WorldWideScience

Sample records for range seismic measurements

  1. Upper limit on a stochastic background of gravitational waves from seismic measurements in the range 0.05-1 Hz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Michael; Harms, Jan

    2014-03-14

    In this Letter, we present an upper limit of ΩGW<1.2×108 on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background integrated over a year in the frequency range 0.05-1 Hz, which improves current upper limits from high-precision laboratory experiments by about 9 orders of magnitude. The limit is obtained using the response of Earth itself to GWs via a free-surface effect described more than 40 years ago by Dyson. The response was measured by a global network of broadband seismometers selected to maximize the sensitivity.

  2. SEG Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert; Laughlin, Darren; Brune, Bob

    2016-10-17

    Significant advancements in the development of sensors to enable rotational seismic measurements have been achieved. Prototypes are available now to support experiments that help validate the utility of rotational seismic measurements.

  3. Soliton microcomb range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-based range measurement systems are important in many application areas, including autonomous vehicles, robotics, manufacturing, formation flying of satellites, and basic science. Coherent laser ranging systems using dual-frequency combs provide an unprecedented combination of long range, high precision, and fast update rate. We report dual-comb distance measurement using chip-based soliton microcombs. A single pump laser was used to generate dual-frequency combs within a single microresonator as counterpropagating solitons. We demonstrated time-of-flight measurement with 200-nanometer precision at an averaging time of 500 milliseconds within a range ambiguity of 16 millimeters. Measurements at distances up to 25 meters with much lower precision were also performed. Our chip-based source is an important step toward miniature dual-comb laser ranging systems that are suitable for photonic integration.

  4. Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brune, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Rotational motion is increasingly understood to be a significant part of seismic wave motion. Rotations can be important in earthquake strong motion and in Induced Seismicity Monitoring. Rotational seismic data can also enable shear selectivity and improve wavefield sampling for vertical geophones in 3D surveys, among other applications. However, sensor technology has been a limiting factor to date. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding a multi-year project that is now entering Phase 2 to develop and deploy a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. Initial focus is on induced seismicity monitoring, particularly for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with fracturing. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, improved noise floors, robustness, and repeatability. This paper presents a summary of Phase 1 results and Phase 2 status.

  5. Laboratory Mid-frequency (Kilohertz) Range Seismic Property Measurements and X-ray CT Imaging of Fractured Sandstone Cores During Supercritical CO2 Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Chang, C.; Harper, E.

    2014-12-01

    During geological sequestration of CO2, fractures are expected to play a critical role in controlling the migration of the injected fluid in reservoir rock. To detect the invasion of supercritical (sc-) CO2 and to determine its saturation, velocity and attenuation of seismic waves can be monitored. When both fractures and matrix porosity connected to the fractures are present, wave-induced dynamic poroelastic interactions between these two different types of rock porosity—high-permeability, high-compliance fractures and low-permeability, low-compliance matrix porosity—result in complex velocity and attenuation changes of compressional waves as scCO2 invades the rock. We conducted core-scale laboratory scCO2 injection experiments on small (diameter 1.5 inches, length 3.5-4 inches), medium-porosity/permeability (porosity 15%, matrix permeability 35 md) sandstone cores. During the injection, the compressional and shear (torsion) wave velocities and attenuations of the entire core were determined using our Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (short-core resonant bar) technique in the frequency range of 1-2 kHz, and the distribution and saturation of the scCO2 determined via X-ray CT imaging using a medical CT scanner. A series of tests were conducted on (1) intact rock cores, (2) a core containing a mated, core-parallel fracture, (3) a core containing a sheared core-parallel fracture, and (4) a core containing a sheared, core-normal fracture. For intact cores and a core containing a mated sheared fracture, injections of scCO2 into an initially water-saturated sample resulted in large and continuous decreases in the compressional velocity as well as temporary increases in the attenuation. For a sheared core-parallel fracture, large attenuation was also observed, but almost no changes in the velocity occurred. In contrast, a sample containing a core-normal fracture exhibited complex behavior of compressional wave attenuation: the attenuation peaked as the leading edge of

  6. Rescaled Range analysis of Induced Seismicity: rapid classification of clusters in seismic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejar-Pizarro, M.; Perez Lopez, R.; Benito-Parejo, M.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Herraiz, M.

    2017-12-01

    Different underground fluid operations, mainly gas storing, fracking and water pumping, can trigger Induced Seismicity (IS). This seismicity is normally featured by small-sized earthquakes (M<2.5), although particular cases reach magnitude as great as 5. It has been up for debate whether earthquakes greater than 5 can be triggered by IS or this level of magnitude only corresponds to tectonic earthquakes caused by stress change. Whatever the case, the characterization of IS for seismic clusters and seismic series recorded close but not into the gas storage, is still under discussion. Time-series of earthquakes obey non-linear patterns where the Hurst exponent describes the persistency or anti-persistency of the sequence. Natural seismic sequences have an H-exponent close to 0.7, which combined with the b-value time evolution during the time clusters, give us valuable information about the stationarity of the phenomena. Tectonic earthquakes consist in a main shock with a decay of time-occurrence of seismic shocks obeying the Omori's empirical law. On the contrary, IS does not exhibit a main shock and the time occurrence depends on the injection operations instead of on the tectonic energy released. In this context, the H-exponent can give information about the origin of the sequence. In 2013, a seismic crisis was declared from the Castor underground gas storing located off-shore in the Mediterranean Sea, close to the Northeastern Spanish cost. The greatest induced earthquake was 3.7. However, a 4.2 earthquake, probably of tectonic origin, occurred few days after the operations stopped. In this work, we have compared the H-exponent and the b-value time evolution according to the timeline of gas injection. Moreover, we have divided the seismic sequence into two groups: (1) Induced Seismicity and (2) Triggered Seismicity. The rescaled range analysis allows the differentiation between natural and induced seismicity and gives information about the persistency and long

  7. Crosshole investigations - short and medium range seismic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.

    1987-02-01

    Seismic tomographic tests were conducted as a part of the Crosshole Investigations program of the Stripa Project. The aim has been to study if it is possible to detect by seismic tomography major fracture zones and determine their dimensions and orientation. The analysis was based on both compressional (P) and transversal (S) waves. The Young's modulus has been also calculated for a sub-set of measurements as a cross check for the P and S wave velocities. The experimental data was collected at the crosshole site in the Stripa mine during 1984-1985. A down-the-hole impact source was used together with triaxial detectors and a digital seismograph. Five tomographic sections were obtained. The number of records per section was appr. 250. Measurements were done down to 200 m depth in all boreholes. The main conclusion is that it is possible to detect major fracture zones by seismic tomography. Their position and orientation can also be estimated. (orig./HP)

  8. Seismic switch for strong motion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harben, P.E.; Rodgers, P.W.; Ewert, D.W.

    1995-05-30

    A seismic switching device is described that has an input signal from an existing microseismic station seismometer and a signal from a strong motion measuring instrument. The seismic switch monitors the signal level of the strong motion instrument and passes the seismometer signal to the station data telemetry and recording systems. When the strong motion instrument signal level exceeds a user set threshold level, the seismometer signal is switched out and the strong motion signal is passed to the telemetry system. The amount of time the strong motion signal is passed before switching back to the seismometer signal is user controlled between 1 and 15 seconds. If the threshold level is exceeded during a switch time period, the length of time is extended from that instant by one user set time period. 11 figs.

  9. Design and analysis of fractional order seismic transducer for displacement and acceleration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraian, Parthasarathi; Gandhi, Uma; Mangalanathan, Umapathy

    2018-04-01

    Seismic transducers are widely used for measurement of displacement, velocity, and acceleration. This paper presents the design of seismic transducer in the fractional domain for the measurement of displacement and acceleration. The fractional order transfer function for seismic displacement and acceleration transducer are derived using Grünwald-Letnikov derivative. Frequency response analysis of fractional order seismic displacement transducer (FOSDT) and fractional order seismic acceleration transducer (FOSAT) are carried out for different damping ratio with the different fractional order, and the maximum dynamic measurement range is identified. The results demonstrate that fractional order seismic transducer has increased dynamic measurement range and less phase distortion as compared to the conventional seismic transducer even with a lower damping ratio. Time response of FOSDT and FOSAT are derived analytically in terms of Mittag-Leffler function, the effect of fractional behavior in the time domain is evaluated from the impulse and step response. The fractional order system is found to have significantly reduced overshoot as compared to the conventional transducer. The fractional order seismic transducer design proposed in this paper is illustrated with a design example for FOSDT and FOSAT. Finally, an electrical equivalent of FOSDT and FOSAT is considered, and its frequency response is found to be in close agreement with the proposed fractional order seismic transducer.

  10. Plagioclase-dominated Seismic Anisotropy in the Basin and Range Lower Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, R. E.; Behr, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy have the ability to provide important information on deformation and structures within the lithosphere. While the mechanisms controlling seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle are fairly well understood (i.e., olivine "lattice preferred orientation" or LPO), less is known about the minerals and structures controlling regional lower crustal anisotropy. We use lower crustal xenoliths from young cinder cones in the eastern Mojave/western Basin and Range to investigate mineral LPOs and their effect on seismic anisotropy. Lower crustal gabbros were collected from two areas roughly 80 km apart — the Cima and Deadman Lake Volcanic Fields. Lower crustal fabrics measured using EBSD are dominated by LPOs in plagioclase associated with both plastic deformation and magmatic flow. In all fabric types, plagioclase LPOs produce seismic fast axes oriented perpendicular to the foliation plane. This is in contrast to mantle peridotite xenoliths from the same locations, which preserve olivine LPOs with fast axes aligned parallel to the foliation plane. The orthogonal orientations of mantle and lower crustal fast axes relative to foliation implies that even where fabric development in both layers is coeval and kinematically compatible, their measured anisotropies can be perpendicular to each other, therefore appearing anti-correlated when measured seismically. Furthermore, our observation of plagioclase-dominated LPO and negligible concentrations of mica is at odds with the common assumption that lower crustal anisotropy is dominated by micaceous minerals, whose slow axes reliably align parallel to lineation or flow. In contrast, our data show that for plagioclase, fast axes align perpendicular to flow and the slow axes are variably aligned within the foliation plane. Therefore, for a crustal section dominated by plagioclase LPO with assumed horizontal foliation, there would be a vertical rather than a horizontal axis of symmetry, resulting in a

  11. Air-coupled seismic waves at long range from Apollo launchings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, W. L.; Dalins, I.; Mccarty, V.; Ewing, M.; Kaschak , G.

    1971-01-01

    Microphones and seismographs were co-located in arrays on Skidaway Island, Georgia, for the launchings of Apollo 13 and 14, 374 km to the south. Simultaneous acoustic and seismic waves were recorded for both events at times appropriate to the arrival of the acoustic waves from the source. The acoustic signal is relatively broadband compared to the nearly monochromatic seismic signal; the seismic signal is much more continuous than the more pulse-like acoustic signal; ground loading from the pressure variations of the acoustic waves is shown to be too small to account for the seismic waves; and the measured phase velocities of both acoustic and seismic waves across the local instrument arrays differ by less than 6 per cent and possibly 3 per cent if experimental error is included. It is concluded that the seismic waves are generated by resonant coupling to the acoustic waves along some 10 km of path on Skidaway Island.

  12. Range-Measuring Video Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard T.; Briscoe, Jeri M.; Corder, Eric L.; Broderick, David

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors of a proposed type would perform the functions of both electronic cameras and triangulation- type laser range finders. That is to say, these sensors would both (1) generate ordinary video or snapshot digital images and (2) measure the distances to selected spots in the images. These sensors would be well suited to use on robots that are required to measure distances to targets in their work spaces. In addition, these sensors could be used for all the purposes for which electronic cameras have been used heretofore. The simplest sensor of this type, illustrated schematically in the upper part of the figure, would include a laser, an electronic camera (either video or snapshot), a frame-grabber/image-capturing circuit, an image-data-storage memory circuit, and an image-data processor. There would be no moving parts. The laser would be positioned at a lateral distance d to one side of the camera and would be aimed parallel to the optical axis of the camera. When the range of a target in the field of view of the camera was required, the laser would be turned on and an image of the target would be stored and preprocessed to locate the angle (a) between the optical axis and the line of sight to the centroid of the laser spot.

  13. Detection capability of the IMS seismic network based on ambient seismic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    All nuclear explosions - on the Earth's surface, underground, underwater or in the atmosphere - are banned by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). As part of this treaty, a verification regime was put into place to detect, locate and characterize nuclear explosion testings at any time, by anyone and everywhere on the Earth. The International Monitoring System (IMS) plays a key role in the verification regime of the CTBT. Out of the different monitoring techniques used in the IMS, the seismic waveform approach is the most effective technology for monitoring nuclear underground testing and to identify and characterize potential nuclear events. This study introduces a method of seismic threshold monitoring to assess an upper magnitude limit of a potential seismic event in a certain given geographical region. The method is based on ambient seismic background noise measurements at the individual IMS seismic stations as well as on global distance correction terms for body wave magnitudes, which are calculated using the seismic reflectivity method. From our investigations we conclude that a global detection threshold of around mb 4.0 can be achieved using only stations from the primary seismic network, a clear latitudinal dependence for the detection threshold can be observed between northern and southern hemisphere. Including the seismic stations being part of the auxiliary seismic IMS network results in a slight improvement of global detection capability. However, including wave arrivals from distances greater than 120 degrees, mainly PKP-wave arrivals, leads to a significant improvement in average global detection capability. In special this leads to an improvement of the detection threshold on the southern hemisphere. We further investigate the dependence of the detection capability on spatial (latitude and longitude) and temporal (time) parameters, as well as on parameters such as source type and percentage of operational IMS stations.

  14. Seismic measurements of explosions in the Tatum Salt Dome, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Healy, J.H.; Jackson, W.H.; Warren, D.R.

    1967-01-01

    Project Sterling provided for the detonation of a nuclear device in the cavity resulting from the Salmon nuclear explosion in the Tatum salt dome in southern Mississippi. It also provided for a high explosive (HE) comparison shot in a nearby drill hole. The purpose of the experiment was to gather information on the seismic decoupling of a nuclear explosion in a cavity by comparing seismic signals from a nuclear shot in the Salmon cavity with seismic signals recorded from Salmon and with seismic signals recorded from a muall (about 2 tons) HE shot in the salt dome. Surface seismic measurements were made by the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, and the Air Force Technical Applications Center with coordination and overall direction by the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory. This report covers only the seismic measurements made by the U. S. Geological Survey. The first objective of this report is to describe the field recording procedures and the data obtained by the U. S. Geological Survey from these events. The second objective is to describe the spectral analyses which have been made on the data and the relative seismic amplitudes which have been determined from these analyses.

  15. Global earthquake catalogs and long-range correlation of seismic activity (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In view of the long-term seismic activity in the world, homogeneity of a global catalog is indispensable. Lately, Engdahl and Villaseñor (2002) compiled a global earthquake catalog of magnitude (M)7.0 or larger during the last century (1900-1999). This catalog is based on the various existing catalogs such as Abe catalog (Abe, 1981, 1984; Abe and Noguchi, 1983a, b) for the world seismicity (1894-1980), its modified catalogs by Perez and Scholz (1984) and by Pacheco and Sykes (1992), and also the Harvard University catalog since 1975. However, the original surface wave magnitudes of Abe catalog were systematically changed by Perez and Scholz (1984) and Pacheco and Sykes (1992). They suspected inhomogeneity of the Abe catalog and claimed that the two seeming changes in the occurrence rate around 1922 and 1948 resulted from magnitude shifts for some instrumental-related reasons. They used a statistical test assuming that such a series of large earthquakes in the world should behave as the stationary Poisson process (uniform occurrences). It is obvious that their claim strongly depends on their a priori assumption of an independent or short-range dependence of earthquake occurrence. We question this assumption from the viewpoint of long-range dependence of seismicity. We make some statistical analyses of the spectrum, dispersion-time diagrams and R/S for estimating and testing of the long-range correlations. We also attempt to show the possibility that the apparent rate change in the global seismicity can be simulated by a certain long-range correlated process. Further, if we divide the globe into the two regions of high and low latitudes, for example, we have different shapes of the cumulative curves to each other, and the above mentioned apparent change-points disappear from the both regions. This suggests that the Abe catalog shows the genuine seismic activity rather than the artifact of the suspected magnitude shifts that should appear in any wide enough regions

  16. Ambient seismic noise interferometry in Hawai'i reveals long-range observability of volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer, Silke; Wolfe, Cecily; Okubo, Paul G.; Haney, Matt; Thurber, Clifford H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of seismic noise interferometry to retrieve Green's functions and the analysis of volcanic tremor are both useful in studying volcano dynamics. Whereas seismic noise interferometry allows long-range extraction of interpretable signals from a relatively weak noise wavefield, the characterization of volcanic tremor often requires a dense seismic array close to the source. We here show that standard processing of seismic noise interferometry yields volcanic tremor signals observable over large distances exceeding 50 km. Our study comprises 2.5 yr of data from the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory short period seismic network. Examining more than 700 station pairs, we find anomalous and temporally coherent signals that obscure the Green's functions. The time windows and frequency bands of these anomalous signals correspond well with the characteristics of previously studied volcanic tremor sources at Pu'u 'Ō'ō and Halema'uma'u craters. We use the derived noise cross-correlation functions to perform a grid-search for source location, confirming that these signals are surface waves originating from the known tremor sources. A grid-search with only distant stations verifies that useful tremor signals can indeed be recovered far from the source. Our results suggest that the specific data processing in seismic noise interferometry—typically used for Green's function retrieval—can aid in the study of both the wavefield and source location of volcanic tremor over large distances. In view of using the derived Green's functions to image heterogeneity and study temporal velocity changes at volcanic regions, however, our results illustrate how care should be taken when contamination by tremor may be present.

  17. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay Region; part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.; Roth, Edward F.

    1977-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for estimating the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. In the current program seismic velocities have been measured at 59 locations 1n the San Francisco Bay Region. This report is the third in a series of Open-File Reports and describes the in-situ velocity measurements at locations 35-59. At each location seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill cuttings, undisturbed (cored) samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the sites. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. There is a variety of geologic and seismic data available in the San Francisco Bay Region for use 1n developing the general zoning techniques which can then be applied to other areas. Shear wave velocities 1n near-surface geologic materials are of especial interest for engineering seismology and seismic zonation studies, yet in general, they are difficult to measure because of contamination by compressional waves. A comparison of various in-situ techniques by Warrick (1974) establishes the reliability of the method utilizing a "horizontal traction" source for sites underlain by bay mud and alluvium. Gibbs, and others (1975a) present data from 12 holes and establishes the reliability of the method for sites underlain by a variety of different rock units and suggest extending the measurements to

  18. Localization of short-range acoustic and seismic wideband sources: Algorithms and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafsudd, J. Z.; Asgari, S.; Hudson, R.; Yao, K.; Taciroglu, E.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the determination of the location (source localization) of a disturbance source which emits acoustic and/or seismic signals. We devise an enhanced approximate maximum-likelihood (AML) algorithm to process data collected at acoustic sensors (microphones) belonging to an array of, non-collocated but otherwise identical, sensors. The approximate maximum-likelihood algorithm exploits the time-delay-of-arrival of acoustic signals at different sensors, and yields the source location. For processing the seismic signals, we investigate two distinct algorithms, both of which process data collected at a single measurement station comprising a triaxial accelerometer, to determine direction-of-arrival. The direction-of-arrivals determined at each sensor station are then combined using a weighted least-squares approach for source localization. The first of the direction-of-arrival estimation algorithms is based on the spectral decomposition of the covariance matrix, while the second is based on surface wave analysis. Both of the seismic source localization algorithms have their roots in seismology; and covariance matrix analysis had been successfully employed in applications where the source and the sensors (array) are typically separated by planetary distances (i.e., hundreds to thousands of kilometers). Here, we focus on very-short distances (e.g., less than one hundred meters) instead, with an outlook to applications in multi-modal surveillance, including target detection, tracking, and zone intrusion. We demonstrate the utility of the aforementioned algorithms through a series of open-field tests wherein we successfully localize wideband acoustic and/or seismic sources. We also investigate a basic strategy for fusion of results yielded by acoustic and seismic arrays.

  19. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbrod, U.; Burjanek, J.; Fäh, D.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. An analysis of ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes might be a new alternative to the already existing methods, e.g. geotechnical displacement measurements. Systematic measurements have been performed recently in Switzerland to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. Each measurement setup included a reference station, which was installed on a stable part close to the instability. Recorded ground motion is highly directional in the unstable parts of the rock slope, and significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies, which were identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. In most cases the directions of maximum amplification are perpendicular to open cracks and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. Such unique signatures might improve our understanding of slope structure and stability. Thus we link observed vibration characteristics with available results of detailed geological characterization. This is supported by numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex topography.For example, a potential relation between eigenfrequencies and unstable rock mass volume is investigated.

  20. Detailed comparison between computed and measured FBR core seismic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forni, M.; Martelli, A.; Melloni, R.; Bonacina, G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed comparison between seismic calculations and measurements performed for various mock-ups consisting of groups of seven and nineteen simplified elements of the Italian PEC fast reactor core. Experimental tests had been performed on shaking tables in air and water (simulating sodium) with excitations increasing up to above Safe Shutdown Earthquake. The PEC core-restraint ring had been simulated in some tests. All the experimental tests have been analysed by use of both the one-dimensional computer program CORALIE and the two-dimensional program CLASH. Comparisons have been made for all the instrumented elements, in both the time and the frequency domains. The good agreement between calculations and measurements has confirmed adequacy of the fluid-structure interaction model used for PEC core seismic design verification

  1. Underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the SSC site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Weaver, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The results of underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the tunnel depth of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 1500 Hz is performed. It is found that amplitudes of ambient ground motion are less than requirements for the Collider, but cultural vibrations are unacceptably large and will cause fast growth of transverse emittance of the SSC beams

  2. Crosshole seismic measurements to characterise and monitor the internal condition of embankment dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazinkhoo, S. [Horizon Engineering Inc., North Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gaffran, P. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2002-12-01

    A sinkhole was discovered at the Bennett Dam in June 1996. The discovery was immediately followed by an investigation consisting 14 geophysical techniques, of which crosshole seismic testing was the most successful. The Bennett Dam Sinkhole Investigation Project resulted in remedial action which involved compaction grouting to repair the defects. Crosshole seismic testing has been carried out annually since 1996 to verify that the integrity of the repaired zone is being maintained. Large amounts of data have been collected since initial testing to augment other acquired data from more conventional geotechnical techniques. Both data sets have provided a unique opportunity to correlate seismic velocities to mechanical soil properties. The condition of the dam can now be readily assessed through the prediction of seismic velocities for a range of soil properties at any point in the dam. The study has resulted in a better understanding of measured velocities with respect to dam behaviour. Results confirm that seismic velocity testing is a useful, non-intrusive tool for monitoring the performance of embankment dams. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  3. Seismic imaging of the shallow subsurface with high frequency seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaelin, B.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-07-01

    Elastic wave propagation in highly heterogeneous media is investigated and theoretical calculations and field measurements are presented. In the first part the dynamic composite elastic medium (DYCEM) theory is derived for one-dimensional stratified media. A self-consistent method using the scattering functions of the individual layers is formulated, which allows the calculation of phase velocity, attenuation and waveform. In the second part the DYCEM theory has been generalized for three-dimensional inclusions. The specific case of spherical inclusions is calculated with the exact scattering functions and compared with several low frequency approximations. In the third part log and VSP data of partially water saturated tuffs in the Yucca Mountain region of Nevada are analyzed. The anomalous slow seismic velocities can be explained by combining self-consistent theories for pores and cracks. The fourth part analyzes an air injection experiment in a shallow fractured limestone, which has shown large effects on the amplitude, but small effects on the travel time of the transmitted seismic waves. The large amplitude decrease during the experiment is mainly due to the impedance contrast between the small velocities of gas-water mixtures inside the fracture and the formation. The slow velocities inside the fracture allow an estimation of aperture and gas concentration profiles

  4. The Global Detection Capability of the IMS Seismic Network in 2013 Inferred from Ambient Seismic Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, P. J.; Ceranna, L.

    2016-12-01

    All nuclear explosions - on the Earth's surface, underground, underwater or in the atmosphere - are banned by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). As part of this treaty, a verification regime was put into place to detect, locate and characterize nuclear explosion testings at any time, by anyone and everywhere on the Earth. The International Monitoring System (IMS) plays a key role in the verification regime of the CTBT. Out of the different monitoring techniques used in the IMS, the seismic waveform approach is the most effective technology for monitoring nuclear underground testing and to identify and characterize potential nuclear events. This study introduces a method of seismic threshold monitoring to assess an upper magnitude limit of a potential seismic event in a certain given geographical region. The method is based on ambient seismic background noise measurements at the individual IMS seismic stations as well as on global distance correction terms for body wave magnitudes, which are calculated using the seismic reflectivity method. From our investigations we conclude that a global detection threshold of around mb 4.0 can be achieved using only stations from the primary seismic network, a clear latitudinal dependence for the detection thresholdcan be observed between northern and southern hemisphere. Including the seismic stations being part of the auxiliary seismic IMS network results in a slight improvement of global detection capability. However, including wave arrivals from distances greater than 120 degrees, mainly PKP-wave arrivals, leads to a significant improvement in average global detection capability. In special this leads to an improvement of the detection threshold on the southern hemisphere. We further investigate the dependence of the detection capability on spatial (latitude and longitude) and temporal (time) parameters, as well as on parameters such as source type and percentage of operational IMS stations.

  5. Seismic b-values and its correlation with seismic moment and Bouguer gravity anomaly over Indo-Burma ranges of northeast India: Tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Mahanta, Rinku; Borgohain, Jayanta Madhab

    2018-03-01

    b-value is one of the most significant seismic parameters for describing the seismicity of a given region at a definite time window. In this study, high-resolution map of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, seismic moment-release, Bouguer gravity anomaly and fault-plane solutions containing faulting styles are analyzed in the Indo-Burma ranges of northeast India using the unified and homogeneous part of the seismicity record in the region (January 1964-December 2016). The study region is subdivided into few square grids of geographical window size 1° × 1° and b-values are calculated in each square grid. Our goal is to explore the spatial correlations and anomalous patterns between the b-value and parameters like seismic moment release, Bouguer gravity anomaly and faulting styles that can help us to better understand the seismotectonics and the state of present-day crustal stress within the Indo-Burma region. Most of the areas show an inverse correlation between b-value and seismic moment release as well as convergence rates. While estimating the b-value as a function of depth, a sudden increase of b-value at a depth of 50-60 km was found out and the receiver function modeling confirms that this depth corresponds to the crust-mantle transition beneath the study region. The region is also associated with negative Bouguer gravity anomalies and an inverse relation is found between Gravity anomaly and b-value. Comparing b-values with different faulting styles, reveal that the areas containing low b-values show thrust mechanism, while the areas associated with intermediate b-values show strike-slip mechanism. Those areas, where the events show thrust mechanism but containing a strike-slip component has the highest b-value.

  6. Retrieval of reflections from seismic background?noise measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Wapenaar, K.; Mulder, W.; Singer, J.; Verdel, A.

    2007-01-01

    The retrieval of the earth's reflection response from cross?correlations of seismic noise recordings can provide valuable information, which may otherwise not be available due to limited spatial distribution of seismic sources. We cross?correlated ten hours of seismic background?noise data acquired

  7. Earthquake Ground Motion Measures for Seismic Response Evaluation of Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, In-Kil; Ahn, Seong-Moon; Choun, Young-Sun; Seo, Jeong-Moon

    2007-03-15

    This study used the assessment results of failure criteria - base shear, story drift, top acceleration and top displacement - for a PSC containment building subjected to 30 sets of near-fault ground motions to evaluate the earthquake ground motion intensity measures. Seven intensity measures, peak ground acceleration(PGA), peak ground velocity(PGV), spectral acceleration(Sa), velocity(Sv), spectrum intensity for acceleration(SIa), velocity(SIv) and displacement(SId), were used to represent alternative ground motion. The regression analyses of the failure criteria for a PSC containment building were carried out to evaluate a proper intensity measure by using two regression models and seven ground motion parameters. The regression analysis results demonstrate the correlation coefficients of the failure criteria in terms of the candidate IM. From the results, spectral acceleration(Sa) is estimated as the best parameter for a evaluation of the structural safety for a seismic PSA.

  8. Laboratory piping system vibration tests to determine parametric effects on damping in the seismic frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    A pipe damping research program is being conducted for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to establish more realistic, best-estimate damping values for use in dynamic structural analyses of piping systems. As part of this program, tests were conducted on a 5-in. (128 mm ID) laboratory piping system to determine the effects of pressure, support configuration, insulation and response amplitude on damping. The tests were designed to produce a wide range of damping values, from very low damping in lightly excited uninsulated systems with few supports, to higher damping under conditions of either/or insulation, high level excitation, and various support arrangements. The effect of pressure at representative seismic levels was considered to be minimal. The supports influence damping at all excitation levels; damping was highest when a mechanical snubber was present in the system. The addition of insulation produced a large increase in damping for the hydraulic shaker excitation tests, but there was no comparable increase for the snapback excitation tests. Once a response amplitude of approximately one-half yield stress was reached, overall damping increased to relatively high levels (>10% of critical)

  9. Statistical Properties of Seismic Noise Measured in Underground Spaces During Seismic Swarm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lyubushin, A. A.; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Lednická, Markéta

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2014), s. 209-224 ISSN 2213-5812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : seismic noise * multifractals * wavelets * kurtosis * West Bohemia seismic swarm Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.543, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40328-014-0051-y

  10. Analysis of short time-space range seismicity patterns in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imotof

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In our paper we analyze the data base obtained from the observations of the Italian Seismological Network from 1975 to 1994 by using a simple algotithm to determine the rate of occurrence of seismic events condi- tioned by the occurrence of previous events after a period of quiescence. The number of observed pairs of earthquakes depends on several parameters: the magnitude threshold of the two events, the spatial and tempo- ral ranges of the quiescence period preceding the first (non aftershock event, the time elapsed between the first and the second events and the spatial dimension of the alarm area. The Akaike information criterion was adopted to assess the optimal set of space-time parameters used in the definition of non-aftershock (events not related to a stronger previous one. In Central Italy, the rate of M ³3.8 earthquakes preceded by at least one M ~ 3.3 foreshock within 14.1 km and 2 days is 30%, while the rate of M ~ 3.3 earthquakes followed by a M ~ 3.8 mainshock in the same space time range is 7%. We observed that the probability that an earthquake of magnitude MI will be followed by an earthquake of magnitude M2 (success rate fits the law log À = a+b (Mi -M2 with b approximately equal to l. By computing the success rate for given values of magnitude threshold of the first and the second events over a dense grid of spatial coordinates, we obtained maps of this feature over the investigated area. The results of this process document variations larger than a factor of five in the success rate over the Italian territory.

  11. Geophysical investigation program Northern Switzerland: Refraction-seismic measurements 84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, G.; Driessen, L.; Lehnen, I.

    1985-01-01

    Acting on instructions from the SGPK/Nagra working group (Baden, Switzerland), PRAKLA-SEISMOS GmbH, Hanover, planned, processed and interpreted seismic refraction measurements in northern Switzerland; CGG, Massy (France) was responsible for carrying out the field work. The aim of the survey was to investigate the shape and depth of a regional, WSW-ENE striking Permocarboniferous trough which underlays the mesozoic sediments of the Tabular Jura. The crystalline basement surface and possibly other geological boundaries were to be identified on the basis of refractor velocities. The recording arrangement included a 36 km spread in the assumed trough axis and four 12 km long spreads perpendicular to the axis (broad side 'T') which covered the trough edges. The resulting good quality data indicated two refractors: horizon H5 which is attributable to the lower Permocarboniferous could only be detected in the western half of the spread with any certainty. Horizon H6 probably represents the crystalline basement surface. If anisotropy is taken into account, the refractor velocity closely corresponds to the Gneiss of the WEIACH- and the Granite 3 of the BOETTSTEIN-borehole. This horizon was clearly discernible on all recordings and allowed the approximate mapping of the trough's shape. The assumed strike direction and depth was largely confirmed. In the WSW section the trough is more than 3300 m deep, it rises to - 3000 m in the ESE section and shows only in the east of the survey area a tendency towards a narrower width and shallower depth (depth data relate to the seismic reference datum at 500 m above MSL). (author)

  12. Stress coupling in the seismic cycle indicated from geodetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Hainzl, S.; Zoeller, G.; Holschneider, M.

    2012-12-01

    The seismic cycle includes several phases, the interseismic, coseismic and postseismic phase. In the interseismic phase, strain gradually builds up around the overall locked fault in tens to thousands of years, while it is coseismically released in seconds. In the postseismic interval, stress relaxation lasts months to years, indicated by evident aseismic deformations which have been indicated to release comparable or even higher strain energy than the main shocks themselves. Benefiting from the development of geodetic observatory, e.g., Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) in the last two decades, the measurements of surface deformation have been significantly improved and become valuable information for understanding the stress evolution on the large fault plane. In this study, we utilize the GPS/InSAR data to investigate the slip deficit during the interseismic phase, the coseismic slip and the early postseismic creep on the fault plane. However, it is already well-known that slip inversions based only on the surface measurements are typically non-unique and subject to large uncertainties. To reduce the ambiguity, we utilize the assumption of stress coupling between interseismic and coseismic phases, and between coseismic and postseismic phases. We use a stress constrained joint inversion in Bayesian approach (Wang et al., 2012) to invert simultaneously for (1) interseismic slip deficit and coseismic slip, and (2) coseismic slip and postseismic creep. As case studies, we analyze earthquakes occurred in well-instrumented regions such as the 2004 M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, the 2010 M8.7 earthquake and the 2011 M9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We show that the inversion with the stress-coupling constraint leads to better constrained slip distributions. Meanwhile, the results also indicate that the assumed stress coupling is reasonable and can be well reflected from the available geodetic measurements. Reference: Lifeng

  13. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region...part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.

    1976-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for determining the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. Currently a program is in progress to measure seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region at an estimated 150 sites. At each site seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill hole cuttings, undisturbed samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the site. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. The broad data base available in the San Francisco Bay region suggests using the area as a pilot area for the development of general techniques applicable to other areas.

  14. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  15. Bridge seismic retrofit measures considering subduction zone earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Over the years, earthquakes have exposed the vulnerability of reinforced concrete structures under : seismic loads. The recent occurrence of highly devastating earthquakes near instrumented regions, e.g. 2010 Maule, Chile : and 2011 Tohoku, Japan, ha...

  16. Climatic modulation of seismicity in the Alpine-Himalayan mountain range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panza, G.F.; Peresan, A.; Zuccolo, E.

    2009-04-01

    The influence of strain field variations associated with seasonal and longer term climatic phenomena on earthquake occurrence is investigated. Two regions (Himalaya and Alps), characterized by present day mountain building and relevant glaciers retreat, as well as by sufficiently long earthquake catalogues, are suitable for the analysis. Secular variations of permanent glaciers dimensions, which are naturally grossly correlated with long-term average surface atmosphere temperature changes, as well as seasonal snow load, cause crustal deformations that modulate seismicity. (author)

  17. Pipe damping: experimental results from laboratory tests in the seismic frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Arendts, J.G.

    1986-06-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting a research program to assist the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in determining best-estimate damping values for the seismic analysis of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a 5-in. piping system was tested by the INEL, and data from USNRC/EPRI piping vibration tests at the ANCO Engineers facility were evaluated. These systems were subjected to various types of excitation methods and magnitudes, the support configurations were varied, and the effects of pipe insulation and internal pressure were investigated on the INEL system. The INEL has used several different methods to reduce the data to determine the damping in both these piping systems under the various test conditions. It was concluded that at representative seismic excitation levels, pressure was not a contributing factor, but the supports, insulation, and magnitude of response all were major influences contributing to damping. These tests are part of the ongoing program to determine how various parameters and data reduction methods affect piping system damping. The evaluation of all relevant test results, including these two series, will potentially lead to revised damping guidelines for the seismic analysis of nuclear plants, making them safer, less costly, and easier to inspect and maintain. The test results as well as accompanying evaluations and recommendations are presented in this report. 27 refs., 72 figs., 13 tabs

  18. Hydrothermal fault zone mapping using seismic and electrical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onacha, Stephen Alumasa

    This dissertation presents a new method of using earthquakes and resistivity data to characterize permeable hydrothermal reservoirs. The method is applied to field examples from Casa Diablo in the Long Valley Caldera, California; Mt. Longonot, Kenya; and Krafla, Iceland. The new method has significant practical value in the exploration and production of geothermal energy. The method uses P- and S-wave velocity, S-wave polarization and splitting magnitude, resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) strike directions to determine fracture-porosity and orientation. The conceptual model used to characterize the buried, fluid-circulating fault zones in hydrothermal systems is based on geological and fracture models. The method has been tested with field earthquake and resistivity data; core samples; temperature measurements; and, for the case of Krafla, with a drilled well. The use of resistivity and microearthquake measurements is based on theoretical formulation of shared porosity, anisotropy and polarization. The relation of resistivity and a double porosity-operator is solved using a basis function. The porosity-operator is used to generate a correlation function between P-wave velocity and resistivity. This correlation is then used to generate P-wave velocity from 2-D resistivity models. The resistivity models are generated from magnetotelluric (MT) by using the Non-Linear Conjugate Gradient (NLCG) inversion method. The seismic and electrical measurements used come from portable, multi station microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring networks and multi-profile, MT and transient electromagnetic (TEM) observation campaigns. The main conclusions in this dissertation are listed below: (1) Strong evidence exists for correlation between MT strike direction and anisotropy and MEQ S-wave splitting at sites close to fluid-filled fracture zones. (2) A porosity operator generated from a double porosity model has been used to generate valid P-wave velocity models from resistivity data. This

  19. Linking ground motion measurements and macro-seismic observations in France: A case study based on the RAP (accelerometric) and BCSF (macro-seismic) databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesueur, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Comparison between accelerometric and macro-seismic observations is made for three mw∼4.5 earthquakes of eastern France between 2003 and 2005. Scalar and spectral instrumental parameters are processed from the accelerometric data recorded by nine accelerometric stations located between 29 km and 180 km from the epicentres. Macro-seismic data are based on the French internet reports. In addition to the individual macro-seismic intensity, analysis of the internal correlation between the encoded answers highlights four predominant fields of questions, bearing different physical meanings: 1) 'vibratory motions of small objects', 2) 'displacement and fall of objects', 3) 'acoustic noise', and 4) 'personal feelings'. Best correlations between macro-seismic and instrumental observations are obtained when the macro-seismic parameters are averaged over 10 km radius circles around each station. macro-seismic intensities predicted by published pgv-intensity relationships quite agree with the observed intensities, contrary to those based on pga. The correlations between the macro-seismic and instrumental data, for intensities between ii and v (ems-98), show that pgv is the instrumental parameter presenting the best correlation with all macro-seismic parameters. The correlation with response spectra, exhibits clear frequency dependence over a limited frequency range [0.5-33 hz]. Horizontal and vertical components are significantly correlated with macro-seismic parameters between 1 and 10 hz, a range corresponding to both natural frequencies of most buildings and high energy content in the seismic ground motion. Between 10 and 25 hz, a clear lack of correlation between macro-seismic and instrumental data is observed, while beyond 25 hz the correlation coefficient increases, approaching that of the PGA correlation level. (author)

  20. Acoustic Transmission Loss and Prolonged Coda Durations of Seismic Airgunning at Intermediate Ranges in the Lau Back-Arc Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheip, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Matsumoto, H.; Dziak, R. P.; Lau, T. A.; Fowler, M.; Conder, J. A.; Wiens, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    During January-February of 2009, the R/V Marcus G. Langseth carried out an active-source seismic survey in the Lau Back-Arc Basin (20 S, 175 W) [Dunn et al., OS13A-1157, 2009]. Although the survey was designed to image sub-seafloor structures, the acoustic energy also was recorded by an array of seven autonomous underwater hydrophones positioned at a range of 29-416 km. The seismic survey used a 36-gun array with a source depth less than 10 m, and fired approximately 9400 shots. The hydrophone receivers were calibrated omni-directional sensors sampled at 250 Hz and moored at a depth of 1000 m. The acoustic environment of the tropical Lau Basin is unique in that the critical depth of the sound channel lies well below the relatively shallow (2000-2500 m) depth of the seafloor. Consequently, sound channel propagation is everywhere bottom limited. The initial arrival of each airgun pulse shows a short rise time, often less than two seconds from initial arrival to peak amplitude; however the coda duration often exceeds sixty seconds. This can be attributed to multipath propagation and seafloor scattering during multiple reflections from the seafloor. Moreover, received level (rms re 1uPa at 1m) versus range data indicate a transmission loss greater than 20log(range), thus exceeding the prediction for a purely spherical spreading model. This also is explained by strong interaction with the seafloor in this bottom-limited setting. The purpose of this paper is to quantify received signal characteristics of the airgun shots and compare predicted variability from numerical models with the observed variability. The results will improve source level estimates for volcanic and tectonic signals within the Lau Basin. They also will be used to assess the possible environmental impacts of further active-source seismic work in bottom-limited settings.

  1. Seismic-Acoustic Active Range Monitoring for Characterizing Low-Order Ordnance Detonation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Thomas S; Weale, Jason C

    2006-01-01

    .... The Distributed Sources focus area strives to characterize the level of contamination in range environments attributed to ordnance residue for the purpose of range management and environmental remediation...

  2. Crustal composition in the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt estimated from seismic velocity by laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Toyoshima, T.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the dynamics of the lithosphere in subduction systems, the knowledge of rock composition is significant. However, rock composition of the overriding plate is still poorly understood. To estimate rock composition of the lithosphere, it is an effective method to compare the elastic wave velocities measured under the high pressure and temperature condition with the seismic velocities obtained by active source experiment and earthquake observation. Due to an arc-arc collision in central Hokkaido, middle to lower crust is exposed along the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt (HMB), providing exceptional opportunities to study crust composition of an island arc. Across the HMB, P-wave velocity model has been constructed by refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic profiling (Iwasaki et al., 2004). Furthermore, because of the interpretation of the crustal structure (Ito, 2000), we can follow a continuous pass from the surface to the middle-lower crust. We corrected representative rock samples from HMB and measured ultrasonic P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocities (Vs) under the pressure up to 1.0 GPa in a temperature range from 25 to 400 °C. For example, the Vp values measured at 25 °C and 0.5 GPa are 5.88 km/s for the granite (74.29 wt.% SiO2), 6.02-6.34 km/s for the tonalites (66.31-68.92 wt.% SiO2), 6.34 km/s for the gneiss (64.69 wt.% SiO2), 6.41-7.05 km/s for the amphibolites (50.06-51.13 wt.% SiO2), and 7.42 km/s for the mafic granulite (50.94 wt.% SiO2). And, Vp of tonalites showed a correlation with SiO2 (wt.%). Comparing with the velocity profiles across the HMB (Iwasaki et al., 2004), we estimate that the lower to middle crust consists of amphibolite and tonalite, and the estimated acoustic impedance contrast between them suggests an existence of a clear reflective boundary, which accords well to the obtained seismic reflection profile (Iwasaki et al., 2014). And, we can obtain the same tendency from comparing measured Vp/Vs ratio and Vp/Vs ratio structure model

  3. Characterization of a complex near-surface structure using well logging and passive seismic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjumea, Beatriz; Macau, Albert; Gabàs, Anna; Figueras, Sara

    2016-04-01

    We combine geophysical well logging and passive seismic measurements to characterize the near-surface geology of an area located in Hontomin, Burgos (Spain). This area has some near-surface challenges for a geophysical study. The irregular topography is characterized by limestone outcrops and unconsolidated sediments areas. Additionally, the near-surface geology includes an upper layer of pure limestones overlying marly limestones and marls (Upper Cretaceous). These materials lie on top of Low Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments (sandstones, clays, gravels). In any case, a layer with reduced velocity is expected. The geophysical data sets used in this study include sonic and gamma-ray logs at two boreholes and passive seismic measurements: three arrays and 224 seismic stations for applying the horizontal-to-vertical amplitude spectra ratio method (H/V). Well-logging data define two significant changes in the P-wave-velocity log within the Upper Cretaceous layer and one more at the Upper to Lower Cretaceous contact. This technique has also been used for refining the geological interpretation. The passive seismic measurements provide a map of sediment thickness with a maximum of around 40 m and shear-wave velocity profiles from the array technique. A comparison between seismic velocity coming from well logging and array measurements defines the resolution limits of the passive seismic techniques and helps it to be interpreted. This study shows how these low-cost techniques can provide useful information about near-surface complexity that could be used for designing a geophysical field survey or for seismic processing steps such as statics or imaging.

  4. New insights of seismic disturbances due to wind turbines - long and short term measurements in SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, Toni; Ritter, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Within the scope of the project "TremAc", we present new insights of ground motion disturbances due to wind turbines (WTs) in the vicinity of the town of Landau, SW Germany. The main goal of this project, which is funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, is the detection of influences from WTs on human health and buildings in an interdisciplinary way. The interaction between WTs, humans, infrastructure (incl.seismic stations) becomes more and more an important role with the increase of installed WTs. We present averaged one hour long PSD-spectra in a frequency range from 0.5 Hz to 7 Hz depending on the wind speed before and after the installation of characteristic WTs, especially for seismic borehole stations, during one month measurements. The results show a clear increase of the ground motion and a related disturbance of the seismic recordings. The station threshold for signal detection below 2 Hz is reduced after the installation of a new wind farm in the area around Landau. This effect occurs even up to distances to the WTs of more than 5 kilometers. The increasing noise level depends also clearly on wind speed, which indicate also the WT origin related with the signals. Using short-term measurements during few hours, we are able to determine the maximum of the PSD values for different discrete frequencies as function of distance to the next WT and to fit a power-law decay curve proportional to 1/rb to the data. In this way we can differentiate between near- and far-field effects of the seismic wave propagation of WTs. A clear frequency dependent decay can be observed, for which high frequencies are more attenuated than lower frequencies, probably due to scattering processes. The new results will help for a better understanding of WTs as a seismic noise source and their interaction with nearby seismic stations and other infrastructure. Seismic data were provided by "Erdbebendienst Südwest", "Federal Institute for Geosciences and

  5. Accuracy of finite-difference modeling of seismic waves : Simulation versus laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, B.

    2017-12-01

    The finite-difference technique for numerical modeling of seismic waves is still important and for some areas extensively used.For exploration purposes is finite-difference simulation at the core of both traditional imaging techniques such as reverse-time migration and more elaborate Full-Waveform Inversion techniques.The accuracy and fidelity of finite-difference simulation of seismic waves are hard to quantify and meaningfully error analysis is really onlyeasily available for simplistic media. A possible alternative to theoretical error analysis is provided by comparing finite-difference simulated data with laboratory data created using a scale model. The advantage of this approach is the accurate knowledge of the model, within measurement precision, and the location of sources and receivers.We use a model made of PVC immersed in water and containing horizontal and tilted interfaces together with several spherical objects to generateultrasonic pressure reflection measurements. The physical dimensions of the model is of the order of a meter, which after scaling represents a model with dimensions of the order of 10 kilometer and frequencies in the range of one to thirty hertz.We find that for plane horizontal interfaces the laboratory data can be reproduced by the finite-difference scheme with relatively small error, but for steeply tilted interfaces the error increases. For spherical interfaces the discrepancy between laboratory data and simulated data is sometimes much more severe, to the extent that it is not possible to simulate reflections from parts of highly curved bodies. The results are important in view of the fact that finite-difference modeling is often at the core of imaging and inversion algorithms tackling complicatedgeological areas with highly curved interfaces.

  6. Seismic survey in southeastern Socorro Island: Background noise measurements, seismic events, and T phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, Raul W [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galindo, Marta [Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, IMS, Vienna (Austria); Pacheco, Javier F; Iglesias, Arturo; Teran, Luis F [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barreda, Jose L; Coba, Carlos [Facultad de Ingenieria, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2005-01-15

    We carried out a seismic survey and installed five portable, broadband seismometers in the southeastern corner of Socorro Island during June 1999. Power spectral densities for all five sites were relatively noisy when compared to reference curves around the world. Power spectral densities remain constant regardless of the time of day, or the day of the week. Cultural noise at the island is very small. Quiet and noisy sites were identified to determine the best location of the T phase station to be installed jointly by the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. During the survey six earthquakes were recorded at epicentral distances between 42 km and 2202 km, with magnitudes between 2.8 and 7.0. Two small earthquakes (M{sub c} = 2.8 and 3.3) occurred on the Clarion Fracture Zone. The four largest and more distant earthquakes produced T waves. One T wave from an epicenter near the coast of Guatemala had a duration of about 100 s and a frequency content between 2 and 8 Hz, with maximum amplitude at about 4.75 Hz. The Tehuacan earthquake of June 15, 1999 (M{sub w} = 7.0) produced arrivals of P {yields} T and S {yields} T waves, with energy between 2 Hz and 3.75 Hz. The earthquake occurred inland within the subducted Cocos plate at a depth of 60 km; a significant portion of the path was continental. Seismic P and S waves probably propagated upward in the subducted slab, and were converted to acoustic energy at the continental slope. Total duration of the T phase is close to 500 s and reaches its maximum amplitude about 200 s after the P {yields} T arrival. The T wave contains energy at frequencies between 2 and 10 Hz and reaches its maximum amplitude at about 2.5 Hz. T phases were also recorded from two earthquakes in Guerrero, Mexico and in the Rivera Fracture Zone. [Spanish] En junio de 1999 instalamos cinco sismometros portatiles de banda ancha en el sureste de la Isla Socorro. Se encontro que las densidades

  7. 3-D Characterization of Seismic Properties at the Smart Weapons Test Range, YPG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The Smart Weapons Test Range (SWTR) lies within the Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. SWTR is a new facility constructed specifically for the development and testing of futuristic intelligent battlefield sensor networks...

  8. Crustal deformation and seismic measurements in the region of McDonald Observatory, West Texas. [Texas and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The arrival times of regional and local earthquakes and located earthquakes in the Basin and Range province of Texas and in the adjacent areas of Chihuahua, Mexico from January 1976 to August 1980 at the UT'NASA seismic array are summarized. The August 1931 Texas earthquake is reevaluated and the seismicity and crustal structure of West Texas is examined. A table of seismic stations is included.

  9. The influence of construction measurement and structure storey on seismic performance of masonry structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baitao; Zhao, Hexian; Yan, Peilei

    2017-08-01

    The damage of masonry structures in earthquakes is generally more severe than other structures. Through the analysis of two typical earthquake damage buildings in the Wenchuan earthquake in Xuankou middle school, we found that the number of storeys and the construction measures had great influence on the seismic performance of masonry structures. This paper takes a teachers’ dormitory in Xuankou middle school as an example, selected the structure arrangement and storey number as two independent variables to design working conditions. Finally we researched on the seismic performance difference of masonry structure under two variables by finite element analysis method.

  10. Magnitude, moment, and measurement: The seismic mechanism controversy and its resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Teru

    This paper examines the history of two related problems concerning earthquakes, and the way in which a theoretical advance was involved in their resolution. The first problem is the development of a physical, as opposed to empirical, scale for measuring the size of earthquakes. The second problem is that of understanding what happens at the source of an earthquake. There was a controversy about what the proper model for the seismic source mechanism is, which was finally resolved through advances in the theory of elastic dislocations. These two problems are linked, because the development of a physically-based magnitude scale requires an understanding of what goes on at the seismic source. I will show how the theoretical advances allowed seismologists to re-frame the questions they were trying to answer, so that the data they gathered could be brought to bear on the problem of seismic sources in new ways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurements of translation, rotation and strain: new approaches to seismic processing and inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernauer, M.; Fichtner, A.; Igel, H.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to seismic tomography based on the joint processing of translation, strain and rotation measurements. Our concept is based on the apparent S and P velocities, defined as the ratios of displacement velocity and rotation amplitude, and displacement velocity and

  12. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  13. Measurements of Capture Efficiency of Range Hoods in Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2015-01-01

    mapped the pollution distribution in the room, and showed that the pollutants escape more at the sides of the cooktop. These preliminary results suggest that more measurements should be conducted investigating the capture efficiency at different pollutant source temperature, size and location...... want a range hood to use little energy and have high capture efficiency to minimize the required air flow to capture the cooking pollutants. Currently there are no standards for rating range hoods for capture efficiency In this study, measurements of range hood capture efficiency were made a tight...... kitchen-room built in a laboratory chamber, and a methodology for standardizing measurement of capture efficiency was developed. The results for a wall mounted range hood, showed that up to half of the cooking pollutants were not captured at a flow rate of 230 m3/h. A more detailed set of measurements...

  14. Measurement Of Compressional-Wave Seismic Velocities In 29 Wells At The Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.W.

    2010-01-01

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1

  15. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  16. Response of HDR-VKL piping system to seismic test excitations: Comparison of analytical predictions and test measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the earthquake investigations at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, simulated seismic tests (SHAM) were performed during April--May 1988 on the VKL (Versuchskreislauf) piping system. The purpose of these experiments was to study the behavior of piping subjected to a range of seismic excitation levels including those that exceed design levels manifold and that might induce failure of pipe supports or plasticity in the pipe runs, and to establish seismic margins for piping and pipe supports. Data obtained in the tests are also used to validate analysis methods. Detailed reports on the SHAM experiments are given elsewhere. The objective of this document is to evaluate a subsystem analysis module of the SMACS code. This module is a linear finite-element based program capable of calculating the response of nuclear power plant subsystems subjected to independent multiple-acceleration input excitation. The evaluation is based on a comparison of computational results of simulation of SHAM tests with corresponding test measurements

  17. Cascadia, an ultracompact seismic instrument with over 200dB of dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tim; Devanney, Peter; Bainbridge, Geoff; Townsend, Bruce

    2017-04-01

    Integration of geophysical instrumentation is clearly a way to lower overall station cost, make installations less complex, reduce installation time, increase station utility and value to a wider group of researchers, data miners and monitoring groups. Initiatives to expand early earthquake warning networks and observatories can use these savings for increasing station density. Integration of mature instrument systems such as broadband sensors and accelerometers used in strong motion studies has to be done with care to preserve the low noise and low frequency performance while providing over 200dB of dynamic range. Understanding the instrument complexities and deployment challenges allows the engineering teams to optimize the packaging to make installation and servicing cost effective, simple, routine and ultimately more reliable. We discuss early results from testing both in the lab and in the field of a newly released instrument called the Cascadia that integrates a broadband seismometer with a class A (USGS rating) accelerometer in a small stainless steel sonde suited for dense arrays in either ad hoc direct bury field deployments or in observatory quality shallow boreholes.

  18. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  19. Kinematics of active deformation across the Western Kunlun mountain range (Xinjiang, China), and potential seismic hazards within the southern Tarim Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilbaud, Christelle; Simoes, Martine; Barrier, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    remains seismic. To quantify the rate of active deformation and the potential for major earthquakes in this region, we combine a structural and quantitative morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, along the topographic mountain front in the epicentral area. Using a seismic profile, we derive......The Western Kunlun mountain range is a slowly converging intra-continental orogen where deformation rates are too low to be properly quantified from geodetic techniques. This region has recorded little seismicity, but the recent July 2015 (Mw 6.4) Pishan earthquake shows that this mountain range...... a structural cross-section in which we identify the fault that broke during the Pishan earthquake, an 8-12 km deep blind ramp beneath the Yecheng-Pishan fold. Combining satellite images and DEMs, we achieve a detailed morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, where we find nine levels of incised...

  20. Paleoseismic observations along the Langshan range-front fault, Hetao Basin, China: Tectonic and seismic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shaopeng; Zhang, Peizhen; Zheng, Wenjun; Yu, Zhongyuan; Lei, Qiyun; Yang, Huili; Liu, Jinfeng; Gong, Huilin

    2018-04-01

    The Langshan range-front fault (LRF) is an active Holocene normal fault that borders Langshan Mountain and the Hetao Basin, northwest of the Ordos Plateau, China. In this study, paleoseismic trenching was undertaken at three sites (North-South): Dongshen village (TC1), Qingshan (TC2), and Wulanhashao (TC3). The paleoevents ED1, ED2, ED3 from TC1 were constrained to 6.0 ± 1.3, 9.6 ± 2.0, and 19.7 ± 4.2 ka, respectively. The single paleoevent (EQ1) from TC2 was constrained to about 6.7 ± 0.1 ka, and the paleoevents EW1, EW2, and EW3 from TC3 were constrained to 2.3 ± 0.4, 6.0 ± 1.0, and before 7.0 ka, respectively. With reference to previous research, the Holocene earthquake sequence of the LRF can be established as 2.30-2.43 (E1), 3.06-4.41 (E2), 6.71-6.80 (E3), 7.60-9.81 (E4), and 19.70 ± 4.20 (E5) ka BP. Events E1, E3, and E4 might have been caused by events with magnitudes of Mw 7.6-7.8 that ruptured the entire LRF. Event E2 might have been smaller magnitude, about M7.0, and ruptured only a portion of the fault. The vertical slip rate of the LRF at the Qingshan site is inferred as 0.9 or 1.4-1.6 mm/year in the last 6.8 ka. The slip rate at Wulanhashao is considered to have been close to, but not recurrence interval of 2500 years.

  1. Measurement of positron range in matter in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, B.E.; Christensen, N.L.

    1995-01-01

    Positron range is one factor that places a limitation on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) resolution. The distance a positron travels through matter before it annihilates with an electron is a function of its initial energy and the electron density of the medium. A strong magnetic field limits positron range when momentum components are transverse to the field. Measurement of positron range was determined by deconvolving the effects of detector response and radioactive distribution from the measured annihilation spread function. The annihilation spread function for a 0.5 mm bead of 68 Ga was measured with 0.2 and 1.0 mm wide slit collimators. Based on the annihilation spread function FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) for a 1.0 mm wide slit the median positron range in tissue equivalent material is 0.87, 0.50, 0.22 mm at 0, 5.0 and 9.4 T, respectively

  2. Acquisition and deconvolution of seismic signals by different methods to perform direct ground-force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Flavio; Schleifer, Andrea; Zgauc, Franco; Meneghini, Fabio; Petronio, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a novel borehole-seismic experiment in which we used different types of onshore-transient-impulsive and non-impulsive-surface sources together with direct ground-force recordings. The ground-force signals were obtained by baseplate load cells located beneath the sources, and by buried soil-stress sensors installed in the very shallow-subsurface together with accelerometers. The aim was to characterize the source's emission by its complex impedance, function of the near-field vibrations and soil stress components, and above all to obtain appropriate deconvolution operators to remove the signature of the sources in the far-field seismic signals. The data analysis shows the differences in the reference measurements utilized to deconvolve the source signature. As downgoing waves, we process the signals of vertical seismic profiles (VSP) recorded in the far-field approximation by an array of permanent geophones cemented at shallow-medium depth outside the casing of an instrumented well. We obtain a significant improvement in the waveform of the radiated seismic-vibrator signals deconvolved by ground force, similar to that of the seismograms generated by the impulsive sources, and demonstrates that the results obtained by different sources present low values in their repeatability norm. The comparison evidences the potentiality of the direct ground-force measurement approach to effectively remove the far-field source signature in VSP onshore data, and to increase the performance of permanent acquisition installations for time-lapse application purposes.

  3. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  4. Spatial filtering velocimeter for vehicle navigation with extended measurement range

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-05-01

    The idea of using spatial filtering velocimeter is proposed to provide accurate velocity information for vehicle autonomous navigation system. The presented spatial filtering velocimeter is based on a CMOS linear image sensor. The limited frame rate restricts high speed measurement of the vehicle. To extend measurement range of the velocimeter, a method of frequency shifting is put forward. Theoretical analysis shows that the frequency of output signal can be reduced and the measurement range can be doubled by this method when the shifting direction is set the same with that of image velocity. The approach of fast Fourier transform (FFT) is employed to obtain the power spectra of the spatially filtered signals. Because of limited frequency resolution of FFT, a frequency spectrum correction algorithm, called energy centrobaric correction, is used to improve the frequency resolution. The correction accuracy energy centrobaric correction is analyzed. Experiments are carried out to measure the moving surface of a conveyor belt. The experimental results show that the maximum measurable velocity is about 800deg/s without frequency shifting, 1600deg/s with frequency shifting, when the frame rate of the image is about 8117 Hz. Therefore, the measurement range is doubled by the method of frequency shifting. Furthermore, experiments were carried out to measure the vehicle velocity simultaneously using both the designed SFV and a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The measurement results of the presented SFV are coincident with that of the LDV, but with bigger fluctuation. Therefore, it has the potential of application to vehicular autonomous navigation.

  5. A story about estimation of a random field of boulders from incomplete seismic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2005-01-01

    deposits along the tunnel line. By use of this important distribution information and of the observed homogeneity of the seismic point source field together with the physical properties of diffraction it became possible to make the wanted prediction. During the excavation the found boulders were counted......This paper reports on the statistical interpretation of seismic diffraction measurements of boulder locations. The measurements are made in a corridor along the planned tunnel line for the later realized bored tunnel through the till deposits under the East Channel of the Great Belt in Denmark...... graphical registrations on seismograms do not make a proper interpretation possible without detailed knowledge about the joint distribution of the primary dimensions of the boulders. Therefore separate measurements were made of the dimensions of boulders deposited visibly on the cliff beaches of the Great...

  6. Large-Strain Monitoring Above a Longwall Coal Mine With GPS and Seismic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, P. L.; Andreatta, V.; Meertens, C. M.; Krahenbuhl, T.; Kenner, B.

    2001-12-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate continuous GPS measurements for use in mine safety studies, a joint GPS-seismic experiment was conducted at an underground longwall coal mine near Paonia, Colorado in June, 2001. Seismic and deformation signals were measured using prototype low-cost monitoring systems as a longwall panel was excavated 150 m beneath the site. Data from both seismic and GPS instruments were logged onto low-power PC-104 Linux computers which were networked using a wireless LAN. The seismic system under development at NIOSH/SRL is based on multiple distributed 8-channel 24-bit A/D converters. The GPS system uses a serial single-frequency (L1) receiver and UNAVCO's "Jstream" Java data logging software. For this experiment, a continuously operating dual-frequency GPS receiver was installed 2.4 km away to serve as a reference site. In addition to the continuously operating sites, 10 benchmarks were surveyed daily with short "rapid-static" occupations in order to provide greater spatial sampling. Two single-frequency sites were located 35 meters apart on a relatively steep north-facing slope. As mining progressed from the east, net displacements of 1.2 meters to the north and 1.65 meters of subsidence were observed over a period of 6 days. The east component exhibited up to 0.45 meters of eastward displacement (toward the excavation) followed by reverse movement to the west. This cycle, observed approximately two days earlier at the eastern L1 site, is consistent with a change in surface strain from tension to compression as the excavation front passed underneath. As this strain "wave" propagated across the field site, surface deformation underwent a cycle of tension crack nucleation, crack opening (up to 15 cm normal displacements), subsequent crack closure, and production of low-angle-thrust compressional deformation features. Analysis of seismic results, surface deformation, and additional survey results are presented.

  7. A generalized formulation for noise-based seismic velocity change measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, C.; Brenguier, F.; Boué, P.; Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Gordeev, E.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of continuous seismic velocity changes is a powerful tool for detecting seasonal variations in crustal structure, volcanic unrest, co- and post-seismic evolution of stress in fault areas or the effects of fluid injection. The standard approach for measuring such velocity changes relies on comparison of travel times in the coda of a set of seismic signals, usually noise-based cross-correlations retrieved at different dates, and a reference trace, usually a averaged function over dates. A good stability in both space and time of the noise sources is then the main assumption for reliable measurements. Unfortunately, these conditions are often not fulfilled, as it happens when ambient-noise sources are non-stationary, such as the emissions of low-frequency volcanic tremors.We propose a generalized formulation for retrieving continuous time series of noise-based seismic velocity changes without any arbitrary reference cross-correlation function. We set up a general framework for future applications of this technique performing synthetic tests. In particular, we study the reliability of the retrieved velocity changes in case of seasonal-type trends, transient effects (similar to those produced as a result of an earthquake or a volcanic eruption) and sudden velocity drops and recoveries as the effects of transient local source emissions. Finally, we apply this approach to a real dataset of noise cross-correlations. We choose the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (Kamchatka) as a case study where the recorded wavefield is hampered by loss of data and dominated by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources. Despite the mentioned wavefield contaminations, we retrieve clear seismic velocity drops associated with the eruptions of the Klyuchevskoy an the Tolbachik volcanoes in 2010 and 2012, respectively.

  8. Small Device For Short-Range Antenna Measurements Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a practical solution for implementing an antenna radiation pattern measurement device using optical fibers. It is suitable for anechoic chambers as well as short range channel sounding. The device is optimized for small size and provides a cheap and easy way to make optical antenna...

  9. Measuring the relativistic perigee advance with satellite laser ranging

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, L; Pavlis, E C

    2002-01-01

    The pericentric advance of a test body by a central mass is one of the classical tests of general relativity. Today, this effect is measured with radar ranging by the perihelion shift of Mercury and other planets in the gravitational field of the Sun, with a relative accuracy of the order of 10 sup - sup 2 -10 sup - sup 3. In this paper, we explore the possibility of a measurement of the pericentric advance in the gravitational field of Earth by analysing the laser-ranged data of some orbiting, or proposed, laser-ranged geodetic satellites. Such a measurement of the perigee advance would place limits on hypothetical, very weak, Yukawa-type components of the gravitational interaction with a finite range of the order of 10 sup 4 km. Thus, we show that, at the present level of knowledge of the orbital perturbations, the relative accuracy, achievable with suitably combined orbital elements of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, is of the order of 10 sup - sup 3. With the corresponding measured value of (2 + 2 gamma - beta)/3, ...

  10. Recoil range distribution measurement in 20Ne + 181Ta reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Goswami, A.; Guin, R.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate linear momentum transfer in various transfer channels in 20 Ne + 181 Ta, recoil range distribution measurements have been carried out at E lab = 180 MeV, populating significant number of l-waves above l crit

  11. Measurements of short-range ordering in Ni3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, J.K.; Ahn, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on extended electron energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) that has been used to measure short-range ordering in Ni 3 Al. Films of fcc Ni 3 Al with suppressed short-range order synthesized by vacuum evaporation of Ni 3 Al onto room temperature substrates. EXELFS data were taken from both Al K and Ni L 23 edges. The development of short-range order was observed after the samples were annealed for various times at temperatures below 350 degrees C. Upon comparison with ab initio planewave EXELFS calculations, it was found that the Warren-Cowley short-range order parameter a(1nn) changed by about -0.1 after 210 minutes of annealing at 150 degrees C

  12. Measuring the relativistic perigee advance with satellite laser ranging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C

    2002-01-01

    The pericentric advance of a test body by a central mass is one of the classical tests of general relativity. Today, this effect is measured with radar ranging by the perihelion shift of Mercury and other planets in the gravitational field of the Sun, with a relative accuracy of the order of 10 -2 -10 -3 . In this paper, we explore the possibility of a measurement of the pericentric advance in the gravitational field of Earth by analysing the laser-ranged data of some orbiting, or proposed, laser-ranged geodetic satellites. Such a measurement of the perigee advance would place limits on hypothetical, very weak, Yukawa-type components of the gravitational interaction with a finite range of the order of 10 4 km. Thus, we show that, at the present level of knowledge of the orbital perturbations, the relative accuracy, achievable with suitably combined orbital elements of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, is of the order of 10 -3 . With the corresponding measured value of (2 + 2γ - β)/3, by using η = 4β - γ - 3 from lunar laser ranging, we could get an estimate of the PPN parameters γ and β with an accuracy of the order of 10 -2 -10 -3 . Nevertheless, these accuracies would be substantially improved in the near future with the new Earth gravity field models by the CHAMP and GRACE missions. The use of the perigee of LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite), with a suitable combination of orbital residuals including also the node and the perigee of LAGEOS II, would also further improve the accuracy of the proposed measurement

  13. Comparison of shear-wave velocity measurements by crosshole, downhole and seismic cone penetration test methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suthaker, N.; Tweedie, R. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are an integral part of geotechnical studies for major structures and are an important tool in their design for site specific conditions such as site-specific earthquake response. This paper reported on a study in which shear wave velocities were measured at a proposed petrochemical plant site near Edmonton, Alberta. The proposed site is underlain by lacustrine clay, glacial till and upper Cretaceous clay shale and sandstone bedrock. The most commonly used methods for determining shear wave velocity include crosshole seismic tests, downhole seismic tests, and seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT). This paper presented the results of all 3 methods used in this study and provided a comparison of the various test methods and their limitations. The crosshole test results demonstrated a common trend of increasing shear wave velocity with depth to about 15 m, below which the velocities remained relatively constant. An anomaly was noted at one site, where the shear wave velocity was reduced at a zone corresponding to clay till containing stiff high plastic clay layers. The field study demonstrated that reasonable agreement in shear wave velocity measurements can be made using crosshole, downhole and seismic tests in the same soil conditions. The National Building Code states that the shear wave velocity is the fundamental method for determining site classification, thus emphasizing the importance of obtaining shear wave velocity measurements for site classification. It was concluded that an SCPT program can be incorporated into the field program without much increase in cost and can be supplemented by downhole or crosshole techniques. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Broadband Laser Ranging for Position Measurements in Shock Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Michelle; Bennett, Corey; Daykin, Edward; Younk, Patrick; Lalone, Brandon; Kostinski, Natalie

    2017-06-01

    Broadband laser ranging (BLR) is a recently developed measurement system that provides an attractive option for determining the position of shock-driven surfaces. This system uses broadband, picosecond (or femtosecond) laser pulses and a fiber interferometer to measure relative travel time to a target and to a reference mirror. The difference in travel time produces a delay difference between pulse replicas that creates a spectral beat frequency. The spectral beating is recorded in real time using a dispersive Fourier transform and an oscilloscope. BLR systems have been designed that measure position at 12.5-40 MHz with better than 100 micron accuracy over ranges greater than 10 cm. We will give an overview of the basic operating principles of these systems. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and by NSTec Contract DE-AC52-06NA25946.

  15. Lifetime measurements in the picosecond range: Achievements and Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, Reiner

    1999-01-01

    This contribution will review the recoil distance method (RDM), its current range of applications as well as future perspectives for the measurement of lifetimes in the picosecond range of excited nuclear levels. Recent Doppler-shift lifetime experiments with large gamma-ray spectrometers have achieved a new level of precision and sensitivity, providing new insights into nuclear structure physics. High precision RDM measurements of near-yrast states in various mass regions have revealed dynamic shape effects beyond the framework of collective models and have also allowed to study the interaction between coexisting shapes. The measurement of lifetimes in superdeformed bands has shown that lifetimes can be measured for nuclear excitations, which are only populated with a few percent of the production cross-section of a nucleus. These experiments have also enabled us to study the mechanism of the decay-out of superdeformed bands. Another example for the need of precise lifetime measurements is the recent verifications of the concept of 'magnetic rotation' in nuclei by the experimental observation of the characteristic drop of B(M1) values as a function of angular momentum. These recent breakthroughs have also opened new perspectives for the use of the RDM technique for more exotic regions of nuclei and nuclear excitations. Here the measurement of lifetimes in neutron rich nuclei, which are not accessible with conventional nuclear reactions using stable beams and targets, is of special interest. Possible experimental approaches and simple estimates for the feasibility of such experiments will be presented. (author)

  16. EVALUATION ON THE SEISMIC RESPONSE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ROAD EMBANKMENT BASED ON THE MODERATE EARTHQUAKE OBSERVATION AND THE MICROTREMOR MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yoshiya; Ichii, Koji; Yamada, Masayuki; Tokida, Ken-Ichi; Takezawa, Koichiro; Shibao, Susumu; Mitsushita, Junji; Murata, Akira; Furukawa, Aiko; Koizumi, Keigo

    Accurate evaluation on the seismic response characteristics of a road embankment is very important for the rational seismic assessment. However, in a lot of previous studies, the seismic response characteristics of an embankment were evaluated based on the results of shaking table test, centrifuge model test and dynamic FEM analysis. In this study, the transfer function and the shear wave velocity of a road embankment were evaluated based on the in-situ records of moderate earthquake observation and microtremor measurement. Test results show the possibility that the shear wave velocity of an embankment can be estimated by the earthquake observation or the microtremor measurement and the dynamic linear FEM analysis.

  17. Advances in crosshole seismic measurements to characterise and monitor the internal condition of embankment dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazinkhoo, S.; Anderlini, C.; Gaffran, P. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Jefferies, M. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The WAC Bennett Dam Sinkhole investigation project was launched in June 1996 in British Columbia following the discovery of a sinkhole. This paper provided information on crosshole seismic velocity testing that was conducted at the WAC Bennett Dam, along with background information on the methods developed to interpret the results of crosshole seismic testing that has been conducted on an annual basis at the dam since 1996. Additional laboratory and field testing conducted at the Mica and Revelstoke dams were also reviewed with particular focus on how the results have improved the interpretation and assessment methods. This paper described the laboratory testing program which consisted of bender element tests, in which shear wave velocities were measured under controlled void ratio, stress and fines content conditions, and critical state triaxial tests to determine the Critical State Lines (CSLs). It was concluded that crosshole seismic shear wave velocity measurements have proven to be a very useful tool for monitoring void ratio and stress conditions at the WAC Bennett Dam and continue to be employed at the dam on an annual basis. Variations in shear wave velocity can be correlated to local construction features at the WAC Bennett and other BC Hydro dams. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  18. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  19. Effective seismic acceleration measurements for low-cost Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentaris, Fragkiskos; Makris, John P.

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing demand on cost effective Structural Health Monitoring systems for buildings as well as important and/or critical constructions. The front end for all these systems is the accelerometer. We present a comparative study of two low cost MEMS accelaration sensors against a very sensitive, high dynamic range strong motion accelerometer of force balance type but much more expensive. A real experiment was realized by deploying the three sesnors in a reinforced concrete building of the premises of TEI of Crete at Chania Crete, an earthquake prone region. The analysis of the collected accelararion data from many seismic events indicates that all sensors are able to efficiently reveal the seismic response of the construction in terms of PSD. Furthermore, it is shown that coherence diagrams between excitation and response of the building under study, depict structural characteristics but also the seismic energy distribution. This work is supported by the Archimedes III Program of the Ministry of Education of Greece, through the Operational Program "Educational and Lifelong Learning", in the framework of the project entitled "Interdisciplinary Multi-Scale Research of Earthquake Physics and Seismotectonics at the front of the Hellenic Arc (IMPACT-ARC)" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds.

  20. An overview of Broadband Laser Ranging Architecture and Measurement Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Edward; La Lone, Brandon; Miller, Edward; Younk, Patrick; Bennett, Corey; Catenacci, Jared; LLNL BLR Development Group Collaboration; LANL BLR Development Group Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Broadband Laser Ranging (BLR) is a developmental diagnostic intended to measure the position of rapidly moving surfaces in combination with optical velocimetry. Design and employment of a BLR diagnostic on dynamic experiments requires consideration for both the inherent measurement system tradeoffs as well as architectural choices appropriate to the nature of investigation. The diagnostic uses spectral interferometry to measure distance by mapping femtosecond laser pulses to the time domain via chromatic dispersion within the fiber-optic architecture. The system parameters and governing equations that describe measurement range, resolution, and Doppler sensitivity will be discussed. We will also briefly review the impact of diagnostic architectural choices including: nature of interferometer, Interferometric dispersion matching, optical amplification, integration of optical velocimetry, BLR calibration, and field operability. To summarize we will present the architectural and operational approach currently being pursued by NSTec within an on-going collaboration between NSTec, Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos National Labs. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. MTF measurement of IR optics in different temperature ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alexander; Duncker, Hannes; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2017-10-01

    Infrared (IR) optical systems are at the core of many military, civilian and manufacturing applications and perform mission critical functions. To reliably fulfill the demanding requirements imposed on today's high performance IR optics, highly accurate, reproducible and fast lens testing is of crucial importance. Testing the optical performance within different temperature ranges becomes key in many military applications. Due to highly complex IR-Applications in the fields of aerospace, military and automotive industries, MTF Measurement under realistic environmental conditions become more and more relevant. A Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) test bench with an integrated thermal chamber allows measuring several sample sizes in a temperature range from -40 °C to +120°C. To reach reliable measurement results under these difficult conditions, a specially developed temperature stable design including an insulating vacuum are used. The main function of this instrument is the measurement of the MTF both on- and off-axis at up to +/-70° field angle, as well as measurement of effective focal length, flange focal length and distortion. The vertical configuration of the system guarantees a small overall footprint. By integrating a high-resolution IR camera with focal plane array (FPA) in the detection unit, time consuming measurement procedures such as scanning slit with liquid nitrogen cooled detectors can be avoided. The specified absolute accuracy of +/- 3% MTF is validated using internationally traceable reference optics. Together with a complete and intuitive software solution, this makes the instrument a turn-key device for today's state-of- the-art optical testing.

  2. An Observability Metric for Underwater Vehicle Localization Using Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Arrichiello

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses observability issues related to the general problem of single and multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV localization using only range measurements. While an AUV is submerged, localization devices, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems, are ineffective, due to the attenuation of electromagnetic waves. AUV localization based on dead reckoning techniques and the use of affordable motion sensor units is also not practical, due to divergence caused by sensor bias and drift. For these reasons, localization systems often build on trilateration algorithms that rely on the measurements of the ranges between an AUV and a set of fixed transponders using acoustic devices. Still, such solutions are often expensive, require cumbersome calibration procedures and only allow for AUV localization in an area that is defined by the geometrical arrangement of the transponders. A viable alternative for AUV localization that has recently come to the fore exploits the use of complementary information on the distance from the AUV to a single transponder, together with information provided by on-board resident motion sensors, such as, for example, depth, velocity and acceleration measurements. This concept can be extended to address the problem of relative localization between two AUVs equipped with acoustic sensors for inter-vehicle range measurements. Motivated by these developments, in this paper, we show that both the problems of absolute localization of a single vehicle and the relative localization of multiple vehicles can be treated using the same mathematical framework, and tailoring concepts of observability derived for nonlinear systems, we analyze how the performance in localization depends on the types of motion imparted to the AUVs. For this effect, we propose a well-defined observability metric and validate its usefulness, both in simulation and by carrying out experimental tests with a real marine vehicle during which the

  3. Seismic monitoring of an Underground Repository in Salt - Results of the measurements at the Gorleben Exploratory mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    We have measured seismic and acoustic signals from various mining activities in the Gorleben exploratory mine in Germany, underground at -840 m and at the surface, tasked by the German Support Programme to the IAEA, in order to provide basic knowledge on the detectability of undeclared activities. During 7 weeks total nearly all sources of sound and vibration available in the mine were covered, with sensors at several positions and sources at several sites, sometimes with background signals from on-going exploration elsewhere. The peak-to-peak values of vibration velocity, referred to 100 m distance, range from tenths of micro metres/second for a hand-held chain saw via few μm/s to tens of μm/s for other tools such as picking, for vehicles, drilling and sledge-hammer blows. A grader with compactor plates produces hundreds, and a blast shot around one hundred thousand μm/s. The last two sources could be detected at the surface, too, at about 1.1 km slant distance; blasts were even seen at 5-6 km distance. The signal strengths vary by a factor 2 to 5 for similar conditions. Fitted by a power law, the decrease with distance is with an exponent mostly between -2 and -1. Spectra of seismic signals from periodic sources (such as percussion drilling or vehicle engines) show harmonic series. Rock removal, e.g. by drilling, produces broad-band excitation up to several kilohertz. Acoustic-seismic coupling is relevant. Monitoring could be done with an underground geophone “fence” around the repository, e.g. 500 m from the salt-dome margin and possibly in the salt 1 km off the repository. With that excavation by drilling and blasting could be detected by a simple amplitude criterion. Under which conditions excavation by tunnel boring machine or road header machine and other weaker activities could be detected needs to be studied.

  4. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  5. Monitoring methane emission of mud volcanoes by seismic tremor measurements: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Albarello

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for estimating methane emission at mud volcanoes is here proposed based on measurements of the seismic tremor on their surface. Data obtained at the Dashgil mud volcano in Azerbaijan reveal the presence of energy bursts characterized by well-determined features (i.e. waveforms, spectra and polarization properties that can be associated with bubbling at depth. Counting such events provides a possible tool for monitoring gas production in the reservoir, thus minimizing logistic troubles and representing a cheap and effective alternative to more complex approaches. Specifically, we model the energy bursts as the effect of resonant gas bubbles at depth. This modelling allows to estimate the dimension of the bubbles and, consequently, the gas outflow from the main conduit in the assumption that all emissions from depth occur by bubble uprising. The application of this model to seismic events detected at the Dashgil mud volcano during three sessions of measurements carried out in 2006 and 2007 provides gas flux estimates that are in line with those provided by independent measurements at the same structure. This encouraging result suggests that the one here proposed could be considered a new promising, cheap and easy to apply tool for gas flux measurements in bubbling gas seepage areas.

  6. Model-based cartilage thickness measurement in the submillimeter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streekstra, G. J.; Strackee, S. D.; Maas, M.; Wee, R. ter; Venema, H. W.

    2007-01-01

    Current methods of image-based thickness measurement in thin sheet structures utilize second derivative zero crossings to locate the layer boundaries. It is generally acknowledged that the nonzero width of the point spread function (PSF) limits the accuracy of this measurement procedure. We propose a model-based method that strongly reduces PSF-induced bias by incorporating the PSF into the thickness estimation method. We estimated the bias in thickness measurements in simulated thin sheet images as obtained from second derivative zero crossings. To gain insight into the range of sheet thickness where our method is expected to yield improved results, sheet thickness was varied between 0.15 and 1.2 mm with an assumed PSF as present in the high-resolution modes of current computed tomography (CT) scanners [full width at half maximum (FWHM) 0.5-0.8 mm]. Our model-based method was evaluated in practice by measuring layer thickness from CT images of a phantom mimicking two parallel cartilage layers in an arthrography procedure. CT arthrography images of cadaver wrists were also evaluated, and thickness estimates were compared to those obtained from high-resolution anatomical sections that served as a reference. The thickness estimates from the simulated images reveal that the method based on second derivative zero crossings shows considerable bias for layers in the submillimeter range. This bias is negligible for sheet thickness larger than 1 mm, where the size of the sheet is more than twice the FWHM of the PSF but can be as large as 0.2 mm for a 0.5 mm sheet. The results of the phantom experiments show that the bias is effectively reduced by our method. The deviations from the true thickness, due to random fluctuations induced by quantum noise in the CT images, are of the order of 3% for a standard wrist imaging protocol. In the wrist the submillimeter thickness estimates from the CT arthrography images correspond within 10% to those estimated from the anatomical

  7. Applicability of reflection seismic measurements in detailed characterization of crystalline bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireni, S.

    2011-03-01

    known geological feature had no reflector. Reflection seismic measurements can be used in detailed characterization of crystalline bedrock. Wide brittle fault zones and lithological contacts but also single fractures were detected. However, interpretation is challenging and geological and geophysical reference material is needed. All the expected features were not detected and the explanations were not always fully satisfying. (orig.)

  8. Seismic amplitude measurements suggest foreshocks have different focal mechanisms than aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, A.; Fuis, G.; Mantis, C.

    1978-01-01

    The ratio of the amplitudes of P and S waves from the foreshocks and aftershocks to three recent California earthquakes show a characteristic change at the time of the main events. As this ratio is extremely sensitive to small changes in the orientation of the fault plane, a small systematic change in stress or fault configuration in the source region may be inferred. These results suggest an approach to the recognition of foreshocks based on simple measurements of the amplitudes of seismic waves. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  9. Correlations, spectral composition and interaction character of seismic and atmospheric geophysical fields in the 1-4 hours period range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, L.N.

    1995-01-01

    Results of analysis of synchronized observations of seismic oscillations ans near-surface atmosphere pressure variations are presented. Similar spectra structure and high levels of coherency coefficients point out the existence of correlational links between them. The conclusion on the necessity of the investigation of the links is made. H hypothesis on possible gravity mechanism of induceing the oscillations in the analyzed geophysical fields is proposed. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Lifetime measurements in the picosecond range: achievements and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent developments in the measurement of lifetimes in the picosecond range using the recoil distance method (RDM) are reviewed. Results from recent RDM experiments on superdeformed bands in the mass-190 region, shears, bands in the neutron deficient lead isotopes, and ground state bands in the mass-130 region are presented. New experimental devices for lifetime experiments at Yale, such as the New Yale Plunger Device (N.Y.P.D.), the SPEctrometer for Doppler-shift Experiments at Yale (SPEEDY) and the plans for the gas-filled recoil separator SASSYER are presented. Perspectives for the use of the RDM technique in the study of exotic nuclei and its potential use with radioactive beams are discussed. (author)

  11. Picosecond X-ray streak camera dynamic range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, C., E-mail: celine.zuber@cea.fr; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Gontier, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rubbelynck, C.; Trosseille, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Fronty, J.-P.; Goulmy, C. [Photonis SAS, Avenue Roger Roncier, BP 520, 19106 Brive Cedex (France)

    2016-09-15

    Streak cameras are widely used to record the spatio-temporal evolution of laser-induced plasma. A prototype of picosecond X-ray streak camera has been developed and tested by Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives to answer the Laser MegaJoule specific needs. The dynamic range of this instrument is measured with picosecond X-ray pulses generated by the interaction of a laser beam and a copper target. The required value of 100 is reached only in the configurations combining the slowest sweeping speed and optimization of the streak tube electron throughput by an appropriate choice of high voltages applied to its electrodes.

  12. AN INDUCTION SENSOR FOR MEASURING CURRENTS OF NANOSECOND RANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Shalamov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A current meter based on the principle of electromagnetic induction is designed to register the current flowing in the rod lightning. The aim of the article is to describe the way of increasing the sensitivity of the converter by means of their serial communication. Methodology. The recorded current is in the nanosecond range. If compared with other methods, meters based on the principle of electromagnetic induction have several advantages, such as simplicity of construction, reliability, low cost, no need in a power source, relatively high sensitivity. Creation of such a meter is necessary, because in some cases there is no possibility to use a shunt. Transient properties of a meter are determined by the number of turns and the constant of integration. Sensitivity is determined by measuring the number of turns, the coil sectional area, the core material and the integration constant. For measuring the magnetic field pulses with a rise time of 5 ns to 50 ns a meter has turns from 5 to 15. The sensitivity of such a meter is low. When the number of turns is increased, the output signal and the front increase. Earlier described dependencies were used to select the main parameters of the converter. It was based on generally accepted and widely known equivalent circuit. The experience of created earlier pulse magnetic field meters was considered both for measuring the magnetic fields, and large pulse current. Originality. Series connection of converters has the property of a long line. The level of the transient response of the meter is calculated. The influence of parasitic parameters on the type of meter transient response is examined. The shown construction was not previously described. Practical value. The results of meter implementation are given. The design peculiarities of the given measuring instruments are shown.

  13. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  14. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J N; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2009-01-08

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir-Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction.

  15. Ionospheric Coherence Bandwidth Measurements in the Lower VHF Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) experiment consists of a satellite-based radio receiver suite to study various aspects of trans-ionospheric signal propagation and detection in four frequency bands, 2 - 55 MHz, 125 - 175 MHz, 365 - 415 MHz and 820 - 1100 MHz. In this paper, we present simultaneous ionospheric coherence bandwidth and S4 scintillation index measurements in the 32 - 44 MHz frequency range collected during the ESCINT equatorial scintillation experiment. 40-MHz continuous wave (CW) and 32 - 44 MHz swept frequency signals were transmitted simultaneously to the RFProp receiver suite from the Reagan Test Site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands (8.7° N, 167.7° E) in three separate campaigns during the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. Results show coherence bandwidths as small as ~ 1 kHz for strong scintillation (S4 > 0.7) and indicate a high degree of ionospheric variability and irregularity on 10-m spatial scales. Spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities are also observed and are dominant at low elevation angles. The results are compared to previous measurements and available scaling laws.

  16. German seismic regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danisch, Ruediger

    2002-01-01

    Rules and regulations for seismic design in Germany cover the following: seismic design of conventional buildings; and seismic design of nuclear facilities. Safety criteria for NPPs, accident guidelines, and guidelines for PWRs as well as safety standards are cited. Safety standards concerned with NPPs seismic design include basic principles, soil analysis, design of building structures, design of mechanical and electrical components, seismic instrumentation, and measures to be undertaken after the earthquake

  17. Measuring co-seismic deformation of the Sichuan earthquake by satellite differential INSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Gong, Wenyu; Zhang, Jixian

    2008-12-01

    The Sichuan Earthquake, occurred on May 12, 2008, is the strongest earthquake to hit China since the 1976 Tangshan earthquake. The earthquake had a magnitude of M 8.0, and caused surface deformation greater than 3 meters. This paper presents the research work of measuring the co-seismic deformations of the earthquake with satellite differential interferometric SAR technique. Four L-band SAR images were used to form the interferogram with 2 pre- scenes imaged on Feb 17, 2008 and 2 post- scenes on May 19, 2008. The Digital Elevation Models extracted from 1:50,000-scale national geo-spatial database were used to remove the topographic contribution and form a differential interferogram. The interferogram presents very high coherence in most areas, although the pre- and post- images were acquired with time interval of 92 days. This indicates that the L-band PALSAR sensor is very powerful for interferometry applications. The baseline error is regarded as the main phase error source in the differential interferogram. Due to the difficulties of doing field works immediately after the earthquake, only one deformation measurement recorded by a permanent GPS station is obtained for this research. An approximation method is proposed to eliminate the orbital phase error with one control point. The derived deformation map shows similar spatial pattern and deformation magnitude compared with deformation field generated by seismic inversion method.

  18. Investigating Efficiency of Vector-Valued Intensity Measures in Seismic Demand Assessment of Concrete Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alembagheri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of vector-valued intensity measures for predicting the seismic demand in gravity dams is investigated. The Folsom gravity dam-reservoir coupled system is selected and numerically analyzed under a set of two-hundred actual ground motions. First, the well-defined scalar IMs are separately investigated, and then they are coupled to form two-parameter vector IMs. After that, IMs consisting of spectral acceleration at the first-mode natural period of the dam-reservoir system along with a measure of the spectral shape (the ratio of spectral acceleration at a second period to the first-mode spectral acceleration value are considered. It is attempted to determine the optimal second period by categorizing the spectral acceleration at the first-mode period of vibration. The efficiency of the proposed vector IMs is compared with scalar ones considering various structural responses as EDPs. Finally, the probabilistic seismic behavior of the dam is investigated by calculating its fragility curves employing scalar and vector IMs considering the effect of zero response values.

  19. A Comparison between Oceanographic Parameters and Seafloor Pressures; Measured, Theoretical and Modelled, and Terrestrial Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Sarah; Bean, Christopher; Craig, David; Dias, Frederic; Christodoulides, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Microseisms are continuous seismic vibrations which propagate mainly as surface Rayleigh and Love waves. They are generated by the Earth's oceans and there are two main types; primary and secondary microseisms. Primary microseisms are generated through the interaction of travelling surface gravity ocean waves with the seafloor in shallow waters relative to the wavelength of the ocean wave. Secondary microseisms, on the other hand are generated when two opposing wave trains interact and a non-linear second order effect produces a pressure fluctuation which is depth independent. The conditions necessary to produce secondary microseisms are presented in Longuet-Higgins (1950) through the interaction of two travelling waves with the same wave period and which interact at an angle of 180 degrees. Equivalent surface pressure density (p2l) is modelled using the numerical ocean wave model Wavewatch III and this term is considered as the microseism source term. This work presents an investigation of the theoretical second order pressures generated through the interaction of travelling waves with varying wave amplitude, period and angle of incidence. Predicted seafloor pressures calculated off the Southwest coast of Ireland are compared with terrestrially recorded microseism records, measured seafloor pressures and oceanographic parameters. The work presented in this study suggests that a broad set of sea states can generate second order seafloor pressures that are consistent with seafloor pressure measurements. Local seismic arrays throughout Ireland allow us to investigate the temporal covariance of these seafloor pressures with microseism source locations.

  20. Mobile seismic exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dräbenstedt, A., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de; Seyfried, V. [Research & Development, Polytec GmbH, Waldbronn (Germany); Cao, X.; Rembe, C., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Institute of Electrical Information Technology, TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Polom, U., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Leibniz Institute of Applied Geophysics, Hannover (Germany); Pätzold, F.; Hecker, P. [Institute of Flight Guidance, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Zeller, T. [Clausthaler Umwelttechnik Institut CUTEC, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  1. Detecting earthquakes over a seismic network using single-station similarity measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Karianne J.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2018-06-01

    New blind waveform-similarity-based detection methods, such as Fingerprint and Similarity Thresholding (FAST), have shown promise for detecting weak signals in long-duration, continuous waveform data. While blind detectors are capable of identifying similar or repeating waveforms without templates, they can also be susceptible to false detections due to local correlated noise. In this work, we present a set of three new methods that allow us to extend single-station similarity-based detection over a seismic network; event-pair extraction, pairwise pseudo-association, and event resolution complete a post-processing pipeline that combines single-station similarity measures (e.g. FAST sparse similarity matrix) from each station in a network into a list of candidate events. The core technique, pairwise pseudo-association, leverages the pairwise structure of event detections in its network detection model, which allows it to identify events observed at multiple stations in the network without modeling the expected moveout. Though our approach is general, we apply it to extend FAST over a sparse seismic network. We demonstrate that our network-based extension of FAST is both sensitive and maintains a low false detection rate. As a test case, we apply our approach to 2 weeks of continuous waveform data from five stations during the foreshock sequence prior to the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquake. Our method identifies nearly five times as many events as the local seismicity catalogue (including 95 per cent of the catalogue events), and less than 1 per cent of these candidate events are false detections.

  2. Seismic Attenuation of Teleseismic Body Waves in Cascadia, Measured on the Amphibious Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilon, Z.; Abers, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    previous studies using surface waves and contributes to our developing understanding of anelastic controls on seismic parameters by probing the Earth in a different frequency range.

  3. CENTIMETER COSMO-SKYMED RANGE MEASUREMENTS FOR MONITORING GROUND DISPLACEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fratarcangeli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery are widely used in order to monitor displacements impacting the Earth surface and infrastructures. The main remote sensing technique to extract sub-centimeter information from SAR imagery is the Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR, based on the phase information only. However, it is well known that DInSAR technique may suffer for lack of coherence among the considered stack of images. New Earth observation SAR satellite sensors, as COSMO-SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, and the coming PAZ, can acquire imagery with high amplitude resolutions too, up to few decimeters. Thanks to this feature, and to the on board dual frequency GPS receivers, allowing orbits determination with an accuracy at few centimetres level, the it was proven by different groups that TerraSAR-X imagery offer the capability to achieve, in a global reference frame, 3D positioning accuracies in the decimeter range and even better just exploiting the slant-range measurements coming from the amplitude information, provided proper corrections of all the involved geophysical phenomena are carefully applied. The core of this work is to test this methodology on COSMO-SkyMed data acquired over the Corvara area (Bolzano – Northern Italy, where, currently, a landslide with relevant yearly displacements, up to decimeters, is monitored, using GPS survey and DInSAR technique. The leading idea is to measure the distance between the satellite and a well identifiable natural or artificial Persistent Scatterer (PS, taking in account the signal propagation delays through the troposphere and ionosphere and filtering out the known geophysical effects that induce periodic and secular ground displacements. The preliminary results here presented and discussed indicate that COSMO-SkyMed Himage imagery appear able to guarantee a displacements monitoring with an accuracy of few centimetres using only the amplitude data, provided few (at least one stable PS’s are

  4. Physical measurements for ion range verification in charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, M.

    2010-10-01

    This PhD thesis reports on the experimental investigation of the prompt photons created during the fragmentation of the carbon beam used in particle therapy. Two series of experiments have been performed at the GANIL and GSI facilities with 95 MeV/u and 305 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ion beams stopped in PMMA and water phantoms. In both experiments a clear correlation was obtained between the C-ion range and the prompt photon profile. A major issue of these measurements is the discrimination between the prompt photon signal (which is correlated with the ion path) and a vast neutron background uncorrelated with the Bragg-Peak position. Two techniques are employed to allow for this photon-neutron discrimination: the time-of-flight (TOF) and the pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD). The TOF technique allowed demonstrating the correlation of the prompt photon production and the primary ion path while the PSD technique brought great insights to better understand the photon and neutron contribution in TOF spectra. In this work we demonstrated that a collimated set-up detecting prompt photons by means of TOF measurements, could allow real-time control of the longitudinal position of the Bragg-peak under clinical conditions. In the second part of the PhD thesis a simulation study was performed with Geant4 Monte Carlo code to assess the influence of the main design parameters on the efficiency and spatial resolution achievable with a multidetector and multi-collimated Prompt Gamma Camera. Several geometrical configurations for both collimators and stack of detectors have been systematically studied and the considerations on the main design constraints are reported. (author)

  5. Carbon monoxide degassing from seismic fault zones in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutao; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Zheng, Guodong; Li, Jing; Shi, Hongyu; Guo, Zhengfu; Du, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Degassing of carbon monoxide (CO), which plays a significant role in the contribution of deep carbon to the atmosphere, commonly occurs within active fault zones. CO degassing from soil to the atmosphere in the Basin and Range province, west of Beijing (BRPB), China, was investigated by in-situ field measurements in the active fault zones. The measured concentrations of CO in soil gas in the BRPB ranged from 0.29 × 10-6 to 1.1 × 10-6 with a mean value of 0.6 × 10-6, which is approximately twice as large as that in the atmosphere. Net fluxes of CO degassing ranged from -48.6 mg m-2 d-1 to 12.03 mg m-2 d-1. The diffusion of CO from soil to the atmosphere in the BRPB was estimated to be at least 7.6 × 103 ton/a, which is comparable to the corresponding result of about 1.2 × 104 ton/a for CO2. CO concentrations were spatially heterogeneous with clearly higher concentrations along the NE-SW trending in the BRPB. These elevated values of CO concentrations were also coincident with the region with low-velocity and high conductivity in deep mantle, and high Poisson's ratio in the crust, thereby suggesting that CO degassing from the soil might be linked to upwelling of the asthenospheric mantle. Other sources of CO in the soil gas are suggested to be dominated by chemical reactions between deep fluids and carbonate minerals (e.g., dolomite, limestone, and siderite) in country rocks. Biogenic processes may also contribute to the CO in soil gas. The spatial distribution patterns of CO concentrations are coincident with the stress field, suggesting that the concentrations of CO could be a potential indicator for crustal stress field and, hence is potential useful for earthquake monitoring in the BRPB.

  6. Measurement of seismic moments at the RSTN station RSSD for NTS explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, S.R.; Patton, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have estimated the seismic moment for two Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions (Nebbiolo, 6/24/82; Atrisco, 8/5/82) at the Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) station in South Dakota (RSSD; distance from NTS approx. 1280 km). The moments are calculated from the vertical component mid-period channel for the Rayleigh waves and the merged mid- and short-period band for the P waves. The moment estimates from surface waves give values of 1.0 x 10 23 and 2.0 x 10 23 dyn-cm for Nebbiolo and Atrisco, respectively. The body-wave moments obtained at 0.5 Hz are approximately five times greater than those from surface waves and give values of 4.8 x 10 23 and 1.0 x 10 24 dyn-cm for Nebbiolo and Atrisco, respectively. The apparent discrepancy between the body and surface-wave moments can be resolved if there is overshoot (of 5:1) in the explosion source spectrum. As a check on the absolute value of the surface-wave moments, we compared them to moment values predicted from empirical moment-yield relationships for different emplacement media at NTS (Patton, 1983). We found that the agreement between observed and predicted values is satisfactory, within the measurement error on the moments at the one sigma level

  7. The results of measurements of induced seismic vibration at the Zemplínska Široká and Malý Horeš localities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Tometz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary invocation seismic waves, which are presently produced by the seismic survey of the upper part of earth crust, can have anfavourable impact on buildings and other engineering works. Therefore, their measurement and monitoring is required. In 2006, Nafta a. s. company conducted underground an a seismic survey in the south part of East Slovak Basin. During this survey, measurements of seismic effects on engineering objects were carried out, whose results suggest a possible negative impact of invocation seismic vibration. From the experimentally measured data was defined an absorption law of seismic waves, which was used to determine safe distances of a sourceof undulation from a receptor. The presented paper suggests a methodologics measurements and a difference in the velocity of wavepropagation in various geological environs.

  8. Laboratory measurements of the seismic velocities and other petrophysical properties of the Outokumpu deep drill core samples, eastern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbra, Tiiu; Karlqvist, Ronnie; Lassila, Ilkka; Høgström, Edward; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2011-01-01

    Petrophysical, in particular seismic velocity, measurements of the Outokumpu deep drill core (depth 2.5 km) have been carried out to characterize the geophysical nature of the Paleoproterozoic crustal section of eastern Finland and to find lithological and geophysical interpretations to the distinct crustal reflectors as observed in seismic surveys. The results show that different lithological units can be identified based on the petrophysical data. The density of the samples remained nearly constant throughout the drilled section. Only diopside-tremolite skarns and black schists exhibit higher densities. The samples are dominated by the paramagnetic behaviour with occasional ferromagnetic signature caused by serpentinitic rocks. Large variations in seismic velocities, both at ambient pressure and under in situ crustal conditions are observed. The porosity of the samples, which is extremely low, is either intrinsic by nature or caused by decompaction related to fracturing during the core retrieval. It is noteworthy that these microfractures have dramatically lowered the VP and VS values. From the measured velocities and density data we have calculated the seismic impedances, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratios for the lithological units of the Outokumpu section and from these data the reflection coefficients for the major lithological boundaries, evident in the surveyed section, were determined. The data show that the strong and distinct reflections visible in wide-angle seismic surveys are caused by interfaces between diopside-tremolite skarn and either serpentinites, mica schist or black schist.

  9. Cenozoic exhumation and tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range, northern Tibetan Plateau: Insights from the heavy mineral compositions, detrital zircon U-Pb ages and seismic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Wu, C.; Wang, J.; Zhou, T.; Zhang, C.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin is the largest intermountain basin within the Tibetan Plateau. The Cenozoic sedimentary flling characteristics of the basin was significantly influenced by the surrounding tectonic belt, such as the Altyn Tagh Range to the north-west and Qimen Tagh Range to the south. The tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range and the structural relationship between the Qaidam Basin and Qimen Tagh Range remain controversial. To address these issues, we analyzed thousands of heavy mineral data, 720 detrital zircon ages and seismic data of the Qaidam Basin. Based on the regional geological framework and our kinematic analyses, the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Qimen Tagh Range can be divided into two stages. From the Early Eocene to the Middle Miocene, the Devonian (400-360 Ma) and Permian to Triassic (300-200 Ma) zircons which were sourced from the Qimen Tagh Range and the heavy mineral assemblage of zircon-leucoxene-garnet-sphene on the north flank of the Qimen Tagh Range indicated that the Qimen Tagh Range has been exhumed before the Eocene and acted as the primary provenance of the Qaidam Basin. The Kunbei fault system (i.e. the Kunbei, Arlar and Hongliuquan faults) in the southwest of the Qaidam Basin, which can be seen as a natural study window of the Qimen Tagh Range, was characterized by left-lateral strike-slip faults and weak south-dipping thrust faults based on the seismic sections. This strike-slip motion was generated by the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau caused by the onset of the Indian-Eurasian collision. Since the Middle Miocene, the primary mineral assemblages along the northern flank of the Qimen Tagh Range changed from the zircon-leucoxene-garnet-sphene assemblage to the epidote-hornblende-garnet-leucoxene assemblage. Simultaneously, the Kunbei fault system underwent intense south-dipping thrusting, and a nearly 2.2-km uplift can be observed in the hanging wall of the Arlar fault. We attributed these variations to the rapid uplift event of

  10. Assessment of effectiveness of anti-seismic measures in stabilization project of ChNPP shelter object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrat'ev, S.N.; Kritskij, V.B.; Ryzhov, D.I.; Shugajlo, A.P.; Shugajlo, Al.P.; Prabkhakara, M.

    2004-01-01

    The major factors, which may lead to the collapse of the Shelter object (SO) civil structures, are extreme natural phenomena and among them earthquake. In order to raise the resistance of the SO civil structure to seismic and other significant loads and to reduce the risk of their collapse ChNPP requested KSK Consortium to develop the SO Detailed Design for stabilization. At the present work the results of assessment of anti-seismic measures are given based on results of a technical review of the Detailed Design

  11. The Construction and Calibration of a LADAR (Laser Detection and Ranging) Cross-Section Measurement Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    resonator optics consist of two porro prisms which are oriented 900 from one another about the cavity’s optical axis. In other words, the roof edges of each... prism are perpendicular to one another. The Nd:YAG laser rod measures 5 mm in diameter by 75 mm long and is optically pumped by a Xenon flashlamp. Q...Switching of the laser is performed by a Pockels Cell. A dielectric polarizer is sealed between two right angle prisms which are joined symetrically

  12. Measurements on the extended range of the wake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbartzki, G.J.; Kroesing, G; Neuburger, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Coulomb explosion of H 2 + -ions at 28 MeV is used to probe the wake over a range of about 400 A in Al. Preliminary results give food agreement with the wavelength prediction of the simple plasma oscillation wake model. (author)

  13. Assessing the small-strain soil stiffness for offshore wind turbines based on in situ seismic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteijlen, W.G.; Van Dalen, K.N.; Metrikine, A.; Hamre, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, in situ seismic measurements are used to derive the small-strain shear modulus of soil as input for two soil-structure interaction (SSI) models to assess the initial soil stiffness for offshore wind turbine foundations. This stiffness has a defining influence on the first

  14. Extending the range of turbidity measurement using polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Justin S.

    2017-11-21

    Turbidity measurements are obtained by directing a polarized optical beam to a scattering sample. Scattered portions of the beam are measured in orthogonal polarization states to determine a scattering minimum and a scattering maximum. These values are used to determine a degree of polarization of the scattered portions of the beam, and concentrations of scattering materials or turbidity can be estimated using the degree of polarization. Typically, linear polarizations are used, and scattering is measured along an axis that orthogonal to the direction of propagation of the polarized optical beam.

  15. Intensity autocorrelation measurements of frequency combs in the terahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea-Chelmus, Ileana-Cristina; Rösch, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    We report on direct measurements of the emission character of quantum cascade laser based frequency combs, using intensity autocorrelation. Our implementation is based on fast electro-optic sampling, with a detection spectral bandwidth matching the emission bandwidth of the comb laser, around 2.5 THz. We find the output of these frequency combs to be continuous even in the locked regime, but accompanied by a strong intensity modulation. Moreover, with our record temporal resolution of only few hundreds of femtoseconds, we can resolve correlated intensity modulation occurring on time scales as short as the gain recovery time, about 4 ps. By direct comparison with pulsed terahertz light originating from a photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate the peculiar emission pattern of these lasers. The measurement technique is self-referenced and ultrafast, and requires no reconstruction. It will be of significant importance in future measurements of ultrashort pulses from quantum cascade lasers.

  16. Determination of the range of control limits in radioimmunoassay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiori, A.M.C.

    1981-01-01

    A grouping technique is proposed for control limits in radioimmunoassay measurements. It has the advantage of working with control limits of 99.7% without the inconvenience of the confidence intervals. The method is practical and simple. It provides considerable flexibility for the processing of data. As the number of samples increases, the control limits become better defined. (author) [es

  17. Lifetime measurements in the 10-13 s range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, Dzh.; Foa, L.; Dzhordzhi, M.

    1984-01-01

    Semiconducting detectors used in experimental high energy physics are described. Performances of Ge- and Si detectors and telescopes developed on their base as well as some problems associated with separation of coherent and incoherent events are described in detail. New fields are considered of semiconductor detector application: lifetime measurements of heavy particles decaying via weak interaction, such as D-mesons as well as the procedure of determination of the meson production and disintegration point with a space resolution enabling one to measure the length of meson path. The space resolution of detectors operating as proportional chambeps approaches 10-20 μm. Principles of devising the electronics for active target processors are described, solid state detectors being used for the latter

  18. High Dynamic Range Nonlinear Measurement using Analog Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    shield around sensitive areas. The target may also be sensitive to radiated coupling from the system and will benefit from a shield box or Faraday ... cage , if it is not already enclosed. On the shared measurement path and through the target, cross-channel coupling cannot be prevented, so low-PIM...testing is desired, traditional filtering is recommended, as the primary benefits of the analog canceller are effectively nullified. 2.4 Wideband

  19. Temperature measurement in the liquid helium range at pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskevich, E.S.; Krajdenov, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of bronze and germanium resistance thermometers and the use of a (Au + 0.07 % Fe)-Cu thermocouple for temperature measurements from 1.5 to 4.2 K in the hydrostatic compression of up to 10 kbar are considered. To this aim, the thermometer resistance as a function of temperature and pressure is measured. It is revealed that pressure does not change the thermometric response of the bronze resistance thermometer but only shifts it to the region of lower temperatures. The identical investigations of the germanium resistance thermometer shows that strong temperature dependence and the shift of its thermometric response under the influence of pressure make the use of germanium resistance thermometers in high-pressure chambers very inconvenient. The results of the analysis of the (Au + 0.07 % Fe) - Cu thermocouple shows that with a 2 per cent accuracy the thermocouple Seebeck coefficient does not depend on pressure. It permits to use this thermocouple for temperature measurements at high pressures

  20. Using the automized system ''section'' to forecast velocity sections using data on borehole velocity measurement and seismic field prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, M.I.; Gein, F.F.; Zubairov, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    A system of automated processing of seismic data is examined which makes it possible to set up rate functions at arbitrary points of a seismic prospecting section or at points conciding with boreholes in which rate measurements have not been completed. The basis for the forecasting method is data on seismic well logging investigations, seismic prospecting and some indirect observations on sections. The bases of a procedure realizing a forecasting method are set forth, as are those requirements which satisfy the system as a whole. The results of using the ''section'' system in a terrestrial section of Western Siberia are set forth.

  1. A low-power tool for measuring acceleration, pressure, and temperature (APT) with wide dynamic range and bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, Martin; Davis, Earl E.; Paros, Jerome; Johnson, Greg; Meldrum, Robert; Scherwath, Martin; Mihaly, Steven

    2017-04-01

    We present a new tool that facilitates the study of inter-related geodetic, geodynamic, seismic, and oceanographic phenomena. It incorporates a temperature compensated tri-axial accelerometer developed by Quartz Seismic Sensors, Inc., a pressure sensor built by Paroscientific Inc., and a low-power, high-precision frequency counter developed by Bennest Enterprises Ltd. and built by RBR, Ltd. The sensors are housed in a 7 cm o.d. titanium pressure case designed for use to full ocean depths (withstands more than 20 km of water pressure). Sampling intervals are programmable from 0.08 s to 1 hr; standard memory can store up to 130 million samples; total power consumption is roughly 115 mW when operating continuously and proportionately lower when operating intermittently (e.g., 2 mW average at 1 sample per min). Serial and USB communications protocols allow a variety of autonomous and cable-connection options. Measurement precision of the order of 10-8 of full scale (e.g., pressure equivalent to 4000 m water depth, acceleration = +/- 3 g) allows observations of pressure and acceleration variations of 0.4 Pa and 0.3 μm s-2. Long-term variations in vertical acceleration are sensitive to displacement through the gravity gradient down to a level of roughly 2 cm, and variations in horizontal acceleration are sensitive to tilt down to a level of 0.03 μrad. With the large dynamic ranges, high sensitivities and broad bandwidth (6 Hz to DC), ground motion associated with microseisms, strong and weak seismic ground motion, tidal loading, and slow and rapid geodynamic deformation - all normally studied using disparate instruments - can be observed with a single tool. Installation in the marine environment is accomplished by pushing the tool roughly 1 m vertically below the seafloor with a submersible or remotely operated vehicle, with no profile remaining above the seafloor to cause current-induced noise. The weight of the tool is designed to match the sediment it displaces to

  2. Seismic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollogoub, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    This lecture deals with: qualification methods for seismic testing; objectives of seismic testing; seismic testing standards including examples; main content of standard; testing means; and some important elements of seismic testing

  3. An Incremental, Measurable Approach to Increased Seismic Safety in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. S.

    2001-05-01

    Plans for a multiyear effort to assess and mitigate seismic risks in municipalities throughout Latin America and the Caribbean are being developed by a committee of scientists, engineers and public servants from throughout the region. Prompted by AGU and GeoHazards International, with start-up funding from the AGU Council through the AGU Committee on International Participation, the effort will involve scientists, engineers, architects, urban planners, civil defense authorities, municipal authorities, public health authorities, and commerical interests. With technical guidance provided by the project, teams of volunteers will assess risks in their own municipalities and will identify and adopt measures to reduce those risks. Planned by Latin Americans for the benefit of Latin America, the process, which is intended to run for a ten year period, will be iterative and incremental. Progress will be measurable and will be reported at triennial conferences. As an international organization, well-represented in the region and unencumbered by political or commercial relationships, AGU is able to provide effective administrative support for this challenging endeavor.

  4. Measurements and preliminary interpretation of K-Reactor foundation response to man-made seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.C.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    In support of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) effort to develop K-Reactor seismic design basis ground motions, SRTC monitored local high-explosive tests at a ''free-field'' site adjacent to K-Reactor and on the -40 level on the foundation of K-Reactor. The high-explosive tests were part of the SRTC/United States Geological Survey (USGS) regional refraction and attenuation experiment that used deeply buried high explosive charges near New Ellenton, Snelling, and at more distant South Carolina sites. The primary purpose of the Reactor measurements are to compare the relative amplitude and frequency content of ambient noise and shot generated ground motions measured at the K-Reactor foundation level and in the ''free-field'' so that foundation effects to ground motions can be documented and possibly incorporated in the facility design basis. Data analysis indicates that one of the five high explosive tests provided sufficient excitations at K-Reactor to produce satisfactory signal-to-noise between about 1 Hz and 15 Hz. Within this frequency band, Fourier spectral amplitude ratios of motions recorded within the first 10 seconds of first motion show substantial reductions (30 endash 50%) on shot radial and transverse components for frequencies greater than about 3 to 5 Hz. Approximately 50% reductions between 10 to 15 Hz were seen on vertical component ratios, and amplifications of 100% at 4 Hz and 5 Hz endash 6 Hz

  5. Geophysical and transport properties of reservoir rocks. Final report for task 4: Measurements and analysis of seismic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, N.G.W.

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of research on the seismic properties of reservoir rocks is to develop a basic understanding of the effects of rock microstructure and its contained pore fluids on seismic velocities and attenuation. Ultimately, this knowledge would be used to extract reservoir properties information such as the porosity, permeability, clay content, fluid saturation, and fluid type from borehole, cross-borehole, and surface seismic measurements to improve the planning and control of oil and gas recovery. This thesis presents laboratory ultrasonic measurements for three granular materials and attempts to relate the microstructural properties and the properties of the pore fluids to P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation. These experimental results show that artificial porous materials with sintered grains and a sandstone with partially cemented grains exhibit complexities in P- and S-wave attenuation that cannot be adequately explained by existing micromechanical theories. It is likely that some of the complexity observed in the seismic attenuation is controlled by details of the rock microstructure, such as the grain contact area and grain shape, and by the arrangement of the grain packing. To examine these effects, a numerical method was developed for analyzing wave propagation in a grain packing. The method is based on a dynamic boundary integral equation and incorporates generalized stiffness boundary conditions between individual grains to account for viscous losses and grain contact scattering.

  6. Seismic anisotropy beneath NW Himalaya using SKS and SKKS Splitting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, S.; Kumar, S.; Mohanty, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    Seventy six teleseismic earthquakes comprising of both SKS and SKKS were analysed for the NW Himalaya to infer the characteristics of the shear wave splitting parameters in the region. The anisotropy results obtained from the analysis shows upper mantle anisotropy in the study area with the fast axis aligned along a NNE-SSW direction and the average delay times observed at the station ranges from a minimum of 0.3s to a maximum of 1.7s for SKS and SKKS phases. These splitting results obtained for this area shows a parallel trend with motion of the India plate as estimated from NUVEL 1A model in contradiction to the orthogonal E-W trend observed for the NE Himalaya observed at the collision front. The seismic anisotropy observed in this region demarcates a shallow source of anisotropy that may be due to the strain flow in the upper mantle which may be the causative source of the anisotropy in the region.

  7. Design and implementation of a low-cost multichannel seismic noise recorder for array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Llorens, Juan Luis; Juan Giner-Caturla, Jose; Molina-Palacios, Sergio; Galiana-Merino, Juan Jose; Rosa-Herranz, Julio; Agea-Medina, Noelia

    2017-04-01

    Soil characterization is the starting point for seismic hazard studies. Currently, the methods based on ambient noise measurements are very used because they are non-invasive methods and relatively easy to implement in urban areas. Among these methods, the analysis of array measurements provides the dispersion curve and subsequently the shear-wave velocity profile associated to the site under study. In this case, we need several sensors recording simultaneously and a data acquisition system with one channel by sensor, what can become the complete equipment unaffordable for small research groups. In this work, we have designed and implemented a low-cost multichannel ambient noise recorder for array measurements. The complete system is based on Arduino, an open source electronic development platform, which allows recording 12 differential input channels simultaneously. Besides, it is complemented with a conditioning circuit that includes an anti-aliasing filter and a selectable gain between 0 and 40dB. The data acquisition is set up through a user-friendly graphical user interface. It is important to note that the electronic scheme as well as the programming code are open hardware and software, respectively, so it allows other researchers to suite the system to their particular requirements. The developed equipment has been tested at several sites around the province of Alicante (southeast of Spain), where the soil characteristics are well-known from previous studies. Array measurements have been taken and after that, the recorded data have been analysed using the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESAC) methods. The comparison of the obtained dispersion curves with the ones obtained in previous studies shows the suitability of the implemented low-cost system for array measurements.

  8. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  9. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardaya, P. D.; Noh, K. A. B. M.; Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  10. Brittleness estimation from seismic measurements in unconventional reservoirs: Application to the Barnett shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Altimar, Roderick

    Brittleness is a key characteristic for effective reservoir stimulation and is mainly controlled by mineralogy in unconventional reservoirs. Unfortunately, there is no universally accepted means of predicting brittleness from measures made in wells or from surface seismic data. Brittleness indices (BI) are based on mineralogy, while brittleness average estimations are based on Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. I evaluate two of the more popular brittleness estimation techniques and apply them to a Barnett Shale seismic survey in order to estimate its geomechanical properties. Using specialized logging tools such as elemental capture tool, density, and P- and S wave sonic logs calibrated to previous core descriptions and laboratory measurements, I create a survey-specific BI template in Young's modulus versus Poisson's ratio or alternatively lambdarho versus murho space. I use this template to predict BI from elastic parameters computed from surface seismic data, providing a continuous estimate of BI estimate in the Barnett Shale survey. Extracting lambdarho-murho values from microseismic event locations, I compute brittleness index from the template and find that most microsemic events occur in the more brittle part of the reservoir. My template is validated through a suite of microseismic experiments that shows most events occurring in brittle zones, fewer events in the ductile shale, and fewer events still in the limestone fracture barriers. Estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) is an estimate of the expected total production of oil and/or gas for the economic life of a well and is widely used in the evaluation of resource play reserves. In the literature it is possible to find several approaches for forecasting purposes and economic analyses. However, the extension to newer infill wells is somewhat challenging because production forecasts in unconventional reservoirs are a function of both completion effectiveness and reservoir quality. For shale gas reservoirs

  11. Measurements of seismic vibrations induced by Quarry blasts at the Mostecká basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaláb, Zdeněk

    -, č. 271 (2006), s. 49-58 ISSN 0372-9508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : seismic vibration * slope stability * quarry blast Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  12. Seismic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground

  13. Seismic Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-01-01

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  14. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  15. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  16. Kinematics of active deformation across the Western Kunlun mountain range (Xinjiang, China), and potential seismic hazards within the southern Tarim Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilbaud, Christelle; Simoes, Martine; Barrier, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    remains seismic. To quantify the rate of active deformation and the potential for major earthquakes in this region, we combine a structural and quantitative morphological analysis of the Yecheng-Pishan fold, along the topographic mountain front in the epicentral area. Using a seismic profile, we derive...

  17. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling of Broadband Signals - Analysis of Potential Disturbances during CTBT On-Site Inspection Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Altmann, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    For the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) the precise localisation of possible underground nuclear explosion sites is important. During an on-site inspection (OSI) sensitive seismic measurements of aftershocks can be performed, which, however, can be disturbed by other signals. To improve the quality and effectiveness of these measurements it is essential to understand those disturbances so that they can be reduced or prevented. In our work we focus on disturbing signals caused by airborne sources: When the sound of aircraft (as often used by the inspectors themselves) hits the ground, it propagates through pores in the soil. Its energy is transferred to the ground and soil vibrations are created which can mask weak aftershock signals. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is still incomplete. However, it is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. We present our recent advances in this field. We performed several measurements to record sound pressure and soil velocity produced by various sources, e.g. broadband excitation by jet aircraft passing overhead and signals artificially produced by a speaker. For our experimental set-up microphones were placed close to the ground and geophones were buried in different depths in the soil. Several sensors were shielded from the directly incident acoustic signals by a box coated with acoustic damping material. While sound pressure under the box was strongly reduced, the soil velocity measured under the box was just slightly smaller than outside of it. Thus these soil vibrations were mostly created outside the box and travelled through the soil to the sensors. This information is used to estimate characteristic propagation lengths of the acoustically induced signals in the soil. In the seismic data we observed interference patterns which are likely caused by the

  18. A Sparse Bayesian Imaging Technique for Efficient Recovery of Reservoir Channels With Time-Lapse Seismic Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2016-06-01

    Subsurface reservoir flow channels are characterized by high-permeability values and serve as preferred pathways for fluid propagation. Accurate estimation of their geophysical structures is thus of great importance for the oil industry. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used statistical technique for estimating subsurface reservoir model parameters. However, accurate reconstruction of the subsurface geological features with the EnKF is challenging because of the limited measurements available from the wells and the smoothing effects imposed by the \\\\ell _{2} -norm nature of its update step. A new EnKF scheme based on sparse domain representation was introduced by Sana et al. (2015) to incorporate useful prior structural information in the estimation process for efficient recovery of subsurface channels. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways: 1) investigate the effects of incorporating time-lapse seismic data on the channel reconstruction; and 2) explore a Bayesian sparse reconstruction algorithm with the potential ability to reduce the computational requirements. Numerical results suggest that the performance of the new sparse Bayesian based EnKF scheme is enhanced with the availability of seismic measurements, leading to further improvement in the recovery of flow channels structures. The sparse Bayesian approach further provides a computationally efficient framework for enforcing a sparse solution, especially with the possibility of using high sparsity rates through the inclusion of seismic data.

  19. A Sparse Bayesian Imaging Technique for Efficient Recovery of Reservoir Channels With Time-Lapse Seismic Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh; Ravanelli, Fabio; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface reservoir flow channels are characterized by high-permeability values and serve as preferred pathways for fluid propagation. Accurate estimation of their geophysical structures is thus of great importance for the oil industry. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a widely used statistical technique for estimating subsurface reservoir model parameters. However, accurate reconstruction of the subsurface geological features with the EnKF is challenging because of the limited measurements available from the wells and the smoothing effects imposed by the \\ell _{2} -norm nature of its update step. A new EnKF scheme based on sparse domain representation was introduced by Sana et al. (2015) to incorporate useful prior structural information in the estimation process for efficient recovery of subsurface channels. In this paper, we extend this work in two ways: 1) investigate the effects of incorporating time-lapse seismic data on the channel reconstruction; and 2) explore a Bayesian sparse reconstruction algorithm with the potential ability to reduce the computational requirements. Numerical results suggest that the performance of the new sparse Bayesian based EnKF scheme is enhanced with the availability of seismic measurements, leading to further improvement in the recovery of flow channels structures. The sparse Bayesian approach further provides a computationally efficient framework for enforcing a sparse solution, especially with the possibility of using high sparsity rates through the inclusion of seismic data.

  20. Geotechnical Parameters from Seismic Measurements: Two Field Examples from Egypt and Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Mohamed H.

    2016-03-18

    © 2016 EEGS. Geotechnical parameters were used to determine subsurface rock quality for construction purposes. We summarize the mathematical relationships used to calculate the geotechnical parameters from P- and S-wave velocities and density values. These relationships are applied to two field examples; the first is a regional seismic study in Egypt and the second is a 2-D seismic profile recorded in Saudi Arabia. Results from both field examples are used to determine the subsurface rock quality and locate zones that should be avoided during construction. We suggest combining all geotechnical parameters into one map using a normalized-weighted relation, which helps to locate the zones with high versus low rock quality for engineering purposes.

  1. Study of Behavior and Measurement of Seismic Resistant Connections in Light Structural Frame Out of Aspen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shamsian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake is the major Natural disaster in Iran which once a while causes widespread death and financial losses. Constructional system and materials used in them, most often accelerate these damages, so these are considered principal reasons of the events. Countries that have regions of high seismicity, conducted research on constructional systems, materials, and methods of improving their resistance to earthquake. These research efforts have found simple solution of the problem in wood and its proper combinations with other constructional materials. In this research, regarding such target, two subjects were studied. A model of light framed one story single-family residential house in Iran was constructed to determine its dynamical behavior. The model was constructed in one- third scale of a unit with 54 square meters in base. Foundation anchorage in model was made by metal angle pieces, which were bolted to lower plank. These types of connectors could easily be fabricated in metal working shops in Iran. The rest of joints in model were made with bolts and common nails. To see the behavior of the model, its natural frequency, acceleration at different points, lateral movements (displacement, and also response of joints to tensile and compressive forces (developed due to lateral dynamical loading on a shaking table were measured and analyzed. Results have shown that with respect to Fast Fourier Transformation spectra, ratio of maximum acceleration in roof to bottom of model, in sinusoidal acceleration test, the natural frequency of model is ten HZ (fn = 10 Hz, since 10 Hz frequency has the highest amplitude. This result had contingency with data of sinusoidal acceleration records with 10 HZ frequency and 0.64 g as well. Therefore, stiffness of model structure would be 78,250 Kg/cm. In addition, results of several sinusoidal acceleration tests for determining delay damping, has shown on the average 0.039 for this quantity. Brief results of

  2. Improvement of high resolution borehole seismics. Part 1: Development of processing methods for VSP surveys. Part 2: Piezoelectric signal transmitter for seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Heikkinen, P.; Pekonen, S.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the high resolution borehole seismics project has been to improve the reliability and resolution of seismic methods in the particular environment of nuclear waste repository sites. The results obtained, especially the data processing and interpretation methods developed, are applicable also to other geophysical methods (e.g. Georadar). The goals of the seismic development project have been: the development of processing and interpretation techniques for mapping fractured zones, and the design and construction of a seismic source complying with the requirements of repository site characterization programs. Because these two aspects of the work are very different in nature, we have structured the report as two self contained parts. Part 1 describes the development of interpretive techniques. We have used for demonstrating the effect of different methods a VSP data set collected at the SCV site during Stage 1 of the project. Five techniques have been studied: FK-filtering, three versions of Tau-p filtering and a new technique that we have developed lately, Image Space filtering. Part 2 refers to the construction of the piezoelectric source. Earlier results obtained over short distances with low energy piezoelectric transmitters let us believe that the same principle could be applied for seismic signal transmitters, if solutions for higher energy and lower frequency output were found. The instrument which we have constructed is a cylindrical unit which can be placed in a borehole and is able to produce a radial strain when excited axially. The minimum borehole diameter is 56 mm. (au)

  3. NCSRR digital seismic network in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.; Albota, E.; Demetriu, S.; Poiata, N.; Kashima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Digital seismic instrumentation donated by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) to the National Center for Seismic Risk Reduction (NCSRR, Romania) allowed the installation in 2003 of a new Romanian seismic network. In 2005-2006 the network was developed by investments from NCSRR within the budget ensured by Ministry of Transports, Construction and Tourism (MTCT). The NCSRR seismic network contains three types of instrumentation: (i) free-field stations - outside the capital city Bucharest (8 accelerometers), (ii) instrumented buildings - in Bucharest (5 buildings), and (iii) stations with free-field and borehole sensors - in Bucharest (8 sites with ground surface sensor and sensors in 15 boreholes with depths up to 153 m). Since its installation, the NCSRR network recorded more than 170 seismic motions from 26 earthquakes with moment magnitudes ranging from 3.2 to 6.0. The seismic instrumentation was accompanied by investigations of ground conditions and site response: PS logging tests, single-station and array microtremor measurements. The development of seismic monitoring in Romania is a major contribution of JICA Project, creating the premises for a better understanding and modelling of earthquake ground motion, site effects and building response. (authors)

  4. Seismic imaging of the southern California plate-boundary around the South-Central Transverse Ranges using double-difference tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, P. E.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Thurber, C. H.; Zhang, H.; Guo, H.

    2017-12-01

    We derive P and S seismic velocities within and around the South-Central Transverse Ranges section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF), using a new double-difference tomography algorithm incorporating both event-pair and station-pair differential times. The event-pair data can determine high-resolution relative earthquake locations and resolve fine-scale structure in seismogenic zones, whereas station-pair data allow for better absolute locations and higher resolution of structure near the surface where stations are most dense. The tomographic results are based on arrival times of P and S waves generated by 17,753 M>1 local events from 1/1/2010 to 6/30/2015 recorded by 259 stations within a 222 km x 164 km region. The resulting P and S velocity models include low velocities along major fault segments and across-fault velocity contrasts. For example, at depths 50 km parallel to the SAF around Coachella Valley but offset to the NE by 13 km. This is interpreted to mark a dipping section of the SAF that separates granites at depth in the SW from gneisses and schists in the NE. Analysis of fault zone head waves propagating along these sections of the SAF and SJFZ show that major bimaterial interfaces are associated with the observed velocity contrasts. Additional features within the models include elongated low velocity anomalies extending from the SJFZ trifurcation area, which itself has associated low velocity at great depth (>14 km), to the Elsinore Fault in the SW. Moreover, a deep (>13 km) velocity contrast appears beneath the SBB with an east-west strike oblique to both the northern SJFZ and SAF traces. The latter is potentially related to the ancestral Banning Fault, which dips to the north, separating low velocity Pelona schist in the north from high velocity granites in the south.

  5. Measures taken in the member countries of the European Communities for anti-seismic design compared to actual US practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinck, W.; Maurer, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Most countries of the European Communities base their anti-seismic design parameters on specific US earthquake characteristics. There are, however, important discrepancies in the basic data reported on the two continents as well as in their design application. This was one of the topics under discussion within an European working group on methodologies, criteria and standards in nuclear safety. Unlike US practice, in some European countries the maximum earthquake that can be envisaged (corresponding to the Safe Shutdown Earthquake-SEE-in US practice) is defined by adding a margin of safety to the maximum probable earthquake (corresponding to the Operating Basis Earthquake-OBE-in US for which statistical data exist). - Differences exist also in the design parameters to be taken into account in the different European countries especially in the evaluation of the maximum acceleration and on the relationship of the acceleration vs. earthquake intensity. For design purposes, in US as well as in European countries, the assumption is made that seismic waves basically approximate a sustained simple harmonic motion. Under this assumption the Neumann correlation which gives the relationship between the modified Mercalli intensity, the wave period and the ground acceleration is applied. While in the US a whole spectrum of wave periods (from 0.33 to 6.0 sec) -in function of the type of foundation (soil, bed-rock) and the distance of the epicenter- are considered, the European countries base their investigations on shorter wave periods (approximately 0.3 sec). - Mention is made of the existing differences in the relationship of horizontal to vertical acceleration levels. These differences in the evaluation of the earthquake characteristics influence the design to protect the power plants against seismic effects especially as far as stress and strain limits for structures and components within the elastic range and in the excess of yield are concerned

  6. Method of high precision interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Lv, Xin-yuan; Mao, Jin-jin; Liu, Wei; Yang, Dong

    2013-09-01

    Laser ranging is suitable for laser system, for it has the advantage of high measuring precision, fast measuring speed,no cooperative targets and strong resistance to electromagnetic interference,the measuremen of laser ranging is the key paremeters affecting the performance of the whole system.The precision of the pulsed laser ranging system was decided by the precision of the time interval measurement, the principle structure of laser ranging system was introduced, and a method of high precision time interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system was established in this paper.Based on the analysis of the factors which affected the precision of range measure,the pulse rising edges discriminator was adopted to produce timing mark for the start-stop time discrimination,and the TDC-GP2 high precision interval measurement system based on TMS320F2812 DSP was designed to improve the measurement precision.Experimental results indicate that the time interval measurement method in this paper can obtain higher range accuracy. Compared with the traditional time interval measurement system,the method simplifies the system design and reduce the influence of bad weather conditions,furthermore,it satisfies the requirements of low costs and miniaturization.

  7. Direct measurement of source RDP's and yields from near-field Soviet seismic data. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saikia, C.K.; McLaren, J.P.; Helmberger, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the source characteristics represented in the form of a reduced displacement potential (RDP) of Soviet nuclear explosions and was based on the availability of in-country near-field data. At the start of the project, it was thought that data would be readily accessible to us with the start of the open exchange of seismic data between the US and the Soviet Union. In fact, we did receive near-field waveforms of two Soviet nuclear explosions from Azghir test site near the Caspian Sea following which the transfer of data stopped till the end of the project. Consequently, the research effort was descoped. Only recently, some additional data have become available at CSS (Center for Seismic Studies). We have undertaken a thorough investigation of the limited data available from a large coupled shot (64 kT) in Azghir followed five years later by a decoupled shot (8 kT). We have successfully modeled the near-field data from these events to determine their source RDP's and establish a decoupling factor of 15 using a time-domain waveform modeling technique. The results of this study are presented in the enclosed manuscript: Analysis of near-field data from a Soviet decoupling experiment

  8. Seismicity and seismic monitoring in the Asse salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, D.; Gommlich, G.; Hente, B.

    1987-01-01

    Seismicity analyses are made in order to assess the safety of candidate sites for ultimate disposal of hazardous wastes. The report in hand reviews the seismicity history of the Asse salt mine and presents recent results of a measuring campaign made in the area. The monitoring network installed at the site supplies data and information on the regional seismicity, on seismic amplitudes under ground and above ground, and on microseismic activities. (DG) [de

  9. Range measurements of keV hydrogen ions in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schou, J.; Soerensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.; Nielsen, M.; Rune, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3-3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen. The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees with that previously found for solid nitrogen. (orig.)

  10. Enhanced Strain Measurement Range of an FBG Sensor Embedded in Seven-Wire Steel Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Chul-Min; Choi, Song-Yi; Lee, Bang Yeon

    2017-07-18

    FBG sensors offer many advantages, such as a lack of sensitivity to electromagnetic waves, small size, high durability, and high sensitivity. However, their maximum strain measurement range is lower than the yield strain range (about 1.0%) of steel strands when embedded in steel strands. This study proposes a new FBG sensing technique in which an FBG sensor is recoated with polyimide and protected by a polyimide tube in an effort to enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands. The validation test results showed that the proposed FBG sensing technique has a maximum strain measurement range of 1.73% on average, which is 1.73 times higher than the yield strain of the strands. It was confirmed that recoating the FBG sensor with polyimide and protecting the FBG sensor using a polyimide tube could effectively enhance the maximum strain measurement range of FBG sensors embedded in strands.

  11. Seismic measures and defence in depth of nuclear power plant. Lessons learned from the great east Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro

    2011-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred in March 11, 2011 brought about severe accident at nuclear power plant, which gave significant lessons to nuclear experts concerned with safety measures. Concepts of defence in depth was basic philosophy to assure safety of nuclear power plant even against uncertainties exceeding design basis. This concept consisted of prevention, monitoring, and action to mitigate consequences of failures such as a series of physical barriers between the reactor core and the environment, which were called multiple safety systems, each with backup and designed to accommodate human error. As for natural disaster, depth of recognition of characteristic of natural phenomena and its effect and engineering judgment was of prime importance. Different waveforms of ground motion at Fukushima and Onagawa at the Great East Japan Earthquake showed that design ground motion should have large uncertainties. To cope with uncertainties of ground motion, robust seismic measures based on experience were such as design of static seismic intensity and rigid structure of natural period less than 0.1 sec. As for tsunami, defence in depth measures were prepared for the cooling of reactor core, spent fuel and related electric generation equipment with taking into account 1) time lag between tsunami generation and arrival, 2) tsunami affected area could be limited by coastal levee or anti-inundation measure, 3) system redundancy could be assured by different locations of equipments and 4) repair works could be done by shipment of replacement equipment from outside due to limitation of affected regional area. Success examples of Onagawa, Tokai unit 2, Fukushima Daiichi unit 6 and Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plants could suggest definite tsunami defence in depth measures. Containment vent system as final heat sink and emergency condenser as reactor core cooling at outage should be properly utilized for Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Seismic study of soil dynamics at Garner Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archuleta, R.J.; Seale, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Garner Valley downhole array (GVDA) of force-balanced accelerometers was designed to determine the effect that near-surface soil layers have on surface ground motion by measuring in situ seismic waves at various depths. Although there are many laboratory, theoretical and numerical studies that are used to predict the effects that local site geology might have on seismic waves, there are very few direct measurements that can be used to confirm the predictions made by these methods. The effects of local site geology on seismic ground motions are critical for estimating the base motion of structures. The variations in site amplifications at particular periods can range over a factor of 20 or more in comparing amplitude spectra from rock and soil sites, e.g., Mexico City (1985) or San Francisco (1989). The basic phenomenon of nonlinear soil response, and by inference severe attenuation of seismic waves, has rarely been measured although it is commonly observed in laboratory experiments. The basic question is whether or not the local site geology amplifies are attenuates the seismic ground motion. Because the answer depends on the interaction between the local site geology and the amplitude as well as the frequency content of the incoming seismic waves, the in situ measurements must sample the depth variations of the local structure as well as record seismic waves over as wide a range as possible in amplitude and frequency

  13. New insights into the 2012 Emilia (Italy) seismic sequence through advanced numerical modeling of ground deformation InSAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzani, P.; Castaldo, R.; Solaro, G.; Pepe, S.; Bonano, M.; Casu, F.; Manunta, M.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, A.; Samsonov, S.; Lanari, R.; Sansosti, E.

    2013-05-01

    We provide new insights into the two main seismic events that occurred in 2012 in the Emilia region, Italy. We extend the results from previous studies based on analytical inversion modeling of GPS and RADARSAT-1 InSAR measurements by exploiting RADARSAT-2 data. Moreover, we benefit from the available large amount of geological and geophysical information through finite element method (FEM) modeling implemented in a structural-mechanical context to investigate the impact of known buried structures on the modulation of the ground deformation field. We find that the displacement pattern associated with the 20 May event is consistent with the activation of a single fault segment of the inner Ferrara thrust, in good agreement with the analytical solution. In contrast, the interpretation of the 29 May episode requires the activation of three different fault segments and a block roto-translation of the Mirandola anticline. The proposed FEM-based methodology is applicable to other seismic areas where the complexity of buried structures is known and plays a fundamental role in the modulation of the associated surface deformation pattern.

  14. Development of source range measurement instrument in Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Li

    2002-01-01

    Source range measurement instrument in Xi'an pulsed reactor is key equipment of low-side measuring in source range. At the same time, it is also weighty component of out-of-pile neutron-flux level observation system. The authors have done some researching and renovating based on the similar type devices used in nuclear reactor to improve the meter sensitivity, measuring range, noise proof features, reliability in running and maintainability which belong to the main performance index of the instrument. The design ideas, configurations, working principle, performance indexes, technique features and effect in utilizing are introduced briefly

  15. Continuous recording of seismic signals in Alpine permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, H.; Krainer, K.; Staudinger, M.; Brückl, E.

    2009-04-01

    three different types of applications. It enabled fast and efficient field work and provided excellent seismic data at two permafrost sites. At Krummgampen Valley (Ötztal Alps, Tyrol) 13 seismic profiles were measured at altitudes ranging from 2400 to 2900 m to assess information on the permafrost occurrences. At the crest of Hoher Sonnblick (3106 m, Hohe Tauern, Salzburg) seismic signals were recorded on 15 borehole geophones deployed in three 20 m deep boreholes for the application of seismic tomography and passive monitoring of rock falls.

  16. Elastic properties and seismic anisotropy of the Seve Nappe Complex - Laboratory core measurements from the International Continental Drilling Project COSC-1 well, Åre, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Zappone, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The COSC-1 scientific borehole was drilled in the summer of 2014 to ~2.5 km depth to study the structure and composition of the Middle Allochthon of the Central Scandinavian Caledonides. It crosscuts the amphibolite-grade lower part of the Seve nappe and intersects a mylonite zone in the lower 800 m of the borehole. We selected six core samples representing the primary lithologies in the COSC-1 borehole for laboratory investigation of elastic properties. The cores consisted of two amphibolites with differing grain sizes, a calc-silicate gneiss, a felsic gneiss, a coarse grained amphibole bearing gneiss, and a garnet bearing mylonitic schist from the basal shear zone. Both P- and S-waves were measured at ultrasonic frequency (1 MHz), and room temperature hydrostatic pressure conditions up to 260 MPa. Measurements were made along three mutually perpendicular directions, one perpendicular to foliation and two parallel to the foliation with one aligned with mineral lineation. Vp and Vs, anisotropy, and elastic properties are reported as an extrapolation of the high-pressure portion of the ultrasonic measurements back to the intersection with the zero pressure axis. The Vp and Vs in the direction perpendicular to foliation ranges from 5.51-6.67 km/s and 3.18-4.13 km/s, respectively. In the direction parallel to foliation the Vp and Vs ranges from 6.31-7.25 km/s and 3.52-4.35 km/s, respectively. Vp anisotropy ranges from 3% in the calc-silicate gneiss to 18% in mylonitic schist. Acoustic impedance estimations at lithostatic pressure conditions at base of the borehole (70 MPa) show that acoustic impedance contrast generating reflection coefficients between the basal shear zone and overlying units are significant enough to cause seismic reflections. Above the mylonite zone/shear zone, the reflectivity within the lower Seve nappe is due to the impedance contrast between the felsic gneiss and the amphibolite. This result fits with 3D seismic reflection imaging in the area of

  17. Seismic Measurement of the Locations of the Base of Convection Zone and Helium Ionization Zone for Stars in the Kepler Seismic LEGACY Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Lund, Mikkel N.; Aguirre, Víctor Silva [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Raodeo, Keyuri; Mazumdar, Anwesh [Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR, V. N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400088 (India); Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: kuldeep@phys.au.dk [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 065208101 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic glitches are regions inside a star where the sound speed or its derivatives change abruptly. These leave a small characteristic oscillatory signature in the stellar oscillation frequencies. With the precision achieved by Kepler seismic data, it is now possible to extract these small amplitude oscillatory signatures, and infer the locations of the glitches. We perform glitch analysis for all the 66 stars in the Kepler seismic LEGACY sample to derive the locations of the base of the envelope convection zone (CZ) and the helium ionization zone. The signature from helium ionization zone is found to be robust for all stars in the sample, whereas the CZ signature is found to be weak and problematic, particularly for relatively massive stars with large errorbars on the oscillation frequencies. We demonstrate that the helium glitch signature can be used to constrain the properties of the helium ionization layers and the helium abundance.

  18. Comparison of two methods of surface profile extraction from multiple ultrasonic range measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barshan, B; Baskent, D

    Two novel methods for surface profile extraction based on multiple ultrasonic range measurements are described and compared. One of the methods employs morphological processing techniques, whereas the other employs a spatial voting scheme followed by simple thresholding. Morphological processing

  19. Spacecraft Trajectory Estimation Using a Sampled-Data Extended Kalman Filter with Range-Only Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erwin, R. S; Bernstein, Dennis S

    2005-01-01

    .... In this paper we use a sampled-data extended Kalman Filter to estimate the trajectory or a target satellite when only range measurements are available from a constellation or orbiting spacecraft...

  20. The Development of a Tactical-Level Full Range Leadership Measurement Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    full range leadership theory has become established as the predominant and most widely researched theory on leadership . The most commonly used survey...instrument to assess full range leadership theory is the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, originally developed by Bass in 1985. Although much...existing literature to develop a new full range leadership theory measurement instrument that effectively targets low- to mid-level supervisors, or

  1. Coherent change detection and interferometric ISAR measurements in the folded compact range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    A folded compact range configuration has been developed ant the Sandia National Laboratories` compact range antenna and radar-cross- section measurement facility as a means of performing indoor, environmentally-controlled, far-field simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of distributed target samples (i.e. gravel, sand, etc.). The folded compact range configuration has previously been used to perform coherent-change-detection (CCD) measurements, which allow disturbances to distributed targets on the order of fractions of a wavelength to be detected. This report describes follow-on CCD measurements of other distributed target samples, and also investigates the sensitivity of the CCD measurement process to changes in the relative spatial location of the SAR sensor between observations of the target. Additionally, this report describes the theoretical and practical aspects of performing interferometric inverse-synthetic-aperture-radar (IFISAR) measurements in the folded compact range environment. IFISAR measurements provide resolution of the relative heights of targets with accuracies on the order of a wavelength. Several examples are given of digital height maps that have been generated from measurements performed at the folded compact range facility.

  2. Range and number-of-levels effects in derived and stated measures of attribute importance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlegh, PWJ; Schifferstein, HNJ; Wittink, DR

    We study how the range of variation and the number of ttribute levels affect five measures of attribute importance: full profile conjoint estimates, ranges in attribute level attractiveness ratings. regression coefficients. graded paired comparisons. and self-reported ratings, We find that all

  3. An emittance measurement system for a wide range of bunch charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, B.; Engwall, D.; Hofler, A.; Keesee, M.; Legg, R.

    1997-01-01

    As a part of the emittance measurements planned for the FEL injector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), the authors have developed an emittance measurement system that covers the wide dynamic range of bunch charges necessary to fully characterize the high-DC-voltage photocathode gun. The measurements are carried out with a variant of the classical two-slit method using a slit to sample the beam in conjunction with a wire scanner to measure the transmitted beam profile. The use of commercial, ultra-low noise picoammeters makes it possible to cover the wide range of desired bunch charges, with the actual measurements made over the range of 0.25 pC to 125 pC. The entire system, including its integration into the EPICS control system, is discussed

  4. Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

    1996-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  5. Seismic motions from project Rulison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loux, P C [Environmental Research Corp., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    In the range from a few to a few hundred km, seismic measurements from the Rulison event are shown and compared with experimentally and analytically derived pre-event estimates. Seismograms, peak accelerations, and response spectra are given along with a description of the associated geologic environment. Techniques used for the pre-event estimates are identified with emphasis on supportive data and on Rulison results. Of particular interest is the close-in seismic frequency content which is expected to contain stronger high frequency components. This higher frequency content translates into stronger accelerations within the first tens of km, which in turn affect safety preparations. Additionally, the local geologic structure at nearby population centers must be considered. Pre-event reverse profile refraction surveys are used to delineate the geology at Rifle, Rulison, Grand Valley, and other sites. The geologic parameters are then used as input to seismic amplification models which deliver estimates of local resonant frequencies. Prediction of such resonances allows improved safety assurance against seismic effects hazards. (author)

  6. Investigating the temporal fluctuations in geoelectrical and geochemical signals Jointly measured in a seismic area of Southern Apennine chain (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Piscitelli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse geoelectrical and geochemical time series jointly measured by means of a multiparametric automatic station close to an anomalous fluid emission in Val d'Agri (Basilicata, Southern Italy. In the investigated are some destructive seismic events occurred in past and recent years. We analysed the temporal fluctuations of the signals by spectral tools. We detected scaling behaviours in the power spectra of the time series recorded, that are typical fingerprints of fractional Brownian motions. The estimated values of the spectral indices reveal the presence of antipersistent behaviour in the time dynamics of all geoelectrical and geochemical data recorded. This work intends to improve our knowledge of the inner time dynamics of geophysical non-seismometric parameters.

  7. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion in 20Ne + 51V system using recoil range measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recoil range distributions of evaporation residues, populated in 20Ne + 51V reaction at Elab ≈ 145 MeV, have been studied to determine the degree of momentum transferred through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions. Evaporation residues (ERs populated through the complete and incomplete fusion reactions have been identified on the basis of their recoil range in the Al catcher medium. Measured recoil range of evaporation residues have been compared with the theoretical value calculated using the code SRIM. Range integrated cross section of observed ERs have been compared with the value predicted by statistical model code PACE4.

  8. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  9. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  10. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  11. Expanding the dynamic measurement range for polymeric nanoparticle pH sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2011-01-01

    Conventional optical nanoparticle pH sensors that are designed for ratiometric measurements in cells have been based on utilizing one sensor fluorophore and one reference fluorophore in each nanoparticle, which results in a relatively narrow dynamic measurement range. This results in substantial...

  12. A comparison on radar range profiles between in-flight measurements and RCS-predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiden, R. van der; Ewijk, L.J. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    1998-01-01

    The validation of Radar Cross Section (RCS) prediction techniques against real measurements is crucial to acquire confidence in predictions when measurements are nut available. In this paper we present the results of a comparison on one-dimensional signatures, i.e. radar range profiles. The profiles

  13. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII

  14. Improved measurement linearity and precision for AMCW time-of-flight range imaging cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Andrew D; Dorrington, Adrian A; Cree, Michael J; Carnegie, Dale A

    2010-08-10

    Time-of-flight range imaging systems utilizing the amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW) technique often suffer from measurement nonlinearity due to the presence of aliased harmonics within the amplitude modulation signals. Typically a calibration is performed to correct these errors. We demonstrate an alternative phase encoding approach that attenuates the harmonics during the sampling process, thereby improving measurement linearity in the raw measurements. This mitigates the need to measure the system's response or calibrate for environmental changes. In conjunction with improved linearity, we demonstrate that measurement precision can also be increased by reducing the duty cycle of the amplitude modulated illumination source (while maintaining overall illumination power).

  15. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knox, Hunter Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); James, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Rebekah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  16. Missile impacts as sources of seismic energy on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G.V.; McDonald, W.G.; Moore, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    Seismic signals recorded from impacts of missiles at the White Sands Missile Range are radically different from the signal recorded from the Apollo 12 lunar module impact. This implies that lunar structure to depths of at least 10 to 20 kilometers is quite different from the typical structure of the earth's crust. Results obtained from this study can be used to predict seismic wave amplitudes from future man-made lunar impacts. Seismic energy and crater dimensions from impacts are compared with measurements from chemical explosions.

  17. Engineering geological zonation of a complex landslide system through seismic ambient noise measurements at the Selmun Promontory (Malta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Roberto; Martino, Salvatore; Paciello, Antonella; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2018-05-01

    The cliff slope of the Selmun Promontory, located in the Northern part of the island of Malta (Central Mediterranean Sea) close to the coastline, is involved in a landslide process as exhibited by the large block-size talus at its bottom. The landslide process is related to the geological succession outcropping in the Selmun area, characterized by the overposition of a grained limestone on a plastic clay, that induces a lateral spreading phenomenon associated with detachment and collapse of different-size rock blocks. The landslide process shapes a typical landscape with a stable plateau of stiff limestone bordered by an unstable cliff slope. The ruins of Għajn Ħadid Tower, the first of the 13 watchtowers built in 1658 by the Grand Master Martin de Redin, stand out on the Selmun Promontory. The conservation of this important heritage site, already damaged by an earthquake which struck the Maltese Archipelago on 1856 October 12, is currently threatened by a progressive retreat of the landslide process towards the inland plateau area. During 2015 and 2016, field surveys were carried out to derive an engineering geological model of the Selmun Promontory. After a high-resolution geomechanical survey, the spatial distribution of the joints affecting the limestone was obtained. At the same time, 116 single-station noise measurements were carried out to cover inland and edge of the limestone plateau as well as the slope where the clays outcrop. The obtained 1-hour time histories were analysed through the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio technique, as well as polarization and ellipticity analysis of particle motion to define the local seismic response in zones having different stability conditions, that is, related to the presence of unstable rock blocks characterized by different vibrational modes. The results obtained demonstrate the suitability of passive seismic geophysical techniques for zoning landslide hazard in case of rock slopes and prove the relevance of

  18. Seismic properties of the upper mantle beneath Lanzarote (Canary Islands): Model predictions based on texture measurements by EBSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonlanthen, Pierre; Kunze, Karsten; Burlini, Luigi; Grobety, Bernard

    2006-12-01

    We present a petrophysical analysis of upper mantle xenoliths, collected in the Quaternary alkali basalt fields (Series III and IV) from the island of Lanzarote. The samples consist of eight harzburgite and four dunite nodules, 5 to 15 cm in size, and exhibit a typical protogranular to porphyroclastic texture. An anomalous foliation resulting from strong recovery processes is observed in half of the specimens. The lattice preferred orientations (LPO) of olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene were measured using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). In most samples, olivine exhibits LPOs intermediate between the typical single crystal texture and the [100] fiber texture. Occasionally, the [010] fiber texture was also observed. Simultaneous occurrence of both types of fiber textures suggests the existence of more than one deformation regime, probably dominated by a simple shear component under low strain rate and moderate to high temperature. Orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene display a weaker but significant texture. The LPO data were used to calculate the seismic properties of the xenoliths at PT conditions obtained from geothermobarometry, and were compared to field geophysical data reported from the literature. The velocity of P-waves (7.9 km/s) obtained for a direction corresponding to the existing seismic transect is in good agreement with the most recent geophysical interpretation. Our results are consistent with a roughly W-E oriented fastest P-wave propagation direction in the uppermost mantle beneath the Canary Islands, and with the lithosphere structure proposed by previous authors involving a crust-mantle boundary at around 18 km in depth, overlaid by intermediate material between 11 and 18 km.

  19. An impedance bridge measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dan Bee; Lee, Hyung Kew; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a 2-terminal-pair impedance bridge, measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range up to 1 MHz. The bridge was configured with two voltage sources and a phase control unit which enabled the bridge balance by synchronizing the voltage sources with an enhanced phase resolution. Without employing the transformers such as inductive voltage divider, injection and detection transformers, etc, the bridge system is quite simple to set up, and the balance procedure is quick and easy. Using this dual-source coaxial bridge, the 1:1 and 10:1 capacitance ratios were measured with 1 pF–1 nF capacitors in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The measurement values obtained by the dual-source bridge were then compared with reference values measured using a commercial precision capacitance bridge of AH2700A, the Z -matrix method developed by ourselves, and the 4-terminal-pair coaxial bridge by the Czech Metrological Institute. All the measurements agreed within the reference uncertainty range of an order of 10 −6 –10 −5 , proving the bridge ability as a trustworthy tool for measuring the capacitance ratio in the high frequency range. (paper)

  20. Note: long range and accurate measurement of deep trench microstructures by a specialized scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Bing-Feng; Chen, Yuan-Liu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Wule; Jin, Chao; Fang, F Z

    2012-05-01

    A compact but practical scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with high aspect ratio and high depth capability has been specially developed. Long range scanning mechanism with tilt-adjustment stage is adopted for the purpose of adjusting the probe-sample relative angle to compensate the non-parallel effects. A periodical trench microstructure with a pitch of 10 μm has been successfully imaged with a long scanning range up to 2.0 mm. More innovatively, a deep trench with depth and step height of 23.0 μm has also been successfully measured, and slope angle of the sidewall can approximately achieve 67°. The probe can continuously climb the high step and exploring the trench bottom without tip crashing. The new STM could perform long range measurement for the deep trench and high step surfaces without image distortion. It enables accurate measurement and quality control of periodical trench microstructures.

  1. Impedance measurements on a fast transition-edge sensor for optical and near-infrared range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taralli, E; Portesi, C; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Rajteri, M; Novikov, I; Beyer, J

    2010-01-01

    Impedance measurements of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) are a powerful tool to obtain information about the TES thermal and electrical properties. We apply this technique to a 20 μm x 20 μm Ti/Au TES, suitable for application in the optical and near-infrared range, and extend the measurements up to 250 kHz in order to obtain a complete frequency response in the complex plane. From these measurements we obtain important thermal and electrical device parameters such as heat capacity C, thermal conductance G and effective thermal time constant τ eff that will be compared with the corresponding values obtained from noise measurements.

  2. Assessment of health status by molecular measures in adults ranging from middle-aged to old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaijer, M. E. C.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Goldeck, D.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to measures already used in clinical practice, molecular measures have been proposed to assess health status, but these have not yet been introduced into clinical practice. We aimed to test the association of functional capacity measures used in current practice and molecular measures...... with age and health status. The cohort consisted of 178 middle-aged to old participants of the Leiden Longevity Study (range 42-82years). We tested associations between functional capacity measures (physical tests: grip strength, 4-meter walk, chair stand test; cognitive tests: Stroop test, digit symbol...... substitution test and 15-picture learning test) with age and with cardiovascular or metabolic disease as a measure of the health status. These associations with age and health status were also tested for molecular measures (C reactive protein (CRP), numbers of senescent p16INK4a positive cells in the epidermis...

  3. Evaluation of Soil Loss and Erosion Control Measures on Ranges and Range Structures at Installations in Temperate Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Soil Loss Equation ( USLE ) and the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) continue to be widely accepted methods for estimating sediment loss...range areas. Therefore, a generalized design methodology using the Universal Soil Loss Equation ( USLE ) is presented to accommodate the variations...constructed use the slope most suitable to the area topography (3:1 or 4:1). Step 4: Using the Universal Soil Loss equation, USLE , find the values of A

  4. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-04

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation.

  5. Assessing the small-strain soil stiffness for offshore wind turbines based on in situ seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteijlen, W G; Van Dalen, K N; Metrikine, A V; Hamre, L

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental natural frequency as measured on installed offshore wind turbines is significantly higher than its designed value, and it is expected that the explanation for this can be found in the currently adopted modeling of soil-structure interaction. The small-strain soil stiffness is an important design parameter, as it has a defining influence on the first natural frequency of these structures. In this contribution, in situ seismic measurements are used to derive the small-strain shear modulus of soil as input for 3D soil-structure interaction models to assess the initial soil stiffness at small strains for offshore wind turbine foundations. A linear elastic finite element model of a half-space of solids attached to a pile is used to derive an equivalent first mode shape of the foundation. The second model extends the first one by introducing contact elements between pile and soil, to take possible slip and gap-forming into account. The deflections derived with the 3D models are smaller than those derived with the p- y curve design code. This higher stiffness is in line with the higher measured natural frequencies. Finally a method is suggested to translate the response of 3D models into 1D engineering models of a beam laterally supported by uncoupled distributed springs

  6. Smartphone-based accelerometry is a valid tool for measuring dynamic changes in knee extension range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Morten Pallisgaard; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Measurement of static joint range of motion is used extensively in orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities to benchmark treatment efficacy. Static measures are, however, insufficient in providing detailed information about patient impairments. Dynamic range of motion measures cou...

  7. Measurement of the Lense-Thirring drag on high-altitude, laser-ranged artificial satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciufolini, I.

    1986-01-01

    We describe a new method of measuring the Lense-Thirring relativistic nodal drag using LAGEOS together with another high-altitude, laser-ranged, similar satellite with appropriately chosen orbital parameters. We propose, for this purpose, that a future satellite such as LAGEOS II have an inclination supplementary to that of LAGEOS. The experiment proposed here would provide a method for experimental verification of the general relativistic formulation of Mach's principle and measurement of the gravitomagnetic field

  8. Alpha Beam Energy Determination Using a Range Measuring Device for Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Byeon Gil; Hong, Seung Pyo; Kim, Ran Young; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The threshold energy of the {sup 209}Bi(α,3n){sup 210} At reaction is at about 30MeV. Our laboratory suggested an energy measurement method to confirm the proton-beam's energy by using a range measurement device. The experiment was performed energy measurement of alpha beam. The alpha beam of energy 29 MeV has been extracted from the cyclotron for the production of {sup 211}At. This device was composed of four parts: an absorber, a drive shaft, and a servo motor and a Faraday cup. The drive shaft was mounted on the absorber and connects with the axis of the servo motor and rotates linearly and circularly by this servo motor. A Faraday cup is for measuring the beam flux. As this drive shaft rotates, the thickness of the absorber varies depending on the rotation angle of the absorber. The energy of the alpha particle accelerated and extracted from MC-50 cyclotron was calculated with the measurement of the particle range in Al foil and using ASTAR, SRIM, MCNPX software. There were a little discrepancy between the expected energy and the calculated energy within the 0.5MeV error range. We have a plan to make an experiment with various alpha particle energies and another methodology, for example, the cross section measurement of the nuclear reaction.

  9. Permeability and seismic velocity and their anisotropy across the Alpine Fault, New Zealand: An insight from laboratory measurements on core from the Deep Fault Drilling Project phase 1 (DFDP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M. J.; Tatham, D.; Faulkner, D. R.; Mariani, E.; Boulton, C.

    2017-08-01

    The Alpine Fault, a transpressional plate boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates, is known to rupture quasiperiodically with large magnitude earthquakes (Mw 8). The hydraulic and elastic properties of fault zones are thought to vary over the seismic cycle, influencing the nature and style of earthquake rupture and associated processes. We present a suite of laboratory permeability and P (Vp) and S (Vs) wave velocity measurements performed on fault lithologies recovered during the first phase of the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP-1), which sampled principal slip zone (PSZ) gouges, cataclasites, and fractured ultramylonites, with all recovered lithologies overprinted by abundant secondary mineralization, recording enhanced fluid-rock interaction. Core material was tested in three orthogonal directions, orientated relative to the down-core axis and, when present, foliation. Measurements were conducted with pore pressure (H2O) held at 5 MPa over an effective pressure (Peff) range of 5-105 MPa. Permeabilities and seismic velocities decrease with proximity to the PSZ with permeabilities ranging from 10-17 to 10-21 m2 and Vp and Vs ranging from 4400 to 5900 m/s in the ultramylonites/cataclasites and 3900 to 4200 m/s at the PSZ. In comparison with intact country rock protoliths, the highly variable cataclastic structures and secondary phyllosilicates and carbonates have resulted in an overall reduction in permeability and seismic wave velocity, as well as a reduction in anisotropy within the fault core. These results concur with other similar studies on other mature, tectonic faults in their interseismic period.

  10. Varying the item format improved the range of measurement in patient-reported outcome measures assessing physical function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liegl, Gregor; Gandek, Barbara; Fischer, H. Felix

    2017-01-01

    precision between the short forms using different item formats. Results: Sufficient unidimensionality of all short-form items and the original PF item bank was supported. Compared to formats A and B, format C increased the range of reliable measurement by about 0.5 standard deviations on the positive side...

  11. Long-range correlations of serial FEV1 measurements in emphysematous patients and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Madsen, F

    1998-01-01

    are autocorrelated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation structure in time series of FEV1 measurements. Nineteen patients with severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (phenotype PiZ) and moderate to severe emphysema and two subjects with normal lungs were followed for several years with daily self......In obstructive lung disease the annual change in lung function is usually estimated from serial measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Frequent measurements in each patient may not improve this estimate because data are not statistically independent; i.e., the measurements...... measurements show long-range correlations. The practical implication is that FEV1 need not be measured more often than once every 3 mo in studies of the long-term trends in lung function....

  12. Seismic Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  13. Baking enables McLeod gauge to measure in ultrahigh vacuum range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisman, W. S.

    1965-01-01

    Accurate measurements in the ultrahigh vacuum range by a conventional McLeod gage requires degassing of the gage's glass walls. A closed system, in which mercury is forced into the gage by gravity alone, and in which the gage components are baked out for long periods, is used to achieve this degassing.

  14. Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trumpold, H.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    compression and injection moulded plastic negatives and Ni-negatives have been made from which again Ni-positives were produced. The replication processes showed negligible deviations from the Pt and Pa values compared to the primary standards. An important prerequisite is the cleanliness of the surfaces......Background For the precise and accurate measurement of surface topography a whole range of surface detection systems is available. With their application in research and production problems arise due to the lack of traceable standard artefacts for the instrument calibration in X, Y and Z directions...... and for the calibration of filters. Existing ISO standards on calibration specimens are inadequate and limited in that they only cover contacting instruments and only partially the measuring ranges for these instruments. The whole range of non-contacting instruments are not covered despite their increasing use...

  15. Scintillator-CCD camera system light output response to dosimetry parameters for proton beam range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daftari, Inder K., E-mail: idaftari@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Castaneda, Carlos M.; Essert, Timothy [Crocker Nuclear Laboratory,1 Shields Avenue, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Phillips, Theodore L.; Mishra, Kavita K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)

    2012-09-11

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the luminescence light output response in a plastic scintillator irradiated by a 67.5 MeV proton beam using various dosimetry parameters. The relationship of the visible scintillator light with the beam current or dose rate, aperture size and the thickness of water in the water-column was studied. The images captured on a CCD camera system were used to determine optimal dosimetry parameters for measuring the range of a clinical proton beam. The method was developed as a simple quality assurance tool to measure the range of the proton beam and compare it to (a) measurements using two segmented ionization chambers and water column between them, and (b) with an ionization chamber (IC-18) measurements in water. We used a block of plastic scintillator that measured 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3} to record visible light generated by a 67.5 MeV proton beam. A high-definition digital video camera Moticam 2300 connected to a PC via USB 2.0 communication channel was used to record images of scintillation luminescence. The brightness of the visible light was measured while changing beam current and aperture size. The results were analyzed to obtain the range and were compared with the Bragg peak measurements with an ionization chamber. The luminescence light from the scintillator increased linearly with the increase of proton beam current. The light output also increased linearly with aperture size. The relationship between the proton range in the scintillator and the thickness of the water column showed good linearity with a precision of 0.33 mm (SD) in proton range measurement. For the 67.5 MeV proton beam utilized, the optimal parameters for scintillator light output response were found to be 15 nA (16 Gy/min) and an aperture size of 15 mm with image integration time of 100 ms. The Bragg peak depth brightness distribution was compared with the depth dose distribution from ionization chamber measurements

  16. Measuring the Dynamic Soil Response During Repeated Wheeling Using Seismic Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Carizzon, Marco; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    was performed with an agricultural tire (60 kN wheel load) on a gleyic Cambisol. We measured Vp using an acoustic (microseismic) device at various depths before, during (i.e., below the tire), and after wheeling. In addition, we measured bulk density and penetrometer resistance before and after wheeling...

  17. Spin motion determination of the Envisat satellite through laser ranging measurements from a single pass measured by a single station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Jean-Noël; Šilha, Jiří; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to accurately determine the position of space objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to measure the range to the spacecraft with high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits for these targets. Non-active spacecraft, which are not attitude controlled any longer, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques and forces. If the return signal is measured for a non-spherical non-active rotating object, the signal in the range residuals with respect to the reference orbit is more complex. For rotating objects the return signal shows an oscillating pattern or patterns caused by the RRA moving around the satellite's centre of mass. This behaviour is projected onto the radial component measured by the SLR. In our work, we demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique from one sensor to a satellite equipped with a RRA can be used to precisely determine its spin motion during one passage. Multiple SLR measurements of one target over time allow to accurately monitor spin motion changes which can be further used for attitude predictions. We show our solutions of the spin motion determined for the non-active ESA satellite Envisat obtained from measurements acquired during years 2013-2015 by the Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. All the necessary parameters are defined for our own so-called point-like model which describes the motion of a point in space around the satellite centre of mass.

  18. Polymeric pH nanosensor with extended measurement range bearing octaarginine as cell penetrating peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Peng; Sun, Honghao; Liu, Mingxing

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic peptide octaarginine which mimics human immunodeficiency virus-1, Tat protein is used as cell penetrating moiety for new pH nanosensors which demonstrate enhanced cellular uptake and expanded measurement range from pH 3.9 to pH 7.3 by simultaneously incorporating two complemental pH-s......H-sensitive fluorophores in a same nanoparticle. The authors believe that this triple fluorescent pH sensor provides a new tool to pH measurements that can have application in cellular uptake mechanism study and new nanomedicine design.......A synthetic peptide octaarginine which mimics human immunodeficiency virus-1, Tat protein is used as cell penetrating moiety for new pH nanosensors which demonstrate enhanced cellular uptake and expanded measurement range from pH 3.9 to pH 7.3 by simultaneously incorporating two complemental p...

  19. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 mu mol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based...... for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used...... measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized "sensing chemistry" that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded...

  20. An extended set-value observer for position estimation using single range measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcal, Jose; Jouffroy, Jerome; Fossen, Thor I.

    the observability of the system is briefly discussed and an extended set-valued observer is presented, with some discussion about the effect of the measurements noise on the final solution. This observer estimates bounds in the errors assuming that the exogenous signals are bounded, providing a safe region......The ability of estimating the position of an underwater vehicle from single range measurements is important in applications where one transducer marks an important geographical point, when there is a limitation in the size or cost of the vehicle, or when there is a failure in a system...... of transponders. The knowledge of the bearing of the vehicle and the range measurements from a single location can provide a solution which is sensitive to the trajectory that the vehicle is following, since there is no complete constraint on the position estimate with a single beacon. In this paper...

  1. Smartphone Photography as a Tool to Measure Knee Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mica, Megan Conti; Wagner, Eric R; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate measuring knee range of motion (ROM) from smartphone photography. Thirty-two participants (64 knees) obtained smartphone photographs of knee flexion and extension. Surgeons obtained the same photographs and goniometric measurement of ROM. ROM was measured using Adobe Photoshop. Goniometer versus digital measurements, participant versus surgeon photographs, and interobserver measurements were analyzed. The average difference in goniometer and digital photograph measurements was 5°. The interclass correlation was .642(L) and .656(R). The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that 29/32 digital measurements were within the 95% confidence interval (CI). Participants' versus researchers' photographs averaged a 2° difference. The interclass correlation was .924(L) and .91(R). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that 31/32 measurements were within the 95% CI. Interobserver reliability averaged aROMdifference of 5°. The concordance coefficients were .647(L) and .723(R). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that 30 of 32 digital measurements were within the 95% CI. Measuring knee ROM using smartphone digital photography is valid and reliable. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 27(1):52-57, 2018).

  2. Error Analysis of Relative Calibration for RCS Measurement on Ground Plane Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Peng-fei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ground plane range is a kind of outdoor Radar Cross Section (RCS test range used for static measurement of full-size or scaled targets. Starting from the characteristics of ground plane range, the impact of environments on targets and calibrators is analyzed during calibration in the RCS measurements. The error of relative calibration produced by the different illumination of target and calibrator is studied. The relative calibration technique used in ground plane range is to place the calibrator on a fixed and auxiliary pylon somewhere between the radar and the target under test. By considering the effect of ground reflection and antenna pattern, the relationship between the magnitude of echoes and the position of calibrator is discussed. According to the different distances between the calibrator and target, the difference between free space and ground plane range is studied and the error of relative calibration is calculated. Numerical simulation results are presented with useful conclusions. The relative calibration error varies with the position of calibrator, frequency and antenna beam width. In most case, set calibrator close to the target may keep the error under control.

  3. Approach for measuring the chemistry of individual particles in the size range critical for cloud formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauscher, Melanie D; Moore, Meagan J K; Lewis, Gregory S; Hering, Susanne V; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-03-15

    Aerosol particles, especially those ranging from 50 to 200 nm, strongly impact climate by serving as nuclei upon which water condenses and cloud droplets form. However, the small number of analytical methods capable of measuring the composition of particles in this size range, particularly at the individual particle level, has limited our knowledge of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) composition and hence our understanding of aerosols effect on climate. To obtain more insight into particles in this size range, we developed a method which couples a growth tube (GT) to an ultrafine aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UF-ATOFMS), a combination that allows in situ measurements of the composition of individual particles as small as 38 nm. The growth tube uses water to grow particles to larger sizes so they can be optically detected by the UF-ATOFMS, extending the size range to below 100 nm with no discernible changes in particle composition. To gain further insight into the temporal variability of aerosol chemistry and sources, the GT-UF-ATOFMS was used for online continuous measurements over a period of 3 days.

  4. Novel gravimetric measurement technique for quantitative volume calibration in the sub-microliter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Dong; Zengerle, Roland; Steinert, Chris; Ernst, Andreas; Koltay, Peter; Bammesberger, Stefan; Tanguy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel measurement method based on the gravimetric principles adapted from the ASTM E542 and ISO 4787 standards for quantitative volume determination in the sub-microliter range. Such a method is particularly important for the calibration of non-contact micro dispensers as well as other microfluidic devices. The novel method is based on the linear regression analysis of continuously monitored gravimetric results and therefore is referred to as ‘gravimetric regression method (GRM)’. In this context, the regression analysis is necessary to compensate the mass loss due to evaporation that is significant for very small dispensing volumes. A full assessment of the measurement uncertainty of GRM is presented and results in a standard measurement uncertainty around 6 nl for dosage volumes in the range from 40 nl to 1 µl. The GRM has been experimentally benchmarked with a dual-dye ratiometric photometric method (Artel Inc., Westbrook, ME, USA), which can provide traceability of measurement to the International System of Units (SI) through reference standards maintained by NIST. Good precision (max. CV = 2.8%) and consistency (bias around 7 nl in the volume range from 40 to 400 nl) have been observed comparing the two methods. Based on the ASTM and ISO standards on the one hand and the benchmark with the photometric method on the other hand, two different approaches for establishing traceability for the GRM are discussed. (paper)

  5. Comprehensive Measurement of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Wide Range Aerosol Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, L; Pesch, M; Grimm, H

    2011-01-01

    A wide range aerosol spectrometer (WRAS) was used for comprehensive long term measurements of aerosol size distributions. The system combines the results of an optical aerosol spectrometer with the results of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to record essentially the full size range (5 nm - 32 μm) of atmospheric particles in 72 channels. Measurements were carried out over one year (2009) at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW)-Station Hohenpeissenberg, Bavaria. Total particle number concentrations obtained from the aerosol size distributions were compared to the total number concentrations measured by a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The comparison showed an excellent agreement of the data. The high time resolution of 5 minutes allows the combination of the measured size distributions with meteorological data and correlations to gaseous pollutants (CO, NOx and SO2). A good correlation of particle number and CO concentrations was found for long distance transported small particles, which were probably mainly soot particles. Correlations to NOx were observed for aerosols from local sources such as traffic emissions. The formation of secondary aerosols from gaseous precursors was also observed. Episodes of relatively high concentration of particles in the range of 2-3 μm were probably caused by pollen.

  6. 10.23  Mcps laser pseudo-code ranging system with 0.33  mm (1σ) pseudo-range measurement precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaonan; Tong, Shoufeng; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Yue

    2017-07-01

    The inter-satellite laser link is the backbone of the next inter-satellite information network, and ranging and communication are the main functions of the inter-satellite laser link. This study focuses on the inter-satellite laser ranging based on the pseudo-code correlation technology. In this paper, several typical laser-ranging methods have been compared and we determined that the laser pseudo-code ranging architecture is more suitable for the inter-satellite laser communication link. The pseudo-code ranging system is easy to combine with a digital communication system, and we used it to calculate integer ambiguity by modulating the time information. The main challenge of the ranging system is range precision, which is the main focus of this paper. First, the framework of the pseudo-code ranging system is introduced; the ranging architecture of dual one-way ranging is used to eliminate the clock error between the two transceivers, and then the uncertainty of the phase detector is analyzed. In the analysis, the carrier to noise ratio and the ranging code rate are constrained by the laser communication link margin and the electronic hardware limitation. Therefore, the relationship between the sampling depth and the phase detector uncertainty is verified. A series of optical fiber channel laser pseudo-code ranging experiments demonstrated the effects of sampling depth on the ranging precision. By adjusting the depth of storage, such as the depth of 1.6 Mb, we obtained a pseudo-range measurement precision of 0.33 mm (1σ), which is equivalent to 0.0001 times code subdivision of 10.23 Mcps pseudo-code. This paper has achieved high precision in a pseudo-range measurements, which is the foundation of the inter-satellite laser link.

  7. A Study on the Development of Prototype Seismic Isolation Device for NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hongpyo; Cho, Myungsug; Kim, Sunyong; Lee, Yonghee; Kang Kyunghun [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Korean nuclear power plants have been and still are based on seismic resistance design including all of the natural disasters. However, in regions of high seismic hazard, seismic isolation technology is needed to guarantee the seismic safety on nuclear power plants. To achieve this purpose, the research and development of seismic isolation system for the construction in high seismicity area is on-going in Korea. In this study, prototype seismic isolation devices as mentioned above are developed and tested to identify the basic shear and compressive characteristics of them. In this study, assessment performance of basic characteristics on the prototype LRB and EQS seismic isolation for nuclear power plant structures is employed to compare with design values. Based on the test results of compression and shear characteristics, it is judged that they meet the measuring efficiency range conditions which are presented in ISO 22762 and AASHOT guide specification. Therefore, prototype seismic isolation devices like LRB and EQS developed in this study can be expected to be used as reference data when designing a seismic isolation system for nuclear power plant structures in the future.

  8. Novel birefringence interrogation for Sagnac loop interferometer sensor with unlimited linear measurement range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haijun; Shao, Liyang; Qian, Heng; Zhang, Xinpu; Liang, Jiawei; Luo, Bin; Pan, Wei; Yan, Lianshan

    2017-03-20

    A novel demodulation method for Sagnac loop interferometer based sensor has been proposed and demonstrated, by unwrapping the phase changes with birefringence interrogation. A temperature sensor based on Sagnac loop interferometer has been used to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. Several tests with 40 °C temperature range have been accomplished with a great linearity of 0.9996 in full range. The proposed scheme is universal for all Sagnac loop interferometer based sensors and it has unlimited linear measurable range which overwhelming the conventional demodulation method with peak/dip tracing. Furthermore, the influence of the wavelength sampling interval and wavelength span on the demodulation error has been discussed in this work. The proposed interrogation method has a great significance for Sagnac loop interferometer sensor and it might greatly enhance the availability of this type of sensors in practical application.

  9. Detection of cracks with low vertical offset in clayey formations from galleries by using seismic methods. Tournemire experimental station. First part: problem analysis and measurement sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretaudeau, Francois; Gelis, Celine; Cabrera, Justo; Leparoux, Donatienne; Cote, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Within the frame of the expertise of the ANDRA file on the project of storage of radioactive wastes in clayey formations, the detection of natural cracks which could locally alter the argillite containment properties is a crucial issue. As some previous studies showed that some cracks exhibiting a low vertical offset could not be detected in clayey formations from the surface, this document reports a study which aimed at assessing the possibility of detection of such a crack by means of seismic methods directly implemented from underground works. It reports a detailed analysis of the seismic imagery problem, the characterization of different areas of the investigated environment, the assessment and validation of various hypotheses by using experimental data obtained in an experimental station and numerical simulations. The potential of each envisaged method (migration, tomography, wave form inversion) is assessed, notably with respect to synthetic seismic data obtained by numerical modelling. Preliminary results are used to size a complete seismic measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the crack area, and at the assessment of detection limitations of the different methods

  10. GPS measurements of crustal deformation across the southern Arava Valley section of the Dead Sea Fault and implications to regional seismic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiel, Yariv; Masson, Frederic; Piatibratova, Oksana; Mizrahi, Yaakov

    2018-01-01

    Detailed analysis of crustal deformation along the southern Arava Valley section of the Dead Sea Fault is presented. Using dense GPS measurements we obtain the velocities of new near- and far-field campaign stations across the fault. We find that this section is locked with a locking depth of 19.9 ± 7.7 km and a slip rate of 5.0 ± 0.8 mm/yr. The geodetically determined locking depth is found to be highly consistent with the thickness of the seismogenic zone in this region. Analysis of instrumental seismic record suggests that only 1% of the total seismic moment accumulated since the last large event occurred about 800 years ago, was released by small to moderate earthquakes. Historical and paleo-seismic catalogs of this region together with instrumental seismic data and calculations of Coulomb stress changes induced by the 1995 Mw 7.2 Nuweiba earthquake suggest that the southern Arava Valley section of the Dead Sea Fault is in the late stage of the current interseismic period.

  11. Absolute distance measurement with extension of nonambiguity range using the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yoon-Soo; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the method of synthetic wavelength interferometry (SWI) for absolute measurement of long distances using the radio-frequency harmonics of the pulse repetition rate of a mode-locked femtosecond laser. Our intention here is to extend the nonambiguity range (NAR) of the SWI method using a coarse virtual wavelength synthesized by shifting the pulse repetition rate. The proposed concept of NAR extension is experimentally verified by measuring a ˜13-m distance with repeatability of 9.5 μm (root-mean-square). The measurement precision is estimated to be 31.2 μm in comparison with an incremental He-Ne laser interferometer. This extended SWI method is found to be well suited for long-distance measurements demanded in the fields of large-scale precision engineering, geodetic survey, and future space missions.

  12. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  13. Generalized weighted ratio method for accurate turbidity measurement over a wide range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Ping; Song, Hong; Guo, Yilu; Zhan, Shuyue; Huang, Hui; Wang, Hangzhou; Tao, Bangyi; Mu, Quanquan; Xu, Jing; Li, Dejun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-14

    Turbidity measurement is important for water quality assessment, food safety, medicine, ocean monitoring, etc. In this paper, a method that accurately estimates the turbidity over a wide range is proposed, where the turbidity of the sample is represented as a weighted ratio of the scattered light intensities at a series of angles. An improvement in the accuracy is achieved by expanding the structure of the ratio function, thus adding more flexibility to the turbidity-intensity fitting. Experiments have been carried out with an 850 nm laser and a power meter fixed on a turntable to measure the light intensity at different angles. The results show that the relative estimation error of the proposed method is 0.58% on average for a four-angle intensity combination for all test samples with a turbidity ranging from 160 NTU to 4000 NTU.

  14. Potentiometric Measurement of Transition Ranges and Titration Errors for Acid/Base Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Paul A.

    1997-07-01

    Sophomore analytical chemistry courses typically devote a substantial amount of lecture time to acid/base equilibrium theory, and usually include at least one laboratory project employing potentiometric titrations. In an effort to provide students a laboratory experience that more directly supports their classroom discussions on this important topic, an experiment involving potentiometric measurement of transition ranges and titration errors for common acid/base indicators has been developed. The pH and visually-assessed color of a millimolar strong acid/base system are monitored as a function of added titrant volume, and the resultant data plotted to permit determination of the indicator's transition range and associated titration error. Student response is typically quite positive, and the measured quantities correlate reasonably well to literature values.

  15. Measurement range of phase retrieval in optical surface and wavefront metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Gregory R.; Fienup, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Phase retrieval employs very simple data collection hardware and iterative algorithms to determine the phase of an optical field. We have derived limitations on phase retrieval, as applied to optical surface and wavefront metrology, in terms of the speed of beam (i.e., f-number or numerical aperture) and amount of aberration using arguments based on sampling theory and geometrical optics. These limitations suggest methodologies for expanding these ranges by increasing the complexity of the measurement arrangement, the phase-retrieval algorithm, or both. We have simulated one of these methods where a surface is measured at unusual conjugates

  16. A liquid crystalline medium for measuring residual dipolar couplings over a wide range of temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Eberstadt, Matthias; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Meadows, Robert P.; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories (United States)

    1998-10-15

    A mixture of dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC) and 3-(cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio-2-hydroxyl-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPSO) in water forms disc shaped bicelles that become ordered at high magnetic fields over a wide range of temperatures. As illustrated for the FK506 binding protein (FKBP), large residual dipolar couplings can be measured for proteins dissolved in low concentrations (5% w/v) of a DLPC/CHAPSO medium at a molar ratio of 4.2:1. This system is especially useful for measuring residual dipolar couplings for molecules that are only stable at low temperatures.

  17. Is goniometry suitable for measuring ankle range of motion in female ballet dancers? An initial comparison with radiographic measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2011-06-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion to attain the demi-plié (weight-bearing full dorsiflexion [DF]) and en pointe (weight-bearing full plantar flexion [PF]) positions of ballet. However, techniques for assessing this amount of motion have not yet received sufficient scientific scrutiny. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences between weight-bearing goniometric and radiographic ankle range of motion measurements in female ballet dancers. Ankle range of motion in 8 experienced female ballet dancers was assessed by goniometry and 2 radiographic measurement methods. The latter were performed on 3 mediolateral x-rays, in demi-plié, neutral, and en pointe positions; one of them used the same landmarks as goniometry. DF values were not significantly different among the methods, but PF values were (P ballet dancers and suggest that goniometry may not be ideal for assessing ankle range of motion in these individuals. Therefore, further research is needed to standardize how DF and PF are measured in ballet dancers. Diagnostic, Level I.

  18. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  19. Time Biases in laser ranging measurements; impacts on geodetic products (Reference Frame and Orbitography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, A.; Exertier, P.; Lemoine, F. G.; Chinn, D. S.; Zelensky, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    The GGOS objectives are to maintain a geodetic network with an accuracy of 1 mm and a stability of 0.1 mm per year. For years, the laser ranging technique, which provide very accurate absolute distances to geodetic targets enable to determine the scale factor as well as coordinates of the geocenter. In order to achieve this goal, systematic errors appearing in the laser ranging measurements must be considered and solved. In addition to Range Bias (RB), which is the primary source of uncertainty of the technique, Time Bias (TB) has been recently detected by using the Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) space instrument capability on-board the satellite Jason-2. Instead of determining TB through the precise orbit determination that is applied to commonly used geodetic targets like LAGEOS to estimate global geodetic products, we have developed, independently, a dedicated method to transfer time between remote satellite laser ranging stations. As a result, the evolving clock phase shift to UTC of around 30 stations has been determined under the form of time series of time bias per station from 2008 to 2016 with an accuracy of 3-4 ns. It demonstrated the difficulty, in terms of Time & Frequency used technologies, to locally maintain accuracy and long term stability at least in the range of 100 ns that is the current requirement for time measurements (UTC) for the laser ranging technique. Because some laser ranging stations oftently exceed this limit (from 100 ns to a few μs) we have been studying these effects first on the precision orbit determination itself, second on the station positioning. We discuss the impact of TB on LAGEOS and Jason-2 orbits, which appears to affect the along-track component essentially. We also investigate the role of TB in global geodetic parameters as the station coordinates. Finally, we propose to provide the community with time series of time bias of laser ranging stations, under the form of a data- handling-file in order to be included in

  20. A High Dynamic-Range Beam Position Measurement System for ELSA-2

    CERN Document Server

    Balleyguier, P; Guimbal, P; Borrion, H

    2003-01-01

    New beamlines are presently under construction for ELSA, a 20 MeV electron linac located at Bruyères-le-Châtel. These lines need a beam position measurement system filling the following requirements: small footprint, wide dynamic range, single-bunch/multi-bunch capability, simple design. We designed a compact 4-stripline sensor and an electronic treatment chain based on logarithmic amplifiers. This paper presents the design, cold and hot test results.

  1. Identification of long-range transport of aerosols over Austria using EARLINET lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelia, Talianu

    2018-04-01

    The aims of the study is to identify the paths of the long-range transported aerosols over Austria and their potential origin, and to estimate their properties, using lidar measurements from EARLINET stations closest to Austria from Germany and Romania and aerosol transport models. As of now, there is no lidar station in Austria. The study is part of a project to estimate the usefulness of a lidar station located in Vienna, Austria.

  2. Electron density values of various human tissues: in vitro Compton scatter measurements and calculated ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate direct measurements of electron density have been performed on specimens from 10 different tissue types of the human body, representing the major organs, using a Compton scatter technique. As a supplement to these experimental values, calculations have been carried out to determine the electron densities expected for these tissue types. The densities observed are in good agreement with the broad ranges deduced from the basic data previously published. The results of both the in vitro sample measurements and the approximate calculations indicate that the electron density of most normal healthy soft tissue can be expected to fall within the fairly restricted range of +- 5% around 3.4 X 10 23 electrons per cm 3 . The obvious exception to this generalisation is the result for lung tissue, which falls considerably below this range owing to the high air content inherent in its construction. In view of such an overall limited variation with little difference between tissues, it would appear that electron density alone is likely to be a rather poor clinical parameter for tissue analysis, with high accuracy and precision being essential in any in vivo Compton measurements for imaging or diagnosis on specific organs. (author)

  3. Laser Ranging in Solar System: Technology Developments and New Science Measurement Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mcgarry, J.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-12-01

    Laser Ranging has played a major role in geodetic studies of the Earth over the past 40 years. The technique can potentially be used in between planets and spacecrafts within the solar system to advance planetary science. For example, a direct measurement of distances between planets, such as Mars and Venus would make significant improvements in understanding the dynamics of the whole solar system, including the masses of the planets and moons, asteroids and their perturbing interactions, and the gravity field of the Sun. Compared to the conventional radio frequency (RF) tracking systems, laser ranging is potentially more accurate because it is much less sensitive to the transmission media. It is also more efficient because the laser beams are much better focused onto the targets than RF beams. However, existing laser ranging systems are all Earth centric, that is, from ground stations on Earth to orbiting satellites in near Earth orbits or lunar orbit, and to the lunar retro-reflector arrays deployed by the astronauts in the early days of lunar explorations. Several long distance laser ranging experiments have been conducted with the lidar in space, including a two-way laser ranging demonstration between Earth and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MESSENGER spacecraft over 24 million km, and a one way laser transmission and detection experiment over 80 million km between Earth and the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the MGS spacecraft in Mars orbit. A one-way laser ranging operation has been carried out continuously from 2009 to 2014 between multiple ground stations to LRO spacecraft in lunar orbit. The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) on the LADEE mission has demonstrated that a two way laser ranging measurements, including both the Doppler frequency and the phase shift, can be obtained from the subcarrier or the data clocks of a high speed duplex laser communication system. Plans and concepts presently being studied suggest we may be

  4. On the theory of SODAR measurement techniques[SOund Detection And Ranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniou, I.; Joergensen, H.E. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Ormel, F. [Energy Research Center of the Netherlands (Netherlands); Bradley, S.; Huenerbein, S. von [University of Salford (United Kingdom); Emeis, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Warmbier, G. [GWU-Umwelttechnik Gmbh (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    The need for alternative means to measure the wind speed for wind energy purposes has increased with the increase of the size of wind turbines. The cost and the technical difficulties for performing wind speed measurements has also increased with the size of the wind turbines, since it is demanded that the wind speed has to be measured at the rotor centre of the turbine and the size of both the rotor and the hub height have grown following the increase in the size of the wind turbines. The SODAR (SOund Detection And Ranging) is an alternative to the use of cup anemometers and offers the possibility of measuring both the wind speed distribution with height and the wind direction. At the same time the SODAR presents a number of serious drawbacks such as the low number of measurements per time period, the dependence of the ability to measure on the atmospheric conditions and the difficulty of measuring at higher wind speeds due to either background noise or the neutral condition of the atmosphere. Within the WISE project (EU project number NNE5-2001-297), a number of work packages have been defined in order to deal with the SODAR. The present report is the result of the work package 1. Within this package the objective has been to present and achieve the following: 1) An accurate theoretic model that describes all the relevant aspects of the interaction of the sound beam with the atmosphere in the level of detail needed for wind energy applications. 2) Understanding of dependence of SODAR performance on hard- and software configuration. 3) Quantification of principal difference between SODAR wind measurement and wind speed measurements with cup anemometers with regard to power performance measurements.

  5. A Newly Designed Fiber-Optic Based Earth Pressure Transducer with Adjustable Measurement Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Zhen Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber-optic based earth pressure sensor (FPS with an adjustable measurement range and high sensitivity is developed to measure earth pressures for civil infrastructures. The new FPS combines a cantilever beam with fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors and a flexible membrane. Compared with a traditional pressure transducer with a dual diaphragm design, the proposed FPS has a larger measurement range and shows high accuracy. The working principles, parameter design, fabrication methods, and laboratory calibration tests are explained in this paper. A theoretical solution is derived to obtain the relationship between the applied pressure and strain of the FBG sensors. In addition, a finite element model is established to analyze the mechanical behavior of the membrane and the cantilever beam and thereby obtain optimal parameters. The cantilever beam is 40 mm long, 15 mm wide, and 1 mm thick. The whole FPS has a diameter of 100 mm and a thickness of 30 mm. The sensitivity of the FPS is 0.104 kPa/με. In addition, automatic temperature compensation can be achieved. The FPS’s sensitivity, physical properties, and response to applied pressure are extensively examined through modeling and experiments. The results show that the proposed FPS has numerous potential applications in soil pressure measurement.

  6. Comparison of seismic sources for shallow seismic: sledgehammer and pyrotechnics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Aleksander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pyrotechnic materials are one of the types of the explosives materials which produce thermal, luminous or sound effects, gas, smoke and their combination as a result of a self-sustaining chemical reaction. Therefore, pyrotechnics can be used as a seismic source that is designed to release accumulated energy in a form of seismic wave recorded by tremor sensors (geophones after its passage through the rock mass. The aim of this paper was to determine the utility of pyrotechnics for shallow seismic engineering. The work presented comparing the conventional method of seismic wave excitation for seismic refraction method like plate and hammer and activating of firecrackers on the surface. The energy released by various sources and frequency spectra was compared for the two types of sources. The obtained results did not determine which sources gave the better results but showed very interesting aspects of using pyrotechnics in seismic measurements for example the use of pyrotechnic materials in MASW.

  7. Multi-functional measurement systems for studying photon-hadron interactions in the intermediate energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, P.S.; Vol'nov, M.I.; Eliseev, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    The PION multifunctional time-of-flight measurement system operating on-line with the D-116 computer is described. The system is designed to study proton-hadron interaction processes using the PACHRA synchrotron beam. The following devices are involved into the basic permanent system equipment: two gamma telescope counters, neutron spectrometer, scintillation mass spectrometer, and also cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets, ionization chambers, and quantometer. The time-of-flight neutron spectrometer consists of 4 coordinate-sensitive scintillation counters, before which the logic detector operating in the anticoincidence regime is placed. Information acquisition and measurement system control are accomplished by the computer using the CAMAK modules. The above system allows one to observe at the same time different physical processes and to carry out simultaneous measurements in a wide energy range

  8. Standardization of radiation protection measurements in mixed fields of an extended energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    The improved ICRU concept of dose equivalent index aims at standardizing both area and personnel dose measurements so that the results on the dosimetry of external irradiations in radiation protection become compatible. It seems that for photon and neutron energies up to 3 and 20 MeV respectively the realization of dose-equivalent index is straightforward, but the inclusion of higher energies and/or other types of radiation will lead both to conceptual and practical difficulties. It will be shown that practical measurements in mixed radiation fields of an extended energy range for protection purposes will overestimate the standardized quantity. While area measurements can be performed to represent a good approximation, greater uncertainties have to be accepted in personnel dosimetry for stray radiation fields around GeV proton accelerators

  9. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek; Lawes, Malcolm; Liu, Kexin; Mansour, Morkous S.

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Fahed; Moskvin, Vadim; Stantz, Keith M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly impact beam commissioning, treatment verification during particle beam therapy and image guided techniques.

  11. Field test investigation of high sensitivity fiber optic seismic geophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Min, Li; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Faxiang; Sun, Zhihui; Li, Shujuan; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Zhong; Hao, Guanghu

    2017-10-01

    Seismic reflection, whose measured signal is the artificial seismic waves ,is the most effective method and widely used in the geophysical prospecting. And this method can be used for exploration of oil, gas and coal. When a seismic wave travelling through the Earth encounters an interface between two materials with different acoustic impedances, some of the wave energy will reflect off the interface and some will refract through the interface. At its most basic, the seismic reflection technique consists of generating seismic waves and measuring the time taken for the waves to travel from the source, reflect off an interface and be detected by an array of geophones at the surface. Compared to traditional geophones such as electric, magnetic, mechanical and gas geophone, optical fiber geophones have many advantages. Optical fiber geophones can achieve sensing and signal transmission simultaneously. With the development of fiber grating sensor technology, fiber bragg grating (FBG) is being applied in seismic exploration and draws more and more attention to its advantage of anti-electromagnetic interference, high sensitivity and insensitivity to meteorological conditions. In this paper, we designed a high sensitivity geophone and tested its sensitivity, based on the theory of FBG sensing. The frequency response range is from 10 Hz to 100 Hz and the acceleration of the fiber optic seismic geophone is over 1000pm/g. sixteen-element fiber optic seismic geophone array system is presented and the field test is performed in Shengli oilfield of China. The field test shows that: (1) the fiber optic seismic geophone has a higher sensitivity than the traditional geophone between 1-100 Hz;(2) The low frequency reflection wave continuity of fiber Bragg grating geophone is better.

  12. Mantle Flow Across the Baikal Rift Constrained With Integrated Seismic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S.; Meier, T.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    The Baikal Rift is located at the boundary of the stable Siberian Craton and deforming central Mongolia. The origin of the late Cenozoic rifting and volcanism are debated, as is the mantle flow beneath the rift zone. Here we combine new evidence from azimuthally-anisotropic upper-mantle tomography and from a radially-anisotropic inversion of interstation surface-wave dispersion curves with previously published shear-wave-splitting measurements of azimuthal anisotropy across the rift (Gao et al. 1994). While our tomographic model maps isotropic and anisotropic shear-velocity heterogeneity globally, the inversion of interstation phase-velocity measurements produces a single, radially-anisotropic, shear-velocity profile that averages from the rift to 500 km SE of it. The precision and the broad band (8-340 s) of the Rayleigh and Love wave curves ensures high accuracy of the profile. Tomography and shear-wave splitting both give a NW-SE fast direction (perpendicular to the rift) in the vicinity of the rift, changing towards W-E a few hundred kilometers from it. Previously, this has been interpreted as evidence for mantle flow similar to that beneath mid-ocean ridges, with deeper vertical flow directly beneath the rift also proposed. Our radially anisotropic profile, however, shows that while strong anisotropy with SH waves faster than SV waves is present in the thin lithosphere and upper asthenosphere beneath and SE of the rift, no anisotropy is required below 110 km. The tomographic model shows thick cratonic lithosphere north of the rift. These observations suggest that instead of a flow diverging from the rift axis in NW and SE directions, the most likely pattern is the asthenospheric flow in SE direction from beneath the Siberian lithosphere and across the rift. Possible driving forces of the flow are large-scale lithospheric deformation in East Asia and the draining of asthenosphere at W-Pacific subduction zones; a plume beneath the Siberian craton also cannot be

  13. Seismic damage diagnosis of a masonry building using short-term damping measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Leonidas Alexandros S.; Penna, Andrea; Magenes, Guido

    2017-04-01

    It is of considerable importance to perform dynamic identification and detect damage in existing structures. This paper describes a new and practical method for damage diagnosis of masonry buildings requiring minimum computational effort. The method is based on the relative variation of modal damping and validated against experimental data from a full scale two storey shake table test. The experiment involves a building subjected to uniaxial vibrations of progressively increasing intensity at the facilities of EUCENTRE laboratory (Pavia, Italy) up to a near collapse damage state. Five time-histories are applied scaling the Montenegro (1979) accelerogram. These strong motion tests are preceded by random vibration tests (RVT's) which are used to perform modal analysis. Two deterministic methods are applied: the single degree of freedom (SDOF) assumption together with the peak-picking method in the discrete frequency domain and the Eigen realisation algorithm with data correlations (ERA-DC) in the discrete time domain. Regarding the former procedure, some improvements are incorporated to locate rigorously the natural frequencies and estimate the modal damping. The progressive evolution of the modal damping is used as a key indicator to characterise damage on the building. Modal damping is connected to the structural mass and stiffness. A square integrated but only with two components expression for proportional (classical) damping is proposed to fit better with the experimental measurements of modal damping ratios. Using this Rayleigh order formulation the contribution of each of the damping components is evaluated. The stiffness component coefficient is proposed as an effective index to detect damage and quantify its intensity.

  14. CFD comparison with centrifugal compressor measurements on a wide operating range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnou D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal compressors are widely used in industrial applications thanks to their high efficiency. They are able to provide a wide operating range before reaching the flow barrier or surge limits. Performances and range are described by compressor maps obtained experimentally. After a description of performance test rig, this article compares measured centrifugal compressor performances with computational fluid dynamics results. These computations are performed at steady conditions with R134a refrigerant as fluid. Navier-Stokes equations, coupled with k-ε turbulence model, are solved by the commercial software ANSYS-CFX by means of volume finite method. Input conditions are varied in order to calculate several speed lines. Theoretical isentropic efficiency and theoretical surge line are finally compared to experimental data.

  15. Varying the item format improved the range of measurement in patient-reported outcome measures assessing physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegl, Gregor; Gandek, Barbara; Fischer, H Felix; Bjorner, Jakob B; Ware, John E; Rose, Matthias; Fries, James F; Nolte, Sandra

    2017-03-21

    Physical function (PF) is a core patient-reported outcome domain in clinical trials in rheumatic diseases. Frequently used PF measures have ceiling effects, leading to large sample size requirements and low sensitivity to change. In most of these instruments, the response category that indicates the highest PF level is the statement that one is able to perform a given physical activity without any limitations or difficulty. This study investigates whether using an item format with an extended response scale, allowing respondents to state that the performance of an activity is easy or very easy, increases the range of precise measurement of self-reported PF. Three five-item PF short forms were constructed from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) wave 1 data. All forms included the same physical activities but varied in item stem and response scale: format A ("Are you able to …"; "without any difficulty"/"unable to do"); format B ("Does your health now limit you …"; "not at all"/"cannot do"); format C ("How difficult is it for you to …"; "very easy"/"impossible"). Each short-form item was answered by 2217-2835 subjects. We evaluated unidimensionality and estimated a graded response model for the 15 short-form items and remaining 119 items of the PROMIS PF bank to compare item and test information for the short forms along the PF continuum. We then used simulated data for five groups with different PF levels to illustrate differences in scoring precision between the short forms using different item formats. Sufficient unidimensionality of all short-form items and the original PF item bank was supported. Compared to formats A and B, format C increased the range of reliable measurement by about 0.5 standard deviations on the positive side of the PF continuum of the sample, provided more item information, and was more useful in distinguishing known groups with above-average functioning. Using an item format with an extended

  16. Measurement of Shoulder Range of Motion in Patients with Adhesive Capsulitis Using a Kinect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Lee

    Full Text Available Range of motion (ROM measurements are essential for the evaluation for and diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (AC. However, taking these measurements using a goniometer is inconvenient and sometimes unreliable. The Kinect (Microsoft, Seattle, WA, USA is gaining attention as a new motion detecting device that is nonintrusive and easy to implement. This study aimed to apply Kinect to measure shoulder ROM in AC; we evaluated its validity by calculating the agreement of the measurements obtained using Kinect with those obtained using goniometer and assessed its utility for the diagnosis of AC. Both shoulders of 15 healthy volunteers and affected shoulders of 12 patients with AC were included in the study. The passive and active ROM of each were measured with a goniometer for flexion, abduction, and external rotation. Their active shoulder motions for each direction were again captured using Kinect and the ROM values were calculated. The agreement between the two measurements was tested with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Diagnostic performance using the Kinect ROM was evaluated with Cohen's kappa value. The cutoff values of the limited ROM were determined in the following ways: the same as passive ROM values, reflecting the mean difference, and based on receiver operating characteristic curves. The ICC for flexion/abduction/external rotation between goniometric passive ROM and the Kinect ROM were 0.906/0.942/0.911, while those between active ROMs and the Kinect ROMs were 0.864/0.932/0.925. Cohen's kappa values were 0.88, 0.88, and 1.0 with the cutoff values in the order above. Measurements of the shoulder ROM using Kinect show excellent agreement with those taken using a goniometer. These results indicate that the Kinect can be used to measure shoulder ROM and to diagnose AC as an alternative to goniometer.

  17. Validation of a photography-based goniometry method for measuring joint range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonna, Davide; Zarkadas, Peter C; Fitzsimmons, James S; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of evaluating the outcomes after surgery to restore lost elbow motion is the range of motion (ROM) of the elbow. This study examined if digital photography-based goniometry is as accurate and reliable as clinical goniometry for measuring elbow ROM. Instrument validity and reliability for photography-based goniometry were evaluated for a consecutive series of 50 elbow contractures by 4 observers with different levels of elbow experience. Goniometric ROM measurements were taken with the elbows in full extension and full flexion directly in the clinic (once) and from digital photographs (twice in a blinded random manner). Instrument validity for photography-based goniometry was extremely high (intraclass correlation coefficient: extension = 0.98, flexion = 0.96). For extension and flexion measurements by the expert surgeon, systematic error was negligible (0° and 1°, respectively). Limits of agreement were 7° (95% confidence interval [CI], 5° to 9°) and -7° (95% CI, -5° to -9°) for extension and 8° (95% CI, 6° to 10°) and -7° (95% CI, -5° to -9°) for flexion. Interobserver reliability for photography-based goniometry was better than that for clinical goniometry. The least experienced observer's photographic goniometry measurements were closer to the reference measurements than the clinical goniometry measurements. Photography-based goniometry is accurate and reliable for measuring elbow ROM. The photography-based method relied less on observer expertise than clinical goniometry. This validates an objective measure of patient outcome without requiring doctor-patient contact at a tertiary care center, where most contracture surgeries are done. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inertial sensors as measurement tools of elbow range of motion in gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, G; Turpin, JM; Marteu, A; Sakarovitch, C; Teboul, B; Boscher, L; Brocker, P; Robert, P; Guerin, O

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Musculoskeletal system deterioration among the aging is a major reason for loss of autonomy and directly affects the quality of life of the elderly. Articular evaluation is part of physiotherapeutic assessment and helps in establishing a precise diagnosis and deciding appropriate therapy. Reference instruments are valid but not easy to use for some joints. The main goal of our study was to determine reliability and intertester reproducibility of the MP-BV, an inertial sensor (the MotionPod® [MP]) combined with specific software (BioVal [BV]), for elbow passive range-of-motion measurements in geriatrics. Methods This open, monocentric, randomized study compared inertial sensor to inclinometer in patients hospitalized in an acute, post-acute, and long-term-care gerontology unit. Results Seventy-seven patients (mean age 83.5±6.4 years, sex ratio 1.08 [male/female]) were analyzed. The MP-BV was reliable for each of the three measurements (flexion, pronation, and supination) for 24.3% (CI 95% 13.9–32.8) of the patients. Separately, the percentages of reliable measures were 59.7% (49.2–70.5) for flexion, 68.8% (58.4–79.5) for pronation, and 62.3% (51.2–73.1) for supination. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.15 (0.07–0.73), 0.46 (0.27–0.98), and 0.50 (0.31–40 0.98) for flexion, pronation, and supination, respectively. Conclusion This study shows the convenience of the MP-BV in terms of ease of use and of export of measured data. However, this instrument seems less reliable and valuable compared to the reference instruments used to measure elbow range of motion in gerontology. PMID:25759568

  19. Exploring the range of energy savings likely from energy efficiency retrofit measures in Ireland's residential sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineen, D.; Ó Gallachóir, B.P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates the potential energy savings in the Irish residential sector by 2020 due to the introduction of an ambitious retrofit programme. We estimate the technical energy savings potential of retrofit measures targeting energy efficiency of the space and water heating end uses of the 2011 stock of residential dwellings between 2012 and 2020. We build eight separate scenarios, varying the number of dwellings retrofitted and the depth of retrofit carried out in order to investigate the range of energy savings possible. In 2020 the estimated technical savings potential lies in the range from 1713 GWh to 10,817 GWh, but is more likely to fall within the lower end of this range, i.e. between 1700 and 4360 GWh. When rebound effects are taken into account this reduces further to 1100 GWh and 2800 GWh per annum. The purpose of this paper was to test the robustness of the NEEAP target savings for residential retrofit, i.e. 3000 GWh by 2020. We conclude that this target is technically feasible but very challenging and unlikely to be achieved based on progress to date. It will require a significant shift towards deeper retrofit measures compared to what has been achieved by previous schemes. - Highlights: • Paper estimates range of energy savings likely from Irish residential retrofit. • Achieving NEEAP target savings of 3000 GWh by 2020 is feasible but very challenging. • Likely savings of 1100–2800 GWh per annum in 2020, including rebound. • NEEAP target unlikely to be achieved based on current trends.

  20. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-04-25

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption.

  1. Apparatus intended for measuring heat capacity and heat transfer down to mK range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebral, B.; Frossati, G.; Godfrin, H.; Schumacher, G.; Thoulouze, D.

    1978-01-01

    A cryogenic apparatus to perform heat capacity and heat transfer measurements in the range 1.5 mK-50 mK is described. Measurements are performed in an adiabatic demagnetization cell attached to a dilution refrigerator. Heat capacity measurements were effected on CMN-helium systems; the CMN specific heat was deduced above 1.6 mK when using liquid 3 He or a mixture 1.1% 3 He - 98.9% 4 He. A specific heat anomaly was observed with 4 He below 10 mK. It does not seen possible to interprete it by simple thermal equilibrium considerations. The superfluid 3 He heat capacity was also deduced from the results obtained with liquid 3 He under pressure. In heat transfer measurements at the interface CMN-mixture 3 He- 4 He, the temperature dependence of the thermal boundary resistance is in rather good agreement with other powder results. The measured resistances are larger than those predicted by the classical phonon process [fr

  2. Wind field reconstruction from nacelle-mounted lidar short-range measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Borraccino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Profiling nacelle lidars probe the wind at several heights and several distances upstream of the rotor. The development of such lidar systems is relatively recent, and it is still unclear how to condense the lidar raw measurements into useful wind field characteristics such as speed, direction, vertical and longitudinal gradients (wind shear. In this paper, we demonstrate an innovative method to estimate wind field characteristics using nacelle lidar measurements taken within the induction zone. Model-fitting wind field reconstruction techniques are applied to nacelle lidar measurements taken at multiple distances close to the rotor, where a wind model is combined with a simple induction model. The method allows robust determination of free-stream wind characteristics. The method was applied to experimental data obtained with two different types of nacelle lidar (five-beam Demonstrator and ZephIR Dual Mode. The reconstructed wind speed was within 0.5 % of the wind speed measured with a mast-top-mounted cup anemometer at 2.5 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine. The technique described in this paper overcomes measurement range limitations of the currently available nacelle lidar technology.

  3. Linearity improvement on wide-range log signal of neutron measurement system for HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Tuetken, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses engineering activities for improving the linearity characteristics of the Log Power signal from the neutron measurement system for HANARO. This neutron measurement system uses a fission chamber based detector which covers 10.3 decade-wide range from 10 -8 % full power(FP) up to 200%FP, The Log Power signal is designed to control the reactor at low power levels where most of the reactor physics tests are carried out. Therefore, the linearity characteristics of the Log Power signal is the major factor for accurate reactor power control. During the commissioning of the neutron measurement system, it was found that the linearity characteristics of the Log Power signal, especially near 10 -2 %FP, were not accurate enough for controlling the reactor during physics testing. Analysis of the system linearity data directly measured with reactor operating determined that the system was not operating per the design characteristics established from previous installations. The linearity data, which were taken as the reactor was increased in power, were sent to manufacturer's engineering group and a follow-up measures based on the analysis were then fed back to the field. Through step by step trouble-shooting activities, which included minor circuit modifications and alignment procedure changes, the linearity characteristics have been successfully improved and now exceed minimum performance requirements. This paper discusses the trouble-shooting techniques applied, the changes in the linearity characteristics, special circumstances in the HANARO application and the final resolution. (author)

  4. Feasibility of RACT for 3D dose measurement and range verification in a water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsanea, Fahed [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim [Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 535 Barnhill Drive, RT 041, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States); Stantz, Keith M., E-mail: kstantz@purdue.edu [School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2051 and Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 West Walnut Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5289 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to establish the feasibility of using radiation-induced acoustics to measure the range and Bragg peak dose from a pulsed proton beam. Simulation studies implementing a prototype scanner design based on computed tomographic methods were performed to investigate the sensitivity to proton range and integral dose. Methods: Derived from thermodynamic wave equation, the pressure signals generated from the dose deposited from a pulsed proton beam with a 1 cm lateral beam width and a range of 16, 20, and 27 cm in water using Monte Carlo methods were simulated. The resulting dosimetric images were reconstructed implementing a 3D filtered backprojection algorithm and the pressure signals acquired from a 71-transducer array with a cylindrical geometry (30 × 40 cm) rotated over 2π about its central axis. Dependencies on the detector bandwidth and proton beam pulse width were performed, after which, different noise levels were added to the detector signals (using 1 μs pulse width and a 0.5 MHz cutoff frequency/hydrophone) to investigate the statistical and systematic errors in the proton range (at 20 cm) and Bragg peak dose (of 1 cGy). Results: The reconstructed radioacoustic computed tomographic image intensity was shown to be linearly correlated to the dose within the Bragg peak. And, based on noise dependent studies, a detector sensitivity of 38 mPa was necessary to determine the proton range to within 1.0 mm (full-width at half-maximum) (systematic error < 150 μm) for a 1 cGy Bragg peak dose, where the integral dose within the Bragg peak was measured to within 2%. For existing hydrophone detector sensitivities, a Bragg peak dose of 1.6 cGy is possible. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that computed tomographic scanner based on ionizing radiation-induced acoustics can be used to verify dose distribution and proton range with centi-Gray sensitivity. Realizing this technology into the clinic has the potential to significantly

  5. Analysis and suppression of reflections in far-field antenna measurement ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra Castañer, Manuel; Cano Facila, Francisco Jose; Foged, Lars Jacob; Saccardi, Francesco; Nader Kawassaki, Guilherme; Raimundi, Lucas dos Reis; Vilela Rezende, Stefano Albino

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the reflections in two kind of spherical far field ranges: one if the classical acquisition where the AUT is rotated and the second one corresponds to the systems where the AUT is fixed and the antenna probe is rotated. In large far field systems this is not possible, but this can be used to the measurement of small antennas, for instance, with the SATIMO StarGate system. In both cases, it is assumed that only one frequency is acquired and the results shoul...

  6. Skin perfusion measurement: the normal range, the effects of ambient temperature and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Malone, J.M.; Daly, M.J.; Hughes, J.H.; Moore, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitation of skin perfusion provides objective criteria to determine the optimal amputation level in ischemic limb disease, to assess the maturation of pedicle flaps in reconstructive surgery, and to select appropriate treatment for chronic skin ulcers. A technique for measurement of skin perfusion using intradermal (ID) Xe-133 and a gamma camera/minicomputer system was previously reported. An update of this procedure is now reported, the normal range for the lower extremity in men, observations on the effects of ambient temperature, and an experience using the procedure to determine amputation level

  7. Measurement based scenario analysis of short-range distribution system planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on short-range distribution system planning using a probabilistic approach. Empirical probabilistic distributions of load demand and distributed generations are derived from the historical measurement data and incorporated into the system planning. Simulations with various...... feasible scenarios are performed based on a local distribution system at Støvring in Denmark. Simulation results provide more accurate and insightful information for the decision-maker when using the probabilistic analysis than using the worst-case analysis, so that a better planning can be achieved....

  8. Human-Induced Effects on RSS Ranging Measurements for Cooperative Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Rosa, Francescantonio; Pelosi, Mauro; Nurmi, Jari

    2012-01-01

    of human-induced perturbations for enhancing the final positioning accuracy through cooperative schemes has been assessed. It has been proved that the effect of cooperation is very limited if human factors are not taken into account when performing experimental activities.......We present experimental evaluations of human-induced perturbations on received-signal-strength-(RSS-) based ranging measurements for cooperative mobile positioning. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to gain insight and understand the impact of both body loss and hand grip...... on the RSS for enhancing proximity measurements among neighbouring devices in cooperative scenarios. Our main contribution is represented by experimental investigations. Analysis of the errors introduced in the distance estimation using path-loss-based methods has been carried out. Moreover, the exploitation...

  9. Measurement of the cosmic optical background using the long range reconnaissance imager on New Horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemcov, Michael; Immel, Poppy; Nguyen, Chi; Cooray, Asantha; Lisse, Carey M; Poppe, Andrew R

    2017-04-11

    The cosmic optical background is an important observable that constrains energy production in stars and more exotic physical processes in the universe, and provides a crucial cosmological benchmark against which to judge theories of structure formation. Measurement of the absolute brightness of this background is complicated by local foregrounds like the Earth's atmosphere and sunlight reflected from local interplanetary dust, and large discrepancies in the inferred brightness of the optical background have resulted. Observations from probes far from the Earth are not affected by these bright foregrounds. Here we analyse the data from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) instrument on NASA's New Horizons mission acquired during cruise phase outside the orbit of Jupiter, and find a statistical upper limit on the optical background's brightness similar to the integrated light from galaxies. We conclude that a carefully performed survey with LORRI could yield uncertainties comparable to those from galaxy counting measurements.

  10. Measure of the albedo of a warm plasma in the XUV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Thais, Frederic; Geoffroy, Ghita; Raffestin, Didier

    2009-11-01

    It has been shown in a recent experience at PALS [1] that the radiative precursor celerity in front of a strong radiative shock is sensitive to the lateral radiative losses, thus to the albedo of the wall of a ``radiative shock tube.'' In the experiment presented here, we measure the albedo of various materials (Al, Cu, Au) heated by a Xenon gaz at temperature around 30 eV. The Xenon gas was heated by the ALISE laser in CESTA in Bordeaux (France). The emission of Xenon with and without the reflecting samples is measured with a spatially resolving XUV spectrograph in the 30-250 eV range. [4pt] [1] M. Busquet et al, HEDP 3, 8 (2007)

  11. A compact design for monochromatic OSL measurements in the wavelength range 380-1020 NM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Poolton, N.R.J.; Willumsen, F.

    1994-01-01

    automated Riso TL/OSL dating apparatus, thus allowing for either routine scanning or more detailed thermo-optical investigations. The high throughput efficiency of the unit means that the existing 75 W tungsten-halogen lamp can be directly used for such measurements on both quartz and feldspar samples......The development and performance of a compact module is described that allows for the monochromatic illumination of samples in the wavelength range 380-1020 nm, enabling the measurement of energy-resolved optically stimulated luminescence. The unit is designed to couple directly to the existing....... The design allows for rapid spectral scanning with a choice of resolution of anywhere between 10 and 80 nm: stray light levels are less than 0.01%. The unit can equally be used for recording wavelength-resolved emission spectra, whether photo-excited or thermally stimulated; the capabilities of the system...

  12. Photopolarimetric properties of leaf and vegetation covers over a wide range of measurement directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongqiu; Peng, Zhiyan; Wu, Di; Lv, Yunfeng

    2018-02-01

    The optical scattering property of the target is the essential signal for passive remote sensing applications. To deepen our understanding of the light reflected from vegetation, we present results of photopolarimetric laboratory measurements from single leaf and two vegetation covers (planophile and erectophile) over a wide range of viewing directions. The bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPRF) was used to characterize the polarization property of our samples. We observed positive and negative polarization (-BPRFQ) of all samples in the forward scattering and backward scattering directions, respectively. Based on the comparison of the BPRF among single leaf, planophile vegetation and erectophile vegetation, our measurements demonstrate that the orientation of the leaf is a key factor in describing the amount of polarization in the forward scattering direction. Our measurements also validated certain model results stating that (1) specular reflection generates a portion of polarization in the forward scattering direction and diffuses scattering of polarized light in all hemisphere directions, (2) BPRFU is anti-symmetric in the principal plane from a recent study in which the authors simulated the polarized reflectance of vegetation cover using the vector radiative transfer theory. These photopolarimetric measurement results, which can be completely explained by the theoretical results, are useful in remote sensing applications to vegetation.

  13. Long-range active retroreflector to measure the rotational orientation in conjunction with a laser tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, O.; Wachten, Christian; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    High precision optical non-contact position measurement is a key technology in modern engineering. Laser trackers (LT) accurately determine x-y-z coordinates of passive retroreflectors. Next-generation systems answer the need to measure an object`s rotational orientation (pitch, yaw, roll). So far, these devices are based either on photogrammetry or on enhanced retroreflectors. Here we present a new method to measure all six degrees of freedom in conjunction with a LT. The basic principle is to analyze the orientation to the LT's beam path by coupling-out laser radiation. The optical design is inspired by a cat's eye retroreflector equipped with an integrated beam splitter layer. The optical spherical aberration is compensated, which reduces the divergence angle for the reflected beam by one order of magnitude compared to an uncompensated standard system of the same size. The wave front distortion is reduced to less than 0.1 λ @ 633 nm for beam diameters up to 8 mm. Our active retroreflector is suitable for long-range measurements for a distance > 10 m.

  14. A straightforward method for measuring the range of apparent density of microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyun; Li, Mengmeng; Deng, Hua; Cai, Li; Cai, Huiwen; Yan, Beizhan; Hu, Jun; Shi, Huahong

    2018-10-15

    Density of microplastics has been regarded as the primary property that affect the distribution and bioavailability of microplastics in the water column. For measuring the density of microplastis, we developed a simple and rapid method based on density gradient solutions. In this study, we tested four solvents to make the density gradient solutions, i.e., ethanol (0.8 g/cm 3 ), ultrapure water (1.0 g/cm 3 ), saturated NaI (1.8 g/cm 3 ) and ZnCl 2 (1.8 g/cm 3 ). Density of microplastics was measured via observing the float or sink status in the density gradient solutions. We found that density gradient solutions made from ZnCl 2 had a larger uncertainty in measuring density than that from NaI, most likely due to a higher surface tension of ZnCl 2 solution. Solutions made from ethanol, ultrapure water, and NaI showed consistent density results with listed densities of commercial products, indicating that these density gradient solutions were suitable for measuring microplastics with a density range of 0.8-1.8 g/cm 3 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of a vortex shedding flowmeter to the wide range measurement of high temperature gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.P.; Ennis, R.M. Jr.; Herndon, P.G.

    1981-01-01

    A single flowmeter was required for helium gas measurement in a Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor loss of coolant simulator. Volumetric flow accuracy of +-1.0% of reading was required over the Reynolds Number range 6 x 10 3 to 1 x 10 6 at flowing pressures from 0.2 to 9 MPa (29 to 1305 psia) at 350 0 C (660 0 F) flowing temperature. Because of its inherent accuracy and rangeability, a vortex shedding flowmeter was selected and specially modified to provide for a remoted thermal sensor. Experiments were conducted to determine the relationship between signal attenuation and sensor remoting geometry, as well as the relationship between gas flow parameters and remoted thermal sensor signal for both compressed air and helium gas. Based upon the results of these experiments, the sensor remoting geometry was optimized for this application. The resultant volumetric flow rangeability was 155:1. The associated temperature increase at the sensor position was 9 0 C above ambient (25 0 F) at a flowing temperature of 350 0 C. The volumetric flow accuracy was measured over the entire 155:1 flow range at parametric values of flowing density. A volumetric flow accuracy of +- % of reading was demonstrated

  16. Density Measurements of Waste Cooking Oil Biodiesel and Diesel Blends Over Extended Pressure and Temperature Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Xuan NguyenThi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Density and compressibility are primordial parameters for the optimization of diesel engine operation. With this objective, these properties were reported for waste cooking oil biodiesel and its blends (5% and 10% by volume mixed with diesel. The density measurements were performed over expanded ranges of pressure (0.1 to 140 MPa and temperature (293.15 to 353.15 K compatible with engine applications. The isothermal compressibility was estimated within the same experimental range by density differentiation. The Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAMEs profile of the biodiesel was determined using a Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS technique. The storage stability of the biodiesel was assessed in terms of the reproducibility of the measured properties. The transferability of this biodiesel fuel was discussed on the basis of the standards specifications that support their use in fuel engines. Additionally, this original set of data represents meaningful information to develop new approaches or to evaluate the predictive capability of models previously developed.

  17. Measuring sensitivity in pharmacoeconomic studies. Refining point sensitivity and range sensitivity by incorporating probability distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuijten, M J

    1999-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe a refinement of a previously presented method, based on the concept of point sensitivity, to deal with uncertainty in economic studies. The original method was refined by the incorporation of probability distributions which allow a more accurate assessment of the level of uncertainty in the model. In addition, a bootstrap method was used to create a probability distribution for a fixed input variable based on a limited number of data points. The original method was limited in that the sensitivity measurement was based on a uniform distribution of the variables and that the overall sensitivity measure was based on a subjectively chosen range which excludes the impact of values outside the range on the overall sensitivity. The concepts of the refined method were illustrated using a Markov model of depression. The application of the refined method substantially changed the ranking of the most sensitive variables compared with the original method. The response rate became the most sensitive variable instead of the 'per diem' for hospitalisation. The refinement of the original method yields sensitivity outcomes, which greater reflect the real uncertainty in economic studies.

  18. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Seismic Interferometry to Investigate Seismic Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzel, E.; Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity provides a direct means of measuring the physical characteristics of active tectonic features such as fault zones. Hundreds of small earthquakes often occur along a fault during a seismic swarm. This seismicity helps define the tectonically active region. When processed using novel geophysical techniques, we can isolate the energy sensitive to the fault, itself. Here we focus on two methods of seismic interferometry, ambient noise correlation (ANC) and the virtual seismometer method (VSM). ANC is based on the observation that the Earth's background noise includes coherent energy, which can be recovered by observing over long time periods and allowing the incoherent energy to cancel out. The cross correlation of ambient noise between a pair of stations results in a waveform that is identical to the seismogram that would result if an impulsive source located at one of the stations was recorded at the other, the Green function (GF). The calculation of the GF is often stable after a few weeks of continuous data correlation, any perturbations to the GF after that point are directly related to changes in the subsurface and can be used for 4D monitoring.VSM is a style of seismic interferometry that provides fast, precise, high frequency estimates of the Green's function (GF) between earthquakes. VSM illuminates the subsurface precisely where the pressures are changing and has the potential to image the evolution of seismicity over time, including changes in the style of faulting. With hundreds of earthquakes, we can calculate thousands of waveforms. At the same time, VSM collapses the computational domain, often by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This allows us to do high frequency 3D modeling in the fault region. Using data from a swarm of earthquakes near the Salton Sea, we demonstrate the power of these techniques, illustrating our ability to scale from the far field, where sources are well separated, to the near field where their locations fall within each other

  20. Induced seismicity. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models

  1. At Home Photography-Based Method for Measuring Wrist Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Rancy, Schneider K; Johnsen, Parker H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  To determine the reliability of wrist range of motion (WROM) measurements based on digital photographs taken by patients at home compared with traditional measurements done in the office with a goniometer. Methods  Sixty-nine postoperative patients were enrolled in this study at least 3 months postoperatively. Active and passive wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation were recorded by one of the two attending surgeons with a 1-degree resolution goniometer at the last postoperative office visit. Patients were provided an illustrated instruction sheet detailing how to take digital photographic images at home in six wrist positions (active and passive flexion/extension, and radial/ulnar deviation). Wrist position was measured from digital images by both the attending surgeons in a randomized, blinded fashion on two separate occasions greater than 2 weeks apart using the same goniometer. Reliability analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient to assess agreement between clinical and photography-based goniometry, as well as intra- and interobserver agreement. Results  Out of 69 enrolled patients, 30 (43%) patients sent digital images. Of the 180 digital photographs, only 9 (5%) were missing or deemed inadequate for WROM measurements. Agreement between clinical and photography-based measurements was "almost perfect" for passive wrist flexion/extension and "substantial" for active wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for the attending surgeons was "almost perfect" for all measurements. Discussion  This study validates a photography-based goniometry protocol allowing accurate and reliable WROM measurements without direct physician contact. Passive WROM was more accurately measured from photographs than active WROM. This study builds on previous photography-based goniometry literature by validating a protocol in which patients or their families take and submit their own

  2. Accelerated ice-sheet mass loss in Antarctica from 18-year satellite laser ranging measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the ice-sheet mass balance in Antarctic is very difficult due to complex ice sheet condition and sparse in situ measurements. In this paper, the low-degree gravity field coefficients of up to degree and order 5 derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR measurements are used to determine the ice mass variations in Antarctica for the period 1993–2011. Results show that the ice mass is losing with -36±13 Gt/y in Antarctica, -42±11 Gt/y in the West Antarctica and 6±10 Gt/y in the East Antarctica from 1993 to 2011. The ice mass variations from the SLR 5×5 have a good agreement with the GRACE 5×5, GRACE 5×5 (1&2 and GRACE (60×60 for the entire continent since 2003, but degree 5 from SLR is not sufficient to quantify ice losses in West and East Antarctica, respectively. The rate of ice loss in Antarctica is -28±17 Gt/y for 1993-2002 and -55±17 Gt/y for 2003-2011, indicating significant accelerated ice mass losses since 2003. Furthermore, the results from SLR are comparable with GRACE measurements.

  3. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  4. An absolute measurement of 252Cf prompt fission neutron spectrum at low energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajtai, A.; Dyachenko, P.P.; Kutzaeva, L.S.; Kononov, V.N.; Androsenko, P.A.; Androsenko, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Prompt neutron energy spectrum at low energies (25 keV 252 Cf spontaneous fission has been measured with a time-of-flight technique on a 30 cm flight-path. Ionization chamber and lithium-glass were used as fission fragment and neutron detectors, respectively. Lithium glasses of NE-912 (containing 6 Li) and of NE-913 (containing 7 Li) 45 mm in diameter and 9.5 mm in thickness have been employed alternatively, for the registration of fission neutrons and gammas. For the correct determination of the multiscattering effects - the main difficulty of the low energy neutron spectrum measurements - a special geometry for the neutron detector was used. Special attention was paid also to the determination of the absolute efficiency of the neutron detector. The real response function of the spectrometer was determined by a Monte-Carlo calculation. The scattering material content of the ionization chamber containing a 252 Cf source was minimized. As a result of this measurement a prompt fission neutron spectrum of Maxwell type with a T=1.42 MeV parameter was obtained at this low energy range. We did not find any neutron excess or irregularities over the Maxwellian. (author)

  5. Measurements of long-range enhanced collisional velocity drag through plasma wave damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M.; Anderegg, F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2018-05-01

    We present damping measurements of axial plasma waves in magnetized, multispecies ion plasmas. At high temperatures T ≳ 10-2 eV, collisionless Landau damping dominates, whereas, at lower temperatures T ≲ 10-2 eV, the damping arises from interspecies collisional drag, which is dependent on the plasma composition and scales roughly as T-3 /2 . This drag damping is proportional to the rate of parallel collisional slowing, and is found to exceed classical predictions of collisional drag damping by as much as an order of magnitude, but agrees with a new collision theory that includes long-range collisions. Centrifugal mass separation and collisional locking of the species occur at ultra-low temperatures T ≲ 10-3 eV, which reduce the drag damping from the T-3 /2 collisional scaling. These mechanisms are investigated by measuring the damping of higher frequency axial modes, and by measuring the damping in plasmas with a non-equilibrium species profile.

  6. Measurement of the extreme ankle range of motion required by female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2010-12-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion, especially plantar flexion, but research about measuring such motion is lacking. The purposes of this study were to determine in a sample of ballet dancers whether non-weight-bearing ankle range of motion is significantly different from the weight-bearing equivalent and whether inclinometric plantar flexion measurement is a suitable substitute for standard plantar flexion goniometry. Fifteen female ballet dancers (5 university, 5 vocational, and 5 professional dancers; age 21 ± 3.0 years) volunteered. Subjects received 5 assessments on 1 ankle: non-weight-bearing goniometry dorsiflexion (NDF) and plantar flexion (NPF), weight-bearing goniometry in the ballet positions demi-plié (WDF) and en pointe (WPF), and non-weight-bearing plantar flexion inclinometry (IPF). Mean NDF was significantly lower than WDF (17° ± 1.3° vs 30° ± 1.8°, P ballet proficiency. The authors conclude that assessment of extreme ankle motion in female ballet dancers is challenging, and goniometry and inclinometry appear to measure plantar flexion differently.

  7. Gamma compensated pulsed ionization chamber wide range neutron/reactor power measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    An improved method and system of pulsed mode operation of ionization chambers is described in which a single sensor system with gamma compensation is provided by sampling, squaring, automatic gate selector, and differential amplifier circuit means, employed in relation to chambers sensitized to neutron plus gamma and gamma only to subtract out the gamma component, wherein squaring functions circuits, a supplemental high performance pulse rate system, and operational and display mode selection and sampling gate circuits are utilized to provide automatic wide range linear measurement capability for neutron flux and reactor power. Neon is employed as an additive in the ionization chambers to provide independence of ionized gas kinetics temperature effects, and the pulsed mode of operation provide independence of high temperature insulator leakage effects. (auth)

  8. High Resolution and Large Dynamic Range Resonant Pressure Sensor Based on Q-Factor Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Stell, Christopher B. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Vorperian, Vatche (Inventor); Wilcox, Jaroslava (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure sensor has a high degree of accuracy over a wide range of pressures. Using a pressure sensor relying upon resonant oscillations to determine pressure, a driving circuit drives such a pressure sensor at resonance and tracks resonant frequency and amplitude shifts with changes in pressure. Pressure changes affect the Q-factor of the resonating portion of the pressure sensor. Such Q-factor changes are detected by the driving/sensing circuit which in turn tracks the changes in resonant frequency to maintain the pressure sensor at resonance. Changes in the Q-factor are reflected in changes of amplitude of the resonating pressure sensor. In response, upon sensing the changes in the amplitude, the driving circuit changes the force or strength of the electrostatic driving signal to maintain the resonator at constant amplitude. The amplitude of the driving signals become a direct measure of the changes in pressure as the operating characteristics of the resonator give rise to a linear response curve for the amplitude of the driving signal. Pressure change resolution is on the order of 10(exp -6) torr over a range spanning from 7,600 torr to 10(exp -6) torr. No temperature compensation for the pressure sensor of the present invention is foreseen. Power requirements for the pressure sensor are generally minimal due to the low-loss mechanical design of the resonating pressure sensor and the simple control electronics.

  9. 2D fluorescence spectra measurement of six kinds of bioagents simulants by short range Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpedro, Man

    2018-02-01

    Pantoea agglomerans (Pan), Staphylococcus aureus (Sta), Bacillus globigii (BG) and Escherichia coli (EH), these four kinds of bioagents simulants of were cultured and then their growth curves were measured, the generation time was 0.99h, 0.835h, 1.07h and 1.909h, respectively. A small short range fluorescence lidar working at wavelengths of 266nm and 355nm was designed and used to measure the two-dimensional fluorescence spectra of bioagents simulants in the amino acid segment and NADH segment, respectively. In a controllable fluorescence measurement chamber, the two-dimensional fluorescence spectra of vegetative liquid bacterial aerosols as well as BSA and OVA, two protein toxinic simulants were measured with a resolution of 4nm. The two-dimensional fluorescence spectral shape of Pan, Sta, EH and BG, BSA and OVA were consistent with the standard fluorescent component tryptophan in the amino acid band with FWHM of 60nm, but the central wavelength of the fluorescence spectra of these simulants blue/purple shifted obviously as affected by the external biochemical environment, concentration and ratio of different bacterial internal fluorophores, so the energy level between the excited state and the ground state of the fluorescence molecule increased. Differently, weak NADH fluorescence spectra with 100nm FWHM inside the four vegetative bacteria aerosols were detected, but Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering contribution of water, nitrogen in the fluorescence spectra could not be effectively extracted. The second - order derivative fluorescence spectra of four simulants showed that the high - order processing and recognition of the fluorescence spectra was feasible.

  10. Development of prompt gamma measurement system for in vivo proton beam range verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Chul Hee

    2011-02-01

    In radiation therapy, most research has focused on reducing unnecessary radiation dose to normal tissues and critical organs around the target tumor volume. Proton therapy is considered to be one of the most promising radiation therapy methods with its physical characteristics in the dose distribution, delivering most of the dose just before protons come to rest at the so-named Bragg peak; that is, proton therapy allows for a very high radiation dose to the tumor volume, effectively sparing adjacent critical organs. However, the uncertainty in the location of the Bragg peak, coming from not only the uncertainty in the beam delivery system and the treatment planning method but also anatomical changes and organ motions of a patient, could be a critical problem in proton therapy. In spite of the importance of the in vivo dose verification to prevent the misapplication of the Bragg peak and to guarantee both successful treatment and patient safety, there is no practical methodology to monitor the in vivo dose distribution, only a few attempts have been made so far. The present dissertation suggests the prompt gamma measurement method for monitoring of the in vivo proton dose distribution during treatment. As a key part of the process of establishing the utility of this method, the verification of the clear relationship between the prompt gamma distribution and the proton dose distribution was accomplished by means of Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements. First, the physical properties of prompt gammas were investigated on the basis of cross-section data and Monte Carlo simulations. Prompt gammas are generated mainly from proton-induced nuclear interactions, and then emitted isotropically in less than 10 -9 sec at energies up to 10 MeV. Simulation results for the prompt gamma yield of the major elements of a human body show that within the optimal energy range of 4-10 MeV the highest number of prompt gammas is generated from oxygen, whereas over the

  11. Higher measured than modeled ozone production at increased NOx levels in the Colorado Front Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Baier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical models must correctly calculate the ozone formation rate, P(O3, to accurately predict ozone levels and to test mitigation strategies. However, air quality models can have large uncertainties in P(O3 calculations, which can create uncertainties in ozone forecasts, especially during the summertime when P(O3 is high. One way to test mechanisms is to compare modeled P(O3 to direct measurements. During summer 2014, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS directly measured net P(O3 in Golden, CO, approximately 25 km west of Denver along the Colorado Front Range. Net P(O3 was compared to rates calculated by a photochemical box model that was constrained by measurements of other chemical species and that used a lumped chemical mechanism and a more explicit one. Median observed P(O3 was up to a factor of 2 higher than that modeled during early morning hours when nitric oxide (NO levels were high and was similar to modeled P(O3 for the rest of the day. While all interferences and offsets in this new method are not fully understood, simulations of these possible uncertainties cannot explain the observed P(O3 behavior. Modeled and measured P(O3 and peroxy radical (HO2 and RO2 discrepancies observed here are similar to those presented in prior studies. While a missing atmospheric organic peroxy radical source from volatile organic compounds co-emitted with NO could be one plausible solution to the P(O3 discrepancy, such a source has not been identified and does not fully explain the peroxy radical model–data mismatch. If the MOPS accurately depicts atmospheric P(O3, then these results would imply that P(O3 in Golden, CO, would be NOx-sensitive for more of the day than what is calculated by models, extending the NOx-sensitive P(O3 regime from the afternoon further into the morning. These results could affect ozone reduction strategies for the region surrounding Golden and possibly other areas that do not comply with national ozone

  12. Auroral radar measurements at 16-cm wavelength with high range and time resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, K.; Turunen, T.; Moorcroft, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Auroral radar measurements performed with the EISCAT facility are presented. Backscatter cross sections of the irregularities produced by the two-stream (Farley-Buneman) or gradient drift plasma instabilities have been recorded with a range separation of 1.5 km, corresponding to a spacing of successive values in height of about 0.4 km. The apparent height profiles of the backscatter have a width of about 5-6 km and occur between 95 and 112 km altitude, with a mean at 104 km. Very often, fast motions of the backscatter layers are observed which can be explained as fast moving ionospheric structures controlled by magnetospheric convection. The maximal time resolution of the measurements is 12.5 ms. The statistics of the backscatter amplitudes at this time resolution is close to a Rice distribution with a Rice parameter a ∼ 3.7. The observed backscatter spectra do not change significantly in shape when the integration time is reduced from 5 s to 100 ms

  13. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  14. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR Concluding Experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover as wide as possible working range and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special, channels cooled by reactor inlet carbon dioxide and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or Campbelling mode with unusually low filling pressures and fitted with special trilaminax mineral insulated cables. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. The paper describes the specification against which this system was built, the design process for the detectors, and commissioning experiments together with some of the problems which were encountered. (U.K.)

  15. Rapid response and wide range neutronic power measuring systems for fast pulsed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Kenji; Iida, Toshiyuki; Wakayama, Naoaki.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes our investigation on design principles of the rapid, stable and wide range neutronic power measuring system for fast pulsed reactors. The picoammeter, the logarithmic amplifier, the reactivity meter and the neutron current chamber are the items of investigation. In order to get a rapid response, the method of compensation for the stray capacitance of the feedback circuits and the capacitance of signal cables is applied to the picoammeter, the logarithmic amplifier and the reactivity meter with consideration for the stability margin of a whole detecting system. The response of an ionization current chamber and the method for compensating the ion component of the chamber output to get optimum responses high pass filters are investigated. Statistical fluctuations of the current chamber output are also considered in those works. The optimum thickness of the surrounding moderator of the neutron detector is also discussed from the viewpoint of the pulse shape deformation and the neutron sensitivity increase. The experimental results are reported, which were observed in the pulse operations of the one shot fast pulsed reactor ''YAYOI'' and the one shot TRIGA ''NSRR'' with the measuring systems using those principles. (auth.)

  16. Absolute Hugoniot measurements for CH foams in the 2-9 Mbar range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Karasik, M.; Schmitt, A. J.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Cochrane, K. R.

    2018-03-01

    Absolute Hugoniot measurements for empty plastic foams at ˜10% of solid polystyrene density and supporting rad-hydro simulation results are reported. Planar foam slabs, ˜400 μm thick and ˜500 μm wide, some of which were covered with a 10 μm solid plastic ablator, were directly driven by 4 ns long Nike krypton-fluoride 248 nm wavelength laser pulses that produced strong shock waves in the foam. The shock and mass velocities in our experiments were up to 104 km/s and 84 km/s, respectively, and the shock pressures up to ˜9 Mbar. The motion of the shock and ablation fronts was recorded using side-on monochromatic x-ray imaging radiography. The steadiness of the observed shock and ablation fronts within ˜1% has been verified. The Hugoniot data inferred from our velocity measurements agree with the predictions of the SESAME and CALEOS equation-of-state models near the highest pressure ˜9 Mbar and density compression ratio ˜5. In the lower pressure range 2-5 Mbar, a lower shock density compression is observed than that predicted by the models. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  17. Outlier Detection in GNSS Pseudo-Range/Doppler Measurements for Robust Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Zair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In urban areas or space-constrained environments with obstacles, vehicle localization using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS data is hindered by Non-Line Of Sight (NLOS and multipath receptions. These phenomena induce faulty data that disrupt the precise localization of the GNSS receiver. In this study, we detect the outliers among the observations, Pseudo-Range (PR and/or Doppler measurements, and we evaluate how discarding them improves the localization. We specify a contrario modeling for GNSS raw data to derive an algorithm that partitions the dataset between inliers and outliers. Then, only the inlier data are considered in the localization process performed either through a classical Particle Filter (PF or a Rao-Blackwellization (RB approach. Both localization algorithms exclusively use GNSS data, but they differ by the way Doppler measurements are processed. An experiment has been performed with a GPS receiver aboard a vehicle. Results show that the proposed algorithms are able to detect the ‘outliers’ in the raw data while being robust to non-Gaussian noise and to intermittent satellite blockage. We compare the performance results achieved either estimating only PR outliers or estimating both PR and Doppler outliers. The best localization is achieved using the RB approach coupled with PR-Doppler outlier estimation.

  18. Measurement of transparency ratios for protons from short-range correlated pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, O.; Hakobyan, H.; Shneor, R.; Piasetzky, E.; Weinstein, L. B.; Brooks, W. K.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Gilad, S.; Korover, I.; Beck, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Arrington, J. R.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Mustapha, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, X.; Zonta, I.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear transparency, Tp (A), is a measure of the average probability for a struck proton to escape the nucleus without significant re-interaction. Previously, nuclear transparencies were extracted for quasi-elastic A (e ,e‧ p) knockout of protons with momentum below the Fermi momentum, where the spectral functions are well known. In this Letter we extract a novel observable, the transparency ratio, Tp (A) /Tp(12 C), for knockout of high-missing-momentum protons from the breakup of short-range correlated pairs (2N-SRC) in Al, Fe and Pb nuclei relative to C. The ratios were measured at momentum transfer Q2 ⩾ 1.5(GeV /c) 2 and xB ⩾ 1.2 where the reaction is expected to be dominated by electron scattering from 2N-SRC. The transparency ratios of the knocked-out protons coming from 2N-SRC breakup are 20-30% lower than those of previous results for low missing momentum. They agree with Glauber calculations and agree with renormalization of the previously published transparencies as proposed by recent theoretical investigations. The new transparencies scale as A - 1 / 3, which is consistent with dominance of scattering from nucleons at the nuclear surface.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of nacelle lidar free stream wind speed measurements to wind-induction reconstruction model and lidar range configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elin; Borraccino, Antoine; Meyer Forsting, Alexander Raul

    The sensitivity of nacelle lidar wind speed measurements to wind-induction models and lidar range configurations is studied using experimental data from the Nørrekær Enge (NKE) measurement campaign and simulated lidar data from Reynold-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) aerodynamic computational fluid...... the ZDM was configured to measure at five distances. From the configured distances, a large number of range configurations were created and systematically tested to determine the sensitivity of the reconstructed wind speeds to the number of ranges, minimum range and maximum range in the range......) of the fitting residuals. The results demonstrate that it is not possible to use RANS CFD simulated lidar data to determine optimal range configurations for real-time nacelle lidars due to their perfect (unrealistic) representation of the simulated flow field. The recommended range configurations are therefore...

  20. Seismic protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, R.

    1988-01-01

    To ensure that a nuclear reactor or other damage-susceptible installation is, so far as possible, tripped and already shut down before the arrival of an earthquake shock at its location, a ring of monitoring seismic sensors is provided around it, each sensor being spaced from it by a distance (possibly several kilometres) such that (taking into account the seismic-shock propagation velocity through the intervening ground) a shock monitored by the sensor and then advancing to the installation site will arrive there later than a warning signal emitted by the sensor and received at the installation, by an interval sufficient to allow the installation to trip and shut down, or otherwise assume an optimum anti-seismic mode, in response to the warning signal. Extra sensors located in boreholes may define effectively a three-dimensional (hemispherical) sensing boundary rather than a mere two-dimensional ring. (author)

  1. Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keranen, Katie M.; Weingarten, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    The ability of fluid-generated subsurface stress changes to trigger earthquakes has long been recognized. However, the dramatic rise in the rate of human-induced earthquakes in the past decade has created abundant opportunities to study induced earthquakes and triggering processes. This review briefly summarizes early studies but focuses on results from induced earthquakes during the past 10 years related to fluid injection in petroleum fields. Study of these earthquakes has resulted in insights into physical processes and has identified knowledge gaps and future research directions. Induced earthquakes are challenging to identify using seismological methods, and faults and reefs strongly modulate spatial and temporal patterns of induced seismicity. However, the similarity of induced and natural seismicity provides an effective tool for studying earthquake processes. With continuing development of energy resources, increased interest in carbon sequestration, and construction of large dams, induced seismicity will continue to pose a hazard in coming years.

  2. Cloud cover detection combining high dynamic range sky images and ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, R.; Cazorla, A.; Toledano, C.; Olmo, F. J.; Cachorro, V. E.; de Frutos, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for cloud detection based on high dynamic range images from a sky camera and ceilometer measurements. The algorithm is also able to detect the obstruction of the sun. This algorithm, called CPC (Camera Plus Ceilometer), is based on the assumption that under cloud-free conditions the sky field must show symmetry. The symmetry criteria are applied depending on ceilometer measurements of the cloud base height. CPC algorithm is applied in two Spanish locations (Granada and Valladolid). The performance of CPC retrieving the sun conditions (obstructed or unobstructed) is analyzed in detail using as reference pyranometer measurements at Granada. CPC retrievals are in agreement with those derived from the reference pyranometer in 85% of the cases (it seems that this agreement does not depend on aerosol size or optical depth). The agreement percentage goes down to only 48% when another algorithm, based on Red-Blue Ratio (RBR), is applied to the sky camera images. The retrieved cloud cover at Granada and Valladolid is compared with that registered by trained meteorological observers. CPC cloud cover is in agreement with the reference showing a slight overestimation and a mean absolute error around 1 okta. A major advantage of the CPC algorithm with respect to the RBR method is that the determined cloud cover is independent of aerosol properties. The RBR algorithm overestimates cloud cover for coarse aerosols and high loads. Cloud cover obtained only from ceilometer shows similar results than CPC algorithm; but the horizontal distribution cannot be obtained. In addition, it has been observed that under quick and strong changes on cloud cover ceilometers retrieve a cloud cover fitting worse with the real cloud cover.

  3. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR concluding experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover a working range as wide as possible and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special channels cooled by reactor inlet CO 2 and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or ''Campbelling'' mode. Their neutron to gamma sensitivity ratio was optimised by the use of unusually low filling pressures and they were fitted with special ''trilaminax'' mineral insulated cables to minimise the effects of electrical interference at the 100 kHz channel centre frequency. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. All were processed and tested for operation at 350 deg. C and their fissile coatings (430 μg cm - 1 of natural uranium) were matched to give individual neutron sensitivities with a population spread better than +- 6% about the mean. The mean absolute sensitivities were determined to about +- 5% against manganese foils in the NESTOR reactor at AEE Winfrith. The detectors were complemented by special signal processing channels which provided current fluctuation sensitivity and appropriate output signals to the experiment data acquisition system. These channels also permitted dc measurement of chamber current for more precise flux determination near reactor full power

  4. seismic-py: Reading seismic data with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of seismic exploration of the Earth has changed
    dramatically over the last half a century. The Society of Exploration
    Geophysicists (SEG has worked to create standards to store the vast
    amounts of seismic data in a way that will be portable across computer
    architectures. However, it has been impossible to predict the needs of the
    immense range of seismic data acquisition systems. As a result, vendors have
    had to bend the rules to accommodate the needs of new instruments and
    experiment types. For low level access to seismic data, there is need for a
    standard open source library to allow access to a wide range of vendor data
    files that can handle all of the variations. A new seismic software package,
    seismic-py, provides an infrastructure for creating and managing drivers for
    each particular format. Drivers can be derived from one of the known formats
    and altered to handle any slight variations. Alternatively drivers can be
    developed from scratch for formats that are very different from any previously
    defined format. Python has been the key to making driver development easy
    and efficient to implement. The goal of seismic-py is to be the base system
    that will power a wide range of experimentation with seismic data and at the
    same time provide clear documentation for the historical record of seismic
    data formats.

  5. Guidance related to the efficacy of measures used to mitigate potential impacts of seismic sound on marine mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Research has established that the effectiveness of mitigation of seismic sound operational techniques, described in the statement of Canadian practice, can vary with varying conditions in the marine environment. Among the six factors that should be taken into account, two are emphasized in this review. These are: the establishment of a safety zone, which affects the ability of observers to detect marine mammals; and factors which impact the effectiveness of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) in detecting vocalizing marine mammals under the standard operating conditions of a seismic survey. Some recommendations were put forward for further research, including active acoustics research, and included: building a larger signals library for PAM; and carrying out autonomous PAM with underwater gliders. These suggestions were given with a view to mounting a collegial effort in the future that will advance our collective knowledge concerning the mitigation of the influence of seismic sound on marine mammals rather than entrusting this to any one particular government agency, regulatory body or offshore oil and gas company.

  6. Inertial sensors as measurement tools of elbow range of motion in gerontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacco G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available G Sacco,1–3,* JM Turpin,3,4,* A Marteu,5 C Sakarovitch,6 B Teboul,2 L Boscher,4,5 P Brocker,4 P Robert,1–3 O Guerin2,3,7 1Memory Center, Claude Pompidou Institut, Department of Geriatrics, University Hospital of Nice, Nice, France; 2Centre d’Innovation et d’Usages en Santé (CIU-S, University Hospital of Nice, Cimiez Hospital, Nice, France; 3CoBTeK Cognition Behaviour Technology EA 7276, Research Center Edmond and Lily Safra, Nice Sophia-Antipolis University, Nice, France; 4Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Geriatrics, University Hospital of Nice, Cimiez Hospital, Nice, France; 5Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Neurosciences, University Hospital of Nice, L’Archet Hospital, Nice, France; 6Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, University Hospital of Nice, Cimiez Hospital, Nice, France; 7Acute Geriatrics Unit, Department of Geriatrics, University Hospital of Nice, Cimiez Hospital, Nice, France *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and purpose: Musculoskeletal system deterioration among the aging is a major reason for loss of autonomy and directly affects the quality of life of the elderly. Articular evaluation is part of physiotherapeutic assessment and helps in establishing a precise diagnosis and deciding appropriate therapy. Reference instruments are valid but not easy to use for some joints. The main goal of our study was to determine reliability and intertester reproducibility of the MP-BV, an inertial sensor (the MotionPod® [MP] combined with specific software (BioVal [BV], for elbow passive range-of-motion measurements in geriatrics. Methods: This open, monocentric, randomized study compared inertial sensor to inclinometer in patients hospitalized in an acute, post-acute, and long-term-care gerontology unit. Results: Seventy-seven patients (mean age 83.5±6.4 years, sex ratio 1.08 [male/female] were analyzed. The MP-BV was reliable for each of the three measurements (flexion, pronation, and

  7. Seismic fragility analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, Marin

    2000-01-01

    In the last two decades there is increasing number of probabilistic seismic risk assessments performed. The basic ideas of the procedure for performing a Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of critical structures (NUREG/CR-2300, 1983) could be used also for normal industrial and residential buildings, dams or other structures. The general formulation of the risk assessment procedure applied in this investigation is presented in Franzini, et al., 1984. The probability of failure of a structure for an expected lifetime (for example 50 years) can be obtained from the annual frequency of failure, β E determined by the relation: β E ∫[d[β(x)]/dx]P(flx)dx. β(x) is the annual frequency of exceedance of load level x (for example, the variable x may be peak ground acceleration), P(fI x) is the conditional probability of structure failure at a given seismic load level x. The problem leads to the assessment of the seismic hazard β(x) and the fragility P(fl x). The seismic hazard curves are obtained by the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. The fragility curves are obtained after the response of the structure is defined as probabilistic and its capacity and the associated uncertainties are assessed. Finally the fragility curves are combined with the seismic loading to estimate the frequency of failure for each critical scenario. The frequency of failure due to seismic event is presented by the scenario with the highest frequency. The tools usually applied for probabilistic safety analyses of critical structures could relatively easily be adopted to ordinary structures. The key problems are the seismic hazard definitions and the fragility analyses. The fragility could be derived either based on scaling procedures or on the base of generation. Both approaches have been presented in the paper. After the seismic risk (in terms of failure probability) is assessed there are several approaches for risk reduction. Generally the methods could be classified in two groups. The

  8. Characterizing the Relationship Between Lithospheric Deformation and Seismic Anisotropy in the Basin and Range Province and San Andreas Fault System using Ps Receiver Function Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H. A.; Schnorr, E.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of complex and spatially variable anisotropy in many parts of the western U.S. has been tied to regional tectonic and dynamic processes that go beyond the (frequently) assumed plate motion oriented shear. In the Basin and Range, a well-imaged "swirl" of shear wave splitting observations has been explained via a number of different dynamic processes, including a lithospheric drip and toroidal flow. In central California, rapid variations in splitting direction across the plate boundary have been attributed to a relatively narrow, well-defined shear zone. Ambient noise tomography has further complicated the picture, indicating that some of the observed complexity can be explained by incorporating multiple layers of anisotropy. The goal of this study is to place firm constraints on vertical variations in anisotropy over two tectonically distinct, yet related, regions- the Basin and Range province and the San Andreas fault system, in order to better understand how deformation of the lithosphere is accommodated. To do this, radial and transverse component Ps receiver functions have been calculated for 14 stations within the two regions. Within both study areas, variability exists between most stations at crust and lithospheric mantle depths. This is particularly true for stations located near the San Andreas Fault system. These differences may be attributed to variations in the provenance of the lithospheric "packages" in some areas, however several stations are located near or within the plate boundary system and may be sampling multiple regions with varying deformation fabrics. To account for this, future work will include binning as a function of piercing point. One notable exception to the generally observed variability is along the western margin of the Basin and Range, where several stations show similarities in back azimuthal variations at lower crust and uppermost mantle depths. Preliminary forwarding modeling of two of these stations indicates that

  9. Measurements with vertically viewing charge exchange analyzers during ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Hammett, G.W.; Gammel, G.; Goldston, R.J.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.; Young, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of charge exchange neutral particle analyzers for studying energetic ion distributions in high-temperature plasmas has been demonstrated in a variety of tokamak experiments. Power deposition profiles have been estimated in the Princeton large torus (PLT) from particle measurements as a function of energy and angle during heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and extensive studies of this heating mode are planned for the upcoming operational period in the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR). Unlike the horizontally scanning analyzer on PLT, the TFTR system consists of vertical sightlines intersecting a poloidal cross section of the plasma. A bounce-averaged Fokker--Planck program, which includes a quasilinear operator to calculate ICRF-generated energetic ions, is used to simulate the charge exchange flux expected during fundamental hydrogen heating. These sightlines also cross the trajectory of a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB), and it may be possible to observe the fast ion tail during 3 He minority heating, if the DNB is operated in helium for double charge exchange neutralization

  10. Thermal/vacuum measurements of the Herschel space telescope by close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parian, J. Amiri; Cozzani, A.; Appolloni, M.; Casarosa, G.

    2017-11-01

    In the frame of the development of a videogrammetric system to be used in thermal vacuum chambers at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) and other sites across Europe, the design of a network using micro-cameras was specified by the European Space agency (ESA)-ESTEC. The selected test set-up is the photogrammetric test of the Herschel Satellite Flight Model in the ESTEC Large Space Simulator. The photogrammetric system will be used to verify the Herschel Telescope alignment and Telescope positioning with respect to the Cryostat Vacuum Vessel (CVV) inside the Large Space Simulator during Thermal-Vacuum/Thermal-Balance test phases. We designed a close-range photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation and a videogrammetric system with an overall accuracy of 1:100,000. A semi-automated image acquisition system, which is able to work at low temperatures (-170°C) in order to acquire images according to the designed network has been constructed by ESA-ESTEC. In this paper we will present the videogrammetric system and sub-systems and the results of real measurements with a representative setup similar to the set-up of Herschel spacecraft which was realized in ESTEC Test Centre.

  11. Measurements on rotating ion cyclotron range of frequencies induced particle fluxes in axisymmetric mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Majeski, R.; Wen, Y.J.; Brouchous, D.B.; Proberts, P.; Breun, R.A.; Roberts, D.; Vukovic, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of phenomenological features of plasmas is made with a special emphasis on radio-frequency induced transport, which are maintained when a set of two closely spaced dual half-turn antennas in a central cell of the Phaedrus-B axisymmetric tandem mirror [J. J. Browning et al., Phys. Fluids B 1, 1692 (1989)] is phased to excite electromagnetic fields in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with m=-1 (rotating with ions) and m=+1 (rotating with electrons) azimuthal modes. Positive and negative electric currents are measured to flow axially to the end walls in the cases of m=-1 and m=+1 excitations, respectively. These parallel nonambipolar ion and electron fluxes are observed to be accompanied by azimuthal ion flows in the same directions as the antenna-excitation modes m. The phenomena are argued in terms of radial particle fluxes due to a nonambipolar transport mechanism [Hojo and Hatori, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 2510 (1991); Hatakeyama et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 2815 (1991), and Phys. Rev. E 52, 6664 (1995)], which are induced when azimuthally traveling ICRF waves are absorbed in the magnetized plasma column. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. LHC MD2877: Beam-beam long range impact on coupling measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hostettler, Michi; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    The LHC is now operating with a tune separation of ∼0.004 in collision. This puts tight constraints on the allowed transverse coupling since a |C−| larger than a fraction of the fractional tune split may lead to beam instabilities. In the last years a new tool based on the ADT used in a similar way as an AC-dipole to excite the beam was developed. The ADT AC-dipole gives coherent oscillations without increasing the beam emittance. These oscillations are analyzed automatically to obtain the value of the coupling. A coupling measurement campaign was done in 2017 and while the correction converged and stayed rather constant over time it was observed that depending on the target bunch and filling scheme the results could vary by Δ|C−| ∼ 0.002. In this MD report we investigated 3 different bunches, one with Long Range Beam-Beam (LRBB) in IPs 1 and 5, one with LRBB in all IPs and one with no LRBB. The results indicate that there are differences in coupling between the bunches experiencing different LR...

  13. Measurement and description of three-dimensional shoulder range of motion with degrees of freedom interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haering, Diane; Raison, Maxime; Begon, Mickael

    2014-08-01

    The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the human body due to bony constraint scarcity and soft tissue function unlocking several degrees of freedom (DOF). Clinical evaluation of the shoulder range of motion (RoM) is often limited to a few monoplanar measurements where each DOF varies independently. The main objective of this study was to provide a method and its experimental approach to assess shoulder 3D RoM with DOF interactions. Sixteen participants performed four series of active arm movements with maximal amplitude consisting in (1) elevations with fixed arm axial rotations (elevation series), (2) axial rotations at different elevations (rotation series), both in five planes of elevation, (3) free arm movements with the instruction to fill the largest volume in space while varying hand orientation (random series), and (4) a combination of elevation and rotation series (overall series). A motion analysis system combined with an upper limb kinematic model was used to estimate the 3D joint kinematics. Thoracohumeral Euler angles with correction were chosen to represent rotations. The angle-time-histories were treated altogether to analyze their 3D interaction. Then, all 3D angular poses were included into a nonconvex hull representing the RoM space accounting for DOF interactions. The effect of series of movements (n = 4) on RoM volumes was tested with a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA followed by Bonferroni posthoc analysis. A normalized 3D RoM space was defined by including 3D poses common to a maximal number of participants into a hull of average volume. A significant effect of the series of movements (p measured the largest RoM with an average volume of 3.46 ± 0.89 million cubic degrees. The main difference between the series of movements was due to axial rotation. A normalized RoM hull with average volume was found by encompassing arm poses common to more than 50% of the participants. In general, the results confirmed and characterized the complex 3D

  14. Seismic efficiency of meteor airbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetsov, V. V.; Artemieva, N. A.; Shuvalov, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of numerical simulation for impacts of relatively small asteroids and ice bodies of 30-100 m in size, decelerated in the atmosphere and exploding before they reach the surface, but still producing seismic effects due to the impact wave reaching the surface. The calculated magnitudes fall within the range of 4 to 6, and average seismic efficiency of these events is 2.5 × 10-5. The results obtained allow the seismic hazard from impacts of cosmic bodies to be estimated.

  15. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  16. Seismic Symphonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  17. Validity and reliability of using photography for measuring knee range of motion: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adie Sam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinimetric properties of knee goniometry are essential to appreciate in light of its extensive use in the orthopaedic and rehabilitative communities. Intra-observer reliability is thought to be satisfactory, but the validity and inter-rater reliability of knee goniometry often demonstrate unacceptable levels of variation. This study tests the validity and reliability of measuring knee range of motion using goniometry and photographic records. Methods Design: Methodology study assessing the validity and reliability of one method ('Marker Method' which uses a skin marker over the greater trochanter and another method ('Line of Femur Method' which requires estimation of the line of femur. Setting: Radiology and orthopaedic departments of two teaching hospitals. Participants: 31 volunteers (13 arthritic and 18 healthy subjects. Knee range of motion was measured radiographically and photographically using a goniometer. Three assessors were assessed for reliability and validity. Main outcomes: Agreement between methods and within raters was assessed using concordance correlation coefficient (CCCs. Agreement between raters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs. 95% limits of agreement for the mean difference for all paired comparisons were computed. Results Validity (referenced to radiographs: Each method for all 3 raters yielded very high CCCs for flexion (0.975 to 0.988, and moderate to substantial CCCs for extension angles (0.478 to 0.678. The mean differences and 95% limits of agreement were narrower for flexion than they were for extension. Intra-rater reliability: For flexion and extension, very high CCCs were attained for all 3 raters for both methods with slightly greater CCCs seen for flexion (CCCs varied from 0.981 to 0.998. Inter-rater reliability: For both methods, very high ICCs (min to max: 0.891 to 0.995 were obtained for flexion and extension. Slightly higher coefficients were obtained

  18. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  19. Seismic alarm system for Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, M.; Griesser, L.; Austin, G.E.; Tiurin, S.; Kuendig, C.

    2001-01-01

    A seismic alarm system will be installed at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. There are two reactors, both RMBK 1500 MW units. Each reactor is a water cooled, graphite moderated, channel type reactor. INPP has the most advanced version of the RMBK reactor design series. The first and second units of INPP went into service at the end of 1983 and in August 1987 respectively. Their design lifetime is approx. 30 years. The various buildings and plant have been designed for two earthquake levels, that is the design earthquake and the maximum possible earthquake with peak ground accelerations ranging from 1.2% to 10% of the acceleration due to gravity. Certain parts of the buildings and some of the equipment of the first and second units do not comply with Western seismic standards. As seismic strengthening of the existing buildings and equipment is not feasible economically, a reactor protection system based on an earthquake early warning system was recommended. This system essentially consists of six seismic stations encircling INPP at a radial distance of approx. 30 km and a seventh station at INPP. Each station includes three seismic substations each 500 m apart. The ground motion at each station is measured continuously by three accelerometers and one seismometer. Data is transmitted via telemetry to the control centre at INPP. Early warning alarms are generated if a seismic threshold is exceeded. This paper discusses the characteristics of INPP, the seismic alarm system presently under construction and the experience with other early warning and seismic alarm systems. (author)

  20. Romanian seismic network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Constantin; Rizescu, Mihaela; Popa, Mihaela; Grigore, Adrian

    2000-01-01

    The research in the field of seismology in Romania is mainly carried out by the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP). The NIEP activities are mainly concerned with the fundamental research financed by research contracts from public sources and the maintenance and operation of the Romanian seismic network. A three stage seismic network is now operating under NIEP, designed mainly to monitor the Vrancea seismic region in a magnitude range from microearthquakes to strong events: - network of 18 short-period seismometers (S13); - Teledyne Geotech Instruments (Texas); - network of 7 stations with local digital recording (PCM-5000) on magnetic tape, made up of, S13 geophone (T=2 s) on vertical component and SH1 geophone (T=5 s) on horizontal components; - network of 28 SMA-1 accelerometers and 30 digital accelerometers (Kinemetrics - K2) installed in the free field conditions in the framework of the joint German-Romanian cooperation program (CRC); the K2 instruments cover a magnitude range from 1.4 to 8.0. Since 1994, MLR (Muntele Rosu) station has become part of the GEOFON network and was provided with high performance broad band instruments. At Bucharest and Timisoara data centers, an automated and networked seismological system performs the on-line digital acquisition and processing of the telemetered data. Automatic processing includes discrimination between local and distant seismic events, earthquake location and magnitude computation, and source parameter determination for local earthquakes. The results are rapidly distributed via Internet, to several seismological services in Europe and USA, to be used in the association/confirmation procedures. Plans for new developments of the network include the upgrade from analog to digital telemetry and new stations for monitoring local seismicity. (authors)

  1. Methodology for seismic PSA of NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.

    1999-09-01

    A general methodology is outlined for seismic PSA (probabilistic safety assessment). The main objectives of seismic PSA include: description of the course of an event; understanding the most probable failure sequences; gaining insight into the overall probability of reactor core damage; identification of the main seismic risk contributors; identification of the range of peak ground accelerations contributing significantly to the plant risk; and comparison of the seismic risk with risks from other events. The results of seismic PSA are typically compared with those of internal PSA and of PSA of other external events. If the results of internal and external PSA are available, sensitivity studies and cost benefit analyses are performed prior to any decision regarding corrective actions. If the seismic PSA involves analysis of the containment, useful information can be gained regarding potential seismic damage of the containment. (P.A.)

  2. Photon Pressure Force on Space Debris TOPEX/Poseidon Measured by Satellite Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, D.; Kirchner, G.; Bennett, J. C.; Lachut, M.; Sośnica, K.; Koshkin, N.; Shakun, L.; Koidl, F.; Steindorfer, M.; Wang, P.; Fan, C.; Han, X.; Grunwaldt, L.; Wilkinson, M.; Rodríguez, J.; Bianco, G.; Vespe, F.; Catalán, M.; Salmins, K.; del Pino, J. R.; Lim, H.-C.; Park, E.; Moore, C.; Lejba, P.; Suchodolski, T.

    2017-10-01

    The (TOPography EXperiment) TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) altimetry mission operated for 13 years before the satellite was decommissioned in January 2006, becoming a large space debris object at an altitude of 1,340 km. Since the end of the mission, the interaction of T/P with the space environment has driven the satellite's spin dynamics. Satellite laser ranging (SLR) measurements collected from June 2014 to October 2016 allow for the satellite spin axis orientation to be determined with an accuracy of 1.7°. The spin axis coincides with the platform yaw axis (formerly pointing in the nadir direction) about which the body rotates in a counterclockwise direction. The combined photometric and SLR data collected over the 11 year time span indicates that T/P has continuously gained rotational energy at an average rate of 2.87 J/d and spins with a period of 10.73 s as of 19 October 2016. The satellite attitude model shows a variation of the cross-sectional area in the Sun direction between 8.2 m2 and 34 m2. The direct solar radiation pressure is the main factor responsible for the spin-up of the body, and the exerted photon force varies from 65 μN to 228 μN around the mean value of 138.6 μN. Including realistic surface force modeling in orbit propagation algorithms will improve the prediction accuracy, giving better conjunction warnings for scenarios like the recent close approach reported by the ILRS Space Debris Study Group—an approximate 400 m flyby between T/P and Jason-2 on 20 June 2017.

  3. Relays undergo seismic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Utilities are required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to document that seismic vibration will not adversely affect critical electrical equipment. Seismic testing should be designed to determine the malfunction level (fragility testing). Input possibilities include a continuous sine, a decaying sine, a sine beat, random vibrations, and combinations of random vibrations and sine beat. The sine beat most accurately simulates a seismic event. Test frequencies have a broad range in order to accommodate a variety of relay types and cabinet mounting. Simulation of motion along three axes offers several options, but is best achieved by three in-phase single-axis vibration machines that are less likely to induce testing fatigue failure. Consensus on what constitutes relay failure favors a maximum two microsecond discontinuity. Performance tests should be conducted for at least two of the following: (1) nonoperating modes, (2) operating modes, or (3) the transition above the two modes, with the monitoring mode documented for all three. Results should specify a capability curve of maximum safe seismic acceleration and a graph plotting acceleration with sine-beat frequency

  4. Seismic risk assessment and application in the central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic risk is a somewhat subjective, but important, concept in earthquake engineering and other related decision-making. Another important concept that is closely related to seismic risk is seismic hazard. Although seismic hazard and seismic risk have often been used interchangeably, they are fundamentally different: seismic hazard describes the natural phenomenon or physical property of an earthquake, whereas seismic risk describes the probability of loss or damage that could be caused by a seismic hazard. The distinction between seismic hazard and seismic risk is of practical significance because measures for seismic hazard mitigation may differ from those for seismic risk reduction. Seismic risk assessment is a complicated process and starts with seismic hazard assessment. Although probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is the most widely used method for seismic hazard assessment, recent studies have found that PSHA is not scientifically valid. Use of PSHA will lead to (1) artifact estimates of seismic risk, (2) misleading use of the annual probability of exccedance (i.e., the probability of exceedance in one year) as a frequency (per year), and (3) numerical creation of extremely high ground motion. An alternative approach, which is similar to those used for flood and wind hazard assessments, has been proposed. ?? 2011 ASCE.

  5. Long-Range Channel Measurements on Small Terminal Antennas Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, details are given on a novel measurement device for radio propagation-channel measurements. To avoid measurement errors due to the conductive cables on small terminal antennas, as well as to improve the handling of the prototypes under investigation, an optical measurement device has...

  6. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  7. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Criddle; B. N. Smith; L. D. Hansen; J. N. Church

    2001-01-01

    Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with...

  8. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  9. Seismic Prediction While Drilling (SPWD): Seismic exploration ahead of the drill bit using phased array sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksch, Katrin; Giese, Rüdiger; Kopf, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    maximize the energy of the seismic source in order to reach a sufficient exploration range. The next step for focusing is to use the method of phased array. Dependent of the seismic wave velocities of the surrounding rock, the distance of the actuators to each other and the used frequencies the signal phases for each actuator can be determined. Since one year several measurements with the prototype have been realized under defined conditions at a test site in a mine. The test site consists of a rock block surrounded from three galleries with a dimension of about 100 by 200 meters. For testing the prototype two horizontal boreholes were drilled. They are directed to one of the gallery to get a strong reflector. The quality of the data of the borehole seismics in amplitude and frequency spectra show overall a good signal-to-noise ratio and correlate strongly with the fracture density along the borehole and are associated with a lower signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, the geophones of the prototype show reflections from ahead and rearward in the seismic data. In particular, the reflections from the gallery ahead are used for the calibration of focusing. The direct seismic wave field indicates distinct compression and shear waves. The analysis of several seismic measurements with a focus on the direct seismic waves shows that the phased array technology explicit can influence the directional characteristics of the radiated seimic waves. The amplitudes of the seismic waves can be enhanced up to three times more in the desired direction and simultaneously be attenuated in the reverse direction. A major step for the directional investigation in boreholes has accomplished. But the focusing of the seismic waves has to be improved to maximize the energy in the desired direction in more measurements by calibrating the initiating seismic signals of the sources. A next step this year is the development of a wireline prototype for application in vertical boreholes with depths not

  10. Seismic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    were presumed nuclear explosions announced by ERDA. Of the last, 11 were at the Semipalatinsk test site , 2 at the Western Kazakh test site , 2 in Novaya...which will fulfill U.S. ob- ligations that may be incurred under a possible future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. This report includes 9 contributions...which could assume U.S. seismic-data-management responsibilities in the event that international agreement is reached on a Comprehensive Test Ban

  11. Evaluation of knee range of motion: Correlation between measurements using a universal goniometer and a smartphone goniometric application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael Aparecido; Derhon, Viviane; Brandalize, Michelle; Brandalize, Danielle; Rossi, Luciano Pavan

    2017-07-01

    Goniometers are commonly used to measure range of motion in the musculoskeletal system. Recently smartphone goniometry applications have become available to clinicians. Compare angular measures using a universal goniometer and a smartphone application. Thirty four healthy women with at least 20° of limited range of motion regarding knee extension were recruited. Knee flexion angles of the dominant limb were measured with a universal goniometer and the ROM © goniometric application for the smartphone. Three trained examiners compared the two assessment tools. Strong correlations were found between the measures of the universal goniometer and smartphone application (Pearson's correlation and interclass correlation coefficient > 0.93). The measurements with both devices demonstrated low dispersion and little variation. Measurements obtained using the smartphone goniometric application analyzed are as reliable as those of a universal goniometer. This application is therefore a useful tool for the evaluation of knee range of motion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Martian seismicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goins, N.R.; Lazarewicz, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    During the Viking mission to Mars, the seismometer on Lander II collected approximately 0.24 Earth years of observations data, excluding periods of time dominated by wind-induced Lander vibration. The ''quiet-time'' data set contains no confirmed seismic events. A proper assessment of the significance of this fact requires quantitative estimates of the expected detection rate of the Viking seismometer. The first step is to calculate the minimum magnitude event detectable at a given distance, including the effects of geometric spreading, anelastic attenuation, seismic signal duration, seismometer frequency response, and possible poor ground coupling. Assuming various numerical quantities and a Martian seismic activity comparable to that of intraplate earthquakes, the appropriate integral gives an expected annual detection rate of 10 events, nearly all of which are local. Thus only two to three events would be expected in the observational period presently on hand and the lack of observed events is not in gross contradiction to reasonable expectations. Given the same assumptions, a seismometer 20 times more sensitive than the present instrument would be expected to detect about 120 events annually

  13. Measuring Earth: Current status of the GRACE Follow-On Laser Ranging Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Daniel; LRI Team

    2016-05-01

    The GRACE mission that was launched in 2002 has impressively proven the feasibility of low-orbit satellite-to-satellite tracking for Earth gravity observations. Especially mass transport related to Earth's hydrological system could be well resolved both spatially and temporally. This allows to study processes such as polar ice sheet decline and ground water depletion in great detail. Owing to GRACE's success, NASA and GFZ will launch the successor mission GRACE Follow-On in 2017. In addition to the microwave ranging system, GRACE Follow-On will be the first mission to use a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator to track intersatellite distance changes with unprecedented precision. This new ranging device inherits some of the technologies which have been developed for the future spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA. I will present the architecture of the Laser Ranging Interferometer, point out similarities and differences to LISA, and conclude with the current status of the flight hardware production.

  14. The 2017 Maple Creek Seismic Swarm in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, G.; Hale, J. M.; Farrell, J.; Burlacu, R.; Koper, K. D.; Smith, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) performs near-real-time monitoring of seismicity in the region around Yellowstone National Park in partnership with the United States Geological Survey and the National Park Service. UUSS operates and maintains 29 seismic stations with network code WY (short-period, strong-motion, and broadband) and records data from five other seismic networks—IW, MB, PB, TA, and US—to enhance the location capabilities in the Yellowstone region. A seismic catalog is produced using a conventional STA/LTA detector and single-event location techniques (Hypoinverse). On June 12, 2017, a seismic swarm began in Yellowstone National Park about 5 km east of Hebgen Lake. The swarm is adjacent to the source region of the 1959 MW 7.3 Hebgen Lake earthquake, in an area corresponding to positive Coulumb stress change from that event. As of Aug. 1, 2017, the swarm consists of 1481 earthquakes with 1 earthquake above magnitude 4, 8 earthquakes in the magnitude 3 range, 115 earthquakes in the magnitude 2 range, 469 earthquakes in the magnitude 1 range, 856 earthquakes in the magnitude 0 range, 22 earthquakes with negative magnitudes, and 10 earthquakes with no magnitude. Earthquake depths are mostly between 3 and 10 km and earthquake depth increases toward the northwest. Moment tensors for the 2 largest events (3.6 MW and 4.4. MW) show strike-slip faulting with T axes oriented NE-SW, consistent with the regional stress field. We are currently using waveform cross-correlation methods to measure differential travel times that are being used with the GrowClust program to generate high-accuracy relative relocations. Those locations will be used to identify structures in the seismicity and make inferences about the tectonic and magmatic processes causing the swarm.

  15. A hydrogel based nanosensor with an unprecedented broad sensitivity range for pH measurements in cellular compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, M.; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Optical pH nanosensors have been applied for monitoring intracellular pH in real-time for about two decades. However, the pH sensitivity range of most nanosensors is too narrow, and measurements that are on the borderline of this range may not be correct. Furthermore, ratiometric measurements...... of acidic intracellular pH (pH sensor, a fluorophore based nanosensor, with an unprecedented broad measurement range from pH 1.4 to 7.0. In this nanosensor, three p......H-sensitive fluorophores (difluoro-Oregon Green, Oregon Green 488, and fluorescein) and one pH-insensitive fluorophore (Alexa 568) were covalently incorporated into a nanoparticle hydrogel matrix. With this broad range quadruple-labelled nanosensor all physiological relevant pH levels in living cells can be measured...

  16. Fractional momentum transfer in incomplete fusion reaction: measurement of recoil range distributions in 20Ne + 159Tb system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Singh, D.; Pachouri, Dipti; Afzal Ansari, M.; Rashid, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    The recoil range distribution (RRD) of several residues have been measured for the system 20 Ne + 159 Tb at 165 MeV beam energy by collecting the recoiling residues in the Al-catcher foils of varying thickness

  17. Investigation of fractional momentum transfer: measurement of forward recoil ranges in 16O + natTm collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Unnati; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Singh, B.P.; Prasad, R.; Rakesh Kumar; Golda, K.S.; Bhardwaj, H.D.

    2006-01-01

    For better understanding of complete fusion and incomplete fusion in heavy ion reactions a programme of precise measurements of excitation functions, recoil range distribution and angular distributions of recoils has been undertaken. In the present contribution the recoil range distribution for the residues have been measured at ≅ 6 MeV/nucleon, using recoil-catcher technique followed by off-line gamma-spectroscopy

  18. Integration of ambient seismic noise monitoring, displacement and meteorological measurements to infer the temperature-controlled long-term evolution of a complex prone-to-fall cliff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, C.; Baillet, L.; Comina, C.; Jongmans, D.; Larose, E.; Valentin, J.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2018-06-01

    Monitoring the temporal evolution of resonance frequencies and velocity changes detected from ambient seismic noise recordings can help in recognizing reversible and irreversible modifications within unstable rock volumes. With this aim, the long-term ambient seismic noise data set acquired at the potentially unstable cliff of Madonna delSasso (NW Italian Alps) was analysed in this study, using both spectral analysis and cross-correlation techniques. Noise results were integrated and compared with direct displacement measurements and meteorological data, to understand the long-term evolution of the cliff. No irreversible modifications in the stability of the site were detected over the monitored period. Conversely, daily and seasonal air temperature fluctuations were found to control resonance frequency values, amplitudes and directivities and to induce reversible velocity changes within the fractured rock mass. The immediate modification in the noise parameters due to temperature fluctuations was interpreted as the result of rock mass thermal expansion and contraction, inducing variations in the contact stiffness along the fractures isolating two unstable compartments. Differences with previous case studies were highlighted in the long-term evolution of noise spectral amplitudes and directivities, due to the complex 3-D fracture setting of the site and to the combined effects of the two unstable compartments.

  19. Rockfall induced seismic signals: case study in Montserrat, Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajosana, I.; Suriñach, E.; Abellán, A.; Khazaradze, G.; Garcia, D.; Llosa, J.

    2008-08-01

    After a rockfall event, a usual post event survey includes qualitative volume estimation, trajectory mapping and determination of departing zones. However, quantitative measurements are not usually made. Additional relevant quantitative information could be useful in determining the spatial occurrence of rockfall events and help us in quantifying their size. Seismic measurements could be suitable for detection purposes since they are non invasive methods and are relatively inexpensive. Moreover, seismic techniques could provide important information on rockfall size and location of impacts. On 14 February 2007 the Avalanche Group of the University of Barcelona obtained the seismic data generated by an artificially triggered rockfall event at the Montserrat massif (near Barcelona, Spain) carried out in order to purge a slope. Two 3 component seismic stations were deployed in the area about 200 m from the explosion point that triggered the rockfall. Seismic signals and video images were simultaneously obtained. The initial volume of the rockfall was estimated to be 75 m3 by laser scanner data analysis. After the explosion, dozens of boulders ranging from 10-4 to 5 m3 in volume impacted on the ground at different locations. The blocks fell down onto a terrace, 120 m below the release zone. The impact generated a small continuous mass movement composed of a mixture of rocks, sand and dust that ran down the slope and impacted on the road 60 m below. Time, time-frequency evolution and particle motion analysis of the seismic records and seismic energy estimation were performed. The results are as follows: 1 A rockfall event generates seismic signals with specific characteristics in the time domain; 2 the seismic signals generated by the mass movement show a time-frequency evolution different from that of other seismogenic sources (e.g. earthquakes, explosions or a single rock impact). This feature could be used for detection purposes; 3 particle motion plot analysis shows

  20. 110. PTB seminar: Dose rate measurements of ionizing radiation in the range of natural ambient radiation. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauterbach, U.; Pessara, W.; Woehler-Figgen, S.

    1997-12-01

    Measuring instruments for radiation dose measurement in the range of natural ambient radiation are not subject to legal obligations for calibration and the PTB received numerous requests in the past, asking for measures to be taken in order to ensure reliability of measuring results in this range of radiation. This has induced PTB to organise the seminar, intended to present the current status of measuring technology in this field, reveal problems encountered in practical applications, and discuss suitable ction for quality assurance. The papers of the seminar report the measuring performance and capabilities of the available instruments, results of comparative analyses of measurements, and resulting proposed action for quality assurance. Discussions concluding the sessions are also presented in the processdings volume. (orig./CB) [de

  1. An optical distance sensor : tilt robust differential confocal measurement with mm range and nm uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacace, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Compared with conventional high-end optical systems, application of freeform optics offers many advantages. Their widespread use, however, is held back by the lack of a suitable measurement method.The NANOMEFOS project aims at realizing a universal freeform measurement machine to fill that void.The

  2. Detailed seismic intensity in Morioka area; Moriokashi ni okeru shosai shindo bunpu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T; Yamamoto, H; Settai, H [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yamada, T [Obayashi Road Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    To reveal a seismic intensity distribution in individual areas, a large-scale detailed seismic intensity survey was conducted in Morioka City through questionnaire, as to the Hokkaido Toho-oki (HE) earthquake occurred on October 4, 1994 with a record of seismic intensity 4 at Morioka, and the Sanriku Haruka-oki (SH) earthquake occurred on December 28, 1994 with a record of seismic intensity 5 at Morioka. A relationship was also examined between the seismic intensity distribution and the properties of shallow basement in Morioka City. The range of seismic intensity was from 2.9 to 4.6 and the difference was 1.7 in the case of HE earthquake, and the range was from 3.1 to 5.0 and the difference was 1.9 in the case of SH earthquake. There were large differences in the seismic intensity at individual points. Morioka City has different geological structures in individual areas. There were differences in the S-wave velocity in the surface layer ranging from 150 to 600 m/sec, which were measured using a plate hammering seismic source at 76 areas in Morioka City. These properties of surface layers were in harmony with the seismic intensity distribution obtained from the questionnaire. For the observation of short frequency microtremors at about 490 points in the city, areas with large amplitudes, mean maximum amplitudes of vertical motion components more than 0.1 mkine were distributed in north-western region and a part of southern region. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High dynamic range isotope ratio measurements using an analog electron multiplier

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Williams, P.; Lorinčík, Jan; Franzreb, K.; Herwig, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2013), s. 549-552 ISSN 0142-2421 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 894 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Isotope ratios * electron multiplier * dynamic range Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.393, year: 2013

  4. Seismic detection of tornadoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatom, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    Tornadoes represent the most violent of all forms of atmospheric storms, each year resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage and approximately one hundred fatalities. In recent years, considerable success has been achieved in detecting tornadic storms by means of Doppler radar. However, radar systems cannot determine when a tornado is actually in contact with the ground, expect possibly at extremely close range. At the present time, human observation is the only truly reliable way of knowing that a tornado is actually on the ground. However, considerable evidence exists indicating that a tornado in contact with the ground produces a significant seismic signal. If such signals are generated, the seismic detection and warning of an imminent tornado can become a distinct possibility. 

  5. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guillory, J.; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, J.; Truong, D.; Alexandre, CH.; Wallerand, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2016), 075105:1-6 ISSN 0034-6748 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : distance-measuring instrument * index Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016

  6. Atmospheric particles acting as ice forming nuclei in different size ranges and cloud condensation nuclei measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santachiara, G.; Di Matteo, L.; Belosi, F.; Prodi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of ice nuclei (I N) in different size classes of aerosol P M1, P M2.5, PM10, and total suspended particles (Tsp) were performed at a rural site (S.Pietro Capofiume, in the Po Valley, Italy). Simultaneous measurements of particle number concentrations were also made with a condensation nucleus counter (CN C-TSI), along with particle concentration in different size classes starting from diameter d > 0.3 μm (Optical Spectrometer Grimm, Mod.1.108). No correlation is observed between I N and the particle number concentration measured with the condensation nuclei counter, and there is only a weak correlation with the particle concentration measured using the optical counter, thus confirming the contribution of the accumulation and coarse aerosol fraction. A positive correlation is observed between supersaturation with respect to ice and water values and ice nuclei number concentration, and an exponential dependence of I N on temperature is found. In addition, cloud concentration nuclei (C CN) were measured. The present measurements reveal a diurnal trend, with lower values at about midday and higher ones during the night, a similar trend between C CN and the relative humidity, and opposite to the mixing layer height.

  7. Comparison of the measurement of heart rate in adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) by auscultation and electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C F; Gavaghan, B J; McSweeney, D; Powell, V; Lisle, A

    2014-12-01

    To compare the heart rates of adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) measured by auscultation with a stethoscope with those measured simultaneously using electrocardiography (ECG). With each bird in a standing position, estimation of the heart rate was performed by placing a mark on paper for every 4 beats for roosters and 8 beats for hens as detected by auscultation over 30 s, while simultaneous ECG was performed. Heart rates measured by auscultation showed a high correlation (r = 0.97) with those measured by ECG. There was a high correlation between the heart rates of adult free-range chickens measured by auscultation with a stethoscope and those measured simultaneously using ECG. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  8. Comparison of three different concepts of high dynamic range and dependability optimised current measurement digitisers for beam loss systems

    CERN Document Server

    Viganò, W; Effinger, E; Venturini, G G; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    Three Different Concepts of High Dynamic Range and Dependability Optimised Current Measurement Digitisers for Beam Loss Systems will be compared on this paper. The first concept is based on Current to Frequency Conversion, enhanced with an ADC for extending the dynamic range and decreasing the response time. A summary of 3 years’ worth of operational experience with such a system for LHC beam loss monitoring will be given. The second principle is based on an Adaptive Current to Frequency Converter implemented in an ASIC. The basic parameters of the circuit are discussed and compared with measurements. Several measures are taken to harden both circuits against single event effects and to make them tolerant for operation in radioactive environments. The third circuit is based on a Fully Differential Integrator for enhanced dynamic range, where laboratory and test installation measurements will be presented. All circuits are designed to avoid any dead time in the acquisition and have reliability and fail safe...

  9. Infrared Line Intensities for Formaldehyde from Simultaneous Measurements in the Infrared and Far Infrared Spectral Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissiaux, L.; Földes, T.; Tchana, F. Kwabia; Daumont, L.; Lepère, M.; Vander Auwera, J.

    2011-06-01

    Formaldehyde (H_2CO) is an important intermediate compound in the degradation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including methane, in the terrestrial troposphere. Its observation using optical remote sensing in the infrared range relies on the 3.6 and 5.7 μm absorption bands. Band and individual line intensities have been reported in both ranges. With the present work, we aim to also derive infrared line intensities for formaldehyde, however relying on pure rotation line intensities and the known electric dipole moment to determine the particle density. Indeed, because formaldehyde polymerizes or degrades easily, the gas phase may contain polymerization or degradation products. Spectra of H_2CO diluted in 10 hPa of N_2 were therefore simultaneously recorded in the 20-60 Cm-1 and 3.6 μm ranges, respectively using a Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform spectrometer and a tunable diode laser. see A. Perrin, D. Jacquemart, F. Kwabia Tchana, N. Lacome, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 110 (2009) 700-716, and references therein

  10. Measured electric field intensities near electric cloud discharges detected by the Kennedy Space Center's Lightning Detection and Ranging System, LDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    For a summer thunderstorm, for which simultaneous, airborne electric field measurements and Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System data was available, measurements were coordinated to present a picture of the electric field intensity near cloud electrical discharges detected by the LDAR System. Radar precipitation echos from NOAA's 10 cm weather radar and measured airborne electric field intensities were superimposed on LDAR PPI plots to present a coordinated data picture of thunderstorm activity.

  11. Instrumental measurement of iridium abundances in the part-per-trillion range following neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.W.; Asaro, F.; Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    An automated gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer has been constructed which, following neutron activation, can measure iridium (Ir) abundances of the order of 25 parts-per-trillion (ppt) in rock samples 500 times more rapidly than previously possible by instrumental techniques used at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Twin intrinsic Ge gamma-ray detectors count coincidences between the 316.5 and 468.1 keV gamma rays of 192 Ir, and together with a mineral-oil-based Compton suppression shield provide a sensitivity of 50 ppt Ir in 7 minute measurements of 100 mg limestone samples subsequent to irradiation in the University of Missouri reactor. Over 3000 samples have been measured, and in collaboration with many geologists and paleontologists from around the world, anomalous amounts of Ir have been detected in rocks with approximate ages of 12, 39, 67, 91, 150 and 3500 million years. Modifications are nearly complete to measure ten other elements very important to geochemical studies simultaneously (in the singles rather than the coincidence mode) with the Ir measurements

  12. Measurements of transition probabilities in the range from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peraza Fernandez, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this memory we describe the design, testing and calibration of different spectrometers to measure transition probabilities from the vacuum ultraviolet to the infrared spectral region. For the infrared measurements we have designed and performed a phase sensitive detection system, using an InGaAs photodiode like detector. With this system we have determined the transition probabilities of infrared lines of KrI and XeI. For these lines we haven't found previous measurements. In the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region we have designed a 3 m normal incidence monochromator where we have installed an optical multichannel analyzer. We have tested its accurate working, obtaining the absorption spectrum of KrI. In the visible region we have obtained the emission spectrum of Al using different spectral: hallow-cathode lamp and Nd: YAG laser produced Al plasma. With these spectra we have determined different atomic parameters like transition probabilities and electron temperatures.(author). 83 refs

  13. Optoelectronic device for the measurement of the absolute linear position in the micrometric displacement range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlanes, Tomas; de la Pena, Jose L.; Sanchez-Brea, Luis M.; Alonso, Jose; Crespo, Daniel; Saez-Landete, Jose B.; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2005-07-01

    In this work, an optoelectronic device that provides the absolute position of a measurement element with respect to a pattern scale upon switch-on is presented. That means that there is not a need to perform any kind of transversal displacement after the startup of the system. The optoelectronic device is based on the process of light propagation passing through a slit. A light source with a definite size guarantees the relation of distances between the different elements that constitute our system and allows getting a particular optical intensity profile that can be measured by an electronic post-processing device providing the absolute location of the system with a resolution of 1 micron. The accuracy of this measuring device is restricted to the same limitations of any incremental position optical encoder.

  14. Facility for the measurement of proton polarization in the range 50-70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M; Sakaguchi, H; Sakamoto, H; Ogawa, H; Cynshi, O; Kobayashi, S [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kato, S [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Lab. of Nuclear Studies; Matsuoka, N; Hatanaka, K; Noro, T [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1983-07-01

    A proton polarimetry facility based on silicon analyzers combined with high-purity germanium detectors is described. The scattering efficiency is 1.5 x 10/sup -5/ at 60 MeV with an effective analyzing power of 0.71 and the energy resolution is about 300 keV fwhm. The facility has succeeded in measuring the depolarization in p-/sup 13/C elastic scattering separated clearly from inelastic events. In order to use a silicon detector as an analyzer target, measurements of cross sections and analyzing powers have been performed at proton energies of 65, 60, 55, 50 and 45 MeV.

  15. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillory, Joffray; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam (LCM), LNE, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France); Šmíd, Radek [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam (LCM), LNE, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris (France); Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, Kralovopolska 147, 612 64 Brno (Czech Republic); Alexandre, Christophe [Centre d’Études et de Recherche en Informatique et Communications (CEDRIC), Cnam, 292 rue St-Martin, 75003 Paris (France)

    2016-07-15

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  16. Seismic safety of Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive program is underway at Paks NPP for evaluation of the seismic safety and for development of the necessary safety increasing measures. This program includes the following five measures: investigation of methods, regulations and techniques utilized for reassessment of seismic safety of operating NPPs and promoting safety; investigation of earthquake hazards; development of concepts for creating the seismic safety location of earthquake warning system; determination of dynamic features of systems and facilities determined by the concept, and preliminary evaluation of the seismic safety

  17. Surface Roughness Measurements Utilizing Long-Range Surface-Plasma Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    8217 The theory dealt only with the depen- modes, one symmetric and one antisymmetric, dence of the real wave vector on the real part of that propagate...quantity, while the wave vector is complex. It is shown that for both the supported and unsup- From Eqs. (1) and (2) one obtains the real implic- ported...Opt. Soc. sabbatical leave from the University of Toledo. Am.). Optical feild enhancemeft by long-range surface- I" ouT In O’ in OUT way@, plasma waves

  18. Patient Self-Assessed Passive Range of Motion of the Knee Cannot Replace Health Professional Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Madsen, Frank; Odgaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether patients can accurately self-assess their knee passive range of motion (PROM). A picture-based questionnaire for patient self-assessment of knee PROM was developed and posted to patients. The self-assessed PROM from 58 patients was compared...... (≥ 10-degree flexion contracture). Surgeon- and patient-assessed knee PROM showed a mean difference (95% limits of agreement) of -2.1 degrees (-42.5 to 38.3 degrees) for flexion and -8.1 degrees (-28.8 to 12.7 degrees) for extension. The sensitivity of patient self-assessed PROM in identifying knee...

  19. Range measurements and track kinetics in Dielectric Nuclear Track Detectors (DNTDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aframian, A

    1981-01-01

    Observations of nuclear track development profiles and the kinetics of etched tracks in sensitive dielectric nuclear track detectors indicate three separate phases: the inception phase or the cone phase, the transition phase and the sphere phase. Continued etching of the sphere phase to through-tracks yields accurate range data for particles of different masses and energies and minimum critical angles of registration for each particle. The present results show an energy resolution of 40 keV (fwhm) for 5.48 MeV alpha-particles emitted from Am-241.

  20. A compact, large-range interferometer for precision measurement and inertial sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. J.; Collins, C. J.; Green, A. C.; Hoyland, D.; Speake, C. C.; Freise, A.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.

    2018-05-01

    We present a compact, fibre-coupled interferometer with high sensitivity and a large working range. We propose to use this interferometer as a readout mechanism for future inertial sensors, removing a major limiting noise source, and in precision positioning systems. The interferometer’s peak sensitivity is 2 × 10-{14} m \\sqrt{Hz-1} at 70 Hz and 7 × 10-{11} m \\sqrt{Hz-1} at 10 mHz. If deployed on a GS-13 geophone, the resulting inertial sensing output will be limited by the suspension thermal noise of the reference mass from 10 mHz to 2 Hz.

  1. Seismic assessment and upgrading of Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, K.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive programme for seismic assessment and upgrading is currently in progress at Hungary's Paks NPP. The re-evaluation of the site seismic hazard had been already completed. The technology of safe shut down and heat removal is established and the systems and structures relevant for seismic safety are identified. A seismic instrumentation is installed. The pre-earthquake preparedness and post-earthquake actions are elaborated. The methods for seismic capacity assessment are selected. The seismic capacity evaluation and the design of upgrading measures are currently in progress. The easy to perform upgrading covering the most urgent measures had been already performed. (author)

  2. A measurement of auroral electrons in the 1–10 MeV range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gils, J.N. van; Beek, H.F. van; Fetter, L.D. de; Hendrickx, R.V.

    Particle fluxes have been measured by means of shielded Geiger-Müller telescopes mounted m a rocket, which was launched from ESRANGE(Kiruna) into a diffuse aurora. The analysis of the dependence of the counting rates on altitude indicates that a weak flux of energetic electrons, 1–10 MeV, has been

  3. Constraints on the design of flow measuring structures over a large dynamic flow range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M.J.; Holmes, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Topographical restraints for design storm flow are described as sharp-crested weirs for low flows in series with broad-crested weirs for the high flows. These design selections are considered to be most economical while providing the specified flow measuring capabilities for movement of radionuclides from the solid waste disposal areas into the surface streams around ORNL

  4. A 100 GHz Polarimetric Compact Radar Range for Scale-Model Radar Cross Section Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    common radar bands. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors wish to thank David Jillson (UML STL – Electrical Engineer) for efforts involved in RF and DC wiring...Waldman J., Fetterman H.R., Duffy P.E., Bryant T.G., Tannenwald P.E., “Submillimeter Model Measurements and Their Applications to Millimeter Radar

  5. Seismic instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    RFS or Regles Fondamentales de Surete (Basic Safety Rules) applicable to certain types of nuclear facilities lay down requirements with which compliance, for the type of facilities and within the scope of application covered by the RFS, is considered to be equivalent to compliance with technical French regulatory practice. The object of the RFS is to take advantage of standardization in the field of safety, while allowing for technical progress in that field. They are designed to enable the operating utility and contractors to know the rules pertaining to various subjects which are considered to be acceptable by the Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires, or the SCSIN (Central Department for the Safety of Nuclear Facilities). These RFS should make safety analysis easier and lead to better understanding between experts and individuals concerned with the problems of nuclear safety. The SCSIN reserves the right to modify, when considered necessary, any RFS and specify, if need be, the terms under which a modification is deemed retroactive. The aim of this RFS is to define the type, location and operating conditions for seismic instrumentation needed to determine promptly the seismic response of nuclear power plants features important to safety to permit comparison of such response with that used as the design basis

  6. Investigating the temporal fluctuations in geoelectrical and geochemical signals jointly measured in a a seismic area of Southern Apennine chain (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuomo, V.; Di Bello, G. [Potenza Universita' della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente; Heinecke, J. [Saxon Academy of Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Lapenna, V.; Piscitelli, S.; Telesca, L. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ist. di Metodologie Avanzate di Analisi Ambientale, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Martinelli, G. [Regione Emilia-Romagna, Servizio Cartografico, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    In this work are analysed geoelectrical and geochemical time series jointly measured by means of a multiparametric automatic station close to an anomalous find emission in Val d'Agri (Basilicata, Southern Italy). In the investigated area some destructive seismic events occurred in past and recent years. Temporal fluctuations of the signals by spectral tools are investigated. Scaling behaviours in the power spectra of the time series recorded have been detected, they are typical fingerprints of fractional Brownian motions. The estimated values of the spectral indices reveal the presence of antipersistent behaviour in the time dynamics of all geoelectrical and geochemical data recorded. This work intends to improve the knowledge of the inner time dynamics of geophysical non-seismometric parameters.

  7. Investigating the temporal fluctuations in geoelectrical and geochemical signals jointly measured in a a seismic area of Southern Apennine chain (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuomo, V; Di Bello, G [Potenza Universita' della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell' Ambiente; Heinecke, J [Saxon Academy of Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Lapenna, V; Piscitelli, S; Telesca, L [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ist. di Metodologie Avanzate di Analisi Ambientale, Tito Scalo, PZ (Italy); Martinelli, G [Regione Emilia-Romagna, Servizio Cartografico, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    In this work are analysed geoelectrical and geochemical time series jointly measured by means of a multiparametric automatic station close to an anomalous find emission in Val d'Agri (Basilicata, Southern Italy). In the investigated area some destructive seismic events occurred in past and recent years. Temporal fluctuations of the signals by spectral tools are investigated. Scaling behaviours in the power spectra of the time series recorded have been detected, they are typical fingerprints of fractional Brownian motions. The estimated values of the spectral indices reveal the presence of antipersistent behaviour in the time dynamics of all geoelectrical and geochemical data recorded. This work intends to improve the knowledge of the inner time dynamics of geophysical non-seismometric parameters.

  8. Processing Approaches for DAS-Enabled Continuous Seismic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, S.; Wood, T.; Freifeld, B. M.; Robertson, M.; McDonald, S.; Pevzner, R.; Lindsey, N.; Gelvin, A.; Saari, S.; Morales, A.; Ekblaw, I.; Wagner, A. M.; Ulrich, C.; Daley, T. M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is creating a "field as laboratory" capability for seismic monitoring of subsurface changes. By providing unprecedented spatial and temporal sampling at a relatively low cost, DAS enables field-scale seismic monitoring to have durations and temporal resolutions that are comparable to those of laboratory experiments. Here we report on seismic processing approaches developed during data analyses of three case studies all using DAS-enabled seismic monitoring with applications ranging from shallow permafrost to deep reservoirs: (1) 10-hour downhole monitoring of cement curing at Otway, Australia; (2) 2-month surface monitoring of controlled permafrost thaw at Fairbanks, Alaska; (3) multi-month downhole and surface monitoring of carbon sequestration at Decatur, Illinois. We emphasize the data management and processing components relevant to DAS-based seismic monitoring, which include scalable approaches to data management, pre-processing, denoising, filtering, and wavefield decomposition. DAS has dramatically increased the data volume to the extent that terabyte-per-day data loads are now typical, straining conventional approaches to data storage and processing. To achieve more efficient use of disk space and network bandwidth, we explore improved file structures and data compression schemes. Because noise floor of DAS measurements is higher than that of conventional sensors, optimal processing workflow involving advanced denoising, deconvolution (of the source signatures), and stacking approaches are being established to maximize signal content of DAS data. The resulting workflow of data management and processing could accelerate the broader adaption of DAS for continuous monitoring of critical processes.

  9. Near-source surface seismic measurements for the NPE, NPE Calibration, Hunter`s Trophy, and Mineral Quarry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, R.E.; Leverette, J.A. [Field Command Defense Nuclear Agency, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    An extensive seismic network was deployed on the surface of Rainier Mesa for both the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) Calibration shot as well as the full scale NPE event. This network was very similar to previous deployments for the nuclear events MISTY ECHO, MINERAL QUARRY, and HUNTERS TROPHY. For the full scale NPE event three-component accelerometers and seismometers were fielded at 32 sites across the mesa. A slightly smaller network with 28 stations was in operation for the 300 pound NPE calibration event. The mesa top array included both accelerometers and seismometers. The accelerometers were used to obtain data from the main NPE event while the seismometers with their higher sensitivity were used to record the 300 pound cal shot and several hundred after events from the NPE. Large spatial variations in ground motion are evident in both the full mesa data set as well as a small (80 m on a side) aperture, 9-element triangular array. This paper summarizes the data and discusses wave propagation effects. A companion paper presents a comparative source analysis.

  10. Measures taken in the member countries of the European Communities for anti-seismic design compared to actual US practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinck, W.; Maurer, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    Most countries of the European Communities base their anti-seismic design parameters on specific US earthquake characteristics. There are, however, important discrepancies in the basic data reported on the two continents as well as in their design application. This was one of the topics under discussion within an European working group on methodologies, criteria and standards in nuclear safety. The contribution is based on an inventory of the applied national practices, the existing specifications, regulations, and guidelines applied in the design, the manufacture, and the safety assessment of structures, systems, and components to withstand potential earthquake consequences in the countries of the European Communities. In a comparison of these national specifications and guidelines the common points of agreement are identified and the divergences discussed with reference to the US practice. Special attention is given to the divergencies for definition and determination of the reference eathquakes. In European countries the definitions of the reference earthquakes are largely analogous to definitions in the US Federal Regulations but expressed in a different way. For European countries, threshold values are proposed to guarantee safety for nuclear power plants. (Auth.)

  11. Measuring Pulse Rate Variability using Long-Range, Non-Contact Imaging Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-20

    contains color . 14. ABSTRACT Camera-based measurement of the blood volume pulse via non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography is a very popular approach...ECG) for each window were calculated in beats per minute (bpm). The periodogram method with a Hamming window was used to estimate mean pulse...11 Hz. Independent component analysis (ICA) was then used to decompose the normalized, bandpass-filtered, color -channel signals into independent

  12. A study on the excore neutron flux monitoring system for the wide range measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Jun; Jeong, Dae Won; Baek, Kwang Il; Lee, Jeong Yang; Ha, Jae Hong

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes a study in which only one kind of neutron detector were used in the advanced ENFMS. The conceptual design was performed for overall system with unified fission chamber. The system consists of detector, junction box, wide-range amplifier and signal processing device. Also the requirements of 10CFR50 App. R were considered in design. On the other hand, through computer simulation, the characteristics of pulse-count mode and MSV mode was scrutinized and each noise withstanding capability was analyzed. The results say that 3rd moment has the more stable characteristics to background noise than MSV method. Also, to remain the integrity of information against noise, during installation and operation, the overall system of KSNP was analyzed from a view of noise. By administration for the cause of noise and noise-coupling paths, through the full understanding of noise characteristics, the transfer of the noise source can be minimized. (Author)

  13. n-p Short-Range Correlations from (p,2p+n) Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Malki, A.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Zhalov, D.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the 12C(p,2p+n) reaction at beam momenta of 5.9, 8.0, and 9.0 GeV/c. For quasielastic (p,2p) events pf, the momentum of the knocked-out proton before the reaction, was compared (event by event) with pn, the coincident neutron momentum. For |pn|>kF=0.220 GeV/c (the Fermi momentum) a strong back-to-back directional correlation between pf and pn was observed, indicative of short-range n-p correlations. From pn and pf we constructed the distributions of c.m. and relative motion in the longitudinal direction for correlated pairs. We also determined that 49±13% of events with |pf|>kF had directionally correlated neutrons with |pn|>kF.

  14. Inferring bread doneness with air-pulse/ultrasonic ranging measurements of the loaf elastic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, Loren Elbert

    This research marks the discovery of a method by which bread doneness may be determined based on the elastic properties of the loaf as it bakes. The purpose of the study was to determine if changes in bread characteristics could be determined by non-contact methods during baking, as the basis for improved control of the baking process. Current control of the baking process is based on temperature and dwell time, which are determined by experience to produce a produce which is approximately ``done.'' There is no direct measurement of the property of interest, doneness. An ultrasonic measurement system was developed to measure the response of the loaf to an external stimulus. ``Doneness,'' as reflected in the internal elastic consistency of the bakery product, is assessed in less than 1/2 second, and requires no closer approach to the moving bakery product than about 2 inches. The system is designed to be compatible with strapped bread pans in a standard traveling-tray commercial oven.

  15. [Comparing the ranges of defect measured with standard white on white and Pulsar perimetries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de la Rosa, M; González-Hernández, M; García-Feijoo, J; Sánchez Méndez, M; García-Sánchez, J

    2011-04-01

    Normal thresholds on Pulsar perimetry fall faster than those of standard perimetry in the peripheral visual field. Two related studies were performed. Firstly, the frequency distributions of glaucoma defects on standard automated perimetry (SAP) and the relationship of the centre and periphery (Study A) were studied first, followed by an attempt to establish the limits of pulsar perimetry (Study B). A: frequency of defects was calculated in 78.663 SAP perimetries (G1-TOP, Octopus 1-2-3, Haag-Streit). Study B: 204 eyes with mean defect (MD-SAP) lower than 9 dB were examined 8.92 ± 4.19 times with SAP (TOP-32, Octopus 311) and temporal modulation perimetry (T30W, Pulsar Perimeter, Haag-Streit). Study A: 50.7% of the SAP examinations showed MD values lower than 9 dB and 32.7% bellow 6 dB. The MD correlation of the central 20° with the MD of the most peripheral points was r=0.933. Study B: in cases with MD-TOP-32 lower than 6 dB, SAP had the maximum possibility of detecting defect in 0.02% of points and Pulsar in 0.29%. In subjects with MD-TOP-32 between 6 and 9 dB frequencies were 0.38% in SAP and 3.5% in Pulsar (5.1% for eccentricities higher than 20°). Pulsar allows detecting defects, without range limitations, in the initial half of SAP frequencies expected on glaucoma patients. In order to study the progression of deeper defects the examination should focus on the central points, where the dynamic range of both systems is more equivalent. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Seismic capacity of switchgear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.; Kassir, M.; Pepper, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a component fragility program sponsored by the USNRC, BNL has collected existing information on the seismic capacity of switchgear assemblies from major manufacturers. Existing seismic test data for both low and medium voltage switchgear assemblies have been evaluated and the generic results are presented in this paper. The failure modes are identified and the corresponding generic lower bound capacity levels are established. The test response spectra have been used as a measure of the test vibration input. The results indicate that relays chatter at a very low input level at the base of the switchgear cabinet. This change of state of devices including relays have been observed. Breaker tripping occurs at a higher vibration level. Although the structural failure of internal elements have been noticed, the overall switchgear cabinet structure withstands a high vibration level. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Multicomponent ensemble models to forecast induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király-Proag, E.; Gischig, V.; Zechar, J. D.; Wiemer, S.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, human-induced seismicity has become a more and more relevant topic due to its economic and social implications. Several models and approaches have been developed to explain underlying physical processes or forecast induced seismicity. They range from simple statistical models to coupled numerical models incorporating complex physics. We advocate the need for forecast testing as currently the best method for ascertaining if models are capable to reasonably accounting for key physical governing processes—or not. Moreover, operational forecast models are of great interest to help on-site decision-making in projects entailing induced earthquakes. We previously introduced a standardized framework following the guidelines of the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability, the Induced Seismicity Test Bench, to test, validate, and rank induced seismicity models. In this study, we describe how to construct multicomponent ensemble models based on Bayesian weightings that deliver more accurate forecasts than individual models in the case of Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 enhanced geothermal stimulation projects. For this, we examine five calibrated variants of two significantly different model groups: (1) Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity based on the seismogenic index, simple modified Omori-law-type seismicity decay, and temporally weighted smoothed seismicity; (2) Hydraulics and Seismicity based on numerically modelled pore pressure evolution that triggers seismicity using the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. We also demonstrate how the individual and ensemble models would perform as part of an operational Adaptive Traffic Light System. Investigating seismicity forecasts based on a range of potential injection scenarios, we use forecast periods of different durations to compute the occurrence probabilities of seismic events M ≥ 3. We show that in the case of the Basel 2006 geothermal stimulation the models forecast hazardous levels

  18. Field Installation and Real-Time Data Processing of the New Integrated SeismoGeodetic System with Real-Time Acceleration and Displacement Measurements for Earthquake Characterization Based on High-Rate Seismic and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimakov, Leonid; Jackson, Michael; Passmore, Paul; Raczka, Jared; Alvarez, Marcos; Barrientos, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    We will discuss and show the results obtained from an integrated SeismoGeodetic System, model SG160-09, installed in the Chilean National Network. The SG160-09 provides the user high rate GNSS and accelerometer data, full epoch-by-epoch measurement integrity and, using the Trimble Pivot™ SeismoGeodetic App, the ability to create combined GNSS and accelerometer high-rate (200Hz) displacement time series in real-time. The SG160-09 combines seismic recording with GNSS geodetic measurement in a single compact, ruggedized package. The system includes a low-power, 220-channel GNSS receiver powered by the latest Trimble-precise Maxwell™6 technology and supports tracking GPS, GLONASS and Galileo signals. The receiver incorporates on-board GNSS point positioning using Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technology with satellite clock and orbit corrections delivered over IP networks. The seismic recording element includes an ANSS Class A, force balance triaxial accelerometer with the latest, low power, 24-bit A/D converter, which produces high-resolution seismic data. The SG160-09 processor acquires and packetizes both seismic and geodetic data and transmits it to the central station using an advanced, error-correction protocol with back fill capability providing data integrity between the field and the processing center. The SG160-09 has been installed in the seismic station close to the area of the Iquique earthquake of April 1, 2014, in northern Chile, a seismically prone area at the current time. The hardware includes the SG160-09 system, external Zephyr Geodetic-2 GNSS antenna, and high-speed Internet communication media. Both acceleration and displacement data was transmitted in real-time to the National Seismological Center in Santiago for real-time data processing using Earthworm / Early Bird software. Command/Control of the field station and real-time GNSS position correction are provided via the Pivot software suite. Data from the SG160-09 system was

  19. Respiration rate of stream insects measured in situ along a large altitude range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, S.; Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    Field studies of respiration in stream insects are few in comparison with laboratory studies. To evaluate the influence of temperature and oxygen along altitudinal gradients we measured the respiration rate of fully acclimatized larval Trichoptera, Plecoptera and Ephemeroptera under similar field...... at 100 and 50% oxygen saturation indicated that highland animals reduced their oxygen uptake more than their counterparts in the lowland when oxygen availability decreased. The temperature response of respiration calculated between the insect assemblages at different altitudes showed a mean assemblage Q...

  20. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    the instantaneous transversal wake position which is quantitatively compared with the prediction of the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. The results, shown for two 10-min time series, suggest that the conjecture of the wake behaving as a passive tracer is a fair approximation; this corroborates and expands...... the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond, qualitatively...

  1. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    and frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) are used, and the two frequency comb systems used for the experiments are thoroughly characterized, a Coherent Mira Ti:sapph oscillator and a MenloSystems fiber based frequency comb system. The potential of frequency comb driven Raman transitions is shown...... transition frequencies typically are on the order of a few THz. High precision measurements on these ions have many intriguing applications, for example the test of time-variations of fundamental constants, ultracold chemistry on the quantum level, and quantum information and computing, to name just a few...

  2. Radiometric characterization of six soils in the microwave X-range through complex permittivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palme, U.W.

    1987-10-01

    Estimating and monitoring up-to-date soil moisture conditions over extensive areas through passive (or active) microwave remote sensing techniques requires the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (ε r * ) in function of soil moisture. X-band measurements of ε r * for different moisture conditions were made in laboratory for soil samples of six important Soils (PV 2 , LV 3 , LR d , LE 1 , SAP and Sc). Using a theoretical model and computational programmes developed, these measurements allowed estimates of the emissive characteristics of the soils that would be expected with the X-Band Microwave Radiometer built at INPE. The results, new, for soils from tropical regions, showed that only the physical characteristics and properties of the soils are not sufficient to explain the behaviour of ε r * in function of soil moisture, indicating that the chemical and/or mineralogical properties of the soils do have an important contribution. The results also showed thast ε r * in function of soil moisture depends on soil class. (author) [pt

  3. Evaluation of expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with light source-stepping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Toshimasa; Fujigaki, Motoharu; Murata, Yorinobu

    2015-03-01

    Accurate and wide-range shape measurement method is required in industrial field. The same technique is possible to be used for a shape measurement of a human body for the garment industry. Compact 3D shape measurement equipment is also required for embedding in the inspection system. A shape measurement by a phase shifting method can measure the shape with high spatial resolution because the coordinates can be obtained pixel by pixel. A key-device to develop compact equipment is a grating projector. Authors developed a linear LED projector and proposed a light source stepping method (LSSM) using the linear LED projector. The shape measurement euipment can be produced with low-cost and compact without any phase-shifting mechanical systems by using this method. Also it enables us to measure 3D shape in very short time by switching the light sources quickly. A phase unwrapping method is necessary to widen the measurement range with constant accuracy for phase shifting method. A general phase unwrapping method with difference grating pitches is often used. It is one of a simple phase unwrapping method. It is, however, difficult to apply the conventional phase unwrapping algorithm to the LSSM. Authors, therefore, developed an expansion unwrapping algorithm for the LSSM. In this paper, an expansion algorithm of measurement range suited for 3D shape measurement using two pitches of projected grating with the LSSM was evaluated.

  4. Using satellite laser ranging to measure ice mass change in Greenland and Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bonin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A least squares inversion of satellite laser ranging (SLR data over Greenland and Antarctica could extend gravimetry-based estimates of mass loss back to the early 1990s and fill any future gap between the current Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE and the future GRACE Follow-On mission. The results of a simulation suggest that, while separating the mass change between Greenland and Antarctica is not possible at the limited spatial resolution of the SLR data, estimating the total combined mass change of the two areas is feasible. When the method is applied to real SLR and GRACE gravity series, we find significantly different estimates of inverted mass loss. There are large, unpredictable, interannual differences between the two inverted data types, making us conclude that the current 5×5 spherical harmonic SLR series cannot be used to stand in for GRACE. However, a comparison with the longer IMBIE time series suggests that on a 20-year time frame, the inverted SLR series' interannual excursions may average out, and the long-term mass loss estimate may be reasonable.

  5. Using satellite laser ranging to measure ice mass change in Greenland and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Jennifer A.; Chambers, Don P.; Cheng, Minkang

    2018-01-01

    A least squares inversion of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data over Greenland and Antarctica could extend gravimetry-based estimates of mass loss back to the early 1990s and fill any future gap between the current Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and the future GRACE Follow-On mission. The results of a simulation suggest that, while separating the mass change between Greenland and Antarctica is not possible at the limited spatial resolution of the SLR data, estimating the total combined mass change of the two areas is feasible. When the method is applied to real SLR and GRACE gravity series, we find significantly different estimates of inverted mass loss. There are large, unpredictable, interannual differences between the two inverted data types, making us conclude that the current 5×5 spherical harmonic SLR series cannot be used to stand in for GRACE. However, a comparison with the longer IMBIE time series suggests that on a 20-year time frame, the inverted SLR series' interannual excursions may average out, and the long-term mass loss estimate may be reasonable.

  6. Nanocomposite-Based Microstructured Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors for Low-Pressure Measurement Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Mitrakos

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoresistive pressure sensors capable of detecting ranges of low compressive stresses have been successfully fabricated and characterised. The 5.5 × 5 × 1.6 mm3 sensors consist of a planar aluminium top electrode and a microstructured bottom electrode containing a two-by-two array of truncated pyramids with a piezoresistive composite layer sandwiched in-between. The responses of two different piezocomposite materials, a Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube (MWCNT-elastomer composite and a Quantum Tunneling Composite (QTC, have been characterised as a function of applied pressure and effective contact area. The MWCNT piezoresistive composite-based sensor was able to detect pressures as low as 200 kPa. The QTC-based sensor was capable of detecting pressures as low as 50 kPa depending on the contact area of the bottom electrode. Such sensors could find useful applications requiring the detection of small compressive loads such as those encountered in haptic sensing or robotics.

  7. Seismic and tsunami safety margin assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Nuclear Regulation Authority is going to establish new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines to increase the safety of NPPs. The main purpose of this research is testing structures/components important to safety and tsunami resistant structures/components, and evaluating the capacity of them against earthquake and tsunami. Those capacity data will be utilized for the seismic and tsunami back-fit review based on the new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines. The summary of the program in 2012 is as follows. 1. Component seismic capacity test and quantitative seismic capacity evaluation. PWR emergency diesel generator partial-model seismic capacity tests have been conducted and quantitative seismic capacities have been evaluated. 2. Seismic capacity evaluation of switching-station electric equipment. Existing seismic test data investigation, specification survey and seismic response analyses have been conducted. 3. Tsunami capacity evaluation of anti-inundation measure facilities. Tsunami pressure test have been conducted utilizing a small breakwater model and evaluated basic characteristics of tsunami pressure against seawall structure. (author)

  8. Seismic and tsunami safety margin assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Regulation Authority is going to establish new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines to increase the safety of NPPs. The main purpose of this research is testing structures/components important to safety and tsunami resistant structures/components, and evaluating the capacity of them against earthquake and tsunami. Those capacity data will be utilized for the seismic and tsunami back-fit review based on the new seismic and tsunami safety guidelines. The summary of the program in 2012 is as follows. 1. Component seismic capacity test and quantitative seismic capacity evaluation. PWR emergency diesel generator partial-model seismic capacity tests have been conducted and quantitative seismic capacities have been evaluated. 2. Seismic capacity evaluation of switching-station electric equipment. Existing seismic test data investigation, specification survey and seismic response analyses have been conducted. 3. Tsunami capacity evaluation of anti-inundation measure facilities. Tsunami pressure test have been conducted utilizing a small breakwater model and evaluated basic characteristics of tsunami pressure against seawall structure. (author)

  9. Seismic qualification of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidebrecht, A.C.; Tso, W.K.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the seismic qualification of equipment located in CANDU nuclear power plants. It is particularly concerned with the evaluation of current seismic qualification requirements, the development of a suitable methodology for the seismic qualification of safety systems, and the evaluation of seismic qualification analysis and testing procedures

  10. Lichenometric age measured on rock-falls related to historic seismicity affecting Lorca and its surroundings (Murcia, SE Spain); Datacion mediante liquenometria de los desprendimientos rocosos asociados a la sismicidad historica en Lorca (Murcia, SE de Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Lopez, R.; Martin-Gonzalez, F.; Martinez-Diaz, J. J.; Rodriguez-Pascua, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    During the earthquake at Lorca (Murcia, SE Spain) in 2011 (5.2 Mw, 4km depth) several rock-falls occurred, mobilizing an estimated volume of close to 2,000 m3. All these rock-falls took place within the Estancias and La Tercia mountain ranges, the topography of which is composed of Tortonian calcarenitic sandstones with steep scarps more than 30 m in height. We have conducted a lichenometric study to obtain the age of the ancient rock-falls within the Las Estancias Range. We have assumed an annual growth rate of 0.24 mm for lichen species classified as calcicolous and related to warm climatic conditions. Our aim was to corroborate the hypothesis that seismic events triggered these massive rock-falls. The city of Lorca had experienced two nearfield historic earthquakes (1674 EMS VIII and 1818 EMS VI) and one far-field tremor during the great Lisbon earthquake in 1755 (EMS VI). Results obtained here indicate that the earthquakes of 1674 and 2011 were quite similar, except that the 1674 one mobilised a greater quantity and twenty times the volume of blocks mobilised during the 2011 earthquake. Therefore, we conclude that the size of the earthquake of 1674 was possibly between 6.0 < M < 6.8, assuming similar focal and seismotectonic conditions to those of the instrumentally measured earthquake of 2011. (Author) 34 refs.

  11. Excitation mechanisms for Jovian seismic modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Steve; Stevenson, Dave

    2018-05-01

    Recent (2011) results from the Nice Observatory indicate the existence of global seismic modes on Jupiter in the frequency range between 0.7 and 1.5 mHz with amplitudes of tens of cm/s. Currently, the driving force behind these modes is a mystery; the measured amplitudes are many orders of magnitude larger than anticipated based on theory analogous to helioseismology (that is, turbulent convection as a source of stochastic excitation). One of the most promising hypotheses is that these modes are driven by Jovian storms. This work constructs a framework to analytically model the expected equilibrium normal mode amplitudes arising from convective columns in storms. We also place rough constraints on Jupiter's seismic modal quality factor. Using this model, neither meteor strikes, turbulent convection, nor water storms can feasibly excite the order of magnitude of observed amplitudes. Next we speculate about the potential role of rock storms deeper in Jupiter's atmosphere, because the rock storms' expected energy scales make them promising candidates to be the chief source of excitation for Jovian seismic modes, based on simple scaling arguments. We also suggest some general trends in the expected partition of energy between different frequency modes. Finally we supply some commentary on potential applications to gravity, Juno, Cassini and Saturn, and future missions to Uranus and Neptune.

  12. Factors affecting seismic response of submarine slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biscontin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of submerged slopes on the continental shelf to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and 'local' tsunami hazards worldwide. The geological profile of these slopes typically includes normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated soft cohesive soils with layer thickness ranging from a few meters to hundreds of meters. The factor of safety obtained from pseudo-static analyses is not always a useful measure for evaluating the slope response, since values less than one do not necessarily imply slope failure with large movements of the soil mass. This paper addresses the relative importance of different factors affecting the response of submerged slopes during seismic loading. The analyses use a dynamic finite element code which includes a constitutive law describing the anisotropic stress-strain-strength behavior of normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated clays. The model also incorporates anisotropic hardening to describe the effect of different shear strain and stress histories as well as bounding surface principles to provide realistic descriptions of the accumulation of the plastic strains and excess pore pressure during successive loading cycles. The paper presents results from parametric site response analyses on slope geometry and layering, soil material parameters, and input ground motion characteristics. The predicted maximum shear strains, permanent deformations, displacement time histories and maximum excess pore pressure development provide insight of slope performance during a seismic event.

  13. Study of incomplete fusion sensitivity to projectile structure from forward recoil range distribution measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Harish; Tali, Suhail A.; Afzal Ansari, M.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the projectile structure is found to affect the incomplete fusion (ICF) process by using α- and non-α-cluster structured projectiles which is explored in terms of projectile α-Q-value and is still limited only for a very few systems. Keeping in view the recent aspects especially the projectile structure effect on ICF, the present work is carried out in the series of experiment by using α- and non-α-cluster structured projectiles. Presently, the FRRDs of evaporation residues (ERs) produced in 13 C + 175 Lu system have been measured at ≈ 88 MeV energy. In this work, an attempt has been made to have a better knowledge of projectile α-Q-value effect on ICF

  14. Rhodamine 800 as reference substance for fluorescence quantum yield measurements in deep red emission range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, A., E-mail: andrea.alessi@eni.com [Centro Ricerche per le Energie non Convenzionali, Istituto eni Donegani, e.n.i. S.p.A., Via G. Fauser 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Salvalaggio, M. [Centro Ricerche per le Energie non Convenzionali, Istituto eni Donegani, e.n.i. S.p.A., Via G. Fauser 4, 28100 Novara (Italy); Ruzzon, G. [HORIBA Jobin Yvon Srl, Via Cesare Pavese 35/AB, 20090 Opera Milano (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    The determination of fluorescence quantum yields ({Phi}{sub f}) of deep red dyes emitting at 635-900 nm is difficult due to lack of suitable standards. In this work, we propose a commercial dye, rhodamine 800 (Rho800), as reference standard which belongs to the family of xanthenes. The quantum yield of rhodamine 800 in absolute ethanol has been studied using a relative method with cresyl violet (CV) and rhodamine 101 (Rho101) as references, and an absolute fluorometric method by integrating sphere measurements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A red emitting dye Rhodamine 800 was electronic spectroscopy characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its fluorescence quantum yield was studied using a relative and an absolute method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values found are greater than the values currently known in the literature.

  15. Seismic characterization of fracture properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myer, L.R.; Hopkins, D.; Cook, N.G.W.; Pyrak-Nolte, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that there is a relationship, both empirical and theoretical, between the measured seismic response, the mechanical stiffness (also referred to as specific stiffness) of fractures and their hydraulic conductivity. Laboratory measurements of the mechanical stiffness, hydraulic conductivity and seismic properties of natural fractures are summarized. A theoretical model for the amplitude and group time delay for compressional and shear waves transmitted across a single fracture is presented. Predictions based on this model are compared with laboratory measurements. Finally, the results for a single fracture are extended to multiple parallel fractures. 13 refs., 6 figs

  16. Pose and Shape Reconstruction of a Noncooperative Spacecraft Using Camera and Range Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Volpe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in on-orbit proximity operations has pushed towards the development of autonomous GNC strategies. In this sense, optical navigation enables a wide variety of possibilities as it can provide information not only about the kinematic state but also about the shape of the observed object. Various mission architectures have been either tested in space or studied on Earth. The present study deals with on-orbit relative pose and shape estimation with the use of a monocular camera and a distance sensor. The goal is to develop a filter which estimates an observed satellite’s relative position, velocity, attitude, and angular velocity, along with its shape, with the measurements obtained by a camera and a distance sensor mounted on board a chaser which is on a relative trajectory around the target. The filter’s efficiency is proved with a simulation on a virtual target object. The results of the simulation, even though relevant to a simplified scenario, show that the estimation process is successful and can be considered a promising strategy for a correct and safe docking maneuver.

  17. How to measure atomic diffusion processes in the sub-nanometer range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Gupta, M.; Gutberlet, T.; Stahn, J.; Bruns, M.

    2008-01-01

    Self-diffusion of the atomic constituents in the solid state is a fundamental transport process that controls various materials properties. With established methods of diffusivity determination it is only possible to measure diffusion processes on a length scale down to 10 nm at corresponding diffusivities of 10 -23 m 2 s -1 . However, for complex materials like amorphous or nano-structured solids the given values are often not sufficient for a proper characterization. Consequently, it is necessary to detect diffusion length well below 1 nm. Here, we present the method of neutron reflectometry on isotope multilayers. For two model systems, an amorphous semiconductor and an amorphous metallic alloy, the efficiency of this method is demonstrated to detect minimum diffusion lengths of only 0.6-0.7 nm. It is further shown that diffusivities can be derived which are more than two orders of magnitude lower than those obtainable with conventional methods. Prospects of this method in order to solve actual kinetic problems in materials science are given

  18. Attenuation on an Earth-space path measured in the wavelength range of 8 to 14 micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R W

    1970-06-19

    A telescope operating over the wavelength range of 8 to 14 micrometers has been added to the Crawford Hill sun tracker for the purpose of measuring attenuation in that atmospheric window. Over a 9-month period the attenuation (typically from clouds) exceeded 10, 20, and 30 decibels for 48, 43, and 34 percent of the time.

  19. Total photoabsorption cross section on nuclei measured in energy range 0.5-2.6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirazita, M.

    1998-03-01

    The total photoabsorption cross section on several nuclei has been measured in the energy range 0.5 - 2.6 GeV. Nuclear data show a significant reduction of the absorption strength with respect to the free nucleon case suggesting a shadowing effect at low energies

  20. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) MagLev"-to increase the range of densities that can be levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  1. Synthesis of Algorithm for Range Measurement Equipment to Track Maneuvering Aircraft Using Data on Its Dynamic and Kinematic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudovkin, A. P.; Panasyuk, Yu N.; Danilov, S. N.; Moskvitin, S. P.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of improving automated air traffic control systems is considered through the example of the operation algorithm synthesis for a range measurement channel to track the aircraft, using its kinematic and dynamic parameters. The choice of the state and observation models has been justified, the computer simulations have been performed and the results of the investigated algorithms have been obtained.

  2. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges..., June 22, 2010, table C-1 to subpart C was revised, effective Aug. 23, 2010. For the convenience of the...

  3. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; hide

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  4. Calculation of NPP pipeline seismic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, A.P.; Ambriashvili, Yu.K.; Kaliberda, I.V.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified design procedure of seismic pipeline stability of NPP at WWER reactor is described. The simplified design procedure envisages during the selection and arrangement of pipeline saddle and hydraulic shock absorbers use of method of introduction of resilient mountings of very high rigidity into the calculated scheme of the pipeline and performance of calculations with step-by-step method. It is concluded that the application of the design procedure considered permits to determine strains due to seismic loads, to analyze stressed state in pipeline elements and supporting power of pipe-line saddle with provision for seismic loads to plan measures on seismic protection

  5. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic-event probabilistic seismic hazard model, which can be used further for estimates of seismic loss and seismic risk analysis, has been developed for the territory of Yemen. An updated composite earthquake catalogue has been compiled using the databases from two basic sources and several research publications. The spatial distribution of earthquakes from the catalogue was used to define and characterize the regional earthquake source zones for Yemen. To capture all possible scenarios in the seismic hazard model, a stochastic event set has been created consisting of 15,986 events generated from 1,583 fault segments in the delineated seismic source zones. Distribution of horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA was calculated for all stochastic events considering epistemic uncertainty in ground-motion modeling using three suitable ground motion-prediction relationships, which were applied with equal weight. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps were created showing PGA and MSK seismic intensity at 10% and 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years, considering local soil site conditions. The resulting PGA for 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years (return period 475 years ranges from 0.2 g to 0.3 g in western Yemen and generally is less than 0.05 g across central and eastern Yemen. The largest contributors to Yemen’s seismic hazard are the events from the West Arabian Shield seismic zone.

  6. Accurate dew-point measurement over a wide temperature range using a quartz crystal microbalance dew-point sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Su-Yong; Kim, Jong-Chul; Choi, Buyng-Il

    2008-11-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) dew-point sensors are based on frequency measurement, and so have fast response time, high sensitivity and high accuracy. Recently, we have reported that they have the very convenient attribute of being able to distinguish between supercooled dew and frost from a single scan through the resonant frequency of the quartz resonator as a function of the temperature. In addition to these advantages, by using three different types of heat sinks, we have developed a QCM dew/frost-point sensor with a very wide working temperature range (-90 °C to 15 °C). The temperature of the quartz surface can be obtained effectively by measuring the temperature of the quartz crystal holder and using temperature compensation curves (which showed a high level of repeatability and reproducibility). The measured dew/frost points showed very good agreement with reference values and were within ±0.1 °C over the whole temperature range.

  7. A novel method of range measuring for a mobile robot based on multi-sensor information fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yi; Luo Yuan; Wang Jifeng

    2005-01-01

    The traditional measuring range for a mobile robot is based on a sonar sensor. Because of different working environments, it is very difficult to obtain high precision by using just one single method of range measurement. So, a hybrid sonar sensor and laser scanner method is put forward to overcome these shortcomings. A novel fusion model is proposed based on basic theory and a method of information fusion. An optimal measurement result has been obtained with information fusion from different sensors. After large numbers of experiments and performance analysis, a conclusion can be drawn that the laser scanner and sonar sensor method with multi-sensor information fusion have a higher precision than the single method of sonar. It can also be the same with different environments

  8. RTX Correction Accuracy and Real-Time Data Processing of the New Integrated SeismoGeodetic System with Real-Time Acceleration and Displacement Measurements for Earthquake Characterization Based on High-Rate Seismic and GPS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimakov, L. G.; Raczka, J.; Barrientos, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    We will discuss and show the results obtained from an integrated SeismoGeodetic System, model SG160-09, installed in the Chile (Chilean National Network), Italy (University of Naples Network), and California. The SG160-09 provides the user high rate GNSS and accelerometer data, full epoch-by-epoch measurement integrity and the ability to create combined GNSS and accelerometer high-rate (200Hz) displacement time series in real-time. The SG160-09 combines seismic recording with GNSS geodetic measurement in a single compact, ruggedized case. The system includes a low-power, 220-channel GNSS receiver powered by the latest Trimble-precise Maxwell™6 technology and supports tracking GPS, GLONASS and Galileo signals. The receiver incorporates on-board GNSS point positioning using Real-Time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technology with satellite clock and orbit corrections delivered over IP networks. The seismic recording includes an ANSS Class A, force balance accelerometer with the latest, low power, 24-bit A/D converter, producing high-resolution seismic data. The SG160-09 processor acquires and packetizes both seismic and geodetic data and transmits it to the central station using an advanced, error-correction protocol providing data integrity between the field and the processing center. The SG160-09 has been installed in three seismic stations in different geographic locations with different Trimble global reference stations coverage The hardware includes the SG160-09 system, external Zephyr Geodetic-2 GNSS antenna, both radio and high-speed Internet communication media. Both acceleration and displacement data was transmitted in real-time to the centralized Data Acquisition Centers for real-time data processing. Command/Control of the field station and real-time GNSS position correction are provided via the Pivot platform. Data from the SG160-09 system was used for seismic event characterization along with data from traditional seismic and geodetic stations

  9. SU-F-T-184: 3D Range-Modulator for Scanned Particle Therapy: Development, Monte Carlo Simulations and Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonov, Y; Penchev, P; Ringbaek, T Printz [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); Brons, S [Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, U [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Zink, K [University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Giessen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Active raster scanning in particle therapy results in highly conformal dose distributions. Treatment time, however, is relatively high due to the large number of different iso-energy layers used. By using only one energy and the so called 3D range-modulator irradiation times of a few seconds only can be achieved, thus making delivery of homogeneous dose to moving targets (e.g. lung cancer) more reliable. Methods: A 3D range-modulator consisting of many pins with base area of 2.25 mm2 and different lengths was developed and manufactured with rapid prototyping technique. The form of the 3D range-modulator was optimised for a spherical target volume with 5 cm diameter placed at 25 cm in a water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA package were carried out to evaluate the modulating effect of the 3D range-modulator and simulate the resulting dose distribution. The fine and complicated contour form of the 3D range-modulator was taken into account by a specially programmed user routine. Additionally FLUKA was extended with the capability of intensity modulated scanning. To verify the simulation results dose measurements were carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) with a 400.41 MeV 12C beam. Results: The high resolution measurements show that the 3D range-modulator is capable of producing homogeneous 3D conformal dose distributions, simultaneously reducing significantly irradiation time. Measured dose is in very good agreement with the previously conducted FLUKA simulations, where slight differences were traced back to minor manufacturing deviations from the perfect optimised form. Conclusion: Combined with the advantages of very short treatment time the 3D range-modulator could be an alternative to treat small to medium sized tumours (e.g. lung metastasis) with the same conformity as full raster-scanning treatment. Further simulations and measurements of more complex cases will be conducted to investigate the full potential of the 3D

  10. Seismic attenuation and scattering tomography of rock samples using stochastic wavefields: linking seismology, volcanology, and rock physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Marco; De Siena, Luca; Benson, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Seismic attenuation and scattering are two attributes that can be linked with porosity and permeability in laboratory experiments. When measuring these two quantities using seismic waveforms recorder at lithospheric and volcanic scales the areas of highest heterogeneity, as batches of melt and zones of high deformation, produce anomalous values of the measured quantities, the seismic quality factor and scattering coefficient. When employed as indicators of heterogeneity and absorption in volcanic areas these anomalous effects become strong indicators of magma accumulation and tectonic boundaries, shaping magmatic chambers and conduit systems. We perform attenuation and scattering measurements and imaging using seismic waveforms produced in laboratory experiments, at frequencies ranging between the kHz and MHz. As attenuation and scattering are measured from the shape of the envelopes, disregarding phases, we are able to connect the observations with the micro fracturing and petrological quantities previously measured on the sample. Connecting the imaging of dry and saturated samples via these novel attributes with the burst of low-period events with increasing saturation and deformation is a challenge. Its solution could plant the seed for better relating attenuation and scattering tomography measurements to the presence of fluids and gas, therefore creating a novel path for reliable porosity and permeability tomography. In particular for volcanoes, being able to relate attenuation/scattering measurements with low-period micro seismicity could deliver new data to settle the debate about if both source and medium can produce seismic resonance.

  11. Correlation-based seismic velocity inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of the subsurface comes from the measurement of quantities that are indirectly related to the earth’s structure. Examples are seismic waves, gravity and electromagnetic waves. We consider the use of seismic waves for inference of structural information on an exploration scale.

  12. Three dimensional marine seismic survey has no measurable effect on species richness or abundance of a coral reef associated fish community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Ian; Cripps, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A marine seismic survey was conducted at Scott Reef, North Western Australia. • Effects of the survey on demersal fish were gauged using underwater visual census. • There was no detectable impact of the seismic survey on species abundance. • There was no detectable impact of the seismic survey on species richness. -- Abstract: Underwater visual census was used to determine the effect of a three dimensional seismic survey on the shallow water coral reef slope associated fish community at Scott Reef. A census of the fish community was conducted on six locations at Scott Reef both before and after the survey. The census included small site attached demersal species belonging to the family Pomacentridae and larger roving demersal species belonging to the non-Pomacentridae families. These data were combined with a decade of historical data to assess the impact of the seismic survey. Taking into account spatial, temporal, spatio-temporal and observer variability, modelling showed no significant effect of the seismic survey on the overall abundance or species richness of Pomacentridae or non-Pomacentridae. The six most abundant species were also analysed individually. In all cases no detectable effect of the seismic survey was found on the abundance of these fish species at Scott Reef

  13. Validation of accuracy and reliability of a simple measurement device for the lumber range of motion (SMD-L-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Nakayuki; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Honda, Toshio; Taneichi, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    It is important to evaluate mobility of the lumbar spine for assessment of lumbar spinal disorders and their therapeutic effects. We developed a simple measurement device for the lumbar range of motion (SMD-L-ROM) which can be installed on the trunk. SMD-L-ROM allows to evaluate mobility of the lumbar spine without x-ray exposure. Accuracy and reliability of the measurement device was assessed in this article. SMD-L-ROM comprises two metallic immobilization plates (IPs) with a vertically installed bar and a rubber band for fixation of IP to the trunk. Two IPs were installed at the level of Th12 and the sacrum. Range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar spine was measured by using SMD-L-ROM and radiographic modalities (X-ray and CT). Consistency of the measured values by both of SMD-L-ROM and radiographic modalities was evaluated. Furthermore, inter- and intra-observer agreement of measured values by SMD-L-ROM was assessed. Regarding measurement of ROM, there was a high correlation between SMD-L-ROM and X-ray/CT especially in the sagittal and axial plane. There was no significant difference in the average values of ROM between the two methods. On the other hand, SMD-L-ROM did not detect accurate position of the lumbar spine in all dimensions. There were no inter- and intra-observer errors of measured values by SMD-L-ROM. ROM of the lumbar spine was simply and economically measured with SMD-L-ROM. Accuracy and reliability of SMD-L-ROM was good enough for ROM measurement in the lumbar spine. (author)

  14. Crosshole investigations - results from seismic borehole tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihl, J.; Hammarstroem, M.; Ivansson, S.; Moren, P.

    1986-12-01

    The specially developed system for seismic tomography measurements has proved reliable and versatile in field work. The same equipment can be used for measurements from tens of metres up to a distance of 1000 m. The explosive source has proven reliable, in use although time-consuming. It can be used over the full range of distances. The quality of the tomographic analysis is strongly dependent on the areas under study. In homogeneous rock, and at moderate (i.e. up to 200 m) distances, high-precision tomograms can be obtained. On the other hand, if the rock is heterogeneous, and/or the measuring distance large, the many possible solutions make the interpretation difficult. Information from other types of investigations are then usually needed in order to obtain a satisfactory result. Three-dimensional measurements are possible, although time-consuming. (orig./DG)

  15. The Apollo passive seismic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The completed data set obtained from the 4-station Apollo seismic network includes signals from approximately 11,800 events of various types. Four data sets for use by other investigators, through the NSSDC, are in preparation. Some refinement of the lunar model based on seismic data can be expected, but its gross features remain as presented two years ago. The existence of a small, molten core remains dependent upon the analysis of signals from a single, far-side impact. Analysis of secondary arrivals from other sources may eventually resolve this issue, as well as continued refinement of the magnetic field measurements. Evidence of considerable lateral heterogeneity within the moon continues to build. The mystery of the much meteoroid flux estimate derived from lunar seismic measurements, as compared with earth-based estimates, remains; although, significant correlations between terrestrial and lunar observations are beginning to emerge.

  16. Geophysical surveys and velocimetric measures in the Cerreto di Spoleto (Perugia) area, aiming at a seismic microzoning; Indagini geofisiche e misure velocimetriche finalizzate alla microzonazione sismica dell'area di Cerreto di Spoleto (Perugia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongiovanni, G.; Martino, S.; Paciello, A.; Verrubbi, V. [ENEA, Div. Caratterizzazione dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Centro Ricerche Csaccia, S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Geophysical prospectings and velocimetric measures, aiming at the seismic microzoning of Cerreto di Spoleto area, are presented. Starting from the data obtained by previous geological-geomechanical surveys, seismic-refraction prospectings were carried on in order to obtain a dynamic characterisation and a geometrical description both of soil and rock materials. The velocimetric measures were performed by temporary free-field arrays, recording both environmental noise and small-magnitude seismic events. The analysis of the obtained records is still in progress, in order to evaluate the local seismic wave amplification. [Italian] Vengono illustrate le indagini geofisiche e le misure velocimetriche condotte nell'area di Cerreto di Spoleto (PG) per la microzonazione sismica. In particolare, sulla base dei dati geologici e geomeccanici precedentemente acquisiti, sono state effettuate indagini di sismica a rifrazione che hanno portato alla caratterizzazione dinamica dei litotipi ed alla definizione delle loro geometrie. Le misure velometriche sono state condotte installando array temporanei in free-field per la registrazione di rumore ambientale ed eventi sismici di piccola magnitudo. E' in corso l'elaborazione delle registrazioni ottenute, finalizzata all'analisi degli effetti di amplificazione sismica locale.

  17. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    will be installed in several schools in the most important seismic areas (Vrancea, Dobrogea), vulnerable cities (Bucharest, Ploiesti, Iasi) or high populated places (Cluj, Sibiu, Timisoara, Zalău). All the elements of the seismic station are especially designed for educational purposes and can be operated independently by the students and teachers themselves. The first stage of ROEDUSEIS project was centered on the work of achievement of educational materials for all levels of pre-university education (kindergarten, primary, secondary and high school). A study of necessity preceded the achievement of educational materials. This was done through a set of questionnaires for teachers and students sent to participating schools. Their responses formed a feedback instrument for properly materials editing. The topics covered within educational materials include: seismicity (general principles, characteristics of Romanian seismicity, historical local events), structure of the Earth, measuring of earthquakes, seismic hazard and risk.

  18. Measurement of double differential cross sections of secondary neutrons in the incident energy range 9-13 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Zhou Zuying; Sa Jun; Ke Zunjian; Sui Qingchang; Xia Haihong; Shen Guanren

    1992-01-01

    The status and technique of double differential cross section measurement of secondary neutrons in the incident neutron energy range 9 to 13 MeV is reviewed with emphasis on the work done at CIAE. There are scarce measurements of secondary neutron double differential cross sections in this energy region up to now. A main difficulty for this is lack of an applicable monoenergetic neutron source. When monoenergetic neutron energy reaches 8 Me/v, the break-up neutrons from the d + D or p + T reaction starts to become significant. It is difficult to get a pure secondary neutron spectrum induced only by monoenergetic neutrons. To solve this problem an abnormal fast neutron TOF facility was designed and tested. Double differential neutron emission cross sections of 238 U and 209 Bi at 10 MeV were obtained by combining the data measured by both normal and abnormal TOF spectrometers and a good agreement between measurement and calculation was achieved

  19. Measuring Relativistic effects in the field of the Earth with Laser Ranged Satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) research program is to obtain refined tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) by means of very precise measurements of the round-trip time among a number of ground stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) network and a set of geodetic satellites. These measurements are guaranteed by means of the powerful and precise Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technique. In particular, a big effort of LARASE is dedicated to improve the dynamical models of the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and LARES satellites, with the objective to obtain a more precise and accurate determination of their orbit. These activities contribute to reach a final error budget that should be robust and reliable in the evaluation of the main systematic errors sources that come to play a major role in masking the relativistic precession on the orbit of these laser-ranged satellites. These error sources may be of gravitational and non-gravitational origin. It is important to stress that a more accurate and precise orbit determination, based on more reliable dynamical models, represents a fundamental prerequisite in order to reach a sub-mm precision in the root-mean-square of the SLR range residuals and, consequently, to gather benefits in the fields of geophysics and space geodesy, such as stations coordinates knowledge, geocenter determination and the realization of the Earth's reference frame. The results reached over the last year will be presented in terms of the improvements achieved in the dynamical model, in the orbit determination and, finally, in the measurement of the relativistic precessions that act on the orbit of the satellites considered.

  20. High Resolution Vertical Seismic Profile from the Chicxulub IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Borehole: Wave Speeds and Seismic Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C.; Kofman, R.; Schmitt, D. R.; Lofi, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Christeson, G. L.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    We acquired a closely-spaced vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Chicxulub K-Pg Impact Crater drilling program borehole to calibrate the existing surface seismic profiles and provide complementary measurements of in situ seismic wave speeds. Downhole seismic records were obtained at spacings ranging from 1.25 m to 5 m along the borehole from 47.5 m to 1325 mwsf (meters wireline below sea floor) (Fig 1a) using a Sercel SlimwaveTM geophone chain (University of Alberta). The seismic source was a 30/30ci Sercel Mini GI airgun (University of Texas), fired a minimum of 5 times per station. Seismic data processing used a combination of a commercial processing package (Schlumberger's VISTA) and MatlabTM codes. The VSP displays detailed reflectivity (Fig. 1a) with the strongest reflection seen at 600 mwsf (280 ms one-way time), geologically corresponding to the sharp contact between the post-impact sediments and the target peak ring rock, thus confirming the pre-drilling interpretations of the seismic profiles. A two-way time trace extracted from the separated up-going wavefield matches the major reflection both in travel time and character. In the granitic rocks that form the peak ring of the Chicxulub impact crater, we observe P-wave velocities of 4000-4500 m/s which are significantly less than the expected values of granitoids ( 6000 m/s) (Fig. 1b). The VSP measured wave speeds are confirmed against downhole sonic logging and in laboratory velocimetry measurements; these data provide additional evidence that the crustal material displaced by the impact experienced a significant amount of damage. Samples and data provided by IODP. Samples can be requested at http://web.iodp.tamu.edu/sdrm after 19 October 2017. Expedition 364 was jointly funded by ECORD, ICDP, and IODP with contributions and logistical support from the Yucatan State Government and UNAM. The downhole seismic chain and wireline system is funded by grants to DRS from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and

  1. A system for using the air radioactivity measurements in a long range model to forecast cloud evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galmarini, S.; Graziani, G. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre); Grippa, G.; De Cort, M. (Maind srl, Milan (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    A procedure was developed in the past to reduce uncertainties in long range transport model predictions mainly due to inputing windfield data to atmospheric transport models which are the result of the forecasts of global or regional circulation models. Measurements available in real-time of the air concentrations from national monitoring grids have been used to reduce the uncertainties. The system is based on a long range transport model which can run using a limited amount of meteorological information, and an interpolation routine which generates a new area source from the air measurements, available in real-time, at ground level. The procedure has now been fully automated and is available on a PC, with graphical output, to ease its use in emergency situations. The system requires a connection to the ECMWF network for meteorological input data and to a radiological data bank (ECURIE) or national monitoring networks for monitoring data. (author).

  2. Highly accurate nuclear and electronic stopping cross sections derived using Monte Carlo simulations to reproduce measured range data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, Klaus; Mutzke, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    We have examined and confirmed the previously unexplored concept of using Monte Carlo calculations in combination with measured projected ranges of ions implanted in solids to derive a quantitative description of nuclear interaction and electronic stopping. The study involved 98 ranges of 11B in Si between 1 keV and 8 MeV, contained in 12 sets of 10 different groups. Systematic errors by up to ±8% were removed to establish a refined data base with 93 ranges featuring only statistical uncertainties (±1.8%). The Monte Carlo calculations could be set up to reproduce the refined ranges with a mean ratio 1.002 ± 1.7%. The input parameters required for this very high level of agreement are as follows. Nuclear interaction is best described by the Kr-C potential, but in obligatory combination with the Lindhard-Scharff (LS) screening length. Up to 300 keV, the electronic stopping cross section is proportional to the projectile velocity, Se = kSe,LS, with k = 1.46 ± 0.01. At higher energies, Se falls progressively short of kSe,LS. Around the Bragg peak, i.e., between 0.8 and 10 MeV, Se is modeled by an adjustable function serving to tailor the peak shape properly. Calculated and measured isotope effects for ranges of 10B and 11B in Si agree within the experimental uncertainty (±0.25%). The range-based Se,R(E) reported here predicts the scarce experimental data derived from the energy loss in projectile transmission through thin Si foils to within 2% or better. By contrast, Se(E) data of available stopping power tables exhibit deviations from Se,R(E) between -40% and +14%.

  3. Measurement of the uranium-235 fission cross section over the neutron energy range 1 to 6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, D.M.; Diven, B.C.; Hansen, G.E.; Jarvis, G.A.; Koontz, P.G.; Smith, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The ratio of the fission cross section of 235 U to the scattering cross section of 1 H was measured in the 1- to 6-MeV range using monoenergetic neutrons from a pulsed 3 H(p,n) 3 He source. In this measurement, solid-state detectors determined fission fragment and recoil proton emissions from back-to-back U(99.7%) and polyethylene disks. Timing permitted discrimination against room-scattered neutron backgrounds. Absolute values for 235 U(n,f) are obtained using the Hopkins-Breit evaluation of the hydrogen-scattering cross section

  4. Reproducibility of range of motion and muscle strength measurements in patients with hip osteoarthritis – an interrater study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Penny, Jeannette Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assessment of range of motion (ROM) and muscle strength is fundamental in the clinical diagnosis of hip osteoarthritis (OA) but reproducibility of these measurements has mostly involved clinicians from secondary care and has rarely reported agreement parameters. Therefore......, the primary objective of the study was to determine the inter-rater reproducibility of ROM and muscle strength measurements. Furthermore, the reliability of the overall assessment of clinical hip OA was evaluated. Reporting is in accordance with proposed guidelines for the reporting of reliability...... differentiate between hips with or without osteoarthritis....

  5. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe......-ray spectroscopy based on a one-dimensional model and by a consistency check among the individual measurement techniques. A systematic difference is seen between the two lines of sight and is interpreted to originate from the sensitivity of the oblique detectors to the pitch-angle structure of the distribution...

  6. Application of seismic refraction tomography for subsurface imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seismic refraction tomography involves the measurement of the travel times of seismic refracted raypaths in order to define an image of seismic velocity in the intervening ground. This technique was used to estimate the depth to the fresh basement, estimate thickness of the weathered basement and to determine the ...

  7. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  8. Reliability and responsiveness of a goniometric device for measuring the range of motion in the dart-throwing motion plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasubuchi, Kenji; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Takahiko

    2018-02-26

    Dart-throwing motion (DTM) is an important component of wrist function and, consequently, has the potential to become an evaluation tool in rehabilitation. However, no measurement method is currently available to reliably measure range of motion (ROM) of the wrist in the DTM plane. To determine the reliability and responsiveness of a goniometric device to measure wrist ROM in the DTM plane. ROM of the wrist in the DTM plane was measured in 70 healthy participants. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate the relative reliability of measurement, and a Bland-Altman analysis conducted to establish its absolute reliability, including the 95% limits of agreement (95% LOA). The standard error of the measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change at the 95% confidence level (MDC 95 ) were calculated as measures of responsiveness. The intra-rater ICC was 0.87, and an inter-rater ICC of 0.71. There was no evidence of a fixed or proportional bias. For intra- and inter-rater reliability, 95% LOA ranged from -13.83 to 11.12 and from -17.75 to 16.19, respectively. The SEM and MDC 95 were 4.5° and 12.4°, respectively, for intra-rater reliability, and 6.0° and 16.6°, respectively, for inter-rater reliability. The ROM of the wrist in the DTM plane was measured with fair-to-good reliability and responsiveness and, therefore, has the potential to become an evaluation tool for rehabilitation.

  9. Free tropospheric measurements of CS2 over a 45 deg N to 45 deg S latitude range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. J.; Maroulis, P. J.; Bandy, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The mean value obtained from 52 free tropospheric measurements of CS2 over the 45 deg N-45 deg S latitude range was 5.7 pptv, with standard deviation and standard error of 1.9 and 0.3 pptv, respectively. Large fluctuations in the CS2 concentration are observed which reflect the apparent short atmospheric residence time and inhomogeneities in the surface sources of CS2. The amounts of CS2 in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are statistically equal.

  10. Measurement of pair production cross sections in Ge for the 1. 238-3. 548 MeV energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R K; Singh, K; Sahota, H S

    1985-02-28

    Pair production cross sections have been determined for the 1.238-3.548 MeV energy range in germanium (Z = 32) using a Ge(Li) gamma ray detector. The experimental results have been compared with the theoretical cross sections of previous workers. The results of the present measurements agree with the Bethe-Heitler results down to 1.771 MeV. However, at 1.238 MeV the experimental results are higher than all the theories.

  11. Local seismic monitoring east and north of Toronto - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajer, A.A.; Doughty, M.

    1996-08-01

    Monitoring of small magnitude ('micro') earthquakes in a dense local network is one of the techniques used to delineate currently active faults and seismic sources. The conventional wisdom is that smaller, but more frequent, seismic events normally occur on active fault planes and a log linear empirical relation between frequency and magnitude can be used to estimate the magnitude and recurrence (frequency) of the larger events. A program of site-specific seismic monitoring has been supported by the AECB since 1991, to investigate the feasibility of microearthquake detection in suburban areas of east Toronto in order to assess the rate activity of local events in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants at Pickering and Darlington. For deployment of the seismic stations at the most favorable locations an extensive background noise survey was carried out. This survey involved measuring and comparing the amplitude response of the ambient vibration caused by natural phenomena (e.g. wind blow, water flow, wave action) or human activities such as farming, mining and industrial work at 25 test sites. Subsequently, a five-station seismic network, with a 30 km aperture, was selected between the Pickering and Darlington nuclear power plants on Lake Ontario, to the south, and Lake Scugog to the north. The detection threshold obtained for two of the stations allows recording of local events M L =0-2, a magnitude range which is usually not detected by regional seismic networks. An analysis of several thousand triggered signals resulted in the identification of about 120 local events, which can not be assigned to any source other than the natural release of crustal stresses. The recurrence frequency of these microearthquakes shows a linear relationship which matches that of larger events in the last two centuries in this region. The preliminary results indicate that the stress is currently accumulating and is being released within clusters of small earthquakes

  12. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhi Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  13. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhi; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhang, Dan; Shi, Zhongpan; Zhao, Tieshi

    2016-08-11

    Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR) joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  14. Measurement of the Parameter Kappa, and Reevaluation of Kappa for Small to Moderate Earthquakes at Seismic Stations in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biasi, Glenn; Anderson, John G

    2007-01-01

    ground motions analyses used in PSHA, it contributes to the extreme values of peak ground acceleration that the PSHA predicts. Also, in some areas precarious rock evidence indicates that no such accelerations have occurred. (2) The disagreement among analyses in the value of kappa. Previous reports indicate that smallest earthquakes yield kappa estimate 12-20 msec larger than average values from M3 to M4.5 aftershocks of Little Skull Mountain earthquake. (3) The source of kappa. Classically and in engineering usage, kappa is attributed largely to the upper tens or hundreds of meters at the recording site. However, borehole recordings imply that a significant contribution to kappa originates below several hundred meters depth. Also, when earthquakes are considered from a small source region, a true site effect should be common to all recordings. In fact kappa observations of LSM aftershocks to stations on Yucca Mountain and at network stations appear to vary greatly, as though much of kappa actually derives from near the seismic source. (4) The repository overburden contribution to kappa. PSHA estimated ground motions to a free surface at 300 meters depth with properties of confined rock at that depth. Rock mechanical and borehole estimates suggest that several milliseconds of the total kappa accrue between 300 meters to the surface. If estimates of kappa are small at the surface, little is left to reduce incident ground accelerations from the seismic source to the repository level. (5) The variability of kappa. In most cases parametric estimates of kappa have some range of values that fit the data equally well in a statistical sense, so errors in kappa estimates must be addressed. As noted above, kappa at a station also varies significantly for events from the same source area. (6) Are kappa values from small to moderate magnitude earthquakes appropriately applied to the larger, potentially damaging earthquakes of engineering concern? Put another way, is there a

  15. Measurement of the Parameter Kappa, and Reevaluation of Kappa for Small to Moderate Earthquakes at Seismic Stations in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, Glenn; Anderson, John G

    2007-12-05

    motions analyses used in PSHA, it contributes to the extreme values of peak ground acceleration that the PSHA predicts. Also, in some areas precarious rock evidence indicates that no such accelerations have occurred. 2. The disagreement among analyses in the value of kappa. Previous reports indicate that smallest earthquakes yield kappa estimate 12-20 msec larger than average values from M3 to M4.5 aftershocks of Little Skull Mountain earthquake. 3. The source of kappa. Classically and in engineering usage, kappa is attributed largely to the upper tens or hundreds of meters at the recording site. However, borehole recordings imply that a significant contribution to kappa originates below several hundred meters depth. Also, when earthquakes are considered from a small source region, a true site effect should be common to all recordings. In fact kappa observations of LSM aftershocks to stations on Yucca Mountain and at network stations appear to vary greatly, as though much of kappa actually derives from near the seismic source. 4. The repository overburden contribution to kappa. PSHA estimated ground motions to a free surface at 300 meters depth with properties of confined rock at that depth. Rock mechanical and borehole estimates suggest that several milliseconds of the total kappa accrue between 300 meters to the surface. If estimates of kappa are small at the surface, little is left to reduce incident ground accelerations from the seismic source to the repository level. 5. The variability of kappa. In most cases parametric estimates of kappa have some range of values that fit the data equally well in a statistical sense, so errors in kappa estimates must be addressed. As noted above, kappa at a station also varies significantly for events from the same source area. 6. Are kappa values from small to moderate magnitude earthquakes appropriately applied to the larger, potentially damaging earthquakes of engineering concern? Put another way, is there a significant magnitude

  16. American marten respond to seismic lines in northern Canada at two spatial scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Tigner

    Full Text Available Development of hydrocarbon resources across northwest Canada has spurred economic prosperity and generated concerns over impacts to biodiversity. To balance these interests, numerous jurisdictions have adopted management thresholds that allow for limited energy development but minimize undesirable impacts to wildlife. Used for exploration, seismic lines are the most abundant linear feature in the boreal forest and exist at a variety of widths and recovery states. We used American marten (Martes americana as a model species to measure how line attributes influence species' response to seismic lines, and asked whether responses to individual lines trigger population impacts. Marten response to seismic lines was strongly influenced by line width and recovery state. Compared to forest interiors, marten used open seismic lines ≥ 3 m wide less often, but used open lines ≤ 2 m wide and partially recovered lines ≥ 6 m wide similarly. Marten response to individual line types appeared to trigger population impacts. The probability of occurrence at the home range scale declined with increasing seismic line density, and the inclusion of behavioral response to line density calculations improved model fit. In our top performing model, we excluded seismic lines ≤ 2 m from our calculation of line density, and the probability of occurrence declined > 80% between home ranges with the lowest and highest line densities. Models that excluded seismic lines did not strongly explain occurrence. We show how wildlife-derived metrics can inform regulatory guidelines to increase the likelihood those guidelines meet intended management objectives. With respect to marten, not all seismic lines constitute disturbances, but avoidance of certain line types scales to population impacts. This approach provides the ecological context required to understand cause and effect relationships among socio-economic and ecological conservation goals.

  17. Seismic properties of fluid bearing formations in magmatic geothermal systems: can we directly detect geothermal activity with seismic methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grab, Melchior; Scott, Samuel; Quintal, Beatriz; Caspari, Eva; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are amongst the most common techniques to explore the earth's subsurface. Seismic properties such as velocities, impedance contrasts and attenuation enable the characterization of the rocks in a geothermal system. The most important goal of geothermal exploration, however, is to describe the enthalpy state of the pore fluids, which act as the main transport medium for the geothermal heat, and to detect permeable structures such as fracture networks, which control the movement of these pore fluids in the subsurface. Since the quantities measured with seismic methods are only indirectly related with the fluid state and the rock permeability, the interpretation of seismic datasets is difficult and usually delivers ambiguous results. To help overcome this problem, we use a numerical modeling tool that quantifies the seismic properties of fractured rock formations that are typically found in magmatic geothermal systems. We incorporate the physics of the pore fluids, ranging from the liquid to the boiling and ultimately vapor state. Furthermore, we consider the hydromechanics of permeable structures at different scales from small cooling joints to large caldera faults as are known to be present in volcanic systems. Our modeling techniques simulate oscillatory compressibility and shear tests and yield the P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation factors of fluid saturated fractured rock volumes. To apply this modeling technique to realistic scenarios, numerous input parameters need to be indentified. The properties of the rock matrix and individual fractures were derived from extensive literature research including a large number of laboratory-based studies. The geometries of fracture networks were provided by structural geologists from their published studies of outcrops. Finally, the physical properties of the pore fluid, ranging from those at ambient pressures and temperatures up to the supercritical conditions, were taken from the fluid physics

  18. A wide-frequency range AC magnetometer to measure the specific absorption rate in nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaio, E.; Collantes, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Plazaola, F.; Mornet, S.; Couillaud, F.; Sandre, O.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial to assert their potential for magnetic hyperthermia. To perform this task, calorimetric methods are widely used. However, those methods are not very accurate and are difficult to standardize. In this paper, we present AC magnetometry results performed with a lab-made magnetometer that is able to obtain dynamic hysteresis-loops in the AC magnetic field frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 MHz and intensities up to 24 kA m −1 . In this work, SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in water are measured by AC magnetometry. The so-obtained values are compared with the SAR measured by calorimetric methods. Both measurements, by calorimetry and magnetometry, are in good agreement. Therefore, the presented AC magnetometer is a suitable way to obtain SAR values of magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We propose AC magnetometry as a method to measure the specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for magnetic hyperthermia therapy. • We have built a lab-made AC magnetometer, which is able to measure magnetic dynamic hysteresis-loops of nanoparticle dispersions. • The device works with AC magnetic field intensities up to 24 kA m −1 in a frequency range from 75 kHz to 1 MHz. • The SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles around 12 nm in magnetic diameter dispersed in water are measured by the lab-made magnetometer and different calorimetric methods. • Although all methods are in good agreement, several factors (probe location, thermal inertia, losses, etc.) make calorimetric method less accurate than AC magnetometry

  19. the Preliminary Research Based on Seismic Signals Generated by Hutubi Transmitting Seismic Station with One Large-volume Airgun Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Su, J.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, B.; Ji, Z.

    2017-12-01

    For studying the subsurface structure and its subtle changes, we built the Hutubi transmitting seismic station with one large-volume airgun array at one artificial water pool in the northern segment of Tianshan mountain, where earthquakes occurred frequently. The airgun array consists of six airguns with every airgun capacity of 2000in3, and the artificial water pool with the top diameter of 100m, bottom diameter of 20m and the depth of 18m.We started the regular excitation experiment with the large-volume airgun source every week since June, 2013. Using seismic signals geneated by the Hutubi airgun source, we made the preliminary research on the airgun source, waveform characteristics and the subsurface velocity changes in the northern Tiansh mountain. The results are as follows: The seismic signal exited by the airgun source is characteristic of low-frequency ,and the dominant frequency is in the range of 2 6Hz. The Hutubi transmitting seismic station can continuously generate long-distance detectable and highly repeatable signals, and the correlation coefficient of sigals is greater than 0.95; and the longest propagation distance arrives to 380km, in addition, the 5000-shot stacked sigal using the phase weighted stack technique can be identified in the station, which is about 1300km from the Hutubi transmitting seismic station. Hutubi large-volume airgun source is fitted to detect and monitor the regional-scale subsurface stress state. Applying correlation test method, we measured weak subsurface velocity changes in the northern Tianshan mountain, and found that the several stations, which are within 150km from the the Hutubi transmitting seismic station, appeared 0.1 0.2% relative velocity changes before the Hutubi MS6.2 earthquake on Dec.8, 2016.

  20. Seismic response of uplifting concrete gravity dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, P.; Sauve, G.; Bhattacharjee, S.

    1992-01-01

    The foundation interaction effects on the seismic response of dam-foundation systems have generally been studied using the linear elastic finite element models. In reality, the foundation can not develop effective tensile stresses to a significant degree along the interface. A two-dimensional finite element model, in which nonlinear gap elements are used at the dam-foundation interface to determine the uplift response of concrete gravity dams subjected to seismic loads, is presented. Time domain analyses were performed for a wide range of modelling assumptions such as dam height, interface uplift pressure, interface mesh density, and earthquake input motions, that were systematically varied to find their influence on the seismic response. The nonlinear interface behavior generally reduces the seismic response of dam-foundation systems acting as a seismic isolation mechanism, and may increase the safety against sliding by reducing the base shear transmitted to the foundation. 4 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Water level response measurement in a steel cylindrical liquid storage tank using image filter processing under seismic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Wan; Choi, Hyoung-Suk; Park, Dong-Uk; Baek, Eun-Rim; Kim, Jae-Min

    2018-02-01

    Sloshing refers to the movement of fluid that occurs when the kinetic energy of various storage tanks containing fluid (e.g., excitation and vibration) is continuously applied to the fluid inside the tanks. As the movement induced by an external force gets closer to the resonance frequency of the fluid, the effect of sloshing increases, and this can lead to a serious problem with the structural stability of the system. Thus, it is important to accurately understand the physics of sloshing, and to effectively suppress and reduce the sloshing. Also, a method for the economical measurement of the water level response of a liquid storage tank is needed for the exact analysis of sloshing. In this study, a method using images was employed among the methods for measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank, and the water level response was measured using an image filter processing algorithm for the reduction of the noise of the fluid induced by light, and for the sharpening of the structure installed at the liquid storage tank. A shaking table test was performed to verify the validity of the method of measuring the water level response of a liquid storage tank using images, and the result was analyzed and compared with the response measured using a water level gauge.

  2. Precise predictions of H2O line shapes over a wide pressure range using simulations corrected by a single measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, N. H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Tran, H.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we show that precise predictions of the shapes of H2O rovibrational lines broadened by N2, over a wide pressure range, can be made using simulations corrected by a single measurement. For that, we use the partially-correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer (pcsdKS) model whose parameters are deduced from molecular dynamics simulations and semi-classical calculations. This model takes into account the collision-induced velocity-changes effects, the speed dependences of the collisional line width and shift as well as the correlation between velocity and internal-state changes. For each considered transition, the model is corrected by using a parameter deduced from its broadening coefficient measured for a single pressure. The corrected-pcsdKS model is then used to simulate spectra for a wide pressure range. Direct comparisons of the corrected-pcsdKS calculated and measured spectra of 5 rovibrational lines of H2O for various pressures, from 0.1 to 1.2 atm, show very good agreements. Their maximum differences are in most cases well below 1%, much smaller than residuals obtained when fitting the measurements with the Voigt line shape. This shows that the present procedure can be used to predict H2O line shapes for various pressure conditions and thus the simulated spectra can be used to deduce the refined line-shape parameters to complete spectroscopic databases, in the absence of relevant experimental values.

  3. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators.

  4. Shoulder range of motion measures as risk factors for shoulder and elbow injuries in high school softball and baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Ellen; Rauh, Mitchell J; Michener, Lori A; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Garrison, J Craig; Thigpen, Charles A

    2011-09-01

    Range of motion deficits in shoulder external rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), total rotation range of motion (ER + IR), and horizontal adduction (HA) have been retrospectively associated with overhand athletes' arm injuries. The authors expected the incidence of upper extremity injury in high school softball and baseball players with side-to-side shoulder range of motion deficits to be greater than the incidence of upper extremity injury in players with normal shoulder range of motion. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. High school softball and baseball players (N = 246) participated. Before the start of the season, passive shoulder ER, IR, and HA were assessed at 90° of abduction with the scapula stabilized. Relative risk (RR) was calculated to examine range of motion measure, by categorical criteria, and risk of upper extremity injury. Twenty-seven shoulder and elbow injuries (9 softball, 18 baseball) were observed during the season. The dominant shoulder of all injured players and baseball players displayed a significant decrease in HA (P = .05) and IR (P = .04). The dominant shoulder total rotation of injured baseball players displayed a significant decrease (mean difference = 8.0° ± 0.1°; P = .05) as compared with the dominant shoulder of uninjured baseball players. Players who displayed a decrease of ≥25° of IR in the dominant shoulder were at 4 times greater risk of upper extremity injury compared with players with a .05). There are large mean deficits in shoulder IR and HA between injured and noninjured players, but not in ER or total rotation. Passive shoulder IR loss ≥25° as compared bilaterally was predictive of arm injury. Shoulder range of motion deficits differed between sports and appeared more predictive of injury for baseball players.

  5. Current Practices of Measuring and Reference Range Reporting of Free and Total Testosterone in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Margaret; Flores, David; May, Danica; Gourley, Eric; Nangia, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation and management of male hypogonadism should be based on symptoms and on serum testosterone levels. Diagnostically this relies on accurate testing and reference values. Our objective was to define the distribution of reference values and assays for free and total testosterone by clinical laboratories in the United States. Upper and lower reference values, assay methodology and source of published reference ranges were obtained from laboratories across the country. A standardized survey was reviewed with laboratory staff via telephone. Descriptive statistics were used to tabulate results. We surveyed a total of 120 laboratories in 47 states. Total testosterone was measured in house at 73% of laboratories. At the remaining laboratories studies were sent to larger centralized reference facilities. The mean ± SD lower reference value of total testosterone was 231 ± 46 ng/dl (range 160 to 300) and the mean upper limit was 850 ± 141 ng/dl (range 726 to 1,130). Only 9% of laboratories where in-house total testosterone testing was performed created a reference range unique to their region. Others validated the instrument recommended reference values in a small number of internal test samples. For free testosterone 82% of laboratories sent testing to larger centralized reference laboratories where equilibrium dialysis and/or liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry was done. The remaining laboratories used published algorithms to calculate serum free testosterone. Reference ranges for testosterone assays vary significantly among laboratories. The ranges are predominantly defined by limited population studies of men with unknown medical and reproductive histories. These poorly defined and variable reference values, especially the lower limit, affect how clinicians determine treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seismic behaviour of geotechnical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Vinale

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some fundamental considerations regarding the behaviour of geotechnical structures under seismic loading. First a complete definition of the earthquake disaster risk is provided, followed by the importance of performing site-specific hazard analysis. Then some suggestions are provided in regard to adequate assessment of soil parameters, a crucial point to properly analyze the seismic behaviour of geotechnical structures. The core of the paper is centered on a critical review of the analysis methods available for studying geotechnical structures under seismic loadings. All of the available methods can be classified into three main classes, including the pseudo-static, pseudo-dynamic and dynamic approaches, each of which is reviewed for applicability. A more advanced analysis procedure, suitable for a so-called performance-based design approach, is also described in the paper. Finally, the seismic behaviour of the El Infiernillo Dam was investigated. It was shown that coupled elastoplastic dynamic analyses disclose some of the important features of dam behaviour under seismic loading, confirmed by comparing analytical computation and experimental measurements on the dam body during and after a past earthquake.

  7. Detection of ULF geomagnetic signals associated with seismic events in Central Mexico using Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Chavez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic observatory of Juriquilla Mexico, located at longitude –100.45° and latitude 20.70°, and 1946 m a.s.l., has been operational since June 2004 compiling geomagnetic field measurements with a three component fluxgate magnetometer. In this paper, the results of the analysis of these measurements in relation to important seismic activity in the period of 2007 to 2009 are presented. For this purpose, we used superposed epochs of Discrete Wavelet Transform of filtered signals for the three components of the geomagnetic field during relative seismic calm, and it was compared with seismic events of magnitudes greater than Ms > 5.5, which have occurred in Mexico. The analysed epochs consisted of 18 h of observations for a dataset corresponding to 18 different earthquakes (EQs. The time series were processed for a period of 9 h prior to and 9 h after each seismic event. This data processing was compared with the same number of observations during a seismic calm. The proposed methodology proved to be an efficient tool to detect signals associated with seismic activity, especially when the seismic events occur in a distance (D from the observatory to the EQ, such that the ratio D/ρ < 1.8 where ρ is the earthquake radius preparation zone. The methodology presented herein shows important anomalies in the Ultra Low Frequency Range (ULF; 0.005–1 Hz, primarily for 0.25 to 0.5 Hz. Furthermore, the time variance (σ2 increases prior to, during and after the seismic event in relation to the coefficient D1 obtained, principally in the Bx (N-S and By (E-W geomagnetic components. Therefore, this paper proposes and develops a new methodology to extract the abnormal signals of the geomagnetic anomalies related to different stages of the EQs.

  8. Adaption of an array spectroradiometer for total ozone column retrieval using direct solar irradiance measurements in the UV spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Ralf; Sperfeld, Peter; Riechelmann, Stefan; Nevas, Saulius; Sildoja, Meelis; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2018-04-01

    A compact array spectroradiometer that enables precise and robust measurements of solar UV spectral direct irradiance is presented. We show that this instrument can retrieve total ozone column (TOC) accurately. The internal stray light, which is often the limiting factor for measurements in the UV spectral range and increases the uncertainty for TOC analysis, is physically reduced so that no other stray-light reduction methods, such as mathematical corrections, are necessary. The instrument has been extensively characterised at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. During an international total ozone measurement intercomparison at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory in Tenerife, the high-quality applicability of the instrument was verified with measurements of the direct solar irradiance and subsequent TOC evaluations based on the spectral data measured between 12 and 30 September 2016. The results showed deviations of the TOC of less than 1.5 % from most other instruments in most situations and not exceeding 3 % from established TOC measurement systems such as Dobson or Brewer.

  9. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) and critical temperature (Tc). The critical current (Ic) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new Ic measurement system that can carry out accurate Ic measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The Ic measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa2Cu3O7-x(YBCO) tapes Ic determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  10. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (H c2 ) and critical temperature (T c ). The critical current (I c ) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new I c measurement system that can carry out accurate I c measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The I c measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) tapes I c determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  11. Long-range weight functions in fundamental measure theory of the non-uniform hard-sphere fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We introduce long-range weight functions to the framework of fundamental measure theory (FMT) of the non-uniform, single-component hard-sphere fluid. While the range of the usual weight functions is equal to the hard-sphere radius R , the modified weight functions have range 3 R . Based on the augmented FMT, we calculate the radial distribution function g (r) up to second order in the density within Percus’ test particle theory. Consistency of the compressibility and virial routes on this level allows us to determine the free parameter γ of the theory. As a side result, we obtain a value for the fourth virial coefficient B 4 which deviates by only 0.01% from the exact result. The augmented FMT is tested for the dense fluid by comparing results for g (r) calculated via the test particle route to existing results from molecular dynamics simulations. The agreement at large distances (r   >  6 R) is significantly improved when the FMT with long-range weight functions is used. In order to improve agreement close to contact (r   =  2 R) we construct a free energy which is based on the accurate Carnahan–Starling equation of state, rather than the Percus–Yevick compressibility equation underlying standard FMT. (paper)

  12. Seismic intrusion detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  13. National Seismic Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    The National Seismic Station was developed to meet the needs of regional or worldwide seismic monitoring of underground nuclear explosions to verify compliance with a nuclear test ban treaty. The Station acquires broadband seismic data and transmits it via satellite to a data center. It is capable of unattended operation for periods of at least a year, and will detect any tampering that could result in the transmission of unauthentic seismic data

  14. The concurrent validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Romero Morales

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background New reliable devices for range of motion (ROM measures in older adults are necessary to improve knowledge about the functional capability in this population. Dorsiflexion ROM limitation is associated with ankle injuries, foot pain, lower limb disorders, loss of balance, gait control disorders and fall risk in older adults. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM in older adults. Methods Adescriptive repeated-measures study was designed to test the reliability of Leg Motion in thirty-three healthy elderly patients older than 65 years. The subjects had to meet the following inclusion and exclusion criteria in their medical records: older than 65 years; no lower extremity injury for at least one year prior to evaluation (meniscopathy, or fractures and any chronic injuries (e.g., osteoarthritis; no previous hip, knee or ankle surgery; no neuropathic alterations and no cognitive conditions (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Participants were recruited through the person responsible for the physiotherapist area from a nursing center. The subjects were evaluated in two different sessions at the same time of day, and there was a break of two weeks between sessions. To test the validity of the Leg Motion system, the participants were measured in a weight-bearing lunge position using a classic goniometer with 1° increments, a smartphone with an inclinometer standard app (iPhone 5S® with 1° increments and a measuring tape that could measure 0.1 cm. All testing was performed while the patients were barefoot. The researcher had ten years of experience as a physiotherapist using goniometer, tape measure and inclinometer devices. Results Mean values and standard deviations were as follows: Leg Motion (right 5.15 ± 3.08; left 5.19 ± 2.98, tape measure (right 5.12 ± 3.08; left 5.12 ± 2.80, goniometer (right 45.87° ± 4.98; left 44

  15. Reference range levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the US population by measurement of urinary monohydroxy metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grainger, James; Huang, Wenlin; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Samuel P.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.; Sampson, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/Id-HRMS) method for measuring 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites representing seven parent PAHs in 3 mL of urine at low parts-per-trillion levels. PAH levels were determined in urine samples collected in 1999 and 2000 from approximately 2400 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and, for the first time, reference range values were calculated for these metabolites in the US population. Using this GC/ID-HRMS method, we found detectable concentrations for monohydroxy metabolite isomers of fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, and benz[a]anthracene. Some monohydroxy metabolite isomers of benzo[c]phenanthrene, chrysene, and benz[a]anthracene exhibited low detection frequencies that did not allow for geometric mean calculations. Our study results enabled us to establish a reference range for the targeted PAHs in the general US population

  16. Validity and test-retest reliability of manual goniometers for measuring passive hip range of motion in femoroacetabular impingement patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussbaumer Silvio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to evaluate the construct validity (known group, concurrent validity (criterion based and test-retest (intra-rater reliability of manual goniometers to measure passive hip range of motion (ROM in femoroacetabular impingement patients and healthy controls. Methods Passive hip flexion, abduction, adduction, internal and external rotation ROMs were simultaneously measured with a conventional goniometer and an electromagnetic tracking system (ETS on two different testing sessions. A total of 15 patients and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Results The goniometer provided greater hip ROM values compared to the ETS (range 2.0-18.9 degrees; P P Conclusions The present study suggests that goniometer-based assessments considerably overestimate hip joint ROM by measuring intersegmental angles (e.g., thigh flexion on trunk for hip flexion rather than true hip ROM. It is likely that uncontrolled pelvic rotation and tilt due to difficulties in placing the goniometer properly and in performing the anatomically correct ROM contribute to the overrating of the arc of these motions. Nevertheless, conventional manual goniometers can be used with confidence for longitudinal assessments in the clinic.

  17. Accurate dew-point measurement over a wide temperature range using a quartz crystal microbalance dew-point sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Su-Yong; Kim, Jong-Chul; Choi, Buyng-Il

    2008-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) dew-point sensors are based on frequency measurement, and so have fast response time, high sensitivity and high accuracy. Recently, we have reported that they have the very convenient attribute of being able to distinguish between supercooled dew and frost from a single scan through the resonant frequency of the quartz resonator as a function of the temperature. In addition to these advantages, by using three different types of heat sinks, we have developed a QCM dew/frost-point sensor with a very wide working temperature range (−90 °C to 15 °C). The temperature of the quartz surface can be obtained effectively by measuring the temperature of the quartz crystal holder and using temperature compensation curves (which showed a high level of repeatability and reproducibility). The measured dew/frost points showed very good agreement with reference values and were within ±0.1 °C over the whole temperature range

  18. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes.

  19. Validity and intra-rater reliability of an android phone application to measure cervical range-of-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Brauer, Sandra G; Treleaven, Julia; Pua, Yong-Hao; Mentiplay, Benjamin; Clark, Ross Allan

    2014-04-17

    Concurrent validity and intra-rater reliability using a customized Android phone application to measure cervical-spine range-of-motion (ROM) has not been previously validated against a gold-standard three-dimensional motion analysis (3DMA) system. Twenty-one healthy individuals (age:31 ± 9.1 years, male:11) participated, with 16 re-examined for intra-rater reliability 1-7 days later. An Android phone was fixed on a helmet, which was then securely fastened on the participant's head. Cervical-spine ROM in flexion, extension, lateral flexion and rotation were performed in sitting with concurrent measurements obtained from both a 3DMA system and the phone.The phone demonstrated moderate to excellent (ICC = 0.53-0.98, Spearman ρ = 0.52-0.98) concurrent validity for ROM measurements in cervical flexion, extension, lateral-flexion and rotation. However, cervical rotation demonstrated both proportional and fixed bias. Excellent intra-rater reliability was demonstrated for cervical flexion, extension and lateral flexion (ICC = 0.82-0.90), but poor for right- and left-rotation (ICC = 0.05-0.33) using the phone. Possible reasons for the outcome are that flexion, extension and lateral-flexion measurements are detected by gravity-dependent accelerometers while rotation measurements are detected by the magnetometer which can be adversely affected by surrounding magnetic fields. The results of this study demonstrate that the tested Android phone application is valid and reliable to measure ROM of the cervical-spine in flexion, extension and lateral-flexion but not in rotation likely due to magnetic interference. The clinical implication of this study is that therapists should be mindful of the plane of measurement when using the Android phone to measure ROM of the cervical-spine.

  20. Airborne lidar measurements to investigate the impact of long-range transported dust on shallow marine trade wind convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S.; Gutleben, M.; Wirth, M.; Ewald, F.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds are still main contributors to uncertainties in estimates and interpretation of the Earth's changing energy budget. Their interaction with the Earth's radiation budged has a direct component by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation, and an indirect component, e.g. as aerosols modify the properties and thus the life-time of clouds or by changing the atmosphere's stability. Up to know now sufficient understanding in aerosol-cloud interaction and climate feedback is achieved. Thus studies with respect to clouds, aerosols, their interaction and influence on the radiation budged are highly demanded. In August 2016 the NARVAL-II (Next-generation airborne remote sensing for validation studies) mission took place. Measurements with a combined active (high spectral resolution and water vapor differential absorption lidar and cloud radar) and passive remote sensing (microwave radiometer, hyper spectral imager, radiation measurements) payload were performed with the German high altitude and long-range research aircraft HALO over the subtropical North-Atlantic Ocean to study shallow marine convection during the wet and dusty season. With this, NARVAL-II is follow-up of the NARVAL-I mission which took place during the dry and dust free season in December 2013. During NARVAL-II the measurement flights were designed the way to sample dust influenced areas as well as dust free areas in the trades. One main objective was to investigate the optical and macro physical properties of the dust layer, differences in cloud occurrence in dusty and non-dusty areas, and to study the influence of aerosols on the cloud properties and formation. This allows comparisons of cloud and aerosol distribution as well as their environment between the dry and the wet season, and of cloud properties and distribution with and without the influence of long-range transported dust across the Atlantic Ocean. In our presentation we will give an overview of the NARVAL

  1. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  2. Calibration and uncertainties in gas microflow measurement in the range of 2–200 µg s−1 of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, J; Dijoux, F; Yardin, C; Macé, T; Vaslin-Reimann, S

    2010-01-01

    Today the field of chemistry needs calibration in gas microflow measurement for applications such as thin film deposition, catalysis or the automotive industry. Few European metrology laboratories conduct this type of calibration. In France no laboratory can calibrate below 20 µg s −1 . To meet this growing need, LNE has developed a calibration bench using the method of 'traced gas' in the range of 2–200 µg s −1 . The method and the uncertainty estimation of the calibration bench and calibration results of three laminar flowmeters of Molbloc type and industrial flowmeters are presented in this paper

  3. Innovative Approaches for Seismic Studies of Mars (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerdt, B.

    2010-12-01

    In addition to its intrinsic interest, Mars is particularly well-suited for studying the full range of processes and phenomena related to early terrestrial planet evolution, from initial differentiation to the start of plate tectonics. It is large and complex enough to have undergone most of the processes that affected early Earth but, unlike the Earth, has apparently not undergone extensive plate tectonics or other major reworking that erased the imprint of early events (as evidenced by the presence of cratered surfaces older than 4 Ga). The martian mantle should have Earth-like polymorphic phase transitions and may even support a perovskite layer near the core (depending on the actual core radius), a characteristic that would have major implications for core cooling and mantle convection. Thus even the most basic measurements of planetary structure, such as crustal thickness, core radius and state (solid/liquid), and gross mantle velocity structure would provide invaluable constraints on models of early planetary evolution. Despite this strong scientific motivation (and several failed attempts), Mars remains terra incognita from a seismic standpoint. This is due to an unfortunate convergence of circumstances, prominent among which are our uncertainty in the level of seismic activity and the relatively high cost of landing multiple long-lived spacecraft on Mars to comprise a seismic network for body-wave travel-time analysis; typically four to ten stations are considered necessary for this type of experiment. In this presentation I will address both of these issues. In order to overcome the concern about a possible lack of marsquakes with which to work, it is useful to identify alternative methods for using seismic techniques to probe the interior. Seismology without quakes can be accomplished in a number of ways. “Unconventional” sources of seismic energy include meteorites (which strike the surface of Mars at a relatively high rate), artificial projectiles

  4. Wireless acquisition of multi-channel seismic data using the Seismobile system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakow, Zbigniew

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the wireless acquisition of multi-channel seismic data using a specialized mobile system, Seismobile, designed for subsoil diagnostics for transportation routes. The paper presents examples of multi-channel seismic records obtained during system tests in a configuration with 96 channels (4 landstreamers of 24-channel) and various seismic sources. Seismic waves were generated at the same point using different sources: a 5-kg hammer, a Gisco's source with a 90-kg pile-driver, and two other the pile-drivers of 45 and 70 kg. Particular attention is paid to the synchronization of source timing, the measurement of geometry by autonomous GPS systems, and the repeatability of triggering measurements constrained by an accelerometer identifying the seismic waveform. The tests were designed to the registration, reliability, and range of the wireless transmission of survey signals. The effectiveness of the automatic numbering of measuring modules was tested as the system components were arranged and fixed to the streamers. After measurements were completed, the accuracy and speed of data downloading from the internal memory (SDHC 32GB WiFi) was determined. Additionally, the functionality of automatic battery recharging, the maximum survey duration, and the reliability of battery discharge signalling were assessed.

  5. Combined GPS and seismic monitoring of a 12-story structure in a region of induced seismicity in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, J. S.; Soliman, M.; Kim, H.; Jaiswal, P.; Saunders, J. K.; Vernon, F.; Zhang, W.

    2017-12-01

    This work focuses on quantifying ground motions and their effects in Oklahoma near the location of the 2016 Mw 5.8 Pawnee earthquake, where seismicity has been increasing due to wastewater injection related to oil and natural gas production. Much of the building inventory in Oklahoma was constructed before the increase in seismicity and before the implementation of earthquake design and detailing provisions for reinforced concrete (RC) structures. We will use combined GPS/seismic monitoring techniques to measure ground motion in the field and the response of structures to this ground motion. Several Oklahoma State University buildings experienced damage due to the Pawnee earthquake. The USGS Shake Map product estimated peak ground acceleration (PGA) ranging from 0.12g to 0.15g at campus locations. We are deploying a high-rate GPS sensor and accelerometer on the roof and another accelerometer at ground level of a 12-story RC structure and at selected field sites in order to collect ambient noise data and nearby seismicity. The longer period recording characteristics of the GPS/seismic system are particularly well adapted to monitoring these large structures in the event of a significant earthquake. Gross characteristics of the structural system are described, which consists of RC columns and RC slabs in all stories. We conducted a preliminary structural analysis including modal analysis and response spectrum analysis based on a finite element (FE) simulation, which indicated that the period associated with the first X-axis bending, first torsional, and first Y-axis bending modes are 2.2 s, 2.1 s, and 1.8 s, respectively. Next, a preliminary analysis was conducted to estimate the range of expected deformation at the roof level for various earthquake excitations. The earthquake analysis shows a maximum roof displacement of 5 and 7 cm in the horizontal directions resulting from earthquake loads with PGA of 0.2g, well above the noise level of the combined GPS/seismic

  6. Validity of clinical outcome measures to evaluate ankle range of motion during the weight-bearing lunge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emily A; Docherty, Carrie L

    2017-07-01

    To determine the concurrent validity of standard clinical outcome measures compared to laboratory outcome measure while performing the weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT). Cross-sectional study. Fifty participants performed the WBLT to determine dorsiflexion ROM using four different measurement techniques: dorsiflexion angle with digital inclinometer at 15cm distal to the tibial tuberosity (°), dorsiflexion angle with inclinometer at tibial tuberosity (°), maximum lunge distance (cm), and dorsiflexion angle using a 2D motion capture system (°). Outcome measures were recorded concurrently during each trial. To establish concurrent validity, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were conducted, comparing each dependent variable to the 2D motion capture analysis (identified as the reference standard). A higher correlation indicates strong concurrent validity. There was a high correlation between each measurement technique and the reference standard. Specifically the correlation between the inclinometer placement at 15cm below the tibial tuberosity (44.9°±5.5°) and the motion capture angle (27.0°±6.0°) was r=0.76 (p=0.001), between the inclinometer placement at the tibial tuberosity angle (39.0°±4.6°) and the motion capture angle was r=0.71 (p=0.001), and between the distance from the wall clinical measure (10.3±3.0cm) to the motion capture angle was r=0.74 (p=0.001). This study determined that the clinical measures used during the WBLT have a high correlation with the reference standard for assessing dorsiflexion range of motion. Therefore, obtaining maximum lunge distance and inclinometer angles are both valid assessments during the weight-bearing lunge test. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AcquisitionFootprintAttenuationDrivenbySeismicAttributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuellar-Urbano Mayra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition footprint, one of the major problems that PEMEX faces in seismic imaging, is noise highly correlated to the geometric array of sources and receivers used for onshore and offshore seismic acquisitions. It prevails in spite of measures taken during acquisition and data processing. This pattern, throughout the image, is easily confused with geological features and misguides seismic attribute computation. In this work, we use seismic data from PEMEX Exploración y Producción to show the conditioning process for removing random and coherent noise using linear filters. Geometric attributes used in a workflow were computed for obtaining an acquisition footprint noise model and adaptively subtract it from the seismic data.

  8. Design of transmission-type phase holograms for a compact radar-cross-section measurement range at 650 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noponen, Eero; Tamminen, Aleksi; Vaaja, Matti

    2007-07-10

    A design formalism is presented for transmission-type phase holograms for use in a submillimeter-wave compact radar-cross-section (RCS) measurement range. The design method is based on rigorous electromagnetic grating theory combined with conventional hologram synthesis. Hologram structures consisting of a curved groove pattern on a 320 mmx280 mm Teflon plate are designed to transform an incoming spherical wave at 650 GHz into an output wave generating a 100 mm diameter planar field region (quiet zone) at a distance of 1 m. The reconstructed quiet-zone field is evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The uniformity of the quiet-zone field is further improved by reoptimizing the goal field. Measurement results are given for a test hologram fabricated on Teflon.

  9. Development of Measurement Device of Working Radius of Crane Based on Single CCD Camera and Laser Range Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Satoru

    In this paper, what we want to do is to develop an observation device to measure the working radius of a crane truck. The device has a single CCD camera, a laser range finder and two AC servo motors. First, in order to measure the working radius, we need to consider algorithm of a crane hook recognition. Then, we attach the cross mark on the crane hook. Namely, instead of the crane hook, we try to recognize the cross mark. Further, for the observation device, we construct PI control system with an extended Kalman filter to track the moving cross mark. Through experiments, we show the usefulness of our device including new control system of mark tracking.

  10. Wide-range measurement of thermal effusivity using molybdenum thin film with low thermal conductivity for thermal microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shugo; Matsui, Genzou; Ohta, Hiromichi; Hatori, Kimihito; Taguchi, Kohei; Yamamoto, Suguru

    2017-07-01

    Thermal microscopes are a useful technology to investigate the spatial distribution of the thermal transport properties of various materials. However, for high thermal effusivity materials, the estimated values of thermophysical parameters based on the conventional 1D heat flow model are known to be higher than the values of materials in the literature. Here, we present a new procedure to solve the problem which calculates the theoretical temperature response with the 3D heat flow and measures reference materials which involve known values of thermal effusivity and heat capacity. In general, a complicated numerical iterative method and many thermophysical parameters are required for the calculation in the 3D heat flow model. Here, we devised a simple procedure by using a molybdenum (Mo) thin film with low thermal conductivity on the sample surface, enabling us to measure over a wide thermal effusivity range for various materials.

  11. Seismic wave propagation in granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; López, Francisco; Gallot, Thomas; Ginares, Alejandro; Ortega, Henry; Sanchís, Johnny; Agriela, Adrián; Weatherley, Dion

    2016-10-01

    Asteroids and small bodies of the Solar System are thought to be agglomerates of irregular boulders, therefore cataloged as granular media. It is a consensus that many asteroids might be considered as rubble or gravel piles.Impacts on their surface could produce seismic waves which propagate in the interior of these bodies, thus causing modifications in the internal distribution of rocks and ejections of particles and dust, resulting in a cometary-type comma.We present experimental and numerical results on the study of propagation of impact-induced seismic waves in granular media, with special focus on behavior changes by increasing compression.For the experiment, we use an acrylic box filled with granular materials such as sand, gravel and glass spheres. Pressure inside the box is controlled by a movable side wall and measured with sensors. Impacts are created on the upper face of the box through a hole, ranging from free-falling spheres to gunshots. We put high-speed cameras outside the box to record the impact as well as piezoelectic sensors and accelerometers placed at several depths in the granular material to detect the seismic wave.Numerical simulations are performed with ESyS-Particle, a software that implements the Discrete Element Method. The experimental setting is reproduced in the numerical simulations using both individual spherical particles and agglomerates of spherical particles shaped as irregular boulders, according to rock models obtained with a 3D scanner. The numerical experiments also reproduces the force loading on one of the wall to vary the pressure inside the box.We are interested in the velocity, attenuation and energy transmission of the waves. These quantities are measured in the experiments and in the simulations. We study the dependance of these three parameters with characteristics like: impact speed, properties of the target material and the pressure in the media.These results are relevant to understand the outcomes of impacts in

  12. First evidence for correlations between electron fluxes measured by NOAA-POES satellites and large seismic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battiston, Roberto; Vitale, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    We present the result for the search of correlations between the precipitation of low energy electrons (E>0.3MeV) trapped within the Van Allen Belts and earthquakes with magnitude above 5 Richter scale. We used the electron data measured by the NOAA POES 15,16,17 and 18 satellites collected during a period of 13 years, corresponding to about 18 thousands M>5 earthquakes registered in the NEIC catalog of the U.S. Geological Survey. We defined Particle Burst (PB) the fluctuations of electrons counting rate having a probability −6 of being a statistical fluctuation. The observed correlation involves about 1.410 −3 of the earthquakes in that period of time. It provides the first statistically convincing evidence for the existence of a detectable coupling mechanism between the lithosphere and the magnetosphere having well defined time characteristics

  13. France's seismic zoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadioun, B.

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic hazard in France in relation to nuclear plant siting, the CEA, EDF and the BRGM (Mine and Geology Bureau) have carried out a collaboration which resulted in a seismic-tectonic map of France and a data base on seismic history (SIRENE). These studies were completed with a seismic-tectonic zoning, taking into account a very long period of time, that enabled a probabilistic evaluation of the seismic hazard in France, and that may be related to adjacent country hazard maps

  14. Seismic changes industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the growth in the seismic industry as a result of the recent increases in the foreign market. With the decline of communism and the opening of Latin America to exploration, seismic teams have moved out into these areas in support of the oil and gas industry. The paper goes on to discuss the improved technology available for seismic resolution and the subsequent use of computers to field-proof the data while the seismic team is still on-site. It also discusses the effects of new computer technology on reducing the amount of support staff that is required to both conduct and interpret seismic information

  15. Ambient Seismic Noise Interferometry on the Island of Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer, Silke

    Ambient seismic noise interferometry has been successfully applied in a variety of tectonic settings to gain information about the subsurface. As a passive seismic technique, it extracts the coherent part of ambient seismic noise in-between pairs of seismic receivers. Measurements of subtle temporal changes in seismic velocities, and high-resolution tomographic imaging are then possible - two applications of particular interest for volcano monitoring. Promising results from other volcanic settings motivate its application in Hawai'i, with this work being the first to explore its potential. The dataset used for this purpose was recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's permanent seismic network on the Island of Hawai'i. It spans 2.5 years from 5/2007 to 12/2009 and covers two distinct sources of volcanic tremor. After applying standard processing for ambient seismic noise interferometry, we find that volcanic tremor strongly affects the extracted noise information not only close to the tremor source, but unexpectedly, throughout the island-wide network. Besides demonstrating how this long-range observability of volcanic tremor can be used to monitor volcanic activity in the absence of a dense seismic array, our results suggest that care must be taken when applying ambient seismic noise interferometry in volcanic settings. In a second step, we thus exclude days that show signs of volcanic tremor, reducing the dataset to three months, and perform ambient seismic noise tomography. The resulting two-dimensional Rayleigh wave group velocity maps for 0.1 - 0.9 Hz compare very well with images from previous travel time tomography, both, for the main volcanic structures at low frequencies as well as for smaller features at mid-to-high frequencies - a remarkable observation for the temporally truncated dataset. These robust results suggest that ambient seismic noise tomography in Hawai'i is suitable 1) to provide a three-dimensional S-wave model for the volcanoes and 2

  16. Precise Measurement of the $\\bar{p}p$ Total Cross-Section in the ISR Energy Range

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The major aim of this experiment is the precise measurement of the antiproton-proton total cross-section in the ISR energy range, using the total-rate method. The proton-proton total cross-section is remeasured with the same method and the same apparatus, and a precision of 0.5\\% is expected for both cross-sections. The total-rate method consists in the simultaneous measurement of the total interaction rate and the ISR luminosity. This is done with a set of scintillation-counter hodoscopes covering over 99.99\\% of the solid angle, which are sensitive to over 95\\% of all interactions. In addition to these detectors, small-angle drift-tube hodoscopes are used to measure the differential elastic cross-section as a function of the momentum transfert t. The total cross-section can be measured independently by extrapolating this differential cross-section to the forward direction and invoking the optical theorem. A study of the general features of charged-particle production is performed using finely divided scinti...

  17. A pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenick, W. Van

    1994-01-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to ±3 · 10 -16 A over the environmental range of temperature (-40 to +40 C). Using a single 10 11 Ω feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 · 10 -15 A to 3 · 10 -11 A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 μR h -1 ), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically ∼27 pA at 1 mR h -1 . A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale trademark Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards

  18. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    -wave velocity and density. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field with 4 million grid nodes, each with three unknown model parameters. The computing time was less than 3 minutes on the inversion in the Fourier domain, while each 3-D Fourier transform used about 30 seconds on a single 400 MHz Mips R12000 CPU. A Bayesian method for wavelet estimation from seismic and well data is developed. The method works both on stacked data and prestack data in form of angle gathers. The seismic forward model is based on the convolutional model, where the reflectivity is calculated from the well logs. The estimated wavelets are given as probability density functions such that uncertainties of the wavelets are an integral part of the solution. Possible mistie between the seismic traveltimes and the time axis of the well logs, errors in the log measurements and seismic noise are included in the model. The solution is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation. (Author, abbrev.)

  19. Magma replenishment and volcanic unrest inferred from the analysis of VT micro-seismicity and seismic velocity changes at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, F.; Rivemale, E.; Clarke, D. S.; Schmid, A.; Got, J.; Battaglia, J.; Taisne, B.; Staudacher, T.; Peltier, A.; Shapiro, N. M.; Tait, S.; Ferrazzini, V.; Di Muro, A.

    2011-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise volcano (PdF) is among the most active basaltic volcanoes worldwide with more than one eruption per year on average. Also, PdF is densely instrumented with short-period and broad-band seismometers as well as with GPS receivers. Continuous seismic waveforms are available from 1999. Piton de la Fournaise volcano has a moderate inter-eruptive seismic activity with an average of five detected Volcano-Tectonic (VT) earthquakes per day with magnitudes ranging from 0.5 to 3.5. These earthquakes are shallow and located about 2.5 kilometers beneath the edifice surface. Volcanic unrest is captured on average a few weeks before eruptions by measurements of increased VT seismicity rate, inflation of the edifice summit, and decreased seismic velocities from correlations of seismic noise. Eruptions are usually preceded by seismic swarms of VT earthquakes. Recently, almost 50 % of seismic swarms were not followed by eruptions. Within this work, we aim to gather results from different groups of the UnderVolc research project in order to better understand the processes of deep magma transfer, volcanic unrest, and pre-eruptive magma transport initiation. Among our results, we show that the period 1999-2003 was characterized by a long-term increase of VT seismicity rate coupled with a long-term decrease of seismic velocities. These observations could indicate a long-term replenishment of the magma storage area. The relocation of ten years of inter-eruptive micro-seismicity shows a narrow (~300 m long) sub-vertical fault zone thus indicating a conduit rather than an extended magma reservoir as the shallow magma feeder system. Also, we focus on the processes of short-term volcanic unrest and prove that magma intrusions within the edifice leading to eruptions activate specific VT earthquakes that are distinct from magma intrusions that do not lead to eruptions. We thus propose that, among the different pathways of magma transport within the edifice, only one will

  20. Seismic risk perception test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The perception of risks involves the process of collecting, selecting and interpreting signals about uncertain impacts of events, activities or technologies. In the natural sciences the term risk seems to be clearly defined, it means the probability distribution of adverse effects, but the everyday use of risk has different connotations (Renn, 2008). The two terms, hazards and risks, are often used interchangeably by the public. Knowledge, experience, values, attitudes and feelings all influence the thinking and judgement of people about the seriousness and acceptability of risks. Within the social sciences however the terminology of 'risk perception' has become the conventional standard (Slovic, 1987). The mental models and other psychological mechanisms which people use to judge risks (such as cognitive heuristics and risk images) are internalized through social and cultural learning and constantly moderated (reinforced, modified, amplified or attenuated) by media reports, peer influences and other communication processes (Morgan et al., 2001). Yet, a theory of risk perception that offers an integrative, as well as empirically valid, approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing". To understand the perception of risk is necessary to consider several areas: social, psychological, cultural, and their interactions. Among the various research in an international context on the perception of natural hazards, it seemed promising the approach with the method of semantic differential (Osgood, C.E., Suci, G., & Tannenbaum, P. 1957, The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press). The test on seismic risk perception has been constructed by the method of the semantic differential. To compare opposite adjectives or terms has been used a Likert's scale to seven point. The test consists of an informative part and six sections respectively dedicated to: hazard; vulnerability (home and workplace); exposed value (with reference to

  1. Sources and characteristics of summertime organic aerosol in the Colorado Front Range: perspective from measurements and WRF-Chem modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bahreini

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of organic aerosols (OAs and their precursors in the boundary layer (BL of the Colorado Front Range during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ, July–August 2014 was analyzed by in situ measurements and chemical transport modeling. Measurements indicated significant production of secondary OA (SOA, with enhancement ratio of OA with respect to carbon monoxide (CO reaching 0.085±0.003 µg m−3 ppbv−1. At background mixing ratios of CO, up to  ∼  1.8 µg m−3 background OA was observed, suggesting significant non-combustion contribution to OA in the Front Range. The mean concentration of OA in plumes with a high influence of oil and natural gas (O&G emissions was  ∼  40 % higher than in urban-influenced plumes. Positive matrix factorization (PMF confirmed a dominant contribution of secondary, oxygenated OA (OOA in the boundary layer instead of fresh, hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA. Combinations of primary OA (POA volatility assumptions, aging of semi-volatile species, and different emission estimates from the O&G sector were used in the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem simulation scenarios. The assumption of semi-volatile POA resulted in greater than a factor of 10 lower POA concentrations compared to PMF-resolved HOA. Including top-down modified O&G emissions resulted in substantially better agreements in modeled ethane, toluene, hydroxyl radical, and ozone compared to measurements in the high-O&G-influenced plumes. By including emissions from the O&G sector using the top-down approach, it was estimated that the O&G sector contributed to  <  5 % of total OA, but up to 38 % of anthropogenic SOA (aSOA in the region. The best agreement between the measured and simulated median OA was achieved by limiting the extent of biogenic hydrocarbon aging and consequently biogenic SOA (bSOA production. Despite a lower production of bSOA in

  2. Impact of ground motion characterization on conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.T.; Toro, G.R.; McGuire, R.K.

    1996-07-01

    This study evaluates the impact, on estimates of seismic risk and its uncertainty, of alternative methods in treatment and characterization of earthquake ground motions. The objective of this study is to delineate specific procedures and characterizations that may lead to less biased and more precise seismic risk results. This report focuses on sources of conservatism and variability in risk that may be introduced through the analytical processes and ground-motion descriptions which are commonly implemented at the interface of seismic hazard and fragility assessments. In particular, implication of the common practice of using a single, composite spectral shape to characterize motions of different magnitudes is investigated. Also, the impact of parameterization of ground motion on fragility and hazard assessments is shown. Examination of these results demonstrates the following. (1) There exists significant conservatism in the review spectra (usually, spectra characteristic of western U.S. earthquakes) that have been used in conducting past seismic risk assessments and seismic margin assessments for eastern U.S. nuclear power plants. (2) There is a strong dependence of seismic fragility on earthquake magnitude when PGA is used as the ground-motion characterization. When, however, magnitude-dependent spectra are anchored to a common measure of elastic spectral acceleration averaged over the appropriate frequency range, seismic fragility shows no important nor consistent dependence on either magnitude or strong-motion duration. Use of inelastic spectral acceleration (at the proper frequency) as the ground spectrum anchor demonstrates a very similar result. This study concludes that a single, composite-magnitude spectrum can generally be used to characterize ground motion for fragility assessment without introducing significant bias or uncertainty in seismic risk estimates

  3. Impact of ground motion characterization on conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, R.T.; Toro, G.R.; McGuire, R.K.

    1996-07-01

    This study evaluates the impact, on estimates of seismic risk and its uncertainty, of alternative methods in treatment and characterization of earthquake ground motions. The objective of this study is to delineate specific procedures and characterizations that may lead to less biased and more precise seismic risk results. This report focuses on sources of conservatism and variability in risk that may be introduced through the analytical processes and ground-motion descriptions which are commonly implemented at the interface of seismic hazard and fragility assessments. In particular, implication of the common practice of using a single, composite spectral shape to characterize motions of different magnitudes is investigated. Also, the impact of parameterization of ground motion on fragility and hazard assessments is shown. Examination of these results demonstrates the following. (1) There exists significant conservatism in the review spectra (usually, spectra characteristic of western U.S. earthquakes) that have been used in conducting past seismic risk assessments and seismic margin assessments for eastern U.S. nuclear power plants. (2) There is a strong dependence of seismic fragility on earthquake magnitude when PGA is used as the ground-motion characterization. When, however, magnitude-dependent spectra are anchored to a common measure of elastic spectral acceleration averaged over the appropriate frequency range, seismic fragility shows no important nor consistent dependence on either magnitude or strong-motion duration. Use of inelastic spectral acceleration (at the proper frequency) as the ground spectrum anchor demonstrates a very similar result. This study concludes that a single, composite-magnitude spectrum can generally be used to characterize ground motion for fragility assessment without introducing significant bias or uncertainty in seismic risk estimates.

  4. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs

  5. Mapping Inherited Fractures in the Critical Zone Using Seismic Anisotropy From Circular Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Christopher G.; Holbrook, W. Steven; Carr, Bradley J.; Pasquet, Sylvain; Okaya, David; Flinchum, Brady A.

    2018-04-01

    Weathering and hydrological processes in Earth's shallow subsurface are influenced by inherited bedrock structures, such as bedding planes, faults, joints, and fractures. However, these structures are difficult to observe in soil-mantled landscapes. Steeply dipping structures with a dominant orientation are detectable by seismic anisotropy, with fast wave speeds along the strike of structures. We measured shallow ( 2-4 m) seismic anisotropy using "circle shots," geophones deployed in a circle around a central shot point, in a weathered granite terrain in the Laramie Range of Wyoming. The inferred remnant fracture orientations agree with brittle fracture orientations measured at tens of meters depth in boreholes, demonstrating that bedrock fractures persist through the weathering process into the shallow critical zone. Seismic anisotropy positively correlates with saprolite thickness, suggesting that inherited bedrock fractures may control saprolite thickness by providing preferential pathways for corrosive meteoric waters to access the deep critical zone.

  6. Seismic resistance of WWER equipment (systematization and generalization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaznovski, S.; Chechenov, H.

    1999-01-01

    Within the scope of the contract with IAEA, calculational and experimental investigations of equipment seismic resistance were carried out. Systematic seismic inspection was conducted for 21 WWER type reactors in Armenia, Bulgaria, Russia, Slovakia and Ukraine. On the base of generalisation of extensive real data accumulated during inspection of equipment seismic resistance at different WWER-type NPPs the classification of seismic instability reasons and working out of generalised recommendations were carried out. It gives the possibility to specialists in many cases to expose the seismic insufficiency of equipment and to choose the suitable measures without laborious experimental investigations, tests, and calculations

  7. Contribution to the damage measurement of reinforced concrete buildings under seismic solicitations: proposal of an improvement for the evaluation of the damaging potential of a signal and of the damage for the girders structures: introduction to the reliability analysis of the damage in terms of the damaging potential of a seismic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naze, P.A.

    2004-12-01

    Building damage measurement during and after an earthquake remains an economical as well as technical stake as difficult to cope with as the problem it raises all the more because its importance depends on the field or the building function: civil, medical, military, nuclear... Even building ruin remains one of the most critical diagnosis to establish. Then since prediction of earthquake still remains impossible, foreseeing structural damages due to seismic motion has become a key point in earthquake engineering. This work aims at evaluating the relevance of classical seismic signal damaging potential indices and at proposing improvement of these indices in order to provide better prediction of structural damage due to earthquake. The first part supplies a non exhaustive state of the art of main Damaging Potential Indices IP and Damage Indices ID used in earthquake engineering. In the second part, IP/ID correlations results are analysed in order to evaluate IP relevance, to justify displacement based approach use (capacity spectrum method) for damage prediction and to make good the proposal for improvement of Damaging Potential Index. But studding seismic signal damaging potential is usually not enough to foresee damage firstly because scalar representation of damaging potential is not easy to link to physics reality and secondly because of damage scattering often observed for a single value of seismic signal damaging potential. In the same way, a single damage index value may correspond to very different structural damage states. Hence, this work carries on with a contribution to damage index reliability improvement, able to detect real structural damage appearance as well as to quantify this damage by associating the distance between one structural sate and the structural collapse, defined as an instability. (author)

  8. Reliability of measuring half-cycle cervical range of motion may be increased using a spirit level for calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Jan; Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2018-02-01

    Assessments of range of motion (ROM) represent an essential part of clinical diagnostics. Ultrasonic movement analyses have been demonstrated to provide reliable results when analyzing complete amplitudes (e.g., flexion-extension). However, due to subjective determination of the starting position, the assessment of half-cycle movements (e.g, flexion only) is less reproducible. The present study aimed to examine the reliability of measuring half-cycle cervical ROM using a spirit level for calibration. 20 healthy subjects (30 ± 12yrs, 7♂, 13♀) participated in the randomized, controlled, cross-over trial. In two testing sessions with one week of wash-out in between, cervical ROM was measured by means of an ultrasonic 3D movement analysis system using a test-retest design (baseline and 5 min post baseline). The sessions differed with reference to the mask carrying the ultrasound markers. It was removed during the 5 min break (mask off) or not (mask on). To determine the resting position, a bull's eye spirit level was used in each measurement. With ICC values of 0.90-0.98 (mask on, p spirit level. In contrast to subjective determination of the starting position, analyzing complete movement planes does not increase reliability. Using a defined and objective zero positioning allows the evaluation of repositioning tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xinquan [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sun, Xiaodong, E-mail: sun.200@osu.edu [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Liu, Yang [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, 635 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    This paper focuses on liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions and flow regimes, spanning from bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, to churn-turbulent flows. The measurements have been conducted in two test facilities, the first one with a circular test section and the second one with a rectangular test section. A particle image velocimetry-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PIV-PLIF) system was used to acquire local liquid-phase turbulence information, including the time-averaged velocity and velocity fluctuations in the streamwise and spanwise directions, and Reynolds stress. An optical phase separation method using fluorescent particles and optical filtration technique was adopted to extract the liquid-phase velocity information. An image pre-processing scheme was imposed on the raw PIV images acquired to remove noise due to the presence of bubble residuals and optically distorted particles in the raw PIV images. Four-sensor conductivity probes and high-speed images were also used to acquire the gas-phase information, which was aimed to understand the flow interfacial structure. The highest area-averaged void fraction covered in the measurements for the circular and rectangular test sections was about 40%.

  10. Liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xinquan; Sun, Xiaodong; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on liquid-phase turbulence measurements in air-water two-phase flows over a wide range of void fractions and flow regimes, spanning from bubbly, cap-bubbly, slug, to churn-turbulent flows. The measurements have been conducted in two test facilities, the first one with a circular test section and the second one with a rectangular test section. A particle image velocimetry-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PIV-PLIF) system was used to acquire local liquid-phase turbulence information, including the time-averaged velocity and velocity fluctuations in the streamwise and spanwise directions, and Reynolds stress. An optical phase separation method using fluorescent particles and optical filtration technique was adopted to extract the liquid-phase velocity information. An image pre-processing scheme was imposed on the raw PIV images acquired to remove noise due to the presence of bubble residuals and optically distorted particles in the raw PIV images. Four-sensor conductivity probes and high-speed images were also used to acquire the gas-phase information, which was aimed to understand the flow interfacial structure. The highest area-averaged void fraction covered in the measurements for the circular and rectangular test sections was about 40%.

  11. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. Gentilly 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Results of this probabilistic seismic hazard assessment were determined using a suite of conservative assumptions. The intent of this study was to perform a limited hazard assessment that incorporated a range of technically defensible input parameters. To best achieve this goal, input selected for the hazard assessment tended to be conservative with respect to selection of attenuation modes, and seismicity parameters. Seismic hazard estimates at Gentilly 2 were most affected by selection of the attenuation model. Alternative definitions of seismic source zones had a relatively small impact on seismic hazard. A St. Lawrence Rift model including a maximum magnitude of 7.2 m b in the zone containing the site had little effect on the hazard estimate relative to other seismic source zonation models. Mean annual probabilities of exceeding the design peak ground acceleration, and the design response spectrum for the Gentilly 2 site were computed to lie in the range of 0.001 to 0.0001. This hazard result falls well within the range determined to be acceptable for nuclear reactor sites located throughout the eastern United States. (author) 34 refs., 6 tabs., 28 figs

  12. Differential cross section measurement of elastic scattering 12C(p,p)12C in the astrophysical range of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktibayev, M.K.; Burminskii, V.P.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzazairov -Kakhramanov, V.; Hassan, S.F.; Satpaev, N.K.; Zazulin, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The fulfillment of planned works on measurements of differential cross sections of elastic scattering of protons on nuclear 12 C at the energy region of 350†1050 keV suggests the preparation of thin self - supporting carbon target. The self - supporting target is necessary in order to perform investigations in the total angular range. In the future last data will be used in order to determine optical potentials and scattering phases for this nuclear in the energy range of astrophysical interest. There was prepared target layer of the 12 C with natural composition of carbon and of thickness of 17.4 μg/cm 2 . The spraying was conducted in the vacuum evaporation installation (VUP - 4) by an electron bombardment method. Carbon was sprayed on a glass plate with previously deposited of layer salt. After a heating during 12 hours at the temperature of 150 o C the film of carbon was floated from glass plate and self - supporting target has been picked up on the specially prepared target frame. In order to determine thickness of target there was used the resonance chamber, installed in the protons channel of the accelerator RAC - 2 - 1 (INP NNC RK), with the help of which there was measured energy loss of the protons beam during the passage through target, disposed in the central chamber. For this purpose there was used the reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si with narrow resonance with E R = 992 keV and with detection of gamma-quanta with E γ = 1779 keV. On shift of the resonance E R =992 keV in the reaction 27 Al(p,γ) 28 Si, which takes place owing to protons energy loss in the thickness of carbon film, and using table values of brake quantities S(E p )[MeV·cm 2 /g] [1], there was determined thickness of this fine film. Such the method allows to determine thicknesses of films in the interval of (10 † 100) mcg/cm 2 with the accuracy of not worse than 5%. In the present work there were carried out measurements of angular distributions of cross sections of the

  13. Validation of Measured Damping Trends for Flight-Like Vehicle Panel/Equipment including a Range of Cable Harness Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Fulcher, Clay W.; Jones, Douglas C.; Waldon, James M.; Craigmyle, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    This validation study examines the effect on vibroacoustic response resulting from the installation of cable bundles on a curved orthogrid panel. Of interest is the level of damping provided by the installation of the cable bundles and whether this damping could be potentially leveraged in launch vehicle design. The results of this test are compared with baseline acoustic response tests without cables. Damping estimates from the measured response data are made using a new software tool that leverages a finite element model of the panel in conjunction with advanced optimization techniques. While the full test series is not yet complete, the first configuration of cable bundles that was assessed effectively increased the viscous critical damping fraction of the system by as much as 0.02 in certain frequency ranges.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of a Micelle-Based pH Nanosensor with an Unprecedented Broad Measurement Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Pramod Kumar; Feldborg, Lise N.; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    A new cross-linked micelle pH nanosensor design was investigated. The nanosensor synthesis was based on self-assembly of an amphiphilic triblock copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2-amino ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(coumarin methacrylate) (PEG-b-PAEMA-b-PCMA), which was synthesized by isolated...... irradiation (320 nm pH nanosensors by binding the pH-sensitive fluorophores oregon green 488 and 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6......) carboxyfluorescein and a reference fluorophore Alexa 633 to the PAEMA shell region of the micelles. Fluorescence measurements show that these pH nanosensors are sensitive in a surprisingly broad pH range of 3.4–8.0, which is hypothesized to be due to small differences in the individual fluorophores’ local...

  15. LLNL's Regional Seismic Discrimination Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, W; Mayeda, K; Myers, S; Pasyanos, M; Rodgers, A; Sicherman, A; Walter, W

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's research and development effort to improve the monitoring capability of the planned Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty international monitoring system, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) is testing and calibrating regional seismic discrimination algorithms in the Middle East, North Africa and Western Former Soviet Union. The calibration process consists of a number of steps: (1) populating the database with independently identified regional events; (2) developing regional boundaries and pre-identifying severe regional phase blockage zones; (3) measuring and calibrating coda based magnitude scales; (4a) measuring regional amplitudes and making magnitude and distance amplitude corrections (MDAC); (4b) applying the DOE modified kriging methodology to MDAC results using the regionalized background model; (5) determining the thresholds of detectability of regional phases as a function of phase type and frequency; (6) evaluating regional phase discriminant performance both singly and in combination; (7) combining steps 1-6 to create a calibrated discrimination surface for each stations; (8) assessing progress and iterating. We have now developed this calibration procedure to the point where it is fairly straightforward to apply earthquake-explosion discrimination in regions with ample empirical data. Several of the steps outlined above are discussed in greater detail in other DOE papers in this volume or in recent publications. Here we emphasize the results of the above process: station correction surfaces and their improvement to discrimination results compared with simpler calibration methods. Some of the outstanding discrimination research issues involve cases in which there is little or no empirical data. For example in many cases there is no regional nuclear explosion data at IMS stations or nearby surrogates. We have taken two approaches to this problem, first finding and using mining explosion data when available, and

  16. Angola Seismicity MAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  17. Long-term measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence of long-range transport of biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sciare

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term (5-year measurements of Elemental Carbon (EC and Organic Carbon (OC in bulk aerosols are presented here for the first time in the Mediterranean Basin (Crete Island. A multi-analytical approach (including thermal, optical, and thermo-optical techniques was applied for these EC and OC measurements. Light absorbing dust aerosols were shown to poorly contribute (+12% on a yearly average to light absorption coefficient (babs measurements performed by an optical method (aethalometer. Long-range transport of agricultural waste burning from European countries surrounding the Black Sea was shown for each year during two periods (March–April and July–September. The contribution of biomass burning to the concentrations of EC and OC was shown to be rather small (20 and 14%, respectively, on a yearly basis, although this contribution could be much higher on a monthly basis and showed important seasonal and interannual variability. By removing the biomass burning influence, our data revealed an important seasonal variation of OC, with an increase by almost a factor of two for the spring months of May and June, whereas BC was found to be quite stable throughout the year. Preliminary measurements of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC have shown that the monthly mean WSOC/OC ratio remains stable throughout the year (0.45±0.12, suggesting that the partitioning between water soluble and water insoluble organic matter is not significantly affected by biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. A chemical mass closure performed in the fine mode (Aerodynamic Diameter, A.D.<1.5μm showed that the mass contribution of organic matter (POM was found to be essentially invariable during the year (monthly average of 26±5%.

  18. Long-term measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence of long-range transport of biomass burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciare, J.; Oikonomou, K.; Favez, O.; Cachier, H.; Liakakou, E.; Markaki, Z.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term (5-year) measurements of Elemental Carbon (EC) and Organic Carbon (OC) in bulk aerosols are presented here for the first time in the Mediterranean Basin (Crete Island). A multi-analytical approach (including thermal, optical, and thermo-optical techniques) was applied for these EC and OC measurements. Light absorbing dust aerosols were shown to poorly contribute (+12% on a yearly average) to light absorption coefficient (b(abs)) measurements performed by an optical method (aethalometer). Long-range transport of agricultural waste burning from European countries surrounding the Black Sea was shown for each year during two periods (March-April and July-September). The contribution of biomass burning to the concentrations of EC and OC was shown to be rather small (20 and 14%, respectively, on a yearly basis), although this contribution could be much higher on a monthly basis and showed important seasonal and inter annual variability. By removing the biomass burning influence, our data revealed an important seasonal variation of OC, with an increase by almost a factor of two for the spring months of May and June, whereas BC was found to be quite stable throughout the year. Preliminary measurements of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) have shown that the monthly mean WSOC/ OC ratio remains stable throughout the year (0.45 ± 0.12), suggesting that the partitioning between water soluble and water insoluble organic matter is not significantly affected by biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. A chemical mass closure performed in the fine mode (Aerodynamic Diameter, A. D.≤ 1.5 μm) showed that the mass contribution of organic matter (POM) was found to be essentially invariable during the year (monthly average of 26 ± 5%). (authors)

  19. Seismic microzoning in the metropolitan area of Port - au-Prince - complexity of the subsoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, R.; Bertil, D.; Belvaux, M.; Roulle, A.; Noury, G.; Prepetit, C.; Jean-Philippe, J.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude 7.3 earthquake that struck Haiti in January 12, 2010 has caused a lot of damages in surrounding areas epicenter. These damages are due to a lack of knowledge of the Haitian subsoil. To overcome this problem, the LNBTP, the BME and BRGM have agreed to implement a project of seismic microzonation of the metropolitan area of Port-au-Prince which is financed by the Fund for the reconstruction of the country. The seismic microzonation is an important tool for knowledge of seismic risk. It is based on a collection of geological, geotechnical, geophysical and measures and recognition and the campaign of numerous sites. It describes a class of specific soils with associated spectral response. The objective of the microzoning is to identify and map the homogeneous zones of lithology, topography, liquefaction and ground movements. The zoning of lithological sites effect is to identify and map areas with geological and geomechanical consistent and homogeneous seismic response; the objective is to provide, in each area, seismic movements adapted to the ground. This zoning is done in about five steps: 1- Cross-analysis of geological, geotechnical and geophysical information; 2- Such information comprise the existing data collected and the data acquired during the project; 3- Identification of homogeneous areas. 4- Definition of one or more columns of representative soils associated with each zone; 5 - Possible consolidation of area to get the final seismic zoning. 27 zones types were considered for the study of sites effects after the analysis of all geological, geotechnical and geophysical data. For example, for the formation of Delmas, there are 5 areas with soil classes ranging from D to C. Soil columns described in the metropolitan area of Port-au-Prince are processed with the CyberQuake software, which is developed at the BRGM by Modaressi et al. in 1997, to calculate their response to seismic rock solicitation. The seismic motion is determined by 4

  20. Seismic hazard evaluation for major cities in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razafindrakoto, Hoby N.T.; Rambolamanana, Gerard; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2009-09-01

    The seismic hazard in some areas in Madagascar has been assessed at regional scale in terms of peak ground motion values (displacement, velocity, acceleration) and their periods, following the Neodeterministic approach, based on the computation of realistic synthetic seismograms. The main data input integrates all available tectonic, seismicity and structural model information. The largest peak values are 1.6cm/s for the velocity, 0.03g for the acceleration and more than 0.5cm for the displacement. These values are consistent within a range of macroseismic intensity from VI to VII MCS, and indicate that relatively simple prevention measures and retrofitting actions may guarantee a high safety level and a well sustainable development. (author)

  1. Seismic data are rich in information about subsurface formations and fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfour, Mohammed; Yoon, Wang Jung; Kim, Dongshin [Geophysical Prospecting Lab, Energy & Resources Eng., Dept., Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Hwan [Petroleum Engineering Lab, Energy & Resources Eng., Dept., Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-08

    Seismic attributes are defined as any measured or computed information derived from seismic data. Throughout the last decades extensive work has been done in developing variety of mathematical approaches to extract maximum information from seismic data. Nevertheless, geoscientists found that seismic is still mature and rich in information. In this paper a new seismic attribute is introduced. Instantaneous energy seismic attribute is an amplitude based attribute that has the potential to emphasize anomalous amplitude associated with hydrocarbons. Promising results have been obtained from applying the attribute on seismic section traversing hydrocarbon filled sand from Alberta, Canada.

  2. The range and effectiveness of short-term measures to reduce traffic emissions during high air pollution episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsom, Derek M.

    1999-01-01

    Concern for continuing poor urban air quality, caused primarily by motor vehicles emissions, and the slow progress being made towards reducing total vehicle emissions by long-term measures, such as improving fuel and vehicle technologies, has prompted some authorities to try to reduce the severity and duration of high air pollution episodes by implementing short-term traffic restraint measures. This paper reviews the range of episodic air quality management schemes applied in cities around the world and comments on the effectiveness of such schemes. The difficulty of targeting vehicles according to the contribution they make to the air quality problem is highlighted. The problem of some schemes simply causing a displacement of the area of excessive vehicle emissions rather than reducing total emissions is reviewed. Rapid developments in telematics and improved urban air quality and traffic monitoring networks (e.g. Urban Traffic Management and Control systems) may offer significant improvements in the effectiveness of episodic management schemes in the future. (Author)

  3. Measurement of vortex velocities over a wide range of vortex age, downstream distance and free stream velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorke, J. B.; Moffett, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted to obtain vortex velocity signatures over a wide parameter range encompassing the data conditions of several previous researchers while maintaining a common instrumentation and test facility. The generating wing panel was configured with both a revolved airfoil tip shape and a square tip shape and had a semispan aspect of 4.05/1.0 with a 121.9 cm span. Free stream velocity was varied from 6.1 m/sec to 76.2 m/sec and the vortex core velocities were measured at locations 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 chordlengths downstream of the wing trailing edge, yielding vortex ages up to 2.0 seconds. Wing pitch angles of 6, 8, 9 and 12 deg were investigated. Detailed surface pressure distributions and wing force measurements were obtained for each wing tip configuration. Correlation with vortex velocity data taken in previous experiments is good. During the rollup process, vortex core parameters appear to be dependent primarily on vortex age. Trending in the plateau and decay regions is more complex and the machanisms appear to be more unstable.

  4. Thermal conductivity of a wide range of alternative refrigerants measured with an improved guarded hot-plate apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschmidt, U.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of the refrigerants R22, R123, R134a, R142b, R143a, and R152a has been determined as a function of temperature in the range from 300 to 460 K. Measurements were carried out at atmospheric pressure with an improved guarded hot-plate apparatus. The width of the instrument's gas layer and the temperature difference across the metering section were varied to detect any stray heat transfer. Radiation correction factors were derived from IR absorption spectra. The uncertainty of the measurements is estimated to be 2% at a standard deviation of less than 0.1%. Our data sets are compared with corresponding hot wire results. In contrast to the generally preferred hot wire technique, with its possible electrical and chemical interactions between the wire and the polar refrigerant, there are no such difficulties using a guarded hot-plate apparatus. Our data sets may thus contribute to the discussions on discrepanc