WorldWideScience

Sample records for range rate noise

  1. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  2. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A system that rates noise on the basis of noise maps has been developed which is based on empirical exposure-response relationships, so that effects in the community will be lower if the system gives a better rating. It is consistent with noise metrics and effect endpoint chosen in the EU, i.e., it

  3. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  4. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  5. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps within the framework of the Environmental Noise Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the need for noise measures as well as the improvement that can be obtained with different measures, there is a need for a system that rates environmental noise on the basis of noise maps. Based on empirical exposure-response relationships, a rating system and a stepwise

  6. Controlling a wide range of flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Servo-operated valve and two flowmeters allow accurate control over 1,900:1 flow-rate range. It was developed as part of laboratory instrument for measuring properties of confined fluids under conditions analogous to those encountered in deep drilling operations.

  7. Probability of noise- and rate-induced tipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Paul; Sieber, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We propose an approximation for the probability of tipping when the speed of parameter change and additive white noise interact to cause tipping. Our approximation is valid for small to moderate drift speeds and helps to estimate the probability of false positives and false negatives in early-warning indicators in the case of rate- and noise-induced tipping. We illustrate our approximation on a prototypical model for rate-induced tipping with additive noise using Monte Carlo simulations. The formula can be extended to close encounters of rate-induced tipping and is otherwise applicable to other forms of tipping. We also provide an asymptotic formula for the critical ramp speed of the parameter in the absence of noise for a general class of systems undergoing rate-induced tipping.

  8. Noise in gene expression is coupled to growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Leeat; van Dijk, David; Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Davidi, Dan; Jona, Ghil; Weinberger, Adina; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-12-01

    Genetically identical cells exposed to the same environment display variability in gene expression (noise), with important consequences for the fidelity of cellular regulation and biological function. Although population average gene expression is tightly coupled to growth rate, the effects of changes in environmental conditions on expression variability are not known. Here, we measure the single-cell expression distributions of approximately 900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae promoters across four environmental conditions using flow cytometry, and find that gene expression noise is tightly coupled to the environment and is generally higher at lower growth rates. Nutrient-poor conditions, which support lower growth rates, display elevated levels of noise for most promoters, regardless of their specific expression values. We present a simple model of noise in expression that results from having an asynchronous population, with cells at different cell-cycle stages, and with different partitioning of the cells between the stages at different growth rates. This model predicts non-monotonic global changes in noise at different growth rates as well as overall higher variability in expression for cell-cycle-regulated genes in all conditions. The consistency between this model and our data, as well as with noise measurements of cells growing in a chemostat at well-defined growth rates, suggests that cell-cycle heterogeneity is a major contributor to gene expression noise. Finally, we identify gene and promoter features that play a role in gene expression noise across conditions. Our results show the existence of growth-related global changes in gene expression noise and suggest their potential phenotypic implications. © 2015 Keren et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. The effect of Noise on blood pressure and heart rate in an automotive industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Alimohammadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the possible effects of occupational exposure to high noise is high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Aim of this study was to investigate the association between noise with blood pressure and heart rate in an automotive industry. Methods: 78 male workers who worked in an automobile factory, were participated. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured in the morning and in the middle of the day. All measurements were performed at three noise levels: 85-95, 75-85 and 65-75 dB. All data were analyzed using SPSS and MATLAB. Results: Post Hoc test showed that noise has the same effect on the average systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p= 0.733 but Box-whisker plot showed that after exposure, the variation range of blood pressure and heart rate are much more than the other groups. However, this project didn’t show any a specific correlation between the increase in noise level with heart rate but variance analysis showed that the noise level increase lead to changes in heart rate (p= 0.049.  Conclusions: Noise level in 75-85dB as same as 85-95 dB caused the changes in blood pressure and heart rate. Due to cardiovascular disease, it is recommended training programs for workers, reduced noise level and periodic monitoring of blood pressure of workers, especially with a history of hypertension.

  10. Wind noise in hearing aids: I. Effect of wide dynamic range compression and modulation-based noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the effect of wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) and modulation-based noise reduction (NR) algorithms on wind noise levels at the hearing aid output; and (2) to derive effective strategies for clinicians and engineers to reduce wind noise in hearing aids. Three digital hearing aids were fitted to KEMAR. The noise output was recorded at flow velocities of 0, 4.5, 9.0, and 13.5 m/s in a wind tunnel as the KEMAR head was turned from 0° to 360°. Flow noise levels were compared between the 1:1 linear and 3:1 WDRC conditions, and between NR-activated and NR-deactivated conditions when the hearing aid was programmed to the directional and omnidirectional modes. The results showed that: (1) WDRC increased low-level noise and reduced high-level noise; and (2) different noise reduction algorithms provided different amounts of wind noise reduction in different microphone modes, frequency regions, flow velocities, and head angles. Wind noise can be reduced by decreasing the gain for low-level inputs, increasing the compression ratio for high-level inputs, and activating modulation-based noise reduction algorithms.

  11. Bias-correcting the realized range-based variance in the presence of market microstructure noise

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Podolskij, Mark; Vetter, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Market microstructure noise is a challenge to high-frequency based estimation of the integrated variance, because the noise accumulates with the sampling frequency. In this paper, we analyze the impact of microstructure noise on the realized range-based variance and propose a bias-correction to the range-statistic. The new estimator is shown to be consistent for the integrated variance and asymptotically mixed Gaussian under simple forms of microstructure noise, and we can select ...

  12. Hybrid colored noise process with space-dependent switching rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental issue in the theory of continuous stochastic process is the interpretation of multiplicative white noise, which is often referred to as the Itô-Stratonovich dilemma. From a physical perspective, this reflects the need to introduce additional constraints in order to specify the nature of the noise, whereas from a mathematical perspective it reflects an ambiguity in the formulation of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Recently, we have identified a mechanism for obtaining an Itô SDE based on a form of temporal disorder. Motivated by switching processes in molecular biology, we considered a Brownian particle that randomly switches between two distinct conformational states with different diffusivities. In each state, the particle undergoes normal diffusion (additive noise) so there is no ambiguity in the interpretation of the noise. However, if the switching rates depend on position, then in the fast switching limit one obtains Brownian motion with a space-dependent diffusivity of the Itô form. In this paper, we extend our theory to include colored additive noise. We show that the nature of the effective multiplicative noise process obtained by taking both the white-noise limit (κ →0 ) and fast switching limit (ɛ →0 ) depends on the order the two limits are taken. If the white-noise limit is taken first, then we obtain Itô, and if the fast switching limit is taken first, then we obtain Stratonovich. Moreover, the form of the effective diffusion coefficient differs in the two cases. The latter result holds even in the case of space-independent transition rates, where one obtains additive noise processes with different diffusion coefficients. Finally, we show that yet another form of multiplicative noise is obtained in the simultaneous limit ɛ ,κ →0 with ɛ /κ2 fixed.

  13. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  14. Assessment Of Noise-induced Sleep Fragility In Two Age Ranges By Means Of Polysomnographic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzano, M. G.; Parrino, L.; Spaggiari, M. C.; Buccino, G. P.; Fioriti, G.; Depoortere, H.

    1993-04-01

    The microstructure of sleep, which translates the short-lived fluctuations of the arousal level, is a commonly neglected feature in polysomnographic studies. Specifically arranged microstructural EEG events may provide important information on the dynamic characteristics of the sleep process. CAP (cyclic alternating pattern) and non-CAP are complementary modalities in which arousal-related "phasic" EEG phenomena are organized in non-REM sleep, and they correspond to opposite conditions of unstable and stable sleep depth, respectively. Thus, arousal instability can be measured by the CAP rate, the percentage ratio of total CAP time to total non-REM sleep time. The CAP rate, an age-related physiological variable that increases in several pathological conditions, is highly sensitive to acoustic perturbation. In the present study, two groups of healthy subjects without complaints about sleep, belonging to different age ranges (six young adults, three males and three females, between 20 and 30 years, and six middle-aged individuals, three males and three females, between 40 and 55 years) slept, after adaptation to the sleep laboratory, in a random sequence for two non-consecutive nights either under silent baseline (27·3 dB(A) Lcq) or noise-disturbed (continuous 55 dB(A) white noise) conditions. Age-related and noise-related effects on traditional sleep parameters and on the CAP rate were statistically evaluated by a split-plot test. Compared to young adults, the middle-aged individuals showed a significant reduction of total sleep time, stage 2 and REM sleep and significantly higher values of nocturnal awakenings and the CAP rate. The noisy nights were characterized by similar alterations. The disruptive effects of acoustic perturbation were greater on the more fragile sleep architecture of the older group. The increased fragility of sleep associated with aging probably reflects the decreased capacity of the sleeping brain to maintain steady states of vigilance. Total

  15. Noise models for low counting rate coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Pierre; Allain, Marc; Chamard, Virginie; Rodenburg, John

    2012-11-05

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lens-less microscopy method that extracts the complex-valued exit field from intensity measurements alone. It is of particular importance for microscopy imaging with diffraction set-ups where high quality lenses are not available. The inversion scheme allowing the phase retrieval is based on the use of an iterative algorithm. In this work, we address the question of the choice of the iterative process in the case of data corrupted by photon or electron shot noise. Several noise models are presented and further used within two inversion strategies, the ordered subset and the scaled gradient. Based on analytical and numerical analysis together with Monte-Carlo studies, we show that any physical interpretations drawn from a CDI iterative technique require a detailed understanding of the relationship between the noise model and the used inversion method. We observe that iterative algorithms often assume implicitly a noise model. For low counting rates, each noise model behaves differently. Moreover, the used optimization strategy introduces its own artefacts. Based on this analysis, we develop a hybrid strategy which works efficiently in the absence of an informed initial guess. Our work emphasises issues which should be considered carefully when inverting experimental data.

  16. Spontaneous emission noise in long-range surface plasmon polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-09-19

    Spontaneous emission noise is an important limit to the performance of active plasmonic devices. Here, we investigate the spontaneous emission noise in the long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide based optical gyroscope. A theoretical model of the sensitivity is established to study the incoherent multi-beam interference of spontaneous emission in the gyroscope. Numerical results show that spontaneous emission produces a drift in the transmittance spectra and lowers the signal-to-noise-ratio of the gyroscope. It also strengthens the shot noise to be the main limit to the sensitivity of the gyroscope for high propagation loss. To reduce the negative effects of the spontaneous emission noise on the gyroscope, an external feedback loop is suggested to estimate the drift in the transmittance spectra and therefor enhance the sensitivity. Our work lays a foundation for the improvement of long-range surface plasmon-polariton gyroscope and paves the way to its practical application.

  17. Noise slows the rate of Michaelis-Menten reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyken, J David

    2017-10-07

    Microscopic randomness and the small volumes of living cells combine to generate random fluctuations in molecule concentrations called "noise". Here I investigate the effect of noise on biochemical reactions obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics, concluding that substrate noise causes these reactions to slow. I derive a general expression for the time evolution of the joint probability density of chemical species in arbitrarily connected networks of non-linear chemical reactions in small volumes. This equation is a generalization of the chemical master equation (CME), a common tool for investigating stochastic chemical kinetics, extended to reaction networks occurring in small volumes, such as living cells. I apply this equation to a generalized Michaelis-Menten reaction in an open system, deriving the following general result: 〈p〉≤p¯ and 〈s〉≥s¯, where s¯ and p¯ denote the deterministic steady-state concentration of reactant and product species, respectively, and 〈s〉 and 〈p〉 denote the steady-state ensemble average over independent realizations of a stochastic reaction. Under biologically realistic conditions, namely when substrate is degraded or diluted by cell division, 〈p〉≤p¯. Consequently, noise slows the rate of in vivo Michaelis-Menten reactions. These predictions are validated by extensive stochastic simulations using Gillespie's exact stochastic simulation algorithm. I specify the conditions under which these effects occur and when they vanish, therefore reconciling discrepancies among previous theoretical investigations of stochastic biochemical reactions. Stochastic slowdown of reaction flux caused by molecular noise in living cells may have functional consequences, which the present theory may be used to quantify. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Noise Expands the Response Range of the Bacillus subtilis Competence Circuit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mugler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory circuits must contend with intrinsic noise that arises due to finite numbers of proteins. While some circuits act to reduce this noise, others appear to exploit it. A striking example is the competence circuit in Bacillus subtilis, which exhibits much larger noise in the duration of its competence events than a synthetically constructed analog that performs the same function. Here, using stochastic modeling and fluorescence microscopy, we show that this larger noise allows cells to exit terminal phenotypic states, which expands the range of stress levels to which cells are responsive and leads to phenotypic heterogeneity at the population level. This is an important example of how noise confers a functional benefit in a genetic decision-making circuit.

  19. Noise Expands the Response Range of the Bacillus subtilis Competence Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Andrew; Kittisopikul, Mark; Hayden, Luke; Liu, Jintao; Wiggins, Chris H; Süel, Gürol M; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2016-03-01

    Gene regulatory circuits must contend with intrinsic noise that arises due to finite numbers of proteins. While some circuits act to reduce this noise, others appear to exploit it. A striking example is the competence circuit in Bacillus subtilis, which exhibits much larger noise in the duration of its competence events than a synthetically constructed analog that performs the same function. Here, using stochastic modeling and fluorescence microscopy, we show that this larger noise allows cells to exit terminal phenotypic states, which expands the range of stress levels to which cells are responsive and leads to phenotypic heterogeneity at the population level. This is an important example of how noise confers a functional benefit in a genetic decision-making circuit.

  20. An Exploration of the Range of Noise Intensity That Affects the Membrane Potential of Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity in the human brain occurs in a complex physiologic environment, and noise from all aspects in this physiologic environment affects all aspects of nervous-system function. An essential issue of neural information processing is whether the environmental noise in a neural system can be estimated and quantified in a proper way. In this paper, we calculated the neural energy to estimate the range of critical values of thermal noise intensity that markedly affect the membrane potential and the energy waveform, in order to define such a noisy environment which neuronal activity relies on.

  1. Effects of repetition rate and impulsiveness of simulated helicopter rotor noise on annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Mccurdy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Annoyance judgements were obtained for computer generated stimuli simulative of helicopter impulsive rotor noise to investigate effects of repetition rate and impulsiveness. Each of the 82 different stimuli was judged at 3 sound pressure levels by 48 subjects. Impulse repetition rates covered a range from 10 Hz to 115 Hz; crest factors covered a range from 3.2 dB to 19.3 dB. Increases in annoyance with increases in repetition rate were found which were not predicted by common loudness or annoyance metrics and which were independent of noise level. The ability to predict effects of impulsiveness varied between the noise metrics and was found to be dependent on noise level. The ability to predict the effects of impulsiveness was not generally improved by any of several proposed impulsiveness corrections. Instead, the effects of impulsiveness were found to be systematically related to the frequency content of the stimuli. A modified frequency weighting was developed which offers improved annoyance prediction.

  2. High Dynamic Range RF Front End with Noise Cancellation and Linearization for WiMAX Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Wu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with verification of the high dynamic range for a heterodyne radio frequency (RF front end. A 2.6 GHz RF front end is designed and implemented in a hybrid microwave integrated circuit (HMIC for worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX receivers. The heterodyne RF front end consists of a low-noise amplifier (LNA with noise cancellation, an RF bandpass filter (BPF, a downconverter with linearization, and an intermediate frequency (IF BPF. A noise canceling technique used in the low-noise amplifier eliminates a thermal noise and then reduces the noise figure (NF of the RF front end by 0.9 dB. Use of a downconverter with diode linearizer also compensates for gain compression, which increases the input-referred third-order intercept point (IIP3 of the RF front end by 4.3 dB. The proposed method substantially increases the spurious-free dynamic range (DRf of the RF front end by 3.5 dB.

  3. A Range-Based Multivariate Model for Exchange Rate Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Tims (Ben); R.J. Mahieu (Ronald)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we present a parsimonious multivariate model for exchange rate volatilities based on logarithmic high-low ranges of daily exchange rates. The multivariate stochastic volatility model divides the log range of each exchange rate into two independent latent factors, which are

  4. Predicting Hourly Traflc Noise from Traflc Flow Rate Model: Underlying Concepts for the DYNAMAP Project

    OpenAIRE

    Smiraglia M.; Benocci R.; Zambon G.; Roman H.E.

    2016-01-01

    The DYNAMAP project aims at obtaining a dynamic noise map of a large residential area such as the City of Milan (Italy), by recording traffic noise from a limited number of noise sensors. To this end,we perform a statistical analysis of road stretches and group them into different clusters showing a similar measured hourly traffic noise behavior. In the sameway,we group simulated hourly traffic flow rates and compare their compositions with those of the traffic noise g...

  5. Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytometry Part A Special Section: Separating the signal from the noise: Expanding flow cytometry into the sub-micron range. The current Cytometry Part A Special Section presents three studies that utilize cytometers to study sub-micron particles. The three studies involve the 1...

  6. Gum chewing modulates heart rate variability under noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Noriko; Morita, Manabu

    2012-12-01

    Gum chewing may relieve stress, although this hypothesis has not been proven. Heart-rate variability (HRV) is commonly used to measure stress levels. However, it is not known if gum chewing modulates HRV under acute stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gum chewing on HRV under acute stress. A cross-over study involving 47 non-smoking healthy subjects, aged 22-27 years, was carried out. The subjects received a stress procedure with gum chewing (GS group) and without gum chewing (S group). Additionally, the other 20 subjects were allocated to the gum chewing without stress group (G group). The GS and S groups were exposed to noise for 5 min (75 dBA) as stress. Before and after stress exposure/gum chewing, participants completed the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and a single Stress Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measurement. HRV measurement was performed before and during stress/gum chewing for 5 min. After the stress procedure, VAS score significantly increased in the GS and S groups. During the stress procedure, the GS group showed a significantly lower level of high frequency (HF) and higher levels of low frequency (LF) and LF/HF than the S group. However, there were no significant differences in the scores of the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s) and VAS between the two stress groups. These findings suggest that gum chewing modulates HRV, but may not relieve acute stress caused by noise.

  7. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R; Diaz, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise in CR. The use of the

  8. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  9. Method for calculating self-noise spectra and operating ranges for seismographic inertial sensors and recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John R.; Followill, F.; Hutt, Charles R.; Kromer, R.P.; Nigbor, R.L.; Ringler, A.T.; Steim, J.M.; Wielandt, E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the performance of sensors and recorders is prerequisite to making appropriate use of them in seismology and earthquake engineering. This paper explores a critical aspect of instrument performance, the “self” noise level of the device and the amplitude range it can usefully record. Self noise limits the smallest signals, while instrument clipping level creates the upper limit (above which it either cannot produce signals or becomes unacceptably nonlinear). Where these levels fall, and the “operating range” between them, determines much of the instrument's viability and the applications for which it is appropriate. The representation of seismic-instrument self-noise levels and their effective operating ranges (cf., dynamic range) for seismological inertial sensors, recorders (data acquisition units, or DAUs), and integrated systems of sensors and recorders (data acquisition systems, or DASs) forces one to address an unnatural comparison between transient finite-bandwidth signals, such as earthquake records, and the instrument's self noise, an effectively stationary signal of infinite duration. In addition to being transient, earthquakes and other records of interest are characterized by a peak amplitude and generally a narrow, peaked spectral shape. Unfortunately, any power spectrum computed for such transient signals is ill defined, since the maximum of that spectrum depends strongly upon signal and record durations. In contrast, the noise floor of an instrument is approximately stationary and properly described by a power spectral density (PSD) or its root (rPSD). Put another way, earthquake records have units of amplitude (e.g., m/s2) while PSDs have units of amplitude-squared per hertz (e.g., (m/s2)2/Hz) and the rPSD has units of amplitude per root of hertz (e.g., (m/s2)/Hz1/2). Thus, this incompatability is a conflict between earthquake (amplitude) and PSD (spectral density) units that requires one to make various assumptions before they

  10. Ambient seismic noise interferometry in Hawai'i reveals long-range observability of volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer, Silke; Wolfe, Cecily; Okubo, Paul G.; Haney, Matt; Thurber, Clifford H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of seismic noise interferometry to retrieve Green's functions and the analysis of volcanic tremor are both useful in studying volcano dynamics. Whereas seismic noise interferometry allows long-range extraction of interpretable signals from a relatively weak noise wavefield, the characterization of volcanic tremor often requires a dense seismic array close to the source. We here show that standard processing of seismic noise interferometry yields volcanic tremor signals observable over large distances exceeding 50 km. Our study comprises 2.5 yr of data from the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory short period seismic network. Examining more than 700 station pairs, we find anomalous and temporally coherent signals that obscure the Green's functions. The time windows and frequency bands of these anomalous signals correspond well with the characteristics of previously studied volcanic tremor sources at Pu'u 'Ō'ō and Halema'uma'u craters. We use the derived noise cross-correlation functions to perform a grid-search for source location, confirming that these signals are surface waves originating from the known tremor sources. A grid-search with only distant stations verifies that useful tremor signals can indeed be recovered far from the source. Our results suggest that the specific data processing in seismic noise interferometry—typically used for Green's function retrieval—can aid in the study of both the wavefield and source location of volcanic tremor over large distances. In view of using the derived Green's functions to image heterogeneity and study temporal velocity changes at volcanic regions, however, our results illustrate how care should be taken when contamination by tremor may be present.

  11. Modeling the effects of distortion, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio on stereophotogrammetric range mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Deen, Robert G.; Huffman, William C.; Willson, Reginald G.

    2016-09-01

    Stereophotogrammetry typically employs a pair of cameras, or a single moving camera, to acquire pairs of images from different camera positions, in order to create a three dimensional `range map' of the area being observed. Applications of this technique for building three-dimensional shape models include aerial surveying, remote sensing, machine vision, and robotics. Factors that would be expected to affect the quality of the range maps include the projection function (distortion) of the lenses and the contrast (modulation) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquired image pairs. Basic models of the precision with which the range can be measured assume a pinhole-camera model of the geometry, i.e. that the lenses provide perspective projection with zero distortion. Very-wide-angle or `fisheye' lenses, however (for e.g. those used by robotic vehicles) typically exhibit projection functions that differ significantly from this assumption. To predict the stereophotogrammetric range precision for such applications, we extend the model to the case of an equidistant lens projection function suitable for a very-wide-angle lens. To predict the effects of contrast and SNR on range precision, we perform numerical simulations using stereo image pairs acquired by a stereo camera pair on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Contrast is degraded and noise is added to these data in a controlled fashion and the effects on the quality of the resulting range maps are assessed.

  12. Autonomic imbalance induced breakdown of long-range dependence in healthy heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, N; Struzik, Z R; Kiyono, K; Yamamoto, Y

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of the relation between the long-range correlation property of heart rate and autonomic balance. An investigation of the fractal scaling properties of heart rate variability was carried out by using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Eleven healthy subjects were examined for two consecutive days, which included usual daily activity, strenuous prolonged experimental exercise, and sleep. We also considered two patient groups with autonomic dysfunction characterized by selective sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance. Robust long-range dependence in heart rate is observed only in the state of usual daily activity, characterized by normal heart rate typical of balanced autonomic sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation. This confirms the previously postulated behavioral independence of heart rate regulation, but reveals that the occurrence of 1/f, long-range dependence is restricted to only the state of autonomic balance. Both the sympathetic dominant high heart rate state, realized during strenuous experimental exercise, and the parasympathetic dominant low heart rate state, prevalent in (deep) sleep, are characterized by uncorrelated, near white-noise-like scaling, lacking long-range dependence. Remarkably, the breakdown of the long-range correlations observed in healthy heart rate in the states of sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance is in stark contrast to the increased correlations which have previously been observed in neurogenic parasympathetic and sympathetic dominance in patients suffering from primary autonomic failure and congestive heart failure, respectively. Our findings further reveal the diagnostic capabilities of heart rate dynamics, by differentiating physiological healthy states from pathology.

  13. Parallel Track Initiation for Optical Space Surveillance Using Range and Range Rate Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, P.; Roscoe, C.; Wilkins, M.

    2013-09-01

    As new optical sensors come online and more optical observations become available for space objects previously too small or too far away to detect, the space surveillance community is presented with the computationally challenging problem of generating initial orbit solutions (data association hypotheses) for a large number of short-arc line-of-sight observations. Traditional methods of angles-only orbit determination do not scale well to large problems because of the large number of combinations of observations that must be evaluated, since these methods require at least 3 observations for each initial orbit determination (IOD). On the other hand, if unique ranges are known (or assumed) then IOD can be performed with 2 observations using a Lambert-based approach. Furthermore, if angles and angle rates are available and range and range rate are both known (or assumed) then a complete orbit solution can be obtained for a single observation and the IOD computational load is only O(N). One possible method to deal with line-of-sight data is to assign a number of range hypotheses to each angles-only observation and develop data association hypotheses to be either confirmed or eliminated for each one. This approach would allow the use of the already proven Search and Determine (SAD) algorithm and software that was designed for generating and testing data association hypotheses for position-type observations typical of radar sensors. If the number of range hypotheses can be limited then this method will be more computationally efficient than performing pure angles-only IOD. If angle rates are available or can be derived from the observation data then another possible approach is to assign range and range rate hypotheses to each angle-angle rate pair and develop data association hypotheses based on their corresponding orbit solutions, which will be extremely efficient if the range-range rate hypothesis set can be limited. For both of these methods, once range and range

  14. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  15. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  16. Brown meagre vocalization rate increases during repetitive boat noise exposures: a possible case of vocal compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciulin, Marta; Sebastianutto, Linda; Codarin, Antonio; Calcagno, Giuliana; Ferrero, Enrico A

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated whether or not boat noise causes variations in brown meagre (Sciaena umbra) vocalizations recorded in a nearshore Mediterranean marine reserve. Six nocturnal experimental sessions were carried out from June to September 2009. In each of them, a recreational boat passed over vocalizing fish 6 times with 1 boat passage every 10 min. For this purpose three different boats were used in random order: an 8.5-m cabin-cruiser (CC), a 5-m fiberglass boat (FB), and a 7-m inflatable boat (INF). In situ continuous acoustic recordings were collected using a self-standing sonobuoy. Because boat noise levels largely exceeded both background noise and S. umbra vocalizations in the species' hearing frequency range, masking of acoustic communication was assumed. Although no immediate effect was observed during a single boat passage, the S. umbra mean pulse rate increased over multiple boat passages in the experimental condition but not in the control condition, excluding that the observed effect was due to a natural rise in fish vocalizations. The observed vocal enhancement may result either from an increased density of callers or from an increased number of pulses/sounds produced by already acoustically active individuals, as a form of vocal compensation. These two explanations are discussed.

  17. On the effect of topography on surface wave propagation in the ambient noise frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of analyzing empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-period surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 s). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to significantly affect recovered velocity variations in the ambient noise frequency range.

  18. Improving detection range, signal-to-noise ratio, and measurement time through hyperentanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James F.

    2017-07-01

    An atmospheric imaging system based on quantum hyperentanglement has been developed. Hyper-entanglement can increase the maximum detection range of the system by more than a factor of 10, improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by more than a factor of 10,000, and decrease measurement time. Hyperentanglement refers to entanglement in more than one degree of freedom. A design for creating states hyperentangled in the degrees of freedom polarization, energy-time, orbital angular momentum (OAM), and the radial quantum number is examined. The design helps reduce propagation loss. Figures of merit related to generation and detection efficiencies, the SNR, signal to interference ratio, the measurement time, and phase estimation are provided in closed form. A formula describing how hyperentanglement greatly improves the maximum detection range of the system is derived. Hermite-Gaussian modes, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes, OAM dependence of the LG modes, and mode conversion are discussed. Bell state generation and Bell state measurement, i.e., the ability to distinguish the various Bell states, is discussed. Mathematical and circuit representations of Bell state generation and the Bell state analyzer are provided. Signatures for unique detection of the various Bell states are developed. The formalism permits random noise and entangled or nonentangled sources of interference to be modeled.

  19. Noise and False Alarm Rate Characteristics for Envelope Detector Systems Preceded by RF Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    ratio. The normalized True RMS Spectrum Voltmeter Analyzer Model # Model # HP 3403C HP 3585A Adjustable ,, I Comparator Micronetics [ Filter Noise...range of FARs measured. Figure 20 shows the detector video amplifier chain designed by Richard S. Hughes of NWC to replace the Micronetics noise sotuce

  20. Noise in attractor networks in the brain produced by graded firing rate representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan J Webb

    Full Text Available Representations in the cortex are often distributed with graded firing rates in the neuronal populations. The firing rate probability distribution of each neuron to a set of stimuli is often exponential or gamma. In processes in the brain, such as decision-making, that are influenced by the noise produced by the close to random spike timings of each neuron for a given mean rate, the noise with this graded type of representation may be larger than with the binary firing rate distribution that is usually investigated. In integrate-and-fire simulations of an attractor decision-making network, we show that the noise is indeed greater for a given sparseness of the representation for graded, exponential, than for binary firing rate distributions. The greater noise was measured by faster escaping times from the spontaneous firing rate state when the decision cues are applied, and this corresponds to faster decision or reaction times. The greater noise was also evident as less stability of the spontaneous firing state before the decision cues are applied. The implication is that spiking-related noise will continue to be a factor that influences processes such as decision-making, signal detection, short-term memory, and memory recall even with the quite large networks found in the cerebral cortex. In these networks there are several thousand recurrent collateral synapses onto each neuron. The greater noise with graded firing rate distributions has the advantage that it can increase the speed of operation of cortical circuitry.

  1. Evoked response of heart rate variability using short-duration white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guo-She; Chen, Mei-Ling; Wang, Gin-You

    2010-06-24

    To investigate and to establish a model for evaluation of the instant cardiovascular responses to the noises of low-to-moderate intensity, sixteen healthy subjects were enrolled. The white noises were binaurally presented with a supra-aural earphone. The test intensities of noises were no noise, 50, 60, 70 and 80 dBA. Each noise was continued for 5 min and the electrocardiogram was simultaneously recorded. The cardiac autonomic responses were evaluated using power spectral analysis of the R-R contour obtained from digital signal processing of the ECG tracings. The result showed that the mean heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change significantly with the noises. However, the low-frequency power (LF) which represents cardiac autonomic modulations and the ratio (LHR) of LF to high-frequency power (HF) which reflects cardiac sympathetic modulations were significantly greater in the noise intensity of 50, 60, 70 and 80dBA (pnoise intensity (rho=0.90, pwhite noises can be detected using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and the evoked responses may provide a sensitive way to evaluate the instant effect of noise to humans.

  2. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Katrina N; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-19

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people's livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman's ρ 0.46, p noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage.

  3. Oracle posterior rates in the White Noise Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, A.

    2010-01-01

    All the results about posterior rates obtained until now are related to the optimal (minimax) rates for the estimation problem over the corresponding nonparametric smoothness classes, i.e. of a global nature. In the meantime, a new local approach to optimality has been developed within the

  4. Acoustic noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging reduces pain unpleasantness ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Y; Bentley, D E; Watson, A; Jones, A K P

    2006-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is increasingly used in cognitive studies. Unfortunately, the scanner produces acoustic noise during the image acquisition process. Interference from acoustic noise is known to affect auditory, visual and motor processing, raising the possibility that acoustic interference may also modulate processing of other sensory modalities such as pain. With the increasing use of fMRI in the investigation of the mechanisms of pain perception, particularly in relation to attention, this issue has become highly relevant. Pain is a complex experience, composed of sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational and cognitive-evaluative components. The aim of this experiment was to assess the effect of MRI scanner noise, compared to white noise, on the affective (unpleasantness) and the sensory-discriminative (localisation) components of pain. Painful radiant heat from a CO(2) laser was delivered to the skin of the right forearm in 24 healthy volunteers. The volunteers attended to either pain location or pain unpleasantness during three conditions: i) no noise, ii) exposure to MRI scanner noise (85 dB) or iii) exposure to white noise (85 dB). Both MRI scanner noise and white noise significantly reduced unpleasantness ratings (from 5.1 +/- 1.6 in the control condition to 4.7 +/- 1.5 (P = 0.002) and 4.6 +/- 1.6 (P white noise respectively), whereas the ability to localise pain was not significantly affected (from 85.4 +/- 9.2% correct in the control condition to 83.1 +/- 10.3% (P = 0.06) and 83.9 +/- 9.5% (P = 0.27) with MRI scanner and white noise respectively). This phenomenon should be taken into account in the design of fMRI studies into human pain perception.

  5. Minimum Symbol Error Rate Detection in Single-Input Multiple-Output Channels with Markov Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Minimum symbol error rate detection in Single-Input Multiple- Output(SIMO) channels with Markov noise is presented. The special case of zero-mean Gauss-Markov noise is examined closer as it only requires knowledge of the second-order moments. In this special case, it is shown that optimal detection...... can be achieved by a Multiple-Input Multiple- Output(MIMO) whitening filter followed by a traditional BCJR algorithm. The Gauss-Markov noise model provides a reasonable approximation for co-channel interference, making it an interesting single-user detector for many multiuser communication systems...

  6. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, E D

    1975-10-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model.

  7. The effects of occupational noise on blood pressure and heart rate of workers in an automotive parts industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantary, Saba; Dehghani, Ali; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Omidi, Leila; Rahimzadeh, Mitra

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important impacts of industrial noise is physiological and psychological effects. The increases in workers' blood pressure and heart rate were detected during and after exposure to high levels of noise. The objectives of this research were to determine whether the noise exposures have any effects on blood pressure and heart rate of workers in the automotive parts industry. This case study was done in 2011 at different units of an automotive parts manufacturing in Tehran. Sound pressure level was measured at different units of the factory with a calibrated instrument. Demographic features of workers were gathered with an appropriate questionnaire. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured twice in a day in the start time of work day (before exposure to noise) and middle shift hours (during exposure to noise) in the occupational physician office. For analyzing data, chi-square, independent sample t-test, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used. P < 0.050 was considered statistically significant. The average age of workers in the case and control groups was 35.71 ± 8.10 and 33.40 ± 10.41 years, respectively. There was no difference between the average age of case and control groups (P = 0.436). The results of ANCOVA revealed the significant differences between the mean changes of heart rate F (1, 37) = 26.68, P < 0.001, systolic blood pressure F (1, 37) = 21.70, P < 0.001, and diastolic blood pressure F (1, 37) = 26.20, P < 0.001 of workers in the case and control groups. Exposure to industrial noise may increase the heart rate of workers. Although rises in heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure of workers in the case group were observed after exposure to noise, the values of heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure were in the normal range. Further experimental investigations are needed to determine the relationships between these variables.

  8. A fully integrated CMOS VCXO-IC with low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun, Yang; Yun, Zeng

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity CMOS voltage controlled crystal oscillator IC (VCXO-IC) with LVCMOS and LVPECL output. A differential coupled frequency doubling Colpitts oscillator is adopted to obtain low noise 2× frequency output. Wide tuning range and high linearity are simultaneously achieved by using MOS varactor arrays. The measurement results show that the designed VCXO-IC achieves -134 dBc/Hz phase noise at 1 kHz offset frequency and ± 135 ppm output frequency tuning range within 3% linearity by using 40 MHz fundamental AT-cut crystal. The VCXO-IC is fabricated in the chartered 0.35 μm standard CMOS process and occupies a total silicon area of 2.4 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61350007).

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of gas models of Lennard-Jones type interactions: Extensivity associated with interaction range and external noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadijani, M. Nouri; Abbasi, H.; Nezamipour, S.

    2017-06-01

    Statistics of a two-dimensional gas model interacting through a Lennard-Jones type potential, is considered. The goal is to examine the extensivity of internal energy in respect to the potential range and external white noise through molecular dynamics simulation. Accordingly a molecular dynamics simulation model is designed that provides reasonable evidence, in this respect. It is shown that for the long range potential the internal energy scales according to non-extensive thermodynamics expectation and the criteria is specified. Besides, for the short range case we demonstrate that the external noise drastically modifies the statistics of gas and makes the internal energy non-extensive. The relation between the non-extensive parameter, q, and the relaxation time and the noise intensity is obtained.

  10. Effects of correlated Gaussian noise on the mean firing rate and correlations of an electrically coupled neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Perc, Matjaz; Lu, Qishao; Kurths, Jürgen

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effects of correlated Gaussian noise on a two-dimensional neuronal network that is locally modeled by the Rulkov map. More precisely, we study the effects of the noise correlation on the variations of the mean firing rate and the correlations among neurons versus the noise intensity. Via numerical simulations, we show that the mean firing rate can always be optimized at an intermediate noise intensity, irrespective of the noise correlation. On the other hand, variations of the population coherence with respect to the noise intensity are strongly influenced by the ratio between local and global Gaussian noisy inputs. Biological implications of our findings are also discussed.

  11. Speech Perception in Noise Deficits in Japanese Children with Reading Difficulties: Effects of Presentation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomohiro; Higashibara, Fumiko; Okazaki, Shinji; Maekawa, Hisao

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effects of presentation rate on speech perception in noise and its relation to reading in 117 typically developing (TD) children and 10 children with reading difficulties (RD) in Japan. Responses in a speech perception task were measured for speed, accuracy, and stability in two conditions that varied stimulus presentation rate:…

  12. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina N. Burns

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic waste (e-waste is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people’s livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA and community (70 dBA noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman’s ρ 0.46, p < 0.001. A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01 even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage.

  13. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Katrina N.; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people’s livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman’s ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  14. On a long range particle system with unbounded flip rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meester, R.; Quant, C.

    2000-01-01

    We consider an interacting particle system on f0; 1g Z with non-local, unbounded ip rates. Zeroes ip to one at a rate that depends on the number of ones to the right until we see a zero (the ip rate equals times one plus this number). The ip rate of the ones equals . We give motivation for models

  15. Long Range Sound Propagation over Sea: Application to Wind Turbine Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boue, Matieu

    2007-12-13

    The classical theory of spherical wave propagation is not valid at large distances from a sound source due to the influence of wind and temperature gradients that refract, i.e., bend the sound waves. This will in the downwind direction lead to a cylindrical type of wave spreading for large distances (> 1 km). Cylindrical spreading will give a smaller damping with distance as compared to spherical spreading (3 dB/distance doubling instead of 6 dB). But over areas with soft ground, i.e., grass land, the effect of ground reflections will increase the damping so that, if the effect of atmospheric damping is removed, a behavior close to a free field spherical spreading often is observed. This is the standard assumption used in most national recommendations for predicting outdoor sound propagation, e.g., noise from wind turbines. Over areas with hard surfaces, e.g., desserts or the sea, the effect of ground damping is small and therefore cylindrical propagation could be expected in the downwind direction. This observation backed by a limited number of measurements is the background for the Swedish recommendation, which suggests that cylindrical wave spreading should be assumed for distances larger than 200 m for sea based wind turbines. The purpose of this work was to develop measurement procedures for long range sound transmission and to apply this to investigate the occurrence of cylindrical wave spreading in the Baltic Sea. This work has been successfully finished and is described in this report. Another ambition was to develop models for long range sound transmission based on the parabolic equation. Here the work is not finished but must be continued in another project. Long term measurements were performed in the Kalmar strait, Sweden, located between the mainland and Oeland, during 2005 and 2006. Two different directive sound sources placed on a lighthouse in the middle of the strait produced low frequency tones at 80, 200 and 400 Hz. At the reception point on

  16. Noise Isolation Capability for a Range of Construction Materials Used In Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kossay K. Al-Ahmady

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the ability of noise isolation for some type of concrete block used in Iraq. These materials are divided into groups and the noise isolation of these materials is tested by a device made locally. The results of these materials are compared and the following conclusions are reached: the sound isolation increases generally with the increase of the frequency, the increase is not linear but vibrated and a relative decrease in the sound insolation is noticed for the frequencies from 2000 Hz to 4000 Hz. The sound isolation increases with the increase of density of the material and vice versa. The sound isolation increases with the increase of the thickness if the density is stable. The sound isolation increases with the increase of the thickness of gap between two layers of a material and the highest value of the loss of sound transition corresponds a highest value of reducing of noise level. The lowest value of the noise reduction index corresponds to the lowest value of reducing of noise level. The most effective materials in reducing noise of the materials tested in this research are the solid concrete block to which a layer of Sandwich panel is added. The error percentage was less than 10%, particularly at the frequencies less than 1000 Hz. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.25130/tjes.24.2017.21

  17. Recursive Estimation for Dynamical Systems with Different Delay Rates Sensor Network and Autocorrelated Process Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recursive estimation problem is studied for a class of uncertain dynamical systems with different delay rates sensor network and autocorrelated process noises. The process noises are assumed to be autocorrelated across time and the autocorrelation property is described by the covariances between different time instants. The system model under consideration is subject to multiplicative noises or stochastic uncertainties. The sensor delay phenomenon occurs in a random way and each sensor in the sensor network has an individual delay rate which is characterized by a binary switching sequence obeying a conditional probability distribution. By using the orthogonal projection theorem and an innovation analysis approach, the desired recursive robust estimators including recursive robust filter, predictor, and smoother are obtained. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  18. Associations of traffic noise with self-rated health and psychotropic medication use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jaana I; Lanki, Timo; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Turunen, Anu W; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    Road traffic noise is a common environmental nuisance, which has been thought to increase the risk of many types of health problems. However, population-level evidence often remains scarce. This study examined whether road traffic noise is associated with self-rated health and use of psychotropic medication in a cohort of public sector employees. Data are from the Finnish Public Sector Study cohort. Geographical information system (GIS) was used to link modeled outdoor road traffic noise levels (L den) to residential addresses of 15 611 men and women with cross-sectional survey responses on self-rated health and register-based information on the use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. High trait anxiety scores were used to identify potentially vulnerable individuals. The analyses were run with logistic regression models adjusting for individual and area-level variables. All participants were blind to the aim of the study. Mean level of road traffic noise at participants' home addresses was 52 decibels (dB) (standard deviation 8.1). Noise level >60 dB versus ≤45 dB was associated with poor self-rated health in men [odds ratio (OR) 1.58, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.14-2.21]. Further stratification revealed that the association was evident only among men with high trait anxiety scores (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.28-3.89). No association was found with psychotropic medication use or among women. Exposure to road traffic noise was not associated with increased use of psychotropic medication, although it was associated with weakened self-rated health among men.

  19. Delta: a charge sensitive front-end amplifier with switched gain for low noise, large dynamic range silicon detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, P; Bloch, P; Jarron, P; Löfstedt, B; Reynaud, S; Tabbers, P

    2001-01-01

    The design and results of a radiation hard switched gain charge amplifier optimised for a large dynamic range and large input capacitance are described. The peaking time is 25 ns, dynamic ranges are 0.1 - 50 minimum ionizing particles (MIPs) (high gain) and 1 - 400 MIPs (low gain), signal to noise (S/N) > 10 for Cin < 56pF and radiation tolerance to10 Mrads(Si) and 4x10**13 n/cm**2.

  20. Active random noise control using adaptive learning rate neural networks with an immune feedback law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kuribayashi, Takumi; Ito, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    In this paper an active random noise control using adaptive learning rate neural networks with an immune feedback law is presented. The adaptive learning rate strategy increases the learning rate by a small constant if the current partial derivative of the objective function with respect to the weight and the exponential average of the previous derivatives have the same sign, otherwise the learning rate is decreased by a proportion of its value. The use of an adaptive learning rate attempts to keep the learning step size as large as possible without leading to oscillation. In the proposed method, because of the immune feedback law change a learning rate of the neural networks individually and adaptively, it is expected that a cost function minimize rapidly and training time is decreased. Numerical simulations and experiments of active random noise control with the transfer function of the error path will be performed, to validate the convergence properties of the adaptive learning rate Neural Networks with the immune feedback law. Control results show that adaptive learning rate Neural Networks control structure can outperform linear controllers and conventional neural network controller for the active random noise control.

  1. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  2. Combined influence of CT random noise and HU-RSP calibration curve nonlinearities on proton range systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousmiche, S.; Souris, K.; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J. A.; Macq, B.; Seco, J.

    2017-11-01

    Proton range random and systematic uncertainties are the major factors undermining the advantages of proton therapy, namely, a sharp dose falloff and a better dose conformality for lower doses in normal tissues. The influence of CT artifacts such as beam hardening or scatter can easily be understood and estimated due to their large-scale effects on the CT image, like cupping and streaks. In comparison, the effects of weakly-correlated stochastic noise are more insidious and less attention is drawn on them partly due to the common belief that they only contribute to proton range uncertainties and not to systematic errors thanks to some averaging effects. A new source of systematic errors on the range and relative stopping powers (RSP) has been highlighted and proved not to be negligible compared to the 3.5% uncertainty reference value used for safety margin design. Hence, we demonstrate that the angular points in the HU-to-RSP calibration curve are an intrinsic source of proton range systematic error for typical levels of zero-mean stochastic CT noise. Systematic errors on RSP of up to 1% have been computed for these levels. We also show that the range uncertainty does not generally vary linearly with the noise standard deviation. We define a noise-dependent effective calibration curve that better describes, for a given material, the RSP value that is actually used. The statistics of the RSP and the range continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) have been analytically derived for the general case of a calibration curve obtained by the stoichiometric calibration procedure. These models have been validated against actual CSDA simulations for homogeneous and heterogeneous synthetical objects as well as on actual patient CTs for prostate and head-and-neck treatment planning situations.

  3. A range-rate extraction unit for determining Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Active ranging technique devised for VHF or S-band radar systems divides target Doppler frequency by counter-generated number that is proportional to transmitting frequency, thus producing target velocity data in terms of speed and distance relative to target transponder.

  4. Analytic expressions for rate and CV of a type I neuron driven by white gaussian noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Benjamin; Longtin, André; Bulsara, Adi

    2003-08-01

    We study the one-dimensional normal form of a saddle-node system under the influence of additive gaussian white noise and a static "bias current" input parameter, a model that can be looked upon as the simplest version of a type I neuron with stochastic input. This is in contrast with the numerous studies devoted to the noise-driven leaky integrate-and-fire neuron. We focus on the firing rate and coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike interval density, for which scaling relations with respect to the input parameter and noise intensity are derived. Quadrature formulas for rate and CV are numerically evaluated and compared to numerical simulations of the system and to various approximation formulas obtained in different limiting cases of the model. We also show that caution must be used to extend these results to the Theta neuron model with multiplicative gaussian white noise. The correspondence between the first passage time statistics for the saddle-node model and the Theta neuron model is obtained only in the Stratonovich interpretation of the stochastic Theta neuron model, while previous results have focused only on the Ito interpretation. The correct Stratonovich interpretation yields CVs that are still relatively high, although smaller than in the Ito interpretation; it also produces certain qualitative differences, especially at larger noise intensities. Our analysis provides useful relations for assessing the distance to threshold and the level of synaptic noise in real type I neurons from their firing statistics. We also briefly discuss the effect of finite boundaries (finite values of threshold and reset) on the firing statistics.

  5. Noise suppression and long-range exchange coupling for gallium arsenide spin qubits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Filip

    of the qubit splitting with respect to gate voltages. We show that for singlet-triplet and resonant exchange qubit this can be achieved by operating a quantum dot array in a highly symmetric configuration. The symmetrization approach results in a factor-of-six improvement of the double dot singlet......-triplet exchange oscillations quality factor while the dephasing times for the threeelectron resonant exchange qubit are marginally longer. Second, we present the study of the Overhauser field noise arising due to interaction with the nuclear spin bath. We show that the Overhauser field noise conforms to classical...... dot in nine different charge occupancies and identify ground state spin in all cases. For even-occupied spin-1/2 multielectron quantum dot a variation of the gate voltage by a few milivolts in the vicinity of the charge transition leads to sign change of the exchange interaction with a single...

  6. Crystallized Rates Region of the Interference Channel via Correlated Equilibrium with Interference as Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Charafeddine, Mohamad; Paulraj, Arogyaswami; Cioffi, John

    2010-01-01

    Treating the interference as noise in the n-user interference channel, the paper describes a novel approach to the rates region, composed by the time-sharing convex hull of 2^n-1 corner points achieved through On/Off binary power control. The resulting rates region is denoted crystallized rates region. By treating the interference as noise, the n-user rates region frontiers has been found in the literature to be the convex hull of n hyper-surfaces. The rates region bounded by these hyper-surfaces is not necessarily convex, and thereby a convex hull operation is imposed through the strategy of time-sharing. This paper simplifies this rates region in the n-dimensional space by having only an On/Off binary power control. This consequently leads to 2^n-1 corner points situated within the rates region. A time-sharing convex hull is imposed onto those corner points, forming the crystallized rates region. The paper focuses on game theoretic concepts to achieve that crystallized convex hull via correlated equilibrium...

  7. Signal to Noise Ratio Maximization in Quiet Zone Acquisitions for Range Assessment at Sub-millimeter Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Muñoz-Acevedo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a quiet zone probing approach which deals with low dynamic range quiet zone acquisitions. Lack of dynamic range is a feature of millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength technologies. It is consequence of the gradually smaller power generated by the instrumentation, that follows a f^α law with frequency, being α≥1 variable depending on the signal source’s technology. The proposed approach is based on an optimal data reduction scenario which redounds in a maximum signal to noise ratio increase for the signal pattern, with minimum information losses. After theoretical formulation, practical applications of the technique are proposed.

  8. The Association between Noise, Cortisol and Heart Rate in a Small-Scale Gold Mining Community—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Green

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed a cross-sectional pilot study on salivary cortisol, heart rate, and personal noise exposures in a small-scale gold mining village in northeastern Ghana in 2013. Cortisol level changes between morning and evening among participants showed a relatively low decline in cortisol through the day (−1.44 ± 4.27 nmol/L, n = 18, a pattern consistent with chronic stress. A multiple linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, and time between samples indicated a significant increase of 0.25 nmol/L cortisol from afternoon to evening per 1 dBA increase in equivalent continuous noise exposure (Leq over that period (95% CI: 0.08–0.42, Adj R2 = 0.502, n = 17. A mixed effect linear regression model adjusting for age and sex indicated a significant increase of 0.29 heart beats per minute (BPM for every 1 dB increase in Leq. Using standard deviations (SDs as measures of variation, and adjusting for age and sex over the sampling period, we found that a 1 dBA increase in noise variation over time (Leq SD was associated with a 0.5 BPM increase in heart rate SD (95% CI: 0.04–−0.9, Adj. R2 = 0.229, n = 16. Noise levels were consistently high, with 24-hour average Leq exposures ranging from 56.9 to 92.0 dBA, with a mean daily Leq of 82.2 ± 7.3 dBA (mean monitoring duration 22.1 ± 1.9 hours, n = 22. Ninety-five percent of participants had 24-hour average Leq noise levels over the 70 dBA World health Organization (WHO guideline level for prevention of hearing loss. These findings suggest that small-scale mining communities may face multiple, potentially additive health risks that are not yet well documented, including hearing loss and cardiovascular effects of stress and noise.

  9. Noise Reduction of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Direct Modeling for an Angular Rate Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xue

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach for processing the outputs signal of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS gyroscopes was presented to reduce the bias drift and noise. The principle for the noise reduction was presented, and an optimal Kalman filter (KF was designed by a steady-state filter gain obtained from the analysis of KF observability. In particular, the true angular rate signal was directly modeled to obtain an optimal estimate and make a self-compensation for the gyroscope without needing other sensor’s information, whether in static or dynamic condition. A linear fit equation that describes the relationship between the KF bandwidth and modeling parameter of true angular rate was derived from the analysis of KF frequency response. The test results indicated that the MEMS gyroscope having an ARW noise of 4.87°/h0.5 and a bias instability of 44.41°/h were reduced to 0.4°/h0.5 and 4.13°/h by the KF under a given bandwidth (10 Hz, respectively. The 1σ estimated error was reduced from 1.9°/s to 0.14°/s and 1.7°/s to 0.5°/s in the constant rate test and swing rate test, respectively. It also showed that the filtered angular rate signal could well reflect the dynamic characteristic of the input rate signal in dynamic conditions. The presented algorithm is proved to be effective at improving the measurement precision of the MEMS gyroscope.

  10. Shuttle bit rate synchronizer. [signal to noise ratios and error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, D. C.; Fultz, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A shuttle bit rate synchronizer brassboard unit was designed, fabricated, and tested, which meets or exceeds the contractual specifications. The bit rate synchronizer operates at signal-to-noise ratios (in a bit rate bandwidth) down to -5 dB while exhibiting less than 0.6 dB bit error rate degradation. The mean acquisition time was measured to be less than 2 seconds. The synchronizer is designed around a digital data transition tracking loop whose phase and data detectors are integrate-and-dump filters matched to the Manchester encoded bits specified. It meets the reliability (no adjustments or tweaking) and versatility (multiple bit rates) of the shuttle S-band communication system through an implementation which is all digital after the initial stage of analog AGC and A/D conversion.

  11. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  12. Seamless data-range change using punctured convolutional codes for time-varying signal-to-noise ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Y.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise ration (SNR) environment, symbol rate is often changed to maximize data return. However, the symbol-rate change has some undesirable effects, such as changing the transmission bandwidth and perhaps causing the receiver symbol loop to lose lock temporarily, thus losing some data. In this article, we are proposing an alternate way of varying the data rate without changing the symbol rate and, therefore, the transmission bandwidth. The data rate change is achieved in a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream to adapt to the changing SNR environment. We have also derived an exact expression to enumerate the number of distinct puncturing patterns. To demonstrate this seamless rate change capability, we searched for good puncturing patterns for the Galileo (14,1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the punctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997. We show that this scheme reduces the symbol-rate changes from nine to two and provides a comparable data return in a day and a higher symbol SNR during most of the day.

  13. Forecasting Volatility with the Realized Range in the Presence of Noise and Non-Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Bannouh (Karim); M.P.E. Martens (Martin); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce a heuristic bias-adjustment for the transaction price-based realized range estimator of daily volatility in the presence of bid-ask bounce and non-trading. The adjustment is an extension of the estimator proposed in Christensen et al. (2009). We relax the assumption that all

  14. Sensitivity to perturbations in vivo implies high noise and suggests rate coding in cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Michael; Roth, Arnd; Beeren, Lisa; Häusser, Michael; Latham, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that neural activity exhibits variability, in the sense that identical sensory stimuli produce different responses, but it has been difficult to determine what this variability means. Is it noise, or does it carry important information – about, for example, the internal state of the organism? We address this issue from the bottom up, by asking whether small perturbations to activity in cortical networks are amplified. Based on in vivo whole-cell recordings in rat barrel cortex, we find that a perturbation consisting of a single extra spike in one neuron produces ~28 additional spikes in its postsynaptic targets, and we show, using simultaneous intra- and extra-cellular recordings, that a single spike produces a detectable increase in firing rate in the local network. Theoretical analysis indicates that this amplification leads to intrinsic, stimulus-independent variations in membrane potential on the order of ±2.2 - 4.5 mV – variations that are pure noise, and so carry no information at all. Therefore, for the brain to perform reliable computations, it must either use a rate code, or generate very large, fast depolarizing events, such as those proposed by the theory of synfire chains – yet in our in vivo recordings, we found that such events were very rare. Our findings are consistent with the idea that cortex is likely to use primarily a rate code. PMID:20596024

  15. Rock noise accompanying mining: a comparison of release rates of seismic wave and strain energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Y.; Ishijima, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To get a better understanding of the rock noise that accompanies mining, estimates have been made of the rates of release of seismic wave energy and strain energy. The seismic wave energy was estimated using the empirical equations of Muramatsu and of Gutenberg and Richter. For the estimation of the strain energy release rate, a three-dimensional displacement offsetting technique was applied to a numerical model. It has been found that, although the release rates associated with the two types of energy behave analogously, the absolute values obtained differ by several orders of magnitude. This result is thought to be due to the efficiency involved in seismic waves, and to the method used for calculating the strain energy. 3 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  16. Study of performance of acoustic fixture for using in noise reduction rate tests of hearing protection devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zam Biabani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:One of the recommended methods for evaluation effectiveness of hearing protection is use the acoustic fixture accordance with standard ISO 4869-3. The aim of this study was evaluate the acoustic performance of fixture for using in noise reduction rate tests of hearing protection devices in the laboratory. Methods: In this cross-sectional study , noise reduction rates of five common ear muffs used in the Iran industries were investigated based on the ISO 11904 standard, microphone in real ear method, using noise dosimeter (SVANTEK , Model SV102 equipped with microphone SV25 model which can install inside the ear on 30 subjects under laboratory conditions. Also, noise reduction rate of earmuffs was determined using the fixture model AVASINA9402 accordance with standard procedures. Data were analyzed using the software SPSS21. Results: The results showed the real noise reduction rates of the earmuffs on the studied subjects are from 59% to 94% nominal reduction rates. That rates for the ear muffs on the studied fixture are from 64% to 92.The results showed that the noise reduction rates of the ear muffs on subjects compared with and noise reduction rates of the ear muffs on fixture were not statistically significant (p> 0.05. Conclusion: The results showed the accuracy of noise reduction rate of earmuffs using the fixture compared with real subjects is acceptable. Hence, the fixture is good choice for environments where there’s no possibility of acoustic evaluation on real subjects, also for quality control of productions in the earmuff manufacturers.

  17. Configurable Electronics with Low Noise and 14-bit Dynamic Range for Photodiode-based Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H; Yin, Z; Zhou, D; Cao, X; Li, Q; Liu, Y; Zou, F; Skaali, B; Awes, T C

    2006-01-01

    We describe the principles and measured performance characteristics of custom configurable 32-channel shaper/digitizer Front End Electronics (FEE) cards with 14-bit dynamic range for use with gain-adjustable photon detectors. The electronics has been designed for the PHOS calorimeter of ALICE with avalanche photodiode (APD) readout operated at -25 C ambient temperature and a signal shaping time of $1 {\\mu}s$. The electronics has also been adopted by the EMCal detector of ALICE with the same APD readout, but operated at an ambient temperature of +20 C and with a shaping time of 100ns. The CR-RC2 signal shapers on the FEE cards are implemented in discrete logic on a 10-layer board with two shaper sections for each input channel. The two shaper sections with gain ratio of 16:1 are digitized by 10-bit ADCs and provide an effective dynamic range of 14 bits. Gain adjustment for each individual APD is available through 32 bias voltage control registers of 10-bit range. The fixed gains and shaping times of the pole-z...

  18. Multipath error in range rate measurement by PLL-transponder/GRARR/TDRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, S. J.

    1970-01-01

    Range rate errors due to specular and diffuse multipath are calculated for a tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) using an S band Goddard range and range rate (GRARR) system modified with a phase-locked loop transponder. Carrier signal processing in the coherent turn-around transponder and the GRARR reciever is taken into account. The root-mean-square (rms) range rate error was computed for the GRARR Doppler extractor and N-cycle count range rate measurement. Curves of worst-case range rate error are presented as a function of grazing angle at the reflection point. At very low grazing angles specular scattering predominates over diffuse scattering as expected, whereas for grazing angles greater than approximately 15 deg, the diffuse multipath predominates. The range rate errors at different low orbit altutudes peaked between 5 and 10 deg grazing angles.

  19. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  20. Training in using earplugs or using earplugs with a higher than necessary noise reduction rating? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani Nodoushan, M; Mehrparvar, A H; Torab Jahromi, M; Safaei, S; Mollasadeghi, A

    2014-10-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most common occupational diseases and the second most common cause of workers' claims for occupational injuries. Due to high prevalence of NIHL and several reports of improper use of hearing protective devices (HPDs), we conducted this study to compare the effect of face-to-face training in effective use of earplugs with appropriate NRR to overprotection of workers by using earplugs with higher than necessary noise reduction rating (NRR). In a randomized clinical trial, 150 workers referred to occupational medicine clinic were randomly allocated to three arms---a group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 25 with no training in appropriate use of the device; a group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 25 with training; another group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 30, with no training. Hearing threshold was measured in the study groups by real ear attenuation at threshold (REAT) method. This trial is registered with Australian New Zealand clinical trials Registry, number ACTRN00363175. The mean ± SD age of the participants was 28 ± 5 (range: 19-39) years. 42% of participants were female. The mean noise attenuation in the group with training was 13.88 dB, significantly higher than those observed in other groups. The highest attenuation was observed in high frequencies (4, 6, and 8 kHz) in the group with training. Training in appropriate use of earplugs significantly affects the efficacy of earplugs---even more than using an earplug with higher NRR.

  1. Training in Using Earplugs or Using Earplugs with a Higher than Necessary Noise Reduction Rating? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Salmani Nodoushan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is one of the most common occupational diseases and the second most common cause of workers' claims for occupational injuries. Objective: Due to high prevalence of NIHL and several reports of improper use of hearing protective devices (HPDs, we conducted this study to compare the effect of face-to-face training in effective use of earplugs with appropriate NRR to overprotection of workers by using earplugs with higher than necessary noise reduction rating (NRR. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 150 workers referred to occupational medicine clinic were randomly allocated to three arms—a group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 25 with no training in appropriate use of the device; a group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 25 with training; another group wearing earplugs with an NRR of 30, with no training. Hearing threshold was measured in the study groups by real ear attenuation at threshold (REAT method. This trial is registered with Australian New Zealand clinical trials Registry, number ACTRN00363175. Results: The mean±SD age of the participants was 28±5 (range: 19–39 years. 42% of participants were female. The mean noise attenuation in the group with training was 13.88 dB, significantly higher than those observed in other groups. The highest attenuation was observed in high frequencies (4, 6, and 8 kHz in the group with training. Conclusion: Training in appropriate use of earplugs significantly affects the efficacy of earplugs—even more than using an earplug with higher NRR.

  2. Morphology of the spectral resonance structure of the electromagnetic background noise in the range of 0.1–4 Hz at L = 5.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Yahnin

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous observations of fluctuations of the geomagnetic field at Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (L = 5.2 were used for a comprehensive morphological study of the spectral resonance structure (SRS seen in the background electromagnetic noise in the frequency range of 0.1–4.0 Hz. It is shown that the occurrence rate of SRS is higher in the nighttime than in the daytime. The occurrence rate is higher in winter than in summer. The SRS frequencies and the difference between neighbouring eigenfrequencies (the frequency scale increase towards nighttime and decrease towards daytime. Both frequency scale and occurrence rate exhibit a clear tendency to decrease from minimum to maximum of the solar activity cycle. It is found that the occurrence rate of SRS decreases when geomagnetic activity increases. The SRS is believed to be a consequence of a resonator for Alfvén waves, which is suggested to exist in the upper ionosphere. According to the theory of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR, characteristics of SRS crucially depend on electron density in the F-layer maximum, as well as on the altitudinal scale of the density decay above the maximum.We compared the SRS morphological properties with predictions of the IAR theory. The ionospheric parameters needed for calculation were obtained from the ionosphere model (IRI-95, as well as from measurements made with the ionosonde in Sodankylä. We conclude that, indeed, the main morphological properties of SRS are explained on the basis of the IAR theory. The measured parameters of SRS can be used for improving the ionospheric models.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; wave propagation – Radio Science (electromagnetic noise and interference

  3. Morphology of the spectral resonance structure of the electromagnetic background noise in the range of 0.1–4 Hz at L = 5.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manninen

    Full Text Available Continuous observations of fluctuations of the geomagnetic field at Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (L = 5.2 were used for a comprehensive morphological study of the spectral resonance structure (SRS seen in the background electromagnetic noise in the frequency range of 0.1–4.0 Hz. It is shown that the occurrence rate of SRS is higher in the nighttime than in the daytime. The occurrence rate is higher in winter than in summer. The SRS frequencies and the difference between neighbouring eigenfrequencies (the frequency scale increase towards nighttime and decrease towards daytime. Both frequency scale and occurrence rate exhibit a clear tendency to decrease from minimum to maximum of the solar activity cycle. It is found that the occurrence rate of SRS decreases when geomagnetic activity increases. The SRS is believed to be a consequence of a resonator for Alfvén waves, which is suggested to exist in the upper ionosphere. According to the theory of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR, characteristics of SRS crucially depend on electron density in the F-layer maximum, as well as on the altitudinal scale of the density decay above the maximum.We compared the SRS morphological properties with predictions of the IAR theory. The ionospheric parameters needed for calculation were obtained from the ionosphere model (IRI-95, as well as from measurements made with the ionosonde in Sodankylä. We conclude that, indeed, the main morphological properties of SRS are explained on the basis of the IAR theory. The measured parameters of SRS can be used for improving the ionospheric models.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; wave propagation – Radio Science (electromagnetic noise and interference

  4. Effects of the shear layer growth rate on the supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yuta; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Mamori, Hiroya; Fukushima, Naoya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    Strong acoustic waves emitted from rocket plume might damage to rocket payloads because their payloads consist of fragile structure. Therefore, understanding and prediction of acoustic wave generation are of importance not only in science, but also in engineering. The present study makes experiments of a supersonic jet flow at the Mach number of 2.0 and investigates a relationship between growth rate of a shear layer and noise generation of the supersonic jet. We conducted particle image velocimetry (PIV) and acoustic measurements for three different shaped nozzles. These nozzles were employed to control the condition of a shear layer of the supersonic jet flow. We applied single-pixel ensemble correlation method (Westerweel et al., 2004) for the PIV images to obtain high-resolution averaged velocity profiles. This correlation method enabled us to obtain detailed data of the shear layer. For all cases, acoustic measurements clearly shows the noise source position at the end of a potential core of the jet. In the case where laminar to turbulent transition occurred in the shear layer, the sound pressure level increased by 4 dB at the maximum. This research is partially supported by Presto, JST (JPMJPR1678) and KAKENHI (25709009 and 17H03473).

  5. Symbol Error Rate of MPSK over EGK Channels Perturbed by a Dominant Additive Laplacian Noise

    KAUST Repository

    Souri, Hamza

    2015-06-01

    The Laplacian noise has received much attention during the recent years since it affects many communication systems. We consider in this paper the probability of error of an M-ary phase shift keying (PSK) constellation operating over a generalized fading channel in presence of a dominant additive Laplacian noise. In this context, the decision regions of the receiver are determined using the maximum likelihood and the minimum distance detectors. Once the decision regions are extracted, the resulting symbol error rate expressions are computed and averaged over an Extended Generalized-K fading distribution. Generic closed form expressions of the conditional and the average probability of error are obtained in terms of the Fox’s H function. Simplifications for some special cases of fading are presented and the resulting formulas end up being often expressed in terms of well known elementary functions. Finally, the mathematical formalism is validated using some selected analytical-based numerical results as well as Monte- Carlo simulation-based results.

  6. Quantitative assessment of effects of phase aberration and noise on high-frame-rate imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Lu, Jian-yu

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to quantitatively study effects of phase aberration and noise on high-frame-rate (HFR) imaging using a set of traditional and new parameters. These parameters include the traditional -6-dB lateral resolution, and new parameters called the energy ratio (ER) and the sidelobe ratio (SR). ER is the ratio between the total energy of sidelobe and the total energy of mainlobe of a point spread function (PSF) of an imaging system. SR is the ratio between the peak value of the sidelobe and the peak value of the mainlobe of the PSF. In the paper, both simulation and experiment are conducted for a quantitative assessment and comparison of the effects of phase aberration and noise on the HFR and the conventional delay-and-sum (D&S) imaging methods with the set of parameters. In the HFR imaging method, steered plane waves (SPWs) and limited-diffraction beams (LDBs) are used in transmission, and received signals are processed with the Fast Fourier Transform to reconstruct images. In the D&S imaging method, beams focused at a fixed depth are used in transmission and dynamically focused beams are used in reception for image reconstruction. The simulation results show that the average differences between the -6-dB lateral beam widths of the HFR imaging and the D&S imaging methods are -0.1337mm for SPW and -0.1481mm for LDB, which means that the HFR imaging method has a higher lateral image resolution than the D&S imaging method since the values are negative. In experiments, the average differences are also negative, i.e., -0.2804mm for SPW and -0.3365mm for LDB. The results for the changes of ER and SR between the HFR and the D&S imaging methods have negative values, too. After introducing phase aberration and noise, both simulations and experiments show that the HFR imaging method has also less change in the -6-dB lateral resolution, ER, and SR as compared to the conventional D&S imaging method. This means that the HFR imaging method is less sensitive to

  7. Noise exposure and children's blood pressure and heart rate: the RANCH project.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Elise van; Kamp, I van; Fischer, P; Davies, Hugh W; Houthuijs, D; Stellato, Rebecca K; Clark, Charlotte; Stansfeld, Stephen A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conclusions that can be drawn from earlier studies on noise and children's blood pressure are limited due to inconsistent results, methodological problems, and the focus on school noise exposure. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of aircraft and road traffic noise exposure on

  8. Correlation Between Analog Noise Measurements and the Expected Bit Error Rate of a Digital Signal Propagating Through Passive Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining the bit error rate (BER) of a digital circuit from the measurement of the analog S-parameters of the circuit has been developed. The method is based on the measurement of the noise and the standard deviation of the noise in the S-parameters. Once the standard deviation and the mean of the S-parameters are known, the BER of the circuit can be calculated using the normal Gaussian function.

  9. Application of time-hopping UWB range-bit rate performance in the UWB sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nascimento, J.R.V. do; Nikookar, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the achievable range-bit rate performance is evaluated for Time-Hopping (TH) UWB networks complying with the FCC outdoor emission limits in the presence of Multiple Access Interference (MAI). Application of TH-UWB range-bit rate performance is presented for UWB sensor networks.

  10. 5 CFR 532.253 - Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to the same occupational series and title, that lead, supervise, or perform production facilitating..., supervisory, and production facilitating positions. 532.253 Section 532.253 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF....253 Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions. (a...

  11. Criterion Noise in Ratings-Based Recognition: Evidence from the Effects of Response Scale Length on Recognition Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aaron S.; Tullis, Jonathan G.; Lee, Ji Hae

    2013-01-01

    Rating scales are a standard measurement tool in psychological research. However, research has suggested that the cognitive burden involved in maintaining the criteria used to parcel subjective evidence into ratings introduces "decision noise" and affects estimates of performance in the underlying task. There has been debate over whether…

  12. Read noise for a 2.5μm cutoff Teledyne H2RG at 1-1000Hz frame rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger M.; Hale, David

    2012-07-01

    A camera operating a Teledyne H2RG in H and Ks bands is under construction at Caltech to serve as a near-infrared tip-tilt sensor for the Keck-1 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. After imaging the full field for acquisition, small readout windows are placed around one or more natural guide stars anywhere in the AO corrected field of view. Windowed data may be streamed to RAM in the host for a limited time then written to disk as a single file, analogous to a “film strip”, or be transmitted indefinitely via a second fiber optic output to a dedicated computer providing real time control of the AO system. The various windows can be visited at differing cadences, depending on signal levels. We describe a readout algorithm that maximizes exposure duty cycle, minimizes latency, and achieves very low noise by resetting infrequently then synthesizing exposures from Sample Up The Ramp data. To illustrate which noise sources dominate under various conditions, noise measurements are presented as a function of synthesized frame rate and window sizes for a range of detector temperatures. The consequences of spatial variation in noise properties, and dependence on frame rate and temperature are discussed, together with probable causes of statistical outliers.

  13. Tag-based Heart Rate Measurements of Harbor Porpoises During Normal and Noise-exposed Dives to Study Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    nitrogen management and can provide information on the level of stress the animals routinely experience. Here we examine the dive heart rate...ventilation rate and activity in both captive and wild porpoise to better understand the dive response and how it may be overruled by noise exposure. We...acoustic data in captive and wild harbor porpoises. The specific objectives are 1) Quantify the physiological (heart and ventilation rates) and behavioral

  14. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's response to this solicitation calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life...

  15. Expanded Operational Temperature Range for Space Rated Li-Ion Batteries Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quallion's Phase II proposal calls for expanding the nominal operation range of its space rated lithium ion cells, while maintaining their long life capabilities. To...

  16. Reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 in the temperature range 233-400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Suto, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction rate constants of HO2 + O3 were measured in the temperature range 233-400 K using a discharge flow system with photofragment emission detection. In the range 233-253 K, the constants are approximately a constant value, and then increase with increasing temperature. This result suggests that the reaction may have two different channels. An expression representing the reaction rate constants is presented.

  17. Noise activated bistable sensor based on chaotic system with output defined by temporal coding and firing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, Wojciech; Gomes, Iacyel

    2017-11-01

    Traditional bistable sensors use external bias signal to drive its response between states and their detection strategy is based on the output power spectral density or the residence time difference (RTD) in two sensor states. Recently, the noise activated nonlinear dynamic sensors driven only by noise based on RTD technique have been proposed. Here, we present experimental results of dc voltage measurements by noise-driven bistable sensor based on electronic Chua's circuit operating in a chaotic regime where two single scroll attractors coexist. The output of the sensor is quantified by the proportion of the time the sensor stays in one state to the total observation time and by the spike-count rate with spikes defined by crossings between attractors. The relationship between the stimuli and particular observable for different noise intensities is obtained, the usefulness of each coding scheme is discussed, and the optimal noise intensity for detection is indicated. It is shown that the obtained relationship is the same for any observation time when population coding is used. The optimal time window for both detection and the number of units in population coding is found. Our results may be useful for analyses and understanding of the neural activity and in designing bistable storage elements at length scales where thermal fluctuations drastically increase and the effect of noise must be taken into consideration.

  18. Tipping points in open systems: bifurcation, noise-induced and rate-dependent examples in the climate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Peter; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Vitolo, Renato; Cox, Peter

    2012-03-13

    Tipping points associated with bifurcations (B-tipping) or induced by noise (N-tipping) are recognized mechanisms that may potentially lead to sudden climate change. We focus here on a novel class of tipping points, where a sufficiently rapid change to an input or parameter of a system may cause the system to 'tip' or move away from a branch of attractors. Such rate-dependent tipping, or R-tipping, need not be associated with either bifurcations or noise. We present an example of all three types of tipping in a simple global energy balance model of the climate system, illustrating the possibility of dangerous rates of change even in the absence of noise and of bifurcations in the underlying quasi-static system.

  19. Development of a rating procedure for low frequency noise : Results of measurements near runways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, E.; Vercammen, M.; Ploeg, F. van der; Granneman, J.; Vos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent issues concerning low frequency aircraft noise around airports (groundnoise) and a legal verdict about the application of low frequency noise criteria in the Netherlands have been the motivation to start a research commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the

  20. Part 5: GPS Telemetry Detection Rates (Cougar Home Ranges), GCS NAD 83 (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cougar home-ranges were calculated to compare the mean probability of a GPS fix acquisition across the home-range to the actual fix success rate (FSR) of the collar...

  1. A Low-Power Wireless Image Sensor Node with Noise-Robust Moving Object Detection and a Region-of-Interest Based Rate Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A Low-Power Wireless Image Sensor Node with Noise-Robust Moving Object Detection and a Region-of- Interest Based Rate Controller Jong Hwan Ko...military surveillance, with a noise-robust moving object detection and region-of- interest based rate controller. The improved robustness to noise...detection, Region-of- interest , Rate control Introduction In wireless image sensor nodes for moving object surveillance, energy efficiency can be

  2. Finite Range Effects in Energies and Recombination Rates of Three Identical Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peder Klokmose; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.

    2013-01-01

    at negative scattering length for creation of a bound trimer moves to higher or lower values depending on the sign of the effective range compared to the location of the threshold for the single-parameter zero-range model. Large effective ranges, corresponding to narrow resonances, are needed......We investigate finite-range effects in systems with three identical bosons. We calculate recombination rates and bound state spectra using two different finite-range models that have been used recently to describe the physics of cold atomic gases near Feshbach resonances where the scattering length...... is large. The models are built on contact potentials which take into account finite range effects; one is a two-channel model and the other is an effective range expansion model implemented through the boundary condition on the three-body wave function when two of the particles are at the same point...

  3. Diversification Rates and the Evolution of Species Range Size Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Castiglione

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The geographic range sizes frequency distribution (RFD within clades is typically right-skewed with untransformed data, and bell-shaped or slightly left-skewed under the log-transformation. This means that most species within clades occupy diminutive ranges, whereas just a few species are truly widespread. A number of ecological and evolutionary explanations have been proposed to account for this pattern. Among the latter, much attention has been given to the issue of how extinction and speciation probabilities influence RFD. Numerous accounts now convincingly demonstrate that extinction rate decreases with range size, both in living and extinct taxa. The relationship between range size and speciation rate, though, is much less obvious, with either small or large ranged species being proposed to originate more daughter taxa. Herein, we used a large fossil database including 21 animal clades and more than 80,000 fossil occurrences distributed over more than 400 million years of marine metazoans (exclusive of vertebrates evolution, to test the relationship between extinction rate, speciation rate, and range size. As expected, we found that extinction rate almost linearly decreases with range size. In contrast, speciation rate peaks at the large (but not the largest end of the range size spectrum. This is consistent with the peripheral isolation mode of allopatric speciation being the main mechanism of species origination. The huge variation in phylogeny, fossilization potential, time of fossilization, and the overarching effect of mass extinctions suggest caution must be posed at generalizing our results, as individual clades may deviate significantly from the general pattern.

  4. Tipping points in open systems: bifurcation, noise-induced and rate-dependent examples in the climate system

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin, Peter; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Vitolo, Renato; Cox, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tipping points associated with bifurcations (B-tipping) or induced by noise (N-tipping) are recognized mechanisms that may potentially lead to sudden climate change. We focus here a novel class of tipping points, where a sufficiently rapid change to an input or parameter of a system may cause the system to "tip" or move away from a branch of attractors. Such rate-dependent tipping, or R-tipping, need not be associated with either bifurcations or noise. We present an example of all three types...

  5. Emission rates of air pollutants from portable gas ranges and nitrogen dioxide exposure assessment in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jun Ho; Youn, Sung Uk; Kwon, Eunkyung; Im, Sungkuk; Akiyama, Yukio; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yang, Wonho

    2009-03-01

    It is important to characterize the emission of air pollutants and suggest an optimum ventilation rate, because the use of portable gas ranges is widespread in houses and restaurants in Korea. Source emission tests were conducted to characterize the emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) from portable gas ranges in steady-state using a well-mixed chamber. The ranges of emission rates of air pollutants from portable gas ranges were 0.55-0.94 mg/h for NO, 0.35-1.08 mg/h for NO2, 1.21-1.63 mg/h for NOx 1.39-4.21 mg/h for CO, 2430-2970 mg/h for CO2 and 0-0.12 mg/h for TVOCs. The required mean and maximum ventilation rates to control the air pollutants from portable gas ranges was 2.70 m3/h and 3.13 m3/h on the basis of the NO2 emission rate, respectively. The mean concentrations of food service worker and customer exposures to NO2 by use of portable gas ranges in restaurants were 48.2 +/- 21.5 ppb and 64.7 +/- 31.5 ppb, respectively.

  6. High-q microring resonator with narrow free spectral range for pulse repetition rate multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Ji, Hua; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz.......We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz....

  7. Development of wide-range constitutive equations for calculations of high-rate deformation of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For development of models of strength and compressibility of metals in wide range of pressures (up to several megabar and strain rates ~ 1÷108 s−1, the method of dynamic tests is used. Since direct measurement of strength is impossible under complicated intensive high-rate loading, a formal model is created at first, and then it is updated basing on comparison with many experiments, which are sensitive to shear strength. Elastic-plastic, viscous-elastic-plastic and relaxation integral models became nowadays most commonly used. The basic unsolved problems in simulation of high-rate deformation of metals are mentioned in the paper.

  8. Coexistence of noise-like pulse and high repetition rate harmonic mode-locking in a dual-wavelength mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Entao; Mo, Kundong; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Fei; Zhou, Xiaojun; Liu, Yong

    2017-07-24

    Coexistence of harmonic mode-locking (HML) and noise-like pulse (NLP) were experimentally observed in a dual-wavelength mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. The coexistence patterns were self-started and maintained within a wide pump range by appropriately setting the intra-cavity polarization state. The HML was obtained at 1955.3 nm with a varied repetition rate range from 324 MHz to 1.138 GHz which benefits from the dispersion compensation, while the NLP observing at 1983.2 nm can operate at either fundamental repetition rate of 4.765 MHz or second harmonic state. Experimental investigations show that the coexistence patterns are caused by the wavelength-dependent phase delay of the mode-locked fiber cavity. Moreover, dual-wavelength NLP was also observed for the first time at 2 μm spectral region by changing the intra-cavity polarization state.

  9. Pneumatic muffler noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudworth, A L; Hanson, W J; Vuisting, W

    1978-11-01

    Sixty-five commercial pneumatic mufflers in the size range of 1/8 to 3/8-inch American Standard Taper Pipe Thread (NPT) were evaluated for noise level as a function of air supply pressure and back pressure. Also, typical directivity pattern and spectral content were determined. A rating system has been devised, as well as individual prediction formulas, to rank order the mufflers and provide a capability of calculating expected noise levels for a given supply pressure. As this study reveals, noise reductions in excess of 40 dBA may be achieved by employing an efficient pneumatic muffler.

  10. Seamless Data-Rate Change Using Punctured Convolutional Codes for Time-Varying Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Ying

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise (SNR) environment, symbol rate is often changed to maximize ata return. However, the symbol-rate change has some undesirable effects such as changing the ransmission bandwidth and perhaps causing the receiver symbol loop to lose lock temporarily, thus osing some data. In this article, we are proposing an alternate way of varying the data rate without hanging the symbol rate and therefore the transmission bandwidth. The data rate change is achieved n a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream to adapt to the hanging SNR environment. We have also derived an exact expression to enumerate the number of nique puncturing patterns. To demonstrate this seamless rate-change capability, we searched for good uncturing patterns for the Galileo (14, 1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the unctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997.

  11. Short-term association between personal exposure to noise and heart rate variability: The RECORD MultiSensor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aarbaoui, Tarik; Méline, Julie; Brondeel, Ruben; Chaix, Basile

    2017-12-01

    Studies revealed long-term associations between noise exposure and cardiovascular health, but the underlying short-term mechanisms remain uncertain. To explore the concomitant and lagged short-term associations between personal exposure to noise and heart rate variability (HRV) in a real life setting in the Île-de-France region. The RECORD MultiSensor Study collected between July 2014 and June 2015 noise and heart rate data for 75 participants, aged 34-74 years, in their living environments for 7 days using a personal dosimeter and electrocardiography (ECG) sensor on the chest. HRV parameters and noise levels were calculated for 5-min windows. Short-term relationships between noise level and log-transformed HRV parameters were assessed using mixed effects models with a random intercept for participants and a temporal autocorrelation structure, adjusted for heart rate, physical activity (accelerometry), and short-term trends. An increase by one dB(A) of A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (Leq) was associated with a 0.97% concomitant increase of the Standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN) (95% CI: 0.92, 1.02), of 2.08% of the Low frequency band power (LF) (95% CI: 1.97, 2.18), of 1.30% of the High frequency band power (HF) (95% CI: 1.17, 1.43), and of 1.16% of the LF/HF ratio (95% CI: 1.10, 1.23). The analysis of lagged exposures to noise adjusted for the concomitant exposure illustrates the dynamic of recovery of the autonomic nervous system. Non-linear associations were documented with all HRV parameters with the exception of HF. Piecewise regression revealed that the association was almost 6 times stronger below than above 65 Leq dB(A) for the SDNN and LF/HF ratio. Personal noise exposure was found to be related to a concomitant increase of the overall HRV, with evidence of imbalance of the autonomic nervous system towards sympathetic activity, a pathway to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  12. Use of baited remote underwater video (BRUV) and motion analysis for studying the impacts of underwater noise upon free ranging fish and implications for marine energy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Louise; Pérez-Domínguez, Rafael; Elliott, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Free-ranging individual fish were observed using a baited remote underwater video (BRUV) system during sound playback experiments. This paper reports on test trials exploring BRUV design parameters, image analysis and practical experimental designs. Three marine species were exposed to playback noise, provided as examples of behavioural responses to impulsive sound at 163-171dB re 1μPa (peak-to-peak SPL) and continuous sound of 142.7dB re 1μPa (RMS, SPL), exhibiting directional changes and accelerations. The methods described here indicate the efficacy of BRUV to examine behaviour of free-ranging species to noise playback, rather than using confinement. Given the increasing concern about the effects of water-borne noise, for example its inclusion within the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and the lack of empirical evidence in setting thresholds, this paper discusses the use of BRUV, and short term behavioural changes, in supporting population level marine noise management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Density of wild prey modulates lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Odden

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors shaping the dynamics of carnivore-livestock conflicts is vital to facilitate large carnivore conservation in multi-use landscapes. We investigated how the density of their main wild prey, roe deer Capreolus capreolus, modulates individual Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep Ovis aries across a range of sheep and roe deer densities. Lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep were collected in south-eastern Norway from 1995 to 2011 along a gradient of different livestock and wild prey densities using VHF and GPS telemetry. We used zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB models including lynx sex, sheep density and an index of roe deer density as explanatory variables to model observed kill rates on sheep, and ranked the models based on their AICc values. The model including the effects of lynx sex and sheep density in the zero-inflation model and the effect of lynx sex and roe deer density in the negative binomial part received most support. Irrespective of sheep density and sex, we found the lowest sheep kill rates in areas with high densities of roe deer. As roe deer density decreased, males killed sheep at higher rates, and this pattern held for both high and low sheep densities. Similarly, females killed sheep at higher rates in areas with high densities of sheep and low densities of roe deer. However, when sheep densities were low females rarely killed sheep irrespective of roe deer density. Our quantification of depredation rates can be the first step towards establishing fairer compensation systems based on more accurate and area specific estimation of losses. This study demonstrates how we can use ecological theory to predict where losses of sheep will be greatest, and can be used to identify areas where mitigation measures are most likely to be needed.

  14. Density of wild prey modulates lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odden, John; Nilsen, Erlend B; Linnell, John D C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors shaping the dynamics of carnivore-livestock conflicts is vital to facilitate large carnivore conservation in multi-use landscapes. We investigated how the density of their main wild prey, roe deer Capreolus capreolus, modulates individual Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep Ovis aries across a range of sheep and roe deer densities. Lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep were collected in south-eastern Norway from 1995 to 2011 along a gradient of different livestock and wild prey densities using VHF and GPS telemetry. We used zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) models including lynx sex, sheep density and an index of roe deer density as explanatory variables to model observed kill rates on sheep, and ranked the models based on their AICc values. The model including the effects of lynx sex and sheep density in the zero-inflation model and the effect of lynx sex and roe deer density in the negative binomial part received most support. Irrespective of sheep density and sex, we found the lowest sheep kill rates in areas with high densities of roe deer. As roe deer density decreased, males killed sheep at higher rates, and this pattern held for both high and low sheep densities. Similarly, females killed sheep at higher rates in areas with high densities of sheep and low densities of roe deer. However, when sheep densities were low females rarely killed sheep irrespective of roe deer density. Our quantification of depredation rates can be the first step towards establishing fairer compensation systems based on more accurate and area specific estimation of losses. This study demonstrates how we can use ecological theory to predict where losses of sheep will be greatest, and can be used to identify areas where mitigation measures are most likely to be needed.

  15. Seamless Data-Rate Change Using Punctured Convolutional Codes for a Time-Varying Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Ying; Cheung, Kar-Ming

    1995-01-01

    In a time-varying signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) environment, symbol rate is changed to maximize data return. However, the symbol-rate changes may cause the receiver symbol loop to lose lock, thus losing real-time data. We propose an alternate way of varying the data rate in a seamless fashion by puncturing the convolutionally encoded symbol stream and transmitting the punctured encoded symbols with a constant symbol rate. We systematically searched for good puncturing patterns for the Galileo (14,1/4) convolutional code and changed the data rates by using the punctured codes to match the Galileo SNR profile of November 9, 1997. We concluded that this scheme reduces the symbol-rate changes from 9 to 2 and provides a larger data return and a higher symbol SNR during most of the day.

  16. WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODY DECAY RATE IN FREE-RANGING BIRDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Eileen M; Walker, Edward D; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Krebs, Bethany L; Newman, Christina; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Levine, Rebecca S; Carrington, Mary E; McLean, Robert G; Goldberg, Tony L; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody duration, following a humoral immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is poorly understood in free-ranging avian hosts. Quantifying antibody decay rate is important for interpreting serologic results and for understanding the potential for birds to serorevert and become susceptible again. We sampled free-ranging birds in Chicago, Illinois, US, from 2005 to 2011 and Atlanta, Georgia, US, from 2010 to 2012 to examine the dynamics of antibody decay following natural WNV infection. Using serial dilutions in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified WNV antibody titer in repeated blood samples from individual birds over time. We quantified a rate of antibody decay for 23 Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) of 0.198 natural log units per month and 24 individuals of other bird species of 0.178 natural log units per month. Our results suggest that juveniles had a higher rate of antibody decay than adults, which is consistent with nonlinear antibody decay at different times postexposure. Overall, most birds had undetectable titers 2 yr postexposure. Nonuniform WNV antibody decay rates in free-ranging birds underscore the need for cautious interpretation of avian serology results in the context of arbovirus surveillance and epidemiology.

  17. The rate of beneficial mutations surfing on the wave of a range expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Lehe

    Full Text Available Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that range expansions can have severe consequences for the gene pool of the expanding population. Due to strongly enhanced genetic drift at the advancing frontier, neutral and weakly deleterious mutations can reach large frequencies in the newly colonized regions, as if they were surfing the front of the range expansion. These findings raise the question of how frequently beneficial mutations successfully surf at shifting range margins, thereby promoting adaptation towards a range-expansion phenotype. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the surfing statistics of recurrent beneficial mutations on wave-like range expansions in linear habitats. We show that the rate of surfing depends on two strongly antagonistic factors, the probability of surfing given the spatial location of a novel mutation and the rate of occurrence of mutations at that location. The surfing probability strongly increases towards the tip of the wave. Novel mutations are unlikely to surf unless they enjoy a spatial head start compared to the bulk of the population. The needed head start is shown to be proportional to the inverse fitness of the mutant type, and only weakly dependent on the carrying capacity. The precise location dependence of surfing probabilities is derived from the non-extinction probability of a branching process within a moving field of growth rates. The second factor is the mutation occurrence which strongly decreases towards the tip of the wave. Thus, most successful mutations arise at an intermediate position in the front of the wave. We present an analytic theory for the tradeoff between these factors that allows to predict how frequently substitutions by beneficial mutations occur at invasion fronts. We find that small amounts of genetic drift increase the fixation rate of beneficial mutations at the advancing front, and thus could be important for adaptation during species invasions.

  18. A micromixer with consistent mixing performance for a wide range of flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Robert; Van Assche, Tom; Sonck, Marc; Denayer, Joeri; Desmet, Gert

    2015-02-01

    A micromixer with consistent mixing performance for a wide range of flow rates is presented. The mixer makes use of internally moving elements, i.e. steel balls that are located in dedicated mixing chambers. Movement is induced by a rotating magnetic field. To get better insight in differences between active and passive mixing, we studied a mixer that can operate in both regimes. A mixing performance study for a range of flow rates along with pressure drop data is presented. The response of the moving elements in regard to the magnetic field is shown experimentally and shows the limitations of earlier modeling studies. Lastly, the estimated power input on the fluids was calculated and allows for a comparison with more well-known convective-type mixers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Analysis of GRACE Range-rate Residuals with Emphasis on Reprocessed Star-Camera Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Flury, J.; Naeimi, M.; Bandikova, T.; Guerr, T. M.; Klinger, B.

    2015-12-01

    Since March 2002 the two GRACE satellites orbit the Earth at rela-tively low altitude. Determination of the gravity field of the Earth including itstemporal variations from the satellites' orbits and the inter-satellite measure-ments is the goal of the mission. Yet, the time-variable gravity signal has notbeen fully exploited. This can be seen better in the computed post-fit range-rateresiduals. The errors reflected in the range-rate residuals are due to the differ-ent sources as systematic errors, mismodelling errors and tone errors. Here, weanalyse the effect of three different star-camera data sets on the post-fit range-rate residuals. On the one hand, we consider the available attitude data andon other hand we take the two different data sets which has been reprocessedat Institute of Geodesy, Hannover and Institute of Theoretical Geodesy andSatellite Geodesy, TU Graz Austria respectively. Then the differences in therange-rate residuals computed from different attitude dataset are analyzed inthis study. Details will be given and results will be discussed.

  20. Constituent source emission rate characterization of three gas-fired domestic ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, J.T.; Zawacki, T.S.; Macriss, R.A.; Moschandreas, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Indoor air quality has come under scrutiny, in recent years, as a result of the need to reduce the rate of air infiltration of residential dwellings and, therefore, of the homeowner's space heating and air conditioning energy budget. Indoor air quality is influenced by outdoor air quality, the building structure and materials, consumer products, appliances, weather, occupant activities, etc. Along with other sources, unvented gas appliances are contributors of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), carbon monoxide (CO), and of other air constituents. Source emission data from 18 gas ranges were published in 1974 showing an average NO/NO/sub 2/ emission factor ratio of about 0.33. More recent work has shown the NO/sub 2//NO ratio to vary in the range of 0.4 to 2.0 and this disparity has been attributed to the differences in the experimental procedure used in each case. This paper presents new emission factor data for NO, NO/sub 2/, CO and of other trace constituents (TSP, VOC, PAH) from three modern gas ranges and provides a mechanism that helps explain the relatively high NO/sub 2//NO ratios. The paper also presents average emission factor data for TSP and formaldehyde and shows that the difference in VOC and PAH emission rates (between the background and with range burners operating) is within the instrument precision limit. 5 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  1. Plio-Quaternary detrital Be-10 paleo-erosion rates from the eastern Peninsular Ranges, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskin, M. E.; Le, K.; Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.; Peryam, T.

    2008-12-01

    Ancient erosion-rate records from cosmogenically produced 10Be in quartz-bearing sediments have potential to establish linkages between erosion, climate change, and tectonics. However it is challenging to isolate an erosion rate signal from subsequent 10Be ingrowth during burial and exhumation of sediments. We present preliminary 10Be erosion rates from sediments as old as 3 Ma from the Fish Creek-Vallecito basin (FCVB) in southeastern California. This basin subsided in the hanging wall of the West Salton Detachment fault, undergoing rapid sedimentation at ≥600 m/Myr until 0.95 Ma. After this time, sedimentation ceased and the basin underwent even more rapid uplift and erosion in response to mid- to late Quaternary transpression. High concentrations (~105 atoms/g) of 10Be in the sediments archived in this basin largely record slow erosion rates in upland sediment source areas in the adjacent eastern Peninsular Ranges. High-resolution magnetostratigraphy provides the necessary age control to correct 10Be for radioactive decay. These corrected concentrations indicate an approximately 40% decline in catchment-averaged erosion rate from Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene time, decreasing from 55 ± 12 m/Myr at ~2.7 Ma to 34 ± 6 m/Myr at ~1.2 Ma. 10Be-derived erosion rate from modern sediments, 31 ± 4 m/Myr, is consistent with this overall trend. Tectonic forcing of erosion rates through growth of footwall relief across the West Salton Detachment fault should yield an increase in catchment-averaged erosion rate with time, a prediction opposite of the observed trend. Thus we hypothesize that the 10Be data set may record the progressive decay of erosion rate in the source following an initial, as-yet undocumented increase due to climate forcing. Such an increase could have been forced by enhanced climate variability following the onset of northern hemisphere glaciation at ~2.5-3 Ma. Alternatively, erosion rates may have slowed as a result of gradual uplift and

  2. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  3. Delta a charge sensitive front-end amplifier with switched gain for low-noise, large dynamic range silicon detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Aspell, P; Bloch, P; Jarron, Pierre; Löfstedt, B; Reynaud, S; Tabbers, P

    2001-01-01

    The design and results of a radiation hard switched gain charge amplifier optimised for a large dynamic range and large input capacitance are described. The peaking time is 25 ns, dynamic ranges are 0.1-50 minimum ionising particles (MIPs) (high gain) and 1-400 MIPs (low gain), signal to noise (S/N)>10 for C/sub m/<56 pF and radiation tolerance to 10 Mrads(Si) and 4*10/sup 13/ n cm/sup -2/. (5 refs).

  4. Application of long-range order to predict unfolding rates of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harihar, B; Selvaraj, S

    2011-03-01

    Predicting the experimental unfolding rates of two-state proteins and models describing the unfolding rates of these proteins is quite limited because of the complexity present in the unfolding mechanism and the lack of experimental unfolding data compared with folding data. In this work, 25 two-state proteins characterized by Maxwell et al. (Protein Sci 2005;14:602–616) using a consensus set of experimental conditions were taken, and the parameter long-range order (LRO) derived from their three-dimensional structures were related with their experimental unfolding rates ln(k(u)). From the total data set of 30 proteins used by Maxwell et al. (Protein Sci 2005;14:602–616), five slow-unfolding proteins with very low unfolding rates were considered to be outliers and were not included in our data set. Except all beta structural class, LRO of both the all-alpha and mixed-class proteins showed a strong inverse correlation of r = -0.99 and -0.88, respectively, with experimental ln(k(u)). LRO shows a correlation of -0.62 with experimental ln(k(u)) for all-beta proteins. For predicting the unfolding rates, a simple statistical method has been used and linear regression equations were developed for individual structural classes of proteins using LRO, and the results obtained showed a better agreement with experimental results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. New constraints on Holocene uplift rates for the Baudo Mountain Range, northwestern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Juan L.; Shen, Zhixiong; Mauz, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    A beach deposit on the southern end of the Baudo Mountain Range, at an elevation of ˜2.0 m above the backshore of the modern beach, was dated at ˜2870 years using optically stimulated luminescence dating. The calculated average uplift rate necessary to raise this deposit is 0.7 mm/yr. This rate combines the long-term regional deformation associated with the subduction of the Nazca Plate under the South American Plate and the collision of the Choco Block microplate against the South American continent, as well as uplift from local faults. We propose that rapid emergence probably as several pulses, each involving decimeter scale coseismic uplift, is likely to have occurred to elevate the beach above the intertidal zone and offset destructive wave erosion.

  6. An investigation of balsa wood over a range of strain-rates and impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamidi, E.; Harrigan, J. J.

    2006-08-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of balsa wood under quasi-static and dynamic conditions is presented. Cylindrical balsa wood specimens were compressed quasi-statically and dynamically along their three principal axes. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) tests were carried out to determine the importance of the material strain-rate. Balsa wood is a relatively low strength material of about 1.5 MPa in the weakest direction, depending on density. Consequently, the SHPB tests were carried out using low mechanical impedance Polymethylmethacrylate pressure bars. Tests at high strain-rates resulted in an increase in both initial crushing and plateau stresses. Direct impact (DI) tests were performed to measure both the proximal and distal end forces over a range of impact velocities. These results both reinforce the SHPB data and provide measurements for stress enhancement.

  7. Numerical study of two-dimensional wet foam over a range of shear rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähärä, T.

    2017-09-01

    The shear rheology of two-dimensional foam is investigated over a range of shear rates with the numerical DySMaL model, which features dynamically deformable bubbles. It is found that at low shear rates, the rheological behavior of the system can be characterized by a yield stress power-law constitutive equation that is consistent with experimental findings and can be understood in terms of soft glassy rheology models. At low shear rates, the system rheology is also found to be subject to a scaling law involving the bubble size, the surface tension, and the viscosity of the carrier fluid. At high shear rates, the model produces a dynamic phase transition with a sudden change in the flow pattern, which is accompanied by a drop in the effective viscosity. This phase transition can be linked to rapid changes in the average bubble deformation and nematic order of the system. It is very likely that this phase transition is a result of the model dynamics and does not happen in actual foams.

  8. Effects of noise exposure on development of tinnitus and hyperacusis: Prevalence rates 12 months after exposure in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeremy G; Larsen, Deb

    2016-04-01

    Fischer Brown Norway (FBN) rats (n = 233) were unilaterally exposed to 12 different combinations of noise intensity, duration, and spectrum, while 46 rats served as sham-exposed controls. Rats were behaviorally tested for tinnitus and hyperacusis using gap-induced inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (Gap) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) using 60-dB SPL before noise-exposure and at regular intervals for 12 mo. 12-mo after noise exposure the middle-aged rats were then tested again for tinnitus and hyperacusis before collecting Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) thresholds. Collapsing across all noise exposure conditions a significant tinnitus-like deficit in responding to silent gaps was observed, with the most likely tinnitus pitch around 16 kHz. Rates of tinnitus 12-mo after noise exposure were greatest in groups receiving the four least intense noise doses (110-dB for 30, 60 and 120 min, and 116-dB for 30 min), while some of the greatest rates of hyperacusis occurred in groups receiving more intense or longer exposures. The results suggest that rates for developing tinnitus in animal models may not be easily predicted based upon noise exposure dose, but that low-to-moderate noise exposures may result in the greatest likelihood for producing tinnitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  10. On the symbol error rate of M-ary MPSK over generalized fading channels with additive Laplacian noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2014-06-01

    This paper considers the symbol error rate of M-ary phase shift keying (MPSK) constellations over extended Generalized-K fading with Laplacian noise and using a minimum distance detector. A generic closed form expression of the conditional and the average probability of error is obtained and simplified in terms of the Fox\\'s H function. More simplifications to well known functions for some special cases of fading are also presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is validated with some numerical results examples done by computer based simulations. © 2014 IEEE.

  11. On the Symbol Error Rate of M-ary MPSK over Generalized Fading Channels with Additive Laplacian Noise

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2015-01-07

    This work considers the symbol error rate of M-ary phase shift keying (MPSK) constellations over extended Generalized-K fading with Laplacian noise and using a minimum distance detector. A generic closed form expression of the conditional and the average probability of error is obtained and simplified in terms of the Fox’s H function. More simplifications to well known functions for some special cases of fading are also presented. Finally, the mathematical formalism is validated with some numerical results examples done by computer based simulations [1].

  12. Estimation of geopotential from satellite-to-satellite range rate data: Numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobe, Glenn E.; Bose, Sam C.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for high-resolution geopotential field estimation by recovering the harmonic coefficients from satellite-to-satellite range rate data is presented and tested against both a controlled analytical simulation of a one-day satellite mission (maximum degree and order 8) and then against a Cowell method simulation of a 32-day mission (maximum degree and order 180). Innovations include: (1) a new frequency-domain observation equation based on kinetic energy perturbations which avoids much of the complication of the usual Keplerian element perturbation approaches; (2) a new method for computing the normalized inclination functions which unlike previous methods is both efficient and numerically stable even for large harmonic degrees and orders; (3) the application of a mass storage FFT to the entire mission range rate history; (4) the exploitation of newly discovered symmetries in the block diagonal observation matrix which reduce each block to the product of (a) a real diagonal matrix factor, (b) a real trapezoidal factor with half the number of rows as before, and (c) a complex diagonal factor; (5) a block-by-block least-squares solution of the observation equation by means of a custom-designed Givens orthogonal rotation method which is both numerically stable and tailored to the trapezoidal matrix structure for fast execution.

  13. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diabatic heating rate estimates from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertically integrated diabatic heating rate estimates (H) calculated from 32 months of European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts daily analyses (May 1985-December 1987) are determined as residuals of the thermodynamic equation in pressure coordinates. Values for global, hemispheric, zonal, and grid point H are given as they vary over the time period examined. The distribution of H is compared with previous results and with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements. The most significant negative correlations between H and OLR occur for (1) tropical and Northern-Hemisphere mid-latitude oceanic areas and (2) zonal and hemispheric mean values for periods less than 90 days. Largest positive correlations are seen in periods greater than 90 days for the Northern Hemispheric mean and continental areas of North Africa, North America, northern Asia, and Antarctica. The physical basis for these relationships is discussed. An interyear comparison between 1986 and 1987 reveals the ENSO signal.

  15. Respiration rate of stream insects measured in situ along a large altitude range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, S.; Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    conditions in streams from 400 to 3800 m above sea level in tropical Ecuador. Mean active respiration rates of the animals at 3800 m were approximately half of those at 400 m. Trichoptera showed a slightly larger difference in respiration with altitude than Ephemeroptera. Comparative respiration measurements...... at 100 and 50% oxygen saturation indicated that highland animals reduced their oxygen uptake more than their counterparts in the lowland when oxygen availability decreased. The temperature response of respiration calculated between the insect assemblages at different altitudes showed a mean assemblage Q...... to temperature in tropical streams is probably due to full acclimatization of the component species to stable and narrow temperature ranges. Adaptations to the low oxygen availability at high altitude probably consist of a suite of genetic physiological and behavioural features....

  16. Effects of laser frequency chirp on modal noise in short-range radio over multimode fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Tartarini, Giovanni; Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2010-01-01

    An important effect of the frequency chirp of the optical transmitter in radio over multimode fiber links is put into evidence experimentally and modeled theoretically for the first time, to our knowledge. This effect can have an important impact in short-range connections, where, although...

  17. Fine-scale movement responses of free-ranging harbour porpoises to capture, tagging and short-term noise pulses from a single airgun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, Floris; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge about the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the behavioural responses of cetaceans is constrained by lack of data on fine-scale movements of individuals. We equipped five free-ranging harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) with high-resolution location and dive loggers and exposed......, with natural behaviour resumed in less than or equal to 24 h. When we exposed porpoises to airgun pulses at ranges of 420–690 m with noise level estimates of 135–147 dB re 1 µPa2s (sound exposure level), one individual displayed rapid and directed movements away from the exposure site and two individuals used...... them to a single 10 inch3 underwater airgun producing high-intensity noise pulses (2–3 s intervals) for 1 min. All five porpoises responded to capture and tagging with longer, faster and more directed movements as well as with shorter, shallower, less wiggly dives immediately after release...

  18. Determination of background, signal-to-noise, and dynamic range of a flow cytometer: A novel practical method for instrument characterization and standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Claudia; Feher, Kristen; von Volkmann, Konrad; Kirsch, Jenny; Radbruch, Andreas; Kaiser, Toralf

    2017-09-27

    A well-defined scale calibration in flow cytometry can improve many aspects of data acquisition such as cytometer setup, instrument comparison and sample comparison. The theory for scale calibration was proposed by Steen over two decades ago, but it has never been put into regular use due to the lack of a widely available precision light source. The introduction of such a light source, the quantiFlash(TM) , gave this possibility. Here, we describe how this light source can be used to characterize a cytometer's PMT performance. We, therefore, characterized the instrument's response over the entire PMT voltage range. As a consequence, we propose a practical method to characterize a cytometer's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range (DNR). This allows the selection of a voltage/gain corresponding to a PMT's maximum efficiency and hence the lowest electronic noise, which can help with experiment design. We further introduced a decibel (dB) scale for the presentation of SNR and DNR values. SNR and DNR are stand-alone values that allow the direct comparison of different instruments. Finally, with this method, it becomes clear that increased SNR comes at the expense of DNR and thus the limiting factor of modern cytometers is the DNR. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges.

  20. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J.; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  1. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  2. Lack of consensus among competency ratings of the same occupation: noise or substance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Sanchez, Juan I; Bartram, Dave; Brown, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Although rating differences among incumbents of the same occupation have traditionally been viewed as error variance in the work analysis domain, such differences might often capture substantive discrepancies in how incumbents approach their work. This study draws from job crafting, creativity, and role theories to uncover situational factors (i.e., occupational activities, context, and complexity) related to differences among competency ratings of the same occupation. The sample consisted of 192 incumbents from 64 occupations. Results showed that 25% of the variance associated with differences in competency ratings of the same occupation was related to the complexity, the context, and primarily the nature of the occupation's work activities. Consensus was highest for occupations involving equipment-related activities and direct contact with the public. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Different Cable Ferrite Materials to Reduce the Electromagnetic Noise in the 2-150 kHz Frequency Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Adrian; Victoria, Jorge; Alcarria, Antonio; Torres, Jose; Martinez, Pedro A; Martos, Julio; Soret, Jesus; Garcia-Olcina, Raimundo; Muetsch, Steffen

    2018-01-23

    The gap of standardization for conducted and field coupled electromagnetic interferences (EMI) in the 2-150 kHz frequency range can lead to Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) problems. This is caused by power systems such as Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) controlled rectifiers, photovoltaic inverters or charging battery units in electric vehicles. This is a very important frequency spectral due to interferences generated in a wide range of devices and, specifically, communication problems in the new technologies and devices incorporated to the traditional grid to convert it into a Smart Grid. Consequently, it is necessary to provide new solutions to attenuate this kind of interference, which involves finding new materials that are able to filter the electromagnetic noise. This contribution is focused on characterizing the performance of a novel material based on nanocrystalline and comparing it to most common material compositions such as MnZn and NiZn. This research is carried out from the point of view of the manufacturing process, magnetic properties and EMI suppression ability. This last item is carried out through two analysis procedures: a theoretical method by determining the attenuation ratio by measuring impedance parameter and proposing a new empirical technique based on measuring directly the insertion loss parameter. Therefore, the main aim of this characterization process is to determine the performance of nanocrystalline compared to traditional cable ferrite compositions to reduce the interferences in this controversial frequency range. From the results obtained, it is possible to deduce that nanocrystalline cable ferrite provides the best performance to filter the electromagnetic noise in the 2-150 kHz frequency range.

  4. Evaluating the effects of traffic noise on reaction time and rate of error in drivers′ movement time estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Alimohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that traffic noise may be associated with poorer mental processing, which can result in longer RT during driving. Therefore, traffic noise would expose drivers to consequent accidents and incidents.

  5. Choosing optimum noise figure and data rate in wireless sensor network radio transceivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, R.; van der Zee, Ronan A.R.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.

    2011-01-01

    To reduce the energy consumption in wireless sensor network transceivers, we propose an approach which combines two tradeoffs. The first tradeoff is between the receiver sensitivity and transmitter output power. The second one is the duty cycle and data rate of the transceiver. The combined approach

  6. Subjective Ratings of Annoyance Produced by Rotary-Wing Aircraft Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    nov "is ossoLaTa Unclassified SECURITY CLASSFICATION 5.Frs PARE FW- D Eneredt- 𔃻 5 7 W Unclassified 69CURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS PAG9(Vhw Da...paths followed during the various maneuvers relative to the location of the observers rendering the ratings. The observers were 25 adults hired on a

  7. Efficient noise-tolerant estimation of heart rate variability using single-channel photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Reza; Helfenbein, Eric D; Babaeizadeh, Saeed

    2017-08-18

    The feasibility of using photoplethysmography (PPG) for estimating heart rate variability (HRV) has been the subject of many recent studies with contradicting results. Accurate measurement of cardiac cycles is more challenging in PPG than ECG due to its inherent characteristics. We developed a PPG-only algorithm by computing a robust set of medians of the interbeat intervals between adjacent peaks, upslopes, and troughs. Abnormal intervals are detected and excluded by applying our criteria. We tested our algorithm on a large database from high-risk ICU patients containing arrhythmias and significant amounts of artifact. The average difference between PPG-based and ECG-based parameters is SDSD and RMSSD. Our performance testing shows that the pulse rate variability (PRV) parameters are comparable to the HRV parameters from simultaneous ECG recordings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A “twisted” microfluidic mixer suitable for a wide range of flow rate applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-06-27

    This paper proposes a new “twisted” 3D microfluidic mixer fabricated by a laser writing/microfabrication technique. Effective and efficient mixing using the twisted micromixers can be obtained by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombining and chaotic advection. The lamination of mixer units provides the splitting and recombination mechanism when the quadrant of circles is arranged in a two-layered serial arrangement of mixing units. The overall 3D path of the microchannel introduces the advection. An experimental investigation using chemical solutions revealed that these novel 3D passive microfluidic mixers were stable and could be operated at a wide range of flow rates. This micromixer finds application in the manipulation of tiny volumes of liquids that are crucial in diagnostics. The mixing performance was evaluated by dye visualization, and using a pH test that determined the chemical reaction of the solutions. A comparison of the tornado-mixer with this twisted micromixer was made to evaluate the efficiency of mixing. The efficiency of mixing was calculated within the channel by acquiring intensities using ImageJ software. Results suggested that efficient mixing can be obtained when more than 3 units were consecutively placed. The geometry of the device, which has a length of 30 mm, enables the device to be integrated with micro total analysis systems and other lab-on-chip devices.

  9. Operation of low-noise single-gap RPC modules exposed to ionisation rates up to 1 kHz/cm$^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Górski, M; Królikowski, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2004.06.123

    2004-01-01

    Two single gap medium-size RPC modules, made of bakelite plates of very good mechanical quality of the surface and having initial volume resistivity of 1 multiplied by 10**1**0 omegacm, were tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN at ionisation rates up to 1 kHz/cm **3. The internal surfaces facing the gas volume of one RPC module were cladded with a thin layer of linseed oil varnish for comparison of oiled and non-oiled RPC operation. The results refer to the gas mixture of C//2H//2F //4/isobutane (97:3) with SF//6 addition below 1%. The single gap modules exhibited full detection efficiency plateau for the high voltage range of about 1 kV at full intensity of gamma rays. Good timing characteristics allowed to reach 95% efficiency at fully opened irradiation source with time window of 20 ns. The intrinsic noise rate for a non-oiled and an oiled RPC gap was, respectively, below 5 and 1 Hz/cm**2 at full efficiency over 1 k V voltage range.

  10. Optimizing Taq polymerase concentration for improved signal-to-noise in the broad range detection of low abundance bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph Spangler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PCR in principle can detect a single target molecule in a reaction mixture. Contaminating bacterial DNA in reagents creates a practical limit on the use of PCR to detect dilute bacterial DNA in environmental or public health samples. The most pernicious source of contamination is microbial DNA in DNA polymerase preparations. Importantly, all commercial Taq polymerase preparations inevitably contain contaminating microbial DNA. Removal of DNA from an enzyme preparation is problematical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that the background of contaminating DNA detected by quantitative PCR with broad host range primers can be decreased greater than 10-fold through the simple expedient of Taq enzyme dilution, without altering detection of target microbes in samples. The general method is: For any thermostable polymerase used for high-sensitivity detection, do a dilution series of the polymerase crossed with a dilution series of DNA or bacteria that work well with the test primers. For further work use the concentration of polymerase that gave the least signal in its negative control (H(2O while also not changing the threshold cycle for dilutions of spiked DNA or bacteria compared to higher concentrations of Taq polymerase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is clear from the studies shown in this report that a straightforward procedure of optimizing the Taq polymerase concentration achieved "treatment-free" attenuation of interference by contaminating bacterial DNA in Taq polymerase preparations. This procedure should facilitate detection and quantification with broad host range primers of a small number of bona fide bacteria (as few as one in a sample.

  11. Night-Time Decibel Hell: Mapping Noise Exposure Zones and Individual Annoyance Ratings in an Urban Environment in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel N. Zakpala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although accumulating evidence over the past thirty years indicates that noise is an environmental stressor in residential settings, much of the data emanated from studies in high-intensity, noise impact zones around airports or major roads. Little is known about religious noise, especially at night, which is increasingly a growing concern for both the general public and policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa. Using geographical information systems (GIS, this study measured and mapped exposure to religious noise in a rapidly urbanising municipality in Ghana. Quantitative noise risk assessment was used to evaluate the risk of religious noise-induced hearing loss to residents in the exposed neighbourhoods. The results show that all neighbourhoods where churches were situated had at least one location with significant risk of noise-induced hearing loss. However, there was no statistically significant relationship between neighbourhoods where religious noise exposure was the highest and where noise annoyance was the highest. The magnitude of the noise values for night-time exposure is remarkable particularly given that excessive night-time noise exposure has the greatest detrimental effect on public health. There is the need to focus on vulnerable groups, sensitive hours of the night, and possible confounding with air pollution in order to wholly address this potential hazard.

  12. Climate-induced seasonal changes in smallmouth bass growth rate potential at the southern range extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middaugh, Christopher R.; Kessinger, Brin; Magoulick, Daniel D.

    2018-01-01

    Temperature increases due to climate change over the coming century will likely affect smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) growth in lotic systems at the southern extent of their native range. However, the thermal response of a stream to warming climate conditions could be affected by the flow regime of each stream, mitigating the effects on smallmouth bass populations. We developed bioenergetics models to compare change in smallmouth bass growth rate potential (GRP) from present to future projected monthly stream temperatures across two flow regimes: runoff and groundwater-dominated. Seasonal differences in GRP between stream types were then compared. The models were developed for fourteen streams within the Ozark–Ouachita Interior Highlands in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, USA, which contain smallmouth bass. In our simulations, smallmouth bass mean GRP during summer months decreased by 0.005 g g−1 day−1 in runoff streams and 0.002 g g−1 day−1 in groundwater streams by the end of century. Mean GRP during winter, fall and early spring increased under future climate conditions within both stream types (e.g., 0.00019 g g−1 day−1 in runoff and 0.0014 g g−1 day−1 in groundwater streams in spring months). We found significant differences in change in GRP between runoff and groundwater streams in three seasons in end-of-century simulations (spring, summer and fall). Potential differences in stream temperature across flow regimes could be an important habitat component to consider when investigating effects of climate change as fishes from various flow regimes that are relatively close geographically could be affected differently by warming climate conditions.

  13. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  14. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal‐Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital‐acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal‐noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step‐down, medical, surgical, and medical‐surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta‐binomial models, we estimated between‐unit variability (signal) and within‐unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal‐noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between‐unit variability to the total of between‐ and within‐unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal‐noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal‐noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  15. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Criddle; B. N. Smith; L. D. Hansen; J. N. Church

    2001-01-01

    Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with...

  16. Parametrization of the average ionization and radiative cooling rates of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Gil de la Fe, Juan Miguel; Rodriguez Perez, Rafael; Florido, Ricardo; Garcia Rubiano, Jesus; Mendoza, M. A.; Nuez, A. de la; Espinosa, G.; Martel Escobar, Carlos; Mínguez Torres, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on the monochromatic emissivity, the radiative power loss and the radiative cooling rate for optically thin carbon plasmas over a wide range of electron temperature and density assuming steady state situations. Furthermore, we propose analytical expressions depending on the electron density and temperature for the average ionization and cooling rate based on polynomial fittings which are valid for the whole range...

  17. High-Counting Rate Photon Detectors for Long-Range Space Optical Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long range, RF space communications do not meet anymore the bandwidth requirements or power constraints of future NASA missions. Optical communications offer the...

  18. Low-frequency noise used as a lifetime test of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursutiu, Doru; Jones, Brian K.

    1996-08-01

    Low-frequency noise (1/f noise) has been measured in light emitting diodes (LEDs) which have been subjected to an accelerated life test by means of large forward bias current pulses. Over a large range of stress pulses the electrical and functional LED properties remain unaltered but an increase in the 1/f noise level was seen and this was correlated with the device reliability. The product `initial noise X initial rate of noise increase' correlated best with the LED lifetime.

  19. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M; Heussler, Sascha P; Breese, Mark B H

    2018-01-05

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio of Fourier transform infra-red spectra on identification of high explosive substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka M.; Heussler, Sascha P.; Breese, Mark B. H.

    2018-01-01

    In the contemporary spectroscopy there is a trend to record spectra with the highest possible spectral resolution. This is clearly justified if the spectral features in the spectrum are very narrow (for example infra-red spectra of gas samples). However there is a plethora of samples (in the liquid and especially in the solid form) where there is a natural spectral peak broadening due to collisions and proximity predominately. Additionally there is a number of portable devices (spectrometers) with inherently restricted spectral resolution, spectral range or both, which are extremely useful in some field applications (archaeology, agriculture, food industry, cultural heritage, forensic science). In this paper the investigation of the influence of spectral resolution, spectral range and signal-to-noise ratio on the identification of high explosive substances by applying multivariate statistical methods on the Fourier transform infra-red spectral data sets is studied. All mathematical procedures on spectral data for dimension reduction, clustering and validation were implemented within R open source environment.

  1. High-sweep-rate 1310 nm MEMS-VCSEL with 150 nm continuous tuning range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, V; Cole, G D; Robertson, M; Uddin, A; Cable, A

    2012-07-05

    Microelectromechanical-systems-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (MEMS-VCSELs) capable of a 150 nm continuous tuning range near 1310 nm are demonstrated. These devices employ a thin optically pumped active region structure with large free-spectral range, which promotes wide and continuous tuning. To achieve VCSEL emission at 1310 nm, a wide-gain-bandwidth indium phosphide-based multiple quantum well active region is combined with a wide-bandwidth fully oxidised GaAs-based mirror through wafer bonding, with tuning enabled by a suspended dielectric top mirror. These devices are capable of being scanned over the entire tuning range at frequencies up to 500 kHz, making them ideal for applications such as swept source optical coherence tomography and high-speed transient spectroscopy.

  2. The effect of ankle range of motion on venous ulcer healing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Elizabeth; Richmond, Nicholas A; Baquerizo, Katherine; Van Driessche, Freya; Slade, Herbert B; Pieper, Barbara; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of ankle movement may contribute to calf muscle pump failure, which is thought to contribute to venous leg ulcer formation, which affects nearly 1 million Americans. We therefore wished to study ankle movement in patients with venous leg ulcers and its effect on healing. Using goniometry, we measured baseline ankle range of motion in venous leg ulcer patients from a Phase 2 dose-finding study of an allogeneic living cell bioformulation. Two hundred twenty-seven patients were enrolled in four active treatment groups and one standard-care control group, all receiving compression therapy. Goniometry data from a control group of 49 patients without venous disease, from a previous study, was used for comparison. We found patients with active venous leg ulcers had significantly reduced ankle range of motion compared with the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks of therapy, baseline ankle range of motion was not associated with healing, as there was no significant difference between healed and nonhealed groups, suggesting that ankle range of motion is not important in venous leg ulcer healing or, more likely, is overcome by compression. However, patients with venous ulcers located on the leg (as opposed to the ankle) had significantly higher ankle range of motion for plantar flexion and inversion (p = 0.021 and p = 0.034, respectively) and improved healing with both cell bioformulation and standard care (p = 0.011), suggesting that wound location is an important variable for ankle range of motion as well as for healing outcomes. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  3. Personality in Free-Ranging Hanuman Langur (Semnopithecus entellus) Males: Subjective Ratings and Recorded Behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečná, M.; Lhota, S.; Weiss, A.; Urbánek, Tomáš; Adamová, T.; Pluháček, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 4 (2008), s. 379-389 ISSN 0735-7036 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : trait rating * questionnaires * behavior al indices Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 2.081, year: 2008

  4. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... individual pay increase. An employee who meets or exceeds performance expectations (i.e., has a rating of record above the unacceptable performance level for the most recently completed appraisal period) must... completed appraisal period, he or she must be treated in the same manner as an employee who meets or exceeds...

  5. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often becomes permanent. Some people react to loud noise with anxiety and irritability, an increase in pulse rate and blood pressure, or an increase in stomach acid. Very loud noise can reduce efficiency in performing difficult tasks by ...

  6. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień Sylwia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  7. Comparison of the measurement of heart rate in adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) by auscultation and electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C F; Gavaghan, B J; McSweeney, D; Powell, V; Lisle, A

    2014-12-01

    To compare the heart rates of adult free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) measured by auscultation with a stethoscope with those measured simultaneously using electrocardiography (ECG). With each bird in a standing position, estimation of the heart rate was performed by placing a mark on paper for every 4 beats for roosters and 8 beats for hens as detected by auscultation over 30 s, while simultaneous ECG was performed. Heart rates measured by auscultation showed a high correlation (r = 0.97) with those measured by ECG. There was a high correlation between the heart rates of adult free-range chickens measured by auscultation with a stethoscope and those measured simultaneously using ECG. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  8. Noise exposure alters long-term neural firing rates and synchrony in primary auditory and rostral belt cortices following bimodal stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Joseph D; Forrest, Taylor J; Basura, Gregory J

    2017-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that bimodal stimulation (spinal trigeminal nucleus [Sp5] paired with best frequency tone) altered neural tone-evoked and spontaneous firing rates (SFRs) in primary auditory cortex (A1) 15 min after pairing in guinea pigs with and without noise-induced tinnitus. Neural responses were enhanced (+10 ms) or suppressed (0 ms) based on the bimodal pairing interval. Here we investigated whether bimodal stimulation leads to long-term (up to 2 h) changes in tone-evoked and SFRs and neural synchrony (correlate of tinnitus) and if the long-term bimodal effects are altered following noise exposure. To obviate the effects of permanent hearing loss on the results, firing rates and neural synchrony were measured three weeks following unilateral (left ear) noise exposure and a temporary threshold shift. Simultaneous extra-cellular single-unit recordings were made from contralateral (to noise) A1 and dorsal rostral belt (RB); an associative auditory cortical region thought to influence A1, before and after bimodal stimulation (pairing intervals of 0 ms; simultaneous Sp5-tone and +10 ms; Sp5 precedes tone). Sixty and 120 min after 0 ms pairing tone-evoked and SFRs were suppressed in sham A1; an effect only preserved 120 min following pairing in noise. Stimulation at +10 ms only affected SFRs 120 min after pairing in sham and noise-exposed A1. Within sham RB, pairing at 0 and +10 ms persistently suppressed tone-evoked and SFRs, while 0 ms pairing in noise markedly enhanced tone-evoked and SFRs up to 2 h. Together, these findings suggest that bimodal stimulation has long-lasting effects in A1 that also extend to the associative RB that is altered by noise and may have persistent implications for how noise damaged brains process multi-sensory information. Moreover, prior to bimodal stimulation, noise damage increased neural synchrony in A1, RB and between A1 and RB neurons. Bimodal stimulation led to persistent changes in neural synchrony in

  9. Extension of non-invasive EEG into the kHz range for evoked thalamocortical activity by means of very low noise amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, H J; Fedele, T; Curio, G; Burghoff, M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrafast electroencephalographic signals, having frequencies above 500 Hz, can be observed in somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Usually, these recordings have a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) because weak signals are overlaid by intrinsic noise of much higher amplitude like that generated by biological sources and the amplifier. As an example, recordings at the scalp taken during electrical stimulation of the median nerve show a 600 Hz burst with submicro-volt amplitudes which can be extracted from noise by the use of massive averaging and digital signal processing only. We have investigated this signal by means of a very low noise amplifier made in-house (minimal voltage noise 2.7 nV Hz(-1/2), FET inputs). We examined how the SNR of the data is altered by the bandwidth and the use of amplifiers with different intrinsic amplifier noise levels of 12 and 4.8 nV Hz(-1/2), respectively. By analyzing different frequency contributions of the signal, we found an extremely weak 1 kHz component superimposed onto the well-known 600 Hz burst. Previously such high-frequency electroencephalogram responses around 1 kHz have only been observed by deep brain electrodes implanted for tremor therapy of Parkinson patients. For the non-invasive measurement of such signals, we recommend that amplifier noise should not exceed 4 nV Hz(-1/2).

  10. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  11. Mechanical and Microstructural Investigation of Dual Phase Stainless Steel (LDX2101) under a wide range of strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ali; Escobedo-Diaz, Juan; Ashraf, Mahmud; Brown, Andrew; Hazell, Paul; Hutchison, Wayne; Quadir, Zakaria

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical response and the microstructural evolution of lean duplex stainless steel 2101 (LDSS 2101) under a wide range of strain rates has been investigated. Experimental testing spanned from quasistatic, high strain-rate (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar) and shock loading. The microstructural changes, e.g. phase transformation and grain rotation, texture and substructure evolution, were investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). A significant increase in the yield stress with increasing strain rate was observed. The plastic deformation, e.g. work hardening rate, was also depended on the strain-rate. The threshold stress for the iron-epsilon phase transformation was obtained from free surface velocity measurements and the retained high pressure phase was assessed by XRD measurements.

  12. The combined effects of forward masking by noise and high click rate on monaural and binaural human auditory nerve and brainstem potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Polyakov, Andrey; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Naomi

    2004-07-01

    To study effects of forward masking and rapid stimulation on human monaurally- and binaurally-evoked brainstem potentials and suggest their relation to synaptic fatigue and recovery and to neuronal action potential refractoriness. Auditory brainstem evoked potentials (ABEPs) were recorded from 12 normally- and symmetrically hearing adults, in response to each click (50 dB nHL, condensation and rarefaction) in a train of nine, with an inter-click interval of 11 ms, that followed a white noise burst of 100 ms duration (50 dB nHL). Sequences of white noise and click train were repeated at a rate of 2.89 s(-1). The interval between noise and first click in the train was 2, 11, 22, 44, 66 or 88 ms in different runs. ABEPs were averaged (8000 repetitions) using a dwell time of 25 micros/address/channel. The binaural interaction components (BICs) of ABEPs were derived and the single, centrally located equivalent dipoles of ABEP waves I and V and of the BIC major wave were estimated. The latencies of dipoles I and V of ABEP, their inter-dipole interval and the dipole magnitude of component V were significantly affected by the interval between noise and clicks and by the serial position of the click in the train. The latency and dipole magnitude of the major BIC component were significantly affected by the interval between noise and clicks. Interval from noise and the click's serial position in the train interacted to affect dipole V latency, dipole V magnitude, BIC latencies and the V-I inter-dipole latency difference. Most of the effects were fully apparent by the first few clicks in the train, and the trend (increase or decrease) was affected by the interval between noise and clicks. The changes in latency and magnitude of ABEP and BIC components with advancing position in the click train and the interactions of click position in the train with the intervals from noise indicate an interaction of fatigue and recovery, compatible with synaptic depletion and replenishing

  13. Shell model based reaction rates for rp-process nuclei in the mass range A=44-63

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Wiescher, M C

    2001-01-01

    We have used large-scale shell-model diagonalization calculations to determine the level spectra, proton spectroscopic factors, and electromagnetic transition probabilities for proton rich nuclei in the mass range A=44-63. Based on these results and the available experimental data, we calculated the resonances for proton capture reactions on neutron deficient nuclei in this mass range. We also calculated the direct capture processes on these nuclei in the framework of a Woods-Saxon potential model. Taking into account both resonant and direct contributions, we determined the ground-state proton capture reaction rates for these nuclei under hot hydrogen burning conditions for temperatures between 10 sup 8 and 10 sup 1 sup 0 K. The calculated compound-nucleus level properties and the reaction rates are presented here; the rates are also available in computer-readable format from the authors.

  14. Active Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuru-Mohan, N. K.; Doty, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Jet noise is often a dominant component of aircraft noise, particularly at takeoff. To meet the stringent noise regulations, the aircraft industry is in a pressing need of advanced noise reduction concepts. In the present study, the potential of piezoelectrically-activated chevrons for jet noise reduction was experimentally investigated. The perturbations near the nozzle exit caused by piezoelectrically-activated chevrons could be used to modify the growth rate of the mixing layer and thereby potentially reduce jet noise. These perturbations are believed to increase the production of small-scale disturbances at the expense of large-scale turbulent structures. These large-scale turbulent structures are responsible for the dominant portion of the jet mixing noise, particularly low-frequency noise. Therefore, by exciting the static chevron geometry through piezoelectric actuators, an additional acoustic benefit could possibly be achieved. To aid in the initial implementation of this concept, several flat-faced faceted nozzles (four, six, and eight facets) were investigated. Among the faceted nozzles, it was found that the eight-faceted nozzle behaves very similarly to the round nozzle. Furthermore, among the faceted nozzles with static chevrons, the four-faceted nozzle with static chevrons was found to be most effective in terms of jet noise reduction. The piezoelectrically-activated chevrons reduced jet noise up to 2 dB compared to the same nozzle geometry without excitation. This benefit was observed over a wide range of excitation frequencies by applying very low voltages to the piezoelectric actuators.

  15. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  17. Design, experimental verification, and analysis of a 1.8-V-input-range voltage-to-current converter using source degeneration for low-noise multimodal CMOS biosensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ikeda, Kei; Muto, Keita; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    A multimodal complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) biosensor array manufactured using measurement methods such as potentiometry, amperometry, and impedimetry improves its cost competitiveness and measurement accuracy. In addition, it provides a wider range of application because it can obtain signals from multiple aspects. To develop high-signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) multimodal biosensor arrays, time-domain current integration was proposed in the literature and found to be effective. In addition to amperometry and impedimetry, it is possible to perform current integration using the potentiometry output by employing a voltage-to-current converter (VCC). However, a conventional VCC with a fixed transconductance mode does not provide a sufficient input range (<0.6 V) and its noise property has not been investigated. In this work, we investigate the design and noise property of a newly proposed VCC with source degeneration that enhances the input range. For evaluating the proposed method, a test chip was fabricated in a 0.6 µm CMOS. The measured results successfully demonstrate that the input range was enhanced from 0.6 to 1.8 V. Autonomous current limitation was also confirmed. The measured total input-referred noise was 0.445 mV (from 10 Hz to 10 kHz, assuming current integration at every 1 ms).

  18. Variations of cyclic alternating pattern rate and homeostasis of sleep organization: a controlled study on the effects of white noise and zolpidem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzano, M G; Parrino, L; Fioriti, G; Farolfi, A; Spaggiari, M C; Anelli, S; Arcelloni, T

    1988-04-01

    The Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP) is a physiologic structure of normal non-REM (NREM) sleep, functionally correlated to long-lasting arousal instability. In 12 healthy volunteers, a continuous 45 dB (A) white noise induced no remarkable changes on the standard sleep parameters. However, compared to the baseline conditions, the acoustic perturbation determined a significant increase of the Cyclic Alternating Pattern Rate (CAPR), that measures the amount of CAP during sleep. Ten mg of zolpidem, a novel imidazopyridine hypnotic compound, did not modify the structure of unperturbed sleep, but induced a highly significant reduction of the increased values of CAP Rate due to white noise. The homeostatic function of CAP is stressed. CAPR appears to be a highly sensitive indicator of environmental modification during sleep.

  19. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  20. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  1. Behaviour and modelling of aluminium alloy AA6060 subjected to a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilamosa Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical behaviour in tension of an as-cast and homogenized AA6060 alloy was investigated at a wide range of strains (the entire deformation process up to fracture, strain rates (0.01–750 s−1 and temperatures (20–350 ∘C. The tests at strain rates up to 1 s−1 were performed in a universal testing machine, while a split-Hopkinson tension bar (SHTB system was used for strain rates from 350 to 750 s−1. The samples were heated with an induction-based heating system. A typical feature of aluminium alloys at high temperatures is that necking occurs at a rather early stage of the deformation process. In order to determine the true stress-strain curve also after the onset of necking, all tests were instrumented with a digital camera. The experimental tests reveal that the AA6060 material has negligible strain-rate sensitivity (SRS for temperatures lower than 200 ∘C, while both yielding and work hardening exhibit a strong positive SRS at higher temperatures. The coupled strain-rate and temperature sensitivity is challenging to capture with most existing constitutive models. The paper presents an outline of a new semi-physical model that expresses the flow stress in terms of plastic strain, plastic strain rate and temperature. The parameters of the model were determined from the tests, and the stress-strain curves from the tests were compared with the predictions of the model. Good agreement was obtained over the entire strain rate and temperature range.

  2. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  3. Effects of release rates on the range of attraction of carbon dioxide to some southwestern Ontario mosquito species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, S B; McElligott, P E

    1989-03-01

    The effects of release rates of 0, 250, 500, 1,000 and 4,000 ml/min on the range of attraction of carbon dioxide to some southwestern Ontario mosquito species was determined using ramp traps placed at 3, 7, 11, 15 and 19 m from a central pressurized cylinder. For female Aedes vexans, spring Aedes spp. and Anopheles walkeri, an increase in the release rate of CO2 from 1,000 to 4,000 ml/min resulted in extension of the range of attractiveness from between 3-7 m to between 7-11 m; rates of 500 and 250 ml/min did result in an increase in number of mosquitoes in the traps. Correspondingly, significantly more mosquitoes were caught in the traps at 3 m when the rate was increased to 1,000 ml/min from 500 ml/min. For Ae. vexans, 4,000 ml/min of CO2 attracted more mosquitoes to the 7 m traps than 1,000 ml/min. In this work carbon dioxide did not result in an increase in the number of Culiseta inornata, Cs. morsitans and Culex restuans and Cx. pipiens in the traps.

  4. A comparison between the first-fit settings of two multichannel digital signal-processing strategies: music quality ratings and speech-in-noise scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Paul; Searchfield, Grant; Coad, Gavin

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which level-dependent hearing aid digital signal-processing strategy (DSP) participants preferred when listening to music and/or performing a speech-in-noise task. Two receiver-in-the-ear hearing aids were compared: one using 32-channel adaptive dynamic range optimization (ADRO) and the other wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) incorporating dual fast (4 channel) and slow (15 channel) processing. The manufacturers' first-fit settings based on participants' audiograms were used in both cases. Results were obtained from 18 participants on a quick speech-in-noise (QuickSIN; Killion, Niquette, Gudmundsen, Revit, & Banerjee, 2004) task and for 3 music listening conditions (classical, jazz, and rock). Participants preferred the quality of music and performed better at the QuickSIN task using the hearing aids with ADRO processing. A potential reason for the better performance of the ADRO hearing aids was less fluctuation in output with change in sound dynamics. ADRO processing has advantages for both music quality and speech recognition in noise over the multichannel WDRC processing that was used in the study. Further evaluations of which DSP aspects contribute to listener preference are required.

  5. Video-based heart rate monitoring across a range of skin pigmentations during an acute hypoxic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S; Jacquel, Dominique; Foo, David M H; Borg, Ulf R

    2017-11-09

    The robust monitoring of heart rate from the video-photoplethysmogram (video-PPG) during challenging conditions requires new analysis techniques. The work reported here extends current research in this area by applying a motion tolerant algorithm to extract high quality video-PPGs from a cohort of subjects undergoing marked heart rate changes during a hypoxic challenge, and exhibiting a full range of skin pigmentation types. High uptimes in reported video-based heart rate (HRvid) were targeted, while retaining high accuracy in the results. Ten healthy volunteers were studied during a double desaturation hypoxic challenge. Video-PPGs were generated from the acquired video image stream and processed to generate heart rate. HRvid was compared to the pulse rate posted by a reference pulse oximeter device (HRp). Agreement between video-based heart rate and that provided by the pulse oximeter was as follows: Bias = - 0.21 bpm, RMSD = 2.15 bpm, least squares fit gradient = 1.00 (Pearson R = 0.99, p < 0.0001), with a 98.78% reporting uptime. The difference between the HRvid and HRp exceeded 5 and 10 bpm, for 3.59 and 0.35% of the reporting time respectively, and at no point did these differences exceed 25 bpm. Excellent agreement was found between the HRvid and HRp in a study covering the whole range of skin pigmentation types (Fitzpatrick scales I-VI), using standard room lighting and with moderate subject motion. Although promising, further work should include a larger cohort with multiple subjects per Fitzpatrick class combined with a more rigorous motion and lighting protocol.

  6. Error Rates of M-PAM and M-QAM in Generalized Fading and Generalized Gaussian Noise Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2013-07-01

    This letter investigates the average symbol error probability (ASEP) of pulse amplitude modulation and quadrature amplitude modulation coherent signaling over flat fading channels subject to additive white generalized Gaussian noise. The new ASEP results are derived in a generic closed-form in terms of the Fox H function and the bivariate Fox H function for the extended generalized-K fading case. The utility of this new general closed-form is that it includes some special fading distributions, like the Generalized-K, Nakagami-m, and Rayleigh fading and special noise distributions such as Gaussian and Laplacian. Some of these special cases are also treated and are shown to yield simplified results.

  7. The effect of multi-channel wide dynamic range compression, noise reduction, and the directional microphone on horizontal localization performance in hearing aid wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidser, Gitte; Rohrseitz, Kristin; Dillon, Harvey; Hamacher, Volkmar; Carter, Lyndal; Rass, Uwe; Convery, Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    This study examined the effect that signal processing strategies used in modern hearing aids, such as multi-channel WDRC, noise reduction, and directional microphones have on interaural difference cues and horizontal localization performance relative to linear, time-invariant amplification. Twelve participants were bilaterally fitted with BTE devices. Horizontal localization testing using a 360 degrees loudspeaker array and broadband pulsed pink noise was performed two weeks, and two months, post-fitting. The effect of noise reduction was measured with a constant noise present at 80 degrees azimuth. Data were analysed independently in the left/right and front/back dimension and showed that of the three signal processing strategies, directional microphones had the most significant effect on horizontal localization performance and over time. Specifically, a cardioid microphone could decrease front/back errors over time, whereas left/right errors increased when different microphones were fitted to left and right ears. Front/back confusions were generally prominent. Objective measurements of interaural differences on KEMAR explained significant shifts in left/right errors. In conclusion, there is scope for improving the sense of localization in hearing aid users.

  8. Equivalent magnetic noise reduction at high frequency range due to polarized direction optimization in Terfenol-D/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cong; Ma, Jiashuai; Yao, Meng; Di, Wenning; Lin, Di; Xu, Haiqing; Wang, Wei; Luo, Haosu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the responsivities and output voltage noise power spectral densities of magnetoelectric (ME) laminate sensors, consisting of length magnetized Terfenol-D alloys and transverse/width poled Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals (i.e. L-T mode and L-W mode respectively), which are directly integrated with custom-build low noise charge amplifier circuits. Both the theoretical analyses and experimental results prove that the L-W mode sensor with the optimized polarized direction of the PMNT plate possesses lower magnetic detection limit at the interested high frequency range of 10 kHz≤f≤50 kHz. The equivalent magnetic noise (EMN) of the L-W mode sensor is 0.78 pT/Hz1/2 at 30 kHz, which is about 1.7 times lower than the 1.35 pT/Hz1/2 for conventional L-T mode sensor. Furthermore, an effective method of using operational amplifiers with low equivalent input noise voltage and employing ME laminate composites with high voltage coefficient to reduce the EMNs of the ME laminate sensors at high frequency range has been established.

  9. Modular 125 ps resolution time interval digitizer for 10 MHz stop burst rates and 33 ms range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turko, B.

    1978-01-01

    A high resolution multiple stop time interval digitizer is described. It is capable of resolving stop burst rates of up to 10 MHz with an incremental resolution of 125 ps within a range of 33 ms. The digitizer consists of five CAMAC modules and uses a standard CAMAC crate and controller. All the functions and ranges are completely computer controlled. Any two subsequent stop pulses in a burst can be resolved within 100 ns due to a new dual interpolation technique employed. The accuracy is maintained by a high stability 125 MHz reference clock. Up to 131 stop events can be stored in a 48-bit, 10 MHz derandomizing storage register before the digitizer overflows. The experimental data are also given.

  10. FORECASTING OF ESTIMATED PERFORMANCE OF CONCRETE WITH ORGANIC AND HYDRAULIC BINDING AGENTS WITHIN WIDE RANGE OF TEMPERATURE AND STRAIN RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Verenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology  for determination of estimated performance of main road-building materials (asphalt concrete and сold recycled material within wide range of temperature and strain rate, is developed in the paper and it allows to obtain the whole spectrum of parameters required for calculation of a road pavement structure with minimum number of test results. This technique can be useful in designing material and pavement structure during its repair while using the method of cold in-place recycling because it enables significantly to reduce a number of laboratory tests. The methodology has been implemented as a computer program for its practical application.

  11. Convergent evolution toward an improved growth rate and a reduced resistance range in Prochlorococcus strains resistant to phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrani, Sarit; Lindell, Debbie

    2015-04-28

    Prochlorococcus is an abundant marine cyanobacterium that grows rapidly in the environment and contributes significantly to global primary production. This cyanobacterium coexists with many cyanophages in the oceans, likely aided by resistance to numerous co-occurring phages. Spontaneous resistance occurs frequently in Prochlorococcus and is often accompanied by a pleiotropic fitness cost manifested as either a reduced growth rate or enhanced infection by other phages. Here, we assessed the fate of a number of phage-resistant Prochlorococcus strains, focusing on those with a high fitness cost. We found that phage-resistant strains continued evolving toward an improved growth rate and a narrower resistance range, resulting in lineages with phenotypes intermediate between those of ancestral susceptible wild-type and initial resistant substrains. Changes in growth rate and resistance range often occurred in independent events, leading to a decoupling of the selection pressures acting on these phenotypes. These changes were largely the result of additional, compensatory mutations in noncore genes located in genomic islands, although genetic reversions were also observed. Additionally, a mutator strain was identified. The similarity of the evolutionary pathway followed by multiple independent resistant cultures and clones suggests they undergo a predictable evolutionary pathway. This process serves to increase both genetic diversity and infection permutations in Prochlorococcus populations, further augmenting the complexity of the interaction network between Prochlorococcus and its phages in nature. Last, our findings provide an explanation for the apparent paradox of a multitude of resistant Prochlorococcus cells in nature that are growing close to their maximal intrinsic growth rates.

  12. Micro-Viscometer for Measuring Shear-Varying Blood Viscosity over a Wide-Ranging Shear Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Jun; Lee, Seung Yeob; Jee, Solkeun; Atajanov, Arslan; Yang, Sung

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a micro-viscometer is developed for measuring shear-varying blood viscosity over a wide-ranging shear rate. The micro-viscometer consists of 10 microfluidic channel arrays, each of which has a different micro-channel width. The proposed design enables the retrieval of 10 different shear rates from a single flow rate, thereby enabling the measurement of shear-varying blood viscosity with a fixed flow rate condition. For this purpose, an optimal design that guarantees accurate viscosity measurement is selected from a parametric study. The functionality of the micro-viscometer is verified by both numerical and experimental studies. The proposed micro-viscometer shows 6.8% (numerical) and 5.3% (experimental) in relative error when compared to the result from a standard rotational viscometer. Moreover, a reliability test is performed by repeated measurement (N = 7), and the result shows 2.69 ± 2.19% for the mean relative error. Accurate viscosity measurements are performed on blood samples with variations in the hematocrit (35%, 45%, and 55%), which significantly influences blood viscosity. Since the blood viscosity correlated with various physical parameters of the blood, the micro-viscometer is anticipated to be a significant advancement for realization of blood on a chip. PMID:28632151

  13. The effect of inbreeding rate on fitness, inbreeding depression and heterosis over a range of inbreeding coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkala, Nina; Knott, K Emily; Kotiaho, Janne S; Nissinen, Kari; Puurtinen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of inbreeding and genetic drift within populations and hybridization between genetically differentiated populations is important for many basic and applied questions in ecology and evolutionary biology. The magnitudes and even the directions of these effects can be influenced by various factors, especially by the current and historical population size (i.e. inbreeding rate). Using Drosophila littoralis as a model species, we studied the effect of inbreeding rate over a range of inbreeding levels on (i) mean fitness of a population (relative to that of an outbred control population), (ii) within-population inbreeding depression (reduction in fitness of offspring from inbred versus random mating within a population) and (iii) heterosis (increase in fitness of offspring from interpopulation versus within-population random mating). Inbreeding rate was manipulated by using three population sizes (2, 10 and 40), and fitness was measured as offspring survival and fecundity. Fast inbreeding (smaller effective population size) resulted in greater reduction in population mean fitness than slow inbreeding, when populations were compared over similar inbreeding coefficients. Correspondingly, populations with faster inbreeding expressed more heterosis upon interpopulation hybridization. Inbreeding depression within the populations did not have a clear relationship with either the rate or the level of inbreeding. PMID:25553071

  14. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  15. A low-noise X-band microstrip VCO with 2.5 GHz tuning range using a GaN-on-SiC p-HEMT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.M.P.; Vliet, F.E. van

    2005-01-01

    A low-noise X-band microstrip hybrid VCO has been designed and realised using a 2 × 50 μm GaN-on-SiC pseudo-morphic HEMT as the active device. The transistor has been manufactured by TIGER and features a gate-length of 0.15 μm, an fT of 22 GHz, a break-down voltage of 42 Volts and an Idss, close to

  16. Estimating the possible range of recycling rates achieved by dump waste pickers: The case of Bantar Gebang in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shunsuke; Araki, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    This article presents informal recycling contributions made by scavengers in the surrounding area of Bantar Gebang final disposal site for municipal solid waste generated in Jakarta. Preliminary fieldwork was conducted through daily conversations with scavengers to identify recycling actors at the site, and then quantitative field surveys were conducted twice. The first survey (n = 504 households) covered 33% of all households in the area, and the second survey (n = 69 households) was conducted to quantify transactions of recyclables among scavengers. Mathematical equations were formulated with assumptions made to estimate the possible range of recycling rates achieved by dump waste pickers. Slightly over 60% of all respondents were involved in informal recycling and over 80% of heads of households were waste pickers, normally referred to as live-in waste pickers and live-out waste pickers at the site. The largest percentage of their spouses were family workers, followed by waste pickers and housewives. Over 95% of all households of respondents had at least one waste picker or one small boss who has a coequal status of a waste picker. Average weight of recyclables collected by waste pickers at the site was estimated to be approximately 100 kg day(-1) per household on the net weight basis. The recycling rate of solid wastes collected by all scavengers at the site was estimated to be in the range of 2.8-7.5% of all solid wastes transported to the site. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  18. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  19. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Osten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181 in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  20. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Julia; Milkereit, Benjamin; Schick, Christoph; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181) in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed) was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  1. Resistive Switching Assisted by Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2013-01-01

    We extend results by Stotland and Di Ventra on the phenomenon of resistive switching aided by noise. We further the analysis of the mechanism underlying the beneficial role of noise and study the EPIR (Electrical Pulse Induced Resistance) ratio dependence with noise power. In the case of internal noise we find an optimal range where the EPIR ratio is both maximized and independent of the preceding resistive state. However, when external noise is considered no beneficial effect is observed.

  2. The Feasibility of Noise Control in a Soft Drink Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouladi Dehaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background “Noise” can be defined as any unwanted sound. Soft drink plants, which produce the raw materials used in most carbonated beverage factories, are sources of noise. Objectives This study investigated the noise pollution present in a soft drink CO2 gas injection plant, in order to present noise control measures. Materials and Methods The instructions specified by the canadian center for occupational health and safety (CCOHS were followed during the noise study, and a sound level meter, CEL.450 calibrated with CEL-110.2 based on ISO-9612 methods, was used to record the sound pressure level (SPL at each grid point. SPL was determined in weighting scales A and C. and a noise survey map of equivalent SPLs was drawn for each part. Each part of the floor area of the soft drink factory where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map to determine the causes of high levels of noise. In order to reduce noise level in each part, the absorption coefficient, transmission loss, and noise reduction rate were calculated in the proposed control area. Results According to the study results, noise levels in a CO2 plant’s house and control room ranged from 88 to 102 dB and 79 to 82 dB (A, respectively. In order to reduce the amount of emitted noise in the CO2 plant house and control room, a noise control plan was implemented in each part of the facility; it was met with effective results. Conclusions The findings of this investigation have clearly revealed that plant workers are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. However, after the implementation of a noise control plan in each part of the facility, the noise dose received by workers has significantly decreased. The need to implement a noise conservation program was established.

  3. A wide-frequency range AC magnetometer to measure the specific absorption rate in nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garaio, E., E-mail: eneko.garayo@ehu.es [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Collantes, J.M. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Garcia, J.A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika Saila, UPV/EHU, P.K. 644, Bilbao (Spain); Mornet, S. [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux, UPR 9048 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Couillaud, F. [Résonance Magnétique des Systèmes Biologiques, UMR 5536 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Sandre, O., E-mail: olivier.sandre@enscbp.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie des Polymères Organiques, UMR 5629 CNRS / Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-11-15

    Measurement of specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial to assert their potential for magnetic hyperthermia. To perform this task, calorimetric methods are widely used. However, those methods are not very accurate and are difficult to standardize. In this paper, we present AC magnetometry results performed with a lab-made magnetometer that is able to obtain dynamic hysteresis-loops in the AC magnetic field frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 MHz and intensities up to 24 kA m{sup −1}. In this work, SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in water are measured by AC magnetometry. The so-obtained values are compared with the SAR measured by calorimetric methods. Both measurements, by calorimetry and magnetometry, are in good agreement. Therefore, the presented AC magnetometer is a suitable way to obtain SAR values of magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We propose AC magnetometry as a method to measure the specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for magnetic hyperthermia therapy. • We have built a lab-made AC magnetometer, which is able to measure magnetic dynamic hysteresis-loops of nanoparticle dispersions. • The device works with AC magnetic field intensities up to 24 kA m{sup −1} in a frequency range from 75 kHz to 1 MHz. • The SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles around 12 nm in magnetic diameter dispersed in water are measured by the lab-made magnetometer and different calorimetric methods. • Although all methods are in good agreement, several factors (probe location, thermal inertia, losses, etc.) make calorimetric method less accurate than AC magnetometry.

  4. Free Space Optical Interconnect (FSOI) modules for short range data transfer applied to board to board high rate communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Myriam; Mallet, Maxime; Pujol, Laurence; Claudepierre, Christian; Veyron, Johannès.; Giroud, Romain; Mousseaux, Daniel; Quentel, Francois; Foucal, Vincent; Pez, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    To provide more flexibility in inter-board communication in blade chassis, we developed a Free Space Optical Interconnect (FSOI) system for short range high speed data transfer. We designed robust and low footprint components compliant with both a use in milaero environment and an operation up to 5 and 10 Gbps. The 5Gpbs configuration demonstrated large tolerance to misalignment between emitter and receiver modules: +1.5/-1 mm along optical axis, lateral tolerance of +/-1 mm and angular tolerances of +/-1.5°. Reliable performances have been demonstrated over a temperature range from -30°C to 80°C and constraint environment as thermal and damp heat cycles and vibrations. Increase the data rate of the FSO device one step beyond up to 10 Gbps requires dealing with mode partitioning troubles generated by the use of VCSEL lasers. We designed and evaluated an improved opto-mechanical combination to overcome this drawback. The resulting device shows error free 10 Gbps data transfer while keeping large tolerance to Tx/Rx misalignments.

  5. Modeling Short-Range Soil Variability and its Potential Use in Variable-Rate Treatment of Experimental Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moameni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Iran, the experimental plots under fertilizer trials are managed in such a way that the whole plot area uniformly receives agricultural inputs. This could lead to biased research results and hence to suppressing of the efforts made by the researchers. This research was conducted in a selected site belonging to the Gonbad Agricultural Research Station, located in the semiarid region, northeastern Iran. The aim was to characterize the short-range spatial variability of the inherent and management-depended soil properties and to determine if this variation is large and can be managed at practical scales. The soils were sampled using a grid 55 m apart. In total, 100 composite soil samples were collected from topsoil (0-30 cm and were analyzed for calcium carbonate equivalent, organic carbon, clay, available phosphorus, available potassium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese. Descriptive statistics were applied to check data trends. Geostatistical analysis was applied to variography, model fitting and contour mapping. Sampling at 55 m made it possible to split the area of the selected experimental plot into relatively uniform areas that allow application of agricultural inputs with variable rates. Keywords: Short-range soil variability, Within-field soil variability, Interpolation, Precision agriculture, Geostatistics

  6. On the influence of freight trains on humans: a laboratory investigation of the impact of nocturnal low frequency vibration and noise on sleep and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael G; Croy, Ilona; Ogren, Mikael; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic.

  7. On the influence of freight trains on humans: a laboratory investigation of the impact of nocturnal low frequency vibration and noise on sleep and heart rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic.

  8. Noise prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  9. Analytical approximations of the firing rate of an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neuron in the presence of synaptic noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreen eHertäg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational models offer a unique tool for understanding the network-dynamical mechanisms which mediate between physiological and biophysical properties, and behavioral function. A traditional challenge in computational neuroscience is, however, that simple neuronal models which can be studied analytically fail to reproduce the diversity of electrophysiological behaviors seen in real neurons, while detailed neuronal models which do reproduce such diversity are intractable analytically and computationally expensive. A number of intermediate models have been proposed whose aim is to capture the diversity of firing behaviors and spike times of real neurons while entailing a mathematical description as simple as possible. One such model is the exponential integrate-and-fire neuron with spike rate adaptation (aEIF which consists of two differential equations for the membrane potential (V and an adaptation current (w. Despite its simplicity, it can reproduce a wide variety of physiologically observed spiking patterns, can be fit to physiological recordings quantitatively, and, once done so, is able to predict spike times on traces not used for model fitting. Here we compute the steady-state firing rate of aEIF in the presence of Gaussian synaptic noise, using two approaches. The first approach is based on the 2-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation that describes the (V,w-probability distribution, which is solved using an expansion in the ratio between the time constants of the two variables. The second is based on the firing rate of the EIF model, which is averaged over the distribution of the $w$ variable. These analytically derived closed-form expressions were tested on simulations from a large variety of model cells quantitatively fitted to in vitro electrophysiological recordings from pyramidal cells and interneurons. Theoretical predictions closely agreed with the firing rate of the simulated cells fed with in-vivo-like synaptic noise.

  10. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  11. Learning time-dependent noise to reduce logical errors: real time error rate estimation in quantum error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Li, Ying

    2017-12-01

    Quantum error correction is important to quantum information processing, which allows us to reliably process information encoded in quantum error correction codes. Efficient quantum error correction benefits from the knowledge of error rates. We propose a protocol for monitoring error rates in real time without interrupting the quantum error correction. Any adaptation of the quantum error correction code or its implementation circuit is not required. The protocol can be directly applied to the most advanced quantum error correction techniques, e.g. surface code. A Gaussian processes algorithm is used to estimate and predict error rates based on error correction data in the past. We find that using these estimated error rates, the probability of error correction failures can be significantly reduced by a factor increasing with the code distance.

  12. A long-range and long-life telemetry data-acquisition system for heart rate and multiple body temperatures from free-ranging animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, G. F.; Westbrook, R. M.; Fryer, T. B.; Miranda, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The system includes an implantable transmitter, external receiver-retransmitter collar, and a microprocessor-controlled demodulator. The size of the implant is suitable for animals with body weights of a few kilograms or more; further size reduction of the implant is possible. The ECG is sensed by electrodes designed for internal telemetry and to reduce movement artifacts. The R-wave characteristics are then specifically selected to trigger a short radio frequency pulse. Temperatures are sensed at desired locations by thermistors and then, based on a heartbeat counter, transmitted intermittently via pulse interval modulation. This modulation scheme includes first and last calibration intervals for a reference by ratios with the temperature intervals to achieve good accuracy even over long periods. Pulse duration and pulse sequencing are used to discriminate between heart rate and temperature pulses as well as RF interference.

  13. Optimization of statistical methods for HpGe gamma-ray spectrometer used in wide count rate ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. Torino, Turin (Italy); Mana, G. [INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy); Palmisano, C. [UNITO - Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Turin (Italy); INRIM - Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Turin (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The need to perform γ-ray measurements with HpGe detectors is a common technique in many fields such as nuclear physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine and neutron activation analysis. The use of HpGe detectors is chosen in situations where isotope identification is needed because of their excellent resolution. Our challenge is to obtain the “best” spectroscopy data possible in every measurement situation. “Best” is a combination of statistical (number of counts) and spectral quality (peak, width and position) over a wide range of counting rates. In this framework, we applied Bayesian methods and the Ellipsoidal Nested Sampling (a multidimensional integration technique) to study the most likely distribution for the shape of HpGe spectra. In treating these experiments, the prior information suggests to model the likelihood function with a product of Poisson distributions. We present the efforts that have been done in order to optimize the statistical methods to HpGe detector outputs with the aim to evaluate to a better order of precision the detector efficiency, the absolute measured activity and the spectra background. Reaching a more precise knowledge of statistical and systematic uncertainties for the measured physical observables is the final goal of this research project.

  14. Along-Track Geopotential Difference and Deflection of the Vertical from GRACE Range Rate: Use of GEOGRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRACE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory and numerical algorithm to directly determine the time-varying along-track geopotential difference and deflection of the vertical at the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite altitude. The determination was implemented using the GEOGRACE computer program using the K-band range rate (KBRR of GRACE from the Level-1B (L1B product. The method treated KBRR, GPS-derived orbit of GRACE and an initial geopotential difference as measurements used in the least-squares estimation of the geopotential difference and its formal error constrained by the energy conservation principle. The computational procedure consisted of three steps: data reading and interpolation, data calibration and estimations of the geopotential difference and its error. The formal error allowed removal of KBRR outliers that contaminated the gravity solutions. We used the most recent models to account for the gravity changes from multiple sources. A case study was carried out over India to estimate surface mass anomalies from GEOGRACE-derived geopotential differences. The 10-day mass changes were consistent with those from the MASCON solutions of NASA (correlation coefficient up to 0.88. Using the geopotential difference at satellite altitude avoids the errors caused by downward continuation, enabling the detection of small-scale mass changes.

  15. ZigBee Radio with External Low-Noise Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the performance study of a ZigBee module with an external low-noise amplifier, measured in both outdoor and indoor environments. Our previous study has already shown that the indoor campus environment such as walls and floors would reduce the radio link range drastically and the packet error rate increased. In this study, an external low-noise amplifier has been added to a ZigBee module to increase the receiver sensitivity. It is shown that with an external low-noise amplifier the outdoor radio range can reach up to 403 m with a negligible packet error rate compared to 144 m without the low-noise amplifier for point-to-point connection. Thus, by increasing the receiver sensitivity the radio range can be increased without increasing of the radio power output so that the power consumption can still be kept low to obtain long battery lifetime.

  16. Auditory sustained field responses to periodic noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keceli Sumru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auditory sustained responses have been recently suggested to reflect neural processing of speech sounds in the auditory cortex. As periodic fluctuations below the pitch range are important for speech perception, it is necessary to investigate how low frequency periodic sounds are processed in the human auditory cortex. Auditory sustained responses have been shown to be sensitive to temporal regularity but the relationship between the amplitudes of auditory evoked sustained responses and the repetitive rates of auditory inputs remains elusive. As the temporal and spectral features of sounds enhance different components of sustained responses, previous studies with click trains and vowel stimuli presented diverging results. In order to investigate the effect of repetition rate on cortical responses, we analyzed the auditory sustained fields evoked by periodic and aperiodic noises using magnetoencephalography. Results Sustained fields were elicited by white noise and repeating frozen noise stimuli with repetition rates of 5-, 10-, 50-, 200- and 500 Hz. The sustained field amplitudes were significantly larger for all the periodic stimuli than for white noise. Although the sustained field amplitudes showed a rising and falling pattern within the repetition rate range, the response amplitudes to 5 Hz repetition rate were significantly larger than to 500 Hz. Conclusions The enhanced sustained field responses to periodic noises show that cortical sensitivity to periodic sounds is maintained for a wide range of repetition rates. Persistence of periodicity sensitivity below the pitch range suggests that in addition to processing the fundamental frequency of voice, sustained field generators can also resolve low frequency temporal modulations in speech envelope.

  17. Separating Decision and Encoding Noise in Signal Detection Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Carlos Alexander; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Dosher, Barbara Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop an extension to the Signal Detection Theory (SDT) framework to separately estimate internal noise arising from representational and decision processes. Our approach constrains SDT models with decision noise by combining a multi-pass external noise paradigm with confidence rating responses. In a simulation study we present evidence that representation and decision noise can be separately estimated over a range of representative underlying representational and decision noise level configurations. These results also hold across a number of decision rules and show resilience to rule miss-specification. The new theoretical framework is applied to a visual detection confidence-rating task with three and five response categories. This study compliments and extends the recent efforts of researchers (Benjamin, Diaz, & Wee, 2009; Mueller & Weidemann, 2008; Rosner & Kochanski, 2009, Kellen, Klauer, & Singmann, 2012) to separate and quantify underlying sources of response variability in signal detection tasks. PMID:26120907

  18. Anthropogenic noise compromises the anti-predator behaviour of the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Ilaria; Aldred, Nicholas; Caldwell, Gary S

    2017-09-15

    Anthropogenic noise is a significant pollutant of the world's oceans, affecting behavioural and physiological traits in a range of species, including anti-predator behaviours. Using the open field test, we investigated the effects of recordings of piling and drilling noise on the anti-predator behaviour of captive juvenile European seabass in response to a visual stimulus (a predatory mimic). The impulsive nature of piling noise triggered a reflexive startle response, which contrasted the behaviour elicited by the continuous drilling noise. When presented with the predatory mimic, fish exposed to both piling and drilling noise explored the experimental arena more extensively than control fish exposed to ambient noise. Fish under drilling and piling conditions also exhibited reduced predator inspection behaviour. Piling and drilling noise induced stress as measured by ventilation rate. This study provides further evidence that the behaviour and physiology of European seabass is significantly affected by exposure to elevated noise levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primarily to one’s overall health. Top of Page Health Effects Noise pollution adversely affects the lives of millions of people. ... its effect, disseminate information to the public regarding noise pollution and its adverse health effects, respond to inquiries on matters related to noise, ...

  20. Expanding the range for predicting critical flow rates of gas wells producing from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upchurch, E.R. (Thums Long Beach Co. (US))

    1989-08-01

    The critical flow rate of a gas well is the minimum flow rate required to prevent accumulation of liquids in the tubing. Theoretical models currently available for estimating critical flow rates are restricted to wells with water/gas ratios less than 150bbl/MMcf (0.84 X 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/). For wells producing at higher water/gas ratios from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs, a method of estimating critical flow rates is derived through use of an empirical multiphase-flow correlation.

  1. Comparison of the noise performance of 10 GHz repetition rate quantum-dot and quantum well monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, G.; Thompson, M. G.; Yvind, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    Mode-locked lasers are commonly used in carrier-wave signal generation systems because of their excellent phase noise performance. Owing to the importance of this key parameter, this study presents a like-for-like comparison of the noise performance of the passive mode-locked regime of two devices...... fabricated with different material gain systems, one quantum well and the other quantum dot (QD), both with a monolithic all-active two-section mode-locked structure. Two important factors are identified as having a significant effect on the noise performance, the RF linewidth of the first harmonic...... and the shape of the noise pedestals, both depending on the passive mode-locked bias conditions. Nevertheless, the dominant contribution of the RF linewidth to the phase noise, which is significantly narrower for the QD laser, makes this material more suitable for optical generation of low-noise millimetre...

  2. An experimental comparison of leaf decomposition rates in a wide range of temperate plant species and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J. H.C.

    1996-01-01

    1 An experimental multispecies screening of leaf decomposition rates was undertaken in order to identify and quantify general patterns in leaf decomposition rates in functional plant types and taxa. Functional species groups were characterized using whole-plant and whole-leaf features relevant to

  3. The effect of inbreeding rate on fitness, inbreeding depression and heterosis over a range of inbreeding coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Pekkala, Nina; Knott, K. Emily; Janne S Kotiaho; Nissinen, Kari; Puurtinen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of inbreeding and genetic drift within populations and hybridization between genetically differentiated populations is important for many basic and applied questions in ecology and evolutionary biology. The magnitudes and even the directions of these effects can be influenced by various factors, especially by the current and historical population size (i.e. inbreeding rate). Using Drosophila littoralis as a model species, we studied the effect of inbreeding rate over...

  4. Estimated glomerular filtration rate within the normal or mildly impaired range and incident non-valvular atrial fibrillation: Results from a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Alon; Haim, Moti; Hoshen, Moshe; Balicer, Ran D; Reges, Orna; Leibowitz, Morton; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Hasdai, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, in particular in the significant renal impairment range (estimated glomerular filtration rate filtration rate range. Methods Using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) estimated glomerular filtration rate formula, we identified ambulatory adults (>22 years old) without rheumatic heart disease or prosthetic valves and with 60 ml/min/1.73 m2filtration rate10 m patient-years of follow-up (∼75% 65,000 individuals had ≥1 atrial fibrillation event (incident atrial fibrillation rate 5.1% and 5.8% excluding or including prior cardiovascular disease, or 49 and 55 per 10,000 patient-years, respectively). In both cohorts, individuals with versus without incident atrial fibrillation had lower mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (∼83 versus 95 ml/min/1.73 m2). Adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus, overall a 10 ml/min/1.73 m2 decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate was independently associated with a mean increase in incident atrial fibrillation of 1.5% and 2.4% in the cohorts excluding or including prior cardiovascular disease, respectively ( p filtration rate and atrial fibrillation was observed in the 90-130 ml/min/1.73 m2 range, whereas a blunted association was observed in the 60-90 ml/min/1.73 m2 range. Conclusion Within the 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 filtration rate filtration rate is independently associated with incident non-valvular atrial fibrillation in adults without prior atrial fibrillation, mainly attributed to a graded association within the 90-130 ml/min/1.73 m2 range.

  5. Noise Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  6. Stem anatomy and relative growth rate in seedlings of a wide range of woody plant species and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro-Díez, P.; Puyravaud, J.P.; Cornelissen, J. H C; Villar-Salvador, P.

    Stem traits were analysed in laboratory-grown seedlings of 80 European woody and semiwoody species of known potential relative growth rate (RGR) and of similar ontogenetic phase. The objectives were, firstly, to assess the relation between stem structure and plant growth potential and, secondly, to

  7. Probing high-frequency noise with macroscopic resonant tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, T.; Amin, M. H. S.; Johnson, M. W.; Altomare, F.; Berkley, A. J.; Gildert, S.; Harris, R.; Johansson, J.; Bunyk, P.; Ladizinsky, E.; Tolkacheva, E.; Averin, D. V.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a method for extracting the high-frequency noise spectral density of an rf-SQUID flux qubit from macroscopic resonant tunneling (MRT) rate measurements. The extracted noise spectral density is consistent with that of an ohmic environment up to frequencies ~4 GHz. We have also derived an expression for the MRT line shape expected for a noise spectral density consisting of such a broadband ohmic component and an additional strongly peaked low-frequency component. This hybrid model provides an excellent fit to experimental data across a range of tunneling amplitudes and temperatures.

  8. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  9. Numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of ultrafine- and coarse-grained Zr-Nb alloys over a wide range of strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbenta, V. A.; Skripnyak, N. V.; Skripnyak, V. A.; Skripnyak, E. G.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the results on the development of theoretical methods of evaluation and prediction of mechanical properties of Zr-Nb alloys over a range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1. The mechanical behavior of coarse- and ultrafine-grained Zr-1Nb (E110) was investigated numerically. The ranges of strain rates and temperatures in which the mechanical behavior of Zr-1Nb alloy can be described using modified models of Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong were defined. The results can be used in engineering analysis of designed technical systems for nuclear reactors.

  10. Self-Rated Attentiveness Interacts with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Noise Stimulation in Reaction Time in a Go/No-Go Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikström, Sverker; Jürgensen, Anna-Maria; Haghighi, Maryam; Månsson, Daniel; Smidelik, David; Habekost, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has found that stimulating inattentive people with auditory white noise induces enhancement in cognitive performance. This enhancement is believed to occur due to a statistical phenomenon called stochastic resonance, where noise increases the probability of a signal passing the firing threshold in the neural cells. Here we investigate whether people with low attentiveness benefit to a larger extent than attentive people from stimulation by auditory white noise and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The results show, for both auditory noise and tDCS stimulation, that the changes in performance relative to nonstimulation correlate with the degree of attentiveness in a Go/No-Go task, but not in a N-back task. These results suggest that the benefit of tDCS may interact with inattentiveness.

  11. Investigation of flow behavior for linear melt blown polypropylenes with different molecular weights in very wide shear rate range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabek, Jiri; Zatloukal, Martin; Martyn, Mike

    2017-05-01

    In this work, three different linear polypropylenes, with melt flow rate between 450-1200 g.10min-1, have been characterized by using rotational and twin bore capillary rheometer equipped by novel inert orifice die design as well as by the instrumented injection molding machine. The measured data, that shows first as well as second Newtonian plateau, were consequently fitted by four conventional models (Cross, Carreau, Generalized Quemada and Carreau-Yasuda models) as well as by two novel viscosity models (modified Quemada and Carreau models) suggested here for the first time. It has been found that modified 5-parametric Carreau model has the highest capability to describe the measured shear viscosity data for given polymer melts.

  12. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  13. The response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Bradley, J.; Dwivedi, A.; Casem, D.

    2016-05-01

    This article presents the response of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subjected to large strains, high strain rates, high pressures, a range in temperatures, and variations in the intermediate principal stress. Laboratory data from the literature, and new test data provided here, are used in the evaluation. The new data include uniaxial stress compression tests (at various strain rates and temperatures) and uniaxial stress tension tests (at low strain rates and ambient temperatures). The compression tests include experiments at ˙ɛ = 13,000 s-1, significantly extending the range of known strain rate data. The observed behavior of PMMA includes the following: it is brittle in compression at high rates, and brittle in tension at all rates; strength is dependent on the pressure, strain, strain rate, temperature, and the intermediate principal stress; the shear modulus increases as the pressure increases; and it is highly compressible. Also presented are novel, high velocity impact tests (using high-speed imaging) that provide insight into the initiation and evolution of damage. Lastly, computational constitutive models for pressure, strength, and failure are presented that provide responses that are in good agreement with the laboratory data. The models are used to compute several ballistic impact events for which experimental data are available.

  14. Dependence of neutron rate production with accelerator beam profile and energy range in an ADS-TRIGA RC1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firoozabadi, M.M.; Karimi, J. [Birjand Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Zangian, M. [Shahid Beheshti Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2016-12-15

    Lead, mercury, tantalum and tungsten were used as target material for calculation of spallation processes in an ADS-TRIGA RC1 reactor. The results show that tungsten has the highest neutron production rate. Therefore it was selected as target material for further calculations. The sensitivity of neutron parameters of the ADS reactor core relative to a change of beam profile and proton energy was determined. The core assembly and parameters of the TRIGA RC1 demonstration facility were used for the calculation model. By changing the proton energy from 115 to 1 400 MeV by using the intra-nuclear cascade model of Bertini (INC-Bertini), the quantity of the relative difference in % for energy gain (G) and spallation neutron yield (Y{sub n/p}), increases to 289.99 % and 5199.15 % respectively. These changes also reduce the amount of relative difference for the proton beam current (I{sub p}) and accelerator power (P{sub acc}), 99.81 % and 81.28 % respectively. In addition, the use of a Gaussian distribution instead of a uniform distribution in the accelerator beam profile increases the quantity of relative difference for energy gain (G), net neutron multiplication (M) and spallation neutron yield (Y{sub n/p}), up to 4.93 %, 4.9 % and 5.55 % respectively.

  15. Thyroid hormone levels within reference range are associated with heart rate, cardiac structure, and function in middle-aged men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roef, Greet L; Taes, Youri E; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Daele, Caroline M; De Buyzere, Marc L; Gillebert, Thierry C; Rietzschel, Ernst R

    2013-08-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) has many effects on the heart, and marked changes in cardiac function and structure occur in patients with (subclinical) thyroid disease. We investigated whether between-subject variation in thyroid hormone levels within the euthyroid range is also associated with heart rate and echocardiographic heart function and structure. Subjects were selected from the Asklepios study (n=2524), a population-representative random sample of patients aged between 35 and 55 years, free from overt cardiovascular disease at baseline. Analyses were restricted to 2078 subjects (1013 women and 1065 men), not using antihypertensive or thyroid medication nor having antithyroperoxidase antibody levels above clinical cut-off or thyrotropin (TSH) levels outside the reference range. All subjects were phenotyped in-depth and underwent comprehensive echocardiography, including diastolic evaluation. Thyroid function parameters were determined by automated electrochemiluminescence. Heart rate was robustly positively associated with (quartiles of) free T3 (FT3) and T3, both in subjects with TSH levels within reference (0.27-4.2 μU/L) and in narrow TSH range (0.5-2.5 μU/L; plevels within the euthyroid range and heart rate, and more subtle effects on cardiac function and structure. More specifically, we suggest a smaller LV cavity size (with increased relative wall thickness), an enhanced atrial and ventricular contraction, and LV relaxation with higher circulating thyroid hormones. These results illustrate that variation in thyroid hormone levels, even within the reference range, exerts effects on the heart.

  16. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Su, Xingya; Zhao, Longmao

    The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 s-1 to 2.4 × 103 s-1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA) is occurred at the temperature region of 673-973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s-1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel.

  17. Experience-dependent enhancement of pitch-specific responses in the auditory cortex is limited to acceleration rates in normal voice range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, A; Gandour, J T; Suresh, C H

    2015-09-10

    The aim of this study is to determine how pitch acceleration rates within and outside the normal pitch range may influence latency and amplitude of cortical pitch-specific responses (CPR) as a function of language experience (Chinese, English). Responses were elicited from a set of four pitch stimuli chosen to represent a range of acceleration rates (two each inside and outside the normal voice range) imposed on the high rising Mandarin Tone 2. Pitch-relevant neural activity, as reflected in the latency and amplitude of scalp-recorded CPR components, varied depending on language-experience and pitch acceleration of dynamic, time-varying pitch contours. Peak latencies of CPR components were shorter in the Chinese than the English group across stimuli. Chinese participants showed greater amplitude than English for CPR components at both frontocentral and temporal electrode sites in response to pitch contours with acceleration rates inside the normal voice pitch range as compared to pitch contours with acceleration rates that exceed the normal range. As indexed by CPR amplitude at the temporal sites, a rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group only. Only over the right temporal site was amplitude greater in the Chinese group relative to the English. These findings may suggest that the neural mechanism(s) underlying processing of pitch in the right auditory cortex reflect experience-dependent modulation of sensitivity to acceleration in just those rising pitch contours that fall within the bounds of one's native language. More broadly, enhancement of native pitch stimuli and stronger rightward asymmetry of CPR components in the Chinese group is consistent with the notion that long-term experience shapes adaptive, distributed hierarchical pitch processing in the auditory cortex, and reflects an interaction with higher order, extrasensory processes beyond the sensory memory trace. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise.

  19. Low noise constant current source for bias dependent noise measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, D.; Bose, Suvendu; Bardhan, K. K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chakraborty, R. K. [Bidhannagar College, EB - 2, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-01-15

    A low noise constant current source used for measuring the 1/f noise in disordered systems in ohmic as well as nonohmic regime is described. The source can supply low noise constant current starting from as low as 1 {mu}A to a few tens of milliampere with a high voltage compliance limit of around 20 V. The constant current source has several stages, which can work in a standalone manner or together to supply the desired value of load current. The noise contributed by the current source is very low in the entire current range. The fabrication of a low noise voltage preamplifier modified for bias dependent noise measurements and based on the existing design available in the MAT04 data sheet is also described.

  20. Compressive mechanical compatibility of anisotropic porous Ti6Al4V alloys in the range of physiological strain rate for cortical bone implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuping; Li, Jinshan; Kou, Hongchao; Huang, Tingting; Zhou, Lian

    2015-09-01

    Porous titanium and its alloys are believed to be promising materials for bone implant applications, since they can reduce the "stress shielding" effect by tailoring porosity and improve fixation of implant through bone ingrowth. In the present work, porous Ti6Al4V alloys for biomedical application were fabricated by diffusion bonding of alloy meshes. Compressive mechanical behavior and compatibility in the range of physiological strain rate were studied under quasi-static and dynamic conditions. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V alloys possess anisotropic structure with elongated pores in the out-of-plane direction. For porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 60-70 % porosity, more than 40 % pores are in the range of 200-500 μm which is the optimum pore size suited for bone ingrowth. Quasi-static Young's modulus and yield stress of porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 30-70 % relative density are in the range of 6-40 GPa and 100-500 MPa, respectively. Quasi-static compressive properties can be quantitatively tailored by porosity to match those of cortical bone. Strain rate sensitivity of porous Ti6Al4V alloys is related to porosity. Porous Ti6Al4V alloys with porosity higher than 50 % show enhanced strain rate sensitivity, which is originated from that of base materials and micro-inertia effect. Porous Ti6Al4V alloys with 60-70 % porosity show superior compressive mechanical compatibility in the range of physiological strain rate for cortical bone implant applications.

  1. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jing

    Full Text Available The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10−3 s−1 to 2.4 × 103 s−1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA is occurred at the temperature region of 673–973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s−1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel. Keywords: Railway wheel steel, SHPB, Strain rate, Temperature effect, Strain aging

  2. Impact of Vessel Noise on Oyster Toadfish (Opsanus tau) Behavior and Implications for Underwater Noise Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahforst, Cecilia S.

    Underwater noise and its impacts on marine life are growing management concerns. This dissertation considers both the ecological and social concerns of underwater noise, using the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) as a model species. Oyster toadfish call for mates using a boatwhistle sound, but increased ambient noise levels from vessels or other anthropogenic activities are likely to influence the ability of males to find mates. If increased ambient noise levels reduce fish fitness then underwater noise can impact socially valued ecosystem services (e.g. fisheries). The following ecological objectives of the impacts of underwater noise on oyster toadfish were investigated: (1) to determine how noise influences male calling behavior; (2) to assess how areas of high vessel activity ("noisy") and low vessel activity ("quiet") influence habitat utilization (fish standard length and occupancy rate); and (3) to discover if fitness (number of clutches and number of embryos per clutch) is lower in "noisy" compared with "quiet" sites. Field experiments were executed in "noisy" and "quiet" areas. Recorded calls by males in response to playback sounds (vessel, predator, and snapping shrimp sounds) and egg deposition by females ("noisy" vs. "quiet" sites) demonstrated that oyster toadfish are impacted by underwater noise. First, males decreased their call rates and called louder in response to increased ambient noise levels. Second, oyster toadfish selected nesting sites in areas with little or no inboard motorboat activity. Third, male oyster toadfish at "noisy" sites either had no egg clutches on their shelters or the number of embryos per clutch was significantly lower than in the "quiet" areas. Underwater noise and disturbance from vessels are influencing the fitness of the oyster toadfish. The social significance of the growing concerns regarding underwater noise was investigated by identifying dominant themes found within two types of texts: four recent underwater noise

  3. Absolute rate constant and O(3P yield for the O(1D+N2O reaction in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Carl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The absolute rate constant for the reaction that is the major source of stratospheric NOx, O(1D+N2O → products, has been determined in the temperature range 227 K to 719 K, and, in the temperature range 248 K to 600 K, the fraction of the reaction that yields O(3P. Both the rate constants and product yields were determined using a recently-developed chemiluminescence technique for monitoring O(1D that allows for higher precision determinations for both rate constants, and, particularly, O(3P yields, than do other methods. We found the rate constant, kR1, to be essentially independent of temperature between 400 K and 227 K, having a value of (1.37±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1, and for temperatures greater than 450 K a marked decrease in rate constant was observed, with a rate constant of only (0.94±0.11×10−10 cm3 s−1 at 719 K. The rate constants determined over the 227 K–400 K range show very low scatter and are significantly greater, by 20% at room temperature and 15% at 227 K, than the current recommended values. The fraction of O(3P produced in this reaction was determined to be 0.002±0.002 at 250 K rising steadily to 0.010±0.004 at 600 K, thus the channel producing O(3P can be entirely neglected in atmospheric kinetic modeling calculations. A further result of this study is an expression of the relative quantum yields as a function of temperature for the chemiluminescence reactions (kCL1C2H + O(1D → CH(A + CO and (kCL2C2H + O(3P → CH(A + CO, both followed by CH(A → CH(X + hν, as kCL1(T/kCL2(T=(32.8T−3050/(6.29T+398.

  4. Influence of trophic variables on the depth-range distributions and zonation rates of deep-sea megafauna: the case of the Western Mediterranean assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartes, Joan E.; Carrassón, Maite

    2004-02-01

    We studied in a deep-sea megafaunal community the relationship of different trophic variables to the depth ranges inhabited by and depth zonation of species, after the ordination of fish and decapod crustaceans in feeding guilds. The variables studied included trophic level of species, food sources exploited, mean weight of predators and prey, feeding intensity and dietary diversity of species. We compiled data on the diets of 18 species of fish and 14 species of decapod crustaceans distributed between 862 and 2261 m in the Catalano-Balearic Basin (Western Mediterranean). Feeding guilds were identified for fish and decapods separately and at two depth strata (862-1400 and 1400-2261 m). The zonation rates (degree of depth overlap) between species within each trophic guild differed by guild and taxon (fish and decapods). The three guilds (G1, G2 and G3) of decapod crustaceans showed quite significantly distinct overlap. G1 (plankton feeders) showed the widest overlap (1326-1381 m) and G3 (benthos feeders) the narrowest (330-476 m). Among the four guilds established for fish, G1, comprising larger predators such as sharks, showed the lowest overlap (between 194 and 382 m). Macrourids overlap ranged between 122 and 553 m, the rest of benthopelagic feeders ranged between 423 and 970 m, and G3 (benthos feeders) gave overlaps between 867 and 1067 m. Significant differences were detected between the depth overlap of most feeding guilds excluding the paired comparisons between G1/macrourids, and G2/G3. Among decapods higher zonation rates (=lower depth overlap) were identified in those guilds occupying higher trophic levels (TL), with a similar, though not as general, trend among fish. In the ordination of species in feeding guilds, TL as indicated by δ15N measurements, was significantly correlated with Dimension 1 (D1) of ordination—MDS-analysis, both in fish and decapods at 862-1400 m. However, deeper (at 1400-2261 m), D1 was not significantly correlated with TL but

  5. Long-range coupling of single atoms mediated by metallic nano-wires and metamaterials: collective decay rate modifications and level shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzsotjan, David; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the long-range coupling of individual atoms coupled to plasmon modes of metallic nanostructures. Placing a pair of emitters along a thin metallic wire, we observe a strong, wire- mediated long-range interaction between the emitters. As a result, super- and subradiance can occur over distances large compared to the resonant wavelength. The states with enhanced or suppressed decay rate are the symmetric or anti-symmetric single-excitation states. Coupling more atoms to a wire network with a nontrivial coupling topology leads to interesting entangled subradiant states of the system. A similar long-range superradiance effect can be observed when two emitters are coupled by a metamaterial slab (also known as a perfect lens) having a refractive index n=-1. Besides the modification of decay rates, dipole-dipole shifts enter due to the plasmon-mediated interaction. Based on the superradiance effect, we propose setups for building a two-qubit quantum phase gate for quantum emitters coupled by a nanowire and a perfect lens, respectively, where the qubits are strongly interacting and individually addressable at the same time.

  6. Absolute Viscosities of Vegetable Oils at Different Temperatures and Shear Rate Range of 64.5 to 4835 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemuel M. Diamante

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the effect of higher shear rates (64.5 to 4835 s−1 on the absolute viscosities of different vegetable oils at different temperatures (26 to 90°C. The absolute viscosities of the different vegetable oils were determined using a Lamy Viscometer RM100, a rotating viscometer with coaxial cylinder. The torque of each sample at different temperatures was recorded at different shear rates. Based on the rheograms (plot of mean shear stress against shear rate, all of the vegetable oils studied were found to be Newtonian fluids. Rice bran oil was the most viscous (0.0398 Pa·s at 38°C while walnut oil was the least viscous (0.0296 Pa·s at 38°C among the oils studied. The higher shear range used did not significantly affect the absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils at the different temperatures. The absolute viscosities of the vegetable oils decreased with increasing temperature and can be fitted with an Arrhenius type relationship. The activation energies for the different vegetable oils ranged from 21 to 30 kJ/mole. The peanut and safflower oils had the highest and lowest activation energies, respectively. This means that greater energy was needed to effect a viscosity change in the peanut oil.

  7. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  8. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  9. Noise sensitivity and road traffic annoyance in a population sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Y.; Rylander, R.

    1991-12-01

    Noise sensitivity was studied in a random sample of the population of Gothenburg, Sweden. The selected population of 805 persons received a mailed questionnaire comprising questions on self-reported noise sensitivity, attitudes to noise, annoyance due to environmental noises and the effect of noise on daily activities. The response rate was 56%. Noise sensitivity was most common in older age groups. Noise-sensitive individuals were more annoyed by road traffic noise, and also reported interference with daily activities to a higher extent than non-sensitive persons. Listening to music while working or reading was also less common in the noise-sensitive group.

  10. An inexpensive sensor for noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Laura; Tatum, Marcus; Thomas, Geb; Sousan, Sinan; Koehler, Kirsten; Peters, Thomas

    2018-02-08

    Noise is a pervasive workplace hazard that varies spatially and temporally. The cost of direct-reading instruments for noise hampers their use in a network. The objectives for this work were to (1) develop an inexpensive noise sensor (noise sensors for use in an inexpensive sensor network. The inexpensive noise sensor consists of an electret condenser microphone, an amplifier circuit, and a microcontroller with a small form factor (28 mm by 47 mm by 9 mm) than can be operated as a stand-alone unit. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate 50 of the new sensors at 5 sound levels: (1) ambient sound in a quiet office; (2) a pink noise test signal from 65 to 85 dBA in 10 dBA increments; and (3) 94 dBA using a SLM calibrator. Ninety-four percent of the noise sensors (n = 46) were within ± 2 dBA of the SLM for sound levels from 65 dBA to 94 dBA. As sound level increased, bias decreased, ranging from 18.3% in the quiet office to 0.48% at 94 dBA. Overall bias of the sensors was 0.83% across the 75 dBA to 94 dBA range. These sensors are available for a variety of uses and can be customized for many applications, including incorporation into a stationary sensor network for continuous monitoring of noise in manufacturing environments.

  11. Accurate and stable equal-pressure measurements of water vapor transmission rate reaching the 10-6 g m-2 day-1 range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoichiro; Yanase, Takashi; Nagahama, Taro; Yoshida, Hajime; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of a gas barrier coating is a critically important parameter for flexible organic device packaging, but its accurate measurement without mechanical stress to ultrathin films has been a significant challenge in instrumental analysis. At the current stage, no reliable results have been reported in the range of 10-6 g m-2 day-1 that is required for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this article, we describe a solution for this difficult, but important measurement, involving enhanced sensitivity by a cold trap, stabilized temperature system, pumped sealing and calibration by a standard conductance element.

  12. Construction Noise Decreases Reproductive Efficiency in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Skye; Glickman, Gary; Norinsky, Rada; Quimby, Fred W; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2009-01-01

    Excessive noise is well known to impair rodent health. To better understand the effect of construction noise and to establish effective noise limits during a planned expansion of our vivarium, we analyzed the effects of construction noise on mouse gestation and neonatal growth. Our hypothesis was that high levels of construction noise would reduce the number of live births and retard neonatal growth. Female Swiss Webster mice were individually implanted with 15 B6CBAF1/J embryos and then exposed to 70- and 90-dBA concrete saw cutting noise samples at defined time points during gestation. In addition, groups of mice with litters were exposed to noise at 70, 80, or 90 dBA for 1 h daily during the first week after parturition. Litter size, birth weight, incidence of stillborn pups, and rate of neonatal weight gain were analyzed. Noise decreased reproductive efficiency by decreasing live birth rates and increasing the number of stillborn pups. PMID:19653943

  13. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  14. Low noise road surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bolčina, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Noise is everywhere. Noise is a sound that makes people stressful and irritate. It often couses sleep disorders and also health problems like different cardiovascular disorders, hearing loss…In most cases traffic noise is the most disturbing. There are different ways to prevent people from traffic noise like building noise barriers and insulation of facades. However noise barriers and insulation of facades do not prevent noise formation, but are lowering existing noise. Another disadvantage i...

  15. Experiment and Simulation Analysis on Noise Attenuation of Al/MF Cylindrical Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the issue concerning internal noise reduction of Al-made cylindrical shell structure, the noise control method of laying melamine foam (MF layer is adopted for in-shell noise attenuation experiments of Al and Al/MF cylindrical shells and corresponding internal noise response spectrograms are obtained. Based on the Virtual.Lab acoustics software, a finite element model is established for the analysis of noise in the Al/MF cylinder shell and numerical simulation computation is conducted for the acoustic mode and in-shell acoustic response; the correctness of the finite element model is verified via comparison with measured data. On this basis, influence rules of different MF laying rate and different laying thickness on acoustic cavity resonance response within the low and medium frequency range of 100–400 Hz are studied. It is indicated that noise reduction increases with MF laying rate, but the amplification decreases along with the rising of MF laying rate; noise reduction per unit thickness decreases with the increase of laying thickness, while noise reduction per unit area increases.

  16. Heterogeneous noise enhances spatial reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has identified the heterogeneity as crucial for the evolution of cooperation in spatial population. However, the influence of heterogeneous noise is still lack. Inspired by this interesting question, in this work, we try to incorporate heterogeneous noise into the evaluation of utility, where only a proportion of population possesses noise, whose range can also be tuned. We find that increasing heterogeneous noise monotonously promotes cooperation and even translates the full defection phase (of the homogeneous version) into the complete cooperation phase. Moreover, the promotion effect of this mechanism can be attributed to the leading role of cooperators who have the heterogeneous noise. These type of cooperators can attract more agents penetrating into the robust cooperator clusters, which is beyond the text of traditional spatial reciprocity. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in the society.

  17. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques.

  18. Aircraft and background noise annoyance effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate annoyance of multiple noise sources, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment, which used 48 subjects, was designed to establish annoyance-noise level functions for three community noise sources presented individually: jet aircraft flyovers, air conditioner, and traffic. The second experiment, which used 216 subjects, investigated the effects of background noise on aircraft annoyance as a function of noise level and spectrum shape; and the differences between overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance. In both experiments, rated annoyance was the dependent measure. Results indicate that the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for traffic is significantly different from that of flyover and air conditioner noise and that further research was justified to determine the influence of the two background noises on overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance (e.g., experiment two). In experiment two, total noise exposure, signal-to-noise ratio, and background source type were found to have effects on all three types of annoyance. Thus, both signal-to-noise ratio, and the background source must be considered when trying to determine community response to combined noise sources.

  19. Passerine birds breeding under chronic noise experience reduced fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Julia; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Cleasby, Ian R; Burke, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Fitness in birds has been shown to be negatively associated with anthropogenic noise, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. It is however crucial to understand the mechanisms of how urban noise impinges on fitness to obtain a better understanding of the role of chronic noise in urban ecology. Here, we examine three hypotheses on how noise might reduce reproductive output in passerine birds: (H1) by impairing mate choice, (H2) by reducing territory quality and (H3) by impeding chick development. We used long-term data from an island population of house sparrows, Passer domesticus, in which we can precisely estimate fitness. We found that nests in an area affected by the noise from large generators produced fewer young, of lower body mass, and fewer recruits, even when we corrected statistically for parental genetic quality using a cross-fostering set-up, supporting H3. Also, individual females provided their young with food less often when they bred in the noisy area compared to breeding attempts by the same females elsewhere. Furthermore, we show that females reacted flexibly to increased noise levels by adjusting their provisioning rate in the short term, which suggests that noise may be a causal factor that reduces reproductive output. We rejected H1 and H2 because nestbox occupancy, parental body mass, age and reproductive investment did not differ significantly between noisy and quiet areas. OUR RESULTS SUGGEST A PREVIOUSLY UNDESCRIBED MECHANISM TO EXPLAIN HOW ENVIRONMENTAL NOISE CAN REDUCE FITNESS IN PASSERINE BIRDS: by acoustically masking parent-offspring communication. More importantly, using a cross-fostering set-up, our results demonstrate that birds breeding in a noisy environment experience significant fitness costs. Chronic noise is omnipresent around human habitation and may produces similar fitness consequences in a wide range of urban bird species.

  20. Passerine birds breeding under chronic noise experience reduced fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schroeder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fitness in birds has been shown to be negatively associated with anthropogenic noise, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. It is however crucial to understand the mechanisms of how urban noise impinges on fitness to obtain a better understanding of the role of chronic noise in urban ecology. Here, we examine three hypotheses on how noise might reduce reproductive output in passerine birds: (H1 by impairing mate choice, (H2 by reducing territory quality and (H3 by impeding chick development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used long-term data from an island population of house sparrows, Passer domesticus, in which we can precisely estimate fitness. We found that nests in an area affected by the noise from large generators produced fewer young, of lower body mass, and fewer recruits, even when we corrected statistically for parental genetic quality using a cross-fostering set-up, supporting H3. Also, individual females provided their young with food less often when they bred in the noisy area compared to breeding attempts by the same females elsewhere. Furthermore, we show that females reacted flexibly to increased noise levels by adjusting their provisioning rate in the short term, which suggests that noise may be a causal factor that reduces reproductive output. We rejected H1 and H2 because nestbox occupancy, parental body mass, age and reproductive investment did not differ significantly between noisy and quiet areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: OUR RESULTS SUGGEST A PREVIOUSLY UNDESCRIBED MECHANISM TO EXPLAIN HOW ENVIRONMENTAL NOISE CAN REDUCE FITNESS IN PASSERINE BIRDS: by acoustically masking parent-offspring communication. More importantly, using a cross-fostering set-up, our results demonstrate that birds breeding in a noisy environment experience significant fitness costs. Chronic noise is omnipresent around human habitation and may produces similar fitness consequences in a wide range of urban bird species.

  1. Impulse Noise Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philemon; Ho, Kevin; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-05-01

    The new Auditory 4.0 model has been developed for the assessment of auditory outcomes, expressed as temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS), from exposures to impulse noise for unprotected ears, including the prediction of TTS recovery. Auditory 4.0 is an empirical model, constructed from test data collected from chinchillas exposed to impulse noise in the laboratory. Injury outcomes are defined as TTS and PTS, and Auditory 4.0 provides the full range of TTS and PTS dose-response curves with the risk factor constructed from A-weighted sound exposure level. Human data from large weapons noise exposure was also used to guide the development of the recovery model. Guided by data, a 28-dBA shift was applied to the dose-response curves to account for the scaling from chinchillas to humans. Historical data from rifle noise tests were used to validate the dose-response curves. New chinchilla tests were performed to collect recovery data to construct the TTS recovery model. Auditory 4.0 is the only model known to date that provides the full TTS and PTS dose-response curves, including a TTS recovery model. The model shows good agreement with historical data. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Wind turbine noise diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarz, W. [Aerocoustics Engineering Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Richarz, H.

    2009-07-01

    This presentation proposed a self-consistent model for broad-band noise emitted from modern wind turbines. The simple source model was consistent with the physics of sound generation and considered the unique features of wind turbines. Although the acoustics of wind turbines are similar to those of conventional propellers, the dimensions of wind turbines pose unique challenges in diagnosing noise emission. The general features of the sound field were deduced. Source motion and source directivity appear to be responsible for amplitude variations. The amplitude modulation is likely to make wind-turbine noise more audible, and may be partly responsible for annoyance that has been reported in the literature. Acoustic array data suggests that broad-band noise is emitted predominantly during the downward sweep of each rotor blade. Source motion and source directivity account for the observed pattern. Rotor-tower interaction effects are of lesser importance. Predicted amplitude modulation ranges from 1 dB to 6dB. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Quantitative analysis of quantum noise masking in quantum stream cipher by intensity modulation operating at G-bit/sec data rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakoshi, Takehisa; Futami, Fumio; Hirota, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    In any communication system, all data including encrypted data by the mathematical cipher are transmitted under the strict rule of the interface frame. Attacker can easily acquire the whole data the same as the data of legitimate users including the address, routing information and so on from the transmission line by tapping. This is very risky, especially for the secret sharing data center operations. So to hide the whole data in the transmission line is very attractive to ensure the high security level. This can be realized by Y-00 type random cipher that the ciphertext of simple mathematical cipher by PRNG is randomized by quantum noise and it gives a masking effect against the attacker's security analysis. This paper clarifies quantitative properties on the masking effect in the random cipher by Y-00 protocol, and shows the fact that a scheme by the intensity modulation may provide the greatest masking effect, even if the attacker employs the universal heterodyne receiver.

  4. Intelligence in early adulthood and subsequent hospitalisation and admission rates for the whole range of mental disorders: longitudinal study of 1,049,663 men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R.; Batty, G. David; Tynelius, Per; Deary, Ian J.; Rasmussen, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower intelligence is a risk factor for several specific mental disorders, but it is unclear whether it is a risk factor for all mental disorder or whether it is associated with illness severity. We examined the relation between pre-morbid intelligence and risk of hospital admission and total admission rates for the whole range of mental disorders. Methods Participants were 1,049,663 Swedish men who took tests of intelligence on conscription into military service and were followed up for hospital admissions for mental disorder for a mean of 22.6 years. International Classification of Diseases diagnoses were recorded at discharge from hospital. Results Risk of hospital admission for all categories of disorder rose with each point decrease in the nine-point IQ score. For a standard deviation decrease in IQ, age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) were 1.60 (1.55, 1.65) for schizophrenia, 1.49 (1.45, 1.53) for other non-affective psychoses, 1.50 (1.47, 1.51) for mood disorders, 1.51 (1.48, 1.54) for neurotic disorders, 1.60 (1.56, 1.64) for adjustment disorders, 1.75 (1.70, 1.80) for personality disorders, 1.75 (1.73, 1.77) for alcohol-related and 1.85 (1.82, 1.88) for other substance use disorders. Lower intelligence was associated with greater comorbidity. Associations changed little on adjustment for potential confounders. Men with lower intelligence had higher total admission rates, a possible marker of clinical severity. Conclusions Lower intelligence is a risk factor for the whole range of mental disorders and for illness severity. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is crucial if we are to find ways to reduce the burden of mental illness. PMID:19907333

  5. Effect of two rehabilitation protocols on range of motion and healing rates after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: aggressive versus limited early passive exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Gun; Cho, Nam Su; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2012-01-01

    To compare range of motion and healing rates between 2 different rehabilitation protocols after arthroscopic single-row repair for full-thickness rotator cuff tear. Sixty-four shoulders available for postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled in this study. Aggressive early passive rehabilitation (manual therapy [2 times per day] and unlimited self-passive stretching exercise) was performed in 30 shoulders (group A) and limited early passive rehabilitation (limited continuous passive motion exercise and limited self-passive exercise) in 34 shoulders (group B). A postoperative MRI scan was performed at a mean of 7.6 months (range, 6 to 12 months) after surgery. Regarding range of motion, group A improved more rapidly in forward flexion, external rotation at the side, internal and external rotation at 90° of abduction, and abduction than group B until 3 months postoperatively with significant differences. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups at 1-year follow-up (P = .827 for forward flexion, P = .132 for external rotation at the side, P = .661 for external rotation at 90° of abduction, and P = .252 for abduction), except in internal rotation at 90° of abduction (P = .021). In assessing the repair integrity with postoperative MRI scans, 7 of 30 cases (23.3%) in group A and 3 of 34 cases (8.8%) in group B had retears, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = .106). Pain, range of motion, muscle strength, and function all significantly improved after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, regardless of early postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, aggressive early motion may increase the possibility of anatomic failure at the repaired cuff. A gentle rehabilitation protocol with limits in range of motion and exercise times after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair would be better for tendon healing without taking any substantial risks

  6. Perceptual effects of noise reduction with respect to personal preference, speech intelligibility, and listening effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2013-01-01

    Most modern hearing aids use noise reduction to increase listening comfort in noisy environments. However, it is unclear whether perceptual effects (e.g., intelligibility, listening effort, and preference) of noise reduction differ among hearing aids and among listeners. The authors compared perceptual scores across different hearing aid noise-reduction systems to determine (1) whether noise-reduction systems differ perceptually and (2) which factors underlie the overall preference of individual listeners. The authors recorded hearing aid noise-reduction outputs and used these signals in a laboratory experiment. The recording method allowed the evaluation of noise reduction in an isolated form, without the dominant effects of hearing aid frequency response and interactions with dynamic-range compression. Ten normal-hearing subjects listened to speech in babble noise processed by noise reduction from four different hearing aids. The subjects performed (1) speech-intelligibility tests, (2) listening-effort ratings, and (3) paired-comparison ratings with respect to noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. Noise-reduction systems from different hearing aids differed in the degree to which they influenced the noise annoyance and speech naturalness perceived by the normal-hearing listeners. Small differences in intelligibility and effort scores were found among different noise-reduction systems but not between having noise reduction on and off. Subjects differed in whether their overall preference was more strongly related to noise annoyance or to speech naturalness. The authors conclude that noise annoyance and speech naturalness are determining factors for the overall preference of normal-hearing listeners for a specific noise-reduction condition, and found individual differences in the preferred weighting of these factors even in a homogeneous group of normal-hearing listeners. Subsequent experiments should include hearing-impaired subjects to

  7. Fitting Noise Management Signal Processing Applying the American Academy of Audiology Pediatric Amplification Guideline: Verification Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Levy, Charla; Pourmand, Nazanin; Abbasalipour, Parvaneh; Bagatto, Marlene; Richert, Frances; Moodie, Shane; Crukley, Jeff; Parsa, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    Although guidelines for fitting hearing aids for children are well developed and have strong basis in evidence, specific protocols for fitting and verifying some technologies are not always available. One such technology is noise management in children's hearing aids. Children are frequently in high-level and/or noisy environments, and many options for noise management exist in modern hearing aids. Verification protocols are needed to define specific test signals and levels for use in clinical practice. This work aims to (1) describe the variation in different brands of noise reduction processors in hearing aids and the verification of these processors and (2) determine whether these differences are perceived by 13 children who have hearing loss. Finally, we aimed to develop a verification protocol for use in pediatric clinical practice. A set of hearing aids was tested using both clinically available test systems and a reference system, so that the impacts of noise reduction signal processing in hearing aids could be characterized for speech in a variety of background noises. A second set of hearing aids was tested across a range of audiograms and across two clinical verification systems to characterize the variance in clinical verification measurements. Finally, a set of hearing aid recordings that varied by type of noise reduction was rated for sound quality by children with hearing loss. Significant variation across makes and models of hearing aids was observed in both the speed of noise reduction activation and the magnitude of noise reduction. Reference measures indicate that noise-only testing may overestimate noise reduction magnitude compared to speech-in-noise testing. Variation across clinical test signals was also observed, indicating that some test signals may be more successful than others for characterization of hearing aid noise reduction. Children provided different sound quality ratings across hearing aids, and for one hearing aid rated the sound

  8. The Effect of Music Listening on Pain, Heart Rate Variability, and Range of Motion in Older Adults After Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Su-Ru; Lee, Pi-Hsia; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that listening and not listening to music had on pain relief, heart rate variability (HRV), and knee range of motion in total knee replacement (TKR) patients who underwent continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation. We adopted a single-group quasi-experimental design. A sample of 49 TKR patients listened to music for 25 min during one session of CPM and no music during another session of CPM the same day for a total of 2 days. Results indicated that during CPM, patients exhibited a significant decrease in the pain level ( p < .05), an increase in the CPM knee flexion angle ( p < .05), a decrease in the low-frequency/high-frequency ratio (LF/HF) and normalized LF (nLF) of the HRV ( p < .01), and an increase in the normalized HF (nHF) and standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN; p < .01) when listening to music compared with no music. This study demonstrated that listening to music can effectively decrease pain during CPM rehabilitation and improve the joint range of motion in patients who underwent TKR surgery.

  9. Six Years in the Life of a Mother Bear - The Longest Continuous Heart Rate Recordings from a Free-Ranging Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Timothy G.; Iaizzo, Paul A.; Garshelis, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological monitoring of free-ranging wild animals is providing new insights into their adaptations to a changing environment. American black bears (Ursus americanus) are highly adaptable mammals, spending up to half the year hibernating, and the remainder of the year attempting to gain weight on a landscape with foods that vary seasonally and year to year. We recorded heart rate (HR) and corresponding activity of an adult female black bear over the course of six years, using an implanted monitor. Despite yearly differences in food, and an every-other year reproductive cycle, this bear exhibited remarkable consistency in HR and activity. HR increased for 12 weeks in spring, from minimal hibernation levels (mean 20-25 beats/minute [bpm]; min 10 bpm) to summer active levels (July daytime: mean 95 bpm). Timing was delayed following one cold winter. In August the bear switched from primarily diurnal to nocturnal, coincident with the availability of baits set by legal hunters. Activity in autumn was higher when the bear was with cubs. Birthing of cubs in January was identified by a transient increase in HR and activity. Long-term physiological and behavioral monitoring is valuable for understanding adaptations of free-ranging animals to climate change, food availability, and human-related stressors.

  10. Fe sub 3 Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  11. Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  12. Lean body mass-adjusted Cockcroft and Gault formula improves the estimation of glomerular filtration rate in subjects with normal-range serum creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wai H; Lim, Ee M; McDonald, Stephen

    2006-06-01

    Assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in individuals with normal-range serum creatinine is important in certain clinical situations, such as in potential living kidney donors. Accurate measurements of GFR invariably involve using an invasive method (e.g. inulin clearances), but is inconvenient. The aim of the present study was to determine whether serum creatinine-based prediction formulae adjusted for lean body mass (LBM) could improve the accuracy of GFR estimation in these subjects. Glomerular filtration rate was determined by the clearance of technetium-99m-labelled diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid ((99m)Tc DTPA) from plasma in 56 subjects with normal serum creatinine. For each subject, GFR was estimated using prediction formulae +/- LBM adjustment and compared with measured GFR. Formulae analysed include Cockcroft-Gault, Levey, Gates, Mawer, Hull, Toto, Jellife and Bjornsson. All formulae +/- LBM adjustment underestimated measured GFR, with poor precision, poor agreement and correlation (r (2) formulae correctly classified those with a normal measured GFR. LBM-adjusted formulae significantly improved the accuracy of GFR estimation compared with unadjusted formulae. The lean body mass-adjusted Cockcroft-Gault formula was the closest to measured GFR but is not accurate enough to replace radionuclide GFR measurement. Prediction formulae should be adjusted for LBM to improve GFR estimation.

  13. Activity-specific metabolic rates for diving, transiting, and resting at sea can be estimated from time-activity budgets in free-ranging marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanniard-du-Dot, Tiphaine; Trites, Andrew W; Arnould, John P Y; Speakman, John R; Guinet, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    Time and energy are the two most important currencies in animal bioenergetics. How much time animals spend engaged in different activities with specific energetic costs ultimately defines their likelihood of surviving and successfully reproducing. However, it is extremely difficult to determine the energetic costs of independent activities for free-ranging animals. In this study, we developed a new method to calculate activity-specific metabolic rates, and applied it to female fur seals. We attached biologgers (that recorded GPS locations, depth profiles, and triaxial acceleration) to 12 northern (Callorhinus ursinus) and 13 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella), and used a hierarchical decision tree algorithm to determine time allocation between diving, transiting, resting, and performing slow movements at the surface (grooming, etc.). We concomitantly measured the total energy expenditure using the doubly-labelled water method. We used a general least-square model to establish the relationship between time-activity budgets and the total energy spent by each individual during their foraging trip to predict activity-specific metabolic rates. Results show that both species allocated similar time to diving (~29%), transiting to and from their foraging grounds (~26-30%), and resting (~8-11%). However, Antarctic fur seals spent significantly more time grooming and moving slowly at the surface than northern fur seals (36% vs. 29%). Diving was the most expensive activity (~30 MJ/day if done non-stop for 24 hr), followed by transiting at the surface (~21 MJ/day). Interestingly, metabolic rates were similar between species while on land or while slowly moving at the surface (~13 MJ/day). Overall, the average field metabolic rate was ~20 MJ/day (for all activities combined). The method we developed to calculate activity-specific metabolic rates can be applied to terrestrial and marine species to determine the energetic costs of daily activities, as well as to

  14. Entangled light from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  15. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kovalev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms. Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.

  16. The importance of mean time in therapeutic range for complication rates in warfarin therapy of patients with atrial fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne Sig; Skjøth, Flemming; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Ehlers, Lars Holger

    2017-01-01

    \\Anticoagulation is used for stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, amongst other by use of the vitamin K antagonist, warfarin. Quality in warfarin therapy is often summarized by the time patients spend within the therapeutic range (percent time in therapeutic range, TTR). The correlation between TTR and the occurrence of complications during warfarin therapy has been established, but the influence of patient characteristics in that respect remains undetermined. The objective of the present papers was to examine the association between mean TTR and complication rates with adjustment for differences in relevant patient cohort characteristics. A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and Embase (2005-2015) to identify eligible studies reporting on use of warfarin therapy by patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and the occurrence of hemorrhage and thromboembolism. Both randomized controlled trials and observational cohort studies were included. The association between the reported mean TTR and major bleeding and stroke/systemic embolism was analyzed by random-effects meta-regression with and without adjustment for relevant clinical cohort characteristics. In the adjusted meta-regressions, the impact of mean TTR on the occurrence of hemorrhage was adjusted for the mean age and the proportion of populations with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack. In the adjusted analyses on thromboembolism, the proportion of females was, furthermore, included. Of 2169 papers, 35 papers met pre-specified inclusion criteria, holding relevant information on 31 patient cohorts. In univariable meta-regression, increasing mean TTR was significantly associated with a decreased rate of both major bleeding and stroke/systemic embolism. However, after adjustment mean TTR was no longer significantly associated with stroke/systemic embolism. The proportion of residual variance composed by between-study heterogeneity was substantial for all analyses

  17. Cryogenic MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, S.; Gaier, T.; Fernandez, J.; Erickson, N.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    Monolithic (MMIC) and discrete transistor (MIC) low noise amplifiers are compared on the basis of performance, cost, and reliability. The need for cryogenic LNA's for future large microwave arrays for radio astronomy is briefly discussed and data is presented on a prototype LNA for the 1 to 10 GZH range along with a very wideband LNA for the 1 to 60 GHz range.

  18. Detection Range of Airborne Magnetometers in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne magnetometers are utilized for the small-range search, precise positioning, and identification of the ferromagnetic properties of underwater targets. As an important performance parameter of sensors, the detection range of airborne magnetometers is commonly set as a fixed value in references regardless of the influences of environment noise, target magnetic properties, and platform features in a classical model to detect airborne magnetic anomalies. As a consequence, deviation in detection ability analysis is observed. In this study, a novel detection range model is proposed on the basis of classic detection range models of airborne magnetometers. In this model, probability distribution is applied, and the magnetic properties of targets and the environment noise properties of a moving submarine are considered. The detection range model is also constructed by considering the distribution of the moving submarine during detection. A cell-averaging greatest-of-constant false alarm rate test method is also used to calculate the detection range of the model at a desired false alarm rate. The detection range model is then used to establish typical submarine search probabilistic models. Results show that the model can be used to evaluate not only the effects of ambient magnetic noise but also the moving and geomagnetic features of the target and airborne detection platform. The model can also be utilized to display the actual operating range of sensor systems.

  19. Hole-Initiated-Avalanche, Linear-Mode, Single-Photon-Sensitive Avalanche Photodetector with Reduced Excess Noise and Low Dark Count Rate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation hard, single photon sensitive InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) receiver technology will be demonstrated useful for long range space based optical...

  20. Challenges in miniaturized automotive long-range lidar system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersch, Thomas; Weigel, Robert; Koelpin, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    This paper discusses the current technical limitations posed on endeavors to miniaturize lidar systems for use in automotive applications and how to possibly extend those limits. The focus is set on long-range scanning direct time of flight LiDAR systems using APD photodetectors. Miniaturization evokes severe problems in ensuring absolute laser safety while maintaining the systems' performance in terms of maximum range, signal-to-noise ratio, detection probability, pixel density, or frame rate. Based on hypothetical but realistic specifications for an exemplary system the complete lidar signal path is calculated. The maximum range of the system is used as a general performance indicator. It is determined with the minimum signal-to-noise ratio required to detect an object. Various system parameters are varied to find their impact on the system's range. The reduction of the laser's pulse width and the right choice for the transimpedance amplifier's amplification have shown to be practicable measures to double the system's range.

  1. A functional characterisation of a wide range of cover crop species: growth and nitrogen acquisition rates, leaf traits and ecological strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribouillois, Hélène; Fort, Florian; Cruz, Pablo; Charles, Raphaël; Flores, Olivier; Garnier, Eric; Justes, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cover crops can produce ecosystem services during the fallow period, as reducing nitrate leaching and producing green manure. Crop growth rate (CGR) and crop nitrogen acquisition rate (CNR) can be used as two indicators of the ability of cover crops to produce these services in agrosystems. We used leaf functional traits to characterise the growth strategies of 36 cover crops as an approach to assess their ability to grow and acquire N rapidly. We measured specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), leaf nitrogen content (LNC) and leaf area (LA) and we evaluated their relevance to characterise CGR and CNR. Cover crop species were positioned along the Leaf Economics Spectrum (LES), the SLA-LDMC plane, and the CSR triangle of plant strategies. LA was positively correlated with CGR and CNR, while LDMC was negatively correlated with CNR. All cover crops could be classified as resource-acquisitive species from their relative position on the LES and the SLA-LDMC plane. Most cover crops were located along the Competition/Ruderality axis in the CSR triangle. In particular, Brassicaceae species were classified as very competitive, which was consistent with their high CGR and CNR. Leaf functional traits, especially LA and LDMC, allowed to differentiate some cover crops strategies related to their ability to grow and acquire N. LDMC was lower and LNC was higher in cover crop than in wild species, pointing to an efficient acquisitive syndrome in the former, corresponding to the high resource availability found in agrosystems. Combining several leaf traits explained approximately half of the CGR and CNR variances, which might be considered insufficient to precisely characterise and rank cover crop species for agronomic purposes. We hypothesised that may be the consequence of domestication process, which has reduced the range of plant strategies and modified the leaf trait syndrome in cultivated species.

  2. [Auditory threshold for white noise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrat, R; Thillier, J L; Durivault, J

    1975-01-01

    The liminal auditory threshold for white noise and for coloured noise was determined from a statistical survey of a group of 21 young people with normal hearing. The normal auditory threshold for white noise with a spectrum covering the whole of the auditory field is between -- 0.57 dB +/- 8.78. The normal auditory threshold for bands of filtered white noise (coloured noise with a central frequency corresponding to the pure frequencies usually employed in tonal audiometry) describes a typical curve which, instead of being homothetic to the usual tonal curves, sinks to low frequencies and then rises. The peak of this curve is replaced by a broad plateau ranging from 750 to 6000 Hz and contained in the concavity of the liminal tonal curves. The ear is therefore less sensitive but, at limited acoustic pressure, white noise first impinges with the same discrimination upon the whole of the conversational zone of the auditory field. Discovery of the audiometric threshold for white noise constitutes a synthetic method of measuring acuteness of hearing which considerably reduces the amount of manipulation required.

  3. The epidemiology of noise exposure in the Australian workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work considers an alternate methodology for the estimation of the noise exposed population of the Australian workforce. Previous methods relied on the statistics from the annual rate of application for worker′s hearing loss compensation claims, the generalization of small scale surveys to the broader population or larger scale telephone surveys. This proposed method takes measured noise exposure data from sampled industries and combines that with official demographic information on the numbers employed in the respective industries. From the Australian data, it is estimated that around 20.1% of the workforce regularly work in noise above the recommended exposure standard (L Aeq, 8 h = 85 dB and 9.4% above and exposure of 90 dB. These figure lie within the range of estimates derived from other methodologies.

  4. Rate of transformation and normal range about cardiac size and cardiothoracic ratio according to patient position and age at chest radiography of Korean adult man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Min [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Purpose of this study is present the normal range of cardiac size and cardiothoracic ratio according to patient position(chest PA and AP) and age of Korean adult male on digital chest X - ray, And to propose a mutually compatible conversion rate. 1,024 males were eligible for this study, among 1,300 normal chest patients who underwent chest PA and low-dose CT examinations on the same day at the 'S' Hospital Health Examination Center in Seoul From January to December 2014. CS and CTR were measured by Danzer (1919). The mean difference between CS and CTR was statistically significant (p<0.01) in Chest PA (CS 135.48 mm, CTR 43.99%) and Chest AP image (CS 155.96 mm, CTR 51.75%). There was no statistically significant difference between left and right heart in chest PA and AP images(p>0.05). CS showed statistically significant difference between Chest PA (p>0. 05) and Chest AP (p<0.05). The thorax size and CTR were statistically significant (p<0.01) in both age and chest PA and AP. Result of this study, On Chest AP image CS was magnified 15%, CTR was magnified 17% compare with Chest PA image. CS and CTR were about 10% difference by changing posture at all ages.

  5. Technical Note: VUV photodesorption rates from water ice in the 120–150 K temperature range – significance for Noctilucent Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kulikov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies have been carried out with the aim to improve our understanding of physicochemical processes which take place at the water ice/air interface initiated by solar irradiation with a wavelength of 121.6 nm. It was intended to mimic the processes of ice particles characteristic of Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs. The experimental set-up used includes a high-vacuum chamber, a gas handling system, a cryostat with temperature controller, an FTIR spectrometer, a vacuum ultraviolet hydrogen lamp, and a microwave generator. We report the first results of measurements of the absolute photodesorption rate (loss of substance due to the escape of photoproducts into gas phase from thin (20–100 nm water ice samples kept in the temperature range of 120–150 K. The obtained results show that a flow of photoproducts into the gas phase is considerably lower than presumed in the recent study by Murray and Plane (2005. The experiments indicate that almost all photoproducts remain in the solid phase, and the principal chemical reaction between them is the recombination reaction H + OH → H2O which is evidently very fast. This means that direct photolysis of mesospheric ice particles seems to have no significant impact on the gas phase chemistry of the upper mesosphere.

  6. Occupational noise management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-06-15

    Occupational noise is a frequently encountered on-the-job health hazard. This guide presented the responsibilities and regulatory requirements related to business activities where noise above 80 decibels is present. The guide provided a definition of noise and discussed noise hazards, types of noise, and on-the-job noise exposure. A risk assessment to noise in the work environment was also discussed. A guide to a hearing conservation program was also included. The main purpose of a hearing conservation program is the prevention of noise induced hearing loss for employees exposed to occupational noise. The components of such a program were outlined, with particular reference to noise monitoring; noise exposure control; worker education and training; hearing (audiometric) testing; and annual program review and record keeping. It was concluded that in terms of record keeping, it can be very helpful to file noise exposure assessments, particularly personal exposure measurements, with hearing test records to facilitate for future reference. refs., appendices.

  7. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  8. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test.......A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  9. Amperometric noise at thin film band electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Simon T; Heien, Michael L; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-09-18

    Background current noise is often a significant limitation when using constant-potential amperometry for biosensor application such as amperometric recordings of transmitter release from single cells through exocytosis. In this paper, we fabricated thin-film electrodes of gold and conductive polymers and measured the current noise in physiological buffer solution for a wide range of different electrode areas. The noise measurements could be modeled by an analytical expression, representing the electrochemical cell as a resistor and capacitor in series. The studies revealed three domains; for electrodes with low capacitance, the amplifier noise dominated, for electrodes with large capacitances, the noise from the resistance of the electrochemical cell was dominant, while in the intermediate region, the current noise scaled with electrode capacitance. The experimental results and the model presented here can be used for choosing an electrode material and dimensions and when designing chip-based devices for low-noise current measurements.

  10. 11th International Workshop on Railway Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David; Gautier, Pierre-Etienne; Iida, Masanobu; Nelson, James; Thompson, David; Tielkes, Thorsten; Towers, David; Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The book reports on the 11th International Workshop on Railway Noise, held on 9 – 13 September, 2013, in Uddevalla, Sweden. The event, which was jointly organized by the Competence Centre Chalmers Railway Mechanics (CHARMEC) and the Departments of Applied Mechanics and Applied Acoustics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, covered a broad range of topics in the field of railway noise and vibration, including: prospects, legal regulations and perceptions; wheel and rail noise; prediction, measurements and monitoring; ground-borne vibration; squeal noise and structure-borne noise; and aerodynamic noise generated by high-speed trains. Further topics included: resilient track forms; grinding, corrugation and roughness; and interior noise and sound barriers. This book, which consists of a collection of peer-reviewed papers originally submitted to the workshop, not only provides readers with an overview of the latest developments in the field, but also offers scientists and engineers essent...

  11. Indirect combustion noise of auxiliary power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Xu, Jun; Schuster, Bill

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in noise suppression technology have significantly reduced jet and fan noise from commercial jet engines. This leads many investigators in the aeroacoustics community to suggest that core noise could well be the next aircraft noise barrier. Core noise consists of turbine noise and combustion noise. There is direct combustion noise generated by the combustion processes, and there is indirect combustion noise generated by the passage of combustion hot spots, or entropy waves, through constrictions in an engine. The present work focuses on indirect combustion noise. Indirect combustion noise has now been found in laboratory experiments. The primary objective of this work is to investigate whether indirect combustion noise is also generated in jet and other engines. In a jet engine, there are numerous noise sources. This makes the identification of indirect combustion noise a formidable task. Here, our effort concentrates exclusively on auxiliary power units (APUs). This choice is motivated by the fact that APUs are relatively simple engines with only a few noise sources. It is, therefore, expected that the chance of success is higher. Accordingly, a theoretical model study of the generation of indirect combustion noise in an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is carried out. The cross-sectional areas of an APU from the combustor to the turbine exit are scaled off to form an equivalent nozzle. A principal function of a turbine in an APU is to extract mechanical energy from the flow stream through the exertion of a resistive force. Therefore, the turbine is modeled by adding a negative body force to the momentum equation. This model is used to predict the ranges of frequencies over which there is a high probability for indirect combustion noise generation. Experimental spectra of internal pressure fluctuations and far-field noise of an RE220 APU are examined to identify anomalous peaks. These peaks are possible indirection combustion noise. In the case of the

  12. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  13. Conducted noise suppression up to GHz range by spin-sprayed Ni{sub 0.2}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2.8-x}O{sub 4} (x=0.3, 0.6) films having different natural resonance frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Koichi [NEC Tokin Corporation, 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8510 (Japan)]. E-mail: kondok@nec-tokin.com; Chiba, Tatsuya [NEC Tokin Corporation, 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8510 (Japan); Ono, Hiroshi [NEC Tokin Corporation, 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8510 (Japan); Yoshida, Shigeyoshi [NEC Tokin Corporation, 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8510 (Japan); Shimada, Yutaka [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Matsushita, Nobuhiro [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Abe, Masanori [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    In order to apply to a novel, flexible type of GHz noise suppressors, we prepared Ni{sub 0.2}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2.8-x}O{sub 4} films with x=0.3 and 0.6 and thicknesses of 2 and 5{mu}m, by spin spray ferrite plating from an aqueous solution on polyimide sheets at 90 deg. C. Placing the films onto a microstrip line, we measured transmission loss {delta}P{sub loss} and reflection parameter S{sub 11} at 10MHz-10GHz. As x increased from 0.3 to 0.6, f{sub r} (natural resonance frequency) decreased from 350 to 50MHz, which resulted in decreasing f{sub c} (a frequency from which {delta}P{sub loss} begins rising) from 400 to 100MHz. This means we can tune f{sub c} of the films by changing the Zn concentration x. At 8GHz, {delta}P{sub loss} obtained by the ferrite films increased from 40% to 70% when their thickness increased from 2 to 5{mu}m. We obtained S{sub 11}<10%, irrespective of Zn concentration, in the whole measurement frequency range. By the films with x=0.3 and 2{mu}m thickness we obtained {delta}P{sub loss}=40%, which was as strong as that obtained by a commercially available composite sheet type noise suppressor of 25{mu}m thickness that are made of ferromagnetic metal flakes embedded in a flexible polymer matrix. Moreover, {delta}P{sub loss} by the ferrite film increased to 70% when the thickness was increased to 5{mu}m. Therefore, our NiZn ferrite films are promising to be actually used as GHz noise suppressors with tunable working frequencies that exhibit stronger noise suppression than the commercialized composite type of noise suppressors.

  14. Flux Noise in a Superconducting Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, F. T.

    2017-08-01

    We study a superconducting transmission line (TL) formed by distributed L C oscillators and excited by external magnetic fluxes which are aroused from random magnetization (A ) placed in substrate or (B ) distributed at interfaces of a two-wire TL. The low-frequency dynamics of a random magnetic field is described based on the diffusion Langevin equation with a short-range source caused by (a ) a random amplitude or (b ) the gradient of magnetization. For a TL modeled as a two-port network with open and shorted ends, the effective magnetic flux at the open end has nonlocal dependency on noise distribution along the TL. The flux-flux correlation function is evaluated and analyzed for the regimes (A a ), (A b ), (B a ), and (B b ). Essential frequency dispersion takes place around the inverse diffusion time of random flux along the TL. Typically, noise effect increases with size faster than the area of the TL. The flux-flux correlator can be verified both via the population relaxation rate of the qubit, which is formed by the Josephson junction shunted by the TL with flux noises, and via random voltage at the open end of the TL.

  15. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletto, Rosangela; Janczak, Andrew M; Marchant-Forde, Ruth M; Marchant-Forde, Jeremy N; Matthews, Donald L; Dowell, Carol A; Hogan, Daniel F; Freeman, Lynetta J; Lay, Donald C

    2011-05-03

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for assessing farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency domain analyses may provide a sensitive and reliable measure of affective states and stress-mediated changes in sympathetic and parasympathetic tones. The aim of this research was to define low (LF) and high frequency (HF) power spectral ranges using pharmacological autonomic blockade, and to examine HRV and BPV parameter changes in response to atropine and propranolol in swine. Ten, 13-week old, barrows (n=6) and gilts (n=4) underwent surgery to place an intra-cardiac electrode and a blood pressure catheter attached to a biotelemetric transmitter; pigs had a 3-week recovery period prior to data collection. Each pig was subjected to administration of 4 intravenous (i.v.) drug treatments: a control treatment, 3 mL of saline, and 3 blockade treatments; 0.1 mg/kg of atropine, 1.0 mg/kg of propranolol, and .1 mg/kg of atropine together with 1.0 mg/kg of propranolol. All treatments were delivered by injection in the jugular vein with a minimum of 48 h between individual treatments. Behavior, ECG and blood pressure data were recorded continuously for a total of 1h, from 30 min pre-injection to 30 min post-injection. For data analyses, two 512-beat intervals were selected for each treatment while the pig was lying and inactive. The first interval was selected from the pre-injection period (baseline), and the second was selected between 10 and 30 min post-injection. Time and frequency domain (power spectral density) analyses were performed on each data interval. Subsequent, LF and HF bands from the power spectral densities were defined based on general linear and regression analyses. The HRV and BPV were computed with a covariate (baseline) factorial analysis of treatment by sex

  16. Non-Markovian noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulinski, A. (Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1994-10-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the [delta] function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process.

  17. Noise suppression via generalized-Markovian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    It is by now well established that noise itself can be useful for performing quantum information processing tasks. We present results which show how one can effectively reduce the error rate associated with a noisy quantum channel by counteracting its detrimental effects with another form of noise. In particular, we consider the effect of adding on top of a purely Markovian (Lindblad) dynamics, a more general form of dissipation, which we refer to as generalized-Markovian noise. This noise has an associated memory kernel and the resulting dynamics are described by an integrodifferential equation. The overall dynamics are characterized by decay rates which depend not only on the original dissipative time scales but also on the new integral kernel. We find that one can engineer this kernel such that the overall rate of decay is lowered by the addition of this noise term. We illustrate this technique for the case where the bare noise is described by a dephasing Pauli channel. We analytically solve this model and show that one can effectively double (or even triple) the length of the channel, while achieving the same fidelity, entanglement, and error threshold. We numerically verify this scheme can also be used to protect against thermal Markovian noise (at nonzero temperature), which models spontaneous emission and excitation processes. A physical interpretation of this scheme is discussed, whereby the added generalized-Markovian noise causes the system to become periodically decoupled from the background Markovian noise.

  18. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This study examine. This study examined noise pollution pollution pollution from sawmillin from sawmillin using HD600 digital data l using HD600 digital data logging sound level me ogging sound level me designed to elicit noise related information. The res sawmills was 58.1 sawmills was 58.1-64.86 dB(A) while machine ...

  19. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments such as tinnitus (96.6%), headache (86.6%) se prevention and control strategies are suggested in additio. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. machine, workers, impacts. , particularly at global concern as strong some high-ranking health.

  20. Noise exposure assessment in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosong, Thitiworn; Kaimook, Wandee; Tantisarasart, Ratchada; Sooksamear, Puwanai; Chayaphum, Satith; Kongkamol, Chanon; Srisintorn, Wisarut; Phakthongsuk, Pitchaya

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the dental services clinic and at the dental laboratory. A noise dosimeter was set following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria and then attached to the subjects' collar to record personal noise dose exposure during working periods. The peaks of the noise spectrum of dental instruments were at 1,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz which depended on the type of instrument. The differences in working areas and job positions had an influence on the level of noise exposure (p personal hearing zone found that the laboratory technicians were exposed to the highest impulsive noise levels (137.1 dBC). The dentists and dental assistants who worked at a pedodontic clinic had the highest percent noise dose (4.60 ± 3.59%). In the working areas, the 8-hour time-weighted average of noise levels ranged between 49.7-58.1 dBA while the noisiest working area was the dental laboratory. Dental personnel are exposed to noise intensities lower than occupational exposure limits. Therefore, these dental personnel may not experience a noise-induced hearing loss.

  1. Noise reduction by wavelet thresholding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Maarten

    2001-01-01

    .... I rather present new material and own insights in the que stions involved with wavelet based noise reduction . On the other hand , the presented material does cover a whole range of methodologies, and in that sense, the book may serve as an introduction into the domain of wavelet smoothing. Throughout the text, three main properties show up ever again: spar...

  2. Traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzaki, Masayuki; Yamaura, Yuichi; Francis, Clinton D.; Nakamura, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    Anthropogenic noise has been increasing globally. Laboratory experiments suggest that noise disrupts foraging behavior across a range of species, but to reveal the full impacts of noise, we must examine the impacts of noise on foraging behavior among species in the wild. Owls are widespread nocturnal top predators and use prey rustling sounds for localizing prey when hunting. We conducted field experiments to examine the effect of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey. Results suggest that foraging efficiency declines with increasing traffic noise levels due to acoustic masking and/or distraction and aversion to traffic noise. Moreover, we estimate that effects of traffic noise on owls’ ability to detect prey reach >120 m from a road, which is larger than the distance estimated from captive studies with bats. Our study provides the first evidence that noise reduces foraging efficiency in wild animals, and highlights the possible pervasive impacts of noise.

  3. Aircraft engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennepohl, F.

    An overview of the main aircraft engine noise sources is given. Special emphasis is devoted to turbomachinery/rotor noise, which plays an important role in all engine concepts appropriate to regional aircraft, such as turbofans, propellers, or new propfan engine concepts. The noise generating mechanisms, including propagation within the engine, and calculation methods used are described. Noise reduction methods are considered, with emphasis on cutoff design of turbomachines. Some noise features of counter rotating propellers and swept rotor blades are mentioned.

  4. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  5. Constitutive modelling of CK45N, AlZnMgCu1.5 and Ti-6Al-4V in a wide range of strain rate and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Magd, E.; Treppmann, C.; Korthäuer, M.

    2003-09-01

    Continuous constitutive equations for wide ranges of strain rates and temperatures are gaining increasing importance for adequate simulation of dynamic deformation processes. The flow behaviour of the carbon steel CK45N, the Aluminium Alloy AIZnMgCul.5 and the Titanium Alloy Ti6A14V is studied at different strain rates between 0.001 s^{-1} and 10000 s^{-1} with temperatures varying between 23^{circ}C and 1000^{circ}C at CK45N and Ti6A14V. AIZnMgCul.5 was investigated in a temperature range from 23^{circ}C up to 500^{circ}C. The mechanical behaviour of the three materials over this wide range needs the consideration of different physical deformation mechanisms. In the range of high temperatures and low strain rates stress relaxation due to creep deformation processes are superimposed to the plastic deformation process with a relatively low strain rate sensitivity and temperature dependence. In the range of high strain rates, the damping controlled deformation mechanism is additionally active leading to a high increase of the strain rate sensitivity. In case of steel, a dynamic age hardening mechanism is superimposed causing a stress increase between 300^{circ}C and 600^{circ}C according to strain rate. The correlation between the material parameters and the instability, localisation and damage is studied on the bases of simple models.

  6. Investigation of noise sources for digital radiography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Lutfi; Olgar, Turan

    2017-06-01

    The performance of digital radiography systems can be evaluated in terms of spatial resolution and noise. Noise plays an important role in the achievable image quality for detecting small and low-contrast structures in digital images created by these systems. Our aim in this study was to investigate the noise sources both in the spatial and frequency domain for three digital radiography systems, one digital fluoroscopy system, and one digital mammography system, and to obtain information about the effective operating dose range of these detectors. Noise evaluation in the spatial domain was done with the relative standard deviation-detector air kerma relationship evaluation method. The characterization of the noise in the spatial domain gives information about the types of noise, but does not give information about the noise power distribution in frequency space. Therefore, noise evaluation in the frequency domain was carried out by noise power spectrum measurement. The observed dominant noise component at lower detector doses was electronic noise for the digital mammography system, whereas structured noise was observed to make up nearly half of the total noise at higher detector doses for one of the digital radiography systems. The structured noise component was increased by use of a grid in these systems, independent of the grid ratio and grid frequency, but this increase was lower for higher grid frequencies. Furthermore, the structured noise coefficient was decreased with gain and offset calibrations. The five systems which we evaluated behaved as a quantum noise limited for clinically used detector doses.

  7. Amperometric Noise at Thin Film Band Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Heien, Michael L.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    ; for electrodes with low capacitance, the amplifier noise dominated, for electrodes with large capacitances, the noise from the resistance of the electrochemical cell was dominant, while in the intermediate region, the current noise scaled with electrode capacitance. The experimental results and the model......Background current noise is often a significant limitation when using constant-potential amperometry for biosensor application such as amperometric recordings of transmitter release from single cells through exocytosis. In this paper, we fabricated thin-film electrodes of gold and conductive...... polymers and measured the current noise in physiological buffer solution for a wide range of different electrode areas. The noise measurements could be modeled by an analytical expression, representing the electrochemical cell as a resistor and capacitor in series. The studies revealed three domains...

  8. Comparison of Aerodynamic Particle Size Distribution Between a Next Generation Impactor and a Cascade Impactor at a Range of Flow Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kuwana, Akemi; Shibata, Hiroko; Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2017-04-01

    Wide variation in respiratory flow rates between patients emphasizes the importance of evaluating the aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of dry powder inhaler (DPI) using a multi-stage impactor at different flow rates. US Pharmacopeia recently listed modified configurations of the Andersen cascade impactor (ACI) and new sets of cut-off diameter specifications for the operation at flow rates of 60 and 90 L/min. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of these changes on the APSD of DPI products at varied flow rates. We obtained APSD profiles of four DPIs and device combinations, Relenza®-Diskhaler® (GlaxoSmithKline Co.), Seebri®-Breezhaler® (Novartis Pharma Co.), Pulmicort®-Turbuhaler® (Astrazeneca Co.), and Spiriva®-Handihaler® (Nippon Boehringer Ingelheim Co.) using Next Generation Impactors (NGIs) and ACIs at flow rates from 28.3 to 90 L/min to evaluate the difference in the use of previous and new sets of cut-off diameter specifications. Processing the data using the new specifications for ACI apparently reduced large differences in APSD obtained by NGI and ACI with the previous specifications at low and high flow rates in all the DPIs. Selecting the appropriate configuration of ACI corresponding to the flow rate provided comparable APSD profiles of Pulmicort®-Turbuhaler® to those using NGIs at varied flow rates. The results confirmed the relevance of the current US Pharmacopeia specifications for ACI analysis in obtaining APSD profiles of DPI products at wide flow rates.

  9. Tools for noise characterization in Virgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accadia, T; Belletoile, A [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Ballardin, G [European Gravitational Observatory (EGO), I-56021 Cascina (PI) (Italy); Barsuglia, M; Bouhou, B [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS: UMR7164-IN2P3-Observatoire de Paris-Universite Denis Diderot-Paris 7 - CEA : DSM/IRFU (France); Bonnand, R [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances (LMA), IN2P3/CNRS, F-69622 Villeurbanne, Lyon (France); Acernese, F; Antonucci, F; Astone, P; Barone, F; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Birindelli, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Boschi, V; Bosi, L, E-mail: elena.cuoco@ego-gw.i

    2010-08-01

    Several software tools were used to perform on-line and of-line noise analysis as a support to commissioning activities, to monitor the rate of glitches, the occurrence of non stationary noise, the presence of environmental contamination, the behavior of narrow spectral features and the coherence with auxiliary channels. We report about the use of these tools to study the main sources of identified noise: broadband, spectral lines and glitches. Plans for the upgrade of the tools will be presented, for example for lines identification purpose to let the scientists in control room do noise characterization in an easier way.

  10. Action-noise-assisted quantum control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amikam; Torrontegui, E.; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of action noise on state-to-state control protocols. Action noise creates dephasing in the instantaneous eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian and hampers the fidelity of the final state with respect to the target state. We find that for shorter protocols the noise more strongly influences the dynamics and degrades fidelity. We suggest improving the fidelity by inducing stronger dephasing rates along the process. The effects of action noise on the dynamics and its manipulation is described for a general Hamiltonian and is then studied by examples.

  11. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  12. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  13. Rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with CH3CHF2 and CHCl2CF3 over the temperature range 295-388 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.

    1991-01-01

    Rate constants for the reactions of OH radicals with CH3CHF2 and CHCl2CF3 have been determined over the temperature range 295-388 K and a total pressure of 1 atm. The OH rate data were obtained using the absolute rate technique of pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic spectroscopy. The data can...... and in the light of the important role CH3CHF2 and CHCl2CF3 play as alternatives to the fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons....

  14. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso; Babisch, Wolfgang; Basner, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The role of noise as an environmental pollutant and its impact on health are being increasingly recognized. Beyond its effects on the auditory system, noise causes annoyance and disturbs sleep, and it impairs cognitive performance. Furthermore, evidence from epidemiologic studies demonstrates that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Both observational and experimental studies indicate that in particular night-time noise can cause disruptions of sleep structure, vegetative arousals (e.g. increases of blood pressure and heart rate) and increases in stress hormone levels and oxidative stress, which in turn may result in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension. This review focuses on the cardiovascular consequences of environmental noise exposure and stresses the importance of noise mitigation strategies for public health. PMID:24616334

  15. NB-PLC channel modelling with cyclostationary noise addition & OFDM implementation for smart grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Togis; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Power line communication (PLC) technology can be a viable solution for the future ubiquitous networks because it provides a cheaper alternative to other wired technology currently being used for communication. In smart grid Power Line Communication (PLC) is used to support communication with low rate on low voltage (LV) distribution network. In this paper, we propose the channel modelling of narrowband (NB) PLC in the frequency range 5 KHz to 500 KHz by using ABCD parameter with cyclostationary noise addition. Behaviour of the channel was studied by the addition of 11KV/230V transformer, by varying load location and load. Bit error rate (BER) Vs signal to noise ratio SNR) was plotted for the proposed model by employing OFDM. Our simulation results based on the proposed channel model show an acceptable performance in terms of bit error rate versus signal to noise ratio, which enables communication required for smart grid applications.

  16. Noise Residual Learning for Noise Modeling in Distributed Video Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm which exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The noise model is one of the inherently difficult challenges in DVC. This paper considers Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes...... noise residual learning techniques that take residues from previously decoded frames into account to estimate the decoding residue more precisely. Moreover, the techniques calculate a number of candidate noise residual distributions within a frame to adaptively optimize the soft side information during...... decoding. A residual refinement step is also introduced to take advantage of correlation of DCT coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques robustly improve the coding efficiency of TDWZ DVC and for GOP=2 bit-rate savings up to 35% on WZ frames are achieved compared with DISCOVER....

  17. Individual daytime noise exposure in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ute; Breitner, Susanne; Hampel, Regina; Wolf, Kathrin; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Gu, Jianwei; Radon, Katja; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies showed that chronic noise exposure modeled through noise mapping is associated with adverse health effects. However, knowledge about real individual noise exposure, emitted by several sources, is limited. To explain the variation in individual daytime noise exposure regarding different microenvironments, activities and individual characteristics. In a repeated measures study in Augsburg, Germany (March 2007-December 2008), 109 individuals participated in 305 individual noise measurements with a mean duration of 5.5h. Whereabouts and activities were recorded in a diary. One-minute averages of A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leq) were determined. We used mixed additive models to elucidate the variation of Leq by diary-based information, baseline characteristics and time-invariant variables like long-term noise exposure. Overall noise levels were highly variable (median: 64 dB(A); range: 37-105 dB(A)). Highest noise levels were measured in traffic during bicycling (69 dB(A); 49-97 dB(A)) and lowest while resting at home (54 dB(A); 37-94 dB(A)). Nearly all diary-based information as well as physical activity, sex and age-group had significant influences on individual noise. In an additional analysis restricted to times spent at the residences, long-term noise exposure did not improve the model fit. Individual exposures to day-time noise were moderate to high and showed high variations in different microenvironments except when being in traffic. Individual noise levels were greatly determined by personal activities but also seemed to depend on environmental noise levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  19. Low Noise Millimeter Wave LNA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort will result in a low noise MMIC G-Band amplifier the covers the entire 165 to 193GHz frequency range. The amplifier will be designed using a 50nm...

  20. Effects of noise, nonlinear processing, and linear filtering on perceived speech quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M; Anderson, Melinda C

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure subjective quality ratings in listeners with normal hearing and listeners with hearing loss for speech subjected to a wide range of processing conditions that are representative of real hearing aids. Speech quality was assessed using a rating scale in a group of 14 listeners with normal hearing and 15 listeners with mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss. Controlled simulations of hearing aid processing were used to process speech that included speech subjected to (1) noise and nonlinear processing, (2) linear filtering, and (3) combinations of noise, nonlinear processing, and linear filtering. The 32 conditions of noise and nonlinear processing included stationary speech-shaped nose, multitalker babble, peak clipping, quantization noise, spectral subtraction, and dynamic range compression (in quiet, with babble, and with spectral subtraction). The 32 linear filtering conditions included high-pass filtering, low-pass filtering, band-pass filtering, positive and negative spectral tilt, and resonance peaks. Subsets of these conditions were used for the 36 conditions that combined noise and nonlinear processing with linear processing. Both listeners with normal hearing and listeners with hearing loss gave consistent (reliable) ratings. In both listener groups, sound quality was significantly affected by the noise, nonlinear processing, and linear filtering conditions. Compared with the listeners with normal hearing, the listeners with hearing loss showed significantly lower ratings of sound quality in nearly all of the processing conditions. For the conditions included in the current hearing aid simulation, noise and nonlinear conditions had a greater effect on quality judgments than did the linear filtering conditions. The data reported here provide a comprehensive dataset of speech quality ratings for simulated hearing aid processing conditions. The results indicate that quality ratings by listeners with hearing

  1. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingji; Or, Siu Wing

    2017-10-25

    We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME) transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG) technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4-30.6 V/(T/m), a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of noise of 0.16-620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz-170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/ f ) noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  2. Repeated exposure to noise increases tolerance in a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Mills, Suzanne C; Lecchini, David; Nedelec, Brendan; Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    Some anthropogenic noise is now considered pollution, with evidence building that noise from human activities such as transportation, construction and exploration can impact behaviour and physiology in a broad range of taxa. However, relatively little research has considered the effects of repeated or chronic noise; extended exposures may result in habituation or sensitisation, and thus changes in response. We conducted a field-based experiment at Moorea Island to investigate how repeated exposure to playback of motorboat noise affected a coral reef fish (Dascyllus trimaculatus). We found that juvenile D. trimaculatus increased hiding behaviour during motorboat noise after two days of repeated exposure, but no longer did so after one and two weeks of exposure. We also found that naïve individuals responded to playback of motorboat noise with elevated ventilation rates, but that this response was diminished after one and two weeks of repeated exposure. We found no strong evidence that baseline blood cortisol levels, growth or body condition were affected by three weeks of repeated motorboat-noise playback. Our study reveals the importance of considering how tolerance levels may change over time, rather than simply extrapolating from results of short-term studies, if we are to make decisions about regulation and mitigation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in the headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. L. May; R. E. Gresswell

    2003-01-01

    Abstract - Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was...

  4. Signs of noise-induced neural degeneration in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtegaard, Pernille; Olsen, Steen Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    of background noise, while leaving the processing of low-level stimuli unaffected. The purpose of this study was to investigate if signs of such primary neural damage from noise-exposure could also be found in noiseexposed human individuals. It was investigated: (1) if noise-exposed listeners with hearing...... thresholds within the “normal” range perform poorer, in terms of their speech recognition threshold in noise (SRTN), and (2) if auditory brainstem responses (ABR) reveal lower amplitude of wave I in the noise-exposed listeners. A test group of noise/music-exposed individuals and a control group were...

  5. Noise in the animal shelter environment: building design and the effects of daily noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Crista L; Enns, R Mark; Grandin, Temple

    2006-01-01

    Sound levels in animal shelters regularly exceed 100 dB. Noise is a physical stressor on animals that can lead to behavioral, physiological, and anatomical responses. There are currently no policies regulating noise levels in dog kennels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise levels dogs are exposed to in an animal shelter on a continuous basis and to determine the need, if any, for noise regulations. Noise levels at a newly constructed animal shelter were measured using a noise dosimeter in all indoor dog-holding areas. These holding areas included large dog adoptable, large dog stray, small dog adoptable, small dog stray, and front intake. The noise level was highest in the large adoptable area. Sound from the large adoptable area affected some of the noise measurements for the other rooms. Peak noise levels regularly exceeded the measuring capability of the dosimeter (118.9 dBA). Often, in new facility design, there is little attention paid to noise abatement, despite the evidence that noise causes physical and psychological stress on dogs. To meet their behavioral and physical needs, kennel design should also address optimal sound range.

  6. Noise as a Health Hazard for Children, Time to Make a Noise about it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Neha; Batra, Prerna; Gupta, Piyush

    2016-02-01

    Noise, a modern day curse of advancing infrastructure and technology, has emerged as an important public health problem. Exposure to noise during pregnancy may result in high-frequency hearing loss in newborns, growth retardation, cochlear damage, prematurity and birth defects. Newborns exposed to sound above 45 decibels may experience increase in blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate; decreased oxygen saturation; and increased caloric consumption. Noise exposure in older children may result in learning disabilities, attention difficulties, insulin resistance, hypertension, stress ulcers and cardiovascular diseases. Sudden exposure to loud noise can lead to rupture of eardrum. The damaging effects of noise pollution are more noticeable in large metropolitan cities, the hubs of urban settlements and industrial growth. Another concern is noise pollution inside the hospitals (particularly intensive care areas) that can lead to serious health consequences both for caregivers and for children. The issue needs to be addressed by both researchers and policy makers on an urgent basis.

  7. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  8. Noise in mesoscopic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    This is a course on noise which covers some of the scattering theory for normal metals, Hanbury Brown and Twiss analogs for noise correlations with electrons, noise correlations in superconducting/normal metal junctions. Entanglement in such NS systems is described with a criterion for violating Bell inegalities. The last section is devoted to the perturbative derivation of noise in a particular one dimensional correlated electron system (Luttinger liquid): edge states in the fractional quant...

  9. l/f Noise in the Superconducting Transition of a MgB2 Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, B.; Aslam, S.; Jones, H.; Stevenson, T.; Cao, N.

    2010-01-01

    The noise voltage spectral density in the superconducting transition of a MgB2 thin film on a SiN-coated Si thick substrate was measured over the frequency range 1 Hz-to-1 KHz. Using established bolometer noise theory the theoretical noise components due to Johnson, 1/f(excess) and phonon noise are modeled to the measured data. It is shown that for the case of a MgB2 thin film in the vicinity of the mid-point of transition, coupled to a heat sink via a fairly high thermal conductance (approximately equal to 10(sup -1) W/K)) that the measured noise voltage spectrum is 1/f limited and exhibits lit dependence with a varying between 0.3 and 0.5 in the measured frequency range. At a video frame rate frequency of 30 Hz the measured noise voltage density in the film is approximately equal to 61 nV /the square root of HZ, using this value an upper limit of electrical NEP approximately equal to 0.67pW / the square root of Hz is implied for a practical MgB2 bolometer operating at 36.1 K.

  10. Insights Gained from the Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195’s Transcriptome Responding to a Wide Range of Respiration Rates and Substrate Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    column temperature of 160° C, and the FID detector temperature of 200° C on a Supelcowax 10 4 column (30 m × 0.53 mm with 1.00 μm film, Supelco). The...monochlorophenol ( MCP ) is the terminal product (21). Therefore, DET will receive 13 2 eeqs per mol DCP. The respiration rate equation for DCP, rDCP, in μeeq

  11. Low noise ICR detection electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.A.; Bruce, J.E.; Hofstadler, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    FTICR signal detection offers many challenges; both wide bandwidth and low noise performance are required. Since, the input impedance of the amplifier is a very critical parameter, optimal performance of the preamplifier involves a careful balance of input impedance and noise performance through circuit design and component selection. The FTICR cell and its connections to the preamplifier are another critical parameter in FTICR detection sensitivity. This work has investigated signal detection electronics for improved FTICR detection sensitivity. Amplifier noise sources are identified and their effect on detection sensitivity are evaluated. A high sensitivity, low noise preamplifier, developed in this laboratory, is presented and its performance is evaluated and contrasted with different preamplifier configurations. The detection circuit is analyzed and the effect of cell and wiring capacitance is discussed. The circuit sensitivity is calculated and compared with measured results. Component selection criteria are discussed and the present state-of-the-art components are evaluated. The effect of preamplifier cooling is also investigated and the results are presented. Different detection frequency ranges result in different circuit optimization; these effects are analyzed and optimal component values and circuit configurations are shown for different frequency ranges.

  12. Noise Perturbation Improves Supervised Speech Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    perturb a noise segment, we first apply short-time Fourier transform (STFT) to derive noise spectrogram, where a frame length of 20 ms and a frame...In addition, we show HIT−FA rate for voiced and unvoiced intervals in Table 4 and Table 5 respectively. We find that frequency perturbation is...effective for both voiced and unvoiced intervals. While classification accuracy and HIT−FA rate evaluate the estimated binary masks, STOI directly compares

  13. Noise pollution has limited effects on nocturnal vigilance in peahens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L; Hermann, Fredrick S

    2016-01-01

    Natural environments are increasingly exposed to high levels of noise pollution. Noise pollution can alter the behavior of animals but we know little about its effects on antipredator behavior. We therefore investigated the impact of noise pollution on vigilance behavior and roost selection in an avian species, peafowl (Pavo cristatus), that inhabits urban environments. Captive peahens were exposed to noise pollution at night and their vigilance levels and roost selections were monitored. The vigilance levels of peahens were unaffected by exposure to noise pollution within trials. Furthermore, the peahens exhibited no preference for roosting farther or closer to noise pollution. Interestingly, predators often avoided the experimental area during nights with noise pollution, which could explain why vigilance rates were higher overall during control compared to noise trials. The results suggest that peahens' perception of risk is not drastically impacted by noise pollution but longer-term studies will be necessary to assess any chronic effects.

  14. Noise in restaurants: levels and mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai Ming; Chung, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (L(eq,1-h)) was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  15. Calculations ofB1Distribution, Specific Energy Absorption Rate, and Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio for a Body-Size Birdcage Coil Loaded with Different Human Subjects at 64 and 128 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Collins, C M; Smith, M B

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model of a female body is developed to study the effects of different body types with different coil drive methods on radio-frequency magnetic ( B 1 ) field distribution, specific energy absorption rate (SAR), and intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (ISNR) for a body-size birdcage coil at 64 and 128 MHz. The coil is loaded with either a larger, more muscular male body model (subject 1) or a newly developed female body model (subject 2), and driven with two-port (quadrature), four-port, or many (ideal) sources. Loading the coil with subject 1 results in significantly less homogeneous B 1 field, higher SAR, and lower ISNR than those for subject 2 at both frequencies. This dependence of MR performance and safety measures on body type indicates a need for a variety of numerical models representative of a diverse population for future calculations. The different drive methods result in similar B 1 field patterns, SAR, and ISNR in all cases.

  16. Individual differences in human annoyance response to noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, R. G.; Hart, F. D.; Obrien, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Individual variations in annoyance and in susceptibility to noise were studied to establish a finer definition of the ingredients of the human annoyance response. The study involved interactions among a heterogeneous sample of human subjects, various noise stimuli, and different physical environments of exposure. Significant differences in annoyance ratings among the six noise stimuli, all equated for peak sound pressure level, were found.

  17. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  18. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  19. Using noise to probe and characterize gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Chris D; McCollum, James M; Allen, Michael S; Dar, Roy D; Simpson, Michael L

    2008-08-05

    Stochastic fluctuations (or "noise") in the single-cell populations of molecular species are shaped by the structure and biokinetic rates of the underlying gene circuit. The structure of the noise is summarized by its autocorrelation function. In this article, we introduce the noise regulatory vector as a generalized framework for making inferences concerning the structure and biokinetic rates of a gene circuit from its noise autocorrelation function. Although most previous studies have focused primarily on the magnitude component of the noise (given by the zero-lag autocorrelation function), our approach also considers the correlation component, which encodes additional information concerning the circuit. Theoretical analyses and simulations of various gene circuits show that the noise regulatory vector is characteristic of the composition of the circuit. Although a particular noise regulatory vector does not map uniquely to a single underlying circuit, it does suggest possible candidate circuits, while excluding others, thereby demonstrating the probative value of noise in gene circuit analysis.

  20. Microwave noise modeling of FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Giovanni; Caddemi, Alina; Schreurs, Dominique M. M.-P.; Wiatr, Wojciech; Mercha, Abdelkarim

    2011-02-01

    The noise characteristics of advanced silicon semiconductor devices fabricated with FinFET technology are investigated and modeled at the probe tip reference planes in the microwave frequency range. The transistor noise model is obtained by assigning an equivalent temperature to each resistor of the small signal equivalent circuit. These temperatures are selected to be equal to the room temperature with the exception of the temperature values of the intrinsic output, feedback, and substrate resistances, which are selected in order to reproduce accurately the 50 Ω noise factor measurements over a broadband frequency range going from 0.5 GHz up to 26.5 GHz. Accurate model simulations are obtained at such high frequencies, thanks to the inclusion of the noise temperature associated to the feedback and substrate resistances representing non-quasi-static effects which cannot be neglected in the investigated frequency range.

  1. Influence of stocking rate, range condition and rainfall on seasonal beef production patterns in the semi-arid savanna of KwaZulu-Natal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hatch, GP

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available of the Swartland form with Clovelly, Hutton, Mispah, Glenrosa and Bonheim forms, occurred at the sites (Soil Classification Working Group, 1991). Three treatments at each site were stocked at the start of each season (October) with 250 kg Brahman-cross cattle... rate. Derivation of the relation from the results of grazing trials. J. Agric. Sci. 83. 335-342. MCDONALD, I.A.W. 1982. The influence of short-term climatic fluctuations on the distribution of savanna organisms in southern Africa. M.Sc. thesis...

  2. Direct-reading dial for noise temperature and noise resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1967-01-01

    An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance.......An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance....

  3. Određivanje daljine cilja pomoću video senzora i analiza uticaja grešaka i šuma merenja / Target range evaluation using video sensor and analysis of the influence of measurement noise and errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoslav Ugarak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available U radu je opisan matematički model određivanja daljine cilja obradom video snimaka u toku praćenja. Analizirani su doprinosi parametara koji utiču na veličinu grešaka i određene su vrednosti standardnog odstupanja. / This paper presents mathematical model of determining target range by analyzing video frame during the tracking. The contribution of effective parameters to accuracy are analyzed and values of standard deviation are determined.

  4. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  5. Numerical evaluation of image homogeneity, signal-to-noise ratio, and specific absorption rate for human brain imaging at 1.5, 3, 7, 10.5, and 14T in an 8-channel transmit/receive array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhipeng; Park, Joshua; Cho, Zang-Hee; Collins, Christopher M

    2015-05-01

    To predict signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) trends and absorbed energy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain up to 14T. A human head in an eight-channel transmit/receive coil was simulated with Maxwell and Bloch equations to determine excitation homogeneity with radiofrequency (RF) shimming, image homogeneity, SNR, and absorbed energy in MRI from 1.5 to 14T considering realistic field distributions and relaxation properties. RF shimming alone achieved a standard deviation in excitation flip angle less than 10° in mid-brain up to 14T, but produced a small region with low excitation on a lower slice. Current reconstruction methods may produce shading artifacts at 14T. SNR increases with a greater-than-linear rate for gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences having short (2 msec) echo time (TE) and long relaxation time (TR) (∼2.3-fold increase from 7T to 14T), but a less-than-linear rate if TE is 10 msec (∼1.6-fold increase from 7T to 14T). Depending on the sequence, SNR per square root of imaging time may produce a less-than-linear increase with B0 . Whole-head absorbed energy shows a less-than-quadratic increase with B0 (1.7-fold increase from 7T to 14T). Numerical simulations indicate that with proper preparation and precautions, imaging of the human brain at up to 14T could be performed safely, with advantages in SNR. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Pseudo noise code and data transmission method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerkoski, L. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Pseudo noise ranging codes, having a predetermined chipping rate, and a pair of binary data sources, each having a bit rate no greater than one tenth the chipping rate, quadriphase, digitally modulate a suppressed carrier wave having a first frequency are examined. Two additional binary data sources, each having a bit rate that is not restricted by the chipping rate of the first carrier, quadriphase, digitally modulate a suppressed carrier wave having a second frequency. The first and second frequencies are only slightly displaced so that there is overlap in the frequency bands which modulate the two carriers. The two suppressed carrier waves are linearly combined and transmitted from a first station to a second station so that the amplitude of the transmitted first wave is controlled so as not to degrade the detectability of the second wave at the second station.

  7. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Christoph; Katz, Joseph; Margalit, S.; Shacham, J.; Yariv, A.

    1982-01-01

    The noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode is derived from the rate equations including Langevin noise sources. This equivalent circuit allows a straightforward calculation of the noise and modulation characteristics of a laser diode combined with electronic components. The intrinsic junction voltage noise spectrum and the light intensity fluctuation of a current driven laser diode are calculated as a function of bias current and frequency.

  8. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility: dependency on signal-to-noise ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The effects on speech intelligibility of three different noise reduction algorithms (spectral subtraction, minimal mean squared error spectral estimation, and subspace analysis) were evaluated in two types of noise (car and babble) over a 12 dB range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results from these listening experiments showed that most algorithms deteriorated intelligibility scores. Modeling of the results with a logit-shaped psychometric function showed that the degradation in intelligibility scores was largely congruent with a constant shift in SNR, although some additional degradation was observed at two SNRs, suggesting a limited interaction between the effects of noise suppression and SNR. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  9. Deformation and rupture behavior of Argentine Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in the temperature range from 700 to 1200deg C at different heating rates in inert atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, M.E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erbacher, F.J.

    1991-12-01

    In the tube burst apparatus TUBA burst tests were performed at CNEA/CAC-Buenos Aires in short Zircaloy-4 tube specimens. The main objective was to investigate the deformation and burst behavior of Argentine cladding tubes and to compare it with data obtained by others. It was found that the burst data e.g. burst temperature and circumferential burst strain and the influence of different heating rates are in good agreement with those from other origin. (orig.). [Deutsch] In der Rohrberstversuchsanlage TUBA (Tube Burst Apparatus) wurden bei CNEA/CAC-Buenos Aires Berstversuche an kurzen Zircaloy-4-Rohrabschnitten durchgefuehrt. Die wesentliche Zielsetzung war die Untersuchung des Verformungs- und Berstverhaltens von Huellrohren aus argentinischer Herstellung und sein Vergleich mit dem aus anderen Laendern. Ein Vergleich der ermittelten Berstdaten wie z.B. Bersttemperatur und Berstdehnung sowie deren Beeinflussung durch unterschiedliche Aufheizraten ergab eine gute Uebereinstimmung mit den Berstdaten von Zircaloy-4 Huellrohren aus anderer Herstellung. (orig.).

  10. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  11. Signal-to-noise ratio determination circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerkoski, L. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) determination of an input is described, having signal components within a given frequency range and noise components, without actual measurement of the noise components. Bandpass limiter having a constant signal plus noise output level is connected to the output of the first filter, the signal-to-noise ratio of the input to the bandpass limiter being linearly related to the dbm level of signal components at the output. Calibration is connected to the bandpass limiter and is responsive to the signal components at the output to derive the SNR of the input to the determination circuit. The SNR determination circuit is disclosed for use in a diversity receiver having a plurality of input channels.

  12. Phase noise and frequency stability in oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Presenting a comprehensive account of oscillator phase noise and frequency stability, this practical text is both mathematically rigorous and accessible. An in-depth treatment of the noise mechanism is given, describing the oscillator as a physical system, and showing that simple general laws govern the stability of a large variety of oscillators differing in technology and frequency range. Inevitably, special attention is given to amplifiers, resonators, delay lines, feedback, and flicker (1/f) noise. The reverse engineering of oscillators based on phase-noise spectra is also covered, and end-of-chapter exercises are given. Uniquely, numerous practical examples are presented, including case studies taken from laboratory prototypes and commercial oscillators, which allow the oscillator internal design to be understood by analyzing its phase-noise spectrum. Based on tutorials given by the author at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, international IEEE meetings, and in industry, this is a useful reference for acade...

  13. Demonstrator study for micro-ranging-laser device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Hartmut; Bernhardt, Bodo; Pereira do Carmo, J.

    2017-11-01

    Within ESA's Innovation Triangle Initiative (ITI) a demonstrator breadboard for a micro-ranging-laser device "MYLRAD" has been developed. Its working principle is the measurement of the round-trip delay time of a laser beam as a phase shift. The demonstrator consists of the laser diode (30 mW, square wave AM), optics, APD detector, narrowband preamplifier, limiter, and a phase digitiser based on a novel noise-shaping synchroniser (NSS) circuit; this works without ADCs and can be built from rad-hard components for space. The system timing and the digitiser algorithm are performed by an FPGA. The demonstrator has been tested at ranges from 1 m to 30 m. With a static non-cooperative target an RMS noise of 1 mm at a result rate of 60 Hz was reached. The demonstrator needs less than 2.5 W power.

  14. Perceptually optimized gain function for cochlear implant signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Stefan J; Dawson, Pam W; Hersbach, Adam A

    2012-01-01

    Noise reduction in cochlear implants has achieved significant speech perception improvements through spectral subtraction and signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction techniques. Current methods use gain functions derived through mathematical optimization or motivated by normal listening psychoacoustic experiments. Although these gain functions have been able to improve speech perception, recent studies have indicated that they are not optimal for cochlear implant noise reduction. This study systematically investigates cochlear implant recipients' speech perception and listening preference of noise reduction with a range of gain functions. Results suggest an advantageous gain function and show that gain functions currently used for noise reduction are not optimal for cochlear implant recipients. Using the cochlear implant optimised gain function, a 27% improvement over the current advanced combination encoder (ACE) stimulation strategy in speech weighted noise and a 7% improvement over current noise reduction strategies were observed in babble noise conditions. The optimized gain function was also most preferred by cochlear implant recipients. The CI specific gain function derived from this study can be easily incorporated into existing noise reduction strategies, to further improve listening performance for CI recipients in challenging environments. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  16. Audible and infrasonic noise levels in the cabins of modern agricultural tractors — Does the risk of adverse, exposure-dependent effects still exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Bilski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The agricultural tractor is one of the most commonly used vehicles on farms and one of the most prominent sources of noise. This article presents an exemplary assessment of the audible and infrasonic noise levels in the cabins of selected modern wheeled agricultural tractors. Materials and Methods: Operator-perceived audible and infrasonic noise levels in the cabins were examined for 20 types of modern tractors during typical conditions of work. The tractors had been in use for no longer than 3 years, with rated power between 96 kW and 227 kW, designed and produced by world-renowned companies. Noise level measurements were performed in accordance with PN-EN ISO 9612:2011 (ISO 9612:2009. Results: Audible noise levels (A-weighted ranged from 62.1 to 87.4 dB-A (average: 68.2 to 83.8 dB-A for different work tasks. The factors influencing noise levels include performed tasks, soil, weather conditions and the skills of individual drivers. In spectrum analysis, the highest noise levels occurred at frequencies 250 Hz, 1 and 2 kHz. Infrasound noise levels (G-weighted ranged from 87.3 to 111.3 dB-G. The driver-experienced exposure to infrasound was found to increase significantly when the vehicle was in motion. Conclusions: Average audible noise levels have no potential to adversely affect the hearing organ during tasks performed inside the closed cabins of the analysed modern agricultural tractors. Due to the relatively low audible noise levels inside the cabins of modern agricultural tractors, non-auditory effects are the only adverse symptoms that can develop. Modern agricultural tractors emit considerable infrasonic noise levels. All tractors introduced into the market should be subjected to tests with regard to infrasonic noise levels.

  17. Noise levels, noise annoyance, and hearing-related problems in a dental college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer; Ali, Wesal Jasim

    2017-05-04

    Through a cross-sectional survey and integrated sound level meter, this research examined noise exposure and auditory- and nonauditory-related problems experienced by students of a dentistry college located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A structured interview questionnaire was used to examine hearing-related problems, noise annoyance, and awareness of 114 students toward noise. The results showed that maximum noise levels were between 65 and 79 dB(A) with peak levels (high and low frequencies) ranging between 89 and 93 dB(A). Around 80% of the students experienced a certain degree of noise annoyance; 54% reported one of the hearing-related problems; and about 10% claimed to have hearing loss to a certain extent. It is recommended that sound-absorbent materials be used during the construction of dental clinics and laboratories to reduce the noise levels.

  18. A mechanical-thermal noise analysis of a nonlinear microgyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Heppler, G. R.; Abdel-Rahman, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical-thermal noise (MTN) equivalent rotation rate (Ωn) is computed by using the linear approximation of the system response and the nonlinear "slow" system. The slow system, which is obtained using the method of multiple scales, is used to identify the linear single-valued response of the system. The linear estimate of the noise equivalent rate fails as the drive direction stroke increases. It becomes imperative in these conditions to use a more complex nonlinear estimate of the noise equivalent rate developed here for the first time in literature. The proposed design achieves a high performance regarding noise equivalent rotation rate.

  19. Residents' annoyance responses to aircraft noise events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Stephens, D. G.; Fields, J. M.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    In a study conducted in the vicinity of Salt Lake City International Airport, community residents reported their annoyance with individual aircraft flyovers during rating sessions conducted in their homes. Annoyance ratings were obtained at different times of the day. Aircraft noise levels were measured, and other characteristics of the aircraft were noted by trained observers. Metrics commonly used for assessing aircraft noise were compared, but none performed significantly better than A-weighted sound pressure level. A significant difference was found between the ratings of commercial jet aircraft and general aviation propeller aircraft, with the latter being judged less annoying. After the effects of noise level were accounted for, no significant differences were found between the ratings of landings and takeoffs. Aircraft noise annoyance reactions are stronger in lowered ambient noise conditions. This is consistent with the theory that reduced nighttime and evening ambient levels could create different reactions at different times of day. After controlling for ambient noise in a multiple regression analysis, no significant differences were found between the ratings of single events obtained during the three time periods: morning, afternoon, and evenings.

  20. A Stochastic Simulation Framework for the Prediction of Strategic Noise Mapping and Occupational Noise Exposure Using the Random Walk Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Zaiton; Bakar, Suhaimi Abu; Dimon, Mohamad Ngasri

    2015-01-01

    Strategic noise mapping provides important information for noise impact assessment and noise abatement. However, producing reliable strategic noise mapping in a dynamic, complex working environment is difficult. This study proposes the implementation of the random walk approach as a new stochastic technique to simulate noise mapping and to predict the noise exposure level in a workplace. A stochastic simulation framework and software, namely RW-eNMS, were developed to facilitate the random walk approach in noise mapping prediction. This framework considers the randomness and complexity of machinery operation and noise emission levels. Also, it assesses the impact of noise on the workers and the surrounding environment. For data validation, three case studies were conducted to check the accuracy of the prediction data and to determine the efficiency and effectiveness of this approach. The results showed high accuracy of prediction results together with a majority of absolute differences of less than 2 dBA; also, the predicted noise doses were mostly in the range of measurement. Therefore, the random walk approach was effective in dealing with environmental noises. It could predict strategic noise mapping to facilitate noise monitoring and noise control in the workplaces. PMID:25875019

  1. Proton-induced noise in digicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Becher, J.; Fowler, W. B.; Flemming, K.

    1981-01-01

    The Space Telescope, which carries four Digicons, will pass several times per day through a low-altitude portion of the radiation belt called the South Atlantic Anomaly. This is expected to create interference in what is otherwise anticipated to be a noise-free device. Two essential components of the Digicon, the semiconductor diode array and the UV transmitting window, generate noise when subjected to medium-energy proton radiation, a primary component of the belt. These trapped protons, having energies ranging from 2 to 400 Mev and fluences at the Digicon up to 4,000 P+/sec-sq cm, pass through both the window and the diode array, depositing energy in each. In order to evaluate the effect of these protons, engineering test models of Digicon tubes to be flown on the High Resolution Spectrograph were irradiated with low-flux monoenergetic proton beams at the University of Maryland cyclotron. Electron-hole pairs produced by the protons passing through the diodes or the surrounding bulk caused a background count rate. This is the result of holes diffusing over a distance of many diode spacings, causing counts to be triggered simultaneously in the output circuits of several adjacent diodes. Pulse-height spectra of these proton-induced counts indicate that most of the bulk-related counts overlap the single photoelectron peak. A geometrical model will be presented of the charge collection characteristics of the diode array that accounts for most of the observed effects.

  2. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  3. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    the pressure fluctuations when the turbulent scales are on order of, or smaller than, the characteristic size of the hydrophone. At both sites, flow-noise levels can exceed ambient noise levels during slack currents by more than 50 dB at 20 Hz and flow-noise is measured at frequencies greater than 500 Hz. In Admiralty Inlet, the use of a compact flow shield is shown to reduce flow-noise levels by up to 30 dB. Below 1 kHz, the dominant source of ambient noise is vessel traffic, though during periods of strong currents, the propagating noise from vessels can be difficult to identify because of flow-noise. At frequencies above 1 kHz, during periods of strong currents, the dominant source of ambient noise is bedload transport. Observation of this higher frequency sound is not affected by flow-noise, which is limited to lower frequencies in northern Admiralty Inlet. These results are combined with marine species hearing thresholds, a turbine source spectrum, and a simple propagation model to roughly quantify the probability of marine animals detecting the sound of operating turbines against ambient noise. The results suggest that the likely detection range of operating turbines is limited to less than 1 km under most conditions. The sound produced by operating tidal turbines at the proposed demonstration-scale tidal power project is not likely to have any significant behavioral effect at greater range. Finally, the ambient statistics at the site are also combined with a sound propagation model and vocalization characteristics of Southern Resident killer whales to determine the effective range for passive acoustic monitoring techniques at the proposed project location. Due to the frequency overlap between sediment-generated noise and killer whale vocalizations, during peak currents the detection range for vocalizations is reduced by up to 90% when compared to slack current noise levels. Although the reduction in detection range is significant, this analysis suggests that

  4. Zadoff-Chu coded ultrasonic signal for accurate range estimation

    KAUST Repository

    AlSharif, Mohammed H.

    2017-11-02

    This paper presents a new adaptation of Zadoff-Chu sequences for the purpose of range estimation and movement tracking. The proposed method uses Zadoff-Chu sequences utilizing a wideband ultrasonic signal to estimate the range between two devices with very high accuracy and high update rate. This range estimation method is based on time of flight (TOF) estimation using cyclic cross correlation. The system was experimentally evaluated under different noise levels and multi-user interference scenarios. For a single user, the results show less than 7 mm error for 90% of range estimates in a typical indoor environment. Under the interference from three other users, the 90% error was less than 25 mm. The system provides high estimation update rate allowing accurate tracking of objects moving with high speed.

  5. Residential traffic noise exposure assessment: application and evaluation of European Environmental Noise Directive maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Charlotta; Nilsson, Mats E; Stenkvist, Dag; Bellander, Tom; Pershagen, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Digital noise maps produced according to the European Environmental Noise Directive (END) could provide valuable exposure information in noise and health research. However, their usefulness in epidemiological studies has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to apply and evaluate Swedish END maps for assessments of residential traffic noise exposure. END maps from three Swedish cities were used to assess residential traffic noise exposure for a population sample of 2496 men and women included in a national Environmental Health Survey. For each subject, we assessed noise levels manually and automatically at three geographical points, using survey data to locate dwellings within buildings. Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) was used to assess agreement between the noise estimates. To evaluate the maps, we compared the observed and predicted proportions of annoyed residents as a function of noise exposure using survey data and already established exposure-response relationships. The root mean square deviation (r.m.s.) was used to assess the precision of observed estimates. The agreement between the noise estimates ranged from κ=0.4 to 0.8. Generally, there was a high correspondence between observed and predicted exposure-response relationships for noise annoyance, regardless of method and if data on dwelling location within building were used. The best precision was, however, found when we manually corrected the noise level according to the location of the dwelling within buildings (r.m.s.=0.029). Noise maps based on the END appear useful for assessing residential traffic noise exposure, particularly if combined with survey data on dwelling location.

  6. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments impairment (71.9%). Therefore noi impairment (71.9%). Therefore noise prevention se prevention audiometric tests, training, education, and enforcem. Keywords: Keywords: .... marketing for local consumption or transportation to the northern ..... disorders in workers as well as those living within the vicinity of ...

  7. Noise Gain Features of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii S. Felinskyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation dynamics of the optical noise in a silica single mode fiber (SMF as function of the pump power variation in the counter pumped fiber Raman amplifier (FRA is experimentally studied. The ratio between the power of amplified spontaneous emission and the power of incoherent optical noise is quantitatively determined by detailed analysis of experimental data in the pump powers range of 100–300 mW within the full band of Stokes frequencies, including FRA working wavelengths over the C + L transparency windows. It is found out the maximum of Raman gain coefficient for optical noise does not exceed ~60% of corresponding peak at the gain profile maximum of coherent signal. It is shown that the real FRA noise figure may be considerably less than 3 dB over a wide wavelength range (100 nm at a pump power of several hundreds of mW.

  8. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  9. Analysis of Electrical Transport and Noise Mechanisms in Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Amorphous silicon, Temperature Coefficient of Resistance , TCR, 1/f Noise , Variable Range...coefficient of resistance (TCR) with low noise is desired at a conductivity dictated by the IC design to minimize NEDT. Selecting a resistance range...associated with low resistivity and large pixel volume i.e., large number of carriers (Hooge’s noise model). To a certain extent, the transport

  10. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  11. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  12. An Epidemiological Prospective Study of Children’s Health and Annoyance Reactions to Aircraft Noise Exposure in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabi, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate health and annoyance reactions to change in chronic exposure to aircraft noise on a sample of South African children. It was the intention of this study to examine if effects of noise on health and annoyance can be demonstrated. If so, whether such effects persist over time, or whether such effects are reversible after the cessation of exposure to noise. A cohort of 732 children with a mean age of 11.1 (range = 8–14) participated at baseline measurements in Wave 1 (2009), and 649 (mean age = 12.3; range = 9–15) and 174 (mean age = 13.3; range = 10–16) children were reassessed in Wave 2 (2010) and Wave 3 (2011) after the relocation of the airport, respectively. The findings revealed that the children who were exposed to chronic aircraft noise continued to experience significantly higher annoyance than their counterparts in all the waves at school, and only in Wave 1 and Wave 2 at home. Aircraft noise exposure did not have adverse effects on the children’s self-reported health outcomes. Taken together, these findings suggest that chronic exposure to aircraft noise may have a lasting impact on children’s annoyance, but not on their subjective health rating. This is one of the first longitudinal studies of this nature in the African continent to make use of an opportunity resulting from the relocation of airport. PMID:23823713

  13. Blue Whales Respond to Anthropogenic Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Melcón, Mariana L.; Amanda J Cummins; Kerosky, Sara M.; Roche, Lauren K.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to...

  14. Relationship Among Signal Fidelity, Hearing Loss, and Working Memory for Digital Noise Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Kathryn; Souza, Pamela; Kates, James; Lunner, Thomas; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    2015-01-01

    This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality. The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise. The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listener's intelligibility scores for binary mask processing

  15. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  16. Noise in biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cox, Chris D; Allen, Michael S; McCollum, James M; Dar, Roy D; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and review many of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic range compression deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Goodhue, William; Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Kierstead, John

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a dynamic range image compression technique for nonlinear deconvolution; the impulse response of the distortion function and the noisy distorted image are jointly transformed to pump a clean reference beam in a two-beam coupling arrangement. The Fourier transform of the pumped reference beam contains the deconvolved image and its conjugate. In contrast to standard deconvolution approaches, for which noise can be a limiting factor in the performance, this approach allows the retrieval of distorted signals embedded in a very high-noise environment.

  19. Noise Suppression Phenomenon in Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felinskyi Georgii

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of small bit error rate is actual in fiber Raman amplifiers. Our experimental data on the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE with backward pumping as a base of optical noise evaluation are presented in this paper. Raman gain spectrum for useful Stokes low-powered signal is calculated and compared with obtained spectrum of non-coherent ASE noise. It is shown that output optical signal has better gain than the amplified spontaneous emission that leads to appreciable growth of output optical signal-to-noise ratio.

  20. The Transimpedance Amplifier Noise Optimization for the Atmospheric Optical Link Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with design of wideband low-noise preamplifier of atmospheric optical link receiver. Sources of noise and the noise models for the PIN photodiode coupled to a transimpedance amplifier are described here. This paper presents the way of optimization the signal to noise ratio at the required frequency range.

  1. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  2. Fan Noise for a Concept Commercial Supersonic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David

    2017-01-01

    NASA is currently studying a commercial supersonic transport (CST) aircraft that could carry 35+ passengers at Mach 1.6+ with a 4000+nm range. The aircraft should also meet environmental goals for sonic boom, airport noise and emissions at cruise. With respect to airport noise, considerable effort has been put into predicting the noise due to the jet exhaust. This report describes an internal NASA effort to consider the contribution of fan noise to the overall engine noise of this class of aircraft.

  3. A simplified method of estimating noise power spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1998-12-01

    A technique to estimate the radial dependence of the noise power spectrum of images is proposed in which the calculations are conducted solely in the spatial domain of the noise image. The noise power spectrum averaged over a radial spatial-frequency interval is obtained form the variance of a noise image that has been convolved with a small kernel that approximates a Laplacian operator. Recursive consolidation of the image by factors of two in each dimension yields estimates of the noise power spectrum over that full range of spatial frequencies.

  4. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise: Research in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Maschke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on systematic noise effects started in Germany back in the fifties with basic experimental studies on humans. As a result, noise was classified as a non-specific stressor, which could cause an ergotropic activation of the complete organism. In the light of this background research a hypothesis was proposed that long-term noise exposure could have an adverse effect on health. This hypothesis was further supported by animal studies. Since the sixties, the adverse effects of chronic road traffic noise exposure were further examined in humans with the help of epidemiological studies. More epidemiological aircraft noise studies followed in the 1970s and thereafter. The sample size was increased, relevant confounding factors were taken into account, and the exposure and health outcomes were investigated objectively and with higher quality measures. To date, more than 20 German epidemiological traffic noise studies have focused on noise-induced health effects, mainly on the cardiovascular system. In particular, the newer German noise studies demonstrate a clear association between residential exposure to traffic noise (particularly night noise and cardiovascular outcomes. Nevertheless, additional research is needed, particularly on vulnerable groups and multiple noise exposures. The epidemiological findings have still not been fully considered in German regulations, particularly for aircraft noise. The findings, however, were taken into account in national recommendations. The Federal Environment Agency recommends noise rating levels of 65 dB(A for the day and 55 dB(A for the night, as a short-term goal. In the medium term, noise rating levels of 60 / 50 (day, night should be reached and noise rating levels of 55 / 45 in the long run.

  5. Enhanced wind turbine noise prediction tool SILANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorsma, K.; Schepers, J.G. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    Wind turbine noise often is quantified in terms of time averaged overall sound power levels, whilst annoyance due to noise level fluctuations in mid- to high-range frequencies ('swish') are not taken into account. Recent experimental research on wind turbine noise has revealed the major causes of the swishing noise to be due to the directivity of the noise sources and convective amplification effects of the moving turbine blades. The findings have been incorporated in the noise prediction tool SILANT which in addition to sound power levels gives sound pressure level predictions for specified observer positions. The noise sources that are taken into account are trailing edge, inflow and tip noise, using the models of Brooks, Pope and Marcolini (BPM) and Amiet and Lowson. The blade is divided into a number of independent elements for which effective inflow velocity and angle of attack information is a necessary input. A distinction is made between the various profiles along the blade span by including their boundary layer displacement thicknesses at the trailing edge in a profile database. The propagation model includes directivity, convective amplification, Doppler shift and atmospheric absorption. The effect of the retarded time is taken into account individually for the separate elements along the blade span using the time dependent rotor azimuth position. A simple empirical model is applied to quantify meteorological effects influencing refraction and ground effects. Prediction results are compared to SIROCCO project measurements from microphones positioned in a circle around a turbine. The high spatial and temporal resolution of the SILANT simulations gives new insights in the variation of wind turbine inflow and trailing edge noise as a function of observer position, rotor azimuth angle and frequency band. The influence of directivity is illustrated for the dominant noise sources.

  6. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches...... the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  7. Effects of noise overexposure on tone detection in noise in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Samantha N; Burton, Jane A; Mercer, Evan T; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan

    2017-11-09

    This report explores the consequences of acoustic overexposures on hearing in noisy environments for two macaque monkeys trained to perform a reaction time detection task using a Go/No-Go lever release paradigm. Behavioral and non-invasive physiological assessments were obtained before and after narrowband noise exposure. Physiological measurements showed elevated auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds and absent distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) post-exposure relative to pre-exposure. Audiograms revealed frequency specific increases in tone detection thresholds, with the greatest increases at the exposure band frequency and higher. Masked detection was affected in a similar frequency specific manner: threshold shift rates (change of masked threshold per dB increase in noise level) were lower than pre-exposure values at frequencies higher than the exposure band. Detection thresholds in sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) noise post-exposure showed no difference from those in unmodulated noise, whereas pre-exposure masked detection thresholds were lower in the presence of SAM noise compared to unmodulated noise. These frequency-dependent results were correlated with cochlear histopathological changes in monkeys that underwent similar noise exposure. These results reveal that behavioral and physiological effects of noise exposure in macaques are similar to those seen in humans and provide preliminary information on the relationship between noise exposure, cochlear pathology and perceptual changes in hearing within individual subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems.

  9. Combined effect of noise and vibration produced by high-speed trains on annoyance in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pyoung Jik; Griffin, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The effects of noise and vibration on annoyance in buildings during the passage of a nearby high-speed train have been investigated in a laboratory experiment with recorded train noise and 20 Hz vibration. The noises included the effects of two types of façade: windows-open and windows-closed. Subjects were exposed to six levels of noise and six magnitudes of vibration, and asked to rate annoyance using an 11-point numerical scale. The experiment consisted of four sessions: (1) evaluation of noise annoyance in the absence of vibration, (2) evaluation of total annoyance from simultaneous noise and vibration, (3) evaluation of noise annoyance in the presence of vibration, and (4) evaluation of vibration annoyance in the absence of noise. The results show that vibration did not influence ratings of noise annoyance, but that total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration was considerably greater than the annoyance caused by noise alone. The noise annoyance and the total annoyance caused by combined noise and vibration were associated with subject self-ratings of noise sensitivity. Two classical models of total annoyance due to combined noise sources (maximum of the single source annoyance or the integration of individual annoyance ratings) provided useful predictions of the total annoyance caused by simultaneous noise and vibration.

  10. Quasiclassical Trajectory Calculations of the Rate Constant of the OH + HBr → Br + H2O Reaction Using a Full-Dimensional Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface Over the Temperature Range 5 to 500 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio G S; Ornellas, Fernando R; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-02-20

    We report a permutationally invariant, ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the OH + HBr → Br + H2O reaction. The PES is a fit to roughly 26 000 spin-free UCCSD(T)/cc-pVDZ-F12a energies and has no classical barrier to reaction. It is used in quasiclassical trajectory calculations with a focus on the thermal rate constant, k(T), over the temperature range 5 to 500 K. Comparisons with available experimental data over the temperature range 23 to 416 K are made using three approaches to treat the OH rotational and associated electronic partition function. All display an inverse temperature dependence of k(T) below roughly 160 K and a nearly constant temperature dependence above 160 K, in agreement with experiment. The calculated rate constant with no treatment of spin-orbit coupling is overall in the best agreement with experiment, being (probably fortuitously) within 20% of it.

  11. Noise in miniature microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  12. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  13. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...

  14. Long-Range Transport of SO2 from Continental Asia to Northeast Asia and the Northwest Pacific Ocean: Flow Rate Estimation Using OMI Data, Surface in Situ Data, and the HYSPLIT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsung Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This present study suggests a method to calculate the SO2 flow rate from a source area to receptor areas on a regional scale using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI SO2 products, surface in situ SO2 data, and the hybrid single particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT model. The method was implemented to calculate the SO2 flow rate from continental Asia to northeast Asia and the Northwest Pacific Ocean. For the high SO2 events when SO2 was transported from continental Asia to Japan via the Korean Peninsula on 22–24 December 2006, the long-range transported SO2 flow rates were 14.0 (21.0 Mg·h−1 OMI·gird−1 at Gangneung (Seoul in Korea and 4.2 (5.3 Mg·h−1 OMI·gird−1 at Hiroshima (Kumamoto in Japan. For the long-range transport of SO2 from continental Asia to the Northwest Pacific Ocean on 6–7 October 2008 (9–11 October 2006, the flow rates were 16.1 (16.2 Mg·h−1 OMI·gird−1 at Hokkaido, Japan (Vladivostok, Russia and 5.6 (16.7 Mg·h−1 OMI·gird−1 at the Aleutian Islands, Northwest Pacific Ocean (Bering Sea. The mean rates of decrease in the SO2 flow rate per 1000 km were also calculated between continental Asia and the receptor areas. Uncertainties in the flow rate estimates were also assessed and discussed.

  15. Simulation for noise cancellation using LMS adaptive filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Haw; Ooi, Lu-Ean; Ko, Ying-Hao; Teoh, Choe-Yung

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the fundamental algorithm of noise cancellation, Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm is studied and enhanced with adaptive filter. The simulation of the noise cancellation using LMS adaptive filter algorithm is developed. The noise corrupted speech signal and the engine noise signal are used as inputs for LMS adaptive filter algorithm. The filtered signal is compared to the original noise-free speech signal in order to highlight the level of attenuation of the noise signal. The result shows that the noise signal is successfully canceled by the developed adaptive filter. The difference of the noise-free speech signal and filtered signal are calculated and the outcome implies that the filtered signal is approaching the noise-free speech signal upon the adaptive filtering. The frequency range of the successfully canceled noise by the LMS adaptive filter algorithm is determined by performing Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) on the signals. The LMS adaptive filter algorithm shows significant noise cancellation at lower frequency range.

  16. Determination of the rate constant for the OH(X2Π) + OH(X2Π) → H2O + O(3P) reaction over the temperature range 295 to 701 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Gokhan; Macdonald, R Glen

    2014-01-09

    The rate constant for the radical-radical reaction OH(X(2)Π) + OH(X(2)Π) → H2O + O((3)P) has been measured over the temperature and pressure ranges 295-701 K and 2-12 Torr, respectively, in mixtures of CF4, N2O, and H2O. The OH radical was produced by the 193 nm laser photolysis of N2O. The resulting O((1)D) atoms reacted rapidly with H2O to produce the OH radical. The OH radical was detected by high-resolution time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy using a single Λ-doublet component of the OH(1,0) P1e/f(4.5) fundamental vibrational transition. A detailed kinetic model was used to determine the reaction rate constant as a function of temperature. These experiments were conducted in a new temperature controlled reaction chamber. The values of the measured rate constants are quite similar to the previous measurements from this laboratory of Bahng and Macdonald (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007 , 111 , 3850 - 3861); however, they cover a much larger temperature range. The results of the present work do not agree with recent measurements of Sangwan and Krasnoperov (J. Phys. Chem. A 2012 , 116 , 11817 - 11822). At 295 K the rate constant of the title reaction was found to be (2.52 ± 0.63) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both experimental scatter and an estimate of systematic errors at the 95% confidence limit. Over the temperature range of the experiments, the rate constant can be represented by k1a = 4.79 × 10(-18)T(1.79) exp(879.0/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with a uncertainty of ±24% at the 2σ level, including experimental scatter and systematic error.

  17. Earth Noise in the 20- to 100-Second Period Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-09

    eliminate the noire entirely on the vertical seismographs and the horizontals are only affected during extreme windy periods. The wind-generated...Estimated squares of the ordinary coherence which fall below the dashed line are not significantly different from zero at the 90 percent...digital acquisition system described in detail by Herrin and McDonald (1971). In addition the data were recorded continuously on 16 mm film . b

  18. Evapotranspiration Rate Measurements of Vegetation Typical of Ground-Water Discharge Areas in the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada, and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah, September 2005-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreo, Michael T.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Stannard, David I.

    2007-01-01

    Evapotranspiration was measured at six eddy-correlation sites for a 1-year period between September 1, 2005, and August 31, 2006. Five sites were in phreatophytic shrubland dominated by greasewood, and one site was in a grassland meadow. The measured annual evapotranspiration ranged from 10.02 to 12.77 inches at the shrubland sites and 26.94 inches at the grassland site. Evapotranspiration rates correlated to measured vegetation densities and to satellite-derived vegetation indexes. Evapotranspiration rates were greater at sites with denser vegetation. The primary water source supporting evapotranspiration was water derived from local precipitation at the shrubland sites, and ground water at the grassland site. Measured precipitation, ranging from 6.21 to 11.41 inches, was within 20 percent of the computed long-term annual mean. The amount of ground water consumed by phreatophytes depends primarily on local precipitation and vegetation density. The ground-water contribution to local evapotranspiration ranged from 6 to 38 percent of total evapotranspiration at the shrubland sites, and 70 percent of total evapotranspiration at the grassland site. Average depth to water ranged from 7.2 to 32.4 feet below land surface at the shrubland sites, and 3.9 feet at the grassland site. Water levels declined throughout the growing season and recovered during the non-growing season. Diurnal water-level fluctuations associated with evapotranspiration were evident at some sites but not at others.

  19. 1/f Noise Scaling Analysis in Unipolar-Type Organic Nanocomposite Resistive Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggul; Jeong, Hyunhak; Jang, Jingon; Kim, Tae-Young; Yoo, Daekyoung; Kim, Youngrok; Jeong, Heejun; Lee, Takhee

    2015-07-28

    We studied noise characteristics of a nanocomposite of polyimide (PI) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) (denoted as PI:PCBM), a composite for the organic nonvolatile resistive memory material. The current fluctuations were investigated over a bias range that covers various intermediate resistive states and negative differential resistance (NDR) in organic nanocomposite unipolar resistive memory devices. From the analysis of the 1/f(γ) type noises, scaling behavior between the relative noise power spectral density S̃ and resistance R was observed, indicating a percolating behavior. Considering a linear rate equation of the charge trapping-detrapping at traps, the percolation behavior and NDR could be understood by the modulation of the conductive phase fraction φ with an external bias. This study can enhance the understanding of the NDR phenomena in organic nanocomposite unipolar resistive memory devices in terms of the current path formation and the memory switching.

  20. Effects of noise, nonlinear processing, and linear filtering on perceived music quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M; Anderson, Melinda C

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative impact of different forms of hearing aid signal processing on quality ratings of music. Music quality was assessed using a rating scale for three types of music: orchestral classical music, jazz instrumental, and a female vocalist. The music stimuli were subjected to a wide range of simulated hearing aid processing conditions including, (1) noise and nonlinear processing, (2) linear filtering, and (3) combinations of noise, nonlinear, and linear filtering. Quality ratings were measured in a group of 19 listeners with normal hearing and a group of 15 listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment. Quality ratings in both groups were generally comparable, were reliable across test sessions, were impacted more by noise and nonlinear signal processing than by linear filtering, and were significantly affected by the genre of music. The average quality ratings for music were reasonably well predicted by the hearing aid speech quality index (HASQI), but additional work is needed to optimize the index to the wide range of music genres and processing conditions included in this study.

  1. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing ... noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Read and comment ...

  2. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: Measuring below the noise floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Roger M.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels. PMID:25786932

  3. Substation noise screening tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybee, Nigel; Everton, Pascal [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. (Canada)], email: nigel.maybee@hfpacoustical.com; Chow, Vincent [Altalink Management Ltd. (Canada)], email: Vincent.Chow@AltaLink.ca

    2011-07-01

    Alberta noise regulations require energy-related facilities to conduct predictions on sound levels, especially for large and medium noise sources. This is usually done with well-known modelling software, but that can be disadvantageous when assessing the noise impact of smaller noise sources, such as transformer substations. This paper focuses on the development of a spreadsheet substation noise screening tool to assess the noise impact of a small transformer substation with precision and ease-of-use. Three aspects must be considered: transformer sound levels, which can be provided by the manufacturer or extracted from accepted sound level references; sound power calculations, which depend on the substation size and operating regime; and sound propagation calculations, which take into account the distance of the receptor from the substation and sound absorption by the air and ground. Comparison of results obtained with this tool with results generated by standard sound modelling software shows the utility, accuracy and ease-of-use of this screening method for assessing the noise impact of transformer substations.

  4. Analysis of the Noise Characteristics of CMOS Current Conveyors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The definition of the current conveyor is reviewed and a multiple-output second generation current conveyor (CCII) is shown to combine the different generations of current conveyors presently existing. Next, noise sources are introduced, and a general noise model for the current conveyor...... is described. This model is used for the analysis of selected examples of current conveyor based operational amplifier configurations and the noise performance of these configurations is compared. Finally, the noise model is developed for a CMOS current conveyor implementation, and approaches...... to an optimization of the noise performance are discussed. It is concluded that a class AB implementation can yield a lower noise output for the same dynamic range than a class A implementation. For both the class A implementation and the class AB implementation it is essential to design low noise current mirrors...

  5. Motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle properties determine the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco; Enoka, Roger M.

    2012-01-01

    Motoneurons receive synaptic inputs from tens of thousands of connections that cause membrane potential to fluctuate continuously (synaptic noise), which introduces variability in discharge times of action potentials. We hypothesized that the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness during voluntary contractions is limited to low muscle forces. The hypothesis was examined with an analytical description of transduction of motor unit spike trains into muscle force, a computational model of motor unit recruitment and rate coding, and experimental analysis of interspike interval variability during steady contractions with the abductor digiti minimi muscle. Simulations varied contraction force, level of synaptic noise, size of motor unit population, recruitment range, twitch contraction times, and level of motor unit short-term synchronization. Consistent with the analytical derivations, simulations and experimental data showed that force variability at target forces above a threshold was primarily due to low-frequency oscillations in neural drive, whereas the influence of synaptic noise was almost completely attenuated by two low-pass filters, one related to convolution of motoneuron spike trains with motor unit twitches (temporal summation) and the other attributable to summation of single motor unit forces (spatial summation). The threshold force above which synaptic noise ceased to influence force steadiness depended on recruitment range, size of motor unit population, and muscle contractile properties. This threshold was low (motor unit recruitment and muscle properties of a typical muscle are tuned to limit the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness to low forces and that the inability to produce a constant force during stronger contractions is mainly attributable to the common low-frequency oscillations in motoneuron discharge rates. PMID:22423000

  6. Design and Noise Optimization of RF Low Noise Amplifier for IEEE Standard 802.11A WLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Munish Kumar; Ravinder Kumar; Viranjay M. Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Low noise amplifier is the front end block of radio-frequency receiver system. Its design required various characteristics such as power gain, noise figure, insertion losses and power consumption. In this paper we have proposed a single stage low noise amplifier design with high gain and low noise using inductive source degeneration topology for frequency range of 3 GHz to 7 GHz and also use the active biasing devices. A range of devices like inductors and capacitors are used to achieve 50 Ω ...

  7. Noise-invariant Neurons in the Avian Auditory Cortex: Hearing the Song in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. Channing; Lee, Tyler; Theunissen, Frédéric E.

    2013-01-01

    Given the extraordinary ability of humans and animals to recognize communication signals over a background of noise, describing noise invariant neural responses is critical not only to pinpoint the brain regions that are mediating our robust perceptions but also to understand the neural computations that are performing these tasks and the underlying circuitry. Although invariant neural responses, such as rotation-invariant face cells, are well described in the visual system, high-level auditory neurons that can represent the same behaviorally relevant signal in a range of listening conditions have yet to be discovered. Here we found neurons in a secondary area of the avian auditory cortex that exhibit noise-invariant responses in the sense that they responded with similar spike patterns to song stimuli presented in silence and over a background of naturalistic noise. By characterizing the neurons' tuning in terms of their responses to modulations in the temporal and spectral envelope of the sound, we then show that noise invariance is partly achieved by selectively responding to long sounds with sharp spectral structure. Finally, to demonstrate that such computations could explain noise invariance, we designed a biologically inspired noise-filtering algorithm that can be used to separate song or speech from noise. This novel noise-filtering method performs as well as other state-of-the-art de-noising algorithms and could be used in clinical or consumer oriented applications. Our biologically inspired model also shows how high-level noise-invariant responses could be created from neural responses typically found in primary auditory cortex. PMID:23505354

  8. Noise reduction efficiency of Helmholtz resonator in simulated channel of HVAC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Yousefi Rizi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: This research showed that the designed Helmholtz resonators at a certain frequency of low-frequency sound demonstrated the soundest decrease. The increase in the Helmholtz resonators′ chamber volume and their neck′s pass area are negatively associated with the rate of sound resonance. As a result, of determining the effective frequency range of the Helmholtz resonator, the designed resonator could be applied as an effective and efficient instrument of removing or decreasing noise.

  9. Analog noise reduction in enzymatic logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Dmitriy; Strack, Guinevere; Pita, Marcos; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2009-07-30

    In this work, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that the analog noise generation by a single enzymatic logic gate can be dramatically reduced to yield gate operation with virtually no input noise amplification. We demonstrate that when a cosubstrate with a much smaller affinity than the primary substrate is used, a negligible increase in the noise output from the logic gate is obtained, as compared to the input noise level. Our general theoretical conclusions were confirmed by experimental realizations of the AND logic gate based on the enzyme horseradish peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate, with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) or ferrocyanide as cosubstrates with vastly different rate constants.

  10. NICU noise and the preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants in the NICU are often exposed to continuous loud noise despite research documenting the presence and damaging effects of noise on the preterm infant's development. Excessive auditory stimulation creates negative physiologic responses such as apnea and fluctuations in heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation. Preterm infants exposed to prolonged excessive noise are also at increased risk for hearing loss, abnormal brain and sensory development, and speech and language problems. Reducing noise levels in the NICU can improve the physiologic stability of sick neonates and therefore enlarge the potential for infant brain development. Recommendations include covering incubators with blankets, removing noisy equipment from the incubator environment, implementing a quiet hour, educating staff to raise awareness, and encouraging staff to limit conversation near infants.

  11. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  12. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Stefan J.; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W.

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  13. Experimental study of noise and Josephson oscillation linewidths in bicrystal YBCO junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constatinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.; Borisenko, I.V.

    2001-01-01

    shot noise asymptote 2eI. At relatively low voltages, V ... range up to voltages V = 2 mV in connection with low-voltage noise rise. Both the features observed, the linewidth broadening and the excess noise over the noise level of thermal fluctuations, are discussed in terms of multiple Andreev reflection, giving rise to a nonequilibrium shot noise-the case...

  14. ZigBee Radio with External Power Amplifier and Low-Noise Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance study of a ZigBee module with both an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier, measured in outdoor and indoor environments, respectively. Our previous study has already shown that the indoor campus environment such as walls and floors would reduce the radio link range drastically and the packet error rate increased. In this study, both an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier have been added to a ZigBee module to increase both the transmitter power and receiver sensitivity. It is shown that with an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier the outdoor radio range can reach up to 1600 m with a negligible packet error rate compared to 144 m without any external amplifier for point-to-point radio connection. Thus, by increasing both the transmitter power and receiver sensitivity the radio range can be increased significantly. The power consumption issue with the added amplifiers is studied as well, indicating that the module can still be battery driven with a battery lifetime of about 9 years at a normal sampling rate to the sensor.

  15. The Contribution of Matched Envelope Dynamic Range to the Binaural Benefits in Simulated Bilateral Electric Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Wong, Lena L. N.; Qiu, Jianxin; Liu, Yehai; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of envelope dynamic-range mismatch on the intelligibility of Mandarin speech in noise by simulated bilateral electric hearing. Method: Noise-vocoded Mandarin speech, corrupted by speech-shaped noise at 5 and 0 dB signal-to-noise ratios, was presented unilaterally or bilaterally to 10 normal-hearing…

  16. Some considerations on noise monitoring for air handling equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujoreanu, C.; Benchea, M.

    2017-02-01

    The HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) beneficiaries are in particular annoyed by the noise generated from the radiant unit and the air circulating ducts, since they are located inside the rooms and buildings. The comparatively experimental results highlight the relations between the air flow, pressure, power-charging and the sound level. The measurements are carried out at different fan’s speeds, ranging the power-charge from 30-100% while the duct air flow is slowly adjusted from full open to full closed, between 0-500 Pa. Third-octave band analysis of random noise of the handling units is realized in an anechoic room, using the measurement procedures that agrees the requirements of the ISO 3744:2011 and ISO 5136:2010 standards. For an accurate design of the HVAC system, the designer needs to know not only the sound power of the radiant unit, but also from all of the air paths, since the sound travels along with the conditioned air. The experimental methodology used in the paper is of real interest for the HVAC manufacturers, in order to rate the sound level of their products and to improve the noise attenuation.

  17. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  18. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  19. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  20. Two-parametric model of the spectrum of traffic noise in Tomsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, A. A.; Kolesnik, A. G.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    The technique of mapping urban noise is proposed on the basis of a two-parameter model of the acoustic noise spectrum. The acoustic noise and spatial distribution of the decay rate in Tomsk are mapped. The factors influencing the formation of the acoustic noise of traffic flow are described. Analysis is performed on how different operating modes of a vehicle's internal combustion engine affect the background level of acoustic noise.

  1. Adaptive Noise Cancellation for speech Employing Fuzzy and Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Hussein Miry; Ali Hussein Miry; Hussain Kareem Khleaf

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive filtering constitutes one of the core technologies in digital signal processing and finds numerous application areas in science as well as in industry. Adaptive filtering techniques are used in a wide range of applications such as noise cancellation. Noise cancellation is a common occurrence in today telecommunication systems. The LMS algorithm which is one of the most efficient criteria for determining the values of the adaptive noise cancellation coefficient...

  2. The role of task interference and exposure duration in judging noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Karin; Ghani, Jody; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether the amount of performance disruption by a noise has an effect on the annoyance that noise evokes, a laboratory situation was created in which the participants rated a number of sounds before, after, and while performing a cognitively demanding memory task. The task consisted of memorizing, and later reproducing, a visually presented sequence of digits while being exposed to irrelevant sound chosen to produce different degrees of disruption. In two experiments, participants assessed these background sounds (frequency-modulated tones, broadband noise and speech) on a rating scale consisting of thirteen categories ranging from 'not annoying at all' to 'extremely annoying.' The judgments were collected immediately before, after, and concomitant to, the memory task. The results of the first experiment (N=24) showed that the annoyance assessments were indeed altered by the experience of disruption, most strongly during, and to a lesser extent after task completion, whereas ratings of the non-disruptive sounds remained largely unaffected. In the second experiment (N=25), participants were exposed to the same sounds, but for longer intervals at a time: 10 min as opposed to 14 s in the first experiment. The longer exposure resulted in increased annoyance in all noise conditions, but did not alter the differential effect of disruption on annoyance, which was replicated. The results of these laboratory experiments support the notion that annoyance cannot be conceived of as a purely perceptual sound property; rather, it is influenced by the degree of interference with the task at hand.

  3. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  4. Internal noise-sustained circadian rhythms in a Drosophila model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianshu; Lang, Xiufeng

    2008-03-15

    Circadian rhythmic processes, mainly regulated by gene expression at the molecular level, have inherent stochasticity. Their robustness or resistance to internal noise has been extensively investigated by most of the previous studies. This work focuses on the constructive roles of internal noise in a reduced Drosophila model, which incorporates negative and positive feedback loops, each with a time delay. It is shown that internal noise sustains reliable oscillations with periods close to 24 h in a region of parameter space, where the deterministic kinetics would evolve to a stable steady state. The amplitudes of noise-sustained oscillations are significantly affected by the variation of internal noise level, and the best performance of the oscillations could be found at an optimal noise intensity, indicating the occurrence of intrinsic coherence resonance. In the oscillatory region of the deterministic model, the coherence of noisy circadian oscillations is suppressed by internal noise, while the period remains nearly constant over a large range of noise intensity, demonstrating robustness of the Drosophila model for circadian rhythms to intrinsic noise. In addition, the effects of time delay in the positive feedback on the oscillations are also investigated. It is found that the time delay could efficiently tune the performance of the noise-sustained oscillations. These results might aid understanding of the exploitation of intracellular noise in biochemical and genetic regulatory systems.

  5. Techniques of microwave noise measurement on cooled transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Eric C.

    Cooled low-noise microwave field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers are widely used in radio telescopes, satellite earth stations, and radar systems to minimize noise added to the signal by the receiver. In designing these amplifiers, the noise parameters of the FETs must be known. It is hard to obtain these parameters, especially at cryogenic temperatures. A load having an electronically controlled reflection coefficient (RC) and noise temperature was built and used to measure the noise parameters of a GaAs FET at 12 K at frequencies in the 1.2-1.6 GHz range. The electronic load simplified the measurement of noise parameters at cryogenic temperatures because its RC was adjusted from outside the cooling apparatus, and the RCs were repeatable. A number of novel techniques for measuring noise and for estimating the noise parameters of a noise measurement receiver and of the device under test were developed. Singular value decomposition was used to improve and analyze noise parameter estimation by least squares fitting. The measurement errors due to frequency errors and non-zero noise power measurement bandwidth were analyzed. A new notation was introduced to simplify the analysis of noisy linear circuits and was used to develop cascading and de-embedding equations for noisy linear two-ports, and was also used to develop some of the new measurement techniques.

  6. An improved probe noise approach for acoustic feedback cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The perhaps most challenging problem in acoustic feedback cancellation using adaptive filters is the bias problem. It is well-known that a probe noise approach can effectively prevent this problem. However, when the probe noise must be inaudible and the steady-state error of the adaptive filter...... must be unchanged, this approach causes a significantly decreased convergence rate of the adaptive filter, and might thereby be less useful in practical applications. In this work, we propose a new probe noise approach which significantly increases the convergence rate while maintaining the steady......-state error of the adaptive algorithm in a multiple-microphone and single-loudspeaker audio system. This is obtained through a specifically designed probe noise signal and a corresponding probe noise enhancement strategy. We show the effects of the proposed probe noise approach by deriving analytical...

  7. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  8. [Noise--a stress factor in occupational and other environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zober, A

    1984-03-01

    The effects of noise on health can be divided into aural effects and extraaural effects. The following review describes - after some historical remarks - first the physical and technical basis of noise analysis. The definition of "equivalent continuous sound level" (Lm) and "rating sound level" (Lr) is given. Extraaural noise effects mainly come from the environment (traffic noise, construction noise on building sites). One must distinguish physical and vegetative reactions. An important extraaural effect is the disturbance of sleep. The objectivation and quantification of extraaural effects of noise on health is very difficult because there exist a lot of disturbing factors. The most important aural effect of noise on health is the occupational hearing loss. To assess these effects, information about physiology, pathophysiology and clinical indications of noise induced labyrinthine deafness is necessary. As examples results of investigations into the effect of noise on arc welders, professional musicians and building workers are presented. Generation of noise should be minimised by technical methods, exposure to noise by personal protection. The methods for occupational medical check-up of the employment accident insurance fund are specially mentioned. The results of these preventive procedures can be seen in the decreasing numbers of occupational hearing loss.

  9. Research on an Automatic Measurement of Impulse Electromagnetic Noise (IV) : Relation of Electromagnetic Induction Noise and Malfunction of Print Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    佐野, 博也; 松本, 史生; サノ, ヒロヤ; マツモト, フミオ; Hiroya, SANO; Fumio, MATUMOTO

    1993-01-01

    Experimental studies were made on electromagnetic susceptibility and malfunction of high speed CMOS digital printed circuit boards (PCB). We measured the induced noise voltage on a printed loop circuit caused by electromagnetic emission from an adjacent digital PCB. Electromagnetic susceptibility of a bus circuit was measured with a TEM cell in frequency range of 10 to 250 MHz. The induced noise increased near the resonance frequency of the circuit. We also measured the amplitude of noise vol...

  10. Noise Model Analysis and Estimation of Effect due to Wind Driven Ambient Noise in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakthivel Murugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transmission in ocean using water as a channel is a challenging process due to attenuation, spreading, reverberation, absorption, and so forth, apart from the contribution of acoustic signals due to ambient noises. Ambient noises in sea are of two types: manmade (shipping, aircraft over the sea, motor on boat, etc. and natural (rain, wind, seismic, etc., apart from marine mammals and phytoplanktons. Since wind exists in all places and at all time: its effect plays a major role. Hence, in this paper, we concentrate on estimating the effects of wind. Seven sets of data with various wind speeds ranging from 2.11 m/s to 6.57 m/s were used. The analysis is performed for frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. It is found that a linear relationship between noise spectrum and wind speed exists for the entire frequency range. Further, we developed a noise model for analyzing the noise level. The results of the empirical data are found to fit with results obtained with the aid of noise model.

  11. Toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rochelle; Chatterjee, Monita

    2013-01-01

    Despite their remarkable clinical success, cochlear-implant listeners today still receive spectrally degraded information. Much research has examined normally hearing adult listeners' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, primarily using noise-vocoded speech to simulate cochlear implant processing. Far less research has explored infants' and toddlers' ability to interpret spectrally degraded signals, despite the fact that children in this age range are frequently implanted. This study examines 27-month-old typically developing toddlers' recognition of noise-vocoded speech in a language-guided looking study. Children saw two images on each trial and heard a voice instructing them to look at one item (“Find the cat!”). Full-spectrum sentences or their noise-vocoded versions were presented with varying numbers of spectral channels. Toddlers showed equivalent proportions of looking to the target object with full-speech and 24- or 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; they failed to look appropriately with 2-channel noise-vocoded speech and showed variable performance with 4-channel noise-vocoded speech. Despite accurate looking performance for speech with at least eight channels, children were slower to respond appropriately as the number of channels decreased. These results indicate that 2-yr-olds have developed the ability to interpret vocoded speech, even without practice, but that doing so requires additional processing. These findings have important implications for pediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:23297920

  12. Accounting for noise when clustering biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloutsky, Roman; Jimenez, Nicolas; Swamidass, S Joshua; Naegle, Kristen M

    2013-07-01

    Clustering is a powerful and commonly used technique that organizes and elucidates the structure of biological data. Clustering data from gene expression, metabolomics and proteomics experiments has proven to be useful at deriving a variety of insights, such as the shared regulation or function of biochemical components within networks. However, experimental measurements of biological processes are subject to substantial noise-stemming from both technical and biological variability-and most clustering algorithms are sensitive to this noise. In this article, we explore several methods of accounting for noise when analyzing biological data sets through clustering. Using a toy data set and two different case studies-gene expression and protein phosphorylation-we demonstrate the sensitivity of clustering algorithms to noise. Several methods of accounting for this noise can be used to establish when clustering results can be trusted. These methods span a range of assumptions about the statistical properties of the noise and can therefore be applied to virtually any biological data source.

  13. Noise levels associated with urban land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gavin; Roland-Mieszkowski, Marek; Jason, Timothy; Rainham, Daniel G

    2012-12-01

    Recent trends towards the intensification of urban development to increase urban densities and avoid sprawl should be accompanied by research into the potential for related health impacts from environmental exposure. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of the built environment and land use on levels of environmental noise. Two different study areas were selected using a combination of small area census geography, land use information, air photography, and ground-truthing. The first study area represented residential land use and consisted of two- to three-story single-family homes. The second study area was characteristic of mixed-use urban planning with apartment buildings as well as commercial and institutional development. Study areas were subdivided into six grids, and a location was randomly selected within each grid for noise monitoring. Each location was sampled four times over a 24-h day, resulting in a total of 24 samples for each of the two areas. Results showed significant variability in noise within study areas and significantly higher levels of environmental noise in the mixed-use area. Both study areas exceeded recommended noise limits when evaluated against World Health Organization guidelines and yielded average noise events values in the moderate to serious annoyance range with the potential to obscure normal conversation and cause sleep disturbance.

  14. Probing High Frequency Noise with Macroscopic Resonant Tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Lanting, T.; Amin, M. H. S.; Johnson, M. W.; Altomare, F.; Berkley, A. J.; Gildert, S.; Harris, R; Johansson, J; Bunyk, P.; Ladizinsky, E.; Tolkacheva, E.; Averin, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a method for extracting the high-frequency noise spectral density of an rf-SQUID flux qubit from macroscopic resonant tunneling (MRT) rate measurements. The extracted noise spectral density is consistent with that of an ohmic environment up to frequencies ~ 4 GHz. We have also derived an expression for the MRT lineshape expected for a noise spectral density consisting of such a broadband ohmic component and an additional strongly peaked low-frequency component. This hybrid m...

  15. Effect of external classroom noise on schoolchildren's reading and mathematics performance: correlation of noise levels and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Skenteris, N; Piperakis, S M

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of low, medium, and high traffic road noise as well as irrelevant background speech noise on primary school children's reading and mathematical performance. A total of 676 participants (324 boys, 47.9% and 352 girls, 52.1%) of the 4th and 5th elementary classes participated in the project. The participants were enrolled in public primary schools from urban areas and had ages ranging from 9 to 10 years and from. Schools were selected on the basis of increasing levels of exposure to road traffic noise and then classified into three categories (Low noise: 55-66 dB, Medium noise: 67-77 dB, and High noise: 72-80 dB). We measured reading comprehension and mathematical skills in accordance with the national guidelines for elementary education, using a test designed specifically for the purpose of this study. On the one hand, children in low-level noise schools showed statistically significant differences from children in medium- and high-level noise schools in reading performance (pschools differed significantly from children in high-level noise schools but only in mathematics performance (p=0.001). Girls in general did better in reading score than boys, especially in schools with medium- and high-level noise. Finally the levels of noise and gender were found to be two independent factors.

  16. Evaluation of combined dynamic compression and single channel noise reduction for hearing aid applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortlang, Steffen; Chen, Zhangli; Gerkmann, Timo; Kollmeier, Birger; Hohmann, Volker; Ewert, Stephan D

    2017-03-30

    Single-channel noise reduction (SCNR) and dynamic range compression (DRC) are important elements in hearing aids. Only relatively few studies have addressed interaction effects and typically used real hearing aids with limited knowledge about the integrated algorithms. Here the potential benefit of different combinations and integration of SCNR and DRC was systematically assessed. Ten different systems combining SCNR and DRC were implemented, including five serial arrangements, a parallel and two multiplicative approaches. In an instrumental evaluation, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement and spectral contrast enhancement (SCE) were assessed. Quality ratings at 0 and +6 dB SNR, and speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in noise were measured using stationary and babble noise. Thirteen young normal-hearing (NH) listeners and 12 hearing-impaired (HI) listeners participated. In line with an increased segmental SNR and spectral contrast compared to a serial concatenation, the parallel approach significantly reduced the perceived noise annoyance for both subject groups. The proposed multiplicative approaches could partly counteract increased speech distortions introduced by DRC and achieved the best overall quality for the HI listeners. For high SNRs well above the individual SRT, the specific combination of SCNR and DRC is perceptually relevant and the integrative approaches were preferred.

  17. The development of noise-induced hearing loss in military trades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Sharon M.; Jewell, Stephanie

    2004-05-01

    An investigation is in progress to determine risk factors for the development of noise-induced hearing loss in Canadian Forces personnel. A total of 1057 individuals representing a wide range of military trades have contributed their current audiogram, first audiogram on record, and responses to a 56-item questionnaire. The protocol for the hearing test was standardized and conformed to current audiological practice. The items included in the questionnaire related to demographics, occupational and nonoccupational noise exposure history, training in and utilization of personal hearing protectors, and factors other than noise which might affect hearing (e.g., head injury, ear disease, exposure to solvents, and the use of medications). Analyses are underway to determine the average current hearing thresholds as a function of frequency and change relative to baseline values at recruitment for groups defined by trade, rated noise hazard, and years of service. Preliminary results suggest ways to improve the training of personnel with respect to the effects of both occupational and nonoccupational noise exposure and methods of implementing hearing conservation strategies. The role of head injury, history of ear disease, and the use of medications appear to be small. [Work supported by Veterans Affairs Canada.

  18. Noise sensitivity and sleep disturbance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, H.E.; Janssen, S.A.; Babisch, W.; Hansell, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that noise induced health effects are strongly related to non-acoustical factors such as noise sensitivity. It is a stable personality trait and it can be conceptualised as a causal pathway confounder and/or effect modifier between noise and health. Furthermore noise sensitivity

  19. Community response to tramway noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Berg, R. van den

    1988-01-01

    A study concerning tramway noise is described and results are presented. The study consisted of a social survey and a noise measurement program. It appeared that tramway noise does not contribute to the annoyance of the total noise if tramway annoyance is substantially below road traffic annoyance

  20. Instrument Noise Simulation for GRACE Follow-On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbeheshti, N.; Mueller, V.; Wegener, H.; Hewitson, M.; Heinzel, G.; Naeimi, M.; Flury, J.

    2016-12-01

    The quality of the temporal gravity field from GRACE Follow-On mission depends on its multi-sensor system consisting of inter-satellite ranging with microwave and laser ranging instrument, GNSS orbit tracking, accelerometry, and attitude sensing. In this presentation, the noise models for GRACE Follow-On major instruments are described and their effect on the estimation of Earth's gravity field accuracy are discussed. To do this the spectrum of the instruments noise models has been related to the spectrum of the disturbing potential of the Earth's gravity field. The instrument noise models are available to the geodesy community through GRACE Follow-On mock data challenges. The performance of gravity field recovery approaches can be tested by comparing observation residuals to the simulated instrument noises. The instrument noise models will also provide valuable insight for inter-satellite ranging configurations beyond GRACE Follow-On.

  1. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Narayanan, S.; Möller, S. A.; Clark, R.; Lee, T. E.; Leek, P. J.; Wallraff, A.; Schulz, St.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Häffner, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 μm. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation, the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion-loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and the possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed onto metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

  2. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingji Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4–30.6 V/(T/m, a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of <−14.5 dB, a small input-output nonlinearity of <10 ppm, and a low gradient noise of 0.16–620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz–170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/f noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  3. Reduction of combustion noise and instabilities using porous inert material with a swirl-stabilized burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequera, Daniel

    Combustion instabilities represent a major problem during operation of power generation systems that can lead to costly shutdown. Combustion instabilities are self excited large amplitude pressure oscillations caused by the coupling of unsteady heat release and acoustic modes of the combustor. These oscillations cause fluctuating mechanical loads and fluctuating heat transfer that can result in catastrophic premature failure of components. Combustion noise, a significant source of noise in gas turbines, can lead to combustion instabilities. Combustion noise and instabilities are different phenomena; however, they both occur due to unsteady heat release of turbulent flames that excites acoustic modes of the combustor. The instabilities self excite when flame adds energy to the acoustic field at a faster rate than it can dissipate it. Swirl-stabilized combustion and porous inert medium (PIM) combustion are two methods that have extensively been used, although independently, for flame stabilization. In this study, the two concepts are combined so that PIM serves as a passive device to mitigate combustion noise and instabilities. A PIM insert is placed within the lean premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor to affect the turbulent flow field reducing combustion noise. This study is the first step for eventual implementation in liquid fuel systems. After presenting the concept, a numerical investigation of the changes in the mean flow field caused by the PIM is presented. Changes in the flow field can be beneficial for noise reduction by optimizing the geometric parameters of the PIM. Next, atmospheric pressure experiments were conducted at low reactant inlet velocity (interior combustion modes were identified and PIM geometric parameters were optimized. Next, a laboratory facility to conduct experiments at high reactant inlet velocity, high inlet air temperature, and high pressure was designed and developed. Results show that the porous insert substantially reduces

  4. Noise in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasfeldt-Hansen, Dorthe; Lærkner, Eva Ann; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    Because noise is a general stressor, noise in the OR should be avoided whenever possible. This article presents the results of a review of the research literature on the topic of noise in the OR. A systematic literature search was conducted. Eighteen relevant articles were identified...... and categorized as follows: noise levels, noise sources, staff performances, and patient’s perception of noise. Each study was assessed according to the strength of the evidence and the quality of the study. Noise levels in the OR in general exceed recommended levels, and the noise sources are related...... to equipment and staff behavior. The main effect of noise on staff performances is related to impaired communication, resulting in a negative effect on patient safety. The literature on patients’ perception of noise is both limited and inconsistent, and more research on this topic is needed....

  5. Noise caused by semiconductor lasers in high-speed fiber-optic links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, C. M.; Stubkjær, Kristian; Olesen, H.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented for the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio caused by mode partition noise, intensity noise, and reflection-induced noise in optical data links. Under given conditions an additional noise source with a S /N ratio of 20 dB will cause a power penalty of 1 d......B in order to maintain a 10-9 bit error rate. From numerical simulations the authors predict the maximum allowable dispersion in the presence of mode partition noise to be approximately 40% of a clock period. This figure is almost independent of bit rate and laser structure and agrees well...

  6. Underwater noise in an impacted environment can affect Guiana dolphin communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Lis; Lima, Isabela M S; Andrade, Luciana G; Carvalho, Rafael R; Bisi, Tatiana L; Lailson-Brito, José; Azevedo, Alexandre F

    2017-01-30

    This study focused on whistles produced by Guiana dolphin under different noise conditions in Guanabara Bay, southeastern Brazil. Recording sessions were performed with a fully calibrated recording system. Whistles and underwater noise levels registered during two behavioral states were compared separately between two areas. Noise levels differed between the two areas across all frequencies. Whistle duration differed between areas and was negatively correlated with noise levels. Whistling rate was positively correlated with noise levels, showing that whistling rate was higher in noisier conditions. Results demonstrated that underwater noise influenced Guiana dolphin acoustic behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Discrete filtering techniques applied to sequential GPS range measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangraas, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The basic navigation solution is described for position and velocity based on range and delta range (Doppler) measurements from NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellites. The application of discrete filtering techniques is examined to reduce the white noise distortions on the sequential range measurements. A second order (position and velocity states) Kalman filter is implemented to obtain smoothed estimates of range by filtering the dynamics of the signal from each satellite separately. Test results using a simulated GPS receiver show a steady-state noise reduction, the input noise variance divided by the output noise variance, of a factor of four. Recommendations for further noise reduction based on higher order Kalman filters or additional delta range measurements are included.

  8. THE PROBLEM COMMUNAL NOISE IN CITY OF VRANJE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Bogdanović

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Noise is any unwanted sound. This means that every sound effects (buzzing, noise, magnifier, speech and so on., which interferes with work or rest, is noise. Communal noise generated by all noise sources that are found in the human environment, excluding the noise that occurs at the workplace in the industrial plants. It mainly comes from traffic and it's called traffic noise. Department of Public Health Vranje is authorized and accredited professional organization that performs measurements of noise pollution in the city of Vranje. Measurement of noise in both cycles included ten measuring points that are found in a residential area. The level of acoustical load at each measurement point is followed by three measurements in the daily interval and two measurements in a night interval. Made the daytime, evening and nighttime measurements at 53 measuring points (a total of 159 measurements over a period of 15 minutes of noise. From the 53 measuring points are higher noise level at measuring point 51 (almost all measuring points and ranges from 2 to 47.2 dB (tab. 1 Measuring points of noise pollution Vranje-2015-day / evening / night . The way to combat environmental noise largely depends on the degree of development, economy, culture and politics. There is no estimate on the world level about the impact of noise on the environment and human health as well as estimates of the price of that impact. The existence of a modern harmonized with European regulations normative acts will be aimed at the maximum limit and control the exposure of the population of acoustic pollution.

  9. Effects of the gaseous and liquid water content of the atmosphere on range delay and Doppler frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flock, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    When high precision is required for range measurement on Earth space paths, it is necessary to correct as accurately as possible for excess range delays due to the dry air, water vapor, and liquid water content of the atmosphere. Calculations based on representative values of atmospheric parameters are useful for illustrating the order of magnitude of the expected delays. Range delay, time delay, and phase delay are simply and directly related. Doppler frequency variations or noise are proportional to the time rate of change of excess range delay. Tropospheric effects were examined as part of an overall consideration of the capability of precision two way ranging and Doppler systems.

  10. Experimental investigation of aerofoil tonal noise generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pröbsting, S.; Serpieri, J.; Scarano, F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the mechanisms associated with tonal noise emission from a NACA 0012 aerofoil at moderate incidence (0; 1; 2 and 4 angle of attack) and with Reynolds numbers ranging from 100 000 to 270 000. Simultaneous time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) of the

  11. Extraaural effects of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marth, E.; Gruber, M.; Koeck, M.; Moese, J.R.; Gallasch, E.; Fueger, G.F.

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term exposition (15 sec) to an indifferent, broad spectrum of noise. Noise levels were set at 85 dB(A) and 110 dB(A). Stress mediators and compensatory mechanisms were studied in 30 test persons. The study was particularly concerned with the metabolic processes providing energy for fight or flight reactions. Most importantly triglycerides are hydrolysed in order to be able to produce the fatty acids that are released. This catabolism is a function of an ACTH-activated lipase. In 93% of the person tested, triglycerides decreased by 7 to 40% of the initial concentration. Blood sugar reaction can be described in two phases: Initially, there was a slight increase in the blood sugar concentration; at higher noise levels, it was followed by a slight decrease. This behaviour was even more characteristic of the insulin concentration. At 85 dB(A), no significant difference concentration was found compared with the levels previous to noise exposition. At 110 dB(A), there was a significant decrease in the insulin level. Vaso constriction of the peripheral blood vessels is a useful parameter for the stress caused by noise. This was shown by registering the finger pulse during the test.

  12. Noise and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Noise is widely understood to be something that interferes with a signal or process. Thus, it is generally thought to be destructive, obscuring signals and interfering with function. However, early in the 20th century, mechanical engineers found that mechanisms inducing additional vibration in mechanical systems could prevent sticking and hysteresis. This so-called "dither" noise was later introduced in an entirely different context at the advent of digital information transmission and recording in the early 1960s. Ironically, the addition of noise allows one to preserve information that would otherwise be lost when the signal or image is digitized. As we shall see, the benefits of added noise in these contexts are closely related to the phenomenon which has come to be known as stochastic resonance, the original version of which appealed to noise to explain how small periodic fluctuations in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit might be amplified in such a way as to bring about the observed periodic transiti...

  13. Does health promotion work in relation to noise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchgrevink, H M

    2003-01-01

    Noise is a health risk. The only scientifically established adverse health effect of noise is noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Besides noise may affect quality of life and cause annoyance and sleep disturbance. The present scientific evidence of potential non-auditory effects of noise on health is quite weak. Whether health promotion works in relation to noise may be reflected by permanent hearing threshold shift development in population studies. Hearing impairment continues to be the most prevalent disability in Western societies. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) still rates noise induced hearing loss among the top ten work-related problems. Recent studies report that employees continue to develop noise induced hearing loss although to a lesser extent than before, in spite of occupational hearing conservation programmes. Besides socio-acusis and leisure noise seem to be an increasing hazard to hearing, also in young children and adolescents. This seems partly related to acute leisure noise exposure (e.g. toy pistols, amplified music). However, population studies increasingly find non-normal high-frequency hearing including the characteristic NIHL-"notch" around 6 kHz also in subjects who do not report noise exposure incidents or activities. Today 12.5% of US children 6-19 years show a noise-"notch" in one or both ears (n= 5249, Niskar et al 2001). A Norwegian county audiometry survey on adults >/= 20 years n=51.975) showed mean unscreened thresholds +10 dB at 6 kHz for both genders even or the youngest age group 20-24 years (Borchgrevink et al 2001). Accordingly, the present health promotion initiatives seem insufficient in relation to noise and noise-induced hearing loss.

  14. Noise robustness of interferometric surface topography evaluation methods. Correlogram correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Ilia; Kiselev, Egor I.; Drexel, Michael; Hauptmannl, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Different surface height estimation methods are differently affected by interferometric noise. From a theoretical analysis we obtain height variance estimators for the methods. The estimations allow us to rigorously compare the noise robustness of popular evaluation algorithms. The envelope methods have the highest variances and hence the lowest noise resistances. The noise robustness improves from the envelope to the phase methods, but a technique involving the correlation of correlograms is superior even to the latter. We dwell on some details of this correlogram correlation method and the range of its application.

  15. Reconfigurable Tri Band mm wave Low Noise Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    and constant “flat” gain across a wide frequency range from a low noise amplifier results in a significant sacrifice in amplifier linearity at the...conference. Figure 1 shows the predicted gain, noise figure, and in/out return loss response of a balanced wideband two-stage low- noise pHEMT...MMIC coupler loss increases LNA noise figure by 0.3 to 0.4 dB, and reduces LNA gain. Figure 1. Predicted performance for a balanced , wideband LNA

  16. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Christina; Verbeek, Jos H; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C; Dreschler, Wouter A; Ferrite, Silvia

    2017-07-07

    noise level. The intervention was associated with a favourable but statistically non-significant downward trend in time of the noise dose of -2.1 percentage points per year (95% CI -4.9 to 0.7, 4 year follow-up, very low-quality evidence). Engineering intervention case studiesWe found 12 studies that described 107 uncontrolled case studies of immediate reductions in noise levels of machinery ranging from 11.1 to 19.7 dB(A) as a result of purchasing new equipment, segregating noise sources or installing panels or curtains around sources. However, the studies lacked long-term follow-up and dose measurements of workers, and we did not use these studies for our conclusions. Hearing protection devicesIn general hearing protection devices reduced noise exposure on average by about 20 dB(A) in one RCT and three CBAs (57 participants, low-quality evidence). Two RCTs showed that, with instructions for insertion, the attenuation of noise by earplugs was 8.59 dB better (95% CI 6.92 dB to 10.25 dB) compared to no instruction (2 RCTs, 140 participants, moderate-quality evidence). Administrative controls: information and noise exposure feedbackOn-site training sessions did not have an effect on personal noise-exposure levels compared to information only in one cluster-RCT after four months' follow-up (mean difference (MD) 0.14 dB; 95% CI -2.66 to 2.38). Another arm of the same study found that personal noise exposure information had no effect on noise levels (MD 0.30 dB(A), 95% CI -2.31 to 2.91) compared to no such information (176 participants, low-quality evidence). Effects on hearing loss Hearing protection devicesIn two studies the authors compared the effect of different devices on temporary threshold shifts at short-term follow-up but reported insufficient data for analysis. In two CBA studies the authors found no difference in hearing loss from noise exposure above 89 dB(A) between muffs and earplugs at long-term follow-up (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.63 to 1.03 ), very low

  17. Road Traffic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  18. Noise and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus from the Latin word tinnire meaning ringing is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound. The most common cause is noise induced hearing loss. Tinnitus may be induced by an acoustic trauma or a permanent noise in the workplace. In case that Tinnitus is induced by acoustic trauma the site of lesion is commonly the base of the cochlea. Tinnitus in the senile population is mostly accompanying presbycusis. Although the incidence of permanent tinnitus following noise exposure is high, little is published about this issue. In the current article we are aimed at studying the prevalence of tinnitus in Minoo and other manufactures.

  19. Bearing fault detection in the acoustic emission frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Massoud S.

    The effectiveness of using bearing fault detection in the acoustic-emission frequency range is demonstrated using a vertical milling machine as the testbed. The experimental testbed is monitored by an accelerometer and an acoustic emission sensor, and the signals are demodulated by rms enveloping and then fast-Fourier-transformed. The analytical computation of the defect characteristic frequency is explained, and the time histories are given of the enveloped signal and its spectrum. The method is shown to be useful for extracting the repetition rate of the repetitive component of the general signal, and the signal generated by the bearing defect is identified in the frequency ranges of mechanical vibration and acoustic emission. The signal in the acoustic-emission frequency range is shown to be helpful for detecting bearing defects because it not affected by repetitive mechanical noise.

  20. Environmental propagation of noise in mines and nearby villages: A study through noise mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwar, Veena D; Mandal, Bibhuti B; Pal, Asim K

    2016-01-01

    Noise mapping being an established practice in Europe is hardly practiced for noise management in India although it is mandatory in Indian mines as per guidelines of the Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS). As a pilot study, noise mapping was conducted in an opencast mine with three different models; one based on the baseline operating conditions in two shifts (Situation A), and two other virtual situations where either production targets were enhanced by extending working hours to three shifts (Situation B) or only by increased mechanization and not changing the duration of work (Situation C). Noise sources were categorized as point, line, area, and moving sources. Considering measured power of the sources, specific meteorological and geographical parameters, noise maps were generated using Predictor LimA software. In all three situations, Lden values were 95 dB(A) and 70-80 dB(A) near drill machine and haul roads, respectively. Noise contours were wider in Situation C due to increase in frequency of dumpers. Lden values near Shovel 1 and Shovel 2 under Situation B increased by 5 dB and 3 dB, respectively due to expansion of working hours. In Situation C, noise levels were >82 dB(A) around shovels. Noise levels on both sides of conveyor belts were in the range of 80-85 dB(A) in Situations A and C whereas it was 85-90 dB(A) in Situation B. Near crusher plants, it ranged from 80 to 90 dB(A) in Situations A and C and between 85 and 95 dB(A) in Situation B. In all situations, noise levels near residential areas exceeded the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) limits, i.e., 55 dB(A). For all situations, predicted noise levels exceeded CPCB limits within the mine and nearby residential area. Residential areas near the crusher plants are vulnerable to increased noise propagation. It is recommended to put an acoustic barrier near the crusher plant to attenuate the noise propagation.

  1. Environmental propagation of noise in mines and nearby villages: A study through noise mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena D Manwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise mapping being an established practice in Europe is hardly practiced for noise management in India although it is mandatory in Indian mines as per guidelines of the Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS. As a pilot study, noise mapping was conducted in an opencast mine with three different models; one based on the baseline operating conditions in two shifts (Situation A, and two other virtual situations where either production targets were enhanced by extending working hours to three shifts (Situation B or only by increased mechanization and not changing the duration of work (Situation C. Methods: Noise sources were categorized as point, line, area, and moving sources. Considering measured power of the sources, specific meteorological and geographical parameters, noise maps were generated using Predictor LimA software. Results: In all three situations, Lden values were 95 dB(A and 70–80 dB(A near drill machine and haul roads, respectively. Noise contours were wider in Situation C due to increase in frequency of dumpers. Lden values near Shovel 1 and Shovel 2 under Situation B increased by 5 dB and 3 dB, respectively due to expansion of working hours. In Situation C, noise levels were >82 dB(A around shovels. Noise levels on both sides of conveyor belts were in the range of 80–85 dB(A in Situations A and C whereas it was 85–90 dB(A in Situation B. Near crusher plants, it ranged from 80 to 90 dB(A in Situations A and C and between 85 and 95 dB(A in Situation B. In all situations, noise levels near residential areas exceeded the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB limits, i.e., 55 dB(A. Conclusions: For all situations, predicted noise levels exceeded CPCB limits within the mine and nearby residential area. Residential areas near the crusher plants are vulnerable to increased noise propagation. It is recommended to put an acoustic barrier near the crusher plant to attenuate the noise propagation.

  2. Effective compression and noise reduction configurations for hearing protectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2007-02-01

    The author proposed to adopt wide dynamic range compression and adaptive multichannel modulation-based noise reduction algorithms to enhance hearing protector performance. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of compression and noise reduction configurations on the amount of noise reduction, speech intelligibility, and overall preferences using existing digital hearing aids. In Experiment 1, sentence materials were recorded in speech spectrum noise and white noise after being processed by eight digital hearing aids. When the hearing aids were set to 3:1 compression, the amount of noise reduction achieved was enhanced or maintained for hearing aids with parallel configurations, but reduced for hearing aids with serial configurations. In Experiments 2 and 3, 16 normal-hearing listeners' speech intelligibility and perceived sound quality were tested when they listened to speech recorded through hearing aids with parallel and serial configurations. Regardless of the configuration, the noise reduction algorithms reduced the noise level and maintained speech intelligibility in white noise. Additionally, the listeners preferred the parallel rather than the serial configuration in 3:1 conditions and the serial configuration in 1:1 rather than 3:1 compression when the noise reduction algorithms were activated. Implications for hearing protector and hearing aid design are discussed.

  3. Training Methods for Image Noise Level Estimation on Wavelet Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Stefano

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the standard deviation of noise contaminating an image is a fundamental step in wavelet-based noise reduction techniques. The method widely used is based on the mean absolute deviation (MAD. This model-based method assumes specific characteristics of the noise-contaminated image component. Three novel and alternative methods for estimating the noise standard deviation are proposed in this work and compared with the MAD method. Two of these methods rely on a preliminary training stage in order to extract parameters which are then used in the application stage. The sets used for training and testing, 13 and 5 images, respectively, are fully disjoint. The third method assumes specific statistical distributions for image and noise components. Results showed the prevalence of the training-based methods for the images and the range of noise levels considered.

  4. Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenskis, Vilius; Maknys, Kęstutis

    2015-12-17

    This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture-emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

  5. Experimental testing of the noise-canceling processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael D; Baer, Ralph N; Simpson, Harry J

    2011-09-01

    Signal-processing techniques for localizing an acoustic source buried in noise are tested in a tank experiment. Noise is generated using a discrete source, a bubble generator, and a sprinkler. The experiment has essential elements of a realistic scenario in matched-field processing, including complex source and noise time series in a waveguide with water, sediment, and multipath propagation. The noise-canceling processor is found to outperform the Bartlett processor and provide the correct source range for signal-to-noise ratios below -10 dB. The multivalued Bartlett processor is found to outperform the Bartlett processor but not the noise-canceling processor. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  6. Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenskis, Vilius; Maknys, Kęstutis

    2015-12-01

    This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture-emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

  7. Community sensitivity to changes in aircraft noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, S.; Horonjeff, R.; Teffeteller, S.; Pearsons, K.

    1981-01-01

    Interviews were conducted in the vicinity of Burbank Airport during a four month period during which a counterbalanced series of changes in aircraft noise exposure occurred due to runway repairs. Another interview was undertaken approximately one year after completion of the initial runway repairs. Noise measurements were made in conjunction with administration of a brief questionnaire to a near exhaustive sample of residents in four airport neighborhoods. The magnitude and direction of change of annoyance with aircraft noise exposure corresponded closely to the actual changes in physical exposure. Estimates were made of time constants for the rate of change of attitudes toward aircraft noise.

  8. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  9. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  10. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    all of these noise sources. 6 777-200 A330-300 MD-90-30 MD-11 A320-214 747-400 A300-600R 767-300ER 757 -200 MD-87 MD-82 B-747-300 A300B4-620...broadband shock noise; fluidic/particulate injection; flexible filaments (i.e., wires attached to the nozzle or tail cone ); offset nozzles to reduce...the introduction of the turbojet engine powered Boeing 707 beginning in 1958. Following a series of lawsuits in the United States and public outcry

  11. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available GepteMehek. WHY IS NOISE SO Our ears are used primarily to communicate with others. to give warning of danger and to absorb sensory pleasures such as from music. The degree of irritation is related to the extent to which a sound interferes with these uses... on aircraft that make too much noise. Motor cars, buses, buzz-bikes and vacuum deaners can be effectively quietened but until now the public has not been prepared to pay the price of legislation. Also, many young sports-car enthusiasts still think...

  12. Rate constant and mechanism of the reaction Cl + CFCl₂H → CFCl₂ + HCl over the temperature range 298-670 K in N₂ or N₂/O₂ diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, E W; Jawad, Khadija M

    2014-05-08

    The rate constant of the reaction Cl + CFCl2H (k1) has been measured relative to the established rate constant for the reaction Cl + CH4 (k2) at 760 Torr. The measurements were carried out in Pyrex reactors using a mixture of CFCl2H, CH4, and Cl2 in either N2 or N2/O2 diluent. Reactants and products were quantified by GC/FID analysis. Cl atoms were generated by irradiation of the mixture with 360 nm light to dissociate the Cl2 for temperatures up to ~550 K. At higher temperature, the Cl2 dissociated thermally, and no irradiation was used. Over the temperature range 298-670 K, k1 is consistently a factor of ~5 smaller than that of k2 with a nearly identical temperature dependence. The optimum non-Arrhenius rate constant is represented by the expression k1 = 1.14 × 10(-22) T(3.49) e(-241/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) with an estimated uncertainty of ±15% including uncertainty in the reference reaction. CFCl3 formed from the reaction CFCl2 + Cl2 (k3) is the sole product in N2 diluent. In ~20% O2 at 298 K, the CFCl3 product is suppressed. The rate constant of reaction 3 was measured relative to that of reaction 4 [CFCl2 + O2 (k4)] giving the result k3/k4 = 0.0031 ± 0.0005 at 298 K. An earlier experiment by others observed C(O)FCl to be the major product of reaction channel 4 [formed via the sequence, CFCl2(O2) → CFCl2O → C(O)FCl + Cl]. Our current experiments verified that there is a Cl atom chain reaction in the presence of O2 as required by this mechanism.

  13. Free-ranging heart rate, body temperature and energy metabolism in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) in the arid regions of South East Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, H C; Buffenstein, R; Fanning, F D; Dawson, T J

    2001-06-01

    Eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) are generally regarded as mesic inhabitants. Even though access to drinking water in permanent stock watering troughs is commonly available, these animals are still found in only low densities in arid pastoral areas. We hypothesised that the differential success of red and grey kangaroos in the arid zone may be due to higher energy requirements of M. giganteus with a concomitant need for increased food, rather than limitations imposed by inadequate water access. We set out to test this by indirectly measuring energy expenditure through the monitoring of heart rate by radio telemetry in semi-free-ranging eastern grey and red kangaroos (Macropus rufus). Radio telemetry measurements of heart rate were calibrated against oxygen consumption and were used in the assessment of energy expenditure of animals maintained in an 8-ha enclosure in the arid zone of southeast Australia. Heart rate provided a reliable estimate of oxygen consumption. This well-correlated relationship was curvilinear and was established for each individual. Behavioural observations revealed that both kangaroo species spent most of the day in low energy demanding activities. M. rufus were more active at night whilst M. giganteus were more active in the early mornings and late afternoons. Like other marsupials, both species had low field metabolic rates (FMRs). However, M. giganteus in keeping with their mesic history had higher FMRs than the more arid-adapted M. rufus, particularly during water restriction. Body temperature telemeters revealed a further species difference in that under hot conditions when water is freely available, M. rufus exhibits a higher and more labile daytime body temperature than M. giganteus. During the hottest part of the day M. giganteus maintain body temperature, relying upon increased evaporative cooling mechanisms, such as licking. Indeed, only when access to drinking water was restricted was thermolability evident in M

  14. Theory of Mesoscopic Threshold Detectors of non-Gaussian Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Recently, measurements of current fluctuations arising from the charge discreteness (shot noise) have become an invaluable tool in mesoscopic physics, the most noticeable achievement being the measurement of quasi-particle charge in the fractional quantum Hall state. Typically, shot noise experiments report measurements of the zero-frequency noise power, which is a characteristic of the Gaussian component of current fluctuations. A natural generalization of the noise power, the counting statistics of charge transmitted through a system, is interesting in itself, because it contains complete information about the electron transport on a long time scale. However, the measurement of non-Gaussian noise effects presents an experimental challenge because of the limitations imposed by the central limit theorem. This difficulty can be partly overcome by placing an auxiliary mesoscopic system (detector) very close to the noise source and arranging strong coupling to the noise. This leads to the idea of a threshold detector, which is able to measure rare current fluctuations. Its basic principle is analogous to a pole vault: A detection event occurs when the measured system variable exceeds a given threshold value. A natural candidate for such a threshold detector is a metastable system operating on an activation principle. By measuring the rate of switching out of the metastable state, information about the statistical properties of the noise driving the system may be extracted. This requires solving the Kramers' problem of noise-activated escape from a metastable state beyond the Gaussian noise approximation and investigating how the measurement circuit affects threshold detection.

  15. Effects of noise on a simple visual attentional task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, L A; Delay, E R

    1989-06-01

    15 male and 15 female subjects scanned an array of lights during one of three types of white-noise conditions (continuous, 1-Hz pulse rate, and 10-Hz pulse rate) at 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 dB. Detection of light stimuli increased under the lower intensities and decreased under the higher intensities in the continuous and the 1-Hz pulse-rate conditions, but decreased as intensity increased in 10-Hz pulse-rate noise. Detection of peripheral stimuli was greatest during continuous noise and lowest during 10-Hz pulse-rate noise. These data are interpreted in terms of changes in attentional focus which result from altered levels of arousal.

  16. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  17. Environmental Noise as an Operative Stressor During Simulated Laparoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterland, Peter; Khan, Faisal S; Ismaili, Elgerta; Cheruvu, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine what effect environmental noise has upon the psychological and physiological stress response of medical students during simulated laparoscopic surgery. An anonymous cohort of medical students were randomized into 2 arms and performed a laparoscopic task on a simulator. The "control" group performed the task in silence, whereas the "noise" group were exposed to an 80 dB verbal recording. Operator stress response was measured using a validated acute stress questionnaire and continuous heart rate (HR). A total of 70 medical students participated. The "state" component of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire increased significantly following the task in both groups with globally higher scores recorded in the noise group. Peak-resting HR values were significantly higher in the noise group. Mean-resting HR was significantly higher in the noise group. Environmental noise in a simulated theater environment generates a measurable increase in operator stress response during laparoscopy.

  18. Realistic camera noise modeling with application to improved HDR synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Due to the ongoing miniaturization of digital camera sensors and the steady increase of the "number of megapixels", individual sensor elements of the camera become more sensitive to noise, even deteriorating the final image quality. To go around this problem, sophisticated processing algorithms in the devices, can help to maximally exploit the knowledge on the sensor characteristics (e.g., in terms of noise), and offer a better image reconstruction. Although a lot of research focuses on rather simplistic noise models, such as stationary additive white Gaussian noise, only limited attention has gone to more realistic digital camera noise models. In this article, we first present a digital camera noise model that takes several processing steps in the camera into account, such as sensor signal amplification, clipping, post-processing,.. We then apply this noise model to the reconstruction problem of high dynamic range (HDR) images from a small set of low dynamic range (LDR) exposures of a static scene. In literature, HDR reconstruction is mostly performed by computing a weighted average, in which the weights are directly related to the observer pixel intensities of the LDR image. In this work, we derive a Bayesian probabilistic formulation of a weighting function that is near-optimal in the MSE sense (or SNR sense) of the reconstructed HDR image, by assuming exponentially distributed irradiance values. We define the weighting function as the probability that the observed pixel intensity is approximately unbiased. The weighting function can be directly computed based on the noise model parameters, which gives rise to different symmetric and asymmetric shapes when electronic noise or photon noise is dominant. We also explain how to deal with the case that some of the noise model parameters are unknown and explain how the camera response function can be estimated using the presented noise model. Finally, experimental results are provided to support our findings.

  19. Playback Experiments for Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holles, Sophie; Simpson, Stephen D; Lecchini, David; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Playbacks are a useful tool for conducting well-controlled and replicated experiments on the effects of anthropogenic noise, particularly for repeated exposures. However, playbacks are unlikely to fully reproduce original sources of anthropogenic noise. Here we examined the sound pressure and particle acceleration of boat noise playbacks in a field experiment and reveal that although there remain recognized limitations, the signal-to-noise ratios of boat playbacks to ambient noise do not exceed those of a real boat. The experimental setup tested is therefore of value for use in experiments on the effects of repeated exposure of aquatic animals to boat noise.

  20. Neuroanatomical substrate of noise sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliuchko, Marina; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja

    2018-01-01

    Recent functional studies suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. In the present work, we examined whether noise sensitivity could be related to the structural...... and hippocampus was measured as well. According to our findings, noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in the selected structures. Among those, we propose and discuss particular areas, previously linked to auditory perceptual, emotional and interoceptive processing, in which larger grey...... matter volume seems to be related to higher noise sensitivity....

  1. Noise robustness of nonlinear filters for image recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towghi, N; Pan, L; Javidi, B

    2001-09-01

    We analyze the performance of the Fourier plane nonlinear filters in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We obtain a range of nonlinearities for which SNR is robust to the variations in input-noise bandwidth. This is shown both by analytical estimates of the SNR for nonlinear filters and by experimental simulations. Specifically, we analyze the SNR when Fourier plane nonlinearity is applied to the input signal. Using the Karhunen-Loève series expansion of the noise process, we obtain precise analytic expressions of the SNR for Fourier plane nonlinear filters in the presence of various types of additive-noise processes. We find a range of nonlinearities that need to be applied that keep the output SNR of the filter stable relative to changes in the noise bandwidth.

  2. The effect of quantum noise on multiplayer quantum game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuai; Fang, Mao-Fa; Zheng, Xiao-Juan

    2007-04-01

    It has recently been realized that quantum strategies have a great advantage over classical ones in quantum games. However, quantum states are easily affected by the quantum noise, resulting in decoherence. In this paper, we investigate the effect of quantum noise on a multiplayer quantum game with a certain strategic space, with all players affected by the same quantum noise at the same time. Our results show that in a maximally entangled state, a special Nash equilibrium appears in the range of 0<=p<=0.622 (p is the quantum noise parameter), and then disappears in the range of 0.622noise leads to the reduction of the quantum player's payoff.

  3. Curing the noise epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  4. Noise: A Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Noise Abatement and Control.

    This booklet contains nine sections describing ways in which noise may endanger health and well-being. Secions are included on: (1) hearing loss; (2) heart disease; (3) other reactions by the body; (4) effects on the unborn; (5) special effects on children; (6) intrusion at home and work; (7) sleep disruption; (8) mental and social well-being; and…

  5. Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the great technical challenges facing the Deep Space Network is receiving signals from a severely weight limited spacecraft hundreds of thousands to billions of kilometers from Earth. This weight limitation has always imposed strict limitations on the size of the spacecraft antenna and the amount of transmitter power radiated. The communication burden is placed upon the ground systems of the Deep Space Network which must recover an extremely weak signal in the presence of nearly overwhelming amounts of noise. Two key parameters that determine the signal to noise ratio of a received signal using a deep space station are the collecting area and efficiency of the antenna, and the amount of noise which is generated in, as well as allowed to enter in, the antenna-mounted receiver. These parameters are used to describe the relative ability of a deep space station to receive weak signals. As spacecraft to Earth communication distances have increased, the Deep Space Network engages in a relentless effort to increase the figure of merit through larger and more efficient antennas, higher frequencies, and lower system noise temperature.

  6. Assessment of noise in furniture factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Petusk Filipe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Work safety is of great importance in all industrial activities. The Norm NR15 of the Brazilian law determines that the work environment be tailored to employees to minimize biological, ergonomic, physical, chemical risks and accidents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure of intermittent noise in a daily dose to workers in furniture factories. Measurements were made with a sound level meter and dosimeter in a workday of eight hours in 14 furniture factories located in the South of Minas Gerais. Noise values ranged from 66.0 to 117.4 dB(A. At a dose of 8 working hours it was observed that the values exceed the tolerance limit of a unit, being from 2.76 to 30.52 for minimum and maximum units, respectively. Both noises and daily doses were superior than the values set by the NR-15-Annex 01 (BRASIL, 2008.

  7. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  8. The French method (of representing noise annoyance)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, F.; Delol, J.

    1980-01-01

    The psophic index used in France for noise exposure from aircraft globally represents the annoyance with the following hypotheses: (1) the global annoyance is a function of the number of aircraft overflights of each type but does not depend on the overflight time; (2) an aircraft flying at night is considered to be just as annoying as 10 aircraft of the same type passing overhead during the day; and (3) and annoyance is only a function of the peak noise levels. Overall, the psophic index appears statistically as good a representation of the average annoyance as methods used in other countries; however, it does seem to reflect poorly the annoyance caused by light aircraft. Noise maps produced for Orly, Roissy, and the area around Paris are described. The range of applications and limitations of the psophic index are discussed.

  9. Current Noise Spectrum of a Quantum Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian; Novotny, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    peaks at integer multiples of the mechanical frequency, which is slightly renormalized. The renormalization explains a previously observed small deviation of the shuttle Current compared to the expected value given by the product of the natural mechanical frequency and the electron charge. For a certain......We present a method for calculating the full current noise spectrum S(omega) for the class of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) that can be described by a Markovian generalized master equation. As a specific example we apply the method to a quantum shuttle. The noise spectrum of the shuttle has...... parameter range the quantum shuttle exhibits a coexistence regime, where the charges are transported by two different mechanisms: Shuttling and sequential tunneling. In our previous studies we showed that characteristic features in the zero-frequency noise could be quantitatively understood as a slow...

  10. Ku band low noise parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A low noise, K sub u-band, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-band parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.

  11. Algorithm Development for a Real-Time Military Noise Monitor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S; Bucci, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The long-range goal of this 1-year SERDP Exploratory Development (SEED) project was to create an improved real-time, high-energy military impulse noise monitoring system that can detect events with peak levels (Lpk...

  12. Effects of Aircraft Noise and Sonic Booms on Domestic Animals and Wildlife: A Literature Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    kuehniella) from 20 to 10 days. In - addition, the mean number of eggs per female was reduced 59% in the noise- exposed group. Honey bees ( Apis mellifera ...ejection General noise (105 dB) Reduces feed consumption, (Kovalcik and Sottnik milk yield, and rate of 1971) milk release Tractor engine sound Increased...rate (120-135 dB) (Bond et al. 1963) Sheep White noise (100 dB) Higher heart rate and (Ames and Arehart 1972) respiration rate; lower feeding

  13. Characterization of Noise Signatures of Involuntary Head Motion in the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Caballero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The variability inherently present in biophysical data is partly contributed by disparate sampling resolutions across instrumentations. This poses a potential problem for statistical inference using pooled data in open access repositories. Such repositories combine data collected from multiple research sites using variable sampling resolutions. One example is the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange repository containing thousands of imaging and demographic records from participants in the spectrum of autism and age-matched neurotypical controls. Further, statistical analyses of groups from different diagnoses and demographics may be challenging, owing to the disparate number of participants across different clinical subgroups. In this paper, we examine the noise signatures of head motion data extracted from resting state fMRI data harnessed under different sampling resolutions. We characterize the quality of the noise in the variability of the raw linear and angular speeds for different clinical phenotypes in relation to age-matched controls. Further, we use bootstrapping methods to ensure compatible group sizes for statistical comparison and report the ranges of physical involuntary head excursions of these groups. We conclude that different sampling rates do affect the quality of noise in the variability of head motion data and, consequently, the type of random process appropriate to characterize the time series data. Further, given a qualitative range of noise, from pink to brown noise, it is possible to characterize different clinical subtypes and distinguish them in relation to ranges of neurotypical controls. These results may be of relevance to the pre-processing stages of the pipeline of analyses of resting state fMRI data, whereby head motion enters the criteria to clean imaging data from motion artifacts.

  14. Annoyance, detection and recognition of wind turbine noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Bockstael, Annelies; De Weirt, Valentine; Botteldooren, Dick

    2013-07-01

    Annoyance, recognition and detection of noise from a single wind turbine were studied by means of a two-stage listening experiment with 50 participants with normal hearing abilities. In-situ recordings made at close distance from a 1.8-MW wind turbine operating at 22 rpm were mixed with road traffic noise, and processed to simulate indoor sound pressure levels at LAeq 40 dBA. In a first part, where people were unaware of the true purpose of the experiment, samples were played during a quiet leisure activity. Under these conditions, pure wind turbine noise gave very similar annoyance ratings as unmixed highway noise at the same equivalent level, while annoyance by local road traffic noise was significantly higher. In a second experiment, listeners were asked to identify the sample containing wind turbine noise in a paired comparison test. The detection limit of wind turbine noise in presence of highway noise was estimated to be as low as a signal-to-noise ratio of -23 dBA. When mixed with local road traffic, such a detection limit could not be determined. These findings support that noticing the sound could be an important aspect of wind turbine noise annoyance at the low equivalent levels typically observed indoors in practice. Participants that easily recognized wind-turbine(-like) sounds could detect wind turbine noise better when submersed in road traffic noise. Recognition of wind turbine sounds is also linked to higher annoyance. Awareness of the source is therefore a relevant aspect of wind turbine noise perception which is consistent with previous research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diode laser pumped solid state laser. Part IV. ; Noise analysis. Handotai laser reiki kotai laser. 4. ; Noise kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, H.; Seno, T.; Tanabe, Y. (Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-06-10

    Concerning the second harmonic generation(SHG) of diode laser pumped solid state laser using a nonlinear optical material, the researches are carried out to pracitically apply to the optical pickup. Therefore, the reduction of output optical noise has become the important researching subject. The theoretical and experimental analyses of noise generating mechanism were carried out for the system in which Nd;YAG as the laser diode and KTP (KTiOPO {sub 4}) as the nonlinear optical crystal were used. The following findings for the noise generating mechanism could be obtained: The competitive interaction between the polarization modes was dominant noise mechanism in the high frequency range from 1 to 20MHz and the noise could be removed sufficiently by using the QWP(quarter wave plate). On the other hand, the noise observed in the low frequency range from 100 to 200kHz depended on the resonance length, agreed qualitatively with the theoretical analysis of the noise to the competitive longitudinal modes and agreed quantitatively with the noise generating frequency range. 10 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Regime shifts driven by dynamic correlations in gene expression noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogita; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process that leads to regime shifts between alternative steady states among individual living cells, inducing phenotypic variability. The effects of white noise on the regime shift in bistable systems have been well characterized, however little is known about such effects of colored noise (noise with nonzero correlation time). Here, we show that noise correlation time, by considering a genetic circuit of autoactivation, can have a significant effect on the regime shift between distinct phenotypic states in gene expression. We demonstrate this theoretically, using stochastic potential, stationary probability density function, and first-passage time based on the Fokker-Planck description, where the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is used to model colored noise. We find that an increase in noise correlation time in the degradation rate can induce a regime shift from a low to a high protein concentration state and enhance the bistable regime, while an increase in noise correlation time in the basal rate retains the bimodal distribution. We then show how cross-correlated colored noises in basal and degradation rates can induce regime shifts from a low to a high protein concentration state, but reduce the bistable regime. We also validate these results through direct numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equation. In gene expression understanding the causes of regime shift to a harmful phenotype could improve early therapeutic intervention in complex human diseases.

  17. Regime shifts driven by dynamic correlations in gene expression noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogita; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process that leads to regime shifts between alternative steady states among individual living cells, inducing phenotypic variability. The effects of white noise on the regime shift in bistable systems have been well characterized, however little is known about such effects of colored noise (noise with nonzero correlation time). Here, we show that noise correlation time, by considering a genetic circuit of autoactivation, can have a significant effect on the regime shift between distinct phenotypic states in gene expression. We demonstrate this theoretically, using stochastic potential, stationary probability density function, and first-passage time based on the Fokker-Planck description, where the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is used to model colored noise. We find that an increase in noise correlation time in the degradation rate can induce a regime shift from a low to a high protein concentration state and enhance the bistable regime, while an increase in noise correlation time in the basal rate retains the bimodal distribution. We then show how cross-correlated colored noises in basal and degradation rates can induce regime shifts from a low to a high protein concentration state, but reduce the bistable regime. We also validate these results through direct numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equation. In gene expression understanding the causes of regime shift to a harmful phenotype could improve early therapeutic intervention in complex human diseases.

  18. The effects of noise vocoding on speech quality perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melinda C; Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M

    2014-03-01

    Speech perception depends on access to spectral and temporal acoustic cues. Temporal cues include slowly varying amplitude changes (i.e. temporal envelope, TE) and quickly varying amplitude changes associated with the center frequency of the auditory filter (i.e. temporal fine structure, TFS). This study quantifies the effects of TFS randomization through noise vocoding on the perception of speech quality by parametrically varying the amount of original TFS available above 1500Hz. The two research aims were: 1) to establish the role of TFS in quality perception, and 2) to determine if the role of TFS in quality perception differs between subjects with normal hearing and subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Ratings were obtained from 20 subjects (10 with normal hearing and 10 with hearing loss) using an 11-point quality scale. Stimuli were processed in three different ways: 1) A 32-channel noise-excited vocoder with random envelope fluctuations in the noise carrier, 2) a 32-channel noise-excited vocoder with the noise-carrier envelope smoothed, and 3) removal of high-frequency bands. Stimuli were presented in quiet and in babble noise at 18dB and 12dB signal-to-noise ratios. TFS randomization had a measurable detrimental effect on quality ratings for speech in quiet and a smaller effect for speech in background babble. Subjects with normal hearing and subjects with sensorineural hearing loss provided similar quality ratings for noise-vocoded speech. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Variation of aircraft noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the basis for increased sensitivity of people to noise during aircraft noise studies. This change in sensitivity could be attributed to either a physiological time-of-day effect (i.e., a circadian rhythm) or simply to the total number of aircraft noise events experienced during a laboratory test period. In order to investigate the time-of-day factor, noise sensitivity measures were obtained from subjects at home with cassette tape recorders/headsets over a 24 hour period. The effect of number of aircraft noise events on noise sensitivity was investigated within a laboratory. In these tests, measures of sensitivity to noise were obtained from subjects before and after their exposure to varying numbers of aircraft noise events. The 24 hour data showed no evidence that noise sensitivity is physiologically cyclical. Consequently, these data can not explain annoyance response variation to aircraft noise tests conducted during the daytime. However, the number of aircraft noise events did influence the subject's noise sensitivity. This effect completely accounts for the systematic increase in noise sensitivity during a laboratory test period.

  20. Noise management by molecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Bruggeman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in the copy number of key regulatory macromolecules ("noise" may cause physiological heterogeneity in populations of (isogenic cells. The kinetics of processes and their wiring in molecular networks can modulate this molecular noise. Here we present a theoretical framework to study the principles of noise management by the molecular networks in living cells. The theory makes use of the natural, hierarchical organization of those networks and makes their noise management more understandable in terms of network structure. Principles governing noise management by ultrasensitive systems, signaling cascades, gene networks and feedback circuitry are discovered using this approach. For a few frequently occurring network motifs we show how they manage noise. We derive simple and intuitive equations for noise in molecule copy numbers as a determinant of physiological heterogeneity. We show how noise levels and signal sensitivity can be set independently in molecular networks, but often changes in signal sensitivity affect noise propagation. Using theory and simulations, we show that negative feedback can both enhance and reduce noise. We identify a trade-off; noise reduction in one molecular intermediate by negative feedback is at the expense of increased noise in the levels of other molecules along the feedback loop. The reactants of the processes that are strongly (cooperatively regulated, so as to allow for negative feedback with a high strength, will display enhanced noise.