WorldWideScience

Sample records for range radar site

  1. Report of findings: Contaminant study of the environment surrounding the Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site (Cape Romanzof) contains many petroleum-related spills and hazardous substances. Therefore, in 1987 and 1988 a field study...

  2. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  3. Antenna induced range smearing in MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Johnston, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing stratosphere troposphere (ST) and mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars for higher resolution to study small-scale turbulent structures and waves. At present most ST and MST radars have resolutions of 150 meters or larger, and are not able to distinguish the thin (40 - 100 m) turbulent layers that are known to occur in the troposphere and stratosphere, and possibly in the mesosphere. However the antenna beam width and sidelobe level become important considerations for radars with superior height resolution. The objective of this paper is to point out that for radars with range resolutions of about 150 meters or less, there may be significant range smearing of the signals from mesospheric altitudes due to the finite beam width of the radar antenna. At both stratospheric and mesospheric heights the antenna sidelobe level for lear equally spaced phased arrays may also produce range aliased signals. To illustrate this effect the range smearing functions for two vertically directed antennas have been calculated, (1) an array of 32 coaxial-collinear strings each with 48 elements that simulates the vertical beam of the Poker Flat, Glaska, MST radar; and (2) a similar, but smaller, array of 16 coaxial-collinear strings each with 24 elements.

  4. Radar Observations of Recent Mars Landing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K. W.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity will arrive at their respective landing sites of Gusev Crater and Terra Meridiani in January 2004. During the 2001 and 2003 Mars Oppositions both landing sites were targeted for a series of radar observations using the telescopes of the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC). This paper will present results of terrestrial delay- Doppler radar observations of the landing sites, predictions for the surface properties that will be encountered, and, after successful landings, correlation between the predicted and observed surface properties. The in-situ observations made by both missions serve as ground truth for the validation of the high resolution radar mapping results.

  5. Local Information from Range-Speed Radar Sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Radar observes targets, but they remain difficult to interpret due to the difficulty in analysing the radar range-speed sequences. The need for accurate analyses tools increases in case of extended target behaviour or multiple channel radars which give additional observation angles. Extended targets

  6. Useful Radar Data for Mars 2001 Landing Site Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Slade, M. A.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1998-01-01

    Radar data, of both Doppler-only and delay-Doppler varieties, played a useful role in the landing site certification process for Mars Pathfinder. Radar provides information on the elevation of the planetary surface, on its radar reflectivity and on the surface roughness. The elevation is important for proper entry, descent and landing, as is the reflectivity if a radar altimeter is to be used on the lander. Both the reflectivity and the surface roughness can measure the rockiness of the surface, important for a safe landing, as well as for rover trafficability. The spatial resolution of this Earth-based remote sensing technique is around 10 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. In the case of Pathfinder the regionally averaged properties were confirmed by ground truth at the landing site in Ares Vallis. The landing site assessment for Pathfinder relied principally on data from the 1995 Mars opposition when sub-Earth latitudes on Mars ranged from 16 to 22 degrees north. Data from earlier oppositions (1992-93, 1990, 1988-89) are available and cover latitudes from 25 south to 25 north at various longitudes. The available data will be presented at the symposium. The data are of varying quality, although ranging data is available for about 20 radar tracks per opposition, reflectivity and roughness analyses may not always be possible. Some older data are also available (1982, 1980) with range-only information.

  7. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  8. Sparse Representation Denoising for Radar High Resolution Range Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profile has attracted considerable attention in radar automatic target recognition. In practice, radar return is usually contaminated by noise, which results in profile distortion and recognition performance degradation. To deal with this problem, in this paper, a novel denoising method based on sparse representation is proposed to remove the Gaussian white additive noise. The return is sparsely described in the Fourier redundant dictionary and the denoising problem is described as a sparse representation model. Noise level of the return, which is crucial to the denoising performance but often unknown, is estimated by performing subspace method on the sliding subsequence correlation matrix. Sliding window process enables noise level estimation using only one observation sequence, not only guaranteeing estimation efficiency but also avoiding the influence of profile time-shift sensitivity. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the return, leading to a high-quality profile.

  9. Angkor site monitoring and evaluation by radar remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fulong; Jiang, Aihui; Ishwaran, Natarajan

    2014-11-01

    Angkor, in the northern province of Siem Reap, Cambodia, is one of the most important world heritage sites of Southeast Asia. Seasonal flood and ground sinking are two representative hazards in Angkor site. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing has played an important role for the Angkor site monitoring and management. In this study, 46 scenes of TerraSAR data acquired in the span of February, 2011 to December, 2013 were used for the time series analysis and hazard evaluation; that is, two-fold classification for flood area extracting and Multi-Temporal SAR Interferometry (MT-InSAR) for ground subsidence monitoring. For the flood investigation, the original Single Look Complex (SLC) TerraSAR-X data were transferred into amplitude images. Water features in dry and flood seasons were firstly extracted using a proposed mixed-threshold approach based on the backscattering; and then for the correlation analysis between water features and the precipitation in seasonally and annually. Using the MT-InSAR method, the ground subsidence was derived with values ranging from -50 to +12 mm/yr in the observation period of February, 2011 to June, 2013. It is clear that the displacement on the Angkor site was evident, implying the necessity of continuous monitoring.

  10. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  11. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  12. Design and use of a mobile, x-band, high range resolution, radar research facility

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Witt, JJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High range resolution (HRR) radar measurements can provide important feature information when performing non-cooperative target recognition. This paper presents a joint development of a mobile, X-band, HRR research radar facility, by the research...

  13. Resolution function of nonsinusoidal radar signals. I - Range-velocity resolution with rectangular pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nasser J.

    1990-05-01

    A generalization of a previously published ambiguity function that applies to radar known as large-relative-bandwidth radar, carrier-free radar, impulse radar, or nonsinusoidal radar is discussed. This radar has recently attracted attention because of its ability to penetrate absorbing materials used in the stealth technology. Another good application is the detection of moving targets with a small radar cross section by a look-down radar, which calls for a thumbtack ambiguity function. Since a small radar cross section in this application is typically due to the small size of the target that is coated with absorbing material, the antistealth feature of the nonsinusoidal radar is implicitly being used. The principle is presented of a resolution function (tentatively called the range-velocity or the range-Doppler resolution function) based on processing a nonsinusoidal signal consisting of N characters with a time separation TD and each character consisting of a sequence of L binary pulses of duration T. It is shown that range-velocity resolution functions approaching the ideal thumbtack function are easy to obtain. The blind speeds of the pulse-Doppler radar with sinusoidal carrier do not inherently occur, and all velocities are observed as true velocities rather than as velocities modulo the first blind speed (velocity ambiguity).

  14. Potential application of the Motorola MSR-20 Radar to DOE site security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlowe, D.; Rebeil, P.; Vigil, R.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes the results of testing the MSR-20 radar and provides guidance on how this radar may be used to provide early detection and warning of approaching intruders beyond DOE facility site boundaries.

  15. A 100,000 Scale Factor Radar Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Neifeld, Mark; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2017-12-19

    The radar cross section of an object is an important electromagnetic property that is often measured in anechoic chambers. However, for very large and complex structures such as ships or sea and land clutters, this common approach is not practical. The use of computer simulations is also not viable since it would take many years of computational time to model and predict the radar characteristics of such large objects. We have now devised a new scaling technique to overcome these difficulties, and make accurate measurements of the radar cross section of large items. In this article we demonstrate that by reducing the scale of the model by a factor 100,000, and using near infrared wavelength, the radar cross section can be determined in a tabletop setup. The accuracy of the method is compared to simulations, and an example of measurement is provided on a 1 mm highly detailed model of a ship. The advantages of this scaling approach is its versatility, and the possibility to perform fast, convenient, and inexpensive measurements.

  16. A laser radar experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-09-01

    An experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using a laser radar for long-range target acquisition and tracking is discussed. A CO2 laser was used to collect range Doppler images, while a medium-power argon ion laser was employed for angular tracking. Laser-radar operation is outlined with emphasis on isotopic laser radars. Laser-radar imaging is covered, and a laser-radar range equation is given. Experimental laser-radar transmitter, receiver, and telescope are described. A 35-foot long surface-to-air missile and payload were tracked in the experiment, with the laser radar acquiring the targets as they reached 480 km in altitude, 750 km from the radar site. The 4-ft-diameter aperture laser-radar telescope provided the resolution and range accuracy equivalent to that of a 120-ft microwave radar antenna.

  17. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  18. Technical document to support no further action decision for site SS17-building 102, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This decision document is to support the No Further Action alternative for Site SS17-Building 102 at the Kotzebue LRRS, Alaska. The purpose of the decision document is to summarize existing data for the site and describe the Air Force`s rationale for selecting the no-further-action alternative.

  19. Technical document to support no further action decision for site SS07-lake, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This decision document is to support the No Further Action alternative for Site SS07-Lake at the Kotzebue LRRS, Alaska. The purpose of the decision document is to summarize existing data for the site and describe the Air Force`s rationale for selecting the no-further-action alternative.

  20. S-band radar calibration test of the Lightning Detection and Ranging system (LDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    A calibration and an accuracy assessment of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) were attempted through a simultaneous track of an S Band radar transponder and a lightning simulator carried by the NASA 6 airplane on a test flight. Included in the report are the results of the calibration test, error analyses of the radar, and the LDAR systems, and recommendations for future calibration tests.

  1. A prototype fully polarimetric 160-GHz bistatic ISAR compact radar range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, C. J.; Horgan, T.; DeMartinis, G.; Coulombe, M. J.; Goyette, T.; Gatesman, A. J.; Nixon, William E.

    2017-05-01

    We present a prototype bistatic compact radar range operating at 160 GHz and capable of collecting fullypolarimetric radar cross-section and electromagnetic scattering measurements in a true far-field facility. The bistatic ISAR system incorporates two 90-inch focal length, 27-inch-diameter diamond-turned mirrors fed by 160 GHz transmit and receive horns to establish the compact range. The prototype radar range with its modest sized quiet zone serves as a precursor to a fully developed compact radar range incorporating a larger quiet zone capable of collecting X-band bistatic RCS data and 3D imagery using 1/16th scale objects. The millimeter-wave transmitter provides 20 GHz of swept bandwidth in the single linear (Horizontal/Vertical) polarization while the millimeter-wave receiver, that is sensitive to linear Horizontal and Vertical polarization, possesses a 7 dB noise figure. We present the design of the compact radar range and report on test results collected to validate the system's performance.

  2. Dynamic Gesture Recognition with a Terahertz Radar Based on Range Profile Sequences and Doppler Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of terahertz radar ranges from 0.1 THz to 10 THz, which is higher than that of microwaves. Multi-modal signals, including high-resolution range profile (HRRP and Doppler signatures, can be acquired by the terahertz radar system. These two kinds of information are commonly used in automatic target recognition; however, dynamic gesture recognition is rarely discussed in the terahertz regime. In this paper, a dynamic gesture recognition system using a terahertz radar is proposed, based on multi-modal signals. The HRRP sequences and Doppler signatures were first achieved from the radar echoes. Considering the electromagnetic scattering characteristics, a feature extraction model is designed using location parameter estimation of scattering centers. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW extended to multi-modal signals is used to accomplish the classifications. Ten types of gesture signals, collected from a terahertz radar, are applied to validate the analysis and the recognition system. The results of the experiment indicate that the recognition rate reaches more than 91%. This research verifies the potential applications of dynamic gesture recognition using a terahertz radar.

  3. Objective Determination of Cloud Heights and Radar Reflectivities Using a Combination of Active Remote Sensors at the ARM CART Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Mace, Gerald G.; Moran, Kenneth P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Miller, Mark A.; Martner, Brooks E.

    2000-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is deploying sensitive, millimeter-wave cloud radars at its Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (CART) sites in Oklahoma, Alaska, and the tropical western Pacific Ocean. The radars complement optical devices, including a Belfort or Vaisala laser ceilometer and a micropulse lidar, in providing a comprehensive source of information on the vertical distribution of hydrometeors overhead at the sites. An algorithm is described that combines data from these active remote sensors to produce an objective determination of hydrometeor height distributions and estimates of their radar reflectivities, vertical velocities, and Doppler spectral widths, which are optimized for accuracy. These data provide fundamental information for retrieving cloud microphysical properties and assessing the radiative effects of clouds on climate. The algorithm is applied to nine months of data from the CART site in Oklahoma for initial evaluation. Much of the algorithm's calculations deal with merging and optimizing data from the radar's four sequential operating modes, which have differing advantages and limitations, including problems resulting from range sidelobes, range aliasing, and coherent averaging. Two of the modes use advanced phase-coded pulse compression techniques to yield approximately 10 and 15 dB more sensitivity than is available from the two conventional pulse modes. Comparison of cloud-base heights from the Belfort ceilometer and the micropulse lidar confirms small biases found in earlier studies, but recent information about the ceilometer brings the agreement to within 20-30 m. Merged data of the radar's modes were found to miss approximately 5.9% of the clouds detected by the laser systems. Using data from only the radar's two less-sensitive conventional pulse modes would increase the missed detections to 22%-34%. A significant remaining problem is that the radar's lower-altitude data are often

  4. Optimizing Single Sweep Range and Doppler Processing for FMCW Radar using Inverse Filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.J. de; Dorp, Ph. van

    2005-01-01

    We discuss range and Doppler processing for FMCW radar using only a single pulse or frequency sweep. The first step is correlation processing, for which the range and Doppler resolution are limited by the ambiguity function. We show that this resolution can be optimized with an additional inverse

  5. Interferometric acquisition and fire control radar for short-range missile defense with optimized radar distribution (SWORD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept "SWORD" (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of the past investments. The Deptuy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology [DAS(R&T)] has a three-year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary Bench-Top Experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  6. Doppler radar observation of thunderstorm circulation in the 1977 trip program. [triple Doppler radar network for lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermitte, R. M.; Conte, D.; Pasqualucci, F.; Lennon, C.; Serafin, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Storm data obtained on August 1, 1977 are examined in an attempt to interpret the relationship between lightning occurrence and the thunderstorm inner dynamics and precipitation processes. Horizontal maps are presented which indicated the position of radiation sources detected by the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network, together with the horizontal motion fields and radar reflectivity data. Detailed inspection of these fields showed that, although radiation sources are found in the vicinity of precipitation cells, they are not located in the heavy precipitation areas, but rather on their rear side in regions where the configuration of the wind fields suggests the presence of updrafts.

  7. Sparse Representation Based Range-Doppler Processing for Integrated OFDM Radar-Communication Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In an integrated radar-communication network, multiuser access techniques with minimal performance degradation and without range-Doppler ambiguities are required, especially in a dense user environment. In this paper, a multiuser access scheme with random subcarrier allocation mechanism is proposed for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM based integrated radar-communication networks. The expression of modulation Symbol-Domain method combined with sparse representation (SR for range-Doppler estimation is introduced and a parallel reconstruction algorithm is employed. The radar target detection performance is improved with less spectrum occupation. Additionally, a Doppler frequency detector is exploited to decrease the computational complexity. Numerical simulations show that the proposed method outperforms the traditional modulation Symbol-Domain method under ideal and realistic nonideal scenarios.

  8. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  9. Optimization of the High-Frequency Radar Sites in the Bering Strait Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Optimization of the High-Frequency Radar Sites in the Bering Strait Region GLEB PANTELEEV International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska...climatological data in the Bering Strait (BS) region are synthesized with dynamical constraints of a numerical model. The optimal HFR placement...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optimization of the High-Frequency Radar Sites in the Bering Strait Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. A computational method to model radar return range in a polygonally based, computer-generated-imagery simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, F. J.; Phillips, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Described is a method for modeling a ground-mapping radar system for use in simulations where the terrain is in a polygonal form commonly used with computer generated imagery (CGI). The method employs a unique approach for rapidly rejecting polygons not visible to the radar to facilitate the real-time simulation of the radar return. This rapid rejection of the nonvisible polygons requires the precalculation and storage of a set of parameters that do not vary during the simulation. The calculation of a radar range as a function of the radar forward-looking angle to the CGI terrain is carried out only for the visible polygons. This method was used as part of a simulation for terrain-following helicopter operations on the vertical motion simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center. It proved to be an efficient means for returning real-time simulated radar range data.

  11. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Heard, Freddie E [Albuquerque, NM; Cordaro, J Thomas [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  12. Radar measurements of surface deformation in the sub mm-range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gerhard; Hort, Matthias; Gerst, Alexander; Scharff, Lea

    2016-04-01

    A portable low power Doppler radar at 24 GHz is used for volcano eruption observations since more than a decade (e.g. Hort and Seyfried, 1998, doi: 10.1029/97GL03482; Seyfried and Hort, 1999, doi: 10.1007/s004450050256; Vöge et al., 2005, doi: 10.1029/2005 EO510001, Vöge and Hort, 2009, doi: 10.1109/TGRS. 2008.2002693, Gerst et al., 2013, doi: 10.1002/jgrb.50234; Scharff et al, 2015, doi: 10.1130/G36705.1) The typical radar products are range resolved Doppler spectra containing information on the reflectivity, radial velocity and its distribution of ejected particles. Here we present the analysis of the phase of radar signals for the detection of comparably slow and small deformations of the solid surface which may occur for example prior to an eruption [Hort et al., 2010, AGU Fall meeting, Abstract V32B-03]. While the phase analysis of weather radar echoes from ground targets is established for estimating the atmospheric refractivity [Besson and du Châtelet, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1175/ JTECH-D-12-00167.1], we consider here the variability of the atmosphere as a source of uncertainty. We describe the implementation of this technique in a dedicated compact low power FMCW system. Observations at Stromboli suggest an expansion of the vent prior to the eruption on the order of millimeter which is on the same oder as reported by [Noferini et al., 2009, doi: 10.1109/IGARSS. 2009. 5416901] and in case of Santiaguito volcano we were able to observe the post eruptive subsidence of the volcanic dome. We suggest further to resolve the range/refractivity ambiguity by using a dual frequency radar with sufficient frequency separation for utilizing the frequency dependence of refractivity.

  13. Range-Doppler Mapping of Space-Based Targets Using the JRO 50 MHz Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesaraju, S.; Mathews, J. D.; Milla, M.; Vierinen, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) two-dimensional square array radar system operating at 6-m wavelength was used to study the Moon and low Earth orbit satellites using the Range-Doppler inverse synthetic aperture radar technique also known as Delay-Doppler imaging. The radar data was collected on Oct 21, 2015. A circularly polarized coded pulse was transmitted from a quarter-array antenna segment during lunar transit over JRO. Dual-linear polarization receive systems were employed on two quarter-array segments and on two 1/64th array modules giving the longest possible baselines across the transit path. A Range-Doppler mapping technique that uses the rotational motion of the targets and an autofocusing motion and ionospheric delay compensation technique has been implemented to generate the two-dimensional maps of the point-target (Satellite) and range-spread target (Moon). A review of our technique and the maps obtained from these observations is presented herein. Range-Doppler maps of the Moon and satellites are instructive with regards to possible further improvement of the technique, especially regarding ionospheric compensation.

  14. Application of ranging technique of radar level meter for draft survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Yijun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper aims to solve the problems of the high subjectivity and low accuracy and efficiency of draft surveying relying on human visual inspection.[Methods] Radar-level oil and liquid measurement technology products are widely used in the petrochemical industry. A device is developed that uses radar to survey the draft of a boat, designed with data series optimization formulae to ensure that the data results are true and correct. At the same time, a test is designed to prove the accuracy of the results.[Results] According to the conditions of the ship,the device is composed of a radar sensor, triangular bracket and display,and is put to use in the test.[Conclusions] With 15 vessels as the research objects,the comparison experiment shows a difference in range between 0.001-0.022 meters, with an average difference rate of 0.028%, which meets the requirements for ship draft survey accuracy.

  15. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  16. Simulation of recording the microwave holograms of complex objects by the near range radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Razevig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar is an object-detection technology that uses radio waves to determine the presence, range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects. In the recent time, there is an increasingly arising interest to the near range microwave imaging that allows detection of the shape and, in some cases, the inner structure of the investigated objects.For design engineering and efficiency evaluation of the cutting-edge radars as well as for testing the developed recovery algorithms a set of microwave holograms of various objects obtained under different conditions is needed. Microwave holograms cannot be obtained only on the basis of the experimental researches related to the measurements of electromagnetic scattering by the real objects since such experiments are time consuming and quite expensive. Therefore, to simulate electromagnetic scattering processes via objects examination is quite a challenge.This investigation goal is to develop a computer simulation method to record the microwave holograms of complex objects by the near range radars.To specify the shape of the investigated objects, Autodesk 3ds Max (3D computer graphics program for making 3D animations, models, and images is used. At a second stage the surface of the created object is described by a set of triangular facets. While calculating the reflected field, a final representation of the object as a set of point reflectors is used. Thus, the model of single scattering, is used without taking into consideration re-reflection and cross-influence of reflectors.Methods are also described to form the focused images of the microwave holograms that allow us to obtain a function describing object reflectivity, by which in most cases an object shape can be easily recognized.A comparison of computer-simulated holograms with experimental data proves the model adequacy.The model can be used to find a dependence of the plane resolution on used frequency, step of scanning, and distance to the object and a

  17. Missing Aircraft Crash Sites and Spatial Relationships to the Last Radar Fix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Robert J; Greatbatch, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the spatial characteristics of missing aircraft in actual distress. No previous studies have looked at the distance from the last radar plot to the crash site. The purpose of this study was to characterize this distance and then identify environmental and flight characteristics that might be used to predict the spatial relationship and, therefore, aid search and rescue planners. Detailed records were obtained from the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center for missing aircraft in distress from 2002 to 2008. The data was combined with information from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Accident Database. The spatial relationship between the last radar plot and crash site was then determined using GIS analysis. A total of 260 missing aircraft incidents involving 509 people were examined, of which 216 (83%) contained radar information. Among the missing aircraft the mortality rate was 89%; most occurred in mountainous terrain (57%); Part 91 flight accounted for 95% of the incidents; and 50% of the aircraft were found within 0.8 nmi from the last radar plot. Flight characteristics, descent rate, icing conditions, and instrument flight rule vs. visual flight rule flight could be used to predict spatial characteristics. In most circumstances, the last radar position is an excellent predictor of the crash site. However, 5% of aircraft are found further than 45.4 nmi. The flight and environmental conditions were identified and placed into an algorithm to aid search planners in determining how factors should be prioritized.

  18. Integrating Radar, Multispectral, and Landing Site Data for Analysis of the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B. A.; Campbell, D. B.; Thompson, T. W.; Hawke, B. R.

    1998-01-01

    Radar maps of the Moon have been produced since the late 1960s, and have been used by a number of authors to study the surface roughness, subsurface rock abundance, and dielectric properties of the lunar surface. These studies focused on a range of topics, including the depth and rock population of the regolith, crater ejecta blankets, pyroclastic mantling layers, and cryptomare deposits. Limited radar sounding data from the Apollo missions identified layering in some regions of the maria. As radar datasets have improved in resolution and calibration, it has become more possible to make quantitative comparisons between the backscatter properties of the Moon, other remote-sensing observations, and the ground truth provided by Surveyor photos and Apollo traverses. This presentation will focus on the results of recent studies of the lunar regolith that make use of these diverse sources of information, and discuss research directions that will be possible with radar data to be collected in the near future.

  19. Range performance calculations using the NVEOL-Georgia Tech Research Institute 0.1- to 100-GHz radar performance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, S. P.; Thomas, N. I.

    1983-05-01

    A computer model that can be used to calculate radar range performance at any frequency in the 0.1-to 100-GHz electromagnetic spectrum is described. These different numerical examples are used to demonstrate how to use the radar range performance model. Input/output documentation are included for each case that was run on the MERADCOM CDC 6600 computer at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

  20. Photonics-based real-time ultra-high-range-resolution radar with broadband signal generation and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Guo, Qingshui; Pan, Shilong

    2017-10-23

    Real-time and high-resolution target detection is highly desirable in modern radar applications. Electronic techniques have encountered grave difficulties in the development of such radars, which strictly rely on a large instantaneous bandwidth. In this article, a photonics-based real-time high-range-resolution radar is proposed with optical generation and processing of broadband linear frequency modulation (LFM) signals. A broadband LFM signal is generated in the transmitter by photonic frequency quadrupling, and the received echo is de-chirped to a low frequency signal by photonic frequency mixing. The system can operate at a high frequency and a large bandwidth while enabling real-time processing by low-speed analog-to-digital conversion and digital signal processing. A conceptual radar is established. Real-time processing of an 8-GHz LFM signal is achieved with a sampling rate of 500 MSa/s. Accurate distance measurement is implemented with a maximum error of 4 mm within a range of ~3.5 meters. Detection of two targets is demonstrated with a range-resolution as high as 1.875 cm. We believe the proposed radar architecture is a reliable solution to overcome the limitations of current radar on operation bandwidth and processing speed, and it is hopefully to be used in future radars for real-time and high-resolution target detection and imaging.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories land use permit for operations at Oliktok Alaska Long Range Radar Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-02-01

    The property subject to this Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is located at the Oliktok Long Range Radar Station (LRRS). The Oliktok LRRS is located at 70À 30 W latitude, 149À 53 W longitude. It is situated at Oliktok Point on the shore of the Beaufort Sea, east of the Colville River. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  2. Radar analysis of fall bird migration stopover sites in the northeastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buler, Jeffrey J.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2014-01-01

    The national network of weather surveillance radars (WSR-88D) detects flying birds and is a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. We used data collected during fall 2008 and 2009 by 16 WSR-88D radars in the northeastern U.S. to quantify the spatial distribution of landbirds during migratory stopover. We geo-referenced estimates based on radar reflectivity, of the density of migrants aloft at their abrupt evening exodus from daytime stopover sites, to the approximate locations from which they emerged. We classified bird stopover use by the magnitude and variation of radar reflectivity across nights; areas were considered “important” stopover sites for conservation if bird density was consistently high. We developed statistical models that predict potentially important stopover sites across the region, based on land cover, ground elevation, and geographic location. Large areas of regionally important stopover sites were located along the coastlines of Long Island Sound, throughout the Delmarva Peninsula, in areas surrounding Baltimore and Washington, along the western edge of the Adirondack Mountains, and within the Appalachian Mountains of southwestern Virginia and West Virginia. Locally important stopover sites generally were associated with deciduous forests embedded within landscapes dominated by developed or agricultural lands, or near the shores of major water bodies. Preserving or enhancing patches of natural habitat, particularly deciduous forests, in developed or agricultural landscapes and along major coastlines could be a priority for conservation plans addressing the stopover requirements of migratory landbirds in the northeastern U.S. Our maps of important stopover sites can be used to focus conservation efforts and can serve as a sampling frame for fieldwork to validate radar observations or for ecological studies of landbirds on migratory stopover.

  3. Simulated Radar Range Profiles of a Simple Room as Compound by FDTD and Xpatch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2008-01-01

    This technical report presents numerical simulations of the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar return from a simple room with a human inside, with application to sensing through the wall (STTW) radar scenarios...

  4. Range Sidelobe Response from the Use of Polyphase Signals in Spotlight Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    each returned echo from the targeted area. Results show the P1 and Frank codes to be the most promising based on the selected parameter presented in...Depiction of Radar Geometric Parameters ................................................60 Figure 40. Idealized Radar Echo ...defined in Table 2, along with the radar parameters , presented in Table 3, we generate an ideal radar echo by applying an FFT to the output of (59). This

  5. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Rate Map L2 1 hour 2 km V7 (TRMM_2A53) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 'Radar Site Rain Map', is an instantaneous surface rain rate map in Cartesian coordinates with a 2 km horizontal resolution. At single radar sites, the map covers an...

  6. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site 3D Rain Map L3 1 month 2 km V7 (TRMM_3A55) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 3A55, 'Monthly 3-D Structure', provides radar site monthly 3-D structure information obtained from 2A55. The 2A55 'Radar Site 3-D Reflectivities', is composed of...

  7. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Type Map L2 1 hour 2 km V7 (TRMM_2A54) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 'Radar Site Convective/Stratiform Map', is an instantaneous map in Cartesian coordinates with a 2 km resolution. At single radar sites, the map covers an area of 300...

  8. A high sensitive 66 dB linear dynamic range receiver for 3-D laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Hao; Zhu, Zhangming

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a CMOS receiver chip realized in 0.18 μm standard CMOS technology and intended for high precision 3-D laser radar. The chip includes an adjustable gain transimpedance pre-amplifier, a post-amplifier and two timing comparators. An additional feedback is employed in the regulated cascode transimpedance amplifier to decrease the input impedance, and a variable gain transimpedance amplifier controlled by digital switches and analog multiplexer is utilized to realize four gain modes, extending the input dynamic range. The measurement shows that the highest transimpedance of the channel is 50 k {{Ω }}, the uncompensated walk error is 1.44 ns in a wide linear dynamic range of 66 dB (1:2000), and the input referred noise current is 2.3 pA/\\sqrt{{Hz}} (rms), resulting in a very low detectable input current of 1 μA with SNR = 5.

  9. 79 GHz UWB automotive short range radar – Spectrum allocation and technology trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-L. Bloecher

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Automotive UWB (Ultra-Wideband short range radar (SSR is on the market as a key technology for novel comfort and safety systems. SiGe based 79 GHz UWB SRR will be a definite candidate for the long term substitution of the 24 GHz UWB SRR. This paper will give an overview of the finished BMBF joint project KOKON and the recently started successing project RoCC, which concentrate on the development of this technology and sensor demonstrators. In both projects, the responsibilities of Daimler AG deal with application based sensor specification, test and evaluation of realized sensor demonstrators. Recent UWB SRR frequency regulation approaches and activitites will be introduced. Furthermore, some first results of Daimler activities within RoCC will be presented, dealing with the packaging and operation of these sensors within the complex car environment.

  10. Initial examination of radar imagery of optical radiometric calibration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Gauthier, D.; D'Iorio, Marie A.; Rivard, B.; Budkewitsch, P.

    1995-12-01

    In-flight absolute radiometric calibration is critical for multi-temporal and multi-sensor data comparisons. In the case of vicarious calibration of optical sensors based on ground-level measurements, the test site must be well characterized in spatial, radiometric, spectral, and temporal domains. Remotely sensed data acquired at other wavelengths can contribute to a baseline understanding of ground targets and provide insight into the usefulness of such targets for in-flight calibration of optical sensors. With these considerations in mind, multi-temporal ERS-1 SAR data have been obtained for White Sands, New Mexico, and Lunar Lake and Railroad Valley playas in Nevada. This paper reports on an initial examination of these SAR image data sets and the significant pattern changes observed in the scenes. It is concluded that surface roughness, soil moisture and run-off are major factors giving rise to the observed scene characteristics.

  11. Studies of polar mesosphere summer echoes at multiple sites using calibrated radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, Nimalan

    A 51.5 MHz VHF radar system, located at Resolute Bay in northern Canada has been monitoring Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) since 1997. This is currently the northernmost radar used to monitor PMSE in the North American sector. It has been recording a lower level of PMSE activity in this region, compared with the PMSE activity recorded by other high latitudes radars operating at similar frequencies. To investigate the reason for this, the radar system has been absolutely calibrated by means of cosmic sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. A general theory is developed in such a way that the calibration procedure can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world, provided the sky noise variations are known. PMSE backscatter cross-sections for the Resolute Bay radar are estimated, converted into an equivalent electron density structure function constant, C2N , and compared with three other radars located at Yellowknife and Andenes during simultaneous measurements. It was found that the estimated C2N for Resolute Bay is at least an order of magnitude lower than the estimated values at the other two locations. This leads us to conclude that the reason why PMSE strengths at Resolute Bay are weak compared with other sites is geophysical in origin, and not due to instrumental effects. The seasonal and diurnal variations of PMSE at Resolute Bay, and their connection to cold mesopause temperatures, are investigated on a long term basis, and compared with the observations at Andenes on a short term basis. Although the PMSE season is relatively short at Resolute Bay, the PMSE temporal variation pattern agrees with Andenes for at least one season. On the other hand, the two sites show a completely different picture for diurnal variations. While PMSE at Andenes show a clear diurnal variation, PMSE at Resolute Bay are modulated by high frequency oscillations. For the first time, a group of near identical SKiYMET meteor

  12. Modified Range-Doppler Processing for FM-CW Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, J.J.M. de; Meta, A.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of compact frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) technology and high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing techniques should pave the way for the development of a lightweight, cost-effective, high-resolution, airborne imaging radar. Regarding FM-CW SAR signal

  13. A Multifrequency Radar System for Detecting Humans and Characterizing Human Activities for Short-Range Through-Wall and Long-Range Foliage Penetration Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram M. Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multifrequency radar system for detecting humans and classifying their activities at short and long ranges is described. The short-range radar system operates within the S-Band frequency range for through-wall applications at distances of up to 3 m. It utilizes two separate waveforms which are selected via switching: a wide-band noise waveform or a continuous single tone. The long-range radar system operating in the W-Band millimeter-wave frequency range performs at distances of up to about 100 m in free space and up to about 30 m through light foliage. It employs a composite multimodal signal consisting of two waveforms, a wide-band noise waveform and an embedded single tone, which are summed and transmitted simultaneously. Matched filtering of the received and transmitted noise signals is performed to detect targets with high-range resolution, whereas the received single tone signal is used for the Doppler analysis. Doppler measurements are used to distinguish between different human movements and gestures using the characteristic micro-Doppler signals. Our measurements establish the ability of this system to detect and range humans and distinguish between different human movements at different ranges.

  14. Full Waveform Analysis for Long-Range 3D Imaging Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace AndrewM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of 3D imaging systems based on laser radar (ladar offers significant advantages in defense and security applications. In particular, it is possible to retrieve 3D shape information directly from the scene and separate a target from background or foreground clutter by extracting a narrow depth range from the field of view by range gating, either in the sensor or by postprocessing. We discuss and demonstrate the applicability of full-waveform ladar to produce multilayer 3D imagery, in which each pixel produces a complex temporal response that describes the scene structure. Such complexity caused by multiple and distributed reflection arises in many relevant scenarios, for example in viewing partially occluded targets, through semitransparent materials (e.g., windows and through distributed reflective media such as foliage. We demonstrate our methodology on 3D image data acquired by a scanning time-of-flight system, developed in our own laboratories, which uses the time-correlated single-photon counting technique.

  15. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  16. Properties of frequency distribution of Pc5-range pulsations observed with the Ekaterinburg decameter radar in the nightside ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelpanov, Maksim A.; Mager, Olga V.; Mager, Pavel N.; Klimushkin, Dmitri Yu.; Berngardt, Oleg I.

    2018-01-01

    A statistical study of waves in the magnetosphere registered with the midlatitude coherent decameter radar located near Ekaterinburg (EKB), Russia is presented. The radar monitors ionospheric flow velocities whose small-scale variations are evoked by magnetosphere ultra low frequency (ULF) waves of Pc5-range. Data from 16 events observed during 7 months in 2014 and 2015 underwent wavelet analysis. Frequencies of the oscillating components were compared with Alfvén eigenfrequencies, which were inferred from THEMIS and Van Allen spacecraft data. The comparison showed that only a minor part of the oscillations registered with the radar in the nightside ionosphere could be attributed to the Alfvén mode. A majority of the waves have lower frequencies, which do not show dependence on Alfvén eigenfrequency of a field line.

  17. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  18. United States Air Force 611th air support group, 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Tin City Long Range Radar Station, Alaska final remedial investigation/feasibility study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    This Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study describes the work performed; explains project objectives; and presents data collected during project activities, results, and conclusions for the Installation Restoration Program at Tin City Longe Range Radar Station, Alaska. The report describes the risks posed by the site and gives the basis for selecting remedies to mitigate the risks.

  19. Effects of Analog-to-Digital Converter Nonlinearities on Radar Range-Doppler Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dubbert, Dale F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tise, Bertice L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Radar operation, particularly Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar modes, are very sensitive to anomalous effects of system nonlinearities. These throw off harmonic spurs that are sometimes detected as false alarms. One significant source of nonlinear behavior is the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). One measure of its undesired nonlinearity is its Integral Nonlinearity (INL) specification. We examine in this report the relationship of INL to GMTI performance.

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-07-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada (US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2001). CAU 499 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): RG-25-001-RD24: Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site which is approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of Avenue 24. The Hydrocarbon Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been caused by numerous small historical over-fillings, spills, and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of approximately 36 years. The tank was located on the east side of Building 24-50 on the TTR.

  1. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  2. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  3. Combined seismic and radar investigation to define ice properties and structure of a cold alpine site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, O.; Bohleber, P.; Drews, R.; Heilig, A.; Hofstede, C.

    2009-04-01

    The cold alpine saddle Colle Gnifetti, Monte Rosa, Swiss-Italian Alps resembles very much polar and subpolar ice masses in terms of glaciological conditions. It has been the site for several ice-core drilling campaigns over more than 20 years to determine paleoclimatological and glaciological conditions. To investigate the feasibility of geophysical methods for improved characterization of ice masses surrounding borehole and ice-core sites, a combined active reflection seismic and ground-penetrating radar pilot study has been carried out in summer 2008. Aims are the characterization of density, internal layering, seismic and radar wave speed and attenuation, identification of anisotropic features (like crystal orientation or bubble content and shape). Here we present the overall setup and first results. Seismic and GPR profiles were centered on an existing borehole location covering the full ice thickness of 62 m. Active seismics was carried out with 24-channel 3-m spacing recording, using a Seismic Impulse Source System (SISSY) along two profiles parallel and perpendicular to the ice-flow direction. The same profiles were complemented with GPR measurements utilizing 250, 500 MHz frequencies. Additionally, circular profiles with 250, 500 and 800 MHz were carried out circumferencing the borehole to detect anisotropic features.

  4. An Iterative Approach to Ground Penetrating Radar at the Maya Site of Pacbitun, Belize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheldon Skaggs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ground penetrating radar (GPR surveys provide distinct advantages for archaeological prospection in ancient, complex, urban Maya sites, particularly where dense foliage or modern debris may preclude other remote sensing or geophysical techniques. Unidirectional GPR surveys using a 500 MHz shielded antenna were performed at the Middle Preclassic Maya site of Pacbitun, Belize. The survey in 2012 identified numerous linear and circular anomalies between 1 m and 2 m deep. Based on these anomalies, one 1 m × 4 m unit and three smaller units were excavated in 2013. These test units revealed a curved plaster surface not previously found at Pacbitun. Post-excavation, GPR data were reprocessed to best match the true nature of excavated features. Additional GPR surveys oriented perpendicular to the original survey confirmed previously detected anomalies and identified new anomalies. The excavations provided information on the sediment layers in the survey area, which allowed better identification of weak radar reflections of the surfaces of a burnt, Middle Preclassic temple in the northern end of the survey area. Additional excavations of the area in 2014 and 2015 revealed it to be a large square structure, which was named El Quemado.

  5. Distance based range profile classification techniques for aircraft recognition by radar - a comparison on real radar data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiden, R. van der; Groen, F.C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft identification is essential in any air-defence scenario. Without a robust classification capability no effective threat evaluation can be performed. A prominent aircraft recognition technique is based on the exploitation of a one-dimensional image of a target, a range profile. In this

  6. Unexploded Ordnance Site Investigation of US Military Ranges in Panama: Empire, Balboa West and Pina Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Process, UXO Detection Technologies, and Detector Reference Area. Table 1-1 UXO Site Investigation Report Components Aiko ik ogai6Componehp - Sect"on Site...200.0 C2 Suspect impact area of Range 6 09 97 482 17 645 592 929.9 D FP- 11 Firing Fan 0995639 17648673 369.0 E FP-15 Firing Fan 0997194 17645735 326.5 K ...bulldozer was brought in to grade and level the area. The transect was surveyed with a hand held EM61 locator starting off the K -6 road about 1.000

  7. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar for Hydrogeologic Characterization at the P Reactor Area, Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. E.; Knapp, C. C.; Addison, A.; Waddell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques were implemented at Savannah River Site (SRS), South Carolina, in order to develop new approaches for hydrogeophysical characterization in heterogeneous environments. The study site is the P Reactor Area located within the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain, with clastic sediments ranging from Late Cretaceous to Miocene age. Lithologies consist of sand, clayey sand, and clay with minor amounts of calcareous minerals. Increasing interest in the P Reactor Area in recent years is the result of the presence of several contaminant plumes including trichloroethylene (TCE) that originates from the northwest section of the reactor facility and discharges into nearby Steel Creek. Here, we present the results from subsurface characterization using the GPR technique involving the PulseEKKO 100 GPR system with 50, 100, and 200 MHz antennas. Data acquisition included (1) several regional 2D common-offset GPR transects for general stratigraphic characterization, (2) a series of common-mid point (CMP) profiles for velocity estimation, (3) a set of vertical radar profiles (VRP) at an existing borehole in the vicinity of the study area, and (4) a 3D GPR survey for detailed subsurface lithostratigraphic characterization collected with the 50 MHz antenna. The ongoing GPR processing will map key dielectric interfaces from the ground surface to ~20 meters, and will be integrated with co-located surface and vertical seismic reflection data as well as with lithologic information obtained from Cone Penetrometer Technology (CPT) tests performed at the study area. This lithosptratigraphic zonation will provide the framework for subsequent hydrological parameter estimation, which will be performed using borehole hydrogeological and crosshole seismic and GPR methods. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER64210.

  8. Modeled Radar Attenuation Rate Profile at the Vostok 5G Ice Core Site, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a modeled radar attenuation rate profile, showing the predicted contributions from pure ice and impurities to radar attenuation at the Vostok...

  9. A Pedestrian Detection Scheme Using a Coherent Phase Difference Method Based on 2D Range-Doppler FMCW Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Eugin; Jin, Young-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hun

    2016-01-20

    For an automotive pedestrian detection radar system, fast-ramp based 2D range-Doppler Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar is effective for distinguishing between moving targets and unwanted clutter. However, when a weak moving target such as a pedestrian exists together with strong clutter, the pedestrian may be masked by the side-lobe of the clutter even though they are notably separated in the Doppler dimension. To prevent this problem, one popular solution is the use of a windowing scheme with a weighting function. However, this method leads to a spread spectrum, so the pedestrian with weak signal power and slow Doppler may also be masked by the main-lobe of clutter. With a fast-ramp based FMCW radar, if the target is moving, the complex spectrum of the range- Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is changed with a constant phase difference over ramps. In contrast, the clutter exhibits constant phase irrespective of the ramps. Based on this fact, in this paper we propose a pedestrian detection for highly cluttered environments using a coherent phase difference method. By detecting the coherent phase difference from the complex spectrum of the range-FFT, we first extract the range profile of the moving pedestrians. Then, through the Doppler FFT, we obtain the 2D range-Doppler map for only the pedestrian. To test the proposed detection scheme, we have developed a real-time data logging system with a 24 GHz FMCW transceiver. In laboratory tests, we verified that the signal processing results from the proposed method were much better than those expected from the conventional 2D FFT-based detection method.

  10. A Pedestrian Detection Scheme Using a Coherent Phase Difference Method Based on 2D Range-Doppler FMCW Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For an automotive pedestrian detection radar system, fast-ramp based 2D range-Doppler Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW radar is effective for distinguishing between moving targets and unwanted clutter. However, when a weak moving target such as a pedestrian exists together with strong clutter, the pedestrian may be masked by the side-lobe of the clutter even though they are notably separated in the Doppler dimension. To prevent this problem, one popular solution is the use of a windowing scheme with a weighting function. However, this method leads to a spread spectrum, so the pedestrian with weak signal power and slow Doppler may also be masked by the main-lobe of clutter. With a fast-ramp based FMCW radar, if the target is moving, the complex spectrum of the range- Fast Fourier Transform (FFT is changed with a constant phase difference over ramps. In contrast, the clutter exhibits constant phase irrespective of the ramps. Based on this fact, in this paper we propose a pedestrian detection for highly cluttered environments using a coherent phase difference method. By detecting the coherent phase difference from the complex spectrum of the range-FFT, we first extract the range profile of the moving pedestrians. Then, through the Doppler FFT, we obtain the 2D range-Doppler map for only the pedestrian. To test the proposed detection scheme, we have developed a real-time data logging system with a 24 GHz FMCW transceiver. In laboratory tests, we verified that the signal processing results from the proposed method were much better than those expected from the conventional 2D FFT-based detection method.

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  12. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  13. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  14. Detection and localization of multiple short range targets using FMCW radar signal

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, a 24 GHz frequency-modulated continuous wave radar is used to detect and localize both stationary and moving targets. Depending on the application, the implemented software offers different modes of operation. For example, it can simply output raw data samples for advanced offline processing or directly carry out a two dimensional fast Fourier transform to estimate the location and velocity of multiple targets. To suppress clutter and detect only moving targets, two methods based on the background reduction and the slow time processing techniques are implemented. A trade-off between the two methods is presented based on their performance and the required processing time. © 2016 IEEE.

  15. Radar interferometry offers new insights into threats to the Angkor site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fulong; Guo, Huadong; Ma, Peifeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Cheng; Ishwaran, Natarajan; Hang, Peou

    2017-01-01

    The conservation of World Heritage is critical to the cultural and social sustainability of regions and nations. Risk monitoring and preventive diagnosis of threats to heritage sites in any given ecosystem are a complex and challenging task. Taking advantage of the performance of Earth Observation technologies, we measured the impacts of hitherto imperceptible and poorly understood factors of groundwater and temperature variations on the monuments in the Angkor World Heritage site (400 km2). We developed a two-scale synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) approach. We describe spatial-temporal displacements (at millimeter-level accuracy), as measured by high-resolution TerraSAR/TanDEM-X satellite images, to provide a new solution to resolve the current controversy surrounding the potential structural collapse of monuments in Angkor. Multidisciplinary analysis in conjunction with a deterioration kinetics model offers new insights into the causes that trigger the potential decline of Angkor monuments. Our results show that pumping groundwater for residential and touristic establishments did not threaten the sustainability of monuments during 2011 to 2013; however, seasonal variations of the groundwater table and the thermodynamics of stone materials are factors that could trigger and/or aggravate the deterioration of monuments. These factors amplify known impacts of chemical weathering and biological alteration of temple materials. The InSAR solution reported in this study could have implications for monitoring and sustainable conservation of monuments in World Heritage sites elsewhere. PMID:28275729

  16. Variability of the Kuroshio Current south of Sagami Bay as observed using long-range coastal HF radars

    OpenAIRE

    Ramp, Steven R.; Barrick, Donald E.; Ito, Tomotaka; Cook, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2007JC004132 Ocean surface currents between Cape Nojima and Hachijo Island have been mapped since fall 2000 using a pair of SeaSonde long-range HF radars. During September 2000 through December 2001, the no large meander (NLM) nearshore (n) and offshore (o) modes were observed. The surface current maps allowed new details to be observed in the structure of these modes and the transitions between them. ...

  17. Characterization of snowfall properties at high-latitude sites through use of a combined Multi-Angle Snow Camera (MASC) and radar approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S.; Wood, N.; Garrett, T. J.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Pettersen, C.

    2016-12-01

    Estimates of snowfall rate derived from radar reflectivities alone are non-unique, as different combinations of snowfall rates and snowflake microphysical properties can conspire to produce nearly identical radar reflectivity signatures. Such ambiguities can result in retrieval uncertainties on the order of 100-200% for individual events. Here, we use observations of snowflake particle size distribution, fallspeed, and habit from the Multi-Angle Snow Camera (MASC) to constrain estimates of snowfall derived from radar reflectivities. MASC measurements of microphysical properties and uncertainties are introduced into a modified form of the optimal-estimation CloudSat snowfall algorithm (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) via the a priori guess and variance terms. Initial results focus on the MASC and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KaZR) measurements at the ARM NSA Barrow Climate Facility site. Use of MASC fallspeed, MASC PSD, and a CloudSat particle model as base assumptions resulted in retrieved total accumulations with a -17% difference relative to nearby National Weather Service observations averaged over five snow events. Use of different but reasonable combinations of retrieval assumptions resulted in estimated snowfall accumulations with differences ranging from -63% to + 86% for the same storm events. Retrieved snowfall rates were particularly sensitive to assumed fallspeed and habit, suggesting that MASC measurements may provide a path forward in reducing the non-uniqueness of the snowfall retrieval problem. Preliminary results also will be presented for the deployment of the MASC, MicroRain Radar (MRR), and Precipitation Imaging Package (PIP) to Haukeliseter, Norway during winter season 2016-17. These instruments will then be deployed to northern Sweden for winter 2017-18. It is hoped more accurate knowledge of snowfall properties dependent upon location and meteorological conditions will be useful for both weather and climate applications.

  18. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  19. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1998) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance at TTR extends only to those areas where SNL activities are carried out. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990a).

  20. 1997 annual site environmental report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Todd; Duncan, Dianne (ed.); Forston, William; Sanchez, Rebecca (ed.)

    1998-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. Thes annual report (calendar year 1997) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management, cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act. In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance extends only to those activities performed by SNL or under its direction. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared as required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  1. Non-cooperative target recognition by means of singular value decomposition applied to radar high resolution range profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio

    2014-12-29

    Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  2. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  3. Radar-Derived Properties of the InSight Landing Site in Western Elysium Planitia on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Morgan, Gareth A.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Grima, Cyril; Smith, Isaac B.; Phillips, Roger J.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2017-10-01

    We carried out an assessment of surface and subsurface properties based on radar observations of the region in western Elysium Planitia selected as the landing site for the InSight mission. Using observations from Arecibo Observatory and from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Shallow Radar (SHARAD), we examined the near-surface properties of the landing site, including characterization of reflectivity, near-surface roughness, and layering. In the Arecibo data (12.6-cm wavelength), we found a radar-reflective surface with no unusual properties that would cause problems for the InSight radar altimeter (7-cm wavelength). In addition, the moderately low backscatter strength is indicative of a relatively smooth surface at {˜} 10-cm scales that is composed of load-bearing materials and should not present a hazard for landing safety. For roughness at 10-100 m scales derived from SHARAD data, we find relatively low values in a narrow distribution, similar to those found at the Phoenix and Opportunity landing sites. The power of returns at InSight is similar to that at Phoenix and thus suggestive of near-surface layering, consistent with a layer of regolith over bedrock (e.g., lava flows) that is largely too shallow ({<}10-20 m) for SHARAD to discern distinct reflectors. However, an isolated area outside of the ellipse chosen in 2015 for InSight's landing shows faint returns that may represent such a contact at depths of {˜} 20-43 m.

  4. Interpretation of Ground Penetrating Radar data at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, K. A.; Mitchell, T. H.; Kunk, J. R.

    1993-07-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is being used extensively during characterization and remediation of chemical and radioactive waste sites at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Time and money for GPR investigations are often not included during the planning and budgeting phase. Therefore GPR investigations must be inexpensive and quick to minimize impact on already established budgets and schedules. An approach to survey design, data collection, and interpretation has been developed which emphasizes speed and budget with minimal impact on the integrity of the interpretation or quality of the data. The following simple rules of thumb can be applied: (1) Assemble as much pre-survey information as possible, (2) Clearly define survey objectives prior to designing the survey and determine which combination of geophysical methods will best meet the objectives, (3) Continuously communicate with the client, before, during and after the investigation, (4) Only experienced GPR interpreters should acquire the field data, (5) Use real-time monitoring of the data to determine where and how much data to collect and assist in the interpretation, (6) Always 'error' in favor of collecting too much data, (7) Surveys should have closely spaced (preferably 5 feet, no more than 10 feet), orthogonal profiles, and (8) When possible, pull the antenna by hand.

  5. Ground penetrating radar and direct current resistivity evaluation of the desiccation test cap, Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, D.E.; Cumbest, R.J.

    1996-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a variety of waste units that may be temporarily or permanently stabilized by closure using an impermeable cover to prevent groundwater infiltration. The placement of an engineered kaolin clay layer over a waste unit is an accepted and economical technique for providing an impermeable cover but the long term stability and integrity of the clay in non-arid conditions is unknown. A simulated kaolin cap has been constructed at the SRA adjacent to the Burial Ground Complex. The cap is designed to evaluate the effects of desiccation on clay integrity, therefore half of the cap is covered with native soil to prevent drying, while the remainder of the cap is exposed. Measurements of the continuing impermeability of a clay cap are difficult because intrusive techniques may locally compromise the structure. Point measurements made to evaluate clay integrity, such as those from grid sampling or coring and made through a soil cover, may miss cracks, joints or fissures, and may not allow for mapping of the lateral extent of elongate features. Because of these problems, a non-invasive technique is needed to map clay integrity, below a soil or vegetation cover, which is capable of moderate to rapid investigation speeds. Two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, direct current resistivity and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been successful at the SRS in geologically mapping shallow subsurface clay layers. The applicability of each technique in detecting the clay layer in the desiccation test cap and associated anomalies was investigated.

  6. Motion Compensation of Moving Targets for High Range Resolution Stepped-Frequency Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiqin Wang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available High range resolution (HRR profiling using stepped-frequency pulse trains suffers from range shift and the attenuation/dispersion of range profiles while the target of interest is moving. To overcome these two drawbacks, a new algorithm based on the maximum likelihood (ML estimation is proposed in this paper. Without altering the conventional stepped-frequency waveform, this algorithm can estimate the target velocity and thereby compensate the phase errors caused by the target’s motion. It is shown that the velocity can be accurately estimated and the range profile can be correctly reconstructed.

  7. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  8. Radar Analysis of Fall Bird Migration Stopover Sites in the Northeastern U.S.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The national network of weather surveillance radars (WSR-88D/NEXRAD) detects birds in flight, and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological...

  9. Submillimeter-Wave Polarimetric Compact Ranges for Scale-Model Radar Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulombe, Michael J; Waldman, Jerry; Giles, R. H; Gatesman, Andrew J; Goyette, Thomas M; Nixon, William

    2002-01-01

    .... A dielectric material fabrication and characterization capability has also been developed to fabricate custom anechoic materials for the ranges as well as scaled dielectric parts for the models and clutter scenes...

  10. Long Range Forecast Possibilities for X-Band Radar Construction on Shemya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schroeder, Brian

    2002-01-01

    .... The goal of this research was to explore the possibilities of long-range forecasts to determine the feasibility of predicting any upcoming two-week windows of opportunity, well in advance, that will...

  11. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Totals Map L3 5 days 2 km V7 (TRMM_3A53) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the 5-day accumulation of the 2A53 product, 'Radar Site Rain Map', which originally is an instantaneous surface rain rate map in Cartesian coordinates with a...

  12. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site 3D Reflectivity L2 1 hour V7 (TRMM_2A55) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — 'Radar Site 3-D Reflectivities', is composed of 3 different fields. The first field has an array of 3-D reflectivities in Cartesian coordinates with a 2 km...

  13. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Sites Central Radar System Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    EPA regulations. The monitoring network is in place at six locations in the state that are either urban or the site of tourism (such as Mt. Rushmore...19.60 VOR/DMEs MVE Montevideo 120 Ch 53 111.6 22.32 18.60 MOX Morris 100 Ch 33 109.6 21.92 18.273 FFM Fergus Falls 100 Ch 41 110.4 22.08 18.40

  14. FrFT-CSWSF: Estimating cross-range velocities of ground moving targets using multistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chenlei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimating cross-range velocity is a challenging task for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR, which is important for ground moving target indication (GMTI. Because the velocity of a target is very small compared with that of the satellite, it is difficult to correctly estimate it using a conventional monostatic platform algorithm. To overcome this problem, a novel method employing multistatic SAR is presented in this letter. The proposed hybrid method, which is based on an extended space-time model (ESTIM of the azimuth signal, has two steps: first, a set of finite impulse response (FIR filter banks based on a fractional Fourier transform (FrFT is used to separate multiple targets within a range gate; second, a cross-correlation spectrum weighted subspace fitting (CSWSF algorithm is applied to each of the separated signals in order to estimate their respective parameters. As verified through computer simulation with the constellations of Cartwheel, Pendulum and Helix, this proposed time-frequency-subspace method effectively improves the estimation precision of the cross-range velocities of multiple targets.

  15. Guidance for Mitigating Environmental Concerns During Range Siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    addressed from both technical and policy standpoints. (2) The natural resources management methodologies will sustain the capabilities of the...berms should not be sited in areas with high water tables since waterlogged soils can lead to damage or fail- ure. Movement of excess water should

  16. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinpeng Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile’s rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile's rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Radar imagery interpretation to provide information about several geothermal sites in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-17

    The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nation-wide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential geothermal and petroleum prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 7 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Radar imagery interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of four sites in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-17

    The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nationwide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential petroleum and geothermal prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 29 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Installation restoration program (irp) remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Human health and ecological risk assessment. Final baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of the Baseline Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Report is to provide an assessment of the risk to human and ecological receptors from exposure to contaminants measured during the 1994 Remedial Investigation at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  1. 1993 site environmental report Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, T.; Howard, D.; McClellan, Y.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Company for the Tonopah Test Range operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories` responsibility for environmental monitoring results extend to those activities performed by Sandia National Laboratories or under its direction. Results from other environmental monitoring activities are included to provide a measure of completeness in reporting. Other environmental compliance programs such as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, environmental permits, and environmental restoration and waste management programs are also included in this report, prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  2. Storm Identification, Tracking and Forecasting Using High-Resolution Images of Short-Range X-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rain nowcasting is an essential part of weather monitoring. It plays a vital role in human life, ranging from advanced warning systems to scheduling open air events and tourism. A nowcasting system can be divided into three fundamental steps, i.e., storm identification, tracking and nowcasting. The main contribution of this work is to propose procedures for each step of the rain nowcasting tool and to objectively evaluate the performances of every step, focusing on two-dimension data collected from short-range X-band radars installed in different parts of Italy. This work presents the solution of previously unsolved problems in storm identification: first, the selection of suitable thresholds for storm identification; second, the isolation of false merger (loosely-connected storms; and third, the identification of a high reflectivity sub-storm within a large storm. The storm tracking step of the existing tools, such as TITANand SCIT, use only up to two storm attributes, i.e., center of mass and area. It is possible to use more attributes for tracking. Furthermore, the contribution of each attribute in storm tracking is yet to be investigated. This paper presents a novel procedure called SALdEdA (structure, amplitude, location, eccentricity difference and areal difference for storm tracking. This work also presents the contribution of each component of SALdEdA in storm tracking. The second order exponential smoothing strategy is used for storm nowcasting, where the growth and decay of each variable of interest is considered to be linear. We evaluated the major steps of our method. The adopted techniques for automatic threshold calculation are assessed with a 97% goodness. False merger and sub-storms within a cluster of storms are successfully handled. Furthermore, the storm tracking procedure produced good results with an accuracy of 99.34% for convective events and 100% for stratiform events.

  3. The proposed flatland radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  4. Transparent 3D Visualization of Archaeological Remains in Roman Site in Ankara-Turkey with Ground Penetrating Radar Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Transparent 3D Visualization of Archaeological Remains in Roman Site in Ankara-Turkey with Ground Penetrating Radar Method Selma KADIOGLU Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 06100 Tandogan/ANKARA-TURKEY kadioglu@eng.ankara.edu.tr Anatolia has always been more the point of transit, a bridge between West and East. Anatolia has been a home for ideas moving from all directions. So it is that in the Roman and post-Roman periods the role of Anatolia in general and of Ancyra (the Roman name of Ankara) in particular was of the greatest importance. Now, the visible archaeological remains of Roman period in Ankara are Roman Bath, Gymnasium, the Temple of Augustus of Rome, Street, Theatre, City Defence-Wall. The Caesar Augustus, the first Roman Emperor, conquered Asia Minor in 25 BC. Then a marble temple was built in Ancyra, the administrative capital of province, today the capital of Turkish Republic, Ankara. This monument was consecrated to the Empreror and to the Goddess Rome. This temple is supposed to have built over an earlier temple dedicated to Kybele and Men between 25 -20 BC. After the death of the Augustus in 14AD, a copy of the text of "Res Gestae Divi Augusti" was inscribed on the interior of the pronaos in Latin, whereas a Greek translation is also present on an exterior wall of the cella. In the 5th century, it was converted in to a church by the Byzantines. The aim of this study is to determine old buried archaeological remains in the Augustus temple, Roman Bath and in the governorship agora in Ulus district. These remains were imaged with transparent three dimensional (3D) visualization of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. Parallel two dimensional (2D) GPR profile data were acquired in the study areas, and then a 3D data volume were built using parallel 2D GPR data. A simplified amplitude-colour range and appropriate opacity function were constructed and transparent 3D image were obtained to activate buried

  5. The 3-D geological model around Chang'E-3 landing site based on lunar penetrating radar Channel 1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuefeng; Zhu, Peimin; Zhao, Na; Xiao, Long; Garnero, Edward; Xiao, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jiannan; Qiao, Le

    2017-07-01

    High-frequency lunar penetrating radar (LPR) data from an instrument on the lunar rover Yutu, from the Chang'E-3 (CE-3) robotic lander, were used to build a three-dimensional (3-D) geological model of the lunar subsurface structure. The CE-3 landing site is in the northern Mare Imbrium. More than five significant reflection horizons are evident in the LPR profile, which we interpret as different period lava flow sequences deposited on the lunar surface. The most probable directions of these flows were inferred from layer depths, thicknesses, and other geological information. Moreover, the apparent Imbrian paleoregolith homogeneity in the profile supports the suggestion of a quiescent period of lunar surface evolution. Similar subsurface structures are found at the NASA Apollo landing sites, indicating that the cause and time of formation of the imaged phenomena may be similar between the two distant regions.

  6. Collaborative community hazard exposure mapping: Distant Early Warning radar sites in Alaska's North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, M.

    2015-12-01

    A method to produce hazard exposure maps that are developed in collaboration with local coastal communities is the focus of this research. Typically efforts to map community exposure to climate threats over large areas have limited consideration of local perspectives about associated risks, constraining their utility for local management. This problem is especially acute in remote locations such as the Arctic where there are unique vulnerabilities to coastal threats that can be fully understood only through inclusion of community stakeholders. Through collaboration with community members, this study identifies important coastal assets and places and surveys local perspectives of exposure to climate threats along Alaska's vast North Slope coastline spanning multiple municipalities. To model physical exposure, the study adapts the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) coastal vulnerability index (CVI) to the Arctic context by incorporating the effects of open water distance determined by sea ice extent, and assigning CVI values to coastal assets and places according to direction and proximity. The study found that in addition to concerns about exposed municipal and industrial assets, North Slope communities viewed exposure of traditional activity sites as presenting a particular risk for communities. Highly exposed legacy Cold War Distant Early Warning Line sites are of particular concern with impacts ranging from financial risk to contamination of sensitive coastal marine environments. This research demonstrates a method to collaboratively map community exposure to coastal climate threats to better understand local risks and produce locally usable exposure maps.

  7. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  8. Selection and spatial Arrangement of rest sites within Northern tamandua (Tamandua mexicana) home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D.D.; Montgomery, R.A.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Jansen, P.A.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Kays, R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of suitable rest sites is considered to be a key determinant of spatial patterns in animal activity. However, it is not immediately evident which landscape features satisfy rest site requirements or how these sites are configured within the home range. We used Global Positioning

  9. Selection and spatial arrangement of rest sites within northern tamandua home ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D. D.; Montgomery, R. A.; Millspaugh, J. J.; Jansen, P. A.; Garzon-Lopez, C. X.; Kays, R.

    The distribution of suitable rest sites is considered to be a key determinant of spatial patterns in animal activity. However, it is not immediately evident which landscape features satisfy rest site requirements or how these sites are configured within the home range. We used Global Positioning

  10. Differential Radar Interferometry for Structural and Ground Deformation Monitoring: A New Tool for the Conservation and Sustainability of Cultural Heritage Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Affected by natural and human-induced factors, cultural heritage sites and their surroundings face threats of structural instability and land displacement. Accurate and rapid identification of the key areas facing existing or potential deformation risks is essential for the conservation and sustainability of heritage sites, particularly for huge archaeological regions. In recent years, the successful application of differential radar interferometry techniques for the measurement of millimeter-level terrain motions has demonstrated their potential for deformation monitoring and preventive diagnosis of cultural heritage sites. In this paper, we review the principles of advanced differential radar interferometry approaches and their applicability for structural and ground deformation monitoring over heritage sites. Then, the advantages and challenges of these approaches are analyzed, followed by a discussion on the selection of radar interferometry systems for different archaeological applications. Finally, a workflow, integrating space-borne and ground-based differential radar interferometry technologies for deformation anomaly monitoring and preventive diagnosis of cultural heritage sites, is proposed.

  11. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  12. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  13. Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar to explore spatial variations in thaw depth and moisture content in the active layer of a permafrost site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Wollschläger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar (GPR was applied at a permafrost site on the Tibetan Plateau to investigate the influence of surface properties and soil texture on the late-summer thaw depth and average soil moisture content of the active layer. Measurements were conducted on an approximately 85 × 60 m2 sized area with surface and soil textural properties that ranged from medium to coarse textured bare soil to finer textured, sparsely vegetated areas covered with fine, wind blown sand, and it included the bed of a gravel road. The survey allowed a clear differentiation of the various units. It showed (i a shallow thaw depth and low average soil moisture content below the sand-covered, vegetated area, (ii an intermediate thaw depth and high average soil moisture content along the gravel road, and (iii an intermediate to deep thaw depth and low to intermediate average soil moisture content in the bare soil terrain. From our measurements, we found hypotheses for the permafrost processes at this site leading to the observed late-summer thaw depth and soil moisture conditions. The study clearly indicates the complicated interactions between surface and subsurface state variables and processes in this environment. Multi-channel GPR is an operational technology to efficiently study such a system at scales varying from a few meters to a few kilometers.

  14. Understanding radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley, Simon

    1999-01-01

    What is radar? What systems are currently in use? How do they work? This book provides engineers and scientists with answers to these critical questions, focusing on actual radar systems in use today. It is a perfect resource for those just entering the field, or as a quick refresher for experienced practitioners. The book leads readers through the specialized language and calculations that comprise the complex world of radar engineering as seen in dozens of state-of-the-art radar systems. An easy to read, wide ranging guide to the world of modern radar systems.

  15. Installation restoration program, remedial investigation/feasibility study report addendum for Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report, 1 August-18 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The following report is an addendum to the Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station (LRRS) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report dated October 1995 (Air Force 1995a). This report and the activities described were undertaken to fulfill the goals and objectives of the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This report includes findings from additional characterization activities conducted in August 1995 at five of 11 Indian Mountain IRP source areas and revisions to RI/FS report conclusions for those source areas.

  16. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvas, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-03-26

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not

  17. Long term changes of altimeter range and geophysical corrections at altimetry calibration sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Cheng, Yongcun; Pascal Willis

    2013-01-01

    trends in the sum of range corrections are found for the calibrations sites both for local scales (within 50km around the selected site) and for regional scales (within 300km). However, the geophysical corrections accounting for atmospheric pressure loading and high frequency sea level variations......Accurate sea level trend determination is fundamentally related to calibration of both the instrument as well as to investigate if there are linear trends in the set of standard geophysical and range corrections applied to the sea level observations. Long term changes in range corrections can leak...... into the observed sea level record and be interpreted as part of the sea level trend. Particularly if these exhibit anomalous trend close to the satellite calibration sites.Long term changes in the routinely applied TOPEX/Jason corrections as well as their changes in coastal regions are investigated at four...

  18. Correlations between Cassini VIMS spectra and RADAR SAR images: Implications for Titan's surface composition and the character of the Huygens Probe Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Anderson, J.A.; Baines, K.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Barrett, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Elachi, C.; Janssen, M.A.; Jaumann, R.; Karkoschka, E.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lopes, R.M.; Lorenz, R.D.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Radebaugh, J.; Rizk, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Stofan, E.R.; Sucharski, T.L.; Tomasko, M.G.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    nearest occurrence of dunes visible in the RADAR SAR images. Fluvial/pluvial processes, every few centuries or millennia, must be cleansing the dark floors of the incised channels and scouring the dark plains at the Huygens landing site both imaged by Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR). ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fuzzy-logic detection and probability of hail exploiting short-range X-band weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vincenzo; Picciotti, Errico; Mazzarella, Vincenzo; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Budillon, Giorgio

    2018-03-01

    This work proposes a new method for hail precipitation detection and probability, based on single-polarization X-band radar measurements. Using a dataset consisting of reflectivity volumes, ground truth observations and atmospheric sounding data, a probability of hail index, which provides a simple estimate of the hail potential, has been trained and adapted within Naples metropolitan environment study area. The probability of hail has been calculated starting by four different hail detection methods. The first two, based on (1) reflectivity data and temperature measurements and (2) on vertically-integrated liquid density product, respectively, have been selected from the available literature. The other two techniques are based on combined criteria of the above mentioned methods: the first one (3) is based on the linear discriminant analysis, whereas the other one (4) relies on the fuzzy-logic approach. The latter is an innovative criterion based on a fuzzyfication step performed through ramp membership functions. The performances of the four methods have been tested using an independent dataset: the results highlight that the fuzzy-oriented combined method performs slightly better in terms of false alarm ratio, critical success index and area under the relative operating characteristic. An example of application of the proposed hail detection and probability products is also presented for a relevant hail event, occurred on 21 July 2014.

  20. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  1. Quality, Range, and Legibility in Web Sites Related to Orofacial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective: The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods: Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON modified code (HONCode; the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results: From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions: Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after “breast-feeding” were presented with restricted range.

  2. Quality, range, and legibility in web sites related to orofacial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Ferrari, Deborah Viviane; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2013-10-01

    Introduction Plenty of information about health is available on the Internet; however, quality and legibility are not always evaluated. Knowledge regarding orofacial functions can be considered important for the population because it allows proper stimulus, early diagnosis, and prevention of the oral myofunctional alterations during early infancy. Objective The aim was evaluate the quality, legibility, and range of Web sites available in Brazilian Portuguese regarding the orofacial functions. Methods Selected Web sites with information directed to parents/caregivers of babies regarding breast-feeding, feeding after 6 months, deleterious oral habits, and breathing and speech were studied. The Web sites were evaluated through the application of Flesch Reading Ease Test and aspects of the Health on the Net (HON) modified code (HONCode); the range of the subjects addressed was compared with other aspects of infant development. Results From the access of 350 pages of the Internet, 35 Web sites were selected and 315 excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. In relation to legibility, Web sites scored an average of 61.23% in the Flesch Test, and the application of the modified HONCode showed an average of 6.43 points; an average of 2.49 subjects were found per Web site evaluated, with information on breast-feeding being more frequent and subjects such as breathing and speech less frequent. Conclusions Web sites that deal with orofacial functions presented standard legibility classification. Only half of the ethical principles were considered by the modified HONCode in their majority, and most addressed subjects after "breast-feeding" were presented with restricted range.

  3. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  4. DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; et. al

    2010-01-11

    The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.10-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide Kd variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

  5. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory's previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  6. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory`s previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory`s Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, ``Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  7. Site-specific range uncertainties caused by dose calculation algorithms for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuemann, J.; Dowdell, S.; Grassberger, C.; Min, C. H.; Paganetti, H.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of introducing site-specific range margins to replace current generic margins in proton therapy. Further, the goal was to study the potential of reducing margins with current analytical dose calculations methods. For this purpose we investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict the range of proton fields. Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencil-beam algorithm were compared with those obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (TOPAS). A total of 508 passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for seven disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma-spine, medulloblastoma-whole brain, lung and head and neck). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons were performed on two-dimensional distal dose surfaces calculated by pencil-beam and MC algorithms to obtain the average range differences and root mean square deviation for each field for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). The average dose degradation of the distal falloff region, defined as the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80-R20), was also analyzed. All ranges were calculated in water-equivalent distances. Considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone, we were able to deduce site-specific estimations. For liver, prostate and whole brain fields our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible even without introducing MC dose calculations. We recommend range margins of 2.8% + 1.2 mm for liver and prostate treatments and 3.1% + 1.2 mm for whole brain treatments, respectively. On the other hand, current margins seem to be insufficient for some breast, lung and head and neck patients, at least if used generically. If no case specific adjustments are applied, a generic margin of 6.3% + 1.2 mm would be

  8. Influence of dead-time on detection efficiency and range performance of photon-counting laser radar that uses a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijian; Lai, Jiancheng; Wang, Chunyong; Yan, Wei; Li, Zhenhua

    2017-08-10

    Dead-time has a significant influence on the detection efficiency and range performance of a photon-counting laser radar system with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode. In this paper, a rapid universal recursive model of the detection probability of discrete time under various dead-times is proposed, which is verified with controlled parameters. Our model has the advantage of fast computing speed and unifies multi-trigger, single-trigger, and zero-dead-time models. The computing speed is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than Gatt's and Zhao's models under a short dead-time condition, with relative errors less than 0.001 and 10(-14), respectively. Subsequently, the detection efficiency and range bias and precision with various dead-times are theoretically calculated and Monte Carlo simulated with different parameters. On the one hand, dead-time shorter than the end time of the target achieves better detection efficiency; however, this results in worse range performance. On the other hand, dead-time longer than the end time of the target maintains the detection efficiency at a low level but provides a better range performance. We discover that noise is the key reason for the periodic fluctuation of the detection efficiency and range performance versus different dead-times and the local optimum values of fluctuations occur when the dead-time is a few nanoseconds shorter or longer than 1, 1/2, 1/3, or even 1/4 of the end time of the target; further, this phenomenon becomes more evident when noise increases. Moreover, weaker noise level is crucial to the detection efficiency, and narrow pulse width and nearer target position in the range gate are important factors to improve precision.

  9. A preliminary test of the application of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) as a thunderstorm warning and location device for the FHA including a correlation with updrafts, turbulence, and radar precipitation echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a test of the use of a Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) remote display in the Patrick AFB RAPCON facility are presented. Agreement between LDAR and radar precipitation echoes of the RAPCON radar was observed, as well as agreement between LDAR and pilot's visual observations of lightning flashes. A more precise comparison between LDAR and KSC based radars is achieved by the superposition of LDAR precipitation echoes. Airborne measurements of updrafts and turbulence by an armored T-28 aircraft flying through the thunderclouds are correlated with LDAR along the flight path. Calibration and measurements of the accuracy of the LDAR System are discussed, and the extended range of the system is illustrated.

  10. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  11. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake, Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-05-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site, Antelope Lake. CAU 496 consists of one site located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

  12. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-09

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program, plant parameters envelopes: Comparison with ranges of values for four hypothetical sites. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this volume is to report the results of the comparison of the ALWR plan parameters envelope with values of site characteristics developed for our hypothetical sites that generally represent conditions encountered within the United States. This effort is not intended to identify or address the suitability of any existing site, site area, or region in the United States. Also included in this volume is Appendix F, SERCH Summaries Regarding Siting.

  14. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  15. Microstrip Antennas with Polarization Diversity across a Wide Frequency Range and Phased Array Antennas for Radar and Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kevin Ming-Jiang

    The thesis comprises of 3 projects; an L-band microstrip antenna with frequency agility and polarization diversity, X-band phased array antennas incorporating commercially packaged RFIC phased array chips, and studies for Ku/Ka-band shared aperture antenna array. The first project features the use of commercially packaged RF-MEMS SPDT switches, that boasts of high reliability, high linearity, low losses, hermetically packaged and fully compatible for SMTA processes for mass-assembly and production. Using the switches in a novel manner for the feed network, microstrip antennas with polarization diversity are presented. Frequency agility is achieved with the use of tuning diodes to provide capacitive loading to the antenna element. Additional inductance effects from surface-mounted capacitors, and its impact, is introduced. Theoretical cross-polarization of probe-fed antenna elements is presented for both linear and circular polarized microstrip antennas. Designs and measurements are presented, for microstrip antennas with polarization diversity, wide frequency tuning range, and both features. Replacement of the tuning diodes with commercially-packaged high Q RF MEMS tunable capacitors will allow for significant improvements to the radiation efficiency. In another project, multi-channel CMOS RFIC phased-array receiver chips are assembled in QFN packages and directly integrated on the same multi-layered PCB stack-up with the antenna arrays. Problems of isolation from the PCB-QFN interface, and potential performance degradation on antenna array from the use of commercial-grade laminates for assembly requirements, namely potential scan blindness and radiation efficiency, are presented. Causes for apparent drift of dielectric constant for microstrip circuits, and high conductor losses observed in measurements, are introduced. Finally, studies are performed for the design of a Ku/Ka-Band shared aperture array. Different approaches for developing dual-band shared apertures

  16. Frequency-Range Distribution of Boulders Around Cone Crater: Relevance to Landing Site Hazard Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Boulders represent a landing hazard that must be addressed in the planning of future landings on the Moon. A boulder under a landing leg can contribute to deck tilt and boulders can damage spacecraft during landing. Using orbital data to characterize boulder populations at locations where landers have safely touched down (Apollo, Luna, Surveyor, and Chang'e-3 sites) is important for determining landing hazard criteria for future missions. Additionally, assessing the distribution of boulders can address broader science issues, e.g., how far craters distribute boulders and how this distribution varies as a function of crater size and age. The availability of new Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images [1] enables the use of boulder size- and range frequency distributions for a variety of purposes [2-6]. Boulders degrade over time and primarily occur around young or fresh craters that are large enough to excavate bedrock. Here we use NAC images to analyze boulder distributions around Cone crater (340 m diameter) at the Apollo 14 site. Cone crater (CC) was selected because it is the largest crater where astronaut surface photography is available for a radial traverse to the rim. Cone crater is young (approximately 29 Ma [7]) relative to the time required to break down boulders [3,8], giving us a data point for boulder range-frequency distributions (BRFDs) as a function of crater age.

  17. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  18. Preliminary inter-model comparison of the Agulhas current with direct range doppler velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Backeberg, Bjorn C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available is of great importance. In this paper we compare direct surface velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar with surface velocity fields obtained from two different ocean numerical models. In particular, we focus on the models...

  19. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  20. Abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line sites in the Western James region of Northern Ontario, Canada: a source of organochlorines for First Nations people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Leonard J S; Wainman, Bruce C; Martin, Ian D; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Sutherland, Celine; Nieboer, Evert

    2006-11-01

    The potential exists for human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminants originating from abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line (MCRL) sites in sub-arctic Canada. We examined patterns of differences with respect to body burden of organochlorines (lipid-adjusted) between residents of the Ontario First Nations of Fort Albany (the site of MCRL Site 050) and Kashechewan (no radar base) and Hamilton (an industrial, southern Ontario community) to assess whether the presence of Site 050 influenced organochlorine body burden with respect to the people of Fort Albany. PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and summation operator14 PCBs congeners [CBs]) and DDE in the plasma of Fort Albany and Kashechewan subjects were elevated relative to Hamilton participants. PCB and DDE-plasma levels in First Nation women were of comparable magnitude to those reported for Inuit women living in the west/central Northwest Territories. Significantly lower DDE/DDT ratios observed for Fort Albany indicates exposure to higher levels of DDT compared to Kashechewan. The probable source of DDT exposure for Fort Albany people is the DDT-contaminated soil surrounding buildings of Site 050. The results of the correspondence analysis (CA) indicated that people from Hamilton had relatively higher pesticides and lower CB body burdens, while people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan exhibited relatively higher CBs and lower pesticide levels (CA-1). The separation of Fort Albany and Kashechewan from Hamilton was also clear using questionnaire data (i.e., plotting dietary principal component [PC]-1 scores against PC-2); PC-1 was correlated with the consumption of a traditional diet. Separation of Kashechewan and Albany residents occurred because the people of Kashechewan ate more traditional meats and consumed shorebirds. Only one significant relationship was found between PC analysis and contaminant loadings; PC-1 versus CA-3 for Kashechewan. The presence of Site 050 on Anderson Island appears to have

  1. Joint inversion of crosshole radar and seismic traveltimes acquired at the South Oyster BacterialTransport Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, Niklas; Tryggvason, Ari; Peterson, John; Hubbard, Susan

    2008-04-15

    The structural approach to joint inversion, entailing common boundaries or gradients, offers a flexible way to invert diverse types of surface-based and/or crosshole geophysical data. The cross-gradients function has been introduced as a means to construct models in which spatial changes in two models are parallel or anti-parallel. Inversion methods that use such structural constraints also provide estimates of non-linear and non-unique field-scale relationships between model parameters. Here, we invert jointly crosshole radar and seismic traveltimes for structurally similar models using an iterative non-linear traveltime tomography algorithm. Application of the inversion scheme to synthetic data demonstrates that it better resolves lithological boundaries than the individual inversions. Tests of the scheme on observed radar and seismic data acquired within a shallow aquifer illustrate that the resultant models have improved correlations with flowmeter data than with models based on individual inversions. The highest correlation with the flowmeter data is obtained when the joint inversion is combined with a stochastic regularization operator, where the vertical integral scale is estimated from the flowmeter data. Point-spread functions shows that the most significant resolution improvements of the joint inversion is in the horizontal direction.

  2. Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langkopf, B.S.; Eshom, E.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes site exploration work completed in support of planned rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Ruff at Nevada Test Site`s, G-Tunnel. As part of this work, the Rock Mechanics Drift (RMD) and the Rock Mass Property Alcove (RMPA) were mined and three coreholes drilled. The results of mapping and corehole logging are displayed, described, and analyzed.

  3. Winter precipitation fields in the Southeastern Mediterranean area as seen by the Ku-band spaceborne weather radar and two C-band ground-based radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, M.; Morin, E.; Notarpietro, R.; Michaelides, S.

    2013-01-01

    The spaceborne weather radar onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite can be used to adjust Ground-based Radar (GR) echoes, as a function of the range from the GR site. The adjustment is based on the average linear radar reflectivity in circular rings around the GR site, for both the GR and attenuation-corrected NearSurfZ TRMM Precipitation Radar (TPR) images. In previous studies, it was found that in winter, for the lowest elevation of the Cyprus C-band radar, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio was decreasing, on average, of approximately 8 dB per decade. In this paper, the same analysis has been applied to another C-band radar in the southeastern Mediterranean area. For the lowest elevation of the "Shacham" radar in Israel, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio is found to decrease of approximately 6 dB per decade. The average departure at the "reference", intermediate range is related to the calibration of the GR. The negative slope of the range dependence is considered to be mainly caused by an overshooting problem (increasing sampling volume of the GR with range combined with non-homogeneous beam filling and, on average, a decreasing vertical profile of radar reflectivity). To check this hypothesis, we have compared the same NearSurfZ TPR images versus GR data acquired using the second elevation. We expected these data to be affected more by overshooting, especially at distant ranges: the negative slope of the range dependence was in fact found to be more evident than in the case of the lowest GR elevation for both the Cypriot and Israeli radar.

  4. Experiment for buried pipes by stepped FM-CW radar; Step shiki FM-CW radar ni yoru maisetsukan tansa jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Ito, M. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tanabe, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    The underground radar exploration is adopted to surveys of cavity under the road and buried pipes since the result of high resolution is obtained. However, the explorative depth of the radar is shallow, 2-3m in soil basement, and its applicable field has been limited. The continuous wave radar (FM-CW radar) was devised to get deeper explorative depth, but has been used for the geological structure survey such as the fault survey since it is lower in resolution as compared with the pulse radar. Therefore, to make use of characteristics of the continuous wave radar and enhance resolution in the shallow part, an experiment on buried pipes was conducted for the purpose of assessing and improving the FM-CW radar. In this processing, the wave form treatment used in the reflection method seismic survey was adopted for the radar survey. There are some problems, but it is effective to adopt the same algorithm to that used in the seismic survey to the radar exploration. The explorative depth was discussed from the damping rate of electromagnetic waves and dynamic range of facilities of the experimental site, and 7m was obtained. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  6. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    Full Text Available Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105–250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80–100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20°–60°. Echo power (< 16 dB, Doppler velocity (between –30 and + 30 ms-1 and spectral width (< 60 ms-1 fluctuate with periods of several to 20 min, perhaps due to short–period atmospheric gravity waves. When the HF radar detected the echoes, a vertical incidence MST radar, located at Esrange in Sweden (650 km north of the HF radar site, observed polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE at altitudes of 80–90 km. This fact suggests that the near range HF echoes are PMSE at HF band, although both radars did not probe a common volume. With increasing radar frequency, HF echo ranges are closer to the radar site and echo power becomes weaker. Possible mechanisms to explain these features are discussed.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides; instruments and techniques

  7. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  8. An approach to combine radar and gauge based rainfall data under consideration of their qualities in low mountain ranges of Saxony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jatho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An approach to combine gauge and radar data and additional quality information is presented. The development was focused on the improvement of the diagnostic for temporal (one hour and spatial (1×1 km2 highly resolved precipitation data. The method is embedded in an online tool and was applied to the target area Saxony, Germany. The aim of the tool is to provide accurate spatial rainfall estimates. The results can be used for rainfall run-off modelling, e.g. in a flood management system.

    Quality information allows a better assessment of the input data and the resulting precipitation field. They are stored in corresponding fields and represent the static and dynamic uncertainties of radar and gauge data. Objective combination of various precipitation and quality fields is realised using a cost function.

    The findings of cross validation reveal that the proposed combination method merged the benefits and disadvantages of interpolated gauge and radar data and leads to mean estimates. The sampling point validation implies that the presented method slightly overestimated the areal rain as well as the high rain intensities in case of convective and advective events, while the results of pure interpolation method performed better. In general, the use of presented cost function avoids false rainfall amount in areas of low input data quality and improves the reliability in areas of high data quality. It is obvious that the combined product includes the small-scale variability of radar, which is seen as the important benefit of the presented combination approach. Local improvements of the final rain field are possible due to consideration of gauges that were not used for radar calibration, e.g. in topographic distinct regions.

  9. Fmcw Mmw Radar For Automotive Longitudinal Control

    OpenAIRE

    David, William

    1997-01-01

    This report presents information on millimeter wave (MMW) radar for automotive longitudinal control. It addresses the fundamental capabilities and limitations of millimeter waves for ranging and contrasts their operation with that of conventional microwave radar. The report analyzes pulsed and FMCW radar configurations, and provides detailed treatment of FMCW radar operating at MMW frequency, its advantages and disadvantages as they relate to range and velocity measurements.

  10. Radar network communication through sensing of frequency hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2013-05-28

    In one embodiment, a radar communication system includes a plurality of radars having a communication range and being capable of operating at a sensing frequency and a reporting frequency, wherein the reporting frequency is different than the sensing frequency, each radar is adapted for operating at the sensing frequency until an event is detected, each radar in the plurality of radars has an identification/location frequency for reporting information different from the sensing frequency, a first radar of the radars which senses the event sends a reporting frequency corresponding to its identification/location frequency when the event is detected, and all other radars in the plurality of radars switch their reporting frequencies to match the reporting frequency of the first radar upon detecting the reporting frequency switch of a radar within the communication range. In another embodiment, a method is presented for communicating information in a radar system.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Interferometry for Assessing Wenchuan Earthquake (2008 Deforestation in the Sichuan Giant Panda Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulong Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic aperture radar (SAR has been an unparalleled tool in cloudy and rainy regions as it allows observations throughout the year because of its all-weather, all-day operation capability. In this paper, the influence of Wenchuan Earthquake on the Sichuan Giant Panda habitats was evaluated for the first time using SAR interferometry and combining data from C-band Envisat ASAR and L-band ALOS PALSAR data. Coherence analysis based on the zero-point shifting indicated that the deforestation process was significant, particularly in habitats along the Min River approaching the epicenter after the natural disaster, and as interpreted by the vegetation deterioration from landslides, avalanches and debris flows. Experiments demonstrated that C-band Envisat ASAR data were sensitive to vegetation, resulting in an underestimation of deforestation; in contrast, L-band PALSAR data were capable of evaluating the deforestation process owing to a better penetration and the significant coherence gain on damaged forest areas. The percentage of damaged forest estimated by PALSAR decreased from 20.66% to 17.34% during 2009–2010, implying an approximate 3% recovery rate of forests in the earthquake impacted areas. This study proves that long-wavelength SAR interferometry is promising for rapid assessment of disaster-induced deforestation, particularly in regions where the optical acquisition is constrained.

  12. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  13. Numerical Simulations of the Lunar Penetrating Radar and Investigations of the Geological Structures of the Lunar Regolith Layer at the Chang’E 3 Landing Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of lunar exploration, and specifically when studying lunar surface structure and thickness, the established lunar regolith model is usually a uniform and ideal structural model, which is not well-suited to describe the real structure of the lunar regolith layer. The present study aims to explain the geological structural information contained in the channel 2 LPR (lunar penetrating radar data. In this paper, the random medium theory and Apollo drilling core data are used to construct a modeling method based on discrete heterogeneous random media, and the simulation data are processed and collected by the electromagnetic numerical method FDTD (finite-difference time domain. When comparing the LPR data with the simulated data, the heterogeneous random medium model is more consistent with the actual distribution of the media in the lunar regolith layer. It is indicated that the interior structure of the lunar regolith layer at the landing site is not a pure lunar regolith medium but rather a regolith-rock mixture, with rocks of different sizes and shapes. Finally, several reasons are given to explain the formation of the geological structures of the lunar regolith layer at the Chang’E 3 landing site, as well as the possible geological stratification structure.

  14. Equatorial MST radars: Further consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, P.

    1983-01-01

    The results presented give additional support to the need of equatorial MST radars in order to obtain more information on the nature of equatorial waves in the MST region. Radar deduced winds such as obtained at Jicamarca for periods of months indicate that with these data the full range of equatorial waves, with time scales of seconds to years, can be studied.

  15. Use of ground-penetrating radar to study tree roots in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; J.A. Doolittle; L. Kress; Susan Cohen; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2001-01-01

    Summary: The objectives of our study were to assess the feasibility of using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to study roots over a broad range of soil conditions in the southeastern United States. Study sites were located in the Southern Piedmont, Carolina Sandhills and Atlantic Coast Flatwoods. At each site, we tested for selection of the appropriate...

  16. Anomalous transient uplift observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using satellite radar interferometry time-series analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    P. Vincent; S. M. Buckley; D. Yang; S. F. Carle

    2011-01-01

    ... is observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using ERS satellite SAR data. Using an InSAR time-series analysis method, we show that an increase in absolute uplift with time is observed between 1997 and 1999...

  17. Goldstone solar system radar signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, R. F.; Satorius, E.; Sanchez, O.

    1992-01-01

    A performance analysis of the planetary radar data acquisition system is presented. These results extend previous computer simulation analysis and are facilitated by the development of a simple analytical model that predicts radar system performance over a wide range of operational parameters. The results of this study are useful to both the radar systems designer and the science investigator in establishing operational radar data acquisition parameters which result in the best systems performance for a given set of input conditions.

  18. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  19. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  20. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar to Investigate Methane and Soil Carbon Dynamics at the Weyandt Environmental Monitoring Site in Western Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, A. D.; Mount, G.; McClellan, M. D.; Hovan, S. A.; Wilson, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies involving methane budgets of western Pennsylvania have sought to quantify the amount and rate of fugitive methane released during industrial natural gas development and from distribution systems. However, in order to fully understand the carbon cycle and budget of the area, contributions from natural systems such as wetlands are also needed. Our research utilizes a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR), aerial imagery, and direct measurements (coring and gas traps) to estimate the contribution of wetlands to the total carbon stock of an agricultural and gas-producing site known as the Weyandt Farm Environmental Monitoring Site in Indiana, Pennsylvania.Our approach uses three-dimensional (3D) GPR surveys to define the thickness from the wetland surface to the regolith or bedrock interface in order to create a volume model of gas-producing organic soils. Depth-profile cores are extracted to confirm soil column interfaces and determine changes in soil carbon content with depth. In addition, gas traps placed across the wetlands measure the spatial and temporal variability of gas methane released. Carbon stocks across the monitoring site are estimated from aerial photographs and are used to determine surface area of each wetland type and develop a relationship between surface area and total carbon stocks within those wetlands. These values can be up scaled to estimate carbon stocks across similar landscapes within broader regions.This research demonstrates the ability of indirect geophysical methods to quickly estimate carbon stocks within irregular wetlands. This will be important when trying to understanding the environmental impact of methane released from both naturally occurring sources and commercial extraction and distribution activities.

  1. Radar Evaluation of Optical Cloud Constraints to Space Launch Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis J.; Short, David A.; Ward, Jennifer G.

    2005-01-01

    Weather constraints to launching space vehicles are designed to prevent loss of the vehicle or mission due to weather hazards (See, e.g., Ref 1). Constraints include Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LLCC) designed to avoid natural and triggered lightning. The LLCC currently in use at most American launch sites including the Eastern Range and Kennedy Space Center require the Launch Weather Officer to determine the height of cloud bases and tops, the location of cloud edges, and cloud transparency. The preferred method of making these determinations is visual observation, but when that isn't possible due to darkness or obscured vision, it is permissible to use radar. This note examines the relationship between visual and radar observations in three ways: A theoretical consideration of the relationship between radar reflectivity and optical transparency. An observational study relating radar reflectivity to cloud edge determined from in-situ measurements of cloud particle concentrations that determine the visible cloud edge. An observational study relating standard radar products to anvil cloud transparency. It is shown that these three approaches yield results consistent with each other and with the radar threshold specified in Reference 2 for LLCC evaluation.

  2. Detection and Identification of Archaeological Sites and Features Using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data Collected from Airborne Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-26

    College Park , Maryland Space Imaging Corporation Stacey Otte, Executive Director, Catalina Island Museum, Catalina Island Conservancy Dr. Mark Raab...engineers developed what they dubbed “ Jurassic Proc” software (for the gigantic body of data used and the enormous processing power required to produce...Phase I surveys. Answer: Accuracy in identifying the location of archaeological sites was made possible by the Jurassic Proc software, written by a

  3. Water Sampling and Analysis for the Tracer/Time-Lapse Radar Imaging Test at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Hydrogeophysical Research Site 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK... soil at the BHRS. Ground tarps under each sampling table also helped to minimize this contamination. Water from the 5-gal carboys was drawn through...that the change is in response to some aspect of the root environment. It has been documented that roots of other species (corn, radish, daffodil

  4. Radar history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  5. Site assessment and cleanup of the Youngs Road small arms firing range at Moosehorn NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A former small arms firing range was located adjacent to Youngs Road in an upland portion of the Baring Division of Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Washington...

  6. The MU radar now partly in operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Ogawa, T.; Tsuda, T.; Sato, T.; Kimura, I.; Fukao, S.

    1984-01-01

    The MU radar (middle- and upper-atmosphere radar) of RASC (Radio Atmospheric Science Center, Kyoto University) is now partly in operation, although the facility will be completed in 1985. The active array system of the radar makes it possible to steer the radar beam as fast as in each interpulse period. Various sophisticated experiments are expected to be performed by the system. A preliminary observation was successful to elucidate atmospheric motions during Typhoon No. 5 which approached the radar site in August, 1983.

  7. Netted LPI RADARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    that range bin masking should also be quite effective. They argue that if a section of the radar waveform recorded by DRFM or repeater...effective. A Digital RF Memory ( DRFM ) can be used to focus the available power of the jammer and inject Doppler noise only a few KHz wide, matching to the

  8. Ground penetrating radar

    CERN Document Server

    Daniels, David J

    2004-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar has come to public attention in recent criminal investigations, but has actually been a developing and maturing remote sensing field for some time. In the light of recent expansion of the technique to a wide range of applications, the need for an up-to-date reference has become pressing. This fully revised and expanded edition of the best-selling Surface-Penetrating Radar (IEE, 1996) presents, for the non-specialist user or engineer, all the key elements of this technique, which span several disciplines including electromagnetics, geophysics and signal processing. The

  9. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  10. Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2004-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  11. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  12. Radar ornithology and the conservation of migratory birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney A. Gauthreaux; Carroll G. Belser

    2005-01-01

    It is possible to study with surveillance radar the movements of migrating birds in the atmosphere at different spatial scales. At a spatial scale within a range of 6 kilometers, high-resolution, 3-centimeter wavelength surveillance radar (e.g. BIRDRAD) can detect the departure of migrants from different types of habitat within a few kilometers of the radar. The radar...

  13. Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-06-18

    The scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) is a polarimetric Doppler radar consisting of three different radar designs based on operating frequency. These are designated as follows: (1) X-band SACR (X-SACR); (2) Ka-band SACR (Ka-SACR); and (3) W-band SACR (W-SACR). There are two SACRs on a single pedestal at each site where SACRs are deployed. The selection of the operating frequencies at each deployed site is predominantly determined by atmospheric attenuation at the site. Because RF attenuation increases with atmospheric water vapor content, ARM's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites use the X-/Ka-band frequency pair. The Southern Great Plains (SGP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites field the Ka-/W-band frequency pair. One ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) has a Ka/W-SACR and the other (AMF2) has a X/Ka-SACR.

  14. The MST Radar Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  15. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  16. Comparison of radar data versus rainfall data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, B.; Hromadka, T.V.; Perez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler radar data are increasingly used in rainfall-runoff synthesis studies, perhaps due to radar data availability, among other factors. However, the veracity of the radar data are often a topic of concern. In this paper, three Doppler radar outcomes developed by the United States National Weather Service at three radar sites are examined and compared to actual rain gage data for two separate severe storm events in order to assess accuracy in the published radar estimates of rainfall. Because the subject storms were very intense rainfall events lasting approximately one hour in duration, direct comparisons between the three radar gages themselves can be made, as well as a comparison to rain gage data at a rain gage location subjected to the same storm cells. It is shown that topographic interference with the radar outcomes can be a significant factor leading to differences between radar and rain gage readings, and that care is needed in calibrating radar outcomes using available rain gage data in order to interpolate rainfall estimates between rain gages using the spatial variation observed in the radar readings. The paper establishes and describes•the need for “ground-truthing” of radar data, and•possible errors due to topographic interference. PMID:26649276

  17. Close Range Photogrammetry Applied to the Documentation of AN Archaeological Site in Gaza Strip, Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, E.; Elter, R.; Ripoche, C.; Quere, N.; de Strasbourg, INSA

    2013-07-01

    In a geopolitical very complex context as the Gaza Strip it has to be dealt with an enhancement of an archaeological site. This site is the monastery of St. Hilarion. To enable a cultural appropriation of a place with several identified phases of occupation must undertake extensive archaeological excavation. Excavate in this geographical area is to implement emergency excavations, so the aim of such a project can be questioned for each mission. Real estate pressure is also a motivating setting the documentation because the large population density does not allow systematic studies of underground before construction projects. This is also during the construction of a road that the site was discovered. Site dimensions are 150 m by 80 m. It is located on a sand dune, 300 m from the sea. To implement the survey, four different levels of detail have been defined for terrestrial photogrammetry. The first level elements are similar to objects, capitals, fragment of columns, tiles for example. Modeling of small objects requires the acquisition of very dense point clouds (density: 1 point / 1 mm on average). The object must then be a maximum area of the sensor of the camera, while retaining in the field of view a reference pattern for the scaling of the point cloud generated. The pictures are taken at a short distance from the object, using the images at full resolution. The main obstacle to the modeling of objects is the presence of noise partly due to the studied materials (sand, smooth rock), which do not favor the detection of points of interest quality. Pretreatments of the cloud will be achieved meticulously since the ouster of points on a surface of a small object results in the formation of a hole with a lack of information, useful to resulting mesh. Level 2 focuses on the stratigraphic units such as mosaics. The monastery of St. Hilarion identifies thirteen floors of which has been documented years ago by silver photographs, scanned later. Modeling of pavements is

  18. Observed chemical characteristics of long-range transported particles at a marine background site in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayetano, Mylene G; Kim, Young J; Jung, Jin Sang; Batmunkh, Tsatsral; Lee, Kwang Yul; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Kwan Chul; Kim, Dong Gyu; Lee, Suk Jo; Kim, Jeong Soo; Chang, Lim Seek

    2011-11-01

    Deokjeok Island is located off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula and is a suitable place to monitor the long-range transport of air pollutants from the Asian continent. In addition to pollutants, Asian dust particles are also transported to the island during long-range transport events. Episodic transport of dust and secondary particles was observed during intensive measurements in the spring (March 31-April 11) and fall (October 13-26) of 2009. In this study, the chemical characteristics of long-range-transported particles were investigated based on highly time-resolved ionic measurements with a particle-into-liquid system coupled with an online ion chromatograph (PILS-IC) that simultaneously measures concentrations of cations (Li+, Na , NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+) and anions (F-, C1-, NO3-, SO42-). The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) distribution retrieved by the modified Bremen Aerosol Retrieval (M-BAER) algorithm from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data confirmed the presence of a thick aerosol plume coming from the Asian continent towards the Korean peninsula. Seven distinctive events involving the long-range transport (LRT) of aerosols were identified and studied, the chemical components of which were strongly related to sector sources. Enrichment of acidic secondary aerosols on mineral dust particles, and even of sea-salt components, during transport was observed in this study. Backward trajectory, chemical analyses, and satellite aerosol retrievals identified two distinct events: a distinctively high [Ca2++Mg2]/[Na+] ratio (>2.0), which was indicative of a preprocessed mineral dust transport event, and a low [Ca2++Mg2+]/[Na+] ratio (<2.0), which was indicative of severe aging of sea-salt components on the processed dust particles. Particulate C1- was depleted by up to 85% in spring and 50% in the fall. A consistent fraction of carbonate replacement (FCR) averaged 0.53 in spring and 0.55 in the fall. Supporting evidences of C1

  19. Radar interferometry persistent scatterer technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kampes, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the Persistent Scatterer Technique, the latest development in radar interferometric data processing. It is the only book on Permanent Scatterer (PS) technique of radar interferometry, and it details a newly developed stochastic model and estimator algorithm to cope with possible problems for the application of the PS technique. The STUN (spatio-temporal unwrapping network) algorithm, developed to cope with these issues in a robust way, is presented and applied to two test sites.

  20. Determining Home Range and Preferred Habitat of Feral Horses on the Nevada National Security Site Using Geographic Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Ashley V. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States)

    2014-05-30

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are free-roaming descendants of domesticated horses and legally protected by the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, which mandates how feral horses and burros should be managed and protected on federal lands. Using a geographic information system to determine the home range and suitable habitat of feral horses on the federally managed Nevada National Security Site can enable wildlife biologists in making best management practice recommendations. Home range was estimated at 88.1 square kilometers. Site suitability was calculated for elevation, forage, slope, water presence and horse observations. These variables were combined in successive iterations into one polygon. Suitability rankings established that 85 square kilometers are most suitable habitat, with 2,052 square kilometers of good habitat 1,252 square kilometers of fair habitat and 122 square kilometers of least suitable habitat.

  1. Ground penetrating radar for fracture mapping in underground hazardous waste disposal sites: A case study from an underground research tunnel, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Sep; Kwon, Jang-Soon; Um, Evan Schankee

    2017-06-01

    Secure disposal or storage of nuclear waste within stable geologic environments hinges on the effectiveness of artificial and natural radiation barriers. Fractures in the bedrock are viewed as the most likely passage for the transport of radioactive waste away from a disposal site. We utilize ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map fractures in the tunnel walls of an underground research tunnel at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). GPR experiments within the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) were carried out by using 200 MHz, 500 MHz, and 1000 MHz antennas. By using the high-frequency antennas, we were able to identify small-scale fractures, which were previously unidentified during the tunnel excavation process. Then, through 3-D visualization of the grid survey data, we reconstructed the spatial distribution and interconnectivity of the multi-scale fractures within the wall. We found that a multi-frequency GPR approach provided more details of the complex fracture network, including deep structures. Furthermore, temporal changes in reflection polarity between the GPR surveys enabled us to infer the hydraulic characteristics of the discrete fracture network developed behind the surveyed wall. We hypothesized that the fractures exhibiting polarity change may be due to a combination of air-filled and mineralogical boundaries. Simulated GPR scans for the considered case were consistent with the observed GPR data. If our assumption is correct, the groundwater flow into these near-surface fractures may form the water-filled fractures along the existing air-filled ones and hence cause the changes in reflection polarity over the given time interval (i.e., 7 days). Our results show that the GPR survey is an efficient tool to determine fractures at various scales. Time-lapse GPR data may be essential to characterize the hydraulic behavior of discrete fracture networks in underground disposal facilities.

  2. Various Effects of Embedded Intrapulse Communications on Pulsed Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    impact of an interfering communications signal on the range-Doppler map of a pulse Doppler radar is investigated. The perspective of a radar operator in a...perspective of a radar operator in a maritime environment is also considered. In all cases, the communications signal is parameterized by the radar - to...utilize the S-band of around 3 GHz, where many maritime radars operate [1]. The two broad categories for how these two signals could be separated from

  3. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  4. Polarimetric Analysis of Backscatter From the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Using L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Minchew, Brent; Jones, Cathleen E.; Holt, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the fully-polarimetric Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data acquired on June 23, 2010, from two adjacent, overlapping flight tracks that imaged the main oil slick near the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) rig site in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that radar backscatter from both clean water and oil in the slick is predominantly from a single surface scatterer, consistent with the tilted Bragg scattering mechanism, across the range of incidence angles from...

  5. Blending of Radial HF Radar Surface Current and Model Using ETKF Scheme For The Sunda Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujiasih, Subekti; Riyadi, Mochammad; Wandono, Dr; Wayan Suardana, I.; Nyoman Gede Wiryajaya, I.; Nyoman Suarsa, I.; Hartanto, Dwi; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-01

    Preliminary study of data blending of surface current for Sunda Strait-Indonesia has been done using the analysis scheme of the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF). The method is utilized to combine radial velocity from HF Radar and u and v component of velocity from Global Copernicus - Marine environment monitoring service (CMEMS) model. The initial ensemble is based on the time variability of the CMEMS model result. Data tested are from 2 CODAR Seasonde radar sites in Sunda Strait and 2 dates such as 09 September 2013 and 08 February 2016 at 12.00 UTC. The radial HF Radar data has a hourly temporal resolution, 20-60 km of spatial range, 3 km of range resolution, 5 degree of angular resolution and spatial resolution and 11.5-14 MHz of frequency range. The u and v component of the model velocity represents a daily mean with 1/12 degree spatial resolution. The radial data from one HF radar site is analyzed and the result compared to the equivalent radial velocity from CMEMS for the second HF radar site. Error checking is calculated by root mean squared error (RMSE). Calculation of ensemble analysis and ensemble mean is using Sangoma software package. The tested R which represents observation error covariance matrix, is a diagonal matrix with diagonal elements equal 0.05, 0.5 or 1.0 m2/s2. The initial ensemble members comes from a model simulation spanning a month (September 2013 or February 2016), one year (2013) or 4 years (2013-2016). The spatial distribution of the radial current are analyzed and the RMSE values obtained from independent HF radar station are optimized. It was verified that the analysis reproduces well the structure included in the analyzed HF radar data. More importantly, the analysis was also improved relative to the second independent HF radar site. RMSE of the improved analysis is better than first HF Radar site Analysis. The best result of the blending exercise was obtained for observation error variance equal to 0.05 m2/s2. This study is

  6. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of how Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) X-band measurements can be combined with meteorological C–band measurements into a single radar product. For this purpose, a blending method has been developed which combines the strengths of the two radar systems. Combining...... the two radar types achieves a radar product with both long range and high temporal resolution. It is validated that the blended radar product performs better than the individual radars based on ground observations from laser disdrometers. However, the data combination is challenged by lower performance...... of the LAWR. Although both radars benefits from the data combination, it is also found that advection based temporal interpolation is a more favourable method for increasing the temporal resolution of meteorological C–band measurements....

  7. 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kauai Test Facility Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Li, Jun [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Minitrez, Alexandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avery, Penny [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); duMond, Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, William [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, III, Allen [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lantow, Tiffany [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Reuben [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Amy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Payne, Jennifer [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ricketson, Sherry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities managed and operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Field Office (SFO), in Albuquerque, New Mexico, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes data and the compliance status of the sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year 2013. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of TTR ER sites. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  8. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  9. Interception of LPI radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jim P.

    1991-11-01

    Most current radars are designed to transmit short duration pulses with relatively high peak power. These radars can be detected easily by the use of relatively modest EW intercept receivers. Three radar functions (search, anti-ship missile (ASM) seeker, and navigation) are examined to evaluate the effectiveness of potential low probability of intercept (LPI) techniques, such as waveform coding, antenna profile control, and power management that a radar may employ against current Electronic Warfare (EW) receivers. The general conclusion is that it is possible to design a LPI radar which is effective against current intercept EW receivers. LPI operation is most easily achieved at close ranges and against a target with a large radar cross section. The general system sensitivity requirement for the detection of current and projected LPI radars is found to be on the order of -100 dBmi which cannot be met by current EW receivers. Finally, three potential LPI receiver architectures, using channelized, superhet, and acousto-optic receivers with narrow RF and video bandwidths are discussed. They have shown some potential in terms of providing the sensitivity and capability in an environment where both conventional and LPI signals are present.

  10. Resonance and aspect matched adaptive radar (RAMAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Terence William

    2012-01-01

    The book describes a new form of radar for which the target response is frequency, i.e., resonance-dependent. The book provides both prototype designs and empirical results collected from a variety of targets. The new form of radar, called RAMAR (Resonance and Aspect Matched Adaptive Radar) advances radar - mere ranging and detection - to the level of RF spectroscopy, and permits an advance of spectroscopic methods from optical, through infra-red and into the RF spectral range. The book will describe how a target's response can be a function of frequency components in the transmitted signal's

  11. Radar principles for the nonspecialist, 3rd edition

    CERN Document Server

    Toomay, John

    2004-01-01

    Radar Principles for the Non-specialist, Third Edition continues its popular tradition: to distill the very complex technology of radar into its fundamentals, tying them to the laws of nature on one end and to the most modern and complex systems on the other. It starts with electromagnetic propagation, describes a radar of the utmost simplicity, and derives the radar range equation from that simple radar. Once the range equation is available, the book attacks the meaning of each term in it, moving through antennas, detection and tracking, radar cross-section, waveforms andsignal proces

  12. Value of a dual-polarized gap-filling radar in support of southern California post-fire debris-flow warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, David P.; Hanshaw, Maiana N.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Laber, Jayme L; Staley, Dennis M.; Kean, Jason W.; Restrepo, Pedro J.

    2011-01-01

    A portable truck-mounted C-band Doppler weather radar was deployed to observe rainfall over the Station Fire burn area near Los Angeles, California, during the winter of 2009/10 to assist with debris-flow warning decisions. The deployments were a component of a joint NOAA–U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research effort to improve definition of the rainfall conditions that trigger debris flows from steep topography within recent wildfire burn areas. A procedure was implemented to blend various dual-polarized estimators of precipitation (for radar observations taken below the freezing level) using threshold values for differential reflectivity and specific differential phase shift that improves the accuracy of the rainfall estimates over a specific burn area sited with terrestrial tipping-bucket rain gauges. The portable radar outperformed local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) National Weather Service network radars in detecting rainfall capable of initiating post-fire runoff-generated debris flows. The network radars underestimated hourly precipitation totals by about 50%. Consistent with intensity–duration threshold curves determined from past debris-flow events in burned areas in Southern California, the portable radar-derived rainfall rates exceeded the empirical thresholds over a wider range of storm durations with a higher spatial resolution than local National Weather Service operational radars. Moreover, the truck-mounted C-band radar dual-polarimetric-derived estimates of rainfall intensity provided a better guide to the expected severity of debris-flow events, based on criteria derived from previous events using rain gauge data, than traditional radar-derived rainfall approaches using reflectivity–rainfall relationships for either the portable or operational network WSR-88D radars. Part of the reason for the improvement was due to siting the radar closer to the burn zone than the WSR-88Ds, but use of the dual-polarimetric variables

  13. Evaluation of long range transport of fossil fuel originated organic aerosol at a background site in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Jin; Lee, Ji Yi; Park, Jin Soo; Lee, Seok Jo; Kim, Hyun Jae; Jeon, Ha Eun; Sung, Min Young

    2013-04-01

    Northeast Asia is heavy air pollution region due to usage of large amounts of fossil fuel. In addition, meteorological conditions represented as prevailing westerlies in Northeast Asia region causes long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants emitted from China to Korea and Japan and even the United States across the Pacific Ocean (Bey et al., 2001). The Baengnyeong Island of Korea is located at the northwestern part of the Korean peninsula and close by North Korea and China, thus this site is regarded as an ideal place for background air measurements in Northeast Asia. Also, it has low local anthropogenic emissions and is frequently influenced by various air masses from China and North Korea in the Island. In this study, we performed intensive sampling during summer and winter in the Baengnyeong Island and analyzed various organic compounds including fossil fuel originated organic markers such as hopanes and PAHs using thermal desorption two dimensional gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOFMS). We also analyzed ~20 urban aerosol samples collected at Seoul, a representative urban site in Northeast Asia region to compare organic compounds distributions of aerosol samples at the Baengnyeong Island. By applying air mass back trajectory analysis and comparing organic compounds distributions in aerosol samples of the Baengnyeong Island and Seoul, the impact of long-range transport of fossil fuel originated organic pollutants at a background site in Northeast Asia were evaluated. (References) Bey, I., Jacob, D.J., Logan, J.A., Yantosca, R.M., 2001. Asian chemical outflow to the Pacific in spring: origins, pathways, and budgets. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmosphere 106, 23097-23113.

  14. MER vistas: ground-truth for Earth-based radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldemann, Albert F.; Larsen, Kristopher W.; Jurgens, Raymond F.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Slade, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    Earth-based delay-Doppler radar observations of Mars with four receiving stations were carried out during the Mars oppositions of 2001 and 2003 in support of Mars Exploration Rover landing site selection. This interferometric planetary radar technique has demonstrated radar mapping of Mars with a 5 km spatial resolution.

  15. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  16. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  17. Radar Scan Methods in Modern Multifunctional Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Skosyrev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered urgent task of organizing the review space in modern multifunctional radar systems shall review the space in a wide range of elevation angles from minus 5 to 60-80 degrees and 360 degrees azimuth. MfRLS this type should provide an overview of the zone for a limited time (2-3 sec, detecting a wide range of subtle high and low-flying targets. The latter circumstance requires the organization to select targets against the background of reflections from the underlying surface and local objects (MP. When providing an overview of the space taken into account the need to increase not only the noise immunity, and survivability.Two variants of the review of space in the elevation plane in the solid-state AESA radar. In the first case the overview space narrow beam by one beam. In the second - the transfer of DNA is formed, covering the whole sector of responsibility in elevation and at the reception beam is formed in spetsvychislitele (CB as a result of the signal processing of digitized after emitters antenna web. The estimations of the parameters specific to the multifunction radar SAM air and missile defense. It is shown that in a number of practically important cases, preference should be given clearly one of the methods described review of space.The functional scheme with AESA radar for both variants of the review. Necessary to analyze their differences. Contains the problem of increasing the cost of MfRLS with digital beamforming DNA with increasing bandwidth probing signal being processed.Noted drawbacks of MfRLS with digital beamforming beam. Including: reduced accuracy of the coordinates at low elevation angles, the complexity of the organization of thermal regime of the solid element base using quasi-continuous signal with a low duty cycle. Shows their fundamentally unavoidable in the steppe and desert areas with uneven terrain (Kazakhstan, China, the Middle East.It is shown that for MfRLS working in strong clutter, more preferably

  18. Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    free" measurements on the same or previous orbits. The Scatterometer is an integral part of the radar. The proposed system which is currently called...Right Arrays SATELLITE ( I ATOMOS PHERE/ SWATHWI DTH Figure 3.1.1 Metrad Coverage 18 4 05. 4 1-4 " -u a . .4 c4 641 C Ov31 N -4 a ~ U . - I.44m 41 44...application is not a study objective, but could be considered as part of an experimental program utilizing scatterometer, radiometer and high resolution

  19. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Vierinen, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products, such as wind fields. This type of a radar would also be useful for over-the-horizon radar, ionosondes, and observations of field-aligned-irregularities.

  20. Tsunami Arrival Detection with High Frequency (HF Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Barrick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time observations of a tsunami have been limited to deep-water, pressure-sensor observations of changes in the sea surface elevation and observations of sea level fluctuations at the coast, which are essentially point measurements. Constrained by these data, models have been used for predictions and warning of the arrival of a tsunami, but to date no system exists for local detection of an actual incoming wave with a significant warning capability. Networks of coastal high frequency (HF-radars are now routinely observing surface currents in many countries. We report here on an empirical method for the detection of the initial arrival of a tsunami, and demonstrate its use with results from data measured by fourteen HF radar sites in Japan and USA following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off Sendai, Japan, on 11 March 2011. The distance offshore at which the tsunami can be detected, and hence the warning time provided, depends on the bathymetry: the wider the shallow continental shelf, the greater this time. We compare arrival times at the radars with those measured by neighboring tide gauges. Arrival times measured by the radars preceded those at neighboring tide gauges by an average of 19 min (Japan and 15 min (USA The initial water-height increase due to the tsunami as measured by the tide gauges was moderate, ranging from 0.3 to 2 m. Thus it appears possible to detect even moderate tsunamis using this method. Larger tsunamis could obviously be detected further from the coast. We find that tsunami arrival within the radar coverage area can be announced 8 min (i.e., twice the radar spectral time resolution after its first appearance. This can provide advance warning of the tsunami approach to the coastline locations.

  1. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Jr., Richard R; Nekoogar, Faranak; Haugen, Peter C

    2013-08-06

    Ultra wideband radar motion sensors strategically placed in an area of interest communicate with a wireless ad hoc network to provide remote area surveillance. Swept range impulse radar and a heart and respiration monitor combined with the motion sensor further improves discrimination.

  2. Site-specific and time-dependent activation of the endocannabinoid system after transection of long-range projections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kallendrusch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After focal neuronal injury the endocannabinioid system becomes activated and protects or harms neurons depending on cannabinoid derivates and receptor subtypes. Endocannabinoids (eCBs play a central role in controlling local responses and influencing neural plasticity and survival. However, little is known about the functional relevance of eCBs in long-range projection damage as observed in stroke or spinal cord injury (SCI. METHODS: In rat organotypic entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC as a relevant and suitable model for investigating projection fibers in the CNS we performed perforant pathway transection (PPT and subsequently analyzed the spatial and temporal dynamics of eCB levels. This approach allows proper distinction of responses in originating neurons (entorhinal cortex, areas of deafferentiation/anterograde axonal degeneration (dentate gyrus and putative changes in more distant but synaptically connected subfields (cornu ammonis (CA 1 region. RESULTS: Using LC-MS/MS, we measured a strong increase in arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA, oleoylethanolamide (OEA and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA levels in the denervation zone (dentate gyrus 24 hours post lesion (hpl, whereas entorhinal cortex and CA1 region exhibited little if any changes. NAPE-PLD, responsible for biosynthesis of eCBs, was increased early, whereas FAAH, a catabolizing enzyme, was up-regulated 48hpl. CONCLUSION: Neuronal damage as assessed by transection of long-range projections apparently provides a strong time-dependent and area-confined signal for de novo synthesis of eCB, presumably to restrict neuronal damage. The present data underlines the importance of activation of the eCB system in CNS pathologies and identifies a novel site-specific intrinsic regulation of eCBs after long-range projection damage.

  3. Polarimetric optimization for clutter suppression in spectral polarimetric weather radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, J.; Unal, C.M.H.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.

    2017-01-01

    For the polarimetric-Doppler weather radar, sometimes there are artifacts caused by radar system itself or external sources displaying in the radar plan position indicator (PPI). These artifacts are not confined to specific range bins and also they are non-stationary when observed in the Doppler

  4. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vic [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nikolich, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three tests—Clean Slate I, II, and III—were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally

  5. Interferometric radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept SWORD (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of past investments. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology (DAS(R&T) has a three- year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary bench-top experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  6. Magneto-Radar Hidden Metal Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Las Vegas, NV)

    2005-07-05

    A varying magnetic field excites slight vibrations in an object and a radar sensor detects the vibrations at a harmonic of the excitation frequency. The synergy of the magnetic excitation and radar detection provides increased detection range compared to conventional magnetic metal detectors. The radar rejects background clutter by responding only to reflecting objects that are vibrating at a harmonic excitation field, thereby significantly improving detection reliability. As an exemplary arrangement, an ultra-wideband micropower impulse radar (MIR) is capable of being employed to provide superior materials penetration while providing range information. The magneto-radar may be applied to pre-screening magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patients, landmine detection and finding hidden treasures.

  7. Space radar image of Ubar optical/radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This pair of images from space shows a portion of the southern Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula in the country of Oman. On the left is a radar image of the region around the site of the fabled Lost City of Ubar, discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. On the right is an enhanced optical image taken by the shuttle astronauts. Ubar existed from about 2800 BC to about 300 AD. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. The actual site of the fortress of the Lost City of Ubar, currently under excavation, is too small to show in either image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, show as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks in the radar image. Although used in modern times, field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images provided by the Landsat satellite was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes. The green areas are limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the scene and appears as a white line. The radar images, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on an early civilization about which little in known. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) and is centered at 18 degrees North latitude and 53 degrees East longitude. The image covers an area about 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United

  8. A ground-based magnetic survey of Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada: data release and preliminary interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Bethany L.; Curry-Elrod, Erika; Drellack, Sigmund

    2014-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) is located in southern Nevada approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas. Frenchman Flat is a sedimentary basin located on the eastern edge of NNSS and extending eastward into the adjacent Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR).

  9. Validation of high-frequency radar ocean surface current observations in the NW of the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Fanjul, E. Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of a four-site long-range (5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde HF radar network deployed along the Galician Coast is attempted through a comparison with measurements from two moored current meters for the entire year 2012. Radial vectors comparison shows correlation coefficients and RMSE in the ranges 0.32-0.72 and 10-17 cm s-1, respectively. Observed discrepancies in current velocities could be partially attributable to the existence of bearing errors and the influence of the current profile, although other factors like the Stokes drift or intrinsic HF radar variance might also contribute. Evidence of bearing errors can be seen, with values lying between -15° and +10°. The study is also conducted on a quarterly basis in order to routinely monitor performance of the sites in terms of bearing offset evolution, with offset values remaining stable throughout 2012. Use of measured antenna pattern only improves performance at two radar sites. Comparison of total current vectors is carried out together with an evaluation of the impact of the selected averaging radius (AR). Lower AR values give rise to optimized metrics when radar sites involved in the comparison operate accurately, reporting correlations and RMSE in the ranges 0.56-0.74 and 8-13 cm s-1, respectively. By contrast, if at least one of the two involved sites operates erratically, the strategy based on reducing AR becomes counterproductive and the imposed standard value of 25 km seems to be appropriate.

  10. 33 CFR 149.580 - What are the requirements for a radar beacon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... radar beacon? 149.580 Section 149.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.580 What are the requirements for a radar beacon? (a) A radar beacon (RACON... Morse code character, the length of which does not exceed 25 percent of the radar range expected to be...

  11. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  12. Monitoring Soil Erosion of a Burn Site in the Central Basin and Range Ecoregion: Final Report on Measurements at the Gleason Fire Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Julianne [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI; Cablk, Mary [DRI; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Legacy Management

    2013-10-01

    The increase in wildfires in arid and semi-arid parts of Nevada and elsewhere in the southwestern United States has implications for post-closure management and long-term stewardship for Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) for which the Nevada Field Office of the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration has responsibility. For many CAUs and Corrective Action Sites, where closure-in-place alternatives are now being implemented or considered, there is a chance that these sites could burn over at some time while they still pose a risk to the environment or human health, given the long half lives of some of the radionuclide contaminants. This study was initiated to examine the effects and duration of wildfire on wind and water erodibility on sites analogous to those that exist on the NNSS. The data analyzed herein were gathered at the prescribed Gleason Fire site near Ely, Nevada, a site comparable to the northern portion of the NNSS. Quantification of wind erosion was conducted with a Portable In-Situ Wind ERosion Lab (PI-SWERL) on unburned soils, and on interspace and plant understory soils within the burned area. The PI-SWERL was used to estimate emissions of suspendible particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than or equal to 10 micrometers) at different wind speeds. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Based on nearly three years of data, the Gleason Fire site does not appear to have returned to pre burn wind erosion levels. Chemical composition data of suspendible particles are variable and show a trend toward pre-burn levels, but provide little insight into how the composition has been changing over time since the fire. Soil, runoff, and sediment data were collected from the Gleason Fire site to monitor the water erosion potential over the nearly three-year period. Soil

  13. Radar remote sensing data for applications in forestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation into the applications of radar remote sensing in forestry. During a four-year period (1982-1985), an extensive set of radar data was acquired at four test sites with forest plantations in The Netherlands: the Roggebotzand and Horsterwold sites at

  14. Evaluation of Two Methods for Determining Surface Soil Moisture from Radar Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, D.; Moran, M.; Bryant, R.; Holifield, C.; Skirvin, S.; Rahman, M.; Kershner, C.; Watts, J.; Slocum, K.

    2003-12-01

    Distributed soil moisture data are useful for determining cross-country mobility, irrigation scheduling, pest management strategy, biomass production and potential for soil erosion and infiltration. Large area monitoring of surface soil moisture (to depths of 5 cm) is possible with radar remote sensing techniques, but accuracy must be assessed before it can be implemented operationally. Two methods for predicting surface soil moisture from radar satellite imagery were tested in sparsely vegetated, semi-arid Arizona rangelands. In the first approach, the Integral Equation Method (IEM) model was run in the forward direction to generate a Look-Up-Table (LUT) of radar backscatter for the expected range of surface roughness and moisture content in the study area. The LUT was used to derive surface soil moisture estimates from radar images acquired at the study site. In the second approach, a difference index was made from time series differences in radar backscatter signals from wet and dry soils. The difference index minimized variations in surface roughness and resulted in a direct relation between difference and surface soil moisture. For both approaches, results were validated against in situ measurements of surface soil moisture at 46 sites with dielectric probes at the time of satellite overpass. The modeling approach requires surface roughness inputs which may be difficult to obtain, whereas the difference technique requires only a dry surface reference backscatter for comparison with wetter surface backscatter to determine moisture content.

  15. Hydrologic applications of weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Habib, Emad; Andrieu, Hervé; Morin, Efrat

    2015-12-01

    By providing high-resolution quantitative precipitation information (QPI), weather radars have revolutionized hydrology in the last two decades. With the aid of GIS technology, radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) have enabled routine high-resolution hydrologic modeling in many parts of the world. Given the ever-increasing need for higher-resolution hydrologic and water resources information for a wide range of applications, one may expect that the use of weather radar will only grow. Despite the tremendous progress, a number of significant scientific, technological and engineering challenges remain to realize its potential. New challenges are also emerging as new areas of applications are discovered, explored and pursued. The purpose of this special issue is to provide the readership with some of the latest advances, lessons learned, experiences gained, and science issues and challenges related to hydrologic applications of weather radar. The special issue features 20 contributions on various topics which reflect the increasing diversity as well as the areas of focus in radar hydrology today. The contributions may be grouped as follows:

  16. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) analysis : Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    "The objective of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of expanding the MDT's Ground Penetrating : Radar (GPR) program to a broader range of pavement evaluation activities. Currently, MDT uses GPR in : conjunction with its Falling Weight Deflecto...

  17. Capabilities and limitations of EISCAT as an MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottger, J.; Baron, M.; Folkestad, K.

    1983-01-01

    The European Incoherent Scatter Radar Facility also has facilities which can be used for coherent scatter research of the middle atmosphere. The observatory consists of two independent systems which allow observations of the upper, middle, and lower atmosphere: a tristatic UHF radar capable of vector drift measurements, and a monostatic VHF system. The characteristics of the components are are described including inter-site communication, on-line displays, and the real-time operating system. Analysis of about 60 hours of middle atmosphere observations in 1982 indicate that EISCAT's capabilities to measure mesospheric parameters should improve during moderately or strongly disturbed conditions, enabling measurement of profiles of wind velocity, electron density, and temperature/collision frequency, and in some instances, ion masses. Because of not yet optimized transmit-receive switching, some limitations exist in the monostatic mode when observing coherent scattering in the stratosphere at short ranges.

  18. Reading of Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR Images of Prehistoric Flint Mine; Case Study from Krzemionki Opatowskie Archaeological Site In Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welc Fabian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical surveys conducted in order to map tunnels and vertical shafts at the Neolithic chert mining field Krzemionki used a ground-penetrating radar(GPR to test hypotheses regarding orientation, depth and subsurface complexity of these voids.Using two-dimensional reflection profiles the vertical shafts, now mostly filled with lithic debris, were easily visible. Amplitude mapping visualized debris at shaft margins as well as a collapsed material inside the voids. Some shallower horizontal tunnels were also visible as sub-horizontal planar reflections generated from both ceiling and floors of these void spaces. Extension of these interpretations to un-mapped areas of the ancient mining district and complexity of these prehistoric mining features could be examined to determine excavation intensity and exploitation techniques used during the Neolithic.

  19. 3D electrical method and step continuous wave radar method for Nojima site. Results of measurement of resistivity at trench site; Nojima danso ni okeru sanjigenhi teikoho to step shiki renzokuha chika radar ho tansa. Trench chosa chiten deno hiteiko sokutei kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Oda, Y.; Tank, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, H. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Jomori, A. [Japan Crust Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Several surveys were carried out near the Nojima fault, including three-dimensional resistivity measurement and underground radar survey at the Ogura area, underground radar survey at the Hirabayashi area, and resistivity measurement in the vicinity of the trench at the Nashinomoto area, in order to investigate in detail the underground structures at a depth up to several tens meters from the ground surface. Resistivity was measured by an automatic analyzer capable of simultaneously measuring potential levels at 14 channels which can cover 112 measuring points at the largest. At the Ogura area, the boundary planes of the resistivity structures are continuously detected in the direction of the fault moving during the earthquake period. The underground radar measurement results suggest accumulated displacement of strata at a depth of around 25m in the Osaka Strata and flexible structures. At the Hirabayashi area, the underground radar analysis detects discrete sections in the reflection planes at the fault position, but no reflection planes of high continuity. At the Nashinomoto area, the clay stratum detected in the fault by excavating the trenches are found to be low in resistivity by the resistivity measurement. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. RADAP II, an interim radar data processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, D. R.; Nilsen, J. D.; Saffle, R. E.; Holmes, D. W.; Hudlow, M. D.; Ahnert, P. R.

    The RADAP (radar data processor) II system, which is developed by the National Weather Service and is a follow-up of the D/RADEX (Digitized Radar Experiment) is described. RADAP maintains the present automatic digital processing capabilities at the D/RADEX sites and extends these capabilities to include 10 network sites in order to fulfill the digital radar data requirements during the period before the production of the Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) systems. Consideration is given to the current and future users of the RADAP II data, to the system capability, operational requirements, and hardware; to the installation schedule, and to the products of RADAP II. RADAP II is used for the continued development and testing of applications software to provide feedback on the operational usefulness of the software which is critical to the successful design and development of the NEXRAD system.

  1. SMAP RADAR Processing and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Kwoun, O.; Chaubell, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission uses L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Model sensitivities translate the soil moisture accuracy to a radar backscatter accuracy of 1 dB at 3 km resolution and a brightness temperature accuracy of 1.3 K at 40 km resolution. This presentation will describe the level 1 radar processing and calibration challenges and the choices made so far for the algorithms and software implementation. To obtain the desired high spatial resolution the level 1 radar ground processor employs synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging techniques. Part of the challenge of the SMAP data processing comes from doing SAR imaging on a conically scanned system with rapidly varying squint angles. The radar echo energy will be divided into range/Doppler bins using time domain processing algorithms that can easily follow the varying squint angle. For SMAP, projected range resolution is about 250 meters, while azimuth resolution varies from 400 meters to 1.2 km. Radiometric calibration of the SMAP radar means measuring, characterizing, and where necessary correcting the gain and noise contributions from every part of the system from the antenna radiation pattern all the way to the ground processing algorithms. The SMAP antenna pattern will be computed using an accurate antenna model, and then validated post-launch using homogeneous external targets such as the Amazon rain forest to look for uncorrected gain variation. Noise subtraction is applied after image processing using measurements from a noise only channel. Variations of the internal electronics are tracked by a loopback measurement which will capture most of the time and temperature variations of the transmit power and receiver gain. Long-term variations of system performance due to component aging will be tracked and corrected using stable external reference

  2. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  3. Weather Radar Impact Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent an inventory of the national impacts of wind turbine interference with NEXRAD radar stations. This inventory was developed by the NOAA Radar...

  4. Efficacy of GPS cluster analysis for predicting carnivory sites of a wide-ranging omnivore: the American black bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindschuh, Sarah R.; Cain, James W.; Daniel, David; Peyton, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to describe and quantify predation by large carnivores expanded considerably with the advent of GPS technology. Analyzing clusters of GPS locations formed by carnivores facilitates the detection of predation events by identifying characteristics which distinguish predation sites. We present a performance assessment of GPS cluster analysis as applied to the predation and scavenging of an omnivore, the American black bear (Ursus americanus), on ungulate prey and carrion. Through field investigations of 6854 GPS locations from 24 individual bears, we identified 54 sites where black bears formed a cluster of locations while predating or scavenging elk (Cervus elaphus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), or cattle (Bos spp.). We developed models for three data sets to predict whether a GPS cluster was formed at a carnivory site vs. a non-carnivory site (e.g., bed sites or non-ungulate foraging sites). Two full-season data sets contained GPS locations logged at either 3-h or 30-min intervals from April to November, and a third data set contained 30-min interval data from April through July corresponding to the calving period for elk. Longer fix intervals resulted in the detection of fewer carnivory sites. Clusters were more likely to be carnivory sites if they occurred in open or edge habitats, if they occurred in the early season, if the mean distance between all pairs of GPS locations within the cluster was less, and if the cluster endured for a longer period of time. Clusters were less likely to be carnivory sites if they were initiated in the morning or night compared to the day. The top models for each data set performed well and successfully predicted 71–96% of field-verified carnivory events, 55–75% of non–carnivory events, and 58–76% of clusters overall. Refinement of this method will benefit from further application across species and ecological systems.

  5. Long-range tropospheric transport of uranium and plutonium weapons fallout from Semipalatinsk nuclear test site to Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Cato Christian; Fifield, L Keith; Oughton, Deborah H; Lind, Ole Christian; Skipperud, Lindis; Bartnicki, Jerzy; Tims, Stephen G; Høibråten, Steinar; Salbu, Brit

    2013-09-01

    A combination of state-of-the-art isotopic fingerprinting techniques and atmospheric transport modelling using real-time historical meteorological data has been used to demonstrate direct tropospheric transport of radioactive debris from specific nuclear detonations at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan to Norway via large areas of Europe. A selection of archived air filters collected at ground level at 9 stations in Norway during the most intensive atmospheric nuclear weapon testing periods (1957-1958 and 1961-1962) has been screened for radioactive particles and analysed with respect to the concentrations and atom ratios of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Digital autoradiography screening demonstrated the presence of radioactive particles in the filters. Concentrations of (236)U (0.17-23nBqm(-3)) and (239+240)Pu (1.3-782μBqm(-3)) as well as the atom ratios (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.237) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.7) varied widely indicating several different sources. Filter samples from autumn and winter tended to have lower atom ratios than those sampled in spring and summer, and this likely reflects a tropospheric influence in months with little stratospheric fallout. Very high (236)U, (239+240)Pu and gross beta activity concentrations as well as low (240)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0517-0.077), (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.00025-0.00062) and (236)U/(239)Pu (0.0188-0.046) atom ratios, characteristic of close-in and tropospheric fallout, were observed in filters collected at all stations in Nov 1962, 7-12days after three low-yield detonations at Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan). Atmospheric transport modelling (NOAA HYSPLIT_4) using real-time meteorological data confirmed that long range transport of radionuclides, and possibly radioactive particles, from Semipalatinsk to Norway during this period was plausible. The present work shows that direct tropospheric transport of fallout from atmospheric nuclear detonations periodically may have

  6. Range doppler dynamic range considerations for dechirp on receive radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Witt, JJ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available [1 + epsilon1(t−∆t) + κ(t−∆t)] (14) where epsilon1(t) denotes the amplitude error function introduced by the signal path shared by both signals, while κ(t) denotes the error affecting only the transmitted signal. As suggested in [3], we may once again write...-B). II. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF DECHIRP PROCESSING We start by writing the expression for the LFM LO signal as sLO(t) = A1 cos[ω1t+ a/2t 2] (1) where A1 denotes the amplitude, ω1 the centre frequency in rad/s and a the chriprate in rad/s2. We model...

  7. Radar: Human Safety Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  8. Software Radar Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Jun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the definition and the key features of Software Radar, which is a new concept, are proposed and discussed. We consider the development of modern radar system technology to be divided into three stages: Digital Radar, Software radar and Intelligent Radar, and the second stage is just commencing now. A Software Radar system should be a combination of various modern digital modular components conformed to certain software and hardware standards. Moreover, a software radar system with an open system architecture supporting to decouple application software and low level hardware would be easy to adopt "user requirements-oriented" developing methodology instead of traditional "specific function-oriented" developing methodology. Compared with traditional Digital Radar, Software Radar system can be easily reconfigured and scaled up or down to adapt to the changes of requirements and technologies. A demonstration Software Radar signal processing system, RadarLab 2.0, which has been developed by Tsinghua University, is introduced in this paper and the suggestions for the future development of Software Radar in China are also given in the conclusion.

  9. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR)

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, A. R.; P. G. Brown; Jones, J.; Ellis, K.J.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The radar system described here (CMOR) comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction) of the meteo...

  10. Accuracy aspects of stereo side-looking radar. [analysis of its visual perception and binocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberl, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The geometry of the radar stereo model and factors affecting visual radar stereo perception are reviewed. Limits to the vertical exaggeration factor of stereo radar are defined. Radar stereo model accuracies are analyzed with respect to coordinate errors caused by errors of radar sensor position and of range, and with respect to errors of coordinate differences, i.e., cross-track distances and height differences.

  11. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  13. TRMM Ground Validation Radar Site Rain Type Totals Map L3 1 month 2 km V7 (TRMM_3A54) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The 3A54 product, 'Site Rainfall Map', is a map of monthly surface rain totals derived from the instantaneous rain rate maps (2A53). The map is in Cartesian...

  14. Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar for locating buried petrified wood sites: a case study in the natural monument of the Petrified Forest of Evros, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargemezis, George; Diamanti, Nectaria; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Fikos, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    A geophysical survey was carried out in the Petrified Forest of Evros, the northernmost regional unit of Greece. This collection of petrified wood has an age of approximately 35 million years and it is the oldest in Greece (i.e., older than the well-known Petrified Forest of Lesvos island located in the North Aegean Sea and which is possibly the largest of the petrified forests worldwide). Protection, development and maintenance projects still need to be carried out at the area despite all fears regarding the forest's fate since many petrified logs remain exposed both in weather conditions - leading to erosion - and to the public. This survey was conducted as part of a more extensive framework regarding the development and protection of this natural monument. Geophysical surveying has been chosen as a non-destructive investigation method since the area of application is both a natural ecosystem and part of cultural heritage. Along with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have been carried out for investigating possible locations of buried fossilized tree trunks. The geoelectrical sections derived from ERT data in combination with the GPR profiles provided a broad view of the subsurface. Two and three dimensional subsurface geophysical images of the surveyed area have been constructed, pointing out probable locations of petrified logs. Regarding ERT, petrified trunks have been detected as high resistive bodies, while lower resistivity values were more related to the surrounding geological materials. GPR surveying has also indicated buried petrified log locations. As these two geophysical methods are affected in different ways by the subsurface conditions, the combined use of both techniques enhanced our ability to produce more reliable interpretations of the subsurface. After the completion of the geophysical investigations of this first stage, petrified trunks were revealed after a subsequent excavation at indicated

  15. A New Empirical Model for Radar Scattering from Bare Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Baghdadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a new semi-empirical radar backscattering model for bare soil surfaces based on the Dubois model. A wide dataset of backscattering coefficients extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images and in situ soil surface parameter measurements (moisture content and roughness is used. The retrieval of soil parameters from SAR images remains challenging because the available backscattering models have limited performances. Existing models, physical, semi-empirical, or empirical, do not allow for a reliable estimate of soil surface geophysical parameters for all surface conditions. The proposed model, developed in HH, HV, and VV polarizations, uses a formulation of radar signals based on physical principles that are validated in numerous studies. Never before has a backscattering model been built and validated on such an important dataset as the one proposed in this study. It contains a wide range of incidence angles (18°–57° and radar wavelengths (L, C, X, well distributed, geographically, for regions with different climate conditions (humid, semi-arid, and arid sites, and involving many SAR sensors. The results show that the new model shows a very good performance for different radar wavelengths (L, C, X, incidence angles, and polarizations (RMSE of about 2 dB. This model is easy to invert and could provide a way to improve the retrieval of soil parameters.

  16. Over-the-horizon backscatter radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes a recently constructed over-the-horizon backscatter (OTH-B) radar system covering as many as 4,800,000 sq nautical miles over a distance of 1800 nautical miles. This HF system operates at frequencies from 5 to 28 MHz. The radar's 3630-ft-long transmitting antenna is divided into six subarrays to accommodate different operating frequencies. Three sets of these arrays are located at the east coast radar system transmit site near Moscow, Maine. The transmitter is powered by 12 10-kW tubes per sector, emitting 360 kW of radiated RF power. The signal processing software correlates the receiver radar track data with flight patterns of unknown aircraft and flight plans of friendly aircraft; twenty-nine computers perform the signal analysis and processing function of the receiver.

  17. The use of the long-range alpha detector (LRAD) for alpha emission surveys at active and inactive firing sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, C.F.V.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Garner, S.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Walter, K.J. [Brown and Root Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Surveys were carried out at five different firing sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure residual alpha emissions in earth contaminated with natural and depleted uranium. This contamination is caused by controlled experimental explosions during testing of the non fissile components of nuclear weapons. Two conclusions were reached: the first is that post shot clearing of the experimental areas is effective at removing contamination and the second is that the diminution of alpha emissions due to aging is small.

  18. Embedded ultrasonic sensors for automotive radar

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, T.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers at Fraunhofer Institute IZM, Germany, had developed embedded ultrasonic sensors for automotive radar with potential for wider applications. The researchers realized that the costs of developing such technology were reduced significantly by using a novel method. The lower-cost long-range automotive radar was also expected to provide significant benefits, along with protecting the driver and passengers in a vehicle traveling at high speeds. The Fraunhofer Institute played such a key...

  19. Distributed radar sensors for aircraft detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavan, G. H.

    1991-04-01

    Radars suitable for aircraft detection could be deployed on singlet space-based interceptor (SBI) platforms. They could operate at short ranges and still achieve useful search rates. Powers are modest and insensitive to frequency; the dominant costs are the pulsers and phased-array elements. A fundamental simplification results from mounting the radar on the life jacket rather than the SBI. Many satellites could be processed to derive aircraft trajectories sufficiently accurate for the commitment of fighters or defensive missiles.

  20. Comparative effects of urea fertilizer and red alder in a site III, coast Douglas-fir plantation in the Washington Cascade Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Miller; Harry W. Anderson; Marshall Murray; Rick. Leon

    2005-01-01

    Five randomly assigned treatments were used to quantify effects of adding varying numbers of red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) or nitrogen (N) fertilization on growth of a 10-year-old conifer plantation at a medium quality site in the western Washington Cascade Range. Zero, 20, 40, and 80 alder trees per acre were retained along with about 300 conifers...

  1. Antenna Pattern Measurements for Oceanographic Radars Using Small Aerial Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, L.; Romero, E.; Johnson, C.; Emery, B.; Gotschalk, C.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a method employing small, quadrotor drone aircraft for antenna pattern measurements (APMs) of high-frequency (HF) oceanographic radars used for observing ocean surface currents. During APMs, the drones carry small radio signal sources in circular arcs centered on receive antenna arrays at HF radar sites, similarly to conventional boat-based APMs. Previous studies have shown that accurate surface current measurements using HF radar require APMs. In the absence of APMs so-called "ideal" antenna patterns are assumed and these can differ substantially from measured patterns. Typically APMs are obtained using small research vessels, an expensive procedure requiring sea-going technicians, a vessel, and other equipment necessary to support small boat operations. Adverse sea conditions and obstacles in the water can limit the ability of small vessels to conduct APMs. In contrast, drones can successfully conduct APMs at much lower cost and in a broader range of sea states with comparable accuracy. Drone-based patterns can extend farther shoreward since they are not affected by the surf zone and thereby expand the range of bearings over which APMs are conducted. We describe recent progress in the use of drones for APMs including: (1) evaluation of the accuracy APM flight trajectories; (2) estimates of radial velocity components due to deviation of flight paths from circular arcs; and (3) the effects of altitude with respect to ground wave versus direct signal propagation. Use of drones simplifies APMs and it is hoped that this will lead to more frequent APMs and improved surface current measurements from HF radar networks.

  2. Application of MIMO Techniques in sky-surface wave hybrid networking sea-state radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Wu, X.; Yue, X.; Liu, J.; Li, C.

    2016-12-01

    The sky-surface wave hybrid networking sea-state radar system contains of the sky wave transmission stations at different sites and several surface wave radar stations. The subject comes from the national 863 High-tech Project of China. The hybrid sky-surface wave system and the HF surface wave system work simultaneously and the HF surface wave radar (HFSWR) can work in multi-static and surface-wave networking mode. Compared with the single mode radar system, this system has advantages of better detection performance at the far ranges in ocean dynamics parameters inversion. We have applied multiple-input multiple-output(MIMO) techniques in this sea-state radar system. Based on the multiple channel and non-causal transmit beam-forming techniques, the MIMO radar architecture can reduce the size of the receiving antennas and simplify antenna installation. Besides, by efficiently utilizing the system's available degrees of freedom, it can provide a feasible approach for mitigating multipath effect and Doppler-spread clutter in Over-the-horizon Radar. In this radar, slow-time phase-coded MIMO method is used. The transmitting waveforms are phase-coded in slow-time so as to be orthogonal after Doppler processing at the receiver. So the MIMO method can be easily implemented without the need to modify the receiver hardware. After the radar system design, the MIMO experiments of this system have been completed by Wuhan University during 2015 and 2016. The experiment used Wuhan multi-channel ionospheric sounding system(WMISS) as sky-wave transmitting source and three dual-frequency HFSWR developed by the Oceanography Laboratory of Wuhan University. The transmitter system located at Chongyang with five element linear equi-spaced antenna array and Wuhan with one log-periodic antenna. The RF signals are generated by synchronized, but independent digital waveform generators - providing complete flexibility in element phase and amplitude control, and waveform type and parameters

  3. Human motion estimation with multiple frequency modulated continuous wave radars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, P.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Human motion estimation is an important issue in automotive, security or home automation applications. Radar systems are well suited for this because they are robust, are independent of day or night conditions and have accurate range and speed domain. The human response in a radar range-speed-time

  4. Using Shadows to Detect Targets In Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    2.2.2 SAR Range and Cross Range Resolutions. The Projection-Slice Theo - rem provides a basis for discussing image resolution in SAR. If the radar...Radar: A Signal Processing Approach. Kluwer Academic Publishers Norwell, MA, USA, 1996. 12. Kersten, P.R., R.W. Jansen , K. Luc, and T.L. Ainsworth

  5. Survey of Ultra-wideband Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokole, Eric L.; Hansen, Pete

    The development of UWB radar over the last four decades is very briefly summarized. A discussion of the meaning of UWB is followed by a short history of UWB radar developments and discussions of key supporting technologies and current UWB radars. Selected UWB radars and the associated applications are highlighted. Applications include detecting and imaging buried mines, detecting and mapping underground utilities, detecting and imaging objects obscured by foliage, through-wall detection in urban areas, short-range detection of suicide bombs, and the characterization of the impulse responses of various artificial and naturally occurring scattering objects. In particular, the Naval Research Laboratory's experimental, low-power, dual-polarized, short-pulse, ultra-high resolution radar is used to discuss applications and issues of UWB radar. Some crucial issues that are problematic to UWB radar are spectral availability, electromagnetic interference and compatibility, difficulties with waveform control/shaping, hardware limitations in the transmission chain, and the unreliability of high-power sources for sustained use above 2 GHz.

  6. Using phase for radar scatterer classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda J.; Rigling, Brian D.; Penno, Robert P.; Zelnio, Edmund G.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems tend to discard phase information of formed complex radar imagery prior to automatic target recognition (ATR). This practice has historically been driven by available hardware storage, processing capabilities, and data link capacity. Recent advances in high performance computing (HPC) have enabled extremely dense storage and processing solutions. Therefore, previous motives for discarding radar phase information in ATR applications have been mitigated. First, we characterize the value of phase in one-dimensional (1-D) radar range profiles with respect to the ability to correctly estimate target features, which are currently employed in ATR algorithms for target discrimination. These features correspond to physical characteristics of targets through radio frequency (RF) scattering phenomenology. Physics-based electromagnetic scattering models developed from the geometrical theory of diffraction are utilized for the information analysis presented here. Information is quantified by the error of target parameter estimates from noisy radar signals when phase is either retained or discarded. Operating conditions (OCs) of signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) and bandwidth are considered. Second, we investigate the value of phase in 1-D radar returns with respect to the ability to correctly classify canonical targets. Classification performance is evaluated via logistic regression for three targets (sphere, plate, tophat). Phase information is demonstrated to improve radar target classification rates, particularly at low SNRs and low bandwidths.

  7. Rapid Visual Site Analysis for Post-disaster Landscape Planning: Expanding the Range of Choice in a Tsunami-affected Town in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wescoat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement In post-disaster situations, it is often necessary to undertake rapid visual site reconnaissance to characterise patterns of damage and identify reconstruction opportunities and constraints. Rapid visual site analysis can occur over a period of hours to days rather than weeks to months. The time constraint is often necessary to assess the viability of initial reconstruction scenarios and help broaden the range of choice among site planning options. Rapid assessment can also minimise the use of scarce local post-disaster resources during the initial reconnaissance phases of planning. Because it involves visual methods rather than equipment-intensive survey techniques, it serves as an initial scoping of alternatives. It may follow emergency shelter response planning methods (for example, Sphere Project, 2011, ch 4 and be followed by more comprehensive site mapping and screening. This action–research project reviews the literature on post-disaster site analysis with an emphasis on the tsunami-affected area of north-eastern Japan. Because research on rapid visual site analysis in post-disaster contexts is limited, we combined field-based site analysis methods, adapted for post-disaster planning, with visual methods for assessing seismic and tsunami hazards.

  8. Leaf hydraulic vulnerability to drought is linked to site water availability across a broad range of species and climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Aims: Vulnerability of the leaf hydraulic pathway to water-stress-induced dysfunction is a key component of drought tolerance in plants and may be important in defining species’ climatic range. However, the generality of the association between leaf hydraulic vulnerability and climate...

  9. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site; 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of

  10. Phased-array radar design application of radar fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Phased-Array Radar Design is a text-reference designed for electrical engineering graduate students in colleges and universities as well as for corporate in-house training programs for radar design engineers, especially systems engineers and analysts who would like to gain hands-on, practical knowledge and skills in radar design fundamentals, advanced radar concepts, trade-offs for radar design and radar performance analysis.

  11. Subtle changes in the active site architecture untangled overlapping substrate ranges and mechanistic differences of two reductive dehalogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Cindy; Diekert, Gabriele; Schubert, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Reductive dehalogenases (RDases) of organohalide-respiring bacteria are cobamide-containing iron-sulfur proteins that catalyze different reductive dehalogenation reactions. Here, we report a functional analysis of two recombinant RDases, the tetrachloroethene (PCE) reductive dehalogenase (PceA) of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51 and the 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) reductive dehalogenase (DcaA) of Desulfitobacterium dichloroeliminans DCA1. Both enzymes share 88% protein sequence identity, but appeared to have divergent mechanisms. In this study, the heterologously produced DcaA converted 1,2-DCA and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) via dihaloelimination to ethene and vinyl chloride, respectively. In addition, halogen substitution at PCE, trichloroethene (TCE) and tribromoethene (TBE) was observed, but only at low rates. In contrast, recombinant PceA exclusively converted halogenated ethenes and showed no dihaloelimination activity. In silico structural analysis of both RDases revealed similar architectures of their active site cavities. Exchange of the highly conserved Tyr298 to Phe led to a complete loss of the PCE, TCE and TBE conversion by both RDases, strengthening the assumption that Tyr298 functions as proton donor in the course of halogen substitution. The exchange did not affect the ability of DcaA to convert 1,2-DCA and 1,1,2-TCA. This result makes the involvement of a proton transfer in the dihaloelimination reaction unlikely and allows for a clear differentiation between two mechanisms working in DcaA and PceA. The analysis of the role of the active site structure for RDase function was extended to the mutations W118F that had a negative effect on DcaA function and W432F or T294V that caused alterations in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase (EC 1.21.99.5), DCA -RDase. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Comparing helicopter-borne profiling radar with airborne laser scanner data for forest structure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Chen, Yuwei; Karjalainen, Mika; Hakala, Teemu; Hyyppä, Juha; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Forests are complex ecosystems that show substantial variation with respect to climate, management regime, stand history, disturbance, and needs of local communities. The dynamic processes of growth and disturbance are reflected in the structural components of forests that include the canopy vertical structure and geometry (e.g. size, height, and form), tree position and species diversity. Current remote-sensing systems to measure forest structural attributes include passive optical sensors and active sensors. The technological capabilities of active remote sensing like the ability to penetrate the vegetation and provide information about its vertical structure has promoted an extensive use of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system over the last 20 years. LiDAR measurements from aircraft (airborne laser scanning, ALS) currently represents the primary data source for three-dimensional information on forest vertical structure. Contrary, despite the potential of radar remote sensing, their use is not yet established in forest monitoring. In order to better understand the interaction of pulsed radar with the forest canopy, and to increase the feasibility of this system, the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute has developed a helicopter-borne profiling radar system, called TomoRadar. TomoRadar is capable of recording a canopy-penetrating profile of forests. To georeference the radar measurements the system was equipped with a global navigation satellite system and an inertial measurement unit with a centimeter level accuracy of the flight trajectory. The TomoRadar operates at Ku-band, (wave lengths λ 1.5cm) with two separated parabolic antennas providing co- and cross-polarization modes. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability of the TomoRadar system, for estimating the forest vertical profile, terrain topography and tree height. We analysed 600 m TomoRadar crosspolarized (i.e. horizontal - vertical

  13. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  14. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  15. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  16. Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

  17. Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radar Plan Position Indicator Scope is the collection of weather radar imagery for the period prior to the beginning of the Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system...

  18. Investigating nearby exoplanets via interstellar radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar radar is a potential intermediate step between passive observation of exoplanets and interstellar exploratory missions. Compared with passive observation, it has the traditional advantages of radar astronomy. It can measure surface characteristics, determine spin rates and axes, provide extremely accurate ranges, construct maps of planets, distinguish liquid from solid surfaces, find rings and moons, and penetrate clouds. It can do this even for planets close to the parent star. Compared with interstellar travel or probes, it also offers significant advantages. The technology required to build such a radar already exists, radar can return results within a human lifetime, and a single facility can investigate thousands of planetary systems. The cost, although too high for current implementation, is within the reach of Earth's economy.

  19. Combined radar and telemetry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  20. Radar efficiency and the calculation of decade-long PMSE backscatter cross-section for the Resolute Bay VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Swarnalingam

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Resolute Bay VHF radar, located in Nunavut, Canada (75.0° N, 95.0° W and operating at 51.5 MHz, has been used to investigate Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE since 1997. PMSE are a unique form of strong coherent radar echoes, and their understanding has been a challenge to the scientific community since their discovery more than three decades ago. While other high latitude radars have recorded strong levels of PMSE activities, the Resolute Bay radar has observed relatively lower levels of PMSE strengths. In order to derive absolute measurements of PMSE strength at this site, a technique is developed to determine the radar efficiency using cosmic (sky noise variations along with the help of a calibrated noise source. VHF radars are only rarely calibrated, but determination of efficiency is even less common. Here we emphasize the importance of efficiency for determination of cross-section measurements. The significant advantage of this method is that it can be directly applied to any MST radar system anywhere in the world as long as the sky noise variations are known. The radar efficiencies for two on-site radars at Resolute Bay are determined. PMSE backscatter cross-section is estimated, and decade-long PMSE strength variations at this location are investigated. It was noticed that the median of the backscatter cross-section distribution remains relatively unchanged, but over the years a great level of variability occurs in the high power tail of the distribution.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, Rock-Mechanics Drift, U12g Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, J.R.; Mansker, W.L.; Hicks, R.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Keil, K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    G-Tunnel at Nevada Test Site (NTS) is the site of thermal and thermomechanical experiments examining the feasibility of emplacing heat-producing nuclear wastes in silicic tuffs. This report describes the general stratigraphy, mineralogy, and bulk chemistry of welded portions of the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, the unit in which most of these experiments will be performed. The geologic characteristics of the Grouse Canyon Member are compared with those of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, presently the preferred horizon for an actual waste repository at Yucca Mountain, near the southwest boundary of Nevada Test Site. This comparison suggests that test results obtained in welded tuff from G-Tunnel are applicable, with limitations, to evaluation of the Topopah Spring Member at Yucca Mountain.

  2. [Biometric ranging of the corpses destroyed at the site of a catastrophe in terms of gender, longitudinal and circumferencial dimensions, and the degree of subcutaneous fat distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Galitskaia, O I; Negasheva, M A

    2012-01-01

    The quantitative criteria for biometric ranging of destroyed corpses in terms of anatomical localization, gender, longitudinal length, trunk circumference, and the folds of subcutaneous fat are proposed. The wealth of anthropometric materials obtained in the studies of various Caucasoid populations was used to calculate the normative tables for biometric ranging of the decomposed corpses. The proposed technology excludes the subjective assessments for the purpose of such classification at the sites of catastrophes. Moreover, it promotes the accumulation of the variety of valuable information, such as the size of the collar, headwear, and footwear, clothing size and height, and portrait features, that can be used for victim identification.

  3. NKS NordRisk. Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A. (Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Lauritzen, Bent; Mikkelsen, Torben (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    Within the NKS NordRisk project, 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe', the NKS NordRisk Atlas has been developed. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected nuclear risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere. A number of case studies of long-term long-range atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides has been developed, based on two years of meteorological data. Radionuclide concentrations in air and radionuclide depositions have been evaluated and examples of long-term averages of the dispersion and deposition and of the variability around these mean values are provided. (au)

  4. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly...... transposons inserted in the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, This strategy permits the stable inheritance of heterologous DNA segments virtually devoid of the sequences used initially to select their insertion....

  5. wradlib - An Open Source Library for Weather Radar Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistermann, M.; Pfaff, Th.; Jacobi, S.

    2012-04-01

    Weather radar data is potentially useful in meteorology, hydrology, disaster prevention and mitigation. Its ability to provide information on precipitation with high spatial and temporal resolution over large areas makes it an invaluable tool for short term weather forecasting or flash flood forecasting. The indirect method of measuring the precipitation field, however, leads to a significant number of data artifacts, which usually must be removed or dealt with before the data can be used with acceptable quality. Data processing requires e.g. the transformation of measurements from polar to cartesian coordinates and from reflectivity to rainfall intensity, the composition of data from several radar sites in a common grid, clutter identification and removal, attenuation and VPR corrections, gauge adjustment and visualization. The complexity of these processing steps is a major obstacle for many potential users in science and practice. Adequate tools are available either only at significant costs with no access to the uncerlying source code, or they are incomplete, insufficiently documented and intransparent. The wradlib project has been initiated in order to lower the barrier for potential users of weather radar data in the geosciences and to provide a common platform for research on new algorithms. wradlib is an open source library for the full range of weather radar related processing algorithms, which is well documented and easy to use. The main parts of the library are currently implemented in the python programming language. Python is well known both for its ease of use as well as its ability to integrate code written in other programming languages like Fortran or C/C++. The well established Numpy and Scipy packages are used to provide decent performance for pure Python implementations of algorithms. We welcome contributions written in any computer language and will try to make them accessible from Python. We would like to present the current state of this

  6. Fusion of range-based data and image-based datasets for efficient documentation of cultural heritage objects and sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, J. L.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays it is possible to measure accurately dense point clouds either with aerial/terrestrial laser scanning systems or with imagebased solutions (namely based on photogrammetric computer vision algorithms such as structure-from-motion (SfM)), from which highly detailed 3D models can be achieved. Besides, direct tools in the form of simple devices such as rulers, compass and plumblines are usually required in simple metric surveys, as well as high-end surveying and geodetic instruments such as robotized imagebased total stations and GNSS (probably to a lesser degree but still required) to set the archaeological/architectural recording project in a global reference frame. With all this gamut of image-based and range-based sensors and datasets (in the form of coordinates, point clouds or 3D models), in different coordinate systems (most of the times local for each device), lack of uniform scale, orientation and levelling, the fusion of data tends to be cumbersome. This paper presents an efficient way to fuse and merge different datasets in the form of point clouds/3D models and geodetic/UTM coordinates. The new developed 3DVEM - Register GEO software is able to handle datasets coming from both direct and indirect methods in order to provide unified and precise deliverables.

  7. Synergetic use of millimeter- and centimeter-wavelength radars for retrievals of cloud and rainfall parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Matrosov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A remote sensing approach for simultaneous retrievals of cloud and rainfall parameters in the vertical column above the US Department of Energy's (DOE Climate Research Facility at the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP Darwin site in Australia is described. This approach uses vertically pointing measurements from a DOE Ka-band radar and scanning measurements from a nearby C-band radar pointing toward the TWP Darwin site. Rainfall retrieval constraints are provided by data from a surface impact disdrometer. The approach is applicable to stratiform precipitating cloud systems when a separation between the liquid hydrometeor layer, which contains rainfall and liquid water clouds, and the ice hydrometeor layer is provided by the radar bright band. Absolute C-band reflectivities and Ka-band vertical reflectivity gradients in the liquid layer are used for retrievals of the mean layer rain rate and cloud liquid water path (CLWP. C-band radar reflectivities are also used to estimate ice water path (IWP in regions above the melting layer. The retrieval uncertainties of CLWP and IWP for typical stratiform precipitation systems are about 500–800 g m−2 (for CLWP and a factor of 2 (for IWP. The CLWP retrieval uncertainties increase with rain rate, so retrievals for higher rain rates may be impractical. The expected uncertainties of layer mean rain rate retrievals are around 20%, which, in part, is due to constraints available from the disdrometer data. The applicability of the suggested approach is illustrated for two characteristic events observed at the TWP Darwin site during the wet season of 2007. A future deployment of W-band radars at the DOE tropical Climate Research Facilities can improve CLWP estimation accuracies and provide retrievals for a wider range of stratiform precipitating cloud events.

  8. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  9. Aspects of Radar Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lüneburg, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    This contribution is a tutorial introduction to the phenomenological theory of radar polarimetry for the coherent scatter case emphasizing monostatic backscattering and forward scattering (transmission). Characteristic similarities and differences between radar polarimetry and optical polarimetry and the role of linear and antilinear operators (time-reversal) are pointed out and typical polarimetric invariants are identified.

  10. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  11. Decoders for MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  12. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  13. Radar based autonomous sensor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Most surveillance systems combine camera sensors with other detection sensors that trigger an alert to a human operator when an object is detected. The detection sensors typically require careful installation and configuration for each application and there is a significant burden on the operator to react to each alert by viewing camera video feeds. A demonstration system known as Sensing for Asset Protection with Integrated Electronic Networked Technology (SAPIENT) has been developed to address these issues using Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASM) and a central High Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that can fuse the detections from multiple sensors. This paper describes the 24 GHz radar based ASM, which provides an all-weather, low power and license exempt solution to the problem of wide area surveillance. The radar module autonomously configures itself in response to tasks provided by the HLDMM, steering the transmit beam and setting range resolution and power levels for optimum performance. The results show the detection and classification performance for pedestrians and vehicles in an area of interest, which can be modified by the HLDMM without physical adjustment. The module uses range-Doppler processing for reliable detection of moving objects and combines Radar Cross Section and micro-Doppler characteristics for object classification. Objects are classified as pedestrian or vehicle, with vehicle sub classes based on size. Detections are reported only if the object is detected in a task coverage area and it is classified as an object of interest. The system was shown in a perimeter protection scenario using multiple radar ASMs, laser scanners, thermal cameras and visible band cameras. This combination of sensors enabled the HLDMM to generate reliable alerts with improved discrimination of objects and behaviours of interest.

  14. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  15. Principles of modern radar radar applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scheer, James A

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Modern Radar: Radar Applications is the third of the three-volume seriesof what was originally designed to be accomplished in one volume. As the final volumeof the set, it finishes the original vision of a complete yet bounded reference for radartechnology. This volume describes fifteen different system applications or class ofapplications in more detail than can be found in Volumes I or II.As different as the applications described, there is a difference in how these topicsare treated by the authors. Whereas in Volumes I and II there is strict adherence tochapter format and leve

  16. A Study of MMW Collision Avoidance Radar System for Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hai-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Collision avoidance radar for trains is pregnant for safety transportation. In order to realize low cost and high performance of azimuth accuracy, we have developed MMW (Milli-Meter Wave radar, which employs switched phased array and frequency stepped technology. This paper analyses the radiation patterns of transmitting/receiving antennas and compensation method for amplitude/phase errors of synthetic wideband frequency stepped signal. To confirm the operation of the radar, low cost millimeter-wave collision avoidance radar was fabricated. Lots of experiments confirmed a high azimuth and range resolution.

  17. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  18. EISCAT_3D: the European three-dimensional imaging radar for atmospheric and geospace research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, Thomas; Aikio, Anita; McCrea, Ian; Turunen, Esa

    The EISCAT Scientific Association operates three incoherent scatter radars in Tromsø (Norway) and on Svalbard. The UHF radar, which operates at 930 MHz, is the only tristatic incoherent scatter radar in the world. The transmitter is located in Tromsø and additional receiver sites are in Kiruna (Sweden) and Sodankylü (Finland). However, due to interferences with mobile a communication, tristatic operation will come to an end in due time. In the future, EISCAT will build the next generation incoherent scatter radar, which will provide comprehensive 3D monitoring of the atmosphere and ionosphere above Northern Fenno-Scandinavia. The EISCAT 3D radar system will consist of multiple phased arrays, using the latest digital signal processing to achieve ten times higher temporal and spatial resolution than the present radars. The European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) selected EISCAT 3D for the Roadmap 2008 for Large-Scale European Research Infrastructures for the next 20-30 years. The facility will be constructed as a modular system by 2015. EISCAT 3D will be a volumetric radar capable of imaging an extended spatial area with simul-taneous full-vector drift velocities, having continuous operation modes, short baseline interfer-ometry capability for imaging sub-beamwidth scales, real-time data access for applications and extensive data archiving facilities. The design of the antenna arrays will be modular at different scales allowing for mass-production of the components. Some arrays will be very large, in the scale of 32,000 individual antenna elements. The receiver arrays will be located at 50-150 km distance from the illuminators, and some smaller arrays closer by to support continuous interferometric observations. The total system will comprise 100,000 elements. The actual radar sites have to be carefully chosen. This new large-scale European research infrastructure has applications in a wide range of Eu-ropean research areas including Earth

  19. Plans for the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope and Potential Coordinated Measurements with Kwajalein Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Gene; Kervin, Paul; Mulrooney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Orbital Debris Program Office is teaming with the US Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) Maui Optical Site to deploy a moderate field-of-view, 1.3 m aperture, optical telescope for orbital debris applications. The telescope will be located on the island of Legan in the Kwajalein Atoll and is scheduled for completion in the Spring of 2011. The telescope is intended to sample both low inclination/high eccentricity orbits and near geosynchronous orbits. The telescope will have a 1 deg diagonal field-of-view on a 4K x 4K CCD. The telescope is expected to be able to detect 10-cm diameter debris at geosynchronous altitudes (5 sec exposure assuming a spherical specular phase function w/ albedo =0.13). Once operational, the telescope has the potential of conducting simultaneous observations with radars operated by the US Army at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) and located on the island of Roi-Namur, approximately 55 km to the north of Legan. Four radars, representing 6 frequency bands, are available for use: ALTAIR (ARPA-Long Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar) operating at VHF & UHF, TRADEX (Target Resolution and Discrimination Experiment) operating at L-band and S-band, ALCOR (ARPA-Lincoln C-band Observables Radar) operating at S-band, and MMW (Millimeter Wave) Radar operating at Ka-band. Also potentially available is the X-band GBRP (Ground Based Radar-Prototype located 25 km to the southeast of Legan on the main island of Kwajalein.

  20. Micropower radar systems for law enforcement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Mast, J.; Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    LLNL researchers have pioneered a unique compact low-power and inexpensive radar technology (microradar) that has enormous potential in various industries. Some licenses are currently in place for motion sensors and stud finders. The ultra-wideband characteristics of the microradar (4 to 10 GHz) make it difficult to detect, yet provide potential range resolution of 1 cm at ranges of greater than 20 meters. Real and synthetic apertures arrays of radar elements can address imaging applications behind walls at those distances. Personnel detection applications are currently being tested.

  1. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  2. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  3. SU-E-T-760: Tolerance Design for Site-Specific Range in Proton Patient QA Process Using the Six Sigma Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lah, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show how tolerance design and tolerancing approaches can be used to predict and improve the site-specific range in patient QA process in implementing the Six Sigma. Methods: In this study, patient QA plans were selected according to 6 site-treatment groups: head &neck (94 cases), spine (76 cases), lung (89 cases), liver (53 cases), pancreas (55 cases), and prostate (121 cases), treated between 2007 and 2013. We evaluated a model of the Six Sigma that determines allowable deviations in design parameters and process variables in patient-specific QA, where possible, tolerance may be loosened, then customized if it necessary to meet the functional requirements. A Six Sigma problem-solving methodology is known as DMAIC phases, which are used stand for: Define a problem or improvement opportunity, Measure process performance, Analyze the process to determine the root causes of poor performance, Improve the process by fixing root causes, Control the improved process to hold the gains. Results: The process capability for patient-specific range QA is 0.65 with only ±1 mm of tolerance criteria. Our results suggested the tolerance level of ±2–3 mm for prostate and liver cases and ±5 mm for lung cases. We found that customized tolerance between calculated and measured range reduce that patient QA plan failure and almost all sites had failure rates less than 1%. The average QA time also improved from 2 hr to less than 1 hr for all including planning and converting process, depth-dose measurement and evaluation. Conclusion: The objective of tolerance design is to achieve optimization beyond that obtained through QA process improvement and statistical analysis function detailing to implement a Six Sigma capable design.

  4. Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and Du Site, CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonapah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ITLV

    1998-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roller Coaster. According to field records, a hardened layer of livestock feces ranging from 2.54 centimeters (cm) (1 inch [in.]) to 10.2 cm (4 in.) thick is present in each of the main sheds. IT personnel conducted a field visit on December 3, 1997, and noted that the only visible feces were located within the east shed, the previously fenced area near the east shed, and a small area southwest of the west shed. Other historical records indicate that other areas may still be covered with animal feces, but heavy vegetation now covers it. It is possible that radionuclides are present in this layer, given the history of operations in this area. Chemicals of concern may include plutonium and depleted uranium. Surface soil sampling was conducted on February 18, 1998. An evaluation of historical documentation indicated that plutonium should not be and depleted uranium could not be present at levels significantly above background as the result of test animals being penned at the site. The samples were analyzed for isotopic plutonium using method NAS-NS-3058. The results of the analysis indicated that plutonium levels of the feces and surface soil were not significantly elevated above background.

  5. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-02

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1-2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1–2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. PMID:26507855

  7. Integrating Radar Image Data with Google Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bruce D.; Gibas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A public Web site has been developed as a method for displaying the multitude of radar imagery collected by NASA s Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) instrument during its 16-year mission. Utilizing NASA s internal AIRSAR site, the new Web site features more sophisticated visualization tools that enable the general public to have access to these images. The site was originally maintained at NASA on six computers: one that held the Oracle database, two that took care of the software for the interactive map, and three that were for the Web site itself. Several tasks were involved in moving this complicated setup to just one computer. First, the AIRSAR database was migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Then the back-end of the AIRSAR Web site was updated in order to access the MySQL database. To do this, a few of the scripts needed to be modified; specifically three Perl scripts that query that database. The database connections were then updated from Oracle to MySQL, numerous syntax errors were corrected, and a query was implemented that replaced one of the stored Oracle procedures. Lastly, the interactive map was designed, implemented, and tested so that users could easily browse and access the radar imagery through the Google Maps interface.

  8. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    -based facilities by this transformed planetary radar astronomy, as well as the upgrading of the Arecibo and Goldstone radars. A technical essay appended to this book provides an overview of planetary radar techniques, especially range-Doppler mapping.

  9. MST radar data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastrom, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    One atmospheric variable which can be deduced from stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar data other than wind speed and direction is C sub n sup 2, related to the eddy dissipation rate. The computation of C sub n sup 2 makes use of the transmitted power (average, or peak plus duty cycle), the range of the echoes, and the returned power. The returned power can be calibrated only if a noise source of known strength is imposed; e.g., in the absence of absolute calibration, one can compare the diurnal noise signal with the galactic sky temperature. Thus to compute C sub n sup 2 one needs the transmitter power, the returned signal as a function of height, and the returned noise at an altitude so high that it is not contaminated by any signal. Now C sub n sup 2 relates with the amount of energy within the inertial subrange, and for many research studies it may be desirable to relate this with background flow as well as shears or irregularities on the size of the sample volume. The latter are quantified by the spectral width.

  10. On auroral dynamics observed by HF radar: 1. Equatorward edge of the afternoon-evening diffuse luminosity belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations and modelling are presented which illustrate the ability of the Finland CUTLASS HF radar to monitor the afternoon-evening equatorward auroral boundary during weak geomagnetic activity. The subsequent substorm growth phase development was also observed in the late evening sector as a natural continuation of the preceding auroral oval dynamics. Over an 8 h period the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a narrow (in range and persistent region of auroral F- and (later E-layer echoes which gradually moved equatorward, consistent with the auroral oval diurnal rotation. This echo region corresponds to the subvisual equatorward edge of the diffuse luminosity belt (SEEL and the ionospheric footprint of the inner boundary of the electron plasma sheet. The capability of the Finland CUTLASS radar to monitor the E-layer SEEL-echoes is a consequence of the nearly zero E-layer rectilinear aspect angles in a region 5–10° poleward of the radar site. The F-layer echoes are probably the boundary blob echoes. The UHF EISCAT radar was in operation and observed a similar subvisual auroral arc and an F-layer electron density enhancement when it appeared in its antenna beam.Key words: Ionsophere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  11. On auroral dynamics observed by HF radar: 1. Equatorward edge of the afternoon-evening diffuse luminosity belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    Full Text Available Observations and modelling are presented which illustrate the ability of the Finland CUTLASS HF radar to monitor the afternoon-evening equatorward auroral boundary during weak geomagnetic activity. The subsequent substorm growth phase development was also observed in the late evening sector as a natural continuation of the preceding auroral oval dynamics. Over an 8 h period the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a narrow (in range and persistent region of auroral F- and (later E-layer echoes which gradually moved equatorward, consistent with the auroral oval diurnal rotation. This echo region corresponds to the subvisual equatorward edge of the diffuse luminosity belt (SEEL and the ionospheric footprint of the inner boundary of the electron plasma sheet. The capability of the Finland CUTLASS radar to monitor the E-layer SEEL-echoes is a consequence of the nearly zero E-layer rectilinear aspect angles in a region 5–10° poleward of the radar site. The F-layer echoes are probably the boundary blob echoes. The UHF EISCAT radar was in operation and observed a similar subvisual auroral arc and an F-layer electron density enhancement when it appeared in its antenna beam.

    Key words: Ionsophere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Radar, Gamma Ray Spectrometer, and Cratering Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars: Radar, Gamma Ray Spectrometer, and Cratering Mineralogy" contained the following reports:The Dielectric Properties of Martian Soil Simulant JSC Mars-1 in the Range from 20Hz to 10kHz; Eastern Sahara Geology from Orbital Radar: Potential Analog to Mars On the Dielectric Properties of the Martian-like Surface Sediments; Radar Observations of Recent Mars Landing Sites; Sounding of Subsurface Water Through Conductive Media in Mars Analog Environments Using Transient Electromagnetics and Low Frequency Ground-penetrating Radar; Burial Depth of the Reservoirs of Hydrogen at the Equatorial Latitudes on Mars; Elemental Composition Variations for Large Dusty and Rocky Regions on Mars Using Gamma-Ray Data from the Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer; The Distribution of Non-Volatile Elements on Mars: Mars Odyssey GRS Results; Using Mars Odyssey GRS Data to Assess Models for the Bulk Composition of Mars; Mars: The Terra Arabia Low Epithermal Neutron Flux Anomaly; The Isidis Basin of Mars: New Results from MOLA, MOC, and THEMIS; Remote Sensing of the Haughton Impact Structure (HIS): A Terrestrial Proof of Concept for Using the Remote Sensing of Martian Craters as a Probe of Subsurface Composition;and Thermal Emission Spectra of Impact Glass and Shocked Deccan Basalt from Lonar Crater, India and Implications for Remote Sensing of Mars.

  13. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  14. High Resolution Software Defined Radar System for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Software Radio Peripheral USRP NI2920, a software defined transceiver so far mainly used in Software Defined Radio applications, is adopted in this work to design a high resolution L-Band Software Defined Radar system. The enhanced available bandwidth, due to the Gigabit Ethernet interface, is exploited to obtain a higher slant-range resolution with respect to the existing Software Defined Radar implementations. A specific LabVIEW application, performing radar operations, is discussed, and successful validations are presented to demonstrate the accurate target detection capability of the proposed software radar architecture. In particular, outdoor and indoor test are performed by adopting a metal plate as reference structure located at different distances from the designed radar system, and results obtained from the measured echo are successfully processed to accurately reveal the correct target position, with the predicted slant-range resolution equal to 6 m.

  15. Feasibility of mitigating the effects of windfarms on primary radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.M.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the feasibility of modifying civil and military radars to mitigate the effects from wind turbines, to provide costings for implementing changes to the radar and to produce guidelines for planning wind farms in the vicinity of radars. The effect of wind turbines on radar signals, assessed through computer modelling, is summarised. The key aspects of turbine design that can be modified to minimise these effects are described. A key issue is the fact that no two radar installations are alike, with settings being customised for local requirements. As a consequence, a detailed understanding of the design and features of each individual radar would be required in order to assess the impact of a wind farm proposal. The costs of a programme of modifications to the civil ATC (air traffic control) radar base will depend on many factors. An estimate of costs is provided, based on the assumption that only 30 of the UK radars would need modification and that a range of modifications from very simple to very complex will be required. A number of other approaches, outside of modification of the radar system, may require investigation during a windfarm planning application, such as layout and location of the wind farm or changing air traffic routes in the vicinity of the wind farm.

  16. Quantifying the contribution of Long-Range Transport to PM, NOx, and SO2 loadings at a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Harshita; Sachan, Himanshu; Garg, Saryu; Arya, Ruhani; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Sinha, Baerbel; Sinha, Vinayak

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the climatology of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.67°N, 76.73°E; 310 m amsl) through 3-day backtrajectories arriving at 20 m above ground level for the period August 2011-November 2012. IISER Mohali is a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Basin. The trajectories are computed in ensemble mode twice daily with an arrival time of 2:30 pm local time (daytime) and 4:30 am local time (nighttime) using the HYSPLIT 4 model with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GDAS file as meterological input data. Due to the close proximity of the site to the Himalayan mountain range the trajectory output is found to be very sensitive to the models input data. IISER Air Quality station is located in the IGB at an altitude of 310 m amsl approximately 20 km south west of the Shivalik hills, but the model terrain height for the site in the ensemble run output varies between 200 m amsl and 3500 m amsl for the GDAS dataset and 200 m amsl to 5000 m amsl for the reanalysis dataset. We conclude that the GDAS dataset performs better than than reanalysis dataset for our site and selected only those trajectories from the trajectory ensemble for cluster analysis, for which the terrain height in the model output was 400 m amsl for Shimla (a site located at an altitude of 1000 m amsl in the mountains 60 km north east of Mohali). We subjected the trajectories to hierarchical, and non-hierarchical (K-means) clustering and found that the air mass transport to our station can be characterised by 10 distinct airflow patterns; 3 of which occur only during the monsoon season. For pre-monsoon season (March-June), post-monsoon season (Sept-Nov) and winter season (Dec-Feb), air mass transport to our site is predominantly from the west. Direct transport of north westerly air masses to our site is subdivided into three clusters (slow, medium and rapid) while other clusters are attributed to south westerly air currents

  17. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  18. A 24GHz Radar Receiver in CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates the system design and circuit implementation of a 24GHz-band short-range radar receiver in CMOS technology. The propagation and penetration properties of EM wave offer the possibility of non-contact based remote sensing and through-the-wall imaging of distance stationary or

  19. Multiple hypothesis clustering in radar plot extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizing, A.G.; Theil, A.; Dorp, Ph. van; Ligthart, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    False plots and plots with inaccurate range and Doppler estimates may severely degrade the performance of tracking algorithms in radar systems. This paper describes how a multiple hypothesis clustering technique can be applied to mitigate the problems involved in plot extraction. The measures of

  20. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xiong Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF. Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars.

  1. Arecibo Radar Observation of Near-Earth Asteroids: Expanded Sample Size, Determination of Radar Albedos, and Measurements of Polarization Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoly, Cassandra; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Springmann, Alessondra; Virkki, Anne; Nolan, Michael C.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Giorgini, Jon D.

    2017-10-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) population ranges in size from a few meters to more than 10 kilometers. NEAs have a wide variety of taxonomic classes, surface features, and shapes, including spheroids, binary objects, contact binaries, elongated, as well as irregular bodies. Using the Arecibo Observatory planetary radar system, we have measured apparent rotation rate, radar reflectivity, apparent diameter, and radar albedos for over 350 NEAs. The radar albedo is defined as the radar cross-section divided by the geometric cross-section. If a shape model is available, the actual cross-section is known at the time of the observation. Otherwise we derive a geometric cross-section from a measured diameter. When radar imaging is available, the diameter was measured from the apparent range depth. However, when radar imaging was not available, we used the continuous wave (CW) bandwidth radar measurements in conjunction with the period of the object. The CW bandwidth provides apparent rotation rate, which, given an independent rotation measurement, such as from lightcurves, constrains the size of the object. We assumed an equatorial view unless we knew the pole orientation, which gives a lower limit on the diameter. The CW also provides the polarization ratio, which is the ratio of the SC and OC cross-sections.We confirm the trend found by Benner et al. (2008) that taxonomic types E and V have very high polarization ratios. We have obtained a larger sample and can analyze additional trends with spin, size, rotation rate, taxonomic class, polarization ratio, and radar albedo to interpret the origin of the NEAs and their dynamical processes. The distribution of radar albedo and polarization ratio at the smallest diameters (≤50 m) differs from the distribution of larger objects (>50 m), although the sample size is limited. Additionally, we find more moderate radar albedos for the smallest NEAs when compared to those with diameters 50-150 m. We will present additional trends we

  2. Block floating point for radar data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1999-01-01

    Integer, floating point, and block floating point (BFP) data formats are analyzed and compared in order to establish the mathematical tools for selection of an optimal format which fulfils the demands of high resolution radar (SAR) data to large dynamic range and adequate S/N. The analysis takes...... quantization noise and saturation distortion into account and concludes that it is preferred to use small blocks and a (new) modified BFP format applying fractional exponents. Data from the EMISAR radar system are applied to illustrate the merits of the different schemes....

  3. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  4. Scanning Radar Investigations to Characterize Cloud and Precipitation Processes for ASR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, Chandrasekar [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Cooperative Inst. for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA)

    2016-12-17

    The project conducted investigations in the following areas related to scanning radar retrievals: a) Development for Cloud drizzle separation studies for the ENA site based on Doppler Spectra b) Advanced radar retrieval for the SGP site c) Characterizing falling snow using multifrequency dual-polarization measurements d) BAECC field experiment. More details about these investigations can be found within each subtopic within the report.

  5. Venus radar mapper attitude reference quaternion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D. T.

    1986-01-01

    Polynomial functions of time are used to specify the components of the quaternion which represents the nominal attitude of the Venus Radar mapper spacecraft during mapping. The following constraints must be satisfied in order to obtain acceptable synthetic array radar data: the nominal attitude function must have a large dynamic range, the sensor orientation must be known very accurately, the attitude reference function must use as little memory as possible, and the spacecraft must operate autonomously. Fitting polynomials to the components of the desired quaternion function is a straightforward method for providing a very dynamic nominal attitude using a minimum amount of on-board computer resources. Although the attitude from the polynomials may not be exactly the one requested by the radar designers, the polynomial coefficients are known, so they do not contribute to the attitude uncertainty. Frequent coefficient updates are not required, so the spacecraft can operate autonomously.

  6. Observation of meteors by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William; Kingsley, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The observation of meteor trails by a vertical mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST) radar beam has the advantage of good height resolution and an approximate knowledge of the zenith angle since the trails are horizontal or near-horizontal. An extension of the ablation theory of meteors was developed for near horizontal trails which takes into account the curvature of the earth. Observations of the Geminid meteor shower by MST radar reveal the 'diffusion heights' to be in fair agreement with the true height, but with some discrepancies that can amount to 4 km. The true heights are almost entirely confined to the range 87-91 km, although the upper limit is attributed to the coherent integration time of the existing MST radar processing.

  7. Discriminating Interceptor Technology Program (DITP) laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank E.; Beaghler, Guy W.

    1999-05-01

    A compact and light weight imaging laser radar system is being developed for an advanced exo-atmospheric missile interceptor platform for the Discriminating Interceptor Technology Program (DITP). The laser radar will be used in combination with a two- color passive IR sensor to provide high angular resolution information for long range tracking and discrimination of multiple targets. A direct-detection approach at 532 nm has been chosen to provide the best overall capability in a system which can be fielded in the near term. The laser radar is designed to operate at 25 W for a limited run time and output short 1.3 ns pulses at 100 Hz. A high speed 10 X 10 pixel receiver capable of efficient single photon detection is also being developed.

  8. Earth curvature and atmospheric refraction effects on radar signal propagation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-01-01

    The earth isnt flat, and radar beams dont travel straight. This becomes more noticeable as range increases, particularly at shallow depression/grazing angles. This report explores models for characterizing this behavior.

  9. Theoretical performance of reiterated LMMSE filtering and coded radar waveforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruggiano, M.; Stolp, E.; Van Genderen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) waveforms offer strong advantages for integrated communication and radar systems. However, they exhibit inherent high-range sidelobes after matched filtering when standard communication constellation symbols are used for the coding of the carriers.

  10. CAMEX-4 TOGA RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TOGA radar dataset consists of browse and radar data collected from the TOGA radar during the CAMEX-4 experiment. TOGA is a C-band linear polarized doppler radar...

  11. An Operative X-band Mini-radar Network to Monitor Rainfall Events with High Time and Space Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertoldo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing frequency of extreme and very localized precipitation events have been causing landslides, floods and casualties, especially in Sicily, due to its complex orography, and to the presence of densely inhabited areas just at the mouth of small basins. In order to monitor such phenomena with the needed high resolution in time and space, an experimental network of X-band mini-radars, exclusively devoted to monitor rain, has been installed in some parts of Sicily since November 2010. The network is made up by 4 mini weather radars able to acquire a rain map every minute (or even at shorter intervals with a radial space resolution better than 100 m within a range of up to 30 km. Their low cost and the easiness of installation make such radars ideal for monitoring small areas or even just limited angular sectors, since it is more convenient to install more than one instrument instead of choosing special site locations or spending for installation support. The raw data are immediately processed in real time by the software installed on each radar unit, Cartesian maps are locally produced, compressed and transmitted via GPRS to a server where ad hoc products for the users are prepared and made available on a web site. A few examples of final products and some comparisons with rain gauges are presented.

  12. High-precision positioning of radar scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheenathayalan, Prabu; Small, David; Schubert, Adrian; Hanssen, Ramon F.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing radar satellites cover wide areas and provide spatially dense measurements, with millions of scatterers. Knowledge of the precise position of each radar scatterer is essential to identify the corresponding object and interpret the estimated deformation. The absolute position accuracy of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scatterers in a 2D radar coordinate system, after compensating for atmosphere and tidal effects, is in the order of centimeters for TerraSAR-X (TSX) spotlight images. However, the absolute positioning in 3D and its quality description are not well known. Here, we exploit time-series interferometric SAR to enhance the positioning capability in three dimensions. The 3D positioning precision is parameterized by a variance-covariance matrix and visualized as an error ellipsoid centered at the estimated position. The intersection of the error ellipsoid with objects in the field is exploited to link radar scatterers to real-world objects. We demonstrate the estimation of scatterer position and its quality using 20 months of TSX stripmap acquisitions over Delft, the Netherlands. Using trihedral corner reflectors (CR) for validation, the accuracy of absolute positioning in 2D is about 7 cm. In 3D, an absolute accuracy of up to ˜ 66 cm is realized, with a cigar-shaped error ellipsoid having centimeter precision in azimuth and range dimensions, and elongated in cross-range dimension with a precision in the order of meters (the ratio of the ellipsoid axis lengths is 1/3/213, respectively). The CR absolute 3D position, along with the associated error ellipsoid, is found to be accurate and agree with the ground truth position at a 99 % confidence level. For other non-CR coherent scatterers, the error ellipsoid concept is validated using 3D building models. In both cases, the error ellipsoid not only serves as a quality descriptor, but can also help to associate radar scatterers to real-world objects.

  13. NKS NordRisk II: Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith Korsholm, U.; Havskov Soerensen, J. (Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)); Astrup, P.; Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-04-15

    The present atlas has been developed within the NKS/NordRisk-II project 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe'. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from 16 nuclear risk sites on the Northern Hemisphere. The atmospheric dispersion model calculations cover a period of 30 days following each release to ensure almost complete deposition of the dispersed material. The atlas contains maps showing the total deposition and time-integrated air concentration of Cs-137 and I-131 based on three years of meteorological data spanning the climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and corresponding time evolution of the ensemble mean atmospheric dispersion. (Author)

  14. RADAR: a rigorously annotated database of A-to-I RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Gokul; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We present RADAR--a rigorously annotated database of A-to-I RNA editing (available at http://RNAedit.com). The identification of A-to-I RNA editing sites has been dramatically accelerated in the past few years by high-throughput RNA sequencing studies. RADAR includes a comprehensive collection of A-to-I RNA editing sites identified in humans (Homo sapiens), mice (Mus musculus) and flies (Drosophila melanogaster), together with extensive manually curated annotations for each editing site. RADAR also includes an expandable listing of tissue-specific editing levels for each editing site, which will facilitate the assignment of biological functions to specific editing sites.

  15. 2016 Annual Site Environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kaua'i Test Facility Hawai'i.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Angela Maria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffith, Stacy R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under contract DE-NA0003525. The DOE/NNSA Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the SNL, Tonopah Test Range (SNL/TTR) in Nevada and the SNL, Kaua‘i Test Facility (SNL/KTF) in Hawai‘i. SNL personnel manage and conduct operations at SNL/TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and have operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering personnel perform most of the environmental programs activities at SNL/TTR. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for cleanup and management of SNL/TTR Environmental Restoration sites. SNL personnel operate SNL/KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs at SNL/TTR and SNL/KTF during calendar year 2016. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial and biological surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. This ASER is prepared in accordance with and as required by DOE O 231.1B, Admin Change 1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.

  16. Atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) over a coastal/rural site downwind of East China: Temporal variation and long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Zhijia; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei; Niu, Zhenchuan

    2011-05-01

    Although much attention has been paid to the mercury pollution in China, limited field studies have been conducted to explore the atmospheric behavior of mercury. To investigate the temporal variation and long-range transport of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM or Hg(0)), the GEM measurements covering four different seasons were performed at a coastal/rural site of the Yellow Sea downwind of East China. Hourly mean concentrations of GEM measured by RA-915+ mercury analyzer over the entire study (four different time periods between July 2007 and May 2009) were 2.31 ± 0.74 ng m -3 with a range of 1.12-7.01 ng m -3. The results showed moderate seasonal variations with high levels in cold seasons (winter: 2.53 ± 0.77 ng m -3 and spring: 2.34 ± 0.54 ng m -3) and low levels in warm seasons (summer: 2.28 ± 0.82 ng m -3 and fall: 2.16 ± 0.84 ng m -3). Over the each campaign a diurnal variation of GEM was observed consistently with peak levels in daytime and low levels in late night and early morning. The pollution rose and NOAA-HYSPLIT back-trajectory model analyses indicated that the elevated GEM was transported to the sampling site from the regional sources of East China and Korea peninsula-Japan. Air masses originated from the East China Sea and the regions of Continental East Asia with low emission strengths of atmospheric mercury (e.g., the east Russia, the north Inner Mongolia and the Bohai Sea) showed the decreased GEM levels.

  17. Spatial variability of extreme rainfall at radar subpixel scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Nadav; Marra, Francesco; Fatichi, Simone; Paschalis, Athanasios; Molnar, Peter; Burlando, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Extreme rainfall is quantified in engineering practice using Intensity-Duration-Frequency curves (IDF) that are traditionally derived from rain-gauges and more recently also from remote sensing instruments, such as weather radars. These instruments measure rainfall at different spatial scales: rain-gauge samples rainfall at the point scale while weather radar averages precipitation on a relatively large area, generally around 1 km2. As such, a radar derived IDF curve is representative of the mean areal rainfall over a given radar pixel and neglects the within-pixel rainfall variability. In this study, we quantify subpixel variability of extreme rainfall by using a novel space-time rainfall generator (STREAP model) that downscales in space the rainfall within a given radar pixel. The study was conducted using a unique radar data record (23 years) and a very dense rain-gauge network in the Eastern Mediterranean area (northern Israel). Radar-IDF curves, together with an ensemble of point-based IDF curves representing the radar subpixel extreme rainfall variability, were developed fitting Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions to annual rainfall maxima. It was found that the mean areal extreme rainfall derived from the radar underestimate most of the extreme values computed for point locations within the radar pixel (on average, ∼70%). The subpixel variability of rainfall extreme was found to increase with longer return periods and shorter durations (e.g. from a maximum variability of 10% for a return period of 2 years and a duration of 4 h to 30% for 50 years return period and 20 min duration). For the longer return periods, a considerable enhancement of extreme rainfall variability was found when stochastic (natural) climate variability was taken into account. Bounding the range of the subpixel extreme rainfall derived from radar-IDF can be of major importance for different applications that require very local estimates of rainfall extremes.

  18. Distributed Aperture Coherence-synthetic Radar Joint Antenna Gain Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Baoliang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available By the synthesis of multi-radar electromagnetic wave space energy, Distributed Aperture Coherencesynthetic Radar (DACR achieves long-range power detection via multi-radar airspace expansion to realize high-precision target angle measurement. DACR has the advantages of strong survival ability, a high cost- effectiveness ratio, high angular accuracy, strong expandability, and easy realization. In this article, we analyze the joint antenna gain of a non-directional multi-point source and, given the theoretical derivation and simulation analysis, we establish a distributed-array-antenna geometric model, analyze the joint antenna pattern and gain, respectively, and determine that the joint antenna gain is approximately equal to the unit radar number and the unit radar gain product. Lastly, we perform a joint antenna gain simulation using HFSS software to further verify the joint antenna gain results.

  19. The emerging versatility of a scannerless range imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.; Bradley, B.; Nellums, B.; Diegert, C.

    1996-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is nearing the completion of the initial development of a unique type of range imaging sensor. This innovative imaging optical radar is based on an active flood-light scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is an all solid-state device (no moving parts) and offers significant size, performance, reliability, simplicity, and affordability advantages over other types of 3-D sensor technologies, including: scanned laser radar, stereo vision, and structured lighting. The sensor is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is very well suited for affordable application to a wide variety of military and commercial uses, including: munition guidance, target recognition, robotic vision, automated inspection, driver enhanced vision, collision avoidance, site security and monitoring, terrain mapping, and facility surveying. This paper reviews the sensor technology and its development for the advanced conventional munition guidance application, and discusses a few of the many other emerging applications for this new innovative sensor technology.

  20. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation technology of wide-band radar targets based on scattering center model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL simulation technology can verify and evaluate the radar by simulating the radio frequency environment in an anechoic chamber. The HWIL simulation technology of wide-band radar targets can accurately generate wide-band radar target echo which stands for the radar target scattering characteristics and pulse modulation of radar transmitting signal. This paper analyzes the wide-band radar target scattering properties first. Since the responses of target are composed of many separate scattering centers, the target scattering characteristic is restructured by scattering centers model. Based on the scattering centers model of wide-band radar target, the wide-band radar target echo modeling and the simulation method are discussed. The wide-band radar target echo is reconstructed in real-time by convoluting the transmitting signal to the target scattering parameters. Using the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM system, the HWIL simulation of wide-band radar target echo with high accuracy can be actualized. A typical wide-band radar target simulation is taken to demonstrate the preferable simulation effect of the reconstruction method of wide-band radar target echo. Finally, the radar target time-domain echo and high-resolution range profile (HRRP are given. The results show that the HWIL simulation gives a high-resolution range distribution of wide-band radar target scattering centers.

  1. Vertical air motion retrievals in deep convective clouds using the ARM scanning radar network in Oklahoma during MC3E

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Kirk W.; Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; Giangrande, Scott E.; Collis, Scott M.; Potvin, Corey K.

    2017-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site includes a heterogeneous distributed scanning Doppler radar network suitable for collecting coordinated Doppler velocity measurements in deep convective clouds. The surrounding National Weather Service (NWS) Next Generation Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (NEXRAD WSR-88D) further supplements this network. Radar velocity measurements are assimilated in a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) algorithm that retrieves horizontal and vertical air motions over a large analysis domain (100 km × 100 km) at storm-scale resolutions (250 m). For the first time, direct evaluation of retrieved vertical air velocities with those from collocated 915 MHz radar wind profilers is performed. Mean absolute and root-mean-square differences between the two sources are of the order of 1 and 2 m s-1, respectively, and time-height correlations are of the order of 0.5. An empirical sensitivity analysis is done to determine a range of 3DVAR constraint weights that adequately satisfy the velocity observations and anelastic mass continuity. It is shown that the vertical velocity spread over this range is of the order of 1 m s-1. The 3DVAR retrievals are also compared to those obtained from an iterative upwards integration technique. The results suggest that the 3DVAR technique provides a robust, stable solution for cases in which integration techniques have difficulty satisfying velocity observations and mass continuity simultaneously.

  2. Radar for tracer particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Felix; Herminghaus, Stephan; Huang, Kai

    2017-05-01

    We introduce a radar system capable of tracking a 5 mm spherical target continuously in three dimensions. The 10 GHz (X-band) radar system has a transmission power of 1 W and operates in the near field of the horn antennae. By comparing the phase shift of the electromagnetic wave traveling through the free space with an IQ-mixer, we obtain the relative movement of the target with respect to the antennae. From the azimuth and inclination angles of the receiving antennae obtained in the calibration, we reconstruct the target trajectory in a three-dimensional Cartesian system. Finally, we test the tracking algorithm with target moving in circular as well as in pendulum motions and discuss the capability of the radar system.

  3. Micropower impulse radar technology and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, J., LLNL

    1998-04-15

    The LLNL-developed Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology has quickly gone from laboratory concept to embedded circuitry in numerous government and commercial systems in the last few years[l]. The main ideas behind MIR, invented by T. McEwan in the Laser Program, are the generation and detection systems for extremely low- power ultra-wideband pulses in the gigaHertz regime using low-cost components. These ideas, coupled with new antenna systems, timing and radio-frequency (RF) circuitry, computer interfaces, and signal processing, have provided the catalyst for a new generation of compact radar systems. Over the past several years we have concentrated on a number of applications of MIR which address a number of remote-sensing applications relevant to emerging programs in defense, transportation, medical, and environmental research. Some of the past commercial successes have been widely publicized [2] and are only now starting to become available for market. Over 30 patents have been filed and over 15 licenses have been signed on various aspects of the MIR technology. In addition, higher performance systems are under development for specific laboratory programs and government reimbursables. The MIR is an ultra- wideband, range-gated radar system that provides the enabling hardware technology used in the research areas mentioned above. It has numerous performance parameters that can be Selected by careful design to fit the requirements. We have improved the baseline, short- range, MIR system to demonstrate its effectiveness. The radar operates over the hand from approximately I to 4 GHz with pulse repetition frequencies up to 10 MHz. It provides a potential range resolution of I cm at ranges of greater than 20 m. We have developed a suite of algorithms for using MIR for image formation. These algorithms currently support Synthetic aperture and multistate array geometries. This baseline MIR radar imaging system has been used for several programmatic applications.

  4. Radar data smoothing filter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  5. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  6. An alternative explanation of PMSE-like scatter in MF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. L. Jones

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been reports in the literature that spaced-antenna MF radars may provide a source of data on Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE. Even though the expected scatter from PMSE at MF frequencies is very much weaker than at VHF, the wide distribution of sites and long duration of data sets for MF radar systems could provide valuable information about the occurrence of PMSE. This paper tests whether there is any evidence of PMSE in the profiles derived using the MF radar at Rothera, Antarctica, one of the few such radars at high southern latitudes. Over a year of data during 1997/1998 has been analysed for the occurrence of persistent features around midday in the altitude range 60-95km. Criteria were chosen to test the likelihood that some of the narrow peaks in the power profiles were manifestations of electron density structures associated with PMSE. Although a small number of persistent features were seen at altitudes of 80-85km that are typically associated with PMSE, there was no seasonality in their occurrence. A detailed analysis of specific days showed that two peaks were often seen with altitude separations consistent with the vertical wavelength of the diurnal tide. Persistent features were also detected at altitudes of 70km and 90km during the winter months, thus showing a quite different seasonality to that of PMSE. An estimate of the turbulence caused by the breaking of gravity waves that have propagated up from the lower atmosphere shows that at Rothera significant energy is deposited near 80km during summer, and near 70 and 90km during winter. This seasonal variability is driven by the screening effect of stratospheric winds, and it appears that breaking gravity wave dynamics, rather than PMSE phenomena, can explain many of the localised altitude features in the MF radar data.

  7. Wideband Radar Echo Frequency-domain Simulation and Analysis for High Speed Moving Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A frequency-domain method is proposed for wideband radar echo simulation of high-speed moving targets. Based on the physical process of electromagnetic waves observing a moving target, a frequency-domain echo model of wideband radar is constructed, and the block diagram of the radar echo simulation in frequency-domain is presented. Then, the impacts of radial velocity and slant range on the matching filtering of LFM radar are analyzed, and some quantitative conclusions on the shift and expansion of the radar profiles are obtained. Simulation results illustrate the correctness and efficiency of the proposed method.

  8. Wind farms impact on radar aviation interests - final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poupart, G.J.

    2003-09-01

    The main objectives of the study were: to determine the effects of siting wind turbines adjacent to primary air traffic control radar; to gather the information required for the generation of guidelines by civil, military and wind farm developer stakeholders; to determine the extent to which the design of wind turbines influences their effects on radar systems and to determine the extent to which design of the radar processing influences the effects of wind turbines on radar systems. A computer model was developed to predict the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of wind turbines and understand the interaction of radar energy and turbines. The model was designed to predict and simulate the impact of wind farms on the primary radar display. Validation of the model was carried out in a full-scale trial and modelling process, with data collected from a number of sources. The model was validated against a single turbine scenario and showed an accurate prediction capability. Further validation of the model could be gained through a multiple turbine trial. The knowledge gained from the development and validation of the predictive computer model has been used to conduct a sensitivity analysis (of the sub-elements of the radar and wind farm interaction) and to compile a list of the key factors influencing the radar signature of wind turbines. The result is a more detailed quantification of the complex interactions between wind turbines and radar systems than was previously available. The key findings of how the design, size and construction materials of wind turbines affect RCS are summarised.

  9. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  10. Evaluation of radar imagery for geological and cartographic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gerald K.; Sheehan, Cynthia A.

    1981-01-01

    The House/Senate conference report on H.R. 4930 (96th Congress), the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations bill, 1980, stated that the U.S. Geological Survey should "begin the use of side-looking airborne radar imagery for topographic and geological mapping, and geological resource surveys in promising areas, particularly Alaska." In response to this mandate, the Survey acquired radar data and began scientific studies to analyze and interpret these data. About 70 percent of the project funding was used to acquire radar imagery and to evaluate Alaskan applications. Results of these studies indicate that radar images have a unique incremental value for certain geologic and cartographic applications but that the images are best suited for use as supplemental information sources or as primary data sources in areas of persistent cloud cover.The value of radar data is greatest for geologic mapping and resource surveys, particularly for mineral and petroleum exploration, where the objective is to locate any single feature or group of features that may control the occurrences of these resources. Radar images are considered by oil and gas companies to be worth the cost of data acquisition within a limited area of active exploration.Radar images also have incremental value for geologic site studies and hazard mapping. The need in these cases is TO inventory all geologic hazards to human life, property, resources, and the environment. For other geologic applications, radar images have a relatively small incremental value over a combination of Landsat images and aerial photographs.The value of radar images for cartographic applications is minimal, except when they are used as a substitute for aerial photographs and topographic maps in persistently cloud-covered areas. If conventional data sources are not available, radar images provide useful information on terrain relief, landforms, drainage patterns, and land cover. Screen less lithography is a low

  11. SRTM Radar Image with Color as Height: Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the area around the January 26, 2001, earthquake in western India, the deadliest in the country's history with some 20,000 fatalities. The epicenter of the magnitude 7.6 earthquake was just to the left of the center of the image. The Gulf of Kachchh (or Kutch) is the black area running from the lower left corner towards the center of the image. The city of Bhuj is in the yellow-toned area among the brown hills left of the image center and is the historical capital of the Kachchh region. Bhuj and many other towns and cities nearby were almost completely destroyed by the shaking of the earthquake. These hills reach up to 500 meters (1,500 feet) elevation. The city of Ahmedabad, capital of Gujarat state, is the radar-bright area next to the right side of the image. Several buildings in Ahmedabad were also destroyed by the earthquake. The dark blue areas around the center of the image and extending to the left side are low-lying salt flats called the Rann of Kachchh with the Little Rann just to the right of the image center. The bumpy area north of the Rann (green and yellow colors) is a large area of sand dunes in Pakistan. A branch of the Indus River used to flow through the area on the left side of this image, but it was diverted by a previous large earthquake that struck this area in 1819.The annotated version of the image includes a 'beachball' that shows the location and slip direction of the January 26, 2001, earthquake from the Harvard Quick CMT catalog: http://www.seismology.harvard.edu/CMTsearch.html. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to brown and white at the highest elevations. This image is a mosaic of four SRTM swaths.This image was acquired by

  12. Space Radar Image of Raco Biomass Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This biomass map of the Raco, Michigan, area was produced from data acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour. Biomass is the amount of plant material on an area of Earth's surface. Radar can directly sense the quantity and organizational structure of the woody biomass in the forest. Science team members at the University of Michigan used the radar data to estimate the standing biomass for this Raco site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Detailed surveys of 70 forest stands will be used to assess the accuracy of these techniques. The seasonal growth of terrestrial plants, and forests in particular, leads to the temporary storage of large amounts of carbon, which could directly affect changes in global climate. In order to accurately predict future global change, scientists need detailed information about current distribution of vegetation types and the amount of biomass present around the globe. Optical techniques to determine net biomass are frustrated by chronic cloud-cover. Imaging radar can penetrate through cloud-cover with negligible signal losses. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German

  13. Space Radar Image of Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its surroundings, centered at 51.17 north latitude and 30.15 west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 16th orbit on October 1, 1994. The area is located on the northern border of the Ukraine Republic and was produced by using the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The differences in the intensity are due to differences in vegetation cover, with brighter areas being indicative of more vegetation. These data were acquired as part of a collaboration between NASA and the National Space Agency of Ukraine in Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences. NASA has included several sites provided by the Ukrainian space agency as targets of opportunity during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The Ukrainian space agency also plans to conduct airborne surveys of these sites during the mission. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is located toward the top of the image near the Pripyat River. The 12-kilometer (7.44-mile)-long cooling pond is easily distinguishable as an elongated dark shape in the center near the top of the image. The reactor complex is visible as the bright area to the extreme left of the cooling pond and the city of Chernobyl is the bright area just below the cooling pond next to the Pripyat River. The large dark area in the bottom right of the image is the Kiev Reservoir just north of Kiev. Also visible is the Dnieper River, which feeds into the Kiev Reservoir from the top of the image. The Soviet government evacuated 116,000 people within 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the Chernobyl reactor after the explosion and fire on April 26, 1986. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight

  14. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  15. Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Webster

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The radar system described here (CMOR comprises a basic 5-element receiving system, co-located with a pulsed transmitter, specifically designed to observe meteor echoes and to determine their position in space with an angular resolution of ~1° and a radial resolution of ~3 km. Two secondary receiving sites, a few km distant and arranged to form approximately a right angle with the base station, allow the determination of the velocity (speed and direction of the meteor that, together with the time of occurrence, lead to an estimate of the orbit of the original meteoroid. Some equipment details are presented along with a method used to determine the orbits. Representative echoes are shown and observations on the 2002 Leonid shower presented.

  16. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Owens, Alan [European Space Technology Centre ESTEC, European Space Agency ESA, Keplerlaan 1, 2200AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav [Czech Metrology Institute, Radiova 3, 102 00 Prague 10 (Czech Republic); Valach, Ondrej [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-21

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV–9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20–30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2–5 m from the station. - Highlights: • Transportable station of mono-energetic gamma rays has been built. • Produced neutron and gamma ray field simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. • Discrete gamma rays produced in wide energy range up to 9 MeV. • Produced gamma ray spectra measured by HPGe and scintillating LaBr{sub 3}Ce detectors. • Demonstration of

  17. Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roofer Coaster. The location had been used as a ranch by private citizens prior to government control of the area. According to historical records, Operation Roofer Coaster activities involved assessing the inhalation uptake of plutonium in animals from the nonnuclear detonation of nuclear weapons. Operation Roofer Coaster consisted of four nonnuclear destruction tests of a nuclear device. The four tests all took place during May and June 1963 and consisted of Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1, 11, and 111. Eighty-four dogs, 84 burros, and 136 sheep were used for the Double Tracks test, and ten sheep and ten dogs were used for Clean Slate 11. These animals were housed at Cactus Spring Ranch. Before detonation, all animals were placed in cages and transported to the field. After the shot, they were taken to the decontamination area where some may have been sacrificed immediately. All animals, including those sacrificed, were returned to Cactus Spring Ranch at this point to have autopsies performed or to await being sacrificed at a later date. A description of the Cactus Spring Ranch activities found in project files indicates the ranch was used solely for the purpose of the Roofer Coaster tests and bioaccumulation studies and was never used for any other project. No decontamination or cleanup had been conducted at Cactus Spring Ranch prior to the start of the project. When the project was complete, the pits at Cactus Spring Ranch were filled with soil, and trailers where dogs were housed and animal autopsies had been performed were removed

  18. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  19. Metamaterial for Radar Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    capacitive coupling with adjacent patches, as shown in Figure 3. The via provides inductance to ground. Figure 3. (a) Planar LH distributed periodic...After [20]). The capacitance in the structure balances out the inductance present when the cylinder is placed in a square array. The metallic... RADAR FREQUENCIES by Szu Hau Tan September 2012 Thesis Advisor: David C. Jenn Second Reader: James Calusdian

  20. Noise considerations for vital signs CW radar sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Jensen, Thomas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2011-01-01

    The use of continuous wave (CW) radars for measuring human vital signs have recently received a lot of attention due to its many promising applications like monitoring people at hospitals or infants at home without the need for wired sensors. This paper briefly presents the typical CW radar setup...... and the underlying signal theory for such sensors. Then to point out and especially clarify one of the most important effects aiding the design of vital signs radars (VSR), a more detailed discussion concerning phase noise cancellation (or filtering) by range correlation is given. This discussion leads to some...

  1. Operation of a Radar Altimeter over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, Matthew D.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents documentation for the Advanced Application Flight Experiment (AAFE) pulse compression radar altimeter and its role in the NASA Multisensor Airborne Altimetry Experiment over Greenland in 1993. The AAFE Altimeter is a Ku-band microwave radar which has demonstrated 14 centimeter range precision in operation over arctic ice. Recent repairs and improvements were required to make the Greenland missions possible. Transmitter, receiver and software modifications, as well as the integration of a GPS receiver are thoroughly documented. Procedures for installation, and operation of the radar are described. Finally, suggestions are made for further system improvements.

  2. Mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buler, Jeffrey J; Randall, Lori A; Fleskes, Joseph P; Barrow, Wylie C; Bogart, Tianna; Kluver, Daria

    2012-01-01

    The current network of weather surveillance radars within the United States readily detects flying birds and has proven to be a useful remote-sensing tool for ornithological study. Radar reflectivity measures serve as an index to bird density and have been used to quantitatively map landbird distributions during migratory stopover by sampling birds aloft at the onset of nocturnal migratory flights. Our objective was to further develop and validate a similar approach for mapping wintering waterfowl distributions using weather surveillance radar observations at the onset of evening flights. We evaluated data from the Sacramento, CA radar (KDAX) during winters 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. We determined an optimal sampling time by evaluating the accuracy and precision of radar observations at different times during the onset of evening flight relative to observed diurnal distributions of radio-marked birds on the ground. The mean time of evening flight initiation occurred 23 min after sunset with the strongest correlations between reflectivity and waterfowl density on the ground occurring almost immediately after flight initiation. Radar measures became more spatially homogeneous as evening flight progressed because birds dispersed from their departure locations. Radars effectively detected birds to a mean maximum range of 83 km during the first 20 min of evening flight. Using a sun elevation angle of -5° (28 min after sunset) as our optimal sampling time, we validated our approach using KDAX data and additional data from the Beale Air Force Base, CA (KBBX) radar during winter 1998-1999. Bias-adjusted radar reflectivity of waterfowl aloft was positively related to the observed diurnal density of radio-marked waterfowl locations on the ground. Thus, weather radars provide accurate measures of relative wintering waterfowl density that can be used to comprehensively map their distributions over large spatial extents.

  3. Radar Image, Color as Height , Salalah, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. It illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. This area on the southern coast of the Arabian Peninsula is characterized by a narrow coastal plain (bottom) facing southward into the Arabian Sea, backed by the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains. The backslope of the Qara Mountains slopes gently into the vast desert of the Empty Quarter (at top). This area is subject to strong monsoonal storms from the Arabian Sea during the summer, when the mountains are enveloped in a sort of perpetual fog. The moisture from the monsoon enables agriculture on the Salalah plain, and also provides moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade. Radar and topographic data are used by historians and archaeologists to discover ancient trade routes and other significant ruins.This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to brown at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1070 meters (3500 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot

  4. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  5. Accurate Characterization of Winter Precipitation Using In-Situ Instrumentation, CSU-CHILL Radar, and Advanced Scattering Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A. J.; Notaros, B. M.; Bringi, V. N.; Kleinkort, C.; Huang, G. J.; Kennedy, P.; Thurai, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel approach to remote sensing and characterization of winter precipitation and modeling of radar observables through a synergistic use of advanced in-situ instrumentation for microphysical and geometrical measurements of ice and snow particles, image processing methodology to reconstruct complex particle three-dimensional (3D) shapes, computational electromagnetics to analyze realistic precipitation scattering, and state-of-the-art polarimetric radar. Our in-situ measurement site at the Easton Valley View Airport, La Salle, Colorado, shown in the figure, consists of two advanced optical imaging disdrometers within a 2/3-scaled double fence intercomparison reference wind shield, and also includes PLUVIO snow measuring gauge, VAISALA weather station, and collocated NCAR GPS advanced upper-air system sounding system. Our primary radar is the CSU-CHILL radar, with a dual-offset Gregorian antenna featuring very high polarization purity and excellent side-lobe performance in any plane, and the in-situ instrumentation site being very conveniently located at a range of 12.92 km from the radar. A multi-angle snowflake camera (MASC) is used to capture multiple different high-resolution views of an ice particle in free-fall, along with its fall speed. We apply a visual hull geometrical method for reconstruction of 3D shapes of particles based on the images collected by the MASC, and convert these shapes into models for computational electromagnetic scattering analysis, using a higher order method of moments. A two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD), collocated with the MASC, provides 2D contours of a hydrometeor, along with the fall speed and other important parameters. We use the fall speed from the MASC and the 2DVD, along with state parameters measured at the Easton site, to estimate the particle mass (Böhm's method), and then the dielectric constant of particles, based on a Maxwell-Garnet formula. By calculation of the "particle-by-particle" scattering

  6. Combining C- and X-band Weather Radars for Improving Precipitation Estimates over Urban Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk

    The topic of this thesis is weather radar precipitation measurements. Measuring the spatial and temporal variations of the precipitation by weather radars has significant advantages compared to point measurements from rain gauges within urban drainage applications. Knowledge on how the rainfall...... individually and owned by local water utility companies. Although the two radar systems use similar working principles, the systems have significant differences regarding technology, temporal resolution, spatial resolution, range and scanning strategy. The focus of the research was to combine the precipitation...... measurements from the two radar systems into a single radar data product, which utilises strengths and compensates for weaknesses of the individual radar system. The core of the research has thereby been to investigate the consequences of the differences of the two radar systems in order to understand...

  7. CSSF MIMO RADAR: Low-Complexity Compressive Sensing Based MIMO Radar That Uses Step Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2011-01-01

    A new approach is proposed, namely CSSF MIMO radar, which applies the technique of step frequency (SF) to compressive sensing (CS) based multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar. The proposed approach enables high resolution range, angle and Doppler estimation, while transmitting narrowband pulses. The problem of joint angle-Doppler-range estimation is first formulated to fit the CS framework, i.e., as an L1 optimization problem. Direct solution of this problem entails high complexity as it employs a basis matrix whose construction requires discretization of the angle-Doppler-range space. Since high resolution requires fine space discretization, the complexity of joint range, angle and Doppler estimation can be prohibitively high. For the case of slowly moving targets, a technique is proposed that achieves significant complexity reduction by successively estimating angle-range and Doppler in a decoupled fashion and by employing initial estimates obtained via matched filtering to further reduce the space that nee...

  8. Investigation of Rainfall Characteristics Using TRMM PR and Ground Based Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, B.; Lang, T. J.; Nesbitt, S. W.; Cifelli, R.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    Despite relatively good agreement between reflectivity profiles, comparisons of rainfall statistics derived from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deviate from ground-based radar (GR) observations in various field locations across the globe. TRMM PR rain rate probability distribution functions underestimate the occurrence of high rain rates (> 80 mm hr-1) compared with similar ground-based statistics, and similarly, GR distributes the total rain volume over a larger range of rain rates. Analysis of ten years of TRMM data over three field sites has shown that the greatest disagreements occur in the most intense convection, such as over land and during the east and break wind regimes over the Amazon and Australia, respectively. These differences are investigated further in this study. Ten years of TRMM PR data are analyzed in conjunction with data collected during two field experiments involving the NCAR S-Pol radar. S-Pol was deployed in Brazil in the Amazon during TRMM LBA in 1998-1999 and near Mazatlan, Mexico as part of the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) in 2004. Additionally, multiple years of data from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology CPOL radar located in Darwin, Australia, are examined to extend the robustness of the GR observations beyond the relatively short field campaigns. Polarimetric data collected by the two radars are used to characterize the differences between TRMM PR and GR observations as a function of bulk hydrometeor type. For example, profiles with significant graupel, as identified by GR, are analyzed to investigate the role of mixed phase in the PR retrievals. The vertical variability of D0 is examined as a function of reflectivity and related to the underlying microphysical conditions using the polarimetric data provided by the GR observations. Spatial variability of D0 is also explored by correlating D0 values derived from GR at different heights. Several significant changes were made to the TRMM processing algorithms in the

  9. Mathematical analysis study for radar data processing and enhancement. Part 1: Radar data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R.; Brownlow, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    A study is performed under NASA contract to evaluate data from an AN/FPS-16 radar installed for support of flight programs at Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. The purpose of this study is to provide information necessary for improving post-flight data reduction and knowledge of accuracy of derived radar quantities. Tracking data from six flights are analyzed. Noise and bias errors in raw tracking data are determined for each of the flights. A discussion of an altiude bias error during all of the tracking missions is included. This bias error is defined by utilizing pressure altitude measurements made during survey flights. Four separate filtering methods, representative of the most widely used optimal estimation techniques for enhancement of radar tracking data, are analyzed for suitability in processing both real-time and post-mission data. Additional information regarding the radar and its measurements, including typical noise and bias errors in the range and angle measurements, is also presented. This is in two parts. This is part 1, an analysis of radar data.

  10. Dictionary for Sparse Representation of Chirp Echo in Broadband Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lei

    2010-01-01

    A new dictionary for sparse representation of chirp echo in broadband radar is put forward in this paper. Different with chirplet decomposition which decomposes echo in time-frequency plane, the dictionary transforms the sparsity of target observed by radar in distance range to the sparsity in frequency domain by stretch processing and the sparse representation of echo is realized. Using strict deduction with mathematics, the sparsity of echo in dictionary is proved and the dictionary is orth...

  11. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Chaos Through-Wall Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Wang, Bingjie; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Wang, Yuncai; Wang, Anbang

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a chaos through-wall imaging radar using ultra-wideband chaotic-pulse-position modulation (CPPM) microwave signal. The CPPM signal based on logistic map with 1-ns pulse width and 1-GHz bandwidth is implemented by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and then up-converted as the radar transmitting signal. Two-dimensional image of human objects behind obstacles is obtained by correlation method and back projection algorithm. Our experiments successfully perform through-wall imaging for single and multiple human objects through 20-cm thick wall. The down-range resolution of the proposed radar is 15 cm. Furthermore, the anti-jamming properties of the proposed radar in CPPM jamming, linear frequency-modulated jamming, and Gaussian noise jamming environments are demonstrated by electromagnetic simulations using the finite-difference time-domain. The simulation results show the CPPM microwave signal possesses excellent jamming immunity to the noise and radio frequency interference, which makes it perform superbly in multiradar environments.

  13. Clutter suppression for moving targets detection with wideband radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Chevalier, F.; Krasnov, O.A.; Deudon, F.; Bidon, S.

    2011-01-01

    Wideband (high range resolution) radars have been proposed [7] as high performance systems for detection of small targets in adverse environments, due to their small resolution cells and non-ambiguity in range and velocity (velocity ambiguity removed by the measurement of the range migration of the

  14. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  15. Automatic Modulation Classification of Common Communication and Pulse Compression Radar Waveforms using Cyclic Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    intermediate frequency LFM linear frequency modulation MAP maximum a posteriori MATLAB® matrix laboratory ML maximun likelihood OFDM orthogonal frequency...cognitive radar and communication systems include threat recognition and analysis, communication interception/demodulation, effective adaptive jammer...resolution, and ambiguity of range and Doppler (range rate) of the target [21]. Variables that may be manipulated in RADAR waveforms include

  16. Effects of surface roughness on sea ice freeboard retrieval with an Airborne Ku-Band SAR radar altimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Stefan; Stenseng, Lars; Helm, Veit

    2010-01-01

    to investigate sea ice volume changes on an Arctic wide scale. Freeboard retrieval requires precise radar range measurements to the ice surface, therefore we investigate the penetration of the Ku-Band radar waves into the overlying snow cover as well as the effects of sub-footprint-scale surface roughness using...... airborne radar and laser altimeters. We find regional variable penetration of the radar signal at late spring conditions, where the difference of the radar and the reference laser range measurement never agrees with the expected snow thickness. In addition, a rough surface can lead to biases...

  17. The role of short-range Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond in maintaining cutinase active site integrity: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matak, Mehdi Youssefi [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Majid Erfani, E-mail: erfani_m@modares.ac.ir [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-11

    Understanding structural determinants in enzyme active site integrity can provide a good knowledge to design efficient novel catalytic machineries. Fusarium solani pisi cutinase with classic triad Ser-His-Asp is a promising enzyme to scrutinize these structural determinants. We performed two MD simulations: one, with the native structure, and the other with the broken Cys171-Cys178 disulfide bond. This disulfide bond stabilizes a turn in active site on which catalytic Asp175 is located. Functionally important H-bonds and atomic fluctuations in catalytic pocket have been changed. We proposed that this disulfide bond within active site can be considered as an important determinant of cutinase active site structural integrity.

  18. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    limited by the nearly continuous cloud cover in the region and heavy rainfall, which occurs more than 150 days each year. The ability of the shuttle radars to 'see' through the forest canopy to the cultivated cacao below -- independent of weather or sunlight conditions --will allow researchers to distinguish forest from cabruca in unprecedented detail. This SIR-C/X-SAR image was produced by assigning red to the L-band, green to the C-band and blue to the X-band. The Una Reserve is located in the middle of the image west of the coastline and slightly northwest of Comandatuba River. The reserve's primary forests are easily detected by the pink areas in the image. The intensity of red in these areas is due to the high density of forest vegetation (biomass) detected by the radar's L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) channel. Secondary forest is visible along the reserve's eastern border. The Serrado Mar mountain range is located in the top left portion of the image. Cabruca forest to the west of Una Reserve has a different texture and a yellow color. The removal of understory in cabruca forest reduces its biomass relative to primary forest, which changes the L-band and C-band penetration depth and returns, and produces a different texture and color in the image. The region along the Atlantic is mainly mangrove swamp, agricultural fields and urban areas. The high intensity of blue in this region is a result of increasing X-band return in areas covered with swamp and low vegetation. The image clearly separates the mangrove region (east of coastal Highway 001, shown in blue) from the taller and dryer forest west of the highway. The high resolution capability of SIR-C/X-SAR imaging and the sensitivity of its frequency and polarization channels to various land covers will be used for monitoring and mapping areas of importance for conservation. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth

  19. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  20. Approaching 80 Years of Passive Radar (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    could not do without transmitting energy was well understood. Though at the beginning of the radar century there were no such threats as anti- radiation ...short and very short range applications using emissions from cell-phone base stations and WiFi hot spots for moving target localisation. System concepts...application for PCR. A preliminary demonstration of the potential of a WiFi - based PBR for local area surveillance applications was presented at the 2nd

  1. High accuracy 3-D laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a mono-static staring 3-D laser radar based on gated viewing with range accuracy below 1 m at 10 m and 1 cm at 100. We use a high sensitivity, fast, intensified CCD camera, and a Nd:Yag passively Q-switched 32.4 kHz pulsed green laser at 532 nm. The CCD has 752x582 pixels. Camer...

  2. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised......Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  3. Retrieval of Snow Properties for Ku- and Ka-band Dual-Frequency Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Liang; Meneghini, Robert; Tokay, Ali; Bliven, Larry F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the estimation of snow microphysical properties and the associated bulk parameters such as snow water content and water equivalent snowfall rate for Ku- and Ka-band dual-frequency radar. This is done by exploring a suitable scattering model and the proper particle size distribution (PSD) assumption that accurately represent, in the electromagnetic domain, the micro/macro-physical properties of snow. The scattering databases computed from simulated aggregates for small-to-moderate particle sizes are combined with a simple scattering model for large particle sizes to characterize snow scattering properties over the full range of particle sizes. With use of the single-scattering results, the snow retrieval lookup tables can be formed in a way that directly links the Ku- and Ka-band radar reflectivities to snow water content and equivalent snowfall rate without use of the derived PSD parameters. A sensitivity study of the retrieval results to the PSD and scattering models is performed to better understand the dual-wavelength retrieval uncertainties. To aid in the development of the Ku- and Ka-band dual-wavelength radar technique and to further evaluate its performance, self-consistency tests are conducted using measurements of the snow PSD and fall velocity acquired from the Snow Video Imager Particle Image Probe (SVIPIP) duringthe winter of 2014 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility site in Wallops Island, Virginia.

  4. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and...

  5. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast...

  6. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  7. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  8. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  9. Intercontinental Bistatic Radar Test Observation of Asteroid 1998 WT24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; DiMartino, M.; Saba, L.; Delbo, M.; Ostro, S.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Orlati, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first intercontinental planetary radar test performed in Italy observing the near Earth asteroid (NEA) 33342 (1998 WT24) in December 2001 by means of the bistatic configurations Goldstone (California, USA)-Medicina (Italy) and Evpatoria (Ukraine)-Medicina. The experiment goal was to characterize the system for realtime radar follow-up observations of NEAs and artificial orbiting debris, in the framework of a feasibility study which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope, at present under construction, also as a planetary radar facility. We report the preliminary results of the radar observations carried out by the IRA-CNR (Instituto di Radioastronomia - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) and the OATo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino) groups, aimed at exploring the scientific potentials of a new space radar program, using the existing facilities in Italy. The planetary radar technique is uniquely capable of investigating geometry and surface properties of various solar system objects, demonstrating advantages over the optical methods in its high spatial resolution and ability to obtain three-dimensional images. A single radar detection allows to obtain extremely accurate orbital elements, improving the instantaneous positional uncertainties by orders of magnitude with respect to an optically determined orbit. Radar is a powerful means to spatially resolve NEAs by measuring the distribution of the echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) with extreme precision in each coordinate, as it provides detailed information about the target physical properties like size, shape, rotation, near-surface bulk density and roughness and internal density distribution. The Medicina 32m antenna had been successfully used for the first time as the receiving part of a bistatic configuration during a test experiment (September 2001) held to check the capabilities of the entire data acquisition system. This test was possible

  10. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  11. Arctic and Antarctic polar mesosphere summer echoes observed with oblique incidence HF radars: analysis using simultaneous MF and VHF radar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSEs have been well studied using vertical incidence VHF radars at northern high-latitudes. In this paper, two PMSE events detected with the oblique incidence SuperDARN HF radars at Hankasalmi, Finland (62.3° N and Syowa Station, Antarctica (69.0° S, are analyzed, together with simultaneous VHF and medium-frequency (MF radar data. Altitude resolutions of the HF radars in the mesosphere and the lower thermosphere are too poor to know exact PMSE altitudes. However, a comparison of Doppler velocity from the HF radar and neutral wind velocity from the MF radar shows that PMSEs at the HF band appeared at altitudes within 80-90km, which are consistent with those from previous vertical incidence HF-VHF radar results. The HF-VHF PMSE occurrences exhibit a semidiurnal behavior, as observed by other researchers. It is found that in one event, PMSEs occurred when westward semidiurnal winds with large amplitude at 85-88km altitudes attained a maximum. When the HF-VHF PMSEs were observed at distances beyond 180km from MF radar sites, the MF radars detected no appreciable signatures of echo enhancement.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  12. Diurnal tidal wind estimates using TIDI and ground-based radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggin, D.; Lieberman, R.; Wu, Q.; Franke, S.

    In this presentation we compare characteristics of the diurnal tide as viewed by the TIDI instrument and ground-based radars at tropical latitudes. The TIDI winds have been retrieved using a new broad-band filter that greatly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio. We investigate the use of global 12-hour differences to obtain tidal amplitudes on a time-scale of 10 days or shorter. The tidal winds are viewed from the ground using radars in the Hawaian Islands and on the Island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. The two Hawaian radars involved in the study are a medium frequency (MF) partial reflection radar on Kauai, and meteor scatter radar on Kauai. The Rarotonga site similarly has both an MF and meteor scatter radar. The Hawaii and Rarotonga locations are almost exactly conjugate (22 deg N and 22 deg S, respectively), and thus are well situated for making tidal comparisons.

  13. Research on Radar Importance with Decision Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lingjie; Du, Yu; Wang, Liuheng

    2017-12-01

    Considering the characteristic of radar, constructed the evaluation index system of radar importance, established the comprehensive evaluation model based on decision matrix. Finally, by means of an example, the methods of this evaluation on radar importance was right and feasibility.

  14. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector.

  15. Space Radar Image of Altona, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band seasonal image of the Altona test site in Manitoba, Canada, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Winnipeg. The image is centered at approximately 49 degrees north latitude and 97.5 degrees west longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 11, 1994, during the first flight of the radar system, and on October 2, 1994, during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The image channels have the following color assignments: red represents data acquired on April 11, 1994; green represents data acquired on October 2, 1994; blue represents the ratio of the two data sets. The test site is located in the Red River Basin and is characterized by rich farmland where a variety of crops are grown, including wheat, barley, canola, corn, sunflowers and sugar beets. This SIR-C/X-SAR research site is applying radar remote sensing to study the characteristics of vegetation and soil moisture. The seasonal comparison between the April and October 1994 data show the dramatic differences between surface conditions on the two dates. At the time of the April acquisition, almost all agricultural fields were bare and soil moisture levels were high. In October, however, soils were drier and while most crops had been harvested, some standing vegetation was still present. The areas which are cyan in color are dark in April and bright in October. These represent fields of standing biomass (amount of vegetation in a specified area) and the differences in brightness within these cyan fields represent differences in vegetation type. The very bright fields in October represent standing broadleaf crops such as corn, which had not yet been harvested. Other standing vegetation which has less biomass, such as hay and grain fields, are less bright. The magenta indicates bare soil surfaces which were wetter (brighter) in April than in October. The variations in brightness of

  16. Comparison of airborne radar altimeter and ground-based Ku-band radar measurements on the ice cap Austfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, O.; Hawley, R. L.; Kohler, J.; Hagen, J. O.; Morris, E. M.; Dunse, T.; Scott, J. B. T.; Eiken, T.

    2008-11-01

    We compare coincident data from the European Space Agency's Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) with ground-based Very High Bandwidth (VHB) stepped-frequency radar measurements in the Ku-band. The ASIRAS instrument obtained data from ~700 m above the surface, using a 13.5 GHz center frequency and a 1 GHz bandwidth. The ground-based VHB radar measurements were acquired using the same center frequency, but with a variable bandwidth of either 1 or 8 GHz. Four sites were visited with the VHB radar; two sites within the transition region from superimposed ice to firn, and two sites in the long-term firn area (wet-snow zone). The greater bandwidth VHB measurements show that the first peak in the airborne data is a composite of the return from the surface (i.e. air-snow interface) and returns of similar or stronger amplitude from reflectors in the upper ~30 cm of the subsurface. The peak position in the airborne data is thus not necessarily a good proxy for the surface since the maximum and width of the first return depend on the degree of interference between surface and subsurface reflectors. The major response from the winter snowpack was found to be caused by units of thin crust/ice layers (0.5 2 mm) surrounded by large crystals (>3 mm). In the airborne data, it is possible to track such layers for tens of kilometers. The winter snowpack lacked thicker ice layers. The last year's summer surface, characterized by a low density large crystal layer overlaying a harder denser layer, gives a strong radar response, frequently the strongest. The clear relationship observed between the VHB and ASIRAS waveforms, justifies the use of ground-based radar measurements in the validation of air- or spaceborne radars.

  17. Calibrated measurements of PMSE strengths at three different locations observed with SKiYMET radars and narrow beam VHF radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W. K.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.

    2009-12-01

    While PMSE are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, debate still exists on their relative strengths as function of latitude and longitude. Different radar design and noise calibration procedures complicate comparison between sites. Here, we use radars at multiple sites, some with a common design, to better determine the radar backscatter cross-section, and hence compare PMSE strengths. Five radars at Yellowknife (62.5oN, 114.3oW), Andenes (69.3oN, 16.0oE) and Resolute Bay (75.0oN, 95.0oW) in the northern hemisphere were used to observe PMSE during July 2005. At Yellowknife, data were collected for thirteen days. In other two locations data were collected continuously for the full month of July. The radars were independently calibrated using the same method, and absolute backscatter cross-sections were determined. Resolute Bay is close to both the magnetic and geomagnetic north poles, and inside the auroral oval, while the other two sites are under the auroral oval on some occasions. Inter-comparison of the calibrated observations indicates that the strength of the PMSE at Yellowknife and Andenes are comparable, and both are significantly stronger than at Resolute Bay.

  18. Error and Uncertainty Quantification in Precipitation Retrievals from GPM/DPR Using Ground-based Dual-Polarization Radar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Chandrasekar V.; Chen*, Haonan; Petersen, Walter

    2017-04-01

    The active Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and passive radiometer onboard Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory extend the observation range attained by Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) from tropical to most of the globe [1]. Through improved measurements of precipitation, the GPM mission is helping to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, as well as climate changes. Ground Validation (GV) is an indispensable part of the GPM satellite mission. In the pre-launch era, several international validation experiments had already generated a substantial dataset that could be used to develop and test the pre-launch GPM algorithms. After launch, more ground validation field campaigns were conducted to further evaluate GPM precipitation data products as well as the sensitivities of retrieval algorithms. Among various validation equipment, ground based dual-polarization radar has shown great advantages to conduct precipitation estimation over a wide area in a relatively short time span. Therefore, radar is always a key component in all the validation field experiments. In addition, the radar polarization diversity has great potential to characterize precipitation microphysics through the identification of raindrop size distribution and different hydrometeor types [2]. Currently, all the radar sites comprising the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88DP) network are operating in dual-polarization mode. However, most of the operational radar based precipitation products are produced at coarse resolution typically on 1 km by 1 km spatial grids, focusing on precipitation accumulations at temporal scales of 1-h, 3-h, 6-h, 12-h, and/or 24-h (daily). Their capability for instantaneous GPM product validation is severely limited due to the spatial and temporal mismatching between observations from the ground and space. This paper first presents the rationale and

  19. Non-cooperative classification of helicopters using millimetre wave radar and ISAR processing

    OpenAIRE

    Essen, H.; Hägelen, M.; Wahlen, A.; Bers, K.-H.; Jäger, K.; Hebel, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Light weight and compact radars with high resolution capability can be built at millimeter wave frequencies. This has been demonstrated for a long period of time for missile seeker application for military use and as automotive radars in a civilian application. The technological advantages of this type of radar can be adapted to security applications in air traffic management at short and medium range as well as on the ground. The application discussed in this paper, focuses on the derivation...

  20. SAR Subsets for Selected Field Sites, 2007-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for 42 selected sites from various terrestrial ecology and meteorological monitoring networks including...

  1. SAR Subsets for Selected Field Sites, 2007-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for 42 selected sites from various terrestrial ecology and meteorological monitoring networks...

  2. Hybridization of Cognitive Radar and Phased Array Radar Having Low Probability of Intercept Transmit Beamforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Basit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of a cognitive radar (CR hybridized with a phased array radar (PAR having a low probability of intercept (LPI transmit beam forming is proposed. PAR directed high gain property reveals its position to interceptors. Hence, the PAR high gain scanned beam patterns, over the entire surveillance region, are spoiled to get the series of low gain basis patterns. For unaffected array detection performance, these basis patterns are linearly combined to synthesize the high gain beam pattern in the desired direction using the set of weight. Genetic algorithm (GA based evolutionary computing technique finds these weights offline and stores to memory. The emerging CR technology, having distinct properties (i.e., information feedback, memory, and processing at receiver and transmitter, is hybridized with PAR having LPI property. The proposed radar receiver estimates the interceptor range and the direction of arrival (DOA, using the extended Kalman filter (EKF and the GA, respectively, and sends as feedback to transmitter. Selector block in transmitter gets appropriate weights from memory to synthesize the high gain beam pattern in accordance with the interceptor range and the direction. Simulations and the results validate the ability of the proposed radar.

  3. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  4. Bird radar validation in the field by time-referencing line-transect surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Baptist, Martin J; Ens, Bruno J; Krijgsveld, Karen L; van Loon, E Emiel

    2013-01-01

    Track-while-scan bird radars are widely used in ornithological studies, but often the precise detection capabilities of these systems are unknown. Quantification of radar performance is essential to avoid observational biases, which requires practical methods for validating a radar's detection capability in specific field settings. In this study a method to quantify the detection capability of a bird radar is presented, as well a demonstration of this method in a case study. By time-referencing line-transect surveys, visually identified birds were automatically linked to individual tracks using their transect crossing time. Detection probabilities were determined as the fraction of the total set of visual observations that could be linked to radar tracks. To avoid ambiguities in assigning radar tracks to visual observations, the observer's accuracy in determining a bird's transect crossing time was taken into account. The accuracy was determined by examining the effect of a time lag applied to the visual observations on the number of matches found with radar tracks. Effects of flight altitude, distance, surface substrate and species size on the detection probability by the radar were quantified in a marine intertidal study area. Detection probability varied strongly with all these factors, as well as species-specific flight behaviour. The effective detection range for single birds flying at low altitude for an X-band marine radar based system was estimated at ~1.5 km. Within this range the fraction of individual flying birds that were detected by the radar was 0.50 ± 0.06 with a detection bias towards higher flight altitudes, larger birds and high tide situations. Besides radar validation, which we consider essential when quantification of bird numbers is important, our method of linking radar tracks to ground-truthed field observations can facilitate species-specific studies using surveillance radars. The methodology may prove equally useful for optimising

  5. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  6. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mondejar, Albert; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Naeije, Marc; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the frontend for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the dataformatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and specific

  7. A variational technique to estimate snowfall rate from coincident radar, snowflake, and fall-speed observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Steven J.; Wood, Norman B.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2017-07-01

    Estimates of snowfall rate as derived from radar reflectivities alone are non-unique. Different combinations of snowflake microphysical properties and particle fall speeds can conspire to produce nearly identical snowfall rates for given radar reflectivity signatures. Such ambiguities can result in retrieval uncertainties on the order of 100-200 % for individual events. Here, we use observations of particle size distribution (PSD), fall speed, and snowflake habit from the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) to constrain estimates of snowfall derived from Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope Alaska (NSA) Climate Research Facility site at Barrow. MASC measurements of microphysical properties with uncertainties are introduced into a modified form of the optimal-estimation CloudSat snowfall algorithm (2C-SNOW-PROFILE) via the a priori guess and variance terms. Use of the MASC fall speed, MASC PSD, and CloudSat snow particle model as base assumptions resulted in retrieved total accumulations with a -18 % difference relative to nearby National Weather Service (NWS) observations over five snow events. The average error was 36 % for the individual events. Use of different but reasonable combinations of retrieval assumptions resulted in estimated snowfall accumulations with differences ranging from -64 to +122 % for the same storm events. Retrieved snowfall rates were particularly sensitive to assumed fall speed and habit, suggesting that in situ measurements can help to constrain key snowfall retrieval uncertainties. More accurate knowledge of these properties dependent upon location and meteorological conditions should help refine and improve ground- and space-based radar estimates of snowfall.

  8. A variational technique to estimate snowfall rate from coincident radar, snowflake, and fall-speed observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Cooper

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of snowfall rate as derived from radar reflectivities alone are non-unique. Different combinations of snowflake microphysical properties and particle fall speeds can conspire to produce nearly identical snowfall rates for given radar reflectivity signatures. Such ambiguities can result in retrieval uncertainties on the order of 100–200 % for individual events. Here, we use observations of particle size distribution (PSD, fall speed, and snowflake habit from the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC to constrain estimates of snowfall derived from Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM North Slope Alaska (NSA Climate Research Facility site at Barrow. MASC measurements of microphysical properties with uncertainties are introduced into a modified form of the optimal-estimation CloudSat snowfall algorithm (2C-SNOW-PROFILE via the a priori guess and variance terms. Use of the MASC fall speed, MASC PSD, and CloudSat snow particle model as base assumptions resulted in retrieved total accumulations with a −18 % difference relative to nearby National Weather Service (NWS observations over five snow events. The average error was 36 % for the individual events. Use of different but reasonable combinations of retrieval assumptions resulted in estimated snowfall accumulations with differences ranging from −64 to +122 % for the same storm events. Retrieved snowfall rates were particularly sensitive to assumed fall speed and habit, suggesting that in situ measurements can help to constrain key snowfall retrieval uncertainties. More accurate knowledge of these properties dependent upon location and meteorological conditions should help refine and improve ground- and space-based radar estimates of snowfall.

  9. Statistical analysis of radar observed F region irregularities from three longitudinal sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Y. C. Cueva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Equatorial Spread F (ESF is a manifestation of ionospheric interchange instabilities in the nighttime equatorial F region. These instabilities generate plasma density irregularities with scale sizes ranging from centimetres to thousands of kilometres. The irregularities can be detected from a variety of instruments such as digisonde, coherent and incoherent scatter radars, in situ space probes, and airglow photometers. In the present study, occurrence statistics of the ESF, based on various parameters are presented using data obtained from the VHF radars located at three longitudinally separated equatorial stations: Christmas Island (2° N, 202.6° E, 2.9° N dip latitude, São Luís (2.59° S, 315.8° E, 0.5° S dip latitude and Jicamarca (12° S, 283.1° E, 0.6° N dip latitude. The ESF parameters presented here are the onset altitude, onset time (onset refers to first appearance of signal in the radar field of view of the bottom-type and plume, and the peak altitude of the plume. Recent studies have used these parameters to classify the spread F occurrence characteristics. The present study reveals novel features namely, the dependence of ESF parameters on the seasonal, solar flux, declination angle and longitudinal dependence from the three radar sites. In addition, we also present an empirical model to determine the nature of these ESF parameters as a function of the solar flux which may enable us to forecast (with 30 min to 1 h tolerance the plume occurrence at any longitude located in between São Luís and Christmas Island.

  10. Initial backscatter occurrence statistics from the CUTLASS HF radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available A statistical study of the occurrence of ground and ionospheric backscatter within the fields-of-view of the CUTLASS HF radars, at an operating frequency of 10 MHz, during the first 20 months of operation has been undertaken. The diurnal variation of the occurrence of backscatter and the range at which such backscatter is observed is found to be highly dependent on seasonal changes of the ionospheric electron density in both the E and F region, determined from ionosonde observations. In general, ionospheric backscatter is observed at far ranges during the local day in winter months and at near ranges during the local night in summer months. The Iceland radar observes more near-range E region backscatter than the Finland radar as a consequence of its more zonal look-direction. The dependence of the occurrence of backscatter on geomagnetic activity and radar operating frequency are also investigated. The occurrence of ground and ionospheric backscatter is discussed in terms of HF propagation modes and ionospheric electron densities as well as geophysical processes. A brief assessment of the possible impact of solar cycle variations on the observations is made and frequency management is discussed. Such a study, with its focus on the `instrumental' aspect of backscatter occurrence, is essential for a full interpretation of HF coherent radar observations.

  11. Electrical Conductivity of the Bishop Tuff, Bishop, CA: Implications for Ground-Penetrating Radar Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, S. H.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Grimm, R. E.; Heggy, E.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Ferrill, D. A.; Clifford, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    Ideal terrestrial analogues to Mars combine known features such as an arid environment, cold climate, deep water table, saline pore waters, and bedrock dominated by igneous or clastic sedimentary units. Terrestrial analogues best suited for calibrating a suite of planetary geophysical instruments, especially radar sounders, need to be sufficiently characterized to provide an accurate understanding of the local geologic context. The Bishop Tuff, Bishop, California is one of a number of recommended Mars analogue sites (National Research Council Decadal Study report on Terrestrial Analogues to Mars, 2001). While not cold, the Volcanic Tableland is situated in an arid environment, and is underlain by a relatively deep water table (100 to 180 m). These factors, combined with availability of detailed characterization data, made this a potentially appealing location in east-central California for testing the performance of existing and planned radar sounders for future Mars exploration. To take advantage of potential synergies that support improved subsurface resolution when applying multiple geophysical techniques, we developed a collaboration to mutually benefit from coordination of field and laboratory activities. Transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings at several locations on the Volcanic Tableland were performed in preparation for potential ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigations, and are documented in this paper. Laboratory data from Bishop Tuff samples, determined using capacitive cells in the frequency range of 1 to 1000 MHz, are also presented to assess the dielectric behavior of the local geologic units. Interpretation of geophysical data resulting from this field study is aided significantly by the wide range of geological, structural, and hydrogeological data collected by our team over the last 8 years. Knowledge about the subsurface electrical conductivity structure, determined through application of TEM, is used to quantify the expected magnitude of

  12. Ground Penetrating Radar Technologies in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Masalov, Sergey A.

    2014-05-01

    Transient electromagnetic fields are of great interest in Ukraine. The following topics are studied by research teams, with high-level achievements all over the world: (i) Ultra-Wide Band/Short-pulse radar techniques (IRE and LLC "Transient Technologies", for more information please visit http://applied.ire.kharkov.ua/radar%20systems_their%20components%20and%20relevant%20technologies_e.html and http://viy.ua); (ii) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) with stepped frequency sounding signals (IRE); (iii) Continuous-Wave (CW) radar with phase-shift keying signals (IRE); and (iv) Radio-wave interference investigation (Scientific and Technical Centre of The Subsurface Investigation, http://geophysics.ua). GPR applications are mainly in search works, for example GPR is often used to search for treasures. It is also used to identify leaks and diffusion of petroleum in soil, in storage areas, as well as for fault location of pipelines. Furthermore, GPR is used for the localization of underground utilities and for diagnostics of the technical state of hydro dams. Deeper GPR probing was performed to identify landslides in Crimea. Rescue radar with CW signal was designed in IRE to search for living people trapped under the rubble of collapsed buildings. The fourth version of this radar has been recently created, showing higher stability and noise immunity. Radio-wave interference investigation allows studying the soil down to tens of meters. It is possible to identify areas with increased conductivity (moisture) of the soil. LLC "Transient Technologies" is currently working with Shevchenko Kyiv University on a cooperation program in which the construction of a test site is one of the planned tasks. In the framework of this program, a GPR with a 300 MHz antenna was handed to the geological Faculty of the University. Employees of "Transient Technologies" held introductory lectures with a practical demonstration for students majoring in geophysics. The authors participated to GPR

  13. A combined QC methodology in Ebro Delta HF radar system: real time web monitoring of diagnostic parameters and offline validation of current data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Pablo; Piedracoba, Silvia; Soto-Navarro, Javier; Ruiz, Maria Isabel; Alvarez Fanjul, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Over recent years, special attention has been focused on the development of protocols for near real-time quality control (QC) of HF radar derived current measurements. However, no agreement has been worldwide achieved to date to establish a standardized QC methodology, although a number of valuable international initiatives have been launched. In this context, Puertos del Estado (PdE) aims to implement a fully operational HF radar network with four different Codar SeaSonde HF radar systems by means of: - The development of a best-practices robust protocol for data processing and QC procedures to routinely monitor sites performance under a wide variety of ocean conditions. - The execution of validation works with in-situ observations to assess the accuracy of HF radar-derived current measurements. The main goal of the present work is to show this combined methodology for the specific case of Ebro HF radar (although easily expandable to the rest of PdE radar systems), deployed to manage Ebro River deltaic area and promote the conservation of an important aquatic ecosystem exposed to a severe erosion and reshape. To this aim, a web interface has been developed to efficiently monitor in real time the evolution of several diagnostic parameters provided by the manufacturer (CODAR) and used as indicators of HF radar system health. This web, updated automatically every hour, examines sites performance on different time basis in terms of: - Hardware parameters: power and temperature. - Radial parameters, among others: Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), number of radial vectors provided by time step, maximum radial range and bearing. - Total uncertainty metrics provided by CODAR: zonal and meridional standard deviations and covariance between both components. - Additionally, a widget embedded in the web interface executes queries against PdE database, providing the chance to compare current time series observed by Tarragona buoy (located within Ebro HF radar spatial domain) and

  14. Radar Chaff: A Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    presented and a general literature review is given. ii loerner. W-M., W. D. fl-Arini. C-Y. Chan, S. Satchi, W-S. Ip, P. W. Mastoria, and 5-Y. Foo, (cont...evolution of the chaff cloud in response to atmospheric processes _n terms of the mean concentration of various dipole " clases " (defined . dipole...Clutter." Arpendix III (Reviaion 1) of Volume It (Radar Clutter) of Book II (Appendixes) of Assessment of Requirements of 1985-20OO Era U. S. Navy Surface

  15. Weather Radar Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-31

    Cartesian grid . Specifi software odles ane shown in, Table 151-3 ail ’ecIbe briefly in this section below. TAi S- _ _ _ UT LUWL ps mw Lqw Tomn am DWq..G. Se 2...beman the weather radar project software devalopmet personnel and the Limoa Control Syms Egiesering Oroup personnel who rde’-d and implementd the moun...We a~ad hove smard our dom collecton wish the FL-2 ainanmd whh the musmmot umm. Data amum ope ea lymA Mmnhb mod carnatly a sshdukd so coomm -kbro

  16. Space Weather Effects on Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    War II, with heavy reliance on radar and radio as war-fighting tools, we encountered unexplained outages. You may have seen movies showing soldiers...individual meteorology offices, and the issues that each range might possibly encounter. You may have radars that can be directly affected by solar radio...may interact with atomic nuclei thus imparting a certain recoil energy and generating secondary particles. Both the recoiling nucleus and secondary

  17. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  18. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  19. SMAP's Radar OBP Algorithm Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Charles; Spencer, Michael W.; Veilleux, Louise; Chan, Samuel; He, Yutao; Zheng, Jason; Nguyen, Kayla

    2009-01-01

    An approach for algorithm specifications and development is described for SMAP's radar onboard processor with multi-stage demodulation and decimation bandpass digital filter. Point target simulation is used to verify and validate the filter design with the usual radar performance parameters. Preliminary FPGA implementation is also discussed.

  20. Behavior Subtraction applied to radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Caro Cuenca, M.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm developed for optical images has been applied to radar data. The algorithm, Behavior Subtraction, is based on capturing the dynamics of a scene and detecting anomalous behavior. The radar application is the detection of small surface targets at sea. The sea surface yields the expected

  1. Performance indicators modern surveillance radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooij, P.N.C.; Theil, A.

    2014-01-01

    Blake chart computations are widely employed to rank detection coverage capabilities of competitive search radar systems. Developed for comparable 2D radar systems with a mechanically rotating reflector antenna, it was not necessary to regard update rate and plot quality in Blake's chart. To

  2. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  3. Variation of weather radar sensitivity at ground level and from space: case studies and possible causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joss, J. [Motto, Intragna (Switzerland); Gabella, M.; Perona, G. [Politecnico di Torino - Electronics Dept., Torino (Italy); Michaelides, S.C. [Meteorological Service, Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2006-10-15

    Firstly, this paper summarizes the procedure for correcting the variation of sensitivity of radars at ground level, using a radar in space for reference, as already described in the literature. Around 10dB have to be added to the measured radar reflectivity Z (in mm{sup 6}/m{sup 3}), when increasing the range from 10 km to 100 km. In other words, instead of an r{sup -2}-dependence (where r is the range, i.e. the distance between the radar and the meteorological target), we find an apparent reduction proportional to r{sup -3}. A similar procedure is used to analyze the dependence of the TRMM radar, using the adjusted data of the radar at ground level for reference. We have to add around 3dB to the measured reflectivity, when increasing the distance from close to Nadir (10 km) to the edge of the swath (100 km). In other words, instead of a constant sensitivity over the swath of the satellite, we find a reduction of sensitivity with the range, proportional to r{sup -0.3}. Secondly, the paper illustrates possible causes of the systematic range dependence of both radars. The old, dominant cause - overshooting of precipitation - is already vastly discussed in literature. We describe the variability of the precipitation with three case studies. The variability of the precipitation is difficult to quantify. It is concluded to be responsible for the variable range dependence and for many disillusions with radar. (orig.)

  4. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  5. ISAR imaging using the instantaneous range instantaneous Doppler method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wazna, TM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging, the Range Instantaneous Doppler (RID) method is used to compensate for the nonuniform rotational motion of the target that degrades the Doppler resolution of the ISAR image. The Instantaneous Range...

  6. Space Radar Image of Sydney, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image is dominated by the metropolitan area of Australia's largest city, Sydney. Sydney Harbour, with numerous coves and inlets, is seen in the upper center of the image, and the roughly circular Botany Bay is shown in the lower right. The downtown business district of Sydney appears as a bright white area just above the center of the image. The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a white line adjacent to the downtown district. The well-known Sydney Opera House is the small, white dot to the right of the bridge. Urban areas appear yellow, blue and brown. The purple areas are undeveloped areas and park lands. Manly, the famous surfing beach, is shown in yellow at the top center of the image. Runways from the Sydney Airport are the dark features that extend into Botany Bay in the lower right. Botany Bay is the site where Captain James Cook first landed his ship, Endeavour, in 1770. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 20, 1994, onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The area shown is 33 kilometers by 38kilometers (20 miles by 23 miles) and is centered at 33.9 degrees south latitude, 151.2 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequenciesand polarizations as follows: red is L-band, vertically transmittedand horizontally received; green is C-band, vertically transmitted and horizontally received; and blue is C-band, vertically transmittedand received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italianand United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. #####

  7. Vertical Radar Profiling to Determine Dielectric Constant, Water Content and Porosity Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knoll, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A vertical radar profiling (VRP) experiment was conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site to determine if direct arrivals and reflections can be recorded using the surface-to-borehole survey geometry...

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION MCGILL W-BAND RADAR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation McGill W-Band Radar GCPEx dataset was collected from February 1, 2012 to February 29, 2012 at the CARE site in Ontario, Canada as a part of...

  9. Orbiting Sounding Radar for Global 3D Tomography Mapping of the Martian Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Y.; Wu, X.; Jordan, R.; Heggy, E.; Plaut, J.-J.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an orbiting sounding radar mission capable of 3-D mapping of the Martian subsurface, thus revealing layers, local ice deposits, and other volatile materials that are crucial for landing site selection or in-situ resource utilization.

  10. Ultrahigh-resolution Cn2 profiles derived from an FM-CW radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jim R.; McLaughlin, Scott

    1992-08-01

    The U.S. Army Atmospheric Science Laboratory operates a frequency modulated-continuous wave (FM-CW) radar at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. This 10 cm wavelength radar has the unique capability of measuring 2 m resolution Cn2 profiles to 2 km above ground level. At this short wavelength, scattering from point targets, presumably insects, seriously contaminates the turbulence measurements. The ability of the FM-CW radar to resolve individual insects even at two km allows the insect signature to be removed from the turbulent backscatter. Radar calibration, data, and a technique for removing insect contamination are presented.

  11. 100 years of radar

    CERN Document Server

    Galati, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    This book offers fascinating insights into the key technical and scientific developments in the history of radar, from the first patent, taken out by Hülsmeyer in 1904, through to the present day. Landmark events are highlighted and fascinating insights provided into the exceptional people who made possible the progress in the field, including the scientists and technologists who worked independently and under strict secrecy in various countries across the world in the 1930s and the big businessmen who played an important role after World War II. The book encourages multiple levels of reading. The author is a leading radar researcher who is ideally placed to offer a technical/scientific perspective as well as a historical one. He has taken care to structure and write the book in such a way as to appeal to both non-specialists and experts. The book is not sponsored by any company or body, either formally or informally, and is therefore entirely unbiased. The text is enriched by approximately three hundred ima...

  12. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenschel, E. [Mirage Systems, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  13. An improved hydrometeor detection method for millimeter-wavelength cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinming; Zhu, Zeen; Zheng, Chuang; Xie, Hailing; Zhou, Tian; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2017-07-01

    A modified method with a new noise reduction scheme that can reduce the noise distribution to a narrow range is proposed to distinguish clouds and other hydrometeors from noise and recognize more features with weak signal in cloud radar observations. A spatial filter with central weighting, which is widely used in cloud radar hydrometeor detection algorithms, is also applied in our method to examine radar return for significant levels of signals. Square clouds were constructed to test our algorithm and the method used for the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Program millimeter-wavelength cloud radar. We also applied both the methods to 6 months of cloud radar observations at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University and compared the results. It was found that our method has significant advantages in reducing the rates of both failed negative and false positive hydrometeor identifications in simulated clouds and recognizing clouds with weak signal from our cloud radar observations.

  14. Laser radar: historical prospective-from the East to the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molebny, Vasyl; McManamon, Paul; Steinvall, Ove; Kobayashi, Takao; Chen, Weibiao

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the history of laser radar development in America, Europe, and Asia. Direct detection laser radar is discussed for range finding, designation, and topographic mapping of Earth and of extraterrestrial objects. Coherent laser radar is discussed for environmental applications, such as wind sensing and for synthetic aperture laser radar development. Gated imaging is discussed through scattering layers for military, medical, and security applications. Laser microradars have found applications in intravascular studies and in ophthalmology for vision correction. Ghost laser radar has emerged as a new technology in theoretical and simulation applications. Laser radar is now emerging as an important technology for applications such as self-driving cars and unmanned aerial vehicles. It is also used by police to measure speed, and in gaming, such as the Microsoft Kinect.

  15. Indoor Radar Cross Section Measurements of Simple Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alexandre Souza Miacci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has described the radar absorbing materials characterization and radar cross section measurements, in the frequency range of 8 to 12 GHz, using a very simple setup. Simple targets like sphere, cylinder, flat plate, and dihedral corner were characterized by measuring the backscattered radiation patterns when these targets were illuminated by monostatic microwave radiation. Measurements were carried out inside an anechoic chamber (9x5x4m3. Typical radar cross section patterns were obtained in different aspect angles, by rotating the targets around their vertical axes. The measured values and the theoretical previsions for each metallic target showed that the used setup guarantees a good precision of the obtained data. By recovering one of the targets, a cylinder, with a specific radar absorbing material developed at Materials Division of the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute, it was possible to compare the obtained patterns and to discuss the influence of radar absorbing materials on the observed radar cross section reduction patterns. The used methodology showed to be useful for attending aeronautical and telecommunication applications.

  16. Experimental study of dual polarized radar return from the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S. A.; Kapustin, I. A.; Lavrova, O. Yu.; Molkov, A. A.; Sergievskaya, I. A.; Shomina, O. V.

    2017-10-01

    Dual-polarized microwave radars are of particular interest nowadays as perspective tool of ocean remote sensing. Microwave radar backscattering at moderate and large incidence angles according to conventional models is determined by resonance (Bragg) surface waves typically of cm-scale wavelength range. Some recent experiments have indicated, however, that an additional, non Bragg component (NBC) contributes to the radar return. The latter is considered to occur due to wave breaking. At present our understanding of the nature of different components of radar return is still poor. This paper presents results of field experiment using an X-/C-/S-band Doppler radar operating at HH- and VVpolarizations. The intensity and radar Doppler shifts for Bragg and non Bragg components are retrieved from measurements of VV and HH radar returns. Analysis of a ratio of VV and HH radar backscatter - polarization ratio (PR) has demonstrated a significant role of a non Bragg component. NBC contributes significantly to the total radar backscatter, in particular, at moderate incidence angles (about 50-70 deg.) it is 2-3 times smaller than VV Bragg component and several times larger that HH Bragg component. Both NBC and BC depend on azimuth angle, being minimal for cross wind direction, but NBC is more isotropic than BC. It is obtained that velocities of scatterers retrieved from radar Doppler shifts are different for Bragg waves and for non Bragg component; NBC structures are "faster" than Bragg waves particularly for upwind radar observations. Bragg components propagate approximately with phase velocities of linear gravity-capillary waves (when accounting for wind drift). Velocities of NBC scatterers depend on radar band, being the largest for S-band and the smallest at X-band, this means that different structures on the water surface are responsible for non Bragg scattering in a given radar band.

  17. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burmeister

    2011-03-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

  18. Inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere during the MaCWAVE winter campaign. Part I. Observations with collocated radars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, P.; Serafimovich, A.; Peters, D.; Latteck, R. [Leibniz-Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik, Kuehlungsborn (Germany); Dalin, P. [Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Goldberg, R. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2006-07-01

    During the MaCWAVE campaign, combined rocket, radiosonde and ground-based measurements have been performed at the Norwegian Andoeya rocket range (ARR) near Andenes and the Swedish rocket range (ESRANGE) near Kiruna in January 2003 to study gravity waves in the vicinity of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. The investigations presented here are mainly based on the evaluation of continuous radar measurements with the ALWIN VHP radar in the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere at Andenes (69.3 N, 16.0 E) and the ESRAD VHP radar near Kiruna (67.9 N, 21.9 E). Both radars are separated by about 260 km. Based on wavelet transformations of both data sets, the strongest activity of inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere has been detected during the first period from 24-26 January 2003 with dominant vertical wavelengths of about 4-5 km as well as with dominant observed periods of about 13-14 h for the altitude range between 5 and 8 km under the additional influence of mountain waves. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of {proportional_to}200 km moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with intrinsic periods in the order of {proportional_to}5 h and with horizontal wavelengths of 200 km, moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. From the derived downward energy propagation it is supposed, that these waves are likely generated by a jet streak in the upper troposphere. The parameters of the jet-induced gravity waves have been estimated at both sites separately. The identified gravity waves are coherent at both locations and show higher amplitudes on the east-side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge, as expected by the influence of mountains. (orig.)

  19. Inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere during the MaCWAVE winter campaign - Part I: Observations with collocated radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P.; Serafimovich, A.; Peters, D.; Dalin, P.; Goldberg, R.; Latteck, R.

    2006-11-01

    During the {MaCWAVE} campaign, combined rocket, radiosonde and ground-based measurements have been performed at the Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) near Andenes and the Swedish Rocket Range (ESRANGE) near Kiruna in January 2003 to study gravity waves in the vicinity of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. The investigations presented here are mainly based on the evaluation of continuous radar measurements with the ALWIN VHF radar in the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere at Andenes (69.3° N, 16.0° E) and the ESRAD VHF radar near Kiruna (67.9° N, 21.9° E). Both radars are separated by about 260 km. Based on wavelet transformations of both data sets, the strongest activity of inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere has been detected during the first period from 24-26 January 2003 with dominant vertical wavelengths of about 4-5 km as well as with dominant observed periods of about 13-14 h for the altitude range between 5 and 8 km under the additional influence of mountain waves. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of 200 km moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with intrinsic periods in the order of 5 h and with horizontal wavelengths of 200 km, moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. From the derived downward energy propagation it is supposed, that these waves are likely generated by a jet streak in the upper troposphere. The parameters of the jet-induced gravity waves have been estimated at both sites separately. The identified gravity waves are coherent at both locations and show higher amplitudes on the east-side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge, as expected by the influence of mountains.

  20. Comparison of range migration correction algorithms for range-Doppler processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Faruk

    2017-07-01

    The next generation digital radars are able to provide high-range resolution by the advancement of radar hardware technologies. These systems take advantage of coherent integration and Doppler processing technique to increase the target's signal-to-noise ratio. Due to the high-range resolution (small range cells) and fast target motion, a target migrates through multiple range cells within a coherent processing interval. Range cell migration (also known as range walk) occurs and degrades the coherent integration gain. There are many approaches in the literature to correct these unavoidable effects and focus the target in the range-Doppler domain. We demonstrate some of these methods on an operational frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar and point out practical issues in the application.

  1. Evaluation of some features for extended target extraction in polarimetric and non-polarimetric radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genderen, P.; Kovalenko, V.

    2009-01-01

    Detection in most surveillance radars is based on the condition of point targets against a more or less homogeneous background. Currently, the resolution of many new types of radar is increasing, at least in the range dimension. Therefore many objects can no longer be considered as points. Also as a

  2. AMBER: An X-band FMCW digital beam forming synthetic aperture radar for a tactical UAV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, M.W. van der; Otten, M.P.G.; Huizing, A.G.; Tan, R.G.; Caro Cuenca, M.; Ruizenaar, M.G.A.

    2013-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. This system is demonstrated on a manned helicopter and motor glider. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to meet

  3. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) From Space - Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Light detection and ranging, or lidar, is like radar but atoptical wavelengths. The principle of operation and theirapplications in remote sensing are similar. Lidars havemany advantages over radars in instrument designs andapplications because of the much shorter laser wavelengthsand narrower beams. The lidar transmitters and receiveroptics are much smaller than radar antenna dishes. Thespatial resolution of lidar measurement is much finer thanthat of radar because of the much smaller footprint size onground. Lidar measurements usually give a better temporalresolution because the laser pulses can be much narrowerthan radio frequency (RF) signals. The major limitation oflidar is the ability to penetrate clouds and ground surfaces.

  4. The potential of modern radar when stealth technology and active interference are used simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, V. V.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of stealth technology and the absence or presence of active interference on the range of the main types of modern radar is evaluated. Levels of reduction of the effective scattering areas in the case of which the radar is ineffective are determined.

  5. Quantitative analysis of X-band weather radar attenuation correction accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2006-01-01

    At short wavelengths, especially C-, X-, and K-band, weather radar signals arc attenuated by the precipitation along their paths. This constitutes a major source of error for radar rainfall estimation, in particular for intense precipitation. A recently developed stochastic simulator of range

  6. Application of Multi-Band Signals to Suppress the Diffraction Lobes in MIMO Radar with Highly Directional Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Nefedov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When emitting the orthogonal signals the MIMO radar generally uses widely directional antennas of transmitting and receiving elements (sites. Principles of MIMO radar are generally applicable at highly directional antennas. For a small sites spacing and application of narrowly focused and synchronous scanning antenna provides new benefits for MIMO radar. These include an increase in the power potential, detection range and easy of synchronous radar zone scanning with equivalent narrow spatial beam.For MIMO radar with narrow radiation patterns it is typical to have a diffraction pattern within the equivalent scanning beam, consisting of a large number of intense grating lobes. The structure of the diffraction pattern and the width of the lobes depend on the inter-element distance (base and the coordinates of MIMO radar position. The angular width of the diffraction pattern is equal to the width of the identical patterns at positions. Removing the angular ambiguity will require special measures to reduce the level of the lateral lobes This paper is devoted to assessing the degree of side lobes reduction by the use of multi-band multi-frequency signals with non-overlapping groups of multi - frequency bands with two versions of the co-processing between the groups of frequency components - additive and multiplicative.It is shown for the embodiment of MIMO radar with 5- receiver and 5-transmitter positions and narrow beam patterns and 5-frequency signal in the band of 1.6 MHz that increasing initial frequency of spectrum up to 10% leads to the fact that diffraction maxima of the lobe for increasing frequencies coincide with minima in the diffraction pattern at the original frequency. This was the basis for using multi-band signals when suppressing the diffraction lobes in MIMO radar. The embodied MIMO radar with two-way 5-frequency signal and detuning initial frequencies 10% shows that the additive treatment gives diffraction of lobe suppression -3

  7. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  8. Radar signal analysis and processing using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Mahafza, Bassem R

    2008-01-01

    Offering radar-related software for the analysis and design of radar waveform and signal processing, this book provides comprehensive coverage of radar signals and signal processing techniques and algorithms. It contains numerous graphical plots, common radar-related functions, table format outputs, and end-of-chapter problems. The complete set of MATLAB[registered] functions and routines are available for download online.

  9. The use of radar for bathymetry assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardoom, J.H.; Greidanus, H.S.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and spaceborne imaging radar. Bathymetric information derived from radar data is limited in accuracy, but radar has a good spatial coverage. The accuracy can be increased by assimilating the radar imagery into existing or insitu gathered

  10. GFP is Efficiently Expressed by Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus Using a Range of Tritimovirus NIa Cleavage Sites and Forms Dense Aggregates in Cereal Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-based transient expression vector was developed to express GFP as a marker protein. The GFP cistron was engineered between the P1 and HC-Pro cistrons in an infectious cDNA clone of WSMV. The cleavage sites, P3/6KI, 6KI/CI, NIa/NIb, or NIb/CP, from WSMV were fused to ...

  11. Characterization, Long-Range Transport and Source Identification of Carbonaceous Aerosols during Spring and Autumn Periods at a High Mountain Site in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-yan Jia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available PM10 (particulate matter samples were collected at Mount Lu, a high elevation mountain site in south China (August and September of 2011; and March, April and May of 2012. Eight carbonaceous fractions of particles were analyzed to characterize the possible carbonaceous emission sources. During the sampling events, daily average concentrations of PM10 at Mount Lu were 97.87 μg/m3 and 73.40 μg/m3 in spring and autumn, respectively. The observed mean organic carbon (OC and element carbon (EC concentrations during spring in PM10 were 10.58 μg/m3 and 2.58 μg/m3, respectively, and those in autumn were 6.89 μg/m3 and 2.40 μg/m3, respectively. Secondary organic carbon concentration was 4.77 μg/m3 and 2.93 μg/m3 on average, accounting for 28.0% and 31.0% of the total OC in spring and autumn, respectively. Relationships between carbonaceous species and results of principal component analysis showed that there were multiple sources contributing to the carbonaceous aerosols at the observation site. Through back trajectory analysis, it was found that air masses in autumn were mainly transported from the south of China, and these have the highest OC but lowest EC concentrations. Air masses in spring transported from northwest China bring 7.77 μg/m3 OC and 2.28 μg/m3 EC to the site, with lower levels coming from other sites. These air mass sources were featured by the effective carbon ratio (ECR.

  12. Flight test diagnostics using radar cross-section measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, P. S. S.; Anderson, W. F.

    1981-11-01

    An automated radar cross-section (RCS) measurement system is described, which features windband coverage, coherent step-frequency measurement, polarization diversity, waveform flexibility, and on-site digital processing. A computer-aided diagnostic technique to facilitate preflight planning and post-mission analyses is also discussed, and applications of the combined capabilities of both systems are considered. It is demonstrated that interactive RCS tailoring of a vehicle's backscatter cross-section improves the collection of radar data, allows post-flight motion extraction on small instrument vehicles, and makes possible the diagnosis of a vehicles endo-atmospheric dynamics to check the aerodynamic coefficient.

  13. In-situ Calibration Methods for Phased Array High Frequency Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, P. J.; Flament, M.; Chavanne, C.; Flores-vidal, X.; Rodriguez, I.; Marié, L.; Hilmer, T.

    2016-12-01

    HF radars measure currents through the Doppler-shift of electromagnetic waves Bragg-scattered by surface gravity waves. While modern clocks and digital synthesizers yield range errors negligible compared to the bandwidth-limited range resolution, azimuth calibration issues arise for beam-forming phased arrays. Sources of errors in the phases of the received waves can be internal to the radar system (phase errors of filters, cable lengths, antenna tuning) and geophysical (standing waves, propagation and refraction anomalies). They result in azimuthal biases (which can be range-dependent) and beam-forming side-lobes (which induce Doppler ambiguities). We analyze the experimental calibrations of 17 deployments of WERA HF radars, performed between 2003 and 2012 in Hawaii, the Adriatic, France, Mexico and the Philippines. Several strategies were attempted: (i) passive reception of continuous multi-frequency transmitters on GPS-tracked boats, cars, and drones; (ii) bi-static calibrations of radars in mutual view; (iii) active echoes from vessels of opportunity of unknown positions or tracked through AIS; (iv) interference of unknown remote transmitters with the chirped local oscillator. We found that: (a) for antennas deployed on the sea shore, a single-azimuth calibration is sufficient to correct phases within a typical beam-forming azimuth range; (b) after applying this azimuth-independent correction, residual pointing errors are 1-2 deg. rms; (c) for antennas deployed on irregular cliffs or hills, back from shore, systematic biases appear for some azimuths at large incidence angles, suggesting that some of the ground-wave electromagnetic energy propagates in a terrain-following mode between the sea shore and the antennas; (d) for some sites, fluctuations of 10-25 deg. in radio phase at 20-40 deg. azimuthal period, not significantly correlated among antennas, are omnipresent in calibrations along a constant-range circle, suggesting standing waves or multiple paths in

  14. How to Create and Manipulate Radar Range-Doppler Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    TYPE OF REPORT Technical Note 7. DOCUMENT DATE December 2014 8. FILE NUMBER 2012/1057198/1 9. TASK NUMBER 07/139 10. TASK SPONSOR DMO/MEWSPO 11. No. OF...not straightforward. But there is some latitude in the definition of a spectrum’s bandwidth, given that technically each plot in Figure 11 has infinite... localised near its peak at −102 m/s. 46 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED DSTO–TN–1386 10.2 Series of Chirped Rectangular Pulses with Doppler Windowing The

  15. Radar Cross Section Studies/Compact Range Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, W. D.; Dominek, A. K.; Gupta, I. J.; Newman, E. H.; Pathak, P. H.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is given of the achievements of NASA Grant NsG-1613 by Ohio State University from May 1, 1987 to April 30, 1988. The major topics covered are as follows: (1) electromagnetic scattering analysis; (2) indoor scattering measurement systems; (3) RCS control; (4) waveform processing techniques; (5) material scattering and design studies; (6) design and evaluation of design studies; and (7) antenna studies. Major progress has been made in each of these areas as verified by the numerous publications produced.

  16. Air and spaceborne radar systems an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lacomme, Philippe; Hardange, Jean-Philippe; Normant, Eric

    2001-01-01

    A practical tool on radar systems that will be of major help to technicians, student engineers and engineers working in industry and in radar research and development. The many users of radar as well as systems engineers and designers will also find it highly useful. Also of interest to pilots and flight engineers and military command personnel and military contractors. """"This introduction to the field of radar is intended for actual users of radar. It focuses on the history, main principles, functions, modes, properties and specific nature of modern airborne radar. The book examines radar's

  17. Under the Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Goss, WM

    2010-01-01

    This is the biography of Ruby Payne-Scott (1912 to 1981). As the first female radio astronomer (and one of the first people in the world to consider radio astronomy), she made classic contributions to solar radio physics. She also played a major role in the design of the Australian government's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research radars, which were in turn of vital importance in the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II and were used by Australian, US and New Zealand personnel. From a sociological perspective, her career also offers many examples of the perils of being a female academic in the first half of the 20th century. Written in an engaging style and complemented by many historical photographs this book gives a fascinating insight into the beginning of radio astronomy and the role of a pioneering woman in astronomy.

  18. Introduction to radar target recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Tait, P

    2006-01-01

    This new text provides an overview of the radar target recognition process and covers the key techniques being developed for operational systems. It is based on the fundamental scientific principles of high resolution radar, and explains how the techniques can be used in real systems, taking into account the characteristics of practical radar system designs and component limitations. It also addresses operational aspects, such as how high resolution modes would fit in with other functions such as detection and tracking. Mathematics is kept to a minimum and the complex techniques and issues are

  19. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4 stable stratospheric

  20. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can

  1. UAV-Borne Profiling Radar for Forest Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave Radar is an attractive solution for forest mapping and inventories because microwave signals penetrates into the forest canopy and the backscattering signal can provide information regarding the whole forest structure. Satellite-borne and airborne imaging radars have been used in forest resources mapping for many decades. However, their accuracy with respect to the main forest inventory attributes substantially varies depending on the wavelength and techniques used in the estimation. Systems providing canopy backscatter as a function of canopy height are, practically speaking, missing. Therefore, there is a need for a radar system that would enable the scientific community to better understand the radar backscatter response from the forest canopy. Consequently, we undertook a research study to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-borne profiling (i.e., waveform radar that could be used to improve the understanding of the radar backscatter response for forestry mapping and inventories. A frequency modulation continuous waveform (FMCW profiling radar, termed FGI-Tomoradar, was introduced, designed and tested. One goal is the total weight of the whole system is less than 7 kg, including the radar system and georeferencing system, with centimetre-level positioning accuracy. Achieving this weight goal would enable the FGI-Tomoradar system to be installed on the Mini-UAV platform. The prototype system had all four linear polarization measuring capabilities, with bistatic configuration in Ku-band. In system performance tests in this study, FGI-Tomoradar was mounted on a manned helicopter together with a Riegl VQ-480-U laser scanner and tested in several flight campaigns performed at the Evo site, Finland. Airborne laser scanning data was simultaneously collected to investigate the differences and similarities of the outputs for the same target area for better understanding the penetration of the microwave signal into the forest canopy

  2. Radar essentials a concise handbook for radar design and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Curry, G Richard

    2012-01-01

    When you need vital data fast, turn to Radar Essentials. This compact yet comprehensive reference has compiled the most used principles, data, tables, and equations that are used by radar and aerospace system designers on a daily basis. Experts and non-experts alike will find this to be their go-to source for recalling and understanding the fundamentals and employing them in design and performance analysis.

  3. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    computed, and the detection of a target is determined based on a Monte Carlo test. For each successful target confirmation, a measurement report is...detection based on Monte Carlo test • add appropriate random perturbations to detec- tion measurements Radar Targets Environment Input Parameters... Fuente and J.R. Casar-Corredera. Optimal radar pulse scheduling using a neural network. In IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks, volume 7, pages 4558–4591

  4. Jurassic and Cretaceous Hagiastridae from the Blake-Bahama Basin /Site 5A, JOIDES Leg I/ and the Great Valley Sequence, California Coast Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessagno, E. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a total of 24 new species and four genuses of Jurassic and Cretaceous Hagiastridae found in the Great Valley Sequence of the California Coast Ranges. Also described are four new species from the late Jurassic strata of the Blake-Bahama Basin. Spumellariina with a spongy meshwork is included in the superfamily Spongodiscacea Haeckel.

  5. Integrated radar-photometry sensor based on constrained optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Youenn; Agam, Gady; Cohen, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Robotic teleoperation is a major research area with numerous applications. Efficient teleoperation, however, greatly depends on the provided sensory information. In this paper, an integrated radar- photometry sensor is presented. The developed sensor relies on the strengths of the two main modalties: robust radar-based range data, and high resolution dynamic photometric imaging. While radar data has low resolution and depth from motion in photometric images is susceptible to poor visibility conditions, the integrated sensor compensates for the flaws of the individual components. The integration of the two modalities is achieved by us ing the radar based range data in order to constrain the optical flow estimation, and fusing the resulting depth maps. The optical flow computation is constrained by a model flow field based upon the radar data, by using a rigidity constraint, and by incorporating edge information into the optical flow estimation. The data fusion is based upon a confidence estimation of the image based depth computation. Results with simulated data demonstrate the good potential of the approach.

  6. Radar Data for Identifying the Characteristics of Tropical Forest Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wuryanta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Radar is one of remote sensing technology which utilizes active electromagnetic energy and are able to provide information about the characteristics of forest stand. This study utilized JERS-1 and ERS-1 radar images to analyze the relationship between the radar backscatter and forest stand characteristics such as Diameter Breast Height (DBH, basal area, and canopy cover. This research was conducted in Jambi Province, Bungo Tebo District, Sumatra, Indonesia. The research site covered the forest concession, Suku Anak Dalam, the area adjacent to Pelepat and Batang Tebo River, and Kuamang Kuning village. Gamma Map Filter with 7 x 7 window size was applied to reduce speckle noise of the SAR images (ERS-1 and JERS-1. This study found out the positive significant correlation between basal area and DBH with JERS-1 radar backscatter (i.e., r = 0.75 and r = 0.70, while ERS-1 radar backscatter has correlation (r = 0.64 with the canopy cover.

  7. Compressive Sensing for MIMO Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to achieve superior resolution as compared to traditional radar systems with the same number of transmit and receive antennas. This paper considers a distributed MIMO radar scenario, in which each transmit element is a node in a wireless network, and investigates the use of compressive sampling for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. According to the theory of compressive sampling, a signal that is sparse in some domain can be recovered based on far fewer samples than required by the Nyquist sampling theorem. The DOA of targets form a sparse vector in the angle space, and therefore, compressive sampling can be applied for DOA estimation. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than other approaches. This is particularly useful in a distributed scenario, in which the results at each receive node need to be transmitted to a fusion center for further processing.

  8. Partly cloudy with a chance of migration: Weather, radars, and aeroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilson, Phillip B.; Frick, Winifred F.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Howard, Kenneth W.; Larkin, Ronald P.; Diehl, Robert H.; Westbrook, John K.; Kelly, T. Adam; Kunz, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Aeroecology is an emerging scientific discipline that integrates atmospheric science, Earth science, geography, ecology, computer science, computational biology, and engineering to further the understanding of biological patterns and processes. The unifying concept underlying this new transdisciplinary field of study is a focus on the planetary boundary layer and lower free atmosphere (i.e., the aerosphere), and the diversity of airborne organisms that inhabit and depend on the aerosphere for their existence. Here, we focus on the role of radars and radar networks in aeroecological studies. Radar systems scanning the atmosphere are primarily used to monitor weather conditions and track the location and movements of aircraft. However, radar echoes regularly contain signals from other sources, such as airborne birds, bats, and arthropods. We briefly discuss how radar observations can be and have been used to study a variety of airborne organisms and examine some of the many potential benefits likely to arise from radar aeroecology for meteorological and biological research over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Radar systems are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the advent of innovative signal processing and dual-polarimetric capabilities. These capabilities should be better harnessed to promote both meteorological and aeroecological research and to explore the interface between these two broad disciplines. We strongly encourage close collaboration among meteorologists, radar scientists, biologists, and others toward developing radar products that will contribute to a better understanding of airborne fauna.

  9. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  10. Integration of WERA Ocean Radar into Tsunami Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzvonkovskaya, Anna; Helzel, Thomas; Kniephoff, Matthias; Petersen, Leif; Weber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    High-frequency (HF) ocean radars give a unique capability to deliver simultaneous wide area measurements of ocean surface current fields and sea state parameters far beyond the horizon. The WERA® ocean radar system is a shore-based remote sensing system to monitor ocean surface in near real-time and at all-weather conditions up to 300 km offshore. Tsunami induced surface currents cause increasing orbital velocities comparing to normal oceanographic situation and affect the measured radar spectra. The theoretical approach about tsunami influence on radar spectra showed that a tsunami wave train generates a specific unusual pattern in the HF radar spectra. While the tsunami wave is approaching the beach, the surface current pattern changes slightly in deep water and significantly in the shelf area as it was shown in theoretical considerations and later proved during the 2011 Japan tsunami. These observed tsunami signatures showed that the velocity of tsunami currents depended on a tsunami wave height and bathymetry. The HF ocean radar doesn't measure the approaching wave height of a tsunami; however, it can resolve the surface current velocity signature, which is generated when tsunami reaches the shelf edge. This strong change of the surface current can be detected by a phased-array WERA system in real-time; thus the WERA ocean radar is a valuable tool to support Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). Based on real tsunami measurements, requirements for the integration of ocean radar systems into TEWS are already defined. The requirements include a high range resolution, a narrow beam directivity of phased-array antennas and an accelerated data update mode to provide a possibility of offshore tsunami detection in real-time. The developed software package allows reconstructing an ocean surface current map of the area observed by HF radar based on the radar power spectrum processing. This fact gives an opportunity to issue an automated tsunami identification message

  11. Bistatic and Multistatic Radar Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Schejbal

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Radar systems, based on bistatic radar concept attracted a substantial attention in the recent years. Passive coherent location systems using "transmitters of opportunity" like radio or TV broadcasters, GSM base stations, satellite communication and GNSS signals proved their potential in detection and tracking moving targets over a significant area. In this paper the multistatic location system with non-cooperative transmitters is described and various aspects of signal processing and signal parameters are discussed.

  12. Modifikacija konvencionalnih radara na bazi koncepta softverskog radara / Conventional radars modification on the software radar concept basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Ivković

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu su projektovani softverski modeli pojedinih funkcionalnih blokova radara, čime se stvorila pogodna osnova za poboljšanje performansi postojećih konvencionalnih radara. Primenom koncepta softverskog radara mogu se unaprediti karakteristike i povećati fleksibilnost konvencionalnih radara kao i implementirati potpuno nove funkcije koje znatno unapređuju njegove performanse. Svi softverski modeli projektovani su u programskom paketu MATLAB. Takođe, opisana je struktura i karakteristike konvencionalnog radara ŽIRAFA, koji je softverski modelovan. Pored toga, opisan je način softverske realizacije memorije RANGE BIN, Doplerovog filtera i detaljno opisan matematički model procesora CFAR. / Software models of some functional radar units are projected in this paper and proper platform for performance improving of existent conventional radars is created. Feature improving and flexibility increasing of conventional radars can be upgraded with application of software radar concept and totally new functions can be implemented which also upgraded its performances. All software models are projected in MATLAB program. Also structure and performances of the conventional radar GIRAFFE, which is modeled by software are described. Additionally, way of the RANGE BIN memory and Doppler filter software realization are described. CFAR mathematical model is presented detailed.

  13. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  14. A 100 GHz Polarimetric Compact Radar Range for Scale-Model Radar Cross Section Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    scene (2 large metal drums, a bag of cement and a water jug ) were created for other efforts at neighboring frequency bands but were used to provide...implementation of various signal processing techniques such as background subtraction and filtering [18-22], the potential use of Doppler information for moving

  15. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Synthetic Aperture Radar Dept.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  16. Ground-Truthing a Next Generation Snow Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S.; Brozena, J. M.; Gogineni, P. S.; Abelev, A.; Gardner, J. M.; Ball, D.; Liang, R.; Newman, T.

    2016-12-01

    During the early spring of 2016 the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) performed a test of a next generation airborne snow radar over ground truth data collected on several areas of fast ice near Barrow, AK. The radar was developed by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) at the University of Kansas, and includes several improvements compared to their previous snow radar. The new unit combines the earlier Ku-band and snow radars into a single unit with an operating frequency spanning the entire 2-18 GHz, an enormous bandwidth which provides the possibility of snow depth measurements with 1.5 cm range resolution. Additionally, the radar transmits on dual polarizations (H and V), and receives the signal through two orthogonally polarized Vivaldi arrays, each with 128 phase centers. The 8 sets of along-track phase centers are combined in hardware to improve SNR and narrow the beamwidth in the along-track, resulting in 8 cross-track effective phase centers which are separately digitized to allow for beam sharpening and forming in post-processing. Tilting the receive arrays 30 degrees from the horizontal also allows the formation of SAR images and the potential for estimating snow-water equivalent (SWE). Ground truth data (snow depth, density, salinity and SWE) were collected over several 60 m wide swaths that were subsequently overflown with the snow radar mounted on a Twin Otter. The radar could be operated in nadir (by beam steering the receive antennas to point beneath the aircraft) or side-looking modes. Results from the comparisons will be shown.

  17. Origin and pathways of the mineral dust transport to two Spanish EARLINET sites: Effect on the observed columnar and range-resolved dust optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, Florian; Sicard, Michaël; Comerón, Adolfo; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Barragan, Ruben; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Granados-Muñoz, Maria Jose; Lyamani, Hassan; Muñoz Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francisco; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Valenzuela, Antonio; García Vizcaíno, David

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, is presented a method for estimation of the effect of the transport process to aerosol optical properties. Aerosol optical data retrieved by lidars and sun-photometer measurements, are applied to Saharan dust events observed simultaneously at the two EARLINET/AERONET sites of Barcelona and Granada during the periods of June-September of 2012 and 2013. For this purpose, elastic lidar profiles and sun-photometer columnar retrievals are analyzed together with satellite observations and dust forecast models. Granada presents more than twice Saharan dust outbreaks compared to Barcelona. The scenarios favoring the Saharan dust outbreaks are identified in both places. The mineral dust originating in the Sahara region and arriving at both stations is usually transport wither over the Atlas Mountains or through an Atlantic pathway. Analyses of dust events affecting both stations reveal how differences in the transport process lead to differences in the aerosol optical properties measured at each station. Mean dust related Ångström exponent is 1.8 times higher in Barcelona than in Granada. This difference is a result of the additional contribution of anthropogenic aerosol, mainly in the aerosol fine mode, during the transport of the mineral dust plume over the Iberian Peninsula.

  18. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  19. Compact U-Slotted Antenna for Broadband Radar Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The original U-shaped patch antenna is properly modified in this work to provide a compact and broadband antenna configuration with reduced cross-polar effects, well suitable for modern radar applications. The proposed antenna layout is applied to design, realize, and test two different prototypes working at P-band and C-band, typically adopted for ground-penetrating radar. The experimental results successfully demonstrate a large operating bandwidth between 15% and 20%, a significant reduction of size (about half of the standard configuration, and a low cross-polarization level within the operating frequency range.

  20. Design, Performance and Optimization for Multimodal Radar Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S. Bhat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the underlying methodology behind an adaptive multimodal radar sensor that is capable of progressively optimizing its range resolution depending upon the target scattering features. It consists of a test-bed that enables the generation of linear frequency modulated waveforms of various bandwidths. This paper discusses a theoretical approach to optimizing the bandwidth used by the multimodal radar. It also discusses the various experimental results obtained from measurement. The resolution predicted from theory agrees quite well with that obtained from experiments for different target arrangements.

  1. Design, Performance and Optimization for Multimodal Radar Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Surendra S.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the underlying methodology behind an adaptive multimodal radar sensor that is capable of progressively optimizing its range resolution depending upon the target scattering features. It consists of a test-bed that enables the generation of linear frequency modulated waveforms of various bandwidths. This paper discusses a theoretical approach to optimizing the bandwidth used by the multimodal radar. It also discusses the various experimental results obtained from measurement. The resolution predicted from theory agrees quite well with that obtained from experiments for different target arrangements.

  2. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  3. 2-D inner-shelf current observations from a single VHF WEllen RAdar (WERA) station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voulgaris, G.; Kumar, N.; Gurgel, K.-W.; Warner, J.C.; List, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of High Frequency (HF) radars used worldwide operate at medium to high frequencies (8 to 30 MHz) providing spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 1.5 km and ranges from 150 to 50 km. This paper presents results from the deployment of a single Very High Frequency (VHF, 48 MHz) WEllen RAdar (WERA) radar with spatial resolution of 150 m and range 10-15 km, used in the nearshore off Cape Hatteras, NC, USA. It consisted of a linear array of 12 antennas operating in beam forming mode. Radial velocities were estimated from radar backscatter for a variety of wind and nearshore wave conditions. A methodology similar to that used for converting acoustically derived beam velocities to an orthogonal system is presented for obtaining 2-D current fields from a single station. The accuracy of the VHF radar-derived radial velocities is examined using a new statistical technique that evaluates the system over the range of measured velocities. The VHF radar velocities showed a bias of 3 to 7 cm/s over the experimental period explainable by the differences in radar penetration and in-situ measurement height. The 2-D current field shows good agreement with the in-situ measurements. Deviations and inaccuracies are well explained by the geometric dilution analysis. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  4. Binary Pulse Compression Techniques for MST Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, R. F.; Sulzer, M. P.; Farley, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    In most mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capability. Short pulses are required for good range resolution but the problem of range biguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a echnique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without scarificing range resolution. Binary phase coding methods for pulse compression are discussed. Many aspects of codes and decoding and their applications to MST experiments are addressed; this includes Barker codes and longer individual codes, and then complementary codes and other code sets. Software decoding, hardware decoders, and coherent integrators are also discussed.

  5. All-digital radar architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  6. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-20

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system.

  7. Measurements at 94 GHz with an imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellgren, J.; Stenstrom, G.; Sume, A.

    1983-10-01

    As part of its mm-wave program the Swedish National Defence Research Institute in Linkoping has developed an imaging combined radar/radiometer system at 94 GHz to investigate the emission, absorption, and reflection properties of matter at this frequency, and to develop data handling and presentation techniques for various purposes. Radar measurements made with the 94-GHz radar with 50-ns pulse length and 0.5-deg beam width are presented. Snow-covered terrain with trees and open ground was observed from a tower between 4 and 54 deg depression angles. The normalized radar cross section has been determined for each angular resolution cell with a 70 x 50 deg section of the terrain, and is presented in image form. Various image representation types have been examined, including color coding which uses range and intensity information to give a perception of the scenery close to the visual one, and which offers the possibility of seeing strong radar reflectors. It is found that the average backscatter from snow in the observed case was stronger than for trees, and its spatial distribution exhibited some deviation from log-normal for parallel transmit and receive polarizations.

  8. Wind turbine clutter mitigation in coastal UHF radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Pan, Chao; Wang, Caijun; Jiang, Dapeng; Wen, Biyang

    2014-01-01

    Coastal UHF radar provides a unique capability to measure the sea surface dynamic parameters and detect small moving targets, by exploiting the low energy loss of electromagnetic waves propagating along the salty and good conducting ocean surface. It could compensate the blind zone of HF surface wave radar at close range and reach further distance than microwave radars. However, its performance is susceptible to wind turbines which are usually installed on the shore. The size of a wind turbine is much larger than the wavelength of radio waves at UHF band, which results in large radar cross section. Furthermore, the rotation of blades adds time-varying Doppler frequency to the clutter and makes the suppression difficult. This paper proposes a mitigation method which is based on the specific periodicity of wind turbine clutter and performed mainly in the time-frequency domain. Field experimental data of a newly developed UHF radar are used to verify this method, and the results prove its effectiveness.

  9. Flexible waveform-constrained optimization design method for cognitive radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Wang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xingzhao

    2017-07-01

    The problem of waveform optimization design for cognitive radar (CR) in the presence of extended target with unknown target impulse response (TIR) is investigated. On the premise of ensuring the TIR estimation precision, a flexible waveform-constrained optimization design method taking both target detection and range resolution into account is proposed. In this method, both the estimate of TIR and transmitted waveform can be updated according to the environment information fed back by the receiver. Moreover, rather than optimizing waveforms for a single design criterion, the framework can synthesize waveforms that provide a trade-off between competing design criteria. The trade-off is determined by the parameter settings, which can be adjusted according to the requirement of radar performance in each cycle of CR. Simulation results demonstrate that CR with the proposed waveform performs better than a traditional radar system with a fixed waveform and offers more flexibility and practicability.

  10. Macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin Li; Dengyu Qiao; Ye Li

    2014-01-01

    Radar has the advantage of being able to detect hidden individuals, which can be used in homeland security, disaster rescue, and healthcare monitoring-related applications. Human macro-motion detection using ultra-wideband impulse radar is studied in this paper. First, a frequency domain analysis is carried out to show that the macro-motion yields a bandpass signal in slow-time. Second, the FTFW (fast-time frequency windowing), which has the advantage of avoiding the measuring range reduction, and the HLF (high-pass linear-phase filter), which can preserve the motion signal effectively, are proposed to preprocess the radar echo. Last, a threshold decision method, based on the energy detector structure, is presented.

  11. Radar velocity determination using direction of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Naething, Richard M.; Horndt, Volker

    2017-12-19

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing direction of arrival (DOA) data to determine various flight parameters for an aircraft A plurality of radar images (e.g., SAR images) can be analyzed to identify a plurality of pixels in the radar images relating to one or more ground targets. In an embodiment, the plurality of pixels can be selected based upon the pixels exceeding a SNR threshold. The DOA data in conjunction with a measurable Doppler frequency for each pixel can be obtained. Multi-aperture technology enables derivation of an independent measure of DOA to each pixel based on interferometric analysis. This independent measure of DOA enables decoupling of the aircraft velocity from the DOA in a range-Doppler map, thereby enabling determination of a radar velocity. The determined aircraft velocity can be utilized to update an onboard INS, and to keep it aligned, without the need for additional velocity-measuring instrumentation.

  12. Multimode/Multifrequency Low Frequency Airborne Radar Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costanzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the design of multimode/multifrequency airborne radar suitable for imaging and subsurface sounding. The system operates at relatively low frequencies in the band ranging from VHF to UHF. It is able to work in two different modalities: (i nadir-looking sounder in the VHF band (163 MHz and (ii side-looking imager (SAR in the UHF band with two channels at 450 MHz and 860 MHz. The radar has been completely designed by CO.Ri.S.T.A. for what concerns the RF and the electronic aspect, and by the University of Calabria for what concerns the design, realization, and test of SAR antennas. The radar has been installed on a civil helicopter and its operation has been validated in flight in both sounder and imager modality. Preliminary surveys have been carried out over different areas of Campania region, South Italy.

  13. Combining millimeter-wave radar and communication paradigms for automotive applications : a signal processing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    As driving becomes more automated, vehicles are being equipped with more sensors generating even higher data rates. Radars (RAdio Detection and Ranging) are used for object detection, visual cameras as virtual mirrors, and LIDARs (LIght Detection and...

  14. Doppler-Bearing Tracking for Analog TV-based Passive Radars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.J. de; Theije, P.A.M. de; Gelsema, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Passive radar systems can exploit various kinds of signals of opportunity, including analogue television signals. Analogue TV signals are not considered favourable though, because they include relatively strong line sync pulses which prevent the unambiguous measurement of range information via

  15. Observations of mesosphere summer echoes with calibrated VHF radars at latitudes between 54°N and 69°N in summer 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Kirkwood, S.; Jönsson, L. O.; Eriksson, Håkan

    2005-08-01

    Mesosphere Summer Echoes (MSE) have been observed with 50-MHz VHF radars at middle (MSE) and polar latitudes (PMSE) for more than 20 years. The occurrence and seasonal variation of these radar echoes as well as their dependence on solar and geomagnetic activity are mostly studied basing on relative signal strength measurements (signal-to-noise ratios). The latitudinal dependence of the appearance and intensity of mesospheric summer echoes is still an open question as the widely used relative signal strength observations are determined by the atmospheric properties as well as by the individual radar characteristics. The use of absolutely calibrated echo powers allows a system in-depended comparison of mesospheric summer echoes observed at different sites by different systems. We present two different radar calibration methods. One applies a noise source to calibrate the receive path of the radar only, a second uses the radar signal itself to calibrate the complete transmitting and receiving path of the radar system. Both techniques and the same calibration hardware have been applied to the ALWIN VHF radar at Andenes/Norway (69°N), the ESRAD radar at Kiruna/Sweden (68deg;N) and OSWIN radar at Kühlungsborn/Germany (54°N). The sensitivity of the different radar systems and the seasonal and diurnal variation of the occurrence of mesospheric summer echoes at different locations are discussed on the basis of radar backscatter cross-sections.

  16. Morphology and possible origins of near-range oblique HF backscatter at high and midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Pavlo, V.; Iserhienrhien, Blessing; St.-Maurice, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    High-frequency radars (HF, ˜10-20 MHz) forming the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) regularly observe returns from very close ranges of ≤300-400 km (near-range echoes, NREs). These echoes are conventionally attributed to backscatter from meteor trails, but other sources of NRE have been invoked, including polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE), and non-field-aligned E region irregularities leading to high-aspect ionospheric returns. In order to relate NRE to a particular mechanism, it is essential to establish beforehand their spatiotemporal trends with respect to season, local time, and latitude. Systematic information of this kind is generally lacking from the literature, so we attempt to fill the gap by performing a statistical analysis of such echoes observed by five radars covering midlatitudes to polar latitudes over all seasons and local times. We detected two major echo populations which were observed at each radar site: (i) a nightside-early morning returns representing the well-known meteor backscatter and (ii) a midsummer population centered near the local noon. At high latitudes the summer daytime echoes are usually interpreted as PMSE, but the observed population extends to much lower latitudes and is centered well above the conventional PMSE height range. We hypothesize that this population could be related to neutral turbulence in the lower E region. In addition, there was a pronounced evening population restricted to the auroral region which we provisionally attribute to irregularities generated by the precipitating energetic particles and strong electric fields.

  17. Estimation of the local and long-range contributions to particulate matter levels using continuous measurements in a single urban background site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulou, Marianna; Skyllakou, Ksakousti; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-06-01

    The Particulate Matter Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) algorithm is used together with PMCAMx, a regional chemical transport model, to develop a simple observation-based method (OBM) for the estimation of local and regional contributions of sources of primary and secondary pollutants in urban areas. We test the hypothesis that the minimum of the diurnal average concentration profile of the pollutant is a good estimate of the average contribution of long range transport levels. We use PMCAMx to generate "pseudo-observations" for four different European cities (Paris, London, Milan, and Dusseldorf) and PSAT to estimate the corresponding "true" local and regional contributions. The predictions of the proposed OBM are compared to the "true" values for different definitions of the source area. During winter, the estimates by the OBM for the local contributions to the concentrations of total PM2.5, primary pollutants, and sulfate are within 25% of the "true" contributions of the urban area sources. For secondary organic aerosol the OBM overestimates the importance of the local sources and it actually estimates the contributions of sources within 200 km from the receptor. During summer for primary pollutants and cities with low nearby emissions (ratio of emissions in an area extending 100 km from the city over local emissions lower than 10) the OBM estimates correspond to the city emissions within 25% or so. For cities with relatively high nearby emissions the OBM estimates correspond to emissions within 100 km from the receptor. For secondary PM2.5 components like sulfate and secondary organic aerosol the OBM's estimates correspond to sources within 200 km from the receptor. Finally, for total PM2.5 the OBM provides approximately the contribution of city emissions during the winter and the contribution of sources within 100 km from the receptor during the summer.

  18. Scaling features of polarimetric radar parameters retrieved from 3 disdrometers and an X-band radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall fields exhibit scaling features over wide range of spatio-temporal scales. The only device providing high resolution rainfall fields in space and time is radar which does not measure rainfall directly. Here we suggest to investigate scaling features of quantities directly observed with polarimetric radars such as the horizontal reflectivity (Zh) and specific differential phase (Kdp). Results will be interpreted in light of the commonly used power-law relations between these quantities and rainfall rate which interests hydro-meteorologist. DSD parameters such as the total drop concentration (Nt) and the mass-weighted diameter (Dm) will also be investigated Two types of data from devices installed in the vicinity of Ecole des Ponts ParisTech are used: (i) outputs from three optical disdrometers of two different types (Campbell Scientific PWS100 and OTT Parsivel2) from which radar parameters are computed with the help of a T-Matrix code, providing 30 s time steps series since September 2013; (ii) outputs of a dual polarization X band radar (METEOR 60DX) installed in December of 2014, providing fields with a resolution of 100 m in space and 2.5 min in time. Analyses are performed in the Universal Multifractal framework which has been extensively used to analyse and simulate geophysical fields extremely variable over wide ranges of scales. Only three parameters are used to characterize variability across scales: C1 the mean intermittency, alpha the multifractality index and H the non-conservative exponent. Event based analyses are carried out and it appears that the studied Kdp time series exhibit a unique scaling regime on the whole range of available scales (30s-2h) with UM parameters consistent with values reported in the literature for rainfall. The results are more contrasted for Zh whose scaling is worse. The scaling of DSD parameters series only holds down to few minutes. Finally these results are compared with the observations in space provide by the X

  19. FPGA Sequencer for Radar Altimeter Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Pollard, Brian D.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2011-01-01

    A sequencer for a radar altimeter provides accurate attitude information for a reliable soft landing of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This is a field-programmable- gate-array (FPGA)-only implementation. A table loaded externally into the FPGA controls timing, processing, and decision structures. Radar is memory-less and does not use previous acquisitions to assist in the current acquisition. All cycles complete in exactly 50 milliseconds, regardless of range or whether a target was found. A RAM (random access memory) within the FPGA holds instructions for up to 15 sets. For each set, timing is run, echoes are processed, and a comparison is made. If a target is seen, more detailed processing is run on that set. If no target is seen, the next set is tried. When all sets have been run, the FPGA terminates and waits for the next 50-millisecond event. This setup simplifies testing and improves reliability. A single vertex chip does the work of an entire assembly. Output products require minor processing to become range and velocity. This technology is the heart of the Terminal Descent Sensor, which is an integral part of the Entry Decent and Landing system for MSL. In addition, it is a strong candidate for manned landings on Mars or the Moon.

  20. Means to achieve wide swath widths in synthetic aperture satellite borne radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrona, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    The radar range equation including processing gains for pulse compression and synthetic aperture generation was the starting point. System geometry considerations were introduced. For simplicity, flat earth geometry was used, although it was realized that this was not a good model for satellite-borne radars. Next, the constraints were introduced. These included those needed to avoid ambiguities in both range and azimuth, those needed to acheive the desired resolution, and those needed to achieve the desired swath width.

  1. High Speed Dim Air Target Detection Using Airborne Radar under Clutter and Jamming Effects

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Almslmany; Q. S. Cao; Wang, C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    The challenging potential problems associated with using airborne radar in detection of high Speed Maneuvering Dim Target (HSMDT) are the highly noise, jamming and clutter effects. The problem is not only how to remove clutter and jamming as well as the range migration and Doppler ambiguity estimation problems due to high relative speed between the targets and airborne radar. Some of the recently published works ignored the range migration problems, while the others ignored the Doppler ambigu...

  2. Radar tracking of multitarget complexes using Hough transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, Thierry B.; Jacobson, William J.; Payson, Harold C.

    1996-06-01

    An important function for a fire control radar consists of the simultaneous tracking of multiple objects in a missile complex. A challenging tracking scenario is encountered when dense clusters of targets are viewed at large stand-off ranges. In this case, multiple target detections are found within a single radar beam. Because such highly populated complexes are not resolved in angle (azimuth, elevation), separation of the individual objects must rely on the use of wideband waveforms with good range resolution. A multi-object tracking algorithm suitable for real-time implementation has been designed to exploit range-only correlations. Good track initiation efficiency is achieved through the use of short radar observation times combined with applications of Hough transforms. Tracking filters are subsequently used to update all existing tracks with metrics and signature histories. A brief description of the algorithm is presented with focus on the specific tracking techniques appropriate for dense clusters of slowly separating objects on ballistic trajectories. The performance of the tracking algorithm has been evaluated and results are presented for several tracking strategies and different radar sampling rates.

  3. The lidar dark band: An oddity of the radar bright band analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Although much has sbeen learned from independent radar and lidar studies of atmospheric precipitations, occasionally supported by aircraft profiling, what has been lacking is combined optical, microwave, and insitu observations of the melting layer. Fortunately, the rainshowers on April 21, 1994, during the Remote Cloud Sensing intensive obervations Period (RCSIOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation Testbed (CART) site provided an opportunity for coordinated dual-wavelength University of Utah Polarization Diversity Lidar, University of Massachusetts Cloud Profiling Radar System Doppler Radar, and the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft measurements.

  4. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  5. Coupling Between Doppler Radar Signatures and Tornado Damage Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carey, Lawrence; Carcione, Brian; Smith, Matthew; Schultz, Elise V.; Schultz, Christopher; Lafontaine, Frank

    2011-01-01

    On April 27, 2011, the southeastern United States was raked with several episodes of severe weather. Numerous tornadoes caused extensive damage, and tragically, the deaths of over 300 people. In Alabama alone, there were 61 confirmed tornados, 4 of them produced EF5 damage, and several were on the ground an hour or more with continuous damage tracks exceeding 80km. The use of Doppler radars covering the region provided reflectivity and velocity signatures that allowed forecasters to monitors the severe storms from beginning to end issuing hundreds of severe weather warnings throughout the day. Meteorologists from the the NWS performed extensive surveys to assess the intensity, duration, and ground track of tornadoes reported during the event. Survey activities included site visits to the affected locations, analysis of radar and satellite data, aerial surveys, and interviews with eyewitnesses. Satellite data from NASA's MODIS and ASTER instruments played a helpful role in determining the location of tornado damage paths and in the assessment. High resolution multispectral and temporal composites helped forecasters corroborate their damage assessments, determine starting and ending points for tornado touchdowns, and helped to provide forecasters with a better big-picture view of the damage region. The imagery also helped to separate damage from the April 27th tornados from severe weather that occurred earlier that month. In a post analysis of the outbreak, tornado damage path signatures observed in the NASA satellite data have been correlated to "debris ball" signatures in the NWS Doppler radars and a special ARMOR dual-polarization radar operated by the University of Alabama Huntsville during the event. The Doppler radar data indicates a circular enhanced reflectivity signal and rotational couplet in the radial velocity likely associated with the tornado that is spatially correlated with the damage tracks in the observed satellite data. An algorithm to detect and

  6. Radar image sequence analysis of inhomogeneous water surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Joerg; Senet, Christian M.; Dankert, Heiko; Hatten, Helge; Ziemer, Friedwart

    1999-10-01

    The radar backscatter from the ocean surface, called sea clutter, is modulated by the surface wave field. A method was developed to estimate the near-surface current, the water depth and calibrated surface wave spectra from nautical radar image sequences. The algorithm is based on the three- dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the spatio- temporal sea clutter pattern in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The dispersion relation is used to define a filter to separate the spectral signal of the imaged waves from the background noise component caused by speckle noise. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) contains information about the significant wave height. The method has been proved to be reliable for the analysis of homogeneous water surfaces in offshore installations. Radar images are inhomogeneous because of the dependency of the image transfer function (ITF) on the azimuth angle between the wave propagation and the antenna viewing direction. The inhomogeneity of radar imaging is analyzed using image sequences of a homogeneous deep-water surface sampled by a ship-borne radar. Changing water depths in shallow-water regions induce horizontal gradients of the tidal current. Wave refraction occurs due to the spatial variability of the current and water depth. These areas cannot be investigated with the standard method. A new method, based on local wavenumber estimation with the multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, is outlined. The MUSIC algorithm provides superior wavenumber resolution on local spatial scales. First results, retrieved from a radar image sequence taken from an installation at a coastal site, are presented.

  7. A Doppler Radar System for Sensing Physiological Parameters in Walking and Standing Positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikeh Pour Ebrahim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Doppler radar can be implemented for sensing physiological parameters wirelessly at a distance. Detecting respiration rate, an important human body parameter, is essential in a range of applications like emergency and military healthcare environments, and Doppler radar records actual chest motion. One challenge in using Doppler radar is being able to monitor several patients simultaneously and in different situations like standing, walking, or lying. This paper presents a complete transmitter-receiver Doppler radar system, which uses a 4 GHz continuous wave radar signal transmission and receiving system, to extract base-band data from a phase-shifted signal. This work reports experimental evaluations of the system for one and two subjects in various standing and walking positions. It provides a detailed signal analysis of various breathing rates of these two subjects simultaneously. These results will be useful in future medical monitoring applications.

  8. Apodization of spurs in radar receivers using multi-channel processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2017-11-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to identification and mitigation of spurious energies or signals (aka "spurs") in radar imaging. Spurious energy in received radar data can be a consequence of non-ideal component and circuit behavior. Such behavior can result from I/Q imbalance, nonlinear component behavior, additive interference (e.g. cross-talk, etc.), etc. The manifestation of the spurious energy in a radar image (e.g., a range-Doppler map) can be influenced by appropriate pulse-to-pulse phase modulation. Comparing multiple images which have been processed using the same data but of different signal paths and modulations enables identification of undesired spurs, with subsequent cropping or apodization of the undesired spurs from a radar image. Spurs can be identified by comparison with a threshold energy. Removal of an undesired spur enables enhanced identification of true targets in a radar image.

  9. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar Corrections Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toto, Tami [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The KAZRCOR Value -added Product (VAP) performs several corrections to the ingested KAZR moments and also creates a significant detection mask for each radar mode. The VAP computes gaseous attenuation as a function of time and radial distance from the radar antenna, based on ambient meteorological observations, and corrects observed reflectivities for that effect. KAZRCOR also dealiases mean Doppler velocities to correct velocities whose magnitudes exceed the radar’s Nyquist velocity. Input KAZR data fields are passed through into the KAZRCOR output files, in their native time and range coordinates. Complementary corrected reflectivity and velocity fields are provided, along with a mask of significant detections and a number of data quality flags. This report covers the KAZRCOR VAP as applied to the original KAZR radars and the upgraded KAZR2 radars. Currently there are two separate code bases for the different radar versions, but once KAZR and KAZR2 data formats are harmonized, only a single code base will be required.

  10. Optical identification of sea-mines - Gated viewing three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A gated viewing high accuracy mono-static laser radar has been developed for the purpose of improving the optical underwater sea-mine identification handled by the Navy. In the final stage of the sea-mine detection, classification and identification process the Navy applies a remote operated...... vehicle for optical identification of the bottom seamine. The experimental results of the thesis indicate that replacing the conventional optical video and spotlight system applied by the Navy with the gated viewing two- and three-dimensional laser radar can improve the underwater optical sea......-mine identification. The laser radar has also a number of applications on land, for example, face recognition at several hundred meters range. The main components of the laser radar system are a green pulsed laser and a fast gating intensified CCD camera. The laser radar system innovation is a combination...

  11. Bistatic High Frequency Radar Ocean Surface Cross Section for an FMCW Source with an Antenna on a Floating Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first- and second-order bistatic high frequency radar cross sections of the ocean surface with an antenna on a floating platform are derived for a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW source. Based on previous work, the derivation begins with the general bistatic electric field in the frequency domain for the case of a floating antenna. Demodulation and range transformation are used to obtain the range information, distinguishing the process from that used for a pulsed radar. After Fourier-transforming the autocorrelation and comparing the result with the radar range equation, the radar cross sections are derived. The new first- and second-order antenna-motion-incorporated bistatic radar cross section models for an FMCW source are simulated and compared with those for a pulsed source. Results show that, for the same radar operating parameters, the first-order radar cross section for the FMCW waveform is a little lower than that for a pulsed source. The second-order radar cross section for the FMCW waveform reduces to that for the pulsed waveform when the scattering patch limit approaches infinity. The effect of platform motion on the radar cross sections for an FMCW waveform is investigated for a variety of sea states and operating frequencies and, in general, is found to be similar to that for a pulsed waveform.

  12. Signal processing for airborne doppler radar detection of hazardous wind shear as applied to NASA 1991 radar flight experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Radar data collected during the 1991 NASA flight tests have been selectively analyzed to support research directed at developing both improved as well as new algorithms for detecting hazardous low-altitude windshear. Analysis of aircraft attitude data from several flights indicated that platform stability bandwidths were small compared to the data rate bandwidths which should support an assumption that radar returns can be treated as short time stationary. Various approaches at detection of weather returns in the presence of ground clutter are being investigated. Non-coventional clutter rejection through spectrum mode tracking and classification algorithms is a subject of continuing research. Based upon autoregressive modeling of the radar return time sequence, this approach may offer an alternative to overcome errors in conventional pulse-pair estimates. Adaptive filtering is being evaluated as a means of rejecting clutter with emphasis on low signal-to-clutter ratio situations, particularly in the presence of discrete clutter interference. An analysis of out-of-range clutter returns is included to illustrate effects of ground clutter interference due to range aliasing for aircraft on final approach. Data are presented to indicate how aircraft groundspeed might be corrected from the radar data as well as point to an observed problem of groundspeed estimate bias variation with radar antenna scan angle. A description of how recorded clutter return data are mixed with simulated weather returns is included. This enables the researcher to run controlled experiments to test signal processing algorithms. In the summary research efforts involving improved modelling of radar ground clutter returns and a Bayesian approach at hazard factor estimation are mentioned.

  13. NOAA NEXt-Generation RADar (NEXRAD) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of Level III weather radar products collected from Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) stations located in the contiguous United States, Alaska,...

  14. ASTEROID RADAR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is intended to include all asteroid radar detections. An entry for each detection reports radar cross-section and circular polarization, if known, as...

  15. Radar detection of mini-asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Chernogor, Leonid F.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the possible early detection of decameter-size space bodies (mini-asteroids) by using the existing non-dedicated and dedicated (space surveillance) radars and also the upcoming radars are presented.

  16. Design of multi-frequency CW radars

    CERN Document Server

    Jankiraman, Mohinder

    2007-01-01

    This book deals with the basic theory for design and analysis of Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) radar systems. The design of one such multi-frequency high resolution LPI radar, PANDORA, is covered.

  17. Progress in existing and planned MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    Radar systems are described which use two different wind measuring techniques: the partial-reflection drift technique and the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) or Doppler beam-swing radar technique. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  18. NAMMA TOGA RADAR DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA TOGA Radar Data dataset consists of a collection of products derived from the NASA TOGA radar observations that were collected in the Republic of Cape...

  19. MST radar data-base management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.

    1983-01-01

    Data management for Mesospheric-Stratospheric-Tropospheric, (MST) radars is addressed. An incoherent-scatter radar data base is discussed in terms of purpose, centralization, scope, and nature of the data base management system.

  20. Space Radar Image of Taal Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Taal volcano, near Manila on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The black area in the center is Taal Lake, which nearly fills the 30-kilometer-diameter (18-mile) caldera. The caldera rim consists of deeply eroded hills and cliffs. The large island in Taal Lake, which itself contains a crater lake, is known as Volcano Island. The bright yellow patch on the southwest side of the island marks the site of an explosion crater that formed during a deadly eruption of Taal in 1965. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 78th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 56 kilometers by 112 kilometers (34 miles by 68 miles) that is centered at 14.0 degrees north latitude and 121.0 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Since 1572, Taal has erupted at least 34 times. Since early 1991, the volcano has been restless, with swarms of earthquakes, new steaming areas, ground fracturing, and increases in water temperature of the lake. Volcanologists and other local authorities are carefully monitoring Taal to understand if the current activity may foretell an eruption. Taal is one of 15 'Decade Volcanoes' that have been identified by the volcanology community as presenting large potential hazards to population centers. The bright area in the upper right of the image is the densely populated city of Manila, only 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of the central crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth