swimming, escape from predators, and feeding. Fishes have provided fertile grounds for ecomorphological investigations throughout ontogeny, as the role of changing morphology in inducing ontogenetic niche shifts is not always clear. In this framework, some studies have demonstrated that certain species undergo gradual changes, whereas other species experience threshold effects in their ecomorphological relationships during ontogeny. In this study, the intraspecific allometry of the dusky grouper was examined. Geometric morphometric tools were used to quantify shape changes through the development, and a modular approach was also applied to analyze the pattern of covariation between three distinct blocks (head, trunk, and tail). For this purpose, a two-block Partial Least Square was computed. This method reveals that the pattern of changes in the overall body shape is the result of the modularized changes of these blocks. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape : A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Thomas W.; Justice, Anne E.; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F.; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.; Lu, Yingchang; Magi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H.; Rueeger, Sina; Teumer, Alexander; Ehret, Georg B.; Ferreira, Teresa; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Karjalainen, Juha; Lagou, Vasiliki; Mahajan, Anubha; Neinast, Michael D.; Prokopenko, Inga; Simino, Jeannette; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Jansen, Rick; Westra, Harm-Jan; White, Charles C.; Absher, Devin; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ahmad, Shafqat; Albrecht, Eva; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cadby, Gemma; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Delgado, Graciela; Demirkan, Ayse; Dueker, Nicole; Eklund, Niina; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Joel; Feenstra, Bjarke; Fischer, Krista; Frau, Francesca; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Geller, Frank; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Grammer, Tanja B.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Haitjema, Saskia; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Johansson, Asa; Kaakinen, Marika; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lehne, Benjamin; Liu, Youfang; Lo, Ken Sin; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luan, Jian'an; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Mangino, Massimo; McKnight, Barbara; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L.; Montasser, May E.; Mueller, Gabriele; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Rayner, Nigel W.; Renstrom, Frida; Rizzi, Federica; Rose, Lynda M.; Ryan, Kathy A.; Salo, Perttu; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert Vernon; Southam, Lorraine; Stancakova, Alena; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sung, Yun Ju; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Trompet, Stella; Pervjakova, Natalia; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van der Laan, Sander W.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Setten, Jessica|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345493990; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wang, Sophie R.; Wang, Zhaoming; Wild, Sarah H.; Willenborg, Christina; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Andrew; Yang, Jian; Yengo, Loic; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andersson, Ehm A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Banasik, Karina; Barcella, Matteo; Barlassina, Cristina; Bellis, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Blangero, John; Blueher, Matthias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boyd, Heather A.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buchman, Aron S.; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter S.; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cole, John; Collins, Francis S.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Dimitriou, Maria; Duan, Jubao; Enroth, Stefan; Eury, Elodie; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gigante, Bruna; Glorioso, Nicola; Go, Alan S.; Gottesman, Omri; Graessler, Juergen; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gu, Yu-Mei; Broer, Linda; Ham, Annelies C.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise L.; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Hysi, Pirro G.; Illig, Thomas; De Jager, Philip L.; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Juonala, Markus; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karaleftheri, Maria; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kinnunen, Leena; Kittner, Steven J.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Krarup, Nikolaj T.; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Krueger, Janine; Kuh, Diana; Kumari, Meena; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Langenberg, Claudia; Lannfelt, Lars; Lanzani, Chiara; Lotay, Vaneet; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Lindstrom, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yan-Ping; Lobbens, Stephane; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mannisto, Satu; Magnusson, Patrik K.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Andrew P.; Narisu, Narisu; Nelis, Mari; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Perusse, Louis; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G.; Pouta, Anneli; Rheinberger, Myriam; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Richards, Marcus; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivolta, Carlo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A.; Scott, William R.; Sebert, Sylvain; Sengupta, Sebanti; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Silveira, Angela; Slagboom, P. Eline; Smit, Jan H.; Sparso, Thomas H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorand, Barbara; Toenjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J.; Voelker, Uwe; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Walker, Ryan W.; Wennauer, Roman; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; de Bakker, Paul I. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342957082; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John; Bennett, David A.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Boeger, Carsten A.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; de Faire, Ulf; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Franke, Lude; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Gronberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heliovaara, Markku; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Hveem, Kristian; James, Alan L.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kaehoenen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kivimaki, Mika; Knekt, Paul B.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kuusisto, Johanna; Maerz, Winfried; Martin, Nicholas G.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lind, Lars; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Mantyselka, Pekka; Melbye, Mads; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Moll, Frans L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070246882; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njolstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pankow, James S.; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Quertermous, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; den Ruijter, Hester M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304123846; Saltevo, Juha; Sattar, Naveed; Schunkert, Heribert; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stefania, Bandinelli; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stumvoll, Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Voelzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Clegg, Deborah J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Rao, D. C.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Ines; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Hunter, David J.; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert C.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Heid, Iris M.; North, Kari E.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially

  15. Alameda Song Sparrow Abundance Related to Salt Marsh Vegetation Patch Size and Shape Metrics Quantified from Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevan B. Moffett

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kevan B. Moffett, Jaslyn Law, Steven M. Gorelick, Nadav Nur, and Julian K. Wooddoi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15547/sfews.2014v12iss3art2Understanding the characteristics of high-quality avian habitat is critical for guiding salt marsh management and restoration. Existing insights into salt marsh avian habitat are often based on the composition of marsh vegetation, e.g., individual plant species cover. This study investigated whether the spatial configuration of marsh surface cover (e.g., patch number, density, size, shape complexity and compactness, degree of dissection of the landscape, variation and repetition of cover type, and the variance within these metrics is a useful, additional indicator of avian habitat quality for the Alameda Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia pusillula, a non-migratory California Species of Special Concern endemic to southern San Francisco Bay. M. m. pusillula density during the breeding seasons of 2002 through 2005 was estimated at 82 observation points in 10 marsh sites within the bird’s geographic range. The mean bird density index (overall mean: 5.61 birds detected per hectare of marsh was not significantly different among marshes of different ages. We mapped the vegetation zones, open water, and upland areas within each marsh site using high resolution aerial photographs and automated classification analysis. We quantified the configuration of surface cover around each bird observation point by 31 metrics. Bird density index was best modeled by a multiple linear regression containing positive relationships with the metrics Mean Core Area Index and Patch Core Area Coefficient of Variation (R2 = 0.210, p < 0.0001. Qualitatively, this model suggested that M. m. pusillula abundance during the breeding season was greatest in marsh areas with compact patches that spanned a variety of patch sizes from moderate-to-large, uninterrupted by other cover. We conclude that configuration-based vegetation pattern analysis could

  16. Plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles for SERS detection of the pesticide thiram: size- and shape-dependent Raman enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengzhen; Sikdar, Debabrata; Huang, Xiqiang; Si, Kae Jye; Xiong, Wei; Gong, Shu; Yap, Lim Wei; Premaratne, Malin; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-02-21

    We systematically investigated the size- and shape-dependent SERS activities of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles towards detection of the pesticide thiram. Monodisperse Au@Ag nanocubes (NCs) and Au@Ag nanocuboids (NBs) were synthesized and their Ag shell thickness was precisely adjusted from ∼1 nm to ∼16 nm. All these nanoparticles were used as SERS substrates for thiram detection, and the Raman intensities with three different lasers (514 nm, 633 nm and 782 nm) were recorded and compared. Our results clearly show that: (1) the excitation wavelength discriminated particle shapes regardless of particle sizes, and the maximized Raman enhancement was observed when the excitation wavelength approaches the SERS peak (provided there is significant local electric field confinement on the plasmonic nanostructures at that wavelength); (2) at the optimized laser wavelength, the maximum Raman enhancement was achieved at a certain threshold of particle size (or silver coating thickness). By exciting particles at their optimized sizes with the corresponding optimized laser wavelengths, we achieved a detection limit of roughly around 100 pM and 80 pM for NCs and NBs, respectively.

  17. Permeability-Selectivity Analysis of Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Membranes: Effect of Pore Size and Shape Distribution and Membrane Stretching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usama Siddiqui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a modeling approach to determine the permeability-selectivity tradeoff for microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes with a distribution of pore sizes and pore shapes. Using the formulated permeability-selectivity model, the effect of pore aspect ratio and pore size distribution on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of the membrane is analyzed. A finite element model is developed to study the effect of membrane stretching on the distribution of pore sizes and shapes in the stretched membrane. The effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff of membranes is also analyzed. The results show that increasing pore aspect ratio improves membrane performance while increasing the width of pore size distribution deteriorates the performance. It was also found that the effect of membrane stretching on the permeability-selectivity tradeoff is greatly affected by the uniformity of pore distribution in the membrane. Stretching showed a positive shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve of membranes with well-dispersed pores while in the case of pore clustering, a negative shift in the permeability-selectivity tradeoff curve was observed.

  18. Shape and size variations of Aegla uruguayana (Anomura, Aeglidae under laboratory conditions: A geometric morphometric approach to the growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P. Diawol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crustacean growth studies typically use modal analysis rather than focusing on the growth of individuals. In the present work, we use geometric morphometrics to determine how organism shape and size varies during the life of the freshwater crab, Aegla uruguayana Schmitt, 1942. A total of 66 individuals from diverse life cycle stages were examined daily and each exuvia was recorded. Digital images of the dorsal region of the cephalothorax were obtained for each exuvia and were subsequently used to record landmark configurations. Moult increment and intermoult period were estimated for each crab. Differences in shape between crabs of different sizes (allometry and sexes (sexual dimorphism; SD were observed. Allometry was registered among specimens; however, SD was not statistically significant between crabs of a given size. The intermoult period increased as size increased, but the moult frequency was similar between the sexes. Regarding ontogeny, juveniles had short and blunt rostrum, robust forehead region, and narrow cephalothorax. Unlike juveniles crabs, adults presented a well-defined anterior and posterior cephalothorax region. The rostrum was long and stylised and the forehead narrow. Geometric morphometric methods were highly effective for the analysis of aeglid-individual- growth and avoided excessive handling of individuals through exuvia analysis.

  19. Effects of the asphaltene structure and the tetralin/heptane solvent ratio on the size and shape of asphaltene aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Lee, Yong-Kul

    2017-05-31

    Asphaltene molecules, which consist of differently hydrogenated polyaromatic cores grafted with side alkyl chains of different sizes and grafting densities, were simulated with a solvent mixture of heptane and tetralin using coarse-grained force fields. Starting with the initial configuration of randomly distributed asphaltene molecules and solvents, the asphaltene molecules aggregate because of the attractive force between their polyaromatic cores, but their sizes and shapes differ. The average aggregate size decreases with an increase in the hydrogenated polycyclic core, side-chain length, and tetralin concentration, which agree with experimental observations in the hydrocracking process. The number of side chains also influences the aggregate size but only in the presence of tetralin. In particular, the effect of tetralin addition occurs more significantly for asphaltene molecules with more side chains because side chains sterically block the intermolecular interactions between polyaromatic cores, which makes it easier for the aromatic ring of tetralin to bind to the polyaromatic core of asphaltene. These steric effects of side chains yield different shapes of aggregates, showing parallel stacking (face-to-face) for aromatic cores with many side chains, and T-shape (edge-to-face) or offset-parallel stacking for those with fewer side chains. These findings agree with the experimental observation regarding the effect of tetralin on the solubility of asphaltene, and indicate that the extent of the tetralin effect depends on the number of side alkyl chains, implying that tetralin solvents need to be added with consideration for the structural change of asphaltene under hydrogenation or dealkylation conditions.

  20. Experimental and theoretical study of dielectrophoretic particle trapping in arrays of insulating structures: Effect of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2015-05-01

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) employs insulating structures embedded in a microchannel to produce electric field gradients. This contribution presents a detailed analysis of the regions within an iDEP system where particles are likely to be retained due to dielectrophoretic trapping in a microchannel with an array of cylindrical insulating structures. The effects of particle size and shape on dielectrophoretic trapping were analyzed by employing 1 and 2 μm polystyrene particles and Escherichia coli cells. This research aims to study the mechanism behind dielectrophoretic trapping and develop a deeper understanding of iDEP systems. Mathematical modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics was employed to assess electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic particle velocities. Experiments were carried out to determine the location of dielectrophoretic barriers that block particle motion within an iDEP microchannel; this supported the estimation of a correction factor to match experiments and simulations. Particle velocities were predicted with the model, demonstrating how the different forces acting on the particles are in equilibrium when particle trapping occurs. The results showed that particle size and shape have a significant effect on the magnitude, location, and shape of the regions of dielectrophoretic trapping of particles, which are defined by DEP isovelocity lines and EK isovelocity lines. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Size and Shape of Protein Molecules at the Nanometer Level Determined by Sedimentation, Gel Filtration, and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    An important part of characterizing any protein molecule is to determine its size and shape. Sedimentation and gel filtration are hydrodynamic techniques that can be used for this medium resolution structural analysis. This review collects a number of simple calculations that are useful for thinking about protein structure at the nanometer level. Readers are reminded that the Perrin equation is generally not a valid approach to determine the shape of proteins. Instead, a simple guideline is presented, based on the measured sedimentation coefficient and a calculated maximum S, to estimate if a protein is globular or elongated. It is recalled that a gel filtration column fractionates proteins on the basis of their Stokes radius, not molecular weight. The molecular weight can be determined by combining gradient sedimentation and gel filtration, techniques available in most biochemistry laboratories, as originally proposed by Siegel and Monte. Finally, rotary shadowing and negative stain electron microscopy are powerful techniques for resolving the size and shape of single protein molecules and complexes at the nanometer level. A combination of hydrodynamics and electron microscopy is especially powerful. PMID:19495910

  2. Effects of domain shape and size in the electronic and optical properties of boron nitride doped graphenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, L.; Azevedo, S.; de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio

    2017-11-01

    The co-dopant, boron nitride (BN) doped graphene (BNG), has been synthesized recently and has been shown to be an efficient method to engineer band gaps in graphene. The control of the dopant domain size allows us to tailor the electronic structure and properties of graphene. We have studied the electronic and optical properties of boron nitride doped graphene with different domain shapes and sizes. Seven different doping configurations (three quantum dot types and four triangular-shaped types, being two with nitrogen and two with boron at the edges, respectively) were chosen and calculated making use of first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). Band gap opening has been observed for such structures whose magnitude increases with the doping concentration. We found that only atoms near the dopant boundary make significant contributions to the near Fermi energy. The configurations with triangular-shaped nanodomains with nitrogen and boron at the edge show a different structure of absorption and conductivity peaks when compared with the quantum dot type structures and graphene. Such findings suggest a controllable way of manipulating the optical properties of doped graphene materials.

  3. Shape- and Size-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aloe vera Plant Extract and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logaranjan, Kaliyaperumal; Raiza, Anasdass Jaculin; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Pandian, Kannaiyan

    2016-11-01

    Biogenic synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) was performed at room temperature using Aloe vera plant extract in the presence of ammoniacal silver nitrate as a metal salt precursor. The formation of AgNP was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals. The shape and size of the synthesized particle were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. These results were confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and further supported by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/Raman scattering (SERS) study. UV-visible spectrum has shown a sharp peak at 420 nm and further evidenced by FTIR peak profile (at 1587.6, 1386.4, and 1076 cm-1 with corresponding compounds). The main band position with SERS was noticed at 1594 cm-1 (C-C stretching vibration). When samples were heated under microwave radiation, AgNP with octahedron shapes with 5-50 nm were found and this method can be one of the easier ways to synthesis anisotropic AgNP, in which the plant extract plays a vital role to regulate the size and shape of the nanoparticles. Enhanced antibacterial effects (two- to fourfold) were observed in the case of Aloe vera plant protected AgNP than the routinely synthesized antibiotic drugs.

  4. Effect of Mo concentration on shape and size of monolayer MoS2 crystals by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhao; Zeng, Xiangbin; Wu, Shaoxiong; Zeng, Yang; Hu, Yishuo; Ding, Jia; Xu, Sue

    2017-10-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a new two-dimensional direct-bandgap semiconductor, has attracted research interests into applications in atomically thin electronics and optoelectronics. Growing monolayer MoS2 film by chemical vapor deposition is the most commonly used approach. Little is known, however, about the cause of the shape and size evolution. Here, we explore how the precursor’s concentration affects the MoS2 crystals’ shape and size. When S concentration is stable, the shape of the MoS2 domain evolves from triangle to hexagon and then truncated triangle, finally back to a triangle as the concentration of Mo elevates. Regulating the concentration of Mo leads to the controllable growth of MoS2 crystal. By controlling the concentration of Mo, we eventually synthesized over 100 µm monolayer MoS2 crystals. Our results are a significant step forward in realizing the ultimate promise of large atomic MoS2 monolayer crystals for flexible, electronic, optoelectronic devices.

  5. The uniqueness of firm size distribution function from tent-shaped growth rate distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atushi

    2007-09-01

    Employing profits data of Japanese firms in 2003 and 2004, we report the proof that a Non-Gibrat's law in the middle scale region of profits is unique under the law of detailed balance. This uniquely leads to the probability distribution function (pdf) of profits. In the proof, two approximations are employed. The pdf of growth rate is described as tent-shaped exponential functions and the value of the origin of the growth rate distribution is constant. These approximations are confirmed in the database. The resultant profits pdf fits with the empirical data consistently. This guarantees the validity of the approximations.

  6. The mid-domain effect matters: simulation analyses of range-size distribution data from Mount Kinabalu, Borneo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grytnes, John-Arvid; Beaman, John H.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund

    2008-01-01

    within the domain (range-restricted MDE), and a model encompassing all species with the theoretical midpoint within the domain (midpoint-restricted MDE). These predictions are compared with observations from the elevational pattern of range-size distributions and species richness of vascular plants...

  7. Covariation between human pelvis shape, stature, and head size alleviates the obstetric dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara; Mitteroecker, Philipp

    2015-05-05

    Compared with other primates, childbirth is remarkably difficult in humans because the head of a human neonate is large relative to the birth-relevant dimensions of the maternal pelvis. It seems puzzling that females have not evolved wider pelvises despite the high maternal mortality and morbidity risk connected to childbirth. Despite this seeming lack of change in average pelvic morphology, we show that humans have evolved a complex link between pelvis shape, stature, and head circumference that was not recognized before. The identified covariance patterns contribute to ameliorate the "obstetric dilemma." Females with a large head, who are likely to give birth to neonates with a large head, possess birth canals that are shaped to better accommodate large-headed neonates. Short females with an increased risk of cephalopelvic mismatch possess a rounder inlet, which is beneficial for obstetrics. We suggest that these covariances have evolved by the strong correlational selection resulting from childbirth. Although males are not subject to obstetric selection, they also show part of these association patterns, indicating a genetic-developmental origin of integration.

  8. How Rural Market Imperfections Shape the Relation Between Farm Size and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltberg, Rasmus

    The subject of this article is the alleged inverse relationship between farm size and productivity in developing countries. The recent controversy is reviewed, and a framework is provided to explain the inverse relationship based on plausible assumptions about imperfections in the markets for labor...

  9. Decoupling of size and shape fluctuations in heteropolymeric sequences reconciles discrepancies in SAXS vs. FRET measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuertes, Gustavo; Banterle, Niccolò; Ruff, Kiersten M; Chowdhury, Aritra; Mercadante, Davide; Koehler, Christine; Kachala, Michael; Estrada Girona, Gemma; Milles, Sigrid; Mishra, Ankur; Onck, Patrick R; Gräter, Frauke; Esteban-Martín, Santiago; Pappu, Rohit V; Svergun, Dmitri I; Lemke, Edward A

    2017-01-01

    Unfolded states of proteins and native states of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) populate heterogeneous conformational ensembles in solution. The average sizes of these heterogeneous systems, quantified by the radius of gyration (RG ), can be measured by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS).

  10. Home-range size and overlap within an introduced population of the Cuban Knight Anole, Anolis equestris (Squamata: Iguanidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Richards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have investigated the spatial relationships of terrestrial lizards, but arboreal species remain poorly studiedbecause they are difficult to observe. The conventional view of home-range size and overlap among territorial, polygynous species of lizards is that: (1 male home ranges are larger than those of females; (2 male home ranges usually encompass, or substantiallyoverlap, those of several females; and (3 male home-range overlap varies but often is minimal, but female home ranges frequently overlap extensively. However, the paucity of pertinent studies makes it difficult to generalize these patterns to arboreal lizards. Weinvestigated home-range size and overlap in the arboreal Knight Anole, Anolis equestris, and compared our findings to published home-range data for 15 other species of Anolis. Using radiotelemetry and mark-recapture/resight techniques, we analyzed the home rangesof individuals from an introduced population of Knight Anoles in Miami, Florida. The home ranges of both sexes substantially overlapped those of the same- and different-sex individuals. In addition, male and female home ranges did not differ significantly, an unusual observation among lizard species. If one compares both male and female home ranges to those of other Anolis species, Knight Anoles have significantly larger home ranges, except for two species for which statistical comparisons were not possible. Our results suggest that home ranges and sex-specific spatial arrangements of canopy lizards may differ from those of more terrestrial species.

  11. The Genetic Architecture of Fluctuating Asymmetry of Mandible Size and Shape in a Population of Mice: Another Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J. Leamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, typically measured by variation in the differences between right and left sides of bilateral traits, is commonly used to assess developmental instability (DI in populations. A previous quantitative trait locus (QTL investigation using an F2 intercross mouse population found little evidence of individual loci affecting FA in mandible size, but an abundance of epistatic interactions between loci. Here we extend this work by testing whether these patterns replicate in an F3 population derived from the same intercross. Using a large number of molecular markers genotyped in over 1200 mice, we uncovered significant interactions between loci (QTLs affecting FA in mandible size (and shape. Epistasis contributed roughly 20% of the variation in FASIZE and 19% of the variation in FASHAPE at the 0.0001 probability level alone, and was comparable to that previously estimated for the F2 mice, and much greater than that generated from the few single-locus QTLs affecting the mandible FA traits. The positions of the single-locus and epistatic QTLs for FA that we discovered suggested that logical candidate genes for DI are those controlling size or shape in the traits themselves, and that they may be interacting with genes for heat shock proteins.

  12. Facile synthesis of iv-vi SnS nanocrystals with shape and size control: nanoparticles, nanoflowers and amorphous nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jiajia; Men, Kangkang; Xiao, Guanjun; Wang, Li; Dai, Quanqin; Zou, Bo; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-09-01

    SnS nanocrystals have been synthesized in a simple and facile way. Sn(6)O(4)(OH)(4) is introduced to synthesize tin sulfide, which is used as tin precursor. By changing the reaction conditions (reaction temperature and Sn/S molar ratio), SnS nanocrystals with different shape and size can be produced. SnS nanoparticles and nanoflowers with orthorhombic crystal structure have uniform size distribution. The SnS nanoflowers firstly transform to polycrystalline nanoflowers, and then become amorphous nanosheets. The drive force of amorphization reduces the high free-energy of nanocrystals. The layered crystal structure of SnS is the main reason for the shape evolution and amorphization processes. The optical properties of nanoparticles are investigated by optical absorption spectra. The optical direct band gap and optical indirect band gap in SnS nanoparticles are 3.6 eV and 1.6 eV, respectively. Compared to direct band gap (1.3 eV) and indirect band gap (1.09 eV) in bulk SnS, both direct transition and indirect transition in nanoparticles show an obvious quantum-size effect.

  13. Construction of invisibility cloaks of arbitrary shape and size using planar layers of metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Oliver; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Elsen, Christoffer; Smith, David; Rahm, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Transformation optics (TO) is a powerful tool for the design of electromagnetic and optical devices with novel functionality derived from the unusual properties of the transformation media. In general, the fabrication of TO media is challenging, requiring spatially varying material properties with both anisotropic electric and magnetic responses. Though metamaterials have been proposed as a path for achieving such complex media, the required properties arising from the most general transformations remain elusive, and cannot implemented by state-of-the-art fabrication techniques. Here, we propose faceted approximations of TO media of arbitrary shape in which the volume of the TO device is divided into flat metamaterial layers. These layers can be readily implemented by standard fabrication and stacking techniques. We illustrate our approximation approach for the specific example of a two-dimensional, omnidirectional "invisibility cloak," and quantify its performance using the total scattering cross section as a practical figure of merit.

  14. Optimization of size and shape of composite heat sinks with phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, C.; Mungara, Praneet; Sharma, Parw

    2011-05-01

    A composite heat sink is one in which a phase change material is interspersed with a high thermal conductivity base material to maximize the thermal performance of the device. Unlike constant area fins considered in literature, this work considers a repeating elemental composite heat sink (ECHS) with variable area fins. The base material is aluminium and the phase change material is n-Eicosane. An in house code was developed in MATLABto determine the time of operation for a vertical fins ECHS for a one dimensional approximation. This was followed by a two dimensional analysis of the problem using FLUENT 6.3. The effects of the shape of the interface surface on the time of operation and overall heat dissipated are determined and design modifications for the composite Heat Sinks based on the results obtained are suggested.

  15. Geometrical properties of rigid frictionless granular packings as a function of particle size and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenen, Jean-François; Descantes, Yannick

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional discrete numerical simulation is used to investigate the properties of close-packed frictionless granular assemblies as a function of particle polydispersity and shape. Unlike some experimental results, simulations show that disordered packings of pinacoids (eight-face convex polyhedra) achieve higher solid fraction values than amorphous packings of spherical or rounded particles, thus fulfilling the analog of Ulam's conjecture stated by Jiao and co-workers for random packings [Y. Jiao and S. Torquato, Phys. Rev. E 84, 041309 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.041309]. This seeming discrepancy between experimental and numerical results is believed to result from difficulties in overcoming inter particle friction through experimental densification processes. Moreover, solid fraction is shown to increase further with bidispersity and peak when the volume proportion of small particles reaches 30 % . Contrarily, substituting up to 50 % of flat pinacoids for isometric ones yields solid fraction decrease, especially when flat particles are also elongated. Nevertheless, particle shape seems to play a minor role in packing solid fraction compared to polydispersity. Additional investigations focused on the packing microstructure confirm that pinacoid packings fulfill the isostatic conjecture and that they are free of order except beyond 30% to 50 % of flat or flat-elongated polyhedra in the packing. This order increase progressively takes the form of a nematic phase caused by the reorientation of flat or flat-elongated particles to minimize the packing potential energy. Simultaneously, this reorientation seems to increase the solid fraction value slightly above the maximum achieved by monodisperse isometric pinacoids, as well as the coordination number. Finally, partial substitution of elongated pinacoids for isometric ones has limited effect on packing solid fraction or order.

  16. Geometrical properties of rigid frictionless granular packings as a function of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenen, Jean-François; Descantes, Yannick

    2017-07-01

    Three-dimensional discrete numerical simulation is used to investigate the properties of close-packed frictionless granular assemblies as a function of particle polydispersity and shape. Unlike some experimental results, simulations show that disordered packings of pinacoids (eight-face convex polyhedra) achieve higher solid fraction values than amorphous packings of spherical or rounded particles, thus fulfilling the analog of Ulam's conjecture stated by Jiao and co-workers for random packings [Y. Jiao and S. Torquato, Phys. Rev. E 84, 041309 (2011)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.041309]. This seeming discrepancy between experimental and numerical results is believed to result from difficulties in overcoming inter particle friction through experimental densification processes. Moreover, solid fraction is shown to increase further with bidispersity and peak when the volume proportion of small particles reaches 30%. Contrarily, substituting up to 50% of flat pinacoids for isometric ones yields solid fraction decrease, especially when flat particles are also elongated. Nevertheless, particle shape seems to play a minor role in packing solid fraction compared to polydispersity. Additional investigations focused on the packing microstructure confirm that pinacoid packings fulfill the isostatic conjecture and that they are free of order except beyond 30% to 50% of flat or flat-elongated polyhedra in the packing. This order increase progressively takes the form of a nematic phase caused by the reorientation of flat or flat-elongated particles to minimize the packing potential energy. Simultaneously, this reorientation seems to increase the solid fraction value slightly above the maximum achieved by monodisperse isometric pinacoids, as well as the coordination number. Finally, partial substitution of elongated pinacoids for isometric ones has limited effect on packing solid fraction or order.

  17. Penis size interacts with body shape and height to influence male attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Mautz, Brian S.; Wong, Bob B. M.; Peters, Richard A.; Jennions, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Compelling evidence from many animal taxa indicates that male genitalia are often under postcopulatory sexual selection for characteristics that increase a male’s relative fertilization success. There could, however, also be direct precopulatory female mate choice based on male genital traits. Before clothing, the nonretractable human penis would have been conspicuous to potential mates. This observation has generated suggestions that human penis size partly evolved because of female choice. ...

  18. A Feasibility Study of the Flare-Cylinder Configuration as a Reentry Body Shape for an Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, B. J.; Hall, J. R.

    1958-01-01

    A study has been made of a flare-cylinder configuration to investigate its feasibility as a reentry body of an intermediate range ballistic missile. Factors considered were heating, weight, stability, and impact velocity. A series of trajectories covering the possible range of weight-drag ratios were computed for simple truncated nose shapes of varying pointedness, and hence varying weight-drag ratios. Four trajectories were chosen for detailed temperature computation from among those trajectories estimated to be possible. Temperature calculations were made for both "conventional" (for example, copper, Inconel, and stainless steel) and "unconventional" (for example, beryllium and graphite) materials. Results of the computations showed that an impact Mach number of 0.5 was readily obtainable for a body constructed from conventional materials. A substantial increase in subsonic impact velocity above a Mach number of 0.5 was possible without exceeding material temperature limits. A weight saving of up to 134 pounds out of 822 was possible with unconventional materials. This saving represents 78 percent of the structural weight. Supersonic impact would require construction of the body from unconventional materials but appeared to be well within the range of attainability.

  19. Coevolving parasites and population size shape the evolution of mating behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstes Niels AG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coevolution with parasites and population size are both expected to influence the evolution of mating rates. To gain insights into the interaction between these dual selective factors, we used populations from a coevolution experiment with the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its microsporidian parasite, Nosema whitei. We maintained each experimental population at two different population sizes. We assayed the mating behaviour of both males and females from coevolved and paired non-coevolved control populations after 24 generations of coevolution with parasites. Results Males from large, coevolved populations (i.e. ancestors were exposed to parasites showed a reduced eagerness to mate compared to males from large, non-coevolved populations. But in small populations, coevolution did not lead to decreased male mating rates. Coevolved females from both large and small populations appeared to be more willing to accept mating than non-coevolved females. Conclusions This study provides unique, experimental insights into the combined roles of coevolving parasites and population size on the evolution of mating rate. Furthermore, we find that males and females respond differently to the same environmental conditions. Our results show that parasites can be key determinants of the sexual behaviour of their hosts.

  20. Grain size effects on stability of nonlinear vibration with nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Minglu; Sun, Qingping

    2017-10-01

    Grain size effects on stability of thermomechanical responses for a nonlinear torsional vibration system with nanocrystalline superelastic NiTi bar are investigated in the frequency and amplitude domains. NiTi bars with average grain size from 10 nm to 100 nm are fabricated through cold-rolling and subsequent annealing. Thermomechanical responses of the NiTi bar as a softening nonlinear damping spring in the torsional vibration system are obtained by synchronised acquisition of rotational angle and temperature under external sinusoidal excitation. It is shown that nonlinearity and damping capacity of the NiTi bar decrease as average grain size of the material is reduced below 100 nm. Therefore jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses become less significant or even vanish and the vibration system becomes more stable. The work in this paper provides a solid experimental base for manipulating the undesired jump phenomena of thermomechanical responses and stabilising the mechanical vibration system through grain refinement of NiTi SMA.

  1. Ultrafast dephasing of surface plasmon excitation in silver nanoparticles: influence of particle size, shape, and chemical surrounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosbach, J; Hendrich, C; Stietz, F; Vartanyan, T; Träger, F

    2002-12-16

    By combination of two special methods, i.e., persistent spectral hole burning and laser assisted nanoparticle preparation, the dephasing time T2 of surface plasmon excitation in silver nanoparticles was systematically investigated. A strong dependence of T2 on the plasmon energy is found which reflects the relevance of interband damping and makes necessary a precise control of the particle shape when measuring T2. The influence of the reduced dimension on the dephasing dynamics was observed as a decrease of T2 with shrinking particle size. In addition, for silver nanoparticles on quartz substrates, a considerable amount of chemical interface damping was observed.

  2. GEOGRAPHIC BODY SIZE AND SHAPE VARIATION IN A MAINLAND Anolis (SQUAMATA: DACTYLOIDAE FROM NORTHWESTERN SOUTH AMERICA (COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Lucia Calderón- Espinosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO JA X-NONE Anolis auratus is a widely distributed species, from Costa Rica in Central America, through northern South America, includingColombia, Venezuela, northern Brazil, Surinam and the Guyanas. In Colombia, its widespread distribution across different life zones suggests that these lizards occupy different environments and exhibit different microhabitat use in different geographic areas. On the other hand, some observations suggest that this species prefers open areas, selecting grasslands over brushy areas, and thus, an alternative hypothesis is that microhabitat use is similar among different populations. In Anolis, body variables related to locomotion (body size and shape define structural microhabitat use, so two distinct patterns could be expected in this species: conservative or highly variable body size and shape throughout the species distribution. To test thesepredictions, we characterized geographic variation in morphometric traits of this species in Colombia. Females and males were similar in body size, but exhibited differences in some variables related to body shape. These characteristics also varied among males and females from different regions, suggesting heterogeneous use of structural microhabitat, between sexes and among populations. As an alternative, phylogenetic divergence among populations could also account for the observed differences. Absence of ecological and phylogenetic data limits our ability to identify the underlying causes of this pattern. However, we provide a general framework to explore hypotheses about evolution of body size and shape in this species.Variación geográfica en tamaño y forma corporalen un Anolis (Squamata: Dactyloidae continentaldel noroeste de Suramérica (ColombiaRESUMENAnolis auratus se distribuye desde Costa Rica en Centro América, el norte de Sur América, incluyendo Colombia, Venezuela, norte de Brasil, Surinam y las Guyanas. En

  3. Home range size and breeding dispersal of a common buzzard (Buteo buteo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väli Ülo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Telemetric studies have provided ample information on threatened raptors, but still little is known about space use and dispersal of common species. Here I describe the home range and breeding dispersal of a GPS-tracked adult male common buzzard, studied in south-eastern Estonia in 2014–16. This buzzard’s home range covered 8.3 km2 (kernel 95% estimate with the core range being 2.1 km2 (kernel 50%. The home range increased in the course of the breeding season but decreased again before migration. Surprisingly, the nests in the two successive breeding years were located in the opposite margins of the home range, 1.7 km from each other.

  4. The relationship between diet breadth and geographic range size in the butterfly subfamily Nymphalinae--a study of global scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Slove

    Full Text Available The "oscillation hypothesis" has been proposed as a general explanation for the exceptional diversification of herbivorous insect species. The hypothesis states that speciation rates are elevated through repeated correlated changes--oscillations--in degree of host plant specificity and geographic range. The aim of this study is to test one of the predictions from the oscillation hypothesis: a positive correlation between diet breadth (number of host plants used and geographic range size, using the globally distributed butterfly subfamily Nymphalinae. Data on diet breadth and global geographic range were collected for 182 Nymphalinae butterflies species and the size of the geographic range was measured using a GIS. We tested both diet breadth and geographic range size for phylogenetic signal to see if species are independent of each other with respect to these characters. As this test gave inconclusive results, data was analysed both using cross-species comparisons and taking phylogeny into account using generalised estimating equations as applied in the APE package in R. Irrespective of which method was used, we found a significant positive correlation between diet breadth and geographic range size. These results are consistent for two different measures of diet breadth and removal of outliers. We conclude that the global range sizes of Nymphalinae butterflies are correlated to diet breadth. That is, butterflies that feed on a large number of host plants tend to have larger geographic ranges than do butterflies that feed on fewer plants. These results lend support for an important step in the oscillation hypothesis of plant-driven diversification, in that it can provide the necessary fuel for future population fragmentation and speciation.

  5. Role of Acid–Base Equilibria in the Size, Shape, and Phase Control of Cesium Lead Bromide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    A binary ligand system composed of aliphatic carboxylic acids and primary amines of various chain lengths is commonly employed in diverse synthesis methods for CsPbBr3 nanocrystals (NCs). In this work, we have carried out a systematic study examining how the concentration of ligands (oleylamine and oleic acid) and the resulting acidity (or basicity) affects the hot-injection synthesis of CsPbBr3 NCs. We devise a general synthesis scheme for cesium lead bromide NCs which allows control over size, size distribution, shape, and phase (CsPbBr3 or Cs4PbBr6) by combining key insights on the acid–base interactions that rule this ligand system. Furthermore, our findings shed light upon the solubility of PbBr2 in this binary ligand system, and plausible mechanisms are suggested in order to understand the ligand-mediated phase control and structural stability of CsPbBr3 NCs. PMID:29381326

  6. Influence of SLM pixel size and shape on the performance of optical correlators and optical memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Michael J.

    2000-05-01

    The principles underlying optical correlators and Fourier transform optical memories are well understood. The components and materials they depend upon are gradually becoming available, bringing these technologies closer to commercialization. As efforts are made to obtain the best possible performance from these systems it becomes increasingly important to understand how their detailed operation differs from simple idealized models. Spatial light modulators (SLMs) used in correlators display sets of discrete data rather than continuous 2D functions, and the optical Fourier transform of these SLMs is influenced by the shape and fill-factor of the SLM's pixels. As a consequence, optical correlators perform a function that is more complex than the simple idealized correlation operation. The performance of Fourier transform optical memories is similarly affected. Here we investigate the operation of such optical systems incorporating pixelated SLMs. Examples are presented which highlight differences between the functions actually performed by these systems and the simple conceptual models of their operation. The output of these systems is commonly detected using pixelated CCD or CMOS imagers, the effect of imager pixel fill-factor is also examined.

  7. Seasonality, weather and climate affect home range size in roe deer across a wide latitudinal gradient within Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morellet, Nicolas; Bonenfant, Christophe; Börger, Luca; Ossi, Federico; Cagnacci, Francesca; Heurich, Marco; Kjellander, Petter; Linnell, John D C; Nicoloso, Sandro; Sustr, Pavel; Urbano, Ferdinando; Mysterud, Atle

    2013-11-01

    1. Because many large mammal species have wide geographical ranges, spatially distant populations may be confronted with different sets of environmental conditions. Investigating how home range (HR) size varies across environmental gradients should yield a better understanding of the factors affecting large mammal ecology. 2. We evaluated how HR size of a large herbivore, the roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), varies in relation to seasonality, latitude (climate), weather, plant productivity and landscape features across its geographical range in Western Europe. As roe deer are income breeders, expected to adjust HR size continuously to temporal variation in food resources and energetic requirements, our baseline prediction was for HR size to decrease with proxies of resource availability. 3. We used GPS locations of roe deer collected from seven study sites (EURODEER collaborative project) to estimate fixed-kernel HR size at weekly and monthly temporal scales. We performed an unusually comprehensive analysis of variation in HR size among and within populations over time across the geographical range of a single species using generalized additive mixed models and linear mixed models, respectively. 4. Among populations, HR size decreased with increasing values for proxies of forage abundance, but increased with increases in seasonality, stochastic variation of temperature, latitude and snow cover. Within populations, roe deer HR size varied over time in relation to seasonality and proxies of forage abundance in a consistent way across the seven populations. Thus, our findings were broadly consistent across the distributional range of this species, demonstrating a strong and ubiquitous link between the amplitude and timing of environmental seasonality and HR size at the continental scale. 5. Overall, the variability in average HR size of roe deer across Europe reflects the interaction among local weather, climate and seasonality, providing valuable insight into the

  8. A Wire-Shaped Supercapacitor in Micrometer Size Based on Fe3O4 Nanosheet Arrays on Fe Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohong; Li, Ruchun; Zhou, Weijia

    2017-10-01

    One-dimensional (1D, wire- and fiber-shaped) supercapacitors have recently attracted interest due to their roll-up, micrometer size and potential applications in portable or wearable electronics. Herein, a 1D wire-shaped electrode was developed based on Fe3O4 nanosheet arrays connected on the Fe wire, which was prepared via oxidation of Fe wire in 0.1 M KCl solution (pH 3) with O2-rich environment under 70 °C. The obtained Fe3O4 nanosheet arrays displayed a high specific capacitance (20.8 mF cm-1 at 10 mV s-1) and long cycling lifespan (91.7% retention after 2500 cycles). The excellent performance may attribute to the connected nanosheet structure with abundant open spaces and the intimate contact between the Fe3O4 and iron substrate. In addition, a wire-shaped asymmetric supercapacitor was fabricated and had excellent capacitive properties with a high energy density (9 µWh cm-2) at power density of 532.7 µW cm-2 and remarkable long-term cycling performance (99% capacitance retention after 2000 cycles). Considering low cost and earth-abundant electrode material, as well as outstanding electrochemical properties, the assembled supercapacitor will possess enormous potential for practical applications in portable electronic device.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Detecting space-time disease clusters with arbitrary shapes and sizes using a co-clustering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sami; Daud, Hanita; Dass, Sarat C; Khan, Habib Nawaz; Khalil, Alamgir

    2017-11-06

    Ability to detect potential space-time clusters in spatio-temporal data on disease occurrences is necessary for conducting surveillance and implementing disease prevention policies. Most existing techniques use geometrically shaped (circular, elliptical or square) scanning windows to discover disease clusters. In certain situations, where the disease occurrences tend to cluster in very irregularly shaped areas, these algorithms are not feasible in practise for the detection of space-time clusters. To address this problem, a new algorithm is proposed, which uses a co-clustering strategy to detect prospective and retrospective space-time disease clusters with no restriction on shape and size. The proposed method detects space-time disease clusters by tracking the changes in space-time occurrence structure instead of an in-depth search over space. This method was utilised to detect potential clusters in the annual and monthly malaria data in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan from 2012 to 2016 visualising the results on a heat map. The results of the annual data analysis showed that the most likely hotspot emerged in three sub-regions in the years 2013-2014. The most likely hotspots in monthly data appeared in the month of July to October in each year and showed a strong periodic trend.

  10. The evolution of environmental tolerance and range size: a comparison of geographically restricted and widespread Mimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Seema N; Angert, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    The geographic ranges of closely related species can vary dramatically, yet we do not fully grasp the mechanisms underlying such variation. The niche breadth hypothesis posits that species that have evolved broad environmental tolerances can achieve larger geographic ranges than species with narrow environmental tolerances. In turn, plasticity and genetic variation in ecologically important traits and adaptation to environmentally variable areas can facilitate the evolution of broad environmental tolerance. We used five pairs of western North American monkeyflowers to experimentally test these ideas by quantifying performance across eight temperature regimes. In four species pairs, species with broader thermal tolerances had larger geographic ranges, supporting the niche breadth hypothesis. As predicted, species with broader thermal tolerances also had more within-population genetic variation in thermal reaction norms and experienced greater thermal variation across their geographic ranges than species with narrow thermal tolerances. Species with narrow thermal tolerance may be particularly vulnerable to changing climatic conditions due to lack of plasticity and insufficient genetic variation to respond to novel selection pressures. Conversely, species experiencing high variation in temperature across their ranges may be buffered against extinction due to climatic changes because they have evolved tolerance to a broad range of temperatures. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Validity of Dynamic Light Scattering Method to Analyze a Range of Gold and Copper Nanoparticle Sizes Attained by Solids Laser Ablation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Golubenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of metals possess a whole series of features, concerned with it’s sizes, this leads to appearing or unusual electromagnetic and optical properties, which are untypical for particulates.An extended method of receiving nanoparticles by means of laser radiation is pulse laser ablation of hard targets in liquid medium.Varying the parameters of laser radiation, such as wavelength of laser radiation, energy density, etc., we can operate the size and shape of the resultant particles.The greatest trend of application in medicine have the nanoparticles of iron, copper, silver, silicon, magnesium, gold and zinc.The subject matter in this work is nanoparticles of copper and gold, received by means of laser ablation of hard targets in liquid medium.The aim of exploration, represented in the article, is the estimation of application of the dynamic light scattering method for determination of the range of nanoparticles sizes in the colloidal solution.For studying of the laser ablation process was chosen the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm. Special attention was spared for the description of the experiment technique of receiving of nanoparticles.As the liquid medium ethanol and distillation water were used.For exploration of the received colloidal system have been used the next methods: DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.The results of measuring by DLS method showed that colloidal solution of the copper in the ethanol is the steady system. Copper nanoparticle’s size reaches 200 nm and is staying in the same size for some time.Received system from the gold’s nanoparticles is polydisperse, unsteady and has a big range of the nanoparticle’s sizes. This fact was confirmed by means of photos, got from the TEM FEI Tecnai G2F20 + GIF and SEM Helios NanoLab 660. The range of the gold nanoparticle’s sizes is from 5 to 60 nm. So, it has been proved that the DLS method is

  12. Application of ferrofluid density separation to particles in the micrometer-size range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strebin, R.S. Jr.; Johnson, J.W.; Robertson, D.M.

    1976-02-01

    A device designed and described by AVCO* as a ''Ferrofluid Density Separator''/sup (1)/ develops an apparent fluid density from nominally 2 to 20 g/cm/sup 3/ dependent on the magnitude of an imposed magnetic field gradient. The ferrofluid retains other normal properties of a liquid. One of these devices and a concentration series of ferrofluids were obtained in order to determine the practicality of separating groups of micrometer-size particles into density fractions. Such separations would be of enormous value in the study of various particle burdens because particles of interest are almost always diluted with overwhelming amounts of other particles. The results of a study of separations of micrometer-size particles with the ferrofluid density separator are presented.

  13. Particle size and shape analysis of MTA finer fractions using Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to observe particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio of mineral trioxide aggregate finer fractions using Portland cement. The High Power Field mode of the flow particle image analyzer was used for analysis. Images of particle samples were automatically collected by the analyzer along with analysis parameters. Mean, standard deviation, and the number of particles were calculated in each group. Parameters of length, width, and perimeter did not show a statistical significance when groups were compared. Examining the parameter of aspect ratio, there was evidence of a statistical significance seen (pparticles that were between 0.5 and 3 microm in size was 88%. Fine particles may penetrate dentin tubules. The average aspect ratio was 0.744 (SD=0.155). It can be speculated that a dentin tubule occlusion pattern is dependent on the aspect ratio.

  14. Phase diagrams of magnetic state transformations in multiferroic composites controlled by size, shape and interfacial coupling strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Qiang; Liu, X. L.; Chen, W. J.; Xiong, W. M.; Jiang, G. L.; Zheng, Yue

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to give a comprehensive view of magnetic state stability and transformations in PZT-film/FeGa-dot multiferroic composite systems due to the combining effects of size, shape and interfacial coupling strain. It is found that the stable magnetic state of the FeGa nanodots is not only a function of the size and shape of the nanodot but also strongly sensitive to the interfacial coupling strain modified by the polarization state of PZT film. In particular, due to the large magnetostriction of FeGa, the phase boundaries between different magnetic states (i.e., in-plane/out-of-plane polar states, and single-/multi-vortex states) of FeGa nanodots can be effectively tuned by the polarization-mediated strain. Fruitful strain-mediated transformation paths of magnetic states including those between states with different orderings (i.e., one is polar and the other is vortex), as well as those between states with the same ordering (i.e., both are polar or both are vortex) have been revealed in a comprehensive view. Our result sheds light on the potential of utilizing electric field to induce fruitful magnetic state transformation paths in multiferroic film-dot systems towards a development of novel magnetic random access memories.

  15. Simultaneous topology, shape and size optimization of truss structures by fully stressed design based on evolution strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Ali; Atai, Ali A.; Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2015-08-01

    The most effective scheme of truss optimization considers the combined effect of topology, shape and size (TSS); however, most available studies on truss optimization by metaheuristics concentrated on one or two of the above aspects. The presence of diverse design variables and constraints in TSS optimization may account for such limited applicability of metaheuristics to this field. In this article, a recently proposed algorithm for simultaneous shape and size optimization, fully stressed design based on evolution strategy (FSD-ES), is enhanced to handle TSS optimization problems. FSD-ES combines advantages of the well-known deterministic approach of fully stressed design with potential global search of the state-of-the-art evolution strategy. A comparison of results demonstrates that the proposed optimizer reaches the same or similar solutions faster and/or is able to find lighter designs than those previously reported in the literature. Moreover, the proposed variant of FSD-ES requires no user-based tuning effort, which is desired in a practical application. The proposed methodology has been tested on a number of problems and is now ready to be applied to more complex TSS problems.

  16. Intra-aneurysmal pressure and flow changes induced by flow diverters: relation to aneurysm size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabide, I; Aguilar, M L; Morales, H G; Geers, A J; Kulcsár, Z; Rüfenacht, D; Frangi, A F

    2013-04-01

    Effects of blood flow modification by flow diverters are observed to lead often to aneurysm thrombosis and reverse remodeling. For this process, to further understand the potential roles of intra-aneurysmal blood pressure changes and aneurysm morphologies, 23 patients were studied by numeric simulation. 3D imaging of aneurysms of different sizes and shapes, all located at the supraclinoid segment of the ICA (n=23), was prepared for CFD simulations. Hemodynamic variables were calculated for conditions before and after virtual FD implantation, reconstituting a vessel wall scaffold across the aneurysm neck. WSS, velocity, residence time, turnover time, and intra-aneurysmal pressure were assessed statistically. After placement of FDs, significant reductions inside the aneurysm were observed for most hemodynamic variables (Paneurysmal pressures. For minimum/maximum intra-aneurysmal pressure values, small but significant changes were found; however, they were considered too small to be of relevance. Calculations in 23 cases did not reveal significant intra-aneurysmal mean or peak pressure changes, indicating a minor role of pressure changes in the rare event of secondary ruptures after FD use. Other hemodynamic variables (WSS and velocity) exhibited more significant changes, indicating their role in intra-aneurysmal thrombus formation. Size-dependent, significantly higher reduction in WSS (P=.069) and velocity (P=.013) was observed in small aneurysms compared with larger ones. When it came to shape, there were significantly higher reductions in WSS (P=.055) and velocity (P=.065) and a significantly higher increase in turnover time in fusiform aneurysms compared with saccular aneurysms.

  17. Phase diagrams of magnetic state transformations in multiferroic composites controlled by size, shape and interfacial coupling strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Sheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to give a comprehensive view of magnetic state stability and transformations in PZT-film/FeGa-dot multiferroic composite systems due to the combining effects of size, shape and interfacial coupling strain. It is found that the stable magnetic state of the FeGa nanodots is not only a function of the size and shape of the nanodot but also strongly sensitive to the interfacial coupling strain modified by the polarization state of PZT film. In particular, due to the large magnetostriction of FeGa, the phase boundaries between different magnetic states (i.e., in-plane/out-of-plane polar states, and single-/multi-vortex states of FeGa nanodots can be effectively tuned by the polarization-mediated strain. Fruitful strain-mediated transformation paths of magnetic states including those between states with different orderings (i.e., one is polar and the other is vortex, as well as those between states with the same ordering (i.e., both are polar or both are vortex have been revealed in a comprehensive view. Our result sheds light on the potential of utilizing electric field to induce fruitful magnetic state transformation paths in multiferroic film-dot systems towards a development of novel magnetic random access memories.

  18. Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal-organic frameworks MIL-101: influence of molecular size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Sun, Qian; Xue, Feng; Lin, Daohui

    2011-11-15

    Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal-organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870 m(2)/g and pore volume of 1.85 cm(3)/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including polar acetone and nonpolar benzene, toluene, ethylbeznene, and xylenes. MIL-101 is of higher adsorption capacities for all selected VOCs than zeolite, activated carbon and other reported adsorbents. Adsorption of VOCs on MIL-101 is captured by a pore filling mechanism, showing the size and shape selectivity of VOC molecules. These prove to be a negative linear relationship between the volume adsorption capacities of VOCs and their molecular cross-sectional area values. Most VOC molecules, such as acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene, enter into MIL-101 pores with the planes having the minimum diameters. However, m-xylene and o-xylene may fill into the pores with the planes having the maximum diameters because of the preferred interaction of MIL-101 with the two methyl groups of adsorbate molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an Andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Calderón-Espinosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  20. Application of a finite size of the charge cloud shape generated by an X-ray photon inside the CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Miyata, E

    2002-01-01

    A mesh experiment enables us to specify the X-ray landing position on a charge-coupled device (CCD) with subpixel resolution. By this experiment, we find that the final charge cloud shape generated by Ti-K X-ray photons (4.5 keV) in the CCD is about 1.5x1.1 mu m sup 2 (standard deviation). An X-ray photon photoabsorbed in the CCD generates a number of electrons, forming an X-ray event. It becomes up to a 4-pixel-split event since the pixel size of the CCD used (12 mu m square pixel) is bigger than the charge cloud size. Using the mesh experiment, we can determine the X-ray landing position on the CCD. In this way, we can compare the estimated X-ray landing position with the actual landing position on the CCD. Employing the charge cloud shape, we can improve the position resolution of the X-ray CCD by referring to the X-ray event pattern. We find that the position accuracy of our method is about 1.0 mu m. We discuss our method, comparing it with the charge centroid method.

  1. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Espinosa, Martha L; Ortega-León, Angela M; Zamora-Abrego, Joan G

    2013-03-01

    Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.

  2. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-02-01

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to significantly improve while maintaining the patient comfort.

  3. Among-Individual Variation in Desert Iguanas (Squamata: Dipsosaurus dorsalis): Endurance Capacity Is Positively Related to Home Range Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jennifer M; Garland, Theodore

    Among species of lizards, endurance capacity measured on a motorized treadmill is positively related to daily movement distance and time spent moving, but few studies have addressed such relationships at the level of individual variation within a sex and age category in a single population. Both endurance capacity and home range size show substantial individual variation in lizards, rendering them suitable for such studies. We predicted that these traits would be positively related because endurance capacity is one of the factors that has the potential to limit home range size. We measured the endurance capacity and home range size of adult male desert iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis). Lizards were field captured for measurements of endurance, and home range data were gathered using visual identification of previously marked individuals. Endurance was significantly repeatable between replicate trials, conducted 1-17 d apart ([Formula: see text] for log-transformed values, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). The log of the higher of two endurance trials was positively but not significantly related to log body mass. The log of home range area was positively but not significantly related to log body mass, the number of sightings, or the time span from first to last sighting. As predicted, log endurance was positively correlated with log home range area ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]; for body-mass residual endurance values: [Formula: see text], one-tailed [Formula: see text]). These results suggest that endurance capacity may have a permissive effect on home range size. Alternatively, individuals with larger home ranges may experience training effects (phenotypic plasticity) that increase their endurance.

  4. The range of local public services and population size: Is there a “zoo effect” in French jurisdictions?

    OpenAIRE

    Quentin Frère; Hakim Hammadou; Sonia Paty

    2011-01-01

    This article contributes to the small literature on the relationship between the range of local public services and population size. Using new data on French local jurisdictions, we test the hypothesis that larger jurisdictions provide a broader range of public goods (the so-called “zoo effect”, Oates (1988)). We take advantage of the fact that, in France, many municipalities recently joined together, forming groups of municipalities (or communities) in order to achieve economies of scale. Us...

  5. Intensity of space use reveals conditional sex-specific effects of prey and conspecific density on home range size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronsson, Malin; Low, Matthew; López-Bao, José V; Persson, Jens; Odden, John; Linnell, John D C; Andrén, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    Home range (HR) size variation is often linked to resource abundance, with sex differences expected to relate to sex-specific fitness consequences. However, studies generally fail to disentangle the effects of the two main drivers of HR size variation, food and conspecific density, and rarely consider how their relative influence change over spatiotemporal scales. We used location data from 77 Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) from a 16-year Scandinavian study to examine HR sizes variation relative to prey and conspecific density at different spatiotemporal scales. By varying the isopleth parameter (intensity of use) defining the HR, we show that sex-specific effects were conditional on the spatial scale considered. Males had larger HRs than females in all seasons. Females' total HR size declined as prey and conspecific density increased, whereas males' total HR was only affected by conspecific density. However, as the intensity of use within the HR increased (from 90% to 50% isopleth), the relationship between prey density and area showed opposing patterns for females and males; for females, the prey density effect was reduced, while for males, prey became increasingly important. Thus, prey influenced the size of key regions within male HRs, despite total HR size being independent of prey density. Males reduced their HR size during the mating season, likely to remain close to individual females in estrous. Females reduced their HR size postreproduction probably because of movement constrains imposed by dependent young. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously considering resources and intraspecific interactions as HR size determinants. We show that sex-specific demands influence the importance of prey and conspecific density on space use at different spatiotemporal scales. Thus, unless a gradient of space use intensity is examined, factors not related to total HR size might be disregarded despite their importance in determining size of key regions within

  6. Shape and Size of Cobalt Nanoislands Formed Spontaneously on Cobalt Terraces during Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arghya; Navarro, Violeta; Frenken, Joost W M; van Bavel, Alexander P; Kuipers, Herman P C E; Saeys, Mark

    2016-06-02

    Cobalt-based catalysts undergo a massive and spontaneous reconstruction to form uniform triangular nanoislands under Fischer-Tropsch (FT) conditions. This reconstruction is driven by the unusual and synergistic adsorption of square-planar carbon and CO at the 4-fold edge sites of the nanoislands, driving the formation of triangular islands. The size of the nanoislands is determined by the balance between energy gain from creating C/CO-covered edges and energy penalty to create C/CO-covered corners. For carbon chemical potentials corresponding to FT conditions, triangular Co islands with 45 Co atoms (about 2 nm) are the most stable surface structure. Decreasing the carbon chemical potential and hence the stability of square-planar carbon favors the formation of larger islands, until reconstruction becomes unfavorable and CO-covered terraces are thermodynamically the most stable. The predicted structure of the islands is consistent with in situ scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained for the first time under realistic FT reaction conditions on a Co(0001) surface.

  7. Influence of patch size and shape on post-fire succession on the Yellowstone plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.G.; Gardner, R.H.; Hargrove, W.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)); Romme, W.H. (Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The 1988 Yellowstone fires provided a unique opportunity to examine how the geometry of fire-created patches affects plant reestablishment. We initiated studies in 1990 in small (1 ha), moderated (74-200 ha), and large (480-3698 ha) crown-fire patches in each of 3 areas. Lodgepole pine forest is reestablishing in most burned areas, but seedling density varies by two orders of magnitude. At spatial scales <100 m, lodgepole seedling density declines with distance from the patch edge. Resprouting of herbaceous vegetation led to prompt revegetation in burned patches of all sizes, suggesting within-patch survival is a dominant recovery mechanism for grasses, forbs, and shrubs. Some annuals (e.g., Gayophytum diffusum) achieved greater densities in large vs. small crown-fire patches and colonized large patches more rapidly. Post-fire plant reestablishment in Yellowstone appears rapid and autogenic even in large burns, and the relative importance of factors controlling early postfire succession varies with spatial scale.

  8. Summer Home Range Size of Female Indiana Bats (Myotis Sodalis) in Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn M. Womack; Sybill K. Amelon; Frank R. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of space use by wildlife that are a conservation concern is critical to ensure that management and conservation provides adequate resources to ensure survival and reproductive success. We radio tracked 13 pregnant and 12 lactating Myotis sodalis (Indiana bat) during the maternity season in northern Missouri. Mean (± SE) home range...

  9. Biological responses according to the shape and size of carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B and MESO-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Usui, Yuki; Maruyama, Kayo; Takanashi, Seiji; Aoki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Manabu; Okamoto, Masanori; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of the shape and size of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) on biological responses in vitro. Three types of MWCNTs - VGCF(®)-X, VGCF(®)-S, and VGCF(®) (vapor grown carbon fibers; with diameters of 15, 80, and 150 nm, respectively) - and three CSCNTs of different lengths (CS-L, 20-80 μm; CS-S, 0.5-20 μm; and CS-M, of intermediate length) were tested. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells were exposed to the CNTs (1-50 μg/mL), and cell viability, permeability, uptake, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide production, and intracellular acidity were measured. CSCNTs were less toxic than MWCNTs in both cell types over a 24-hour exposure period. The cytotoxicity of endocytosed MWCNTs varied according to cell type/size, while that of CSCNTs depended on tube length irrespective of cell type. CNT diameter and length influenced cell aggregation and injury extent. Intracellular acidity increased independently of lysosomal activity along with the number of vacuoles in BEAS-2B cells exposed for 24 hours to either CNT (concentration, 10 μg/mL). However, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide generation did not contribute to cytotoxicity. The results demonstrate that CSCNTs could be suitable for biological applications and that CNT shape and size can have differential effects depending on cell type, which can be exploited in the development of highly specialized, biocompatible CNTs.

  10. The Dynamic Behavior of Water Flowing Through Packed Bed of Different Particle Shapes and Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Ahmed Jasim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted on pressure drop of water flow through vertical cylindrical packed beds in turbulent region and the influence of the operating parameters on its behavior. The bed packing was made of spherical and non-spherical particles (spheres, Rasching rings and intalox saddle with aspect ratio range 3.46 D/dp 8.486 obtaining bed porosities 0.396 0.84 and Reynolds number 1217 21758. The system is consisted of 5 cm inside diameter Perspex column, 50 cm long; distilled water was pumped through the bed with flow rate 875, 1000, 1125, 1250,1375 and 1500 l/h and inlet water temperature 20, 30, 40 and 50 ˚C. The packed bed system was monitored by using LabVIEW program, were the results have been obtained from Data Acquisition Adaptor (DAQ.

  11. the shape and size of macromolecules of carboxymethyl starch in diluted solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Željko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxymethyl starch samples were prepared by etherification in heterogeneous media. Three samples were prepared from corn starch and three samples from potato starch. Degree of substitution of prepared samples ranged from 0.40 to 1.10. The samples were investigated by static and dynamic light scattering and viscosity of diluted solution in 0.10 M NaCl as solvent at 25 C. The values of molar mass, MW, radius of gyration, Rg, hydrodynamic radius, Rh, and limited viscosity number, [η] were determined. It was found that the samples are similar to each other regardless of the type of starch and the degree of substitution. Fractal dimension, df, was equal to 2.380 (Rg - MW and 2.406 (Rη - MW, while parameter was 1.195. The values of fractal dimension and parameter are characteristic values for the behavior of branched clusters in thermodynamically good solvents.

  12. Changes in home range sizes and population densities of carnivore species along the natural to urban habitat gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šálek, Martin; Drahníková, L.; Tkadlec, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-14 ISSN 0305-1838 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Carnivores * home range size * natural–urban gradient * population density * review Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.116, year: 2015

  13. Development of cathodic electrocatalysts for low temperature H2 fuel cell applications: Improving oxygen reduction activity through the manipulation of size, shape, and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleve, Timothy Blair

    In this dissertation, the oxygen reduction activity of metal nanoparticle electrocatalysts is improved through the manipulation of their size, shape, and composition. The design of superior catalysts first requires identifying processes that limit overall performance. On both silver and platinum electrodes, the rate of oxygen reduction is limited by the initial proton/electron transfer to O2, however the limited site availability also limits ORR activity of platinum at high electrochemical potentials. Different approaches must employed to improve the activity of platinum and silver electrocatalysts. The first project in this thesis describes the development of Pt alloy electrocatalysts with enhanced ORR activity compared to Pt/C standards. The design of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts is informed by quantum chemical calculations. By understanding how alloying impacts the reactivity of surface atoms, we are able to prepare a special class of catalysts with finely tunable activity dependent upon the composition of their nanoparticle core. The best performing materials have specific activities up to four times higher than Pt/C electrocatalysts. Rigorous characterization and electrochemical testing confirm these enhancements and the observed trends in activity result from the alloy structure rather than size and shape effects. The second project focuses on controlling the morphology of Ag electrocatalysts in order to improve their alkaline ORR activity. In this study, the rates on Ag nanospheres and Ag nanocubes are compared over a wide range of metal loadings. Contrary to our original hypothesis, nanospheres are found to be slightly more active than nanocubes. Rigorous experimental work confirms the reported shape dependence effects are consistent with the relative abundance of 111 and 100 sites on Ag nanoparticles.

  14. From ratites to rats: the size of fleshy fruits shapes species' distributions and continental rainforest assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Maurizio; Kooyman, Robert; Yap, Jia-Yee S; Laffan, Shawn W

    2015-12-07

    Seed dispersal is a key process in plant spatial dynamics. However, consistently applicable generalizations about dispersal across scales are mostly absent because of the constraints on measuring propagule dispersal distances for many species. Here, we focus on fleshy-fruited taxa, specifically taxa with large fleshy fruits and their dispersers across an entire continental rainforest biome. We compare species-level results of whole-chloroplast DNA analyses in sister taxa with large and small fruits, to regional plot-based samples (310 plots), and whole-continent patterns for the distribution of woody species with either large (more than 30 mm) or smaller fleshy fruits (1093 taxa). The pairwise genomic comparison found higher genetic distances between populations and between regions in the large-fruited species (Endiandra globosa), but higher overall diversity within the small-fruited species (Endiandra discolor). Floristic comparisons among plots confirmed lower numbers of large-fruited species in areas where more extreme rainforest contraction occurred, and re-colonization by small-fruited species readily dispersed by the available fauna. Species' distribution patterns showed that larger-fruited species had smaller geographical ranges than smaller-fruited species and locations with stable refugia (and high endemism) aligned with concentrations of large fleshy-fruited taxa, making them a potentially valuable conservation-planning indicator. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Climate, fire size, and biophysical setting control fire severity and spatial pattern in the northern Cascade Range, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansler, C Alina; McKenzie, Donald

    2014-07-01

    Warmer and drier climate over the past few decades has brought larger fire sizes and increased annual area burned in forested ecosystems of western North America, and continued increases in annual area burned are expected due to climate change. As warming continues, fires may also increase in severity and produce larger contiguous patches of severely burned areas. We used remotely sensed burn-severity data from 125 fires in the northern Cascade Range of Washington, USA, to explore relationships between fire size, severity, and the spatial pattern of severity. We examined relationships between climate and the annual area burned and the size of wildfires over a 25-year period. We tested the hypothesis that increased fire size is commensurate with increased burn severity and increased spatial aggregation of severely burned areas. We also asked how local ecological controls might modulate these relationships by comparing results over the whole study area (the northern Cascade Range) to those from four ecological subsections within it. We found significant positive relationships between climate and fire size, and between fire size and the proportion of high severity and spatial-pattern metrics that quantify the spatial aggregation of high-severity areas within fires, but the strength and significance of these relationships varied among the four subsections. In areas with more contiguous subalpine forests and less complex topography, the proportion and spatial aggregation of severely burned areas were more strongly correlated with fire size. If fire sizes increase in a warming climate, changes in the extent, severity, and spatial pattern of fire regimes are likely to be more pronounced in higher-severity fire regimes with less complex topography and more continuous fuels.

  16. Efficient Electron Injection by Size- and Shape-Controlled Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yong-Jin; Morishita, Norito; Chiba, Takayuki; Ohisa, Satoru; Igarashi, Masahiro; Masuhara, Akito; Kido, Junji

    2015-11-18

    Three different sized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were synthesized as spherical ZnO (S-ZnO), rodlike ZnO (R-ZnO), and intermediate shape and size ZnO (I-ZnO) by controlling the reaction time. The average sizes of the ZnO nanoparticles were 4.2 nm × 3.4 nm for S-ZnO, 9.8 nm × 4.5 nm for I-ZnO, and 20.6 nm × 6.2 nm for R-ZnO. Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with these ZnO nanoparticles as the electron injection layer (EIL) were fabricated. The device with I-ZnO showed lower driving voltage and higher power efficiency than those with S-ZnO and R-ZnO. The superiority of I-ZnO makes it very effective as an EIL for various types of OLEDs regardless of the deposition order or method of fabricating the organic layer, the ZnO layer, and the electrode.

  17. Body size, growth and life span: implications for the polewards range shift of Octopus tetricus in south-eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jorge E; Pecl, Gretta T; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Strugnell, Jan M; León, Rafael I; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters.

  18. Distribution, size, shape, growth potential and extent of abdominal aortic calcified deposits predict mortality in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads; Ganz, Melanie; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Background Aortic calcification is a major risk factor for death from cardiovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between mortality and the composite markers of number, size, morphology and distribution of calcified plaques in the lumbar aorta. Methods 308 postmenopausal women aged 48...... from the Framingham Heart Study cohorts. Results All four scoring systems showed increasing age, smoking, and raised triglyceride levels were the main predictors of mortality after adjustment for all other metabolic and physical parameters. The SCORE card and the Framingham score resulted...... the best predictive power for identification of patients at risk of mortality, with a hazard ratio of 15.6 (p predicts risk of mortality, but also the distribution, shape...

  19. A Metal-Organic Framework with a Pore Size/Shape Suitable for Strong Binding and Close Packing of Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiao-Min; He, Chun-Ting; Liu, Yan; Liao, Pei-Qin; Zhou, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2016-04-04

    Much effort has been devoted to develop new porous structures for methane storage. We report a new porous coordination framework showing exceptional methane uptakes (e.g. 263 v/v at 298 K and 65 bar) and adsorption enthalpies (21.6 kJ mol(-1)) as high as current record holders functionalized by open metal sites. Computational simulations demonstrated that the hierarchical pore structure consisting of single-wall nanocages has suitable sizes/shapes and organic binding sites to enforce not only strong host-methane and methane-methane interactions but also dense packing of methane molecules. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Control of minimum member size in parameter-free structural shape optimization by a medial axis approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Oliver; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a manufacturing constraint for controlling the minimum member size in structural shape optimization problems, which is for example of interest for components fabricated in a molding process. In a parameter-free approach, whereby the coordinates of the FE boundary nodes are used as design variables, the challenging task is to find a generally valid definition for the thickness of non-parametric geometries in terms of their boundary nodes. Therefore we use the medial axis, which is the union of all points with at least two closest points on the boundary of the domain. Since the effort for the exact computation of the medial axis of geometries given by their FE discretization highly increases with the number of surface elements we use the distance function instead to approximate the medial axis by a cloud of points. The approximation is demonstrated on three 2D examples. Moreover, the formulation of a minimum thickness constraint is applied to a sensitivity-based shape optimization problem of one 2D and one 3D model.

  1. Molecular shape, architecture, and size of P2X4 receptors determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark T; Fisher, James A; Fountain, Samuel J; Ford, Robert C; North, R Alan; Khakh, Baljit S

    2008-09-19

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated nonselective cation channels with important physiological roles. However, their structures are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the architecture of P2X receptors using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and direct structure determination using electron microscopy. FRET efficiency measurements indicated that the distance between the C-terminal tails of P2X(4) receptors was 5.6 nm. Single particle analysis of purified P2X(4) receptors was used to determine the three-dimensional structure at a resolution of 21A; the orientation of the particle with respect to the membrane was assigned by labeling the intracellular C termini with 1.8-nm gold particles and the carbohydrate-rich ectodomain with lectin. We found that human P2X(4) is a globular torpedo-like molecule with an approximate volume of 270 nm(3) and a compact propeller-shaped ectodomain. In this structure, the distance between the centers of the gold particles was 6.1 nm, which closely matches FRET data. Thus, our data provide the first views of the architecture, shape, and size of single P2X receptors, furthering our understanding of this important family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  2. Chromosome segment detection for seed size and shape traits using an improved population of wild soybean chromosome segment substitution lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyan; Wang, Wubin; He, Qingyuan; Xiang, Shihua; Tian, Dong; Zhao, Tuanjie; Gai, Junyi

    2017-10-01

    Size and shape of soybean seeds are closely related to seed yield and market value. Annual wild soybeans have the potential to improve cultivated soybeans, but their inferior seed characteristics should be excluded. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/segments of seed size and shape traits in annual wild soybean, its chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) derived from NN1138-2 (recurrent parent, Glycine max) and N24852 (donor parent, Glycine soja) and then modified 2 iterations (coded SojaCSSLP3) were improved further to contain more lines (diagonal segments) and less heterozygous and missing portions. The new population (SojaCSSLP4) composed of 195 CSSLs was evaluated under four environments, and 11, 13, 7, 15 and 14 QTLs/segments were detected for seed length (SL), seed width (SW), seed roundness (SR), seed perimeter (SP) and seed cross section area (SA), respectively, with all 60 wild allele effects negative. Among them, 16 QTLs/segments were shared by 2-5 traits, respectively, but 0-3 segments for each of the 5 traits were independent. The non-shared Satt274 and shared Satt305, Satt540 and Satt239 were major segments, along with other segments composed of two different but related sets of genetic systems for SR and the other 4 traits, respectively. Compared with the literature, 7 SL, 5 SW and 2 SR QTLs/segments were also detected in cultivated soybeans; allele distinction took place between cultivated and wild soybeans, and also among cultivated parents. The present mapping is understood as macro-segment mapping, the segments may be further dissected into smaller segments as well as corresponding QTLs/genes.

  3. Examining the effect of pore size distribution and shape on flow through unsaturated peat using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rezanezhad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated peat soil is controlled by the air-filled porosity, pore size and geometric distribution as well as other physical properties of peat materials. This study investigates how the size and shape of pores affects the flow of water through peat soils. In this study we used X-ray Computed Tomography (CT, at 45 μm resolution under 5 specific soil-water pressure head levels to provide 3-D, high-resolution images that were used to detect the inner pore structure of peat samples under a changing water regime. Pore structure and configuration were found to be irregular, which affected the rate of water transmission through peat soils. The 3-D analysis suggested that pore distribution is dominated by a single large pore-space. At low pressure head, this single large air-filled pore imparted a more effective flowpath compared to smaller pores. Smaller pores were disconnected and the flowpath was more tortuous than in the single large air-filled pore, and their contribution to flow was negligible when the single large pore was active. We quantify the pore structure of peat soil that affects the hydraulic conductivity in the unsaturated condition, and demonstrate the validity of our estimation of peat unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by making a comparison with a standard permeameter-based method. Estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were made for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of pore shape and geometry parameters on the hydraulic properties of peats and how to evaluate the structure of the peat and its affects on parameterization. We also studied the ability to quantify these factors for different soil moisture contents in order to define how the factors controlling the shape coefficient vary with changes in soil water pressure head. The relation between measured and estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at various heads shows that rapid initial drainage, that changes the air

  4. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of hexagonal bipyramidal crystals and hollow self-assembled Al-MOF spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Sarawade, Pradip

    2013-11-25

    We report an efficient protocol for the synthesis of monodisperse crystals of an aluminum (Al)-based metal organic framework (MOF) while obtaining excellent control over the size and shape solely by tuning of the reaction parameters without the use of a template or structure-directing agent. The size of the hexagonal crystals of the Al-MOF can be selectively varied from 100 nm to 2000 nm by simply changing the reaction time and temperature via its nucleation-growth mechanism. We also report a self-assembly phenomenon, observed for the first time in case of Al-MOF, whereby hollow spheres of Al-MOF were formed by the spontaneous organization of triangular sheet building blocks. These MOFs showed broad hysteresis loops during the CO2 capture, indicating that the adsorbed CO2 is not immediately desorbed upon decreasing the external pressure and is instead confined within the framework, which allows for the capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2 from gaseous mixtures. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Parallel averaging of size is possible but range-limited: a reply to Marchant, Simons, and De Fockert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utochkin, Igor S; Tiurina, Natalia A

    2014-02-01

    In their recent paper, Marchant, Simons, and De Fockert (2013) claimed that the ability to average between multiple items of different sizes is limited by small samples of arbitrarily attended members of a set. This claim is based on a finding that observers are good at representing the average when an ensemble includes only two sizes distributed among all items (regular sets), but their performance gets worse when the number of sizes increases with the number of items (irregular sets). We argue that an important factor not considered by Marchant et al. (2013) is the range of size variation that was much bigger in their irregular sets. We manipulated this factor across our experiments and found almost the same efficiency of averaging for both regular and irregular sets when the range was stabilized. Moreover, highly regular sets consisting only of small and large items (two-peaks distributions) were averaged with greater error than sets with small, large, and intermediate items, suggesting a segmentation threshold determining whether all variable items are perceived as a single ensemble or distinct subsets. Our results demonstrate that averaging can actually be parallel but the visual system has some difficulties with it when some items differ too much from others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of different shapes, colors and sizes of standard oral dosage forms in diabetes type 2 patients-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Sven; Riedl, Regina; Sourij, Harald

    2017-01-30

    The clear identification of drug products by the patients is essential for a safe and effective medication management. In order to understand the impact of shape, size and color on medication identification a study was performed in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Ten model drugs differentiated by shape, size and color were evaluated using a mixed method of medication schedule preparation by the participants followed by a semi-structured interview. Detection times were fastest for the large round tablet shape and the bi-chromatic forms. Larger size was easier to identify than the smaller sizes except for the bi-chromatic forms. The shape was the major source of errors, followed by the size and the color dimension. The results from this study suggests that color as a single dimension are perceived more effectively by subjects with T2D compared to shape and size, which requires a more demanding processing of three dimension and is dependent on the perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth of shape- and size-selective zinc oxide nanorods by a microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition method: effect on photocatalysis properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaishali R; Gujar, Tanaji P; Noda, Takeshi; Fujita, Daisuke; Vinu, Ajayan; Grandcolas, Mathieu; Ye, Jinhua

    2010-09-10

    Herein, we demonstrate the shape- and size-selective growth of ZnO nanostructures on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by using a microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition method. By systematically controlling the deposition parameters, it is possible to produce shape- and size-selective nanostructures with high alignment and uniformity. Specifically, the pH of the bath can be used to control the shape of rods from bundled structures to tapered and flat tips. Furthermore, the deposition temperature can be used to control the size of the ZnO array from 770 to 125 nm. The prepared rods were active catalysts in the degradation of methylene blue under UV radiation, and exhibited size-dependent activity.

  8. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  9. Shape, size, velocity and field-aligned currents of dayside plasma injections: a multi-altitude study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available On 20 February 2005, Cluster in the outer magnetosphere and Double Star-2 (TC-2 at mid-altitude are situated in the vicinity of the northern cusp/mantle, with Cluster moving sunward and TC-2 anti-sunward. Their magnetic footprints come very close together at about 15:28 UT, over the common field-of-view of SuperDARN radars. Thanks to this conjunction, we determine the velocity, the transverse sizes, perpendicular and parallel to this velocity, and the shape of three magnetic flux tubes of magnetosheath plasma injection. The velocity of the structures determined from the Cluster four-spacecraft timing analysis is almost purely antisunward, in contrast with the antisunward and duskward convection velocity inside the flux tubes. The transverse sizes are defined from the Cluster-TC-2 separation perpendicular to the magnetic field, and from the time spent by a Cluster spacecraft in one structure; they are comprised between 0.6 and 2 RE in agreement with previous studies. Finally, using a comparison between the eigenvectors deduced from a variance analysis of the magnetic perturbation at the four Cluster and at TC-2, we show that the upstream side of the injection flux tubes is magnetically well defined, with even a concave front for the third one giving a bean-like shape, whereas the downstream side is far more turbulent. We also realise the first quantitative comparison between field-aligned currents at Cluster calculated with the curlometer technique and with the single-spacecraft method, assuming infinite parallel current sheets and taking into account the velocity of the injection flux tubes. The results agree nicely, confirming the validity of both methods. Finally, we compare the field-aligned current distribution of the three injection flux tubes at the altitudes of Cluster and TC-2. Both profiles are fairly similar, with mainly a pair of opposite field-aligned currents, upward at low-latitude and downward at high

  10. Shape, size, velocity and field-aligned currents of dayside plasma injections: a multi-altitude study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchaudon

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available On 20 February 2005, Cluster in the outer magnetosphere and Double Star-2 (TC-2 at mid-altitude are situated in the vicinity of the northern cusp/mantle, with Cluster moving sunward and TC-2 anti-sunward. Their magnetic footprints come very close together at about 15:28 UT, over the common field-of-view of SuperDARN radars. Thanks to this conjunction, we determine the velocity, the transverse sizes, perpendicular and parallel to this velocity, and the shape of three magnetic flux tubes of magnetosheath plasma injection. The velocity of the structures determined from the Cluster four-spacecraft timing analysis is almost purely antisunward, in contrast with the antisunward and duskward convection velocity inside the flux tubes. The transverse sizes are defined from the Cluster-TC-2 separation perpendicular to the magnetic field, and from the time spent by a Cluster spacecraft in one structure; they are comprised between 0.6 and 2 RE in agreement with previous studies. Finally, using a comparison between the eigenvectors deduced from a variance analysis of the magnetic perturbation at the four Cluster and at TC-2, we show that the upstream side of the injection flux tubes is magnetically well defined, with even a concave front for the third one giving a bean-like shape, whereas the downstream side is far more turbulent. We also realise the first quantitative comparison between field-aligned currents at Cluster calculated with the curlometer technique and with the single-spacecraft method, assuming infinite parallel current sheets and taking into account the velocity of the injection flux tubes. The results agree nicely, confirming the validity of both methods. Finally, we compare the field-aligned current distribution of the three injection flux tubes at the altitudes of Cluster and TC-2. Both profiles are fairly similar, with mainly a pair of opposite field-aligned currents, upward at low-latitude and downward at high-latitude. In terms of

  11. Preparation and characterization of Ba{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.2}La{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles and investigation of size & shape effect on microwave absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peymanfar, Reza; Javanshir, Shahrzad, E-mail: shjavan@iust.ac.ir

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal synthesis of Ba{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.2}La{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} performed in the presence of PMMA. • Shape and size-controlled synthesis of NPs over the range 15–50 Nm was explored. • Investigation of shape and size effect of NPs on microwave absorption properties. - Abstract: In this paper, the design and characterization of a radar absorbing material (RAM) was investigated at microwave frequency. Ba{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.2}La{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} magnetic nanoparticles was synthesized thru a facile hydrothermal method in the presence of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the possibility of shape and size-controlled synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) over the range 15–50 Nm was also explored. Afterward, the effect of shape and size of the synthesized Ba{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.2}La{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} NPs on microwave absorption properties was investigated in KU-band. The crystal structures and morphology of as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed by FESEM, XRD, VSM, FTIR analysis. The RAM samples were prepared by dispersion of magnetic NPs in silicone rubber in an ultrasonic bath. The maximum reflection loss (RL) values NPs were 12.04 dB at 14.82 GHz and a broad absorption band (over 1.22 GHz) with RL values <−10 dB are obtained and the maximum reflection loss (RL) values of decrease and shaped NPs were 22.36 dB at 14.78 GHz and a broad absorption band (over 2.67 GHz) with RL values <−10 dB are obtained. The results indicated that the particle size and shape play a major role on the absorption properties of the composites in the 12.4–18 GHz frequency range. It is observed that microwave absorption properties increased with the decrease in average particle size of NPs.

  12. Relationships between tree size, crown shape, gender segregation and sex allocation in Pinus halepensis, a Mediterranean pine tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ne'eman, Gidi; Goubitz, Shirrinka; Werger, Marinus J A; Shmida, Avi

    2011-07-01

    Sex allocation has been studied mainly in small herbaceous plants but much less in monoecious wind-pollinated trees. The aim of this study was to explore changes in gender segregation and sex allocation by Pinus halepensis, a Mediterranean lowland pine tree, within tree crowns and between trees differing in their size or crown shape. The production of new male and female cones and sex allocation of biomass, nitrogen and phosphorus were studied. The relationship between branch location, its reproductive status and proxies of branch vigour was also studied. Small trees produced only female cones, but, as trees grew, they produced both male and female cones. Female cones were produced mainly in the upper part of the crown, and male cones in its middle and lower parts. Lateral branch density was correlated with the number of male but not female cones; lateral branches were more dense in large than in small trees and even denser in hemispherical trees. Apical branches grew faster, were thicker and their phosphorus concentration was higher than in lateral shoots. Nitrogen concentration was higher in cone-bearing apical branches than in apical vegetative branches and in lateral branches with or without cones. Allocation to male relative to female function increased with tree size as predicted by sex allocation theory. The adaptive values of sex allocation and gender segregation patterns in P. halepensis, in relation to its unique life history, are demonstrated and discussed. Small trees produce only female cones that have a higher probability of being pollinated than the probability of male cones pollinating; the female-first strategy enhances population spread. Hemispherical old trees are loaded with serotinous cones that supply enough seeds for post-fire germination; thus, allocation to males is more beneficial than to females.

  13. Grain size and temperature influence on the toughness of a CuAlBe shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C. de, E-mail: victor.albuquerque@fe.up.pt [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida LSR, Cidade Universitaria, S/N 58059-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Melo, Tadeu Antonio de A, E-mail: tadeu@lsr.ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida LSR, Cidade Universitaria, S/N 58059-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Gomes, Rodinei M., E-mail: gomes@lsr.ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida LSR, Cidade Universitaria, S/N 58059-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino Jackson G. de, E-mail: jackson@lsr.ct.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEM), Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida LSR, Cidade Universitaria, S/N 58059-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Tavares, Joao Manuel R.S., E-mail: tavares@fe.up.pt [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (FEUP), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (DEMec)/Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial INEGI, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, S/N 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-11-25

    Research highlights: {yields} This work evaluated the capacity of a CuAlBe alloy to absorb energy until rupture. {yields} The V-notch Charpy test was adopted at -150, -100, -50, 0, 50, 100 and 150 deg. C. {yields} Charpy tests were complemented by DSC, DSC with optical microscope and by SEM. {yields} First work to analyze the toughness of a CuAlBe alloy based on the Charpy test. {yields} The results are of relevant value to enhance the understanding of the CuAlBe alloy. - Abstract: This work is a study of the influence of grain size and temperature on the toughness of CuAlBe shape memory alloys with (CuAlBeNbNi) and without NbNi (CuAlBe) grain refiner elements. The toughness analysis was based on the V-notch Charpy impact test under temperatures of -150, -100, -50, 0, 50, 100 and 150 deg. C. A statistical analysis of the results led to the conclusion that the toughness of both alloys was influenced by temperature and grain size. The CuAlBeNbNi alloy absorbed higher impact energy than the CuAlBe alloy showing that the refining elements improved the toughness of the alloy. To confirm and complement these findings, the fracture surfaces were evaluated by stereomicroscopy. Smooth homogeneous surfaces and rough heterogonous surfaces were detected for the CuAlBeNbNi and CuAlBe alloys, respectively. Predominately brittle zones were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy in both alloys. Furthermore, to determine the phase transformation temperatures and the associated microstructures, the alloys were assessed by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and DSC with optical microscopy.

  14. Release of carbon nanoparticles of different size and shape from nanocomposite poly(lactic) acid film into food simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichkova, Hristiana; Kotsilkov, Stanislav; Ivanov, Evgeni; Kotsilkova, Rumiana; Gyoshev, Stanislav; Stoimenov, Nikolay; Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2017-06-01

    Poly(lactic) acid (PLA) film with 2 wt% mixed carbon nanofillers of graphene nanoplates (GNPs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a weight ratio of 1:1 with impurities of fullerene and carbon black (CB) was produced by layer-to-layer deposition and hot pressing. The release of carbon nanoparticles from the film was studied at varying time-temperature conditions and simulants. Migrants in simulant solvents were examined with laser diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Film integrity and the presence of migrants on the film surfaces were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The partial dissolution of PLA polymer in the solvents was confirmed by swelling tests and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Nanoparticle migrants were not detected in the simulants (at the LOD 0.020 μm of the laser diffraction analysis) after migration testing at 40°C for 10 days. However, high-temperature migration testing at 90°C for 4 h provoked a release of GNPs from the film into ethanol, acetic acid and oil-based food simulants. Short carbon nanotubes were observed rarely to release in the most aggressive acetic acid solvent. Obviously, the enhanced molecular mobility at temperatures above the glass transition and partial dissolution of PLA polymer by the food simulant facilitate the diffusion processes. Moreover, shape, size and concentration of nanoparticles play a significant role. Flexible naked GNPs (lateral size 100-1000 nm) easily migrate when the polymer molecules exhibit enhanced mobility, while fibrous MWCNTs (> 1 μm length) formed entangled networks on the film surfaces as the PLA polymer is partly dissolved, preventing their release into food simulants. The impurities of fullerenes and CB (5-30 nm) were of minor concentration in the polymer, therefore their migration is low or undetectable. The total amount of released migrants is below overall migration limits.

  15. Size and shape information serve as labels in the alarm calls of Gunnison's prairie dogs Cynomys gunnisoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. SLOBODCHIKOFF, William R. BRIGGS, Patricia A DENNIS, Anne-Marie C. HODGE

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Some animals have the capacity to produce different alarm calls for terrestrial and aerial predators. However, it is not clear what cognitive processes are involved in generating these calls. One possibility is the position of the predator: Anything on the ground receives a terrestrial predator call, and anything in the air receives an aerial predator call. Another possibility is that animals are able to recognize the physical features of predators and incorporate those into their calls. As a way of elucidating which of these mechanisms plays a primary role in generating the structure of different calls, we performed two field experiments with Gunnison’s prairie dogs. First, we presented the prairie dogs with a circle, a triangle, and a square, each moving across the colony at the same height and speed. Second, we presented the prairie dogs with two squares of differing sizes. DFA statistics showed that 82.6 percent of calls for the circle and 79.2 percent of the calls for the triangle were correctly classified, and 73.3 percent of the calls for the square were classified as either square or circle. Also, 100 percent of the calls for the larger square and 90 percent of the calls for the smaller square were correctly classified. Because both squares and circles are features of terrestrial predators and triangles are features of aerial predators, our results suggest that prairie dogs might have a cognitive mechanism that labels the abstract shape and size of different predators, rather than the position of the predator [Current Zoology 58 (5: 741-748, 2012].

  16. Silica particle size and shape: in vitro effects on extracellular matrix metabolism and viability of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, M; Lilli, C; Calvitti, M; Rosati, E; Luca, G; Lumare, A; Gambelunghe, A; Murgia, N; Muzi, G; Bellucci, C

    2012-01-01

    Crystal micro-morphology and dimension of silica particles could be responsible for the high prevalence of silicosis as recently found among goldsmiths. In the present study we investigated two samples of silica particles with different surface sizes and shapes for their capacity to induce changes in ECM component production. In addition we investigated if their different effects could be related to cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were cultured with or without a sample of Silica used for casting gold jewellery, named in our experiments Silica P or a commercial sample of Silica with different physical and chemical properties, named in our experiments Silica F. After 48 h of exposure PCR analysis determined levels of several matrix components. As induction of the apoptosis cascade, annexin assay, caspase 3 activity and cellular cytoxicity by MTT assay were assayed. Silica F promoted fibronectin, MMP12, tenascin C and Integrins b5 gene expressions more than Silica P. Silica P stimulated more TGFß1 and its TGFßR1 receptor than Silica F. Cytotoxic effects were induced by the two samples of Silica. On the contrary, no alteration in classic apoptotic marker protein expression was observed in presence of either Silica F or Silica P, suggesting silica particles affect ECM production and metalloproteases through a mechanism that does not involve apoptotic activation. Different Silica micromorphology and TGFß signal pathway are linked to lung fibrotic effects but the potential role Silica in apoptotic and toxic reaction remains to be ascertained.

  17. Sex-biased inbreeding effects on reproductive success and home range size of the critically endangered black rhinoceros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bradley; Wandera, Antony B; Shawcross, Susan G; Edwin Harris, W; Stevens-Wood, Barry; Kemp, Stephen J; Okita-Ouma, Benson; Watts, Phillip C

    2014-04-01

    A central premise of conservation biology is that small populations suffer reduced viability through loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding. However, there is little evidence that variation in inbreeding impacts individual reproductive success within remnant populations of threatened taxa, largely due to problems associated with obtaining comprehensive pedigree information to estimate inbreeding. In the critically endangered black rhinoceros, a species that experienced severe demographic reductions, we used model selection to identify factors associated with variation in reproductive success (number of offspring). Factors examined as predictors of reproductive success were age, home range size, number of nearby mates, reserve location, and multilocus heterozygosity (a proxy for inbreeding). Multilocus heterozygosity predicted male reproductive success (p58%) and correlated with male home range size (p 44%). Such effects were not apparent in females, where reproductive success was determined by age (p < 0.01, explained deviance 34%) as females raise calves alone and choose between, rather than compete for, mates. This first report of a 3-way association between an individual male's heterozygosity, reproductive output, and territory size in a large vertebrate is consistent with an asymmetry in the level of intrasexual competition and highlights the relevance of sex-biased inbreeding for the management of many conservation-priority species. Our results contrast with the idea that wild populations of threatened taxa may possess some inherent difference from most nonthreatened populations that necessitates the use of detailed pedigrees to study inbreeding effects. Despite substantial variance in male reproductive success, the increased fitness of more heterozygous males limits the loss of heterozygosity. Understanding how individual differences in genetic diversity mediate the outcome of intrasexual competition will be essential for effective management, particularly

  18. Quantitative assessment of similarity between randomly acquired characteristics on high quality exemplars and crime scene impressions via analysis of feature size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richetelli, Nicole; Nobel, Madonna; Bodziak, William J; Speir, Jacqueline A

    2017-01-01

    Forensic footwear evidence can prove invaluable to the resolution of a criminal investigation. Naturally, the value of a comparison varies with the rarity of the evidence, which is a function of both manufactured as well as randomly acquired characteristics (RACs). When focused specifically on the latter of these two types of features, empirical evidence demonstrates high discriminating power for the differentiation of known match and known non-match samples when presented with exemplars of high quality and exhibiting a sufficient number of clear and complex RACs. However, given the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the media, substrate, and deposition process encountered during the commission of a crime, RACs on crime scene prints are expected to exhibit a large range of variability in terms of reproducibility, clarity, and quality. Although the pattern recognition skill of the expert examiner is adept at recognizing and evaluating this type of natural variation, there is little research to suggest that objective and numerical metrics can globally process this variation when presented with RACs from degraded crime scene quality prints. As such, the goal of this study was to mathematically compare the loss and similarity of RACs in high quality exemplars versus crime-scene-like quality impressions as a function of RAC shape, perimeter, area, and common source. Results indicate that the unpredictable conditions associated with crime scene print production promotes RAC loss that varies between 33% and 100% with an average of 85%, and that when the entire outsole is taken as a constellation of features (or a RAC map), 64% of the crime-scene-like impressions exhibited 10 or fewer RACs, resulting in a 0.72 probability of stochastic dominance. Given this, individual RAC description and correspondence were further explored using five simple, but objective, numerical metrics of similarity. Statistically significant differences in similarity scores for RAC shape and size

  19. Mixing state of regionally transported soot particles and the coating effect on their size and shape at a mountain site in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Zaizen, Yuji; Kajino, Mizuo; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    Soot particles influence the global climate through interactions with sunlight. A coating on soot particles increases their light absorption by increasing their absorption cross section and cloud condensation nuclei activity when mixed with other hygroscopic aerosol components. Therefore, it is important to understand how soot internally mixes with other materials to accurately simulate its effects in climate models. In this study, we used a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with an auto particle analysis system, which enables more particles to be analyzed than a conventional TEM. Using the TEM, soot particle size and shape (shape factor) were determined with and without coating from samples collected at a remote mountain site in Japan. The results indicate that ~10% of aerosol particles between 60 and 350 nm in aerodynamic diameters contain or consist of soot particles and ~75% of soot particles were internally mixed with nonvolatile ammonium sulfate or other materials. In contrast to an assumption that coatings change soot shape, both internally and externally mixed soot particles had similar shape and size distributions. Larger aerosol particles had higher soot mixing ratios, i.e., more than 40% of aerosol particles with diameters >1 µm had soot inclusions, whereas <20% of aerosol particles with diameters <1 µm included soot. Our results suggest that climate models may use the same size distributions and shapes for both internally and externally mixed soot; however, changing the soot mixing ratios in the different aerosol size bins is necessary.

  20. How do low dispersal species establish large range sizes? The case of the water beetle Graphoderus bilineatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars Lønsmann; Rannap, Riinu; Thomsen, Philip Francis

    2013-01-01

    important than species phylogeny or local spatial attributes. In this study we used the water beetle Graphoderus bilineatus a philopatric species of conservation concern in Europe as a model to explain large range size and to support effective conservation measures for such species that also have limited...... systems and wetlands which used to be highly connected throughout the central plains of Europe. Our data suggest that a broad habitat niche can prevent landscape elements from becoming barriers for species like G. bilineatus. Therefore, we question the usefulness of site protection as conservation...... measures for G. bilineatus and similar philopatric species. Instead, conservation actions should be focused at the landscape level to ensure a long-term viability of such species across their range....

  1. The Influence of Age and Sex on Genetic Associations with Adult Body Size and Shape: A Large-Scale Genome-Wide Interaction Study

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Thomas W.; Anne E Justice; Graff, Mariaelisa; Barata, Llilda; Feitosa, Mary F; Chu, Su; Czajkowski, Jacek; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Lu, Yingchang; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Pers, Tune H.; Rüeger, Sina

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic variants contributing to BMI, a measure of body size, or waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), a measure of body shape. Body size and shape change as people grow older and these changes differ substantially between men and women. To systematically screen for age-and/or sex-specific effects of genetic variants on BMI and WHRadjBMI, we performed meta-analyses of 114 studies (up to 320,485 individuals of Eur...

  2. Evaluation of Argos Telemetry Accuracy in the High-Arctic and Implications for the Estimation of Home-Range Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Christin

    Full Text Available Animal tracking through Argos satellite telemetry has enormous potential to test hypotheses in animal behavior, evolutionary ecology, or conservation biology. Yet the applicability of this technique cannot be fully assessed because no clear picture exists as to the conditions influencing the accuracy of Argos locations. Latitude, type of environment, and transmitter movement are among the main candidate factors affecting accuracy. A posteriori data filtering can remove "bad" locations, but again testing is still needed to refine filters. First, we evaluate experimentally the accuracy of Argos locations in a polar terrestrial environment (Nunavut, Canada, with both static and mobile transmitters transported by humans and coupled to GPS transmitters. We report static errors among the lowest published. However, the 68th error percentiles of mobile transmitters were 1.7 to 3.8 times greater than those of static transmitters. Second, we test how different filtering methods influence the quality of Argos location datasets. Accuracy of location datasets was best improved when filtering in locations of the best classes (LC3 and 2, while the Douglas Argos filter and a homemade speed filter yielded similar performance while retaining more locations. All filters effectively reduced the 68th error percentiles. Finally, we assess how location error impacted, at six spatial scales, two common estimators of home-range size (a proxy of animal space use behavior synthetizing movements, the minimum convex polygon and the fixed kernel estimator. Location error led to a sometimes dramatic overestimation of home-range size, especially at very local scales. We conclude that Argos telemetry is appropriate to study medium-size terrestrial animals in polar environments, but recommend that location errors are always measured and evaluated against research hypotheses, and that data are always filtered before analysis. How movement speed of transmitters affects location

  3. Colloid Science of Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in 2D and 3D Structures. Challenges of Nucleation, Growth, Composition, Particle Shape, Size Control and their Influence on Activity and Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-02-13

    Recent breakthroughs in synthesis in nanosciences have achieved control of size and shapes of nanoparticles that are relevant for catalyst design. In this article, we review the advance of synthesis of nanoparticles, fabrication of two and three dimensional model catalyst system, characterization, and studies of activity and selectivity. The ability to synthesize monodispersed platinum and rhodium nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range permitted us to study the influence of composition, structure, and dynamic properties of monodispersed metal nanoparticle on chemical reactivity and selectivity. We review the importance of size and shape of nanoparticles to determine the reaction selectivity in multi-path reactions. The influence of metal-support interaction has been studied by probing the hot electron flows through the metal-oxide interface in catalytic nanodiodes. Novel designs of nanoparticle catalytic systems are discussed.

  4. Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001–2009 MISR imagery of Borneo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Zender

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Land clearing for crops, plantations and grazing results in anthropogenic burning of tropical forests and peatlands in Indonesia, where images of fire-generated aerosol plumes have been captured by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR since 2001. Here we analyze the size, shape, optical properties, and age of distinct fire-generated plumes in Borneo from 2001–2009. The local MISR overpass at 10:30 a.m. misses the afternoon peak of Borneo fire emissions, and may preferentially sample longer plumes from persistent fires burning overnight. Typically the smoke flows with the prevailing southeasterly surface winds at 3–4 m s−1, and forms ovoid plumes whose mean length, height, and cross-plume width are 41 km, 708 m, and 27% of the plume length, respectively. 50% of these plumes have length between 24 and 50 km, height between 523 and 993 m and width between 18% and 30% of plume length. Length and cross-plume width are lognormally distributed, while height follows a normal distribution. Borneo smoke plume heights are similar to previously reported plume heights, yet Borneo plumes are on average nearly three times longer than previously studied plumes. This could be due to sampling or to more persistent fires and greater fuel loads in peatlands than in other tropical forests. Plume area (median 169 km2, with 25th and 75th percentiles at 99 km2 and 304 km2, respectively varies exponentially with length, though for most plumes a linear relation provides a good approximation. The MISR-estimated plume optical properties involve greater uncertainties than the geometric properties, and show patterns consistent with smoke aging. Optical depth increases by 15–25% in the down-plume direction, consistent with hygroscopic growth and nucleation overwhelming the effects of particle dispersion. Both particle single-scattering albedo and top-of-atmosphere reflectance peak about halfway down-plume, at

  5. Size- and shape-dependent growth of fluorescent ZnS nanorods and nanowires using Ag nanocrystals as seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huaibin; Shang, Hangying; Niu, Jinzhong; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Hongzhe; Li, Lin Song

    2012-10-21

    High-quality, monodisperse, and size-controlled Ag-ZnS nanorods or nanowires have been synthesized successfully using Ag nanocrystals as seeds. Such one-dimensional colloidal Ag-ZnS nanorods or nanowires having a purposefully controlled diameter in the range of 5-9 nm and a length of 18-600 nm were obtained by altering the reaction conditions, such as concentration, reaction time, reaction temperature, and diameter of Ag nanocrystals. The conjunction interface of Ag-ZnS nanorods or nanowires consists of the (200) plane of Ag nanocrystal and (101) plane of ZnS rod or wire, the directions of ZnS nanorods grow preferentially. Based on the photoluminescence and lifetime of Ag-ZnS nanorods, it was found that Ag nanocrystals enhanced the radiative rate eventually, the fluorescence intensity of Ag-ZnS nanorods can be tuned by changing the size of the Ag seeds. The Ag-ZnS nanorods or nanowires showed greatly improved optical properties as compared to ZnS nanocrystals, the maximum emission was around 402 nm and the photoluminescence quantum yield was up to 30% when 5 nm Ag nanocrystals were used as seeds.

  6. Intraspecific variation in body size and shape in an Andean highland anole species, Anolis ventrimaculatus (Squamata: Dactyloidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Calderón-Espinosa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Variation in body characteristics related to lizard locomotion has been poorly studied at the intraspecific level in Anolis species. Local adaptation due to habitat heterogeneity has been reported in some island species. However, studies of mainland species are particularly scarce and suggest different patterns: high variability among highland lizards and poorly differentiated populations in one Amazonian species. We characterized inter population variation of body size and shape in the highland Andean Anolis ventrimaculatus, an endemic species from Western Colombia. A total of 15 morphometric variables were measured in specimens from the reptile collection of the Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional, Colombia. The study included individuals from seven different highland localities. We found size and shape sexual dimorphism, both of which varied among localities. Patterns of variation in body proportions among populations were different in both males and females, suggesting that either sexual or natural selective factors are different in each locality and between sexes. Since this species exhibits a fragmented distribution in highlands, genetic divergence may also be a causal factor of the observed variation. Ecological, behavioral, additional morphological as well as phylogenetic data, may help to understand the evolutionary processes behind the geographic patterns found in this species.La diversificación fenotípica al interior de una especie en características de dimensiones corporales relacionadas con la locomoción de los lagartos, se ha estudiado poco en especies de Anolis. Los datos de algunas especies de isla revelan patrones distintos de variación geográfica y sugieren que la adaptación local, debida a la heterogeneidad del hábitat, ocurre a este nivel. Los estudios de especies de continente son particularmente escasos y sugieren patrones distintos: un lagarto altoandino altamente variable y poblaciones poco

  7. Longitudinal evolution of magnetization of ferromagnets following ultrafast demagnetization: Role of finite size and shape of demagnetized region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Yastremsky

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A dependence of a relaxation rate on the shape of the demagnetized region for a longitudinal evolution of total magnetization to its equilibrium value following the ultrafast demagnetization is demonstrated. This shape-dependence is caused by a motion of the wave front inside the demagnetized region. The contribution of the wave front for spherically symmetric shape of the demagnetized region is up to 3 times and for cylindrically symmetric shape up to 2 times stronger than for one dimensional demagnetized region. This effect can be observed after the demagnetization by a tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse.

  8. Biodegradability of para-aramid respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates (RFP) in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Reed, K L; Stonehuerner, J D; Ghio, A J; Webb, T R

    2006-01-01

    Using both in vivo (inhalation) and in vitro (cell culture) studies, we previously reported that p-aramid respirable fibers (RFP--defined as respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates) are biodegraded in lungs and lung cells of rats following exposures. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether shortening mechanisms of p-aramid RFP biodegradability are also operative in human lung cells. Cultures of human A549 lung epithelial cells (A549), primary alveolar macrophages (HBAL) (collected via bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]) from volunteers), and co-cultures (Co) of the A549 and HBAL were incubated with p-aramid RFP for either 1 h, 1 day, or 1 week to assess RFP shortening. Lengths of RFP were measured using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation, digestion of culture tissue components, and processing. Similar to findings using rat lung cells, only slight RFP shortening was measured in A549 cultures at 1-day and 1-week post-incubation. More importantly, in HBAL and Co groups, greater transverse cleavage of p-aramid RFP was measured at 1-day and 1-week postexposure compared to 1-h HBAL or Co groups, or in any A549 groups. In contrast, cellulose RFP, a biopersistent reference control fiber, were not measurably shortened under similar circumstances. Second, p-aramid RFP were incubated either with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or acellular BAL fluids from human volunteers or rats and processed for SEM analysis of RFP lengths. Mean lengths of p-aramid RFP incubated with human or rat BAL fluids were substantially decreased compared to PBS. Similar to our findings with rat lung cells, components of human lung fluids coat the p-aramid RFP as a prerequisite for subsequent enzymatic cleavage by human phagocytic lung cells and this finding reinforces the concept that inhaled p-aramid RFP are likely to be biodegradable in the lungs of humans.

  9. A simple route to alloyed quaternary nanocrystals Ag-In-Zn-S with shape and size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabka, Grzegorz; Bujak, Piotr; Giedyk, Kamila; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Malinowska, Karolina; Herbich, Jerzy; Golec, Barbara; Wielgus, Ireneusz; Pron, Adam

    2014-05-19

    A convenient method of the preparation of alloyed quaternary Ag-In-Zn-S nanocrystals is elaborated, in which a multicomponent mixture of simple and commercially available precursors, namely, silver nitrate, indium(III) chloride, zinc stearate, 1-dodecanethiol, and sulfur, is used with 1-octadecene as a solvent. The formation of quaternary nanocrystals necessitates the use of an auxiliary sulfur precursor, namely, elemental sulfur dissolved in oleylamine, in addition to 1-dodecanethiol. Without this additional precursor binary ZnS nanocrystals are formed. The optimum reaction temperature of 180 °C was also established. In these conditions shape, size, and composition of the resulting nanocrystals can be adjusted in a controlled manner by changing the molar ratio of the precursors in the reaction mixture. For low zinc stearate contents anisotropic rodlike (ca.3 nm x 10 nm) and In-rich nanocrystals are obtained. This is caused by a significantly higher reactivity of the indium precursor as compared to the zinc one. With increasing zinc precursor content the reactivities of both precursors become more balanced, and the resulting nanocrystals are smaller (1.5-4.0 nm) and become Zn-rich as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive spectrometry investigations. Simultaneous increases in the zinc and sulfur precursor content result in an enlargement of nanocrystals (2.5 to 5.0 nm) and further increase in the molar ZnS content (up to 0.76). The prepared nanoparticles show stable photoluminescence with the quantum yield up to 37% for In and Zn-rich nanocrystals. Their hydrodynamic diameter in toluene dispersion, determined by dynamic light scattering, is roughly twice larger than the diameter of their inorganic core.

  10. Role of particle size, shape, and stiffness in design of intravascular drug delivery systems: insights from computations, experiments, and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Packaging of drug molecules within microparticles and nanoparticles has become an important strategy in intravascular drug delivery, where the particles are designed to protect the drugs from plasma effects, increase drug residence time in circulation, and often facilitate drug delivery specifically at disease sites. To this end, over the past few decades, interdisciplinary research has focused on developing biocompatible materials for particle fabrication, technologies for particle manufacture, drug formulation within the particles for efficient loading, and controlled release and refinement of particle surface chemistries to render selectivity toward disease site for site-selective action. Majority of the particle systems developed for such purposes are spherical nano and microparticles and they have had low-to-moderate success in clinical translation. To refine the design of delivery systems for enhanced performance, in recent years, researchers have started focusing on the physicomechanical aspects of carrier particles, especially their shape, size, and stiffness, as new design parameters. Recent computational modeling studies, as well as, experimental studies using microfluidic devices are indicating that these design parameters greatly influence the particles' behavior in hemodynamic circulation, as well as cell-particle interactions for targeted payload delivery. Certain cellular components of circulation are also providing interesting natural cues for refining the design of drug carrier systems. Based on such findings, new benefits and challenges are being realized for the next generation of drug carriers. The current article will provide a comprehensive review of these findings and discuss the emerging design paradigm of incorporating physicomechanical components in fabrication of particulate drug delivery systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A wind tunnel study of the effects of collision processes on the shape and oscillation for moderate-size raindrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakáll, Miklós; Kessler, Simon; Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.; Borrmann, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Drop-drop collision experiments were carried out at the Mainz vertical wind tunnel. Water drops of 2.5 mm diameter were freely floated at their terminal velocities in a vertical air stream and collided with 0.5 mm diameter droplets. The collisions were recorded with a high speed digital video camera at a frame rate of 1000 per second. Altogether 116 collision events were observed, 75 of which ended with coalescence, and the rest with filament type breakup. The coalescence efficiency and its dependence on the Weber number and on the eccentricity of the colliding drops showed good agreement with earlier numerical studies. Thirty-six recorded collisions were further analyzed in order to characterize the oscillation behavior of large drops after a collisional excitation. Besides the introduction of the experimental method for studying the raindrop collisions, the study primarily focused on the characterization of the average value and the amplitude of the axis ratio variation, the active oscillation modes and their frequencies, and the decay of the oscillations excited by the collision. In spite of the fact that the amplitude of the axis ratio variation increased up to 4 to 6 times of its value before collision - depending on whether the collision ended with coalescence or breakup -, the average axis ratios increased by less than 1%. Since the sizes of largest drops after collision remained practically unchanged during the collision process, the frequencies of the active fundamental (n = 2) oscillation modes of the drops did not change significantly either. Instantaneously after collision the transverse oscillation mode and the whole body rotation dominated, while at a later instant the oblate-prolate mode determined again the drop shape alteration. It was further found that the damping of the oscillation after collision can be adequately described by the viscous decay of a liquid spherical drop.

  12. Movement Patterns, Home Range Size and Habitat Selection of an Endangered Resource Tracking Species, the Black-Throated Finch (Poephila cincta cincta)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rechetelo, Juliana; Grice, Anthony; Reside, April Elizabeth; Hardesty, Britta Denise; Moloney, James

    2016-01-01

    .... To address this knowledge gap for a range-restricted endangered bird, we estimated home range size, daily movement patterns and habitat use of a granivorous subspecies in northeast Australia, the black-throated finch...

  13. Effects of digestion protocols on the isolation and characterization of metal-metal wear particles. I. Analysis of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelas, I; Bobyn, J D; Medley, J B; Krygier, J J; Zukor, D J; Petit, A; Huk, O L

    2001-06-05

    Isolation of metal wear particles from hip simulator lubricants or tissues surrounding implants is a challenging problem because of small particle size, their tendency to agglomerate, and their potential for chemical degradation by digestion reagents. To provide realistic measurements of size, shape, and composition of metal wear particles, it is important to optimize particle isolation and minimize particle changes due to the effects of the reagents. In this study (Part I of II), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine and compare the effects of different isolation protocols, using enzymes or alkaline solutions, on the size and shape of three different types of cobalt-based alloy particles produced from metal-metal bearings. The effect on particle composition was examined in a subsequent study (Part II). Large particles (particles (particle size and to a lesser extent particle shape. For both large particles and small particles generated in water, the changes in size were more extensive after alkaline than after enzymatic protocols and increased with alkaline concentration and time in solution, up to twofold at 2 h and threefold at 48 h. However, when isolating particles from 95% serum, an initial protective effect of serum proteins and/or lipids was observed. Because of this protective effect, there was no significant difference in particle size and shape for both oval and needle-shaped particles after 2 h in 2N KOH and after enzymatic treatments. However, round particles were significantly smaller after 2 h in 2N KOH than after enzymatic treatments. Particle composition may also have been affected by the 2N KOH treatment, as suggested by a difference in particle contrast under TEM, an issue examined in detail in Part II. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 55: 320-329, 2001

  14. Preparation and characterization of Ba0.2Sr0.2La0.6MnO3 nanoparticles and investigation of size & shape effect on microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peymanfar, Reza; Javanshir, Shahrzad

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the design and characterization of a radar absorbing material (RAM) was investigated at microwave frequency. Ba0.2Sr0.2La0.6MnO3 magnetic nanoparticles was synthesized thru a facile hydrothermal method in the presence of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the possibility of shape and size-controlled synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) over the range 15-50 Nm was also explored. Afterward, the effect of shape and size of the synthesized Ba0.2Sr0.2La0.6MnO3 NPs on microwave absorption properties was investigated in KU-band. The crystal structures and morphology of as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed by FESEM, XRD, VSM, FTIR analysis. The RAM samples were prepared by dispersion of magnetic NPs in silicone rubber in an ultrasonic bath. The maximum reflection loss (RL) values NPs were 12.04 dB at 14.82 GHz and a broad absorption band (over 1.22 GHz) with RL values <-10 dB are obtained and the maximum reflection loss (RL) values of decrease and shaped NPs were 22.36 dB at 14.78 GHz and a broad absorption band (over 2.67 GHz) with RL values <-10 dB are obtained. The results indicated that the particle size and shape play a major role on the absorption properties of the composites in the 12.4-18 GHz frequency range. It is observed that microwave absorption properties increased with the decrease in average particle size of NPs.

  15. The Influence of Particle Shape and Size on the Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction: A Density Functional Theory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Bligaard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present first principle investigation of the influence of platinum nanoparticle shape and size on the oxygen reduction reaction activity. We compare the activities of nanoparticles with specific shapes (tetrahedron, octahedron, cube and truncated octahedron) with that of equilibrium particle...... shape at 0.9 V. Furthermore, the influence of support is assessed by looking at the particles with and without support interactions. The equilibrium shape is determined by calculating the changes in surface energies with potential for low-index platinum facets; (111), (100) and (110). This has been done...... by explicitly taking the coverage of oxygenated species into account. A kinetic model derived from counting the number of sites shows that the theoretical activity obtained for equilibrium particle fits well with experimental data. Particles with similar to 3 nm diameter are found to possess the highest...

  16. Analyses of nanoformulated antiretroviral drug charge, size, shape and content for uptake, drug release and antiviral activities in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacek, Ari S; Balkundi, Shantanu; McMillan, JoEllyn; Roy, Upal; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; Mosley, R Lee; Kanmogne, Georgette; Kabanov, Alexander V; Bronich, Tatiana; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-03-10

    Long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1) infection shows limitations in pharmacokinetics and biodistribution while inducing metabolic and cytotoxic aberrations. In turn, ART commonly requires complex dosing schedules and leads to the emergence of viral resistance and treatment failures. We posit that the development of nanoformulated ART could preclude such limitations and affect improved clinical outcomes. To this end, we wet-milled 20 nanoparticle formulations of crystalline indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, and efavirenz, collectively referred to as "nanoART," then assessed their performance using a range of physicochemical and biological tests. These tests were based on cell-nanoparticle interactions using monocyte-derived macrophages and their abilities to uptake and release nanoformulated drugs and affect viral replication. We demonstrate that physical characteristics such as particle size, surfactant coating, surface charge, and most importantly shape are predictors of cell uptake and antiretroviral efficacy. These studies bring this line of research a step closer to developing nanoART that can be used in the clinic to affect the course of HIV-1 infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The constraints and concerns regarding the size and/or shape of the second generation female condom: The narratives from the healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadimetja Mogale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the redesigning of the Reality condom (FC to a new version of the second generation female condom commonly known as (FC2, the users are persistently constrained and concerned about the size and shape of this new version. Condom use is aligned to the Millennium Development Goals (MDG 3, 5 and 6, which address gender equality, improving maternal health and preventing HIV and AIDS.Aim: To explore and describe the constraints and concerns regarding the size and/or shape of the FC2.Setting: The study was conducted at Tshwane health district in Gauteng province. Methods: A qualitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Individual in-depth interviews that yielded narratives in a designated health district in South Africa were conducted.Results: From the analysis of narratives three specific themes emerged. Firstly, the specific theme was that the size and shape of FC2 is undesirable for the health care providers, which may lead women to contract HIV and AIDS. The second theme was that the size and shape of FC2 and female genitals makes insertion complicated and predisposes women to be vulnerable in sexual relationships. The third was that the size and shape of FC2 results in pain and discomfort during coitus, exposing women to unwanted pregnancies and HIV and AIDS.Conclusions: The findings indicated the need for an evocative collaborative, interdisciplinary ‘walk the talk’ sexual health and AIDS education training programme for health care providers in primary health care facilities. Such programmes, if maintained, may assist health care providers to achieve the MDG 3, 5 and 6.

  18. Hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale score and ICH score: which predicts the 30-day mortality better for intracerebral hematoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality.This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018, 0.715 (P = 0.0008 (by ABC/2 to 0.738 (P = 0.0002 (by CAVA, 0.877 (P<0.0001 (by ABC/2 to 0.882 (P<0.0001 (by CAVA, and 0.912 (P<0.0001, respectively.Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score.

  19. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

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    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on t