WorldWideScience

Sample records for range propagation experiment

  1. Cruise Report: Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Long-range Owan ACoustic Propagation EXpewbitent LOAPEX L ý ý . OPXSRO So0 SVLAMVLA 40 KAA 20 M0 1 10 170 IN ISO 140 30 1010 Figure 1.2. LOAPEX assets...4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 5000 > -5000 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 20 0 -I -20 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 .• 50001 1 1 1

  2. Mode tomography using signals from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.

    Ocean acoustic tomography uses acoustic signals to infer the environmental properties of the ocean. The procedure for tomography consists of low frequency acoustic transmissions at mid-water depths to receivers located at hundreds of kilometer ranges. The arrival times of the signal at the receiver are then inverted for the sound speed of the background environment. Using this principle, experiments such as the 2004 Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment have used acoustic signals recorded across Vertical Line Arrays (VLAs) to infer the Sound Speed Profile (SSP) across depth. The acoustic signals across the VLAs can be represented in terms of orthonormal basis functions called modes. The lower modes of the basis set concentrated around mid-water propagate longer distances and can be inverted for mesoscale effects such as currents and eddies. In spite of these advantages, mode tomography has received less attention. One of the important reasons for this is that internal waves in the ocean cause significant amplitude and travel time fluctuations in the modes. The amplitude and travel time fluctuations cause errors in travel time estimates. The absence of a statistical model and the lack of signal processing techniques for internal wave effects have precluded the modes from being used in tomographic inversions. This thesis estimates a statistical model for modes affected by internal waves and then uses the estimated model to design appropriate signal processing methods to obtain tomographic observables for the low modes. In order to estimate a statistical model, this thesis uses both the LOAPEX signals and also numerical simulations. The statistical model describes the amplitude and phase coherence across different frequencies for modes at different ranges. The model suggests that Matched Subspace Detectors (MSDs) based on the amplitude statistics of the modes are the optimum detectors to make travel time estimates for modes up to 250 km. The mean of the

  3. Managing Data From Signal-Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses system for management of data from Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) program, which consists of series of experiments on propagation of signals from transmitter at one fixed location to transponder on tower at another fixed location and from transponder to mobile receiver in van. Purpose of experiments to simulate signal-propagation conditions of land-mobile/satellite communication system.

  4. Diagnostics for the ATA beam propagation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Barletta, W.A.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a discussion of the diagnostics required for the beam propagation experiment to be done with the ATA accelerator. Included are a list of the diagnostics needed; a description of the ATA experimental environment; the status of beam diagnostics available at Livermore including recent developments, and a prioritized list of accelerator and propagation diagnostics under consideration or in various stages of development.

  5. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    fundamental limits to the use of acoustic methods and signal processing imposed by ice and ocean processes in the new Arctic. The hope is that these...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  6. Variable Phase Propagation Velocity for Long Range Lightning Location System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Koh, K.; Mezentsev, A.; Enno, S. E.; Sugier, J.; Fullekrug, M.

    2016-12-01

    Lightning Location System (LLS) is of key importance to numerous meteorological, industrial and aviation systems worldwide. A crucial input parameter of a LLS which utilizes time-of-arrival (TOA) method is the wave propagation velocity at low frequencies. For example, the WWLLN network use group velocity approach, which is assumed to be constant near the speed of light [e.g. Dowden et al., 2002]. The detected lightning signals are normally a mixture of ground waves and sky waves (i.e. ionospheric hops), which are associated with different elevation angle of the incident wave [e.g., Fullekrug et al., 2015]. In this study, we introduce the new concept of "phase propagation velocity" as observed by the receiver considering the elevation angle. It is found that the radio waves from two submarine communication transmitters at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz exhibit phase propagation velocities that are 0.51% slower and 0.64% faster than the speed of light as a result of sky wave contributions and ground effects. Here, we apply our new technique, using a variable phase propagation velocity, to the TOA method for the first time. This method was applied to electric field recordings from a long range LLS ( 500km) that consists of four radio receivers in Western Europe. The lightning locations inferred from variable velocities improve the accuracy of locations inferred from a fixed velocity by 0.89-1.06 km when compared to the lightning locations reported by the UK Met Office. The observed phase propagation velocities depend on the ground and ionosphere conditions along the propagation paths. The distribution of the observed phase propagation velocities in small geographic areas fit a normal distribution that is not centered at the speed of light. Consequently, representative velocities can be calculated for many small geographic areas to produce a velocity map over central France where numerous lightning discharges occurred. This map reflects the impact of sky waves and ground

  7. Experiments on the propagation of plasma filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Porkolab, Miklos

    2008-07-04

    We investigate experimentally the motion and structure of isolated plasma filaments propagating through neutral gas. Plasma filaments, or "blobs," arise from turbulent fluctuations in a range of plasmas. Our experimental geometry is toroidally symmetric, and the blobs expand to a larger major radius under the influence of a vertical electric field. The electric field, which is caused by nabla B and curvature drifts in a 1/R magnetic field, is limited by collisional damping on the neutral gas. The blob's electrostatic potential structure and the resulting E x B flow field give rise to a vortex pair and a mushroom shape, which are consistent with nonlinear plasma simulations. We observe experimentally this characteristic mushroom shape for the first time. We also find that the blob propagation velocity is inversely proportional to the neutral density and decreases with time as the blob cools.

  8. Equatorial ionospheric disturbance observed through a transequatorial HF propagation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maruyama

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A transequatorial radio-wave propagation experiment at shortwave frequencies (HF-TEP was done between Shepparton, Australia, and Oarai, Japan, using the radio broadcasting signals of Radio Australia. The receiving facility at Oarai was capable of direction finding based on the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification algorithm. The results were plotted in azimuth-time diagrams (AT plots. During the daytime, the propagation path was close to the great circle connecting Shepparton and Oarai, thus forming a single line in the AT plots. After sunset, off-great-circle paths, or satellite traces in the AT plot, often appeared abruptly to the west and gradually returned to the great circle direction. However, there were very few signals across the great circle to the east. The off-great-circle propagation was very similar to that previously reported and was attributed to reflection by an ionospheric structure near the equator. From the rate of change in the direction, we estimated the drift velocity of the structure to range mostly from 100 to 300 m/s eastward. Multiple instances of off-great-circle propagation with a quasi-periodicity were often observed and their spatial distance in the east-west direction was within the range of large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (LS-TIDs. Off-great-circle propagation events were frequently observed in the equinox seasons. Because there were many morphological similarities, the events were attributed to the onset of equatorial plasma bubbles.

  9. Sound propagation through a variable area duct - Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of experiment and theory has been made for the propagation of sound through a variable area axisymmetric duct with zero mean flow. Measurement of the acoustic pressure field on both sides of the constricted test section was resolved on a modal basis for various spinning mode sources. Transmitted and reflected modal amplitudes and phase angles were compared with finite element computations. Good agreement between experiment and computation was obtained over a wide range of frequencies and modal transmission variations. The study suggests that modal transmission through a variable area duct is governed by the throat modal cut-off ratio.

  10. An investigation of infrasound propagation over mountain ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Millet, Christophe; Lott, François

    2018-01-01

    Linear theory is used to analyze trapping of infrasound within the lower tropospheric waveguide during propagation above a mountain range. Atmospheric flow produced by the mountains is predicted by a nonlinear mountain gravity wave model. For the infrasound component, this paper solves the wave equation under the effective sound speed approximation using both a finite difference method and a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. It is shown that in realistic configurations, the mountain waves can deeply perturb the low-level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. To interpret these results, each acoustic mode is tracked separately as the horizontal distance increases. It is shown that during statically stable situations, situations that are common during night over land in winter, the mountain waves induce a strong Foehn effect downstream, which shrinks the waveguide significantly. This yields a new form of infrasound absorption that can largely outweigh the direct effect the mountain induces on the low-level waveguide. For the opposite case, when the low-level flow is less statically stable (situations that are more common during day in summer), mountain wave dynamics do not produce dramatic responses downstream. It may even favor the passage of infrasound and mitigate the direct effect of the obstacle.

  11. ATS-6 engineering performance report. Volume 5: Propagation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, R. O. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Propagation experiments at 1550 MHz to 1650 MHz are reviewed, including the Integrated L-Band Experiments system and results, and the Mobile L-Band Terminals for Satellite Communication system. Experiments at 4 GHz to 6 GHz are reported, including the Radio Frequency Interferometer Measurements system and results, and Earth station antenna evaluations. Experiments above 10 GHz are discussed, including Comsat and ATS-6 millimeter wave propagation/experiments, and communication ATS-6 version at 20 and 30 GHz.

  12. Sound propagation from a semi-open shooting range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Berg, F. van den

    2011-01-01

    Semi-open shooting ranges, in contrast to a fully open shooting range, are often used in the densely populated area of the Netherlands. The Ministry of Defense operates a number of these ranges. In these shooting ranges above the line of fire a number of screens are situated for safety precautions

  13. Long-range propagation of nonlinear infrasound waves through an absorbing atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, C D

    2016-04-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) approach for axi-symmetric environmental models, allowing three-dimensional acoustic propagation to be simulated using a two-dimensional Cylindrical coordinate system. A method to stabilize the FDTD algorithm in a viscous medium at atmospheric densities characteristic of the lower thermosphere is described. The stabilization scheme slightly alters the governing equations but results in quantifiable dispersion characteristics. It is shown that this method leaves sound speeds and attenuation unchanged at frequencies that are well resolved by the temporal sampling rate but strongly attenuates higher frequencies. Numerical experiments are performed to assess the effect of source strength on the amplitudes and spectral content of signals recorded at ground level at a range of distances from the source. It is shown that the source amplitudes have a stronger effect on a signal's dominant frequency than on its amplitude. Applying the stabilized code to infrasound propagation through realistic atmospheric profiles shows that nonlinear propagation alters the spectral content of low amplitude thermospheric signals, demonstrating that nonlinear effects are significant for all detectable thermospheric returns.

  14. An algorithm for determination of geodetic path for application in long-range acoustic propagation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Navelkar, G.S.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    A computer program has been developed for the construction of geodetic path between two points on the spheroidal surface for application in long range acoustic propagation in the ocean. Geodetic equations have integrated numerically upto...

  15. Proceedings of the Twenty-First NASA Propagation Experiments Meeting (NAPEX XXI) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) meeting is convened each year to discuss studies supported by the NASA Propagation Program. Representatives from the satellite communications industry, academia and government who have an interest in space-ground radio wave propagation are invited to NAPEX meetings for discussions and exchange of information. The reports delivered at this meeting by program managers and investigators present recent activities and future plans. This forum provides an opportunity for peer discussion of work in progress, timely dissemination of propagation results, and close interaction with the satellite communications industry. NAPEX XXI took place in El Segundo, California on June 11-12, 1997 and consisted of three sessions. Session 1, entitled "ACTS Propagation Study Results & Outcome " covered the results of 20 station-years of Ka-band radio-wave propagation experiments. Session 11, 'Ka-band Propagation Studies and Models,' provided the latest developments in modeling, and analysis of experimental results about radio wave propagation phenomena for design of Ka-band satellite communications systems. Session 111, 'Propagation Research Topics,' covered a diverse range of propagation topics of interest to the space community, including overviews of handbooks and databases on radio wave propagation. The ACTS Propagation Studies miniworkshop was held on June 13, 1997 and consisted of a technical session in the morning and a plenary session in the afternoon. The morning session covered updates on the status of the ACTS Project & Propagation Program, engineering support for ACTS Propagation Terminals, and the Data Center. The plenary session made specific recommendations for the future direction of the program.

  16. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  17. Q/V-band communications and propagation experiments using ALPHASAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The lower satellite frequency bands become more and more congested; therefore it will be necessary to exploit higher frequencies for satellite communications. New broadband applications (e.g. 3D-TV, fast Internet access) will require additional spectrum in the future. The Ku-band is highly utilised nowadays and Ka-band systems, which have been extensively studied in the 1990s, are already in commercial use. The next frontier is the Q/V-band. At millimetre waves the propagation effects are significant. The traditional approach of implementing large fade margins is impractical, since this leads to high EIRP and G/ T figures for the ground stations, resulting in unacceptable costs. Fade mitigation techniques by adaptive coding and modulation (ACM) offer a cost-effective solution to this problem. ESA will launch the ALPHASAT satellite in 2012. It will carry experimental Ka- and Q/V-band propagation and communications payloads, enabling propagation measurements throughout Europe and communications experiments. Three communications spot beams will be covering Northern Italy, Southern Italy and Austria with some overlap. Joanneum Research and Graz University of Technology are preparing for communications and propagation experiments using these new payloads of ALPHASAT in close cooperation with ESA, the Italian Space Agency ASI, Politecnico di Milano and Università Tor Vergata. The main focus of the communications experiments is on ACM techniques. The paper describes the design of the planned Q/V-band ground station with the planned ACM tests and investigations as well as the architecture of the communications terminal, based on a versatile software-defined radio platform.

  18. Analysis of higher harmonics on bidirectional heat pulse propagation experiment in helical and tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Tamura, N.; Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, W. H.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Shafer, M. W.; Ono, M.; López-bruna, D.; Ochando, M. A.; Estrada, T.; Hidalgo, C.; Moon, C.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Tsujimura, T. Ii.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution we analyze modulation electron cyclotron resonance heating (MECH) experiment and discuss higher harmonic frequency dependence of transport coefficients. We use the bidirectional heat pulse propagation method, in which both inward propagating heat pulse and outward propagating heat pulse are analyzed at a radial range, in order to distinguish frequency dependence of transport coefficients due to hysteresis from that due to other reasons, such as radially dependent transport coefficients, a finite damping term, or boundary effects. The method is applied to MECH experiments performed in various helical and tokamak devices, i.e. Large Helical Device (LHD), TJ-II, Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR), and Doublet III-D (DIII-D) with different plasma conditions. The frequency dependence of transport coefficients are clearly observed, showing a possibility of existence of transport hysteresis in flux-gradient relation.

  19. Propagation Loss Measurements at 400 Hertz in the BIFI Range Using a Towed Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-27

    series using the BIFI Range (Reference 1) located between Block Island, Rhode Island and Fishers Island, New York. Three types of acoustic tests were... Colossus theoretical predictions (Reference 7). The agreement is fairly good; it is apparent, howev er, that the Colossus predictions do not take into...given in reference 11. - Propagation loss was measured as a function of range and the results compared to the Colossus predictions’ (reference 7). The

  20. Long-range propagation of plasmon and phonon polaritons in hyperbolic-metamaterial waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E.

    2017-12-01

    We study photonic multilayer waveguides that include layers of materials and metamaterials with a hyperbolic dispersion (HMM). We consider the long-range propagation of plasmon and phonon polaritons at the dielectric–HMM interface in different waveguide geometries (single boundary or different layers of symmetric cladding). In contrast to the traditional analysis of geometrical parameters, we make an emphasis on the optical properties of constituent materials: solving dispersion equations, we analyze how dielectric and HMM permittivities affect propagation length and mode size of waveguide eigenmodes. We derive figures of merit that should be used for each waveguide in a broad range of permittivity values as well as compare them with plasmonic waveguides. We show that the conventional plasmonic quality factor, which is the ratio of real to imaginary parts of permittivity, is not applicable to the case of waveguides with complex structure. Both telecommunication wavelengths and mid-infrared spectral ranges are of interest considering recent advances in van der Waals materials, such as hexagonal boron nitride. We evaluate the performance of the waveguides with hexagonal boron nitride in the range where it possesses hyperbolic dispersion (wavelength 6.3–7.3 μm), and we show that these waveguides with natural hyperbolic properties have higher propagation lengths than metal-based HMM waveguides.

  1. Parametric decay instability of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave in the electron cyclotron frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of the low-power-threshold parametric decay of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave to an upper hybrid wave and a low-hybrid wave is analysed under conditions of nonmonotonic plasma density profile in a magnetic trap. The instability threshold and growth rate are derived explicitly. The analytical results are illustrated under the conditions typical of the ordinary mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance heating harmonic experiments at the FTU tokamak.

  2. Resistance to alveolar shape change limits range of force propagation in lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Smith, Bradford J; Bates, Jason H T

    2015-06-01

    We have recently shown that if the lung parenchyma is modeled in 2 dimensions as a network of springs arranged in a pattern of repeating hexagonal cells, the distortional forces around a contracting airway propagate much further from the airway wall than classic continuum theory predicts. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this occurs because of the negligible shear modulus of a hexagonal spring network. We simulated the narrowing of an airway embedded in a hexagonal network of elastic alveolar walls when the hexagonal cells of the network offered some resistance to a change in shape. We found that as the forces resisting shape change approach about 10% of the forces resisting length change of an individual spring the range of distortional force propagation in the spring network fell of rapidly as in an elastic continuum. We repeated these investigations in a 3-dimensional spring network composed of space-filling polyhedral cells and found similar results. This suggests that force propagation away from a point of local parenchymal distortion also falls off rapidly in real lung tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. UNIX-BASED DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR PROPAGATION EXPERIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    This collection of programs comprises The UNIX Based Data Management System for the Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) which is an attempt to mimic the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) scenario. The major purposes of PiFEx are to define the mobile communications channels and test the workability of new concepts used to design various components of the receiver system. The results of the PiFex experiment are large amounts of raw data which must be accessed according to a researcher's needs. This package provides a system to manage the PiFEx data in an interactive way. The system not only provides the file handling necessary to retrieve the desired data, but also several FORTRAN programs to generate some standard results pertaining to propagation data. This package assumes that the data file initially generated from the experiment has been already converted from binary to ASCII format. The Data Management system described here consists of programs divided into two categories: those programs that handle the PiFEx generated files and those that are used for number-crunching of these files. Five FORTRAN programs and one UNIX shell script file are used for file manipulation purposes. These activities include: calibration of the acquired data; and parsing of the large data file into datasets concerned with different aspects of the experiment such as the specific calibrated propagation data, dynamic and static loop error data, statistical data, and temperature and spatial data on the hardware used in the experiment. The five remaining FORTRAN programs are used to generate usable information about the data. Signal level probability, probability density of the signal fitting the Rician density function, frequency of the data's fade duration, and the Fourier transform of the data can all be generated from these data manipulation programs. In addition, a program is provided which generates a downloadable file from the signal levels and signal phases files for use with the plotting routine

  4. Model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part II. Effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkens, B; Blackstock, D T

    1998-09-01

    A model experiment was reported to be successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through a turbulent atmosphere [B. Lipkens and D. T. Blackstock, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 148-158 (1998)]. In this study the effect on N wave characteristics of turbulence intensity and propagation distance through turbulence are investigated. The main parameters of interest are the rise time and the peak pressure. The effect of turbulence intensity and propagation distance is to flatten the rise time and peak pressure distributions. Rise time and peak pressure distributions always have positive skewness after propagation through turbulence. Average rise time grows with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. The scattering of rise time data is one-sided, i.e., rise times are almost always increased by turbulence. Average peak pressure decreases slowly with turbulence intensity and propagation distance. For the reported data a threefold increase in average rise time is observed and a maximum decrease of about 20% in average peak pressure. Rise times more than ten times that of the no turbulence value are observed. At most, the maximum peak pressure doubles after propagation through turbulence, and the minimum peak pressure values are about one-half the no-turbulence values. Rounded waveforms are always more common than peaked waveforms.

  5. Propagation in a shearing plasma. II - Turbulence and the frequency range of pulsar microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.; Tademaru, E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented which explore the propagation of radio waves and pulses through a turbulent shearing plasma. A stochastic model is used to describe the turbulent velocity field, in which random fluctuations are superposed on a mean profile. Both Gaussian wave packets and shot-noise pulses polarized in the plane of shearing acquire quasi-periodic intensity modulations above the rest-frame plasma frequency. The frequency range over which these modulations appear is shown to depend on the spatial correlation length of the turbulent fluctuations and on their standard deviation from the mean velocity. The period of the modulations is variable from one realization of the random process to the next, and the average period is frequency dependent. The results of these calculations lend further support to a model for pulsar microstructure in which periodic micropulses are pure temporal modulations of the emitted radiation due to propagation effects in magnetospheric shearing regions. It is shown that turbulence on a scale of approximately 10 cm can produce these quasi-periodic modulations over a frequency range comparable to that of observed microstructure.

  6. HF propagation results from the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dev; Groves, Keith M.; McNeil, William; Carrano, Charles; Caton, Ronald G.; Parris, Richard T.; Pederson, Todd R.; Cannon, Paul S.; Angling, Matthew; Jackson-Booth, Natasha

    2017-06-01

    With support from the NASA sounding rocket program, the Air Force Research Laboratory launched two sounding rockets in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands in May 2013 known as the Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment. The rockets released samarium metal vapor at preselected altitudes in the lower F region that ionized forming a plasma cloud. Data from Advanced Research Project Agency Long-range Tracking and Identification Radar incoherent scatter radar and high-frequency (HF) radio links have been analyzed to understand the impacts of the artificial ionization on radio wave propagation. The HF radio wave ray-tracing toolbox PHaRLAP along with ionospheric models constrained by electron density profiles measured with the ALTAIR radar have been used to successfully model the effects of the cloud on HF propagation. Up to three new propagation paths were created by the artificial plasma injections. Observations and modeling confirm that the small amounts of ionized material injected in the lower F region resulted in significant changes to the natural HF propagation environment.

  7. A model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part III: validation of sonic boom propagation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkens, Bart

    2002-01-01

    In previous papers, we have shown that model experiments are successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through the atmospheric turbulent boundary layer. The results from the model experiment, pressure wave forms of spark-produced N waves and turbulence characteristics of the plane jet, are used to test various sonic boom models for propagation through turbulence. Both wave form distortion models and rise time prediction models are tested. Pierce's model [A. D. Pierce, "Statistical theory of atmospheric turbulence effects on sonic boom rise times," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 49, 906-924 (1971)] based on the wave front folding mechanism at a caustic yields an accurate prediction for the rise time of the mean wave form after propagation through the turbulence.

  8. Long Range Sound Propagation over Sea: Application to Wind Turbine Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boue, Matieu

    2007-12-13

    The classical theory of spherical wave propagation is not valid at large distances from a sound source due to the influence of wind and temperature gradients that refract, i.e., bend the sound waves. This will in the downwind direction lead to a cylindrical type of wave spreading for large distances (> 1 km). Cylindrical spreading will give a smaller damping with distance as compared to spherical spreading (3 dB/distance doubling instead of 6 dB). But over areas with soft ground, i.e., grass land, the effect of ground reflections will increase the damping so that, if the effect of atmospheric damping is removed, a behavior close to a free field spherical spreading often is observed. This is the standard assumption used in most national recommendations for predicting outdoor sound propagation, e.g., noise from wind turbines. Over areas with hard surfaces, e.g., desserts or the sea, the effect of ground damping is small and therefore cylindrical propagation could be expected in the downwind direction. This observation backed by a limited number of measurements is the background for the Swedish recommendation, which suggests that cylindrical wave spreading should be assumed for distances larger than 200 m for sea based wind turbines. The purpose of this work was to develop measurement procedures for long range sound transmission and to apply this to investigate the occurrence of cylindrical wave spreading in the Baltic Sea. This work has been successfully finished and is described in this report. Another ambition was to develop models for long range sound transmission based on the parabolic equation. Here the work is not finished but must be continued in another project. Long term measurements were performed in the Kalmar strait, Sweden, located between the mainland and Oeland, during 2005 and 2006. Two different directive sound sources placed on a lighthouse in the middle of the strait produced low frequency tones at 80, 200 and 400 Hz. At the reception point on

  9. On the effect of topography on surface wave propagation in the ambient noise frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of analyzing empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-period surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 s). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to significantly affect recovered velocity variations in the ambient noise frequency range.

  10. The PACEM experiment on line of sight multipath propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, M.; Baudin, F.; Klapisz, C.; Lavergnat, J.; Mayrargue, S.; Mon, J. P.; Nutten, B.; Rooryck, M.; Martin, L.

    1983-04-01

    Physical factors in multipath transmission were examined along a 37 km overland path. Wideband microwave link analyzer data and measurements of temperature, humidity and wind from the ground up to 300 m were combined. Acoustic sounders monitored the temperature structure of the lower atmosphere and a two frequency lidar gave humidity profiles. Data are used to investigate meteorological situations leading to multipath propagation; to study the propagation medium under these conditions; and to derive short term evolutive models for the temperature and humidity in the boundary layer.

  11. Test for Fauske and Associates to perform tube propagation experiments with simulated Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.D.

    1996-02-01

    This test plan, prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, provides guidance for performing tube propagation experiments on simulated Hanford tank wastes and on actual tank waste samples. Simulant compositions are defined and an experimental logic tree is provided for Fauske and Associates (FAI) to perform the experiments. From this guidance, methods and equipment for small-scale tube propagation experiments to be performed at the Hanford Site on actual tank samples will be developed. Propagation behavior of wastes will directly support the safety analysis (SARR) for the organic tanks. Tube propagation may be the definitive tool for determining the relative reactivity of the wastes contained in the Hanford tanks. FAI have performed tube propagation studies previously on simple two- and three-component surrogate mixtures. The simulant defined in this test plan more closely represents actual tank composition. Data will be used to support preparation of criteria for determining the relative safety of the organic bearing wastes.

  12. Double layer propagation in experiments with electron beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskin, L. G.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1993-01-01

    Electron beam injection into a plasma is investigated using the analytical inverted Bernstein-Green-Kruskal method. Particle number and momentum conservation laws are applied to evaluate the propagation velocity and potential drop on the leading edge of the beam. Electric potential is supposed to be monotonic, thus the leading front has a double-layer-like structure. For the case of cold particles, analytical expressions for the double layer velocity and potential drop are obtained. It is pointed out that double layer velocity differs from the initial electron speed: even for weak beams a noticeable deceleration takes place. Strong beams are found incapable of penetrating into plasma - their propagation velocity is very small. Ambient electrons undergo a considerable acceleration forming a return current which neutralizes the injector. Possible instability of the distribution functions is discussed.

  13. Nonvariational mechanism of front propagation: Theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Socorro, A J; Clerc, M G; González-Cortés, G; Wilson, M

    2017-01-01

    Multistable systems exhibit a rich front dynamics between equilibria. In one-dimensional scalar gradient systems, the spread of the fronts is proportional to the energy difference between equilibria. Fronts spreading proportionally to the energetic difference between equilibria is a characteristic of one-dimensional scalar gradient systems. Based on a simple nonvariational bistable model, we show analytically and numerically that the direction and speed of front propagation is led by nonvariational dynamics. We provide experimental evidence of nonvariational front propagation between different molecular orientations in a quasi-one-dimensional liquid-crystal light valve subjected to optical feedback. Free diffraction length allows us to control the variational or nonvariational nature of this system. Numerical simulations of the phenomenological model have quite good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Propagation of uncertainties in mesocosm experiments on ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno de Castro, María

    2016-01-01

    Observations from different mesocosms exposed to the same treatment typically show variability that hinders the detection of potential treatments effects. To unearth relevant sources of variability, I developed and performed a model­-based data analysis that simulates uncertainty propagation. I described how the observed divergence in the outcomes can be due to the amplification of differences in experimentally unresolved ecological factors within same treatment replicates. Three independent ...

  15. Electro-optical propagation measurements during the MINOTAUROS experiment in the Cretan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Christian; Sucher, Erik; Wendelstein, Norbert; Stein, Karin

    2017-09-01

    We report on propagation measurements performed during the MINOTAUROS (Maritime INvestigations On Targets and Atmosphere Under Reduction of Optical Signatures) experiment on Crete, Greece, in late summer of 2016. The field trial has been organized by NATO STO Task Group SET-211 on Naval Platform Protection in the EO/IR Domain with strong support of the Hellenic Navy. Besides meteorological measurements, the experiment included measurements of turbulence using a boundary layer scintillometer on a slant path (d = 8 km) across the entry of Souda Bay (Crete). These are compared to values obtained by a 3D sonic anemometer, which was deployed at one end of the propagation path. Refraction effects have been measured using a 17.5 km path from Drapanos to Gerani. Two meteorological buoys along the path were used to gather information about the atmospheric conditions. An overview and a first analysis of the results are presented. The refraction measurements are compared to simulations using MORTICIA (Model of Range and Transmission in Coastal Inland Atmospheres), a new software tool currently under development in a collaboration of Fraunhofer IOSB and TNO.

  16. Numerical Experiments in Error Control for Sound Propagation Using a Damping Layer Boundary Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from numerical experiments for controlling the error caused by a damping layer boundary treatment when simulating the propagation of an acoustic signal from a continuous pressure source. The computations are with the 2D Linearized Euler Equations (LEE) for both a uniform mean flow and a steady parallel jet. The numerical experiments are with algorithms that are third, fifth, seventh and ninth order accurate in space and time. The numerical domain is enclosed in a damping layer boundary treatment. The damping is implemented in a time accurate manner, with simple polynomial damping profiles of second, fourth, sixth and eighth power. At the outer boundaries of the damping layer the propagating solution is uniformly set to zero. The complete boundary treatment is remarkably simple and intrinsically independant from the dimension of the spatial domain. The reported results show the relative effect on the error from the boundary treatment by varying the damping layer width, damping profile power, damping amplitude, propagtion time, grid resolution and algorithm order. The issue that is being addressed is not the accuracy of the numerical solution when compared to a mathematical solution, but the effect of the complete boundary treatment on the numerical solution, and to what degree the error in the numerical solution from the complete boundary treatment can be controlled. We report maximum relative absolute errors from just the boundary treatment that range from O[10-2] to O[10-7].

  17. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun; Williams, Kevin L; Wang, Zhongkang; Moum, James N

    2008-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an analysis of mid-frequency acoustic transmission data collected at range 550 m during the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment. The acoustic data were collected on a vertical array immediately before, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data collected at a nearby location, a plane-wave model for the nonlinear internal wave's position as a function of time is developed. Experimental results show a new acoustic path is generated as the internal wave passes above the acoustic source.

  18. Long-Range Transhorizon Lunar Surface Radio Wave Propagation in the Presence of a Regolith and a Sparse Exospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-range, over-the-horizon (transhorizon) radio wave propagation is considered for the case of the Moon. In the event that relay satellites are not available or otherwise unwarranted for use, transhorizon communication provides for a contingency or backup option for non line-of-sight lunar surface exploration scenarios. Two potential low-frequency propagation mechanisms characteristic of the lunar landscape are the lunar regolith and the photoelectron induced plasma exosphere enveloping the Moon. Although it was hoped that the regolith would provide for a spherical waveguide which could support a trapped surface wave phenomena, it is found that, in most cases, the regolith is deleterious to long range radio wave propagation. However, the presence of the plasma of the lunar exosphere supports wave propagation and, in fact, surpasses the attenuation of the regolith. Given the models of the regolith and exosphere adopted here, it is recommended that a frequency of 1 MHz be considered for low rate data transmission along the lunar surface. It is also recommended that further research be done to capture the descriptive physics of the regolith and the exospheric plasma so that a more complete model can be obtained. This comprehensive theoretical study is based entirely on first principles and the mathematical techniques needed are developed as required; it is self-contained and should not require the use of outside resources for its understanding.

  19. A unified view to Cologne and Florence experiments on superluminal photon propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardone, Fabio; Mignani, Roberto

    2003-01-13

    We show that two of the first performed experiments on superluminal photon propagation, namely, the 1992 Cologne experiment on the tunneling of evanescent waves in an undersized waveguide, and the 1993 Florence experiment on the microwave propagation in vacuum between two horn antennas, do admit a common interpretation. Precisely, both experimental devices behave as a high-pass filter. We get this result by two different methods, one based on the Friis law (which yields the efficiency of a transmitting device), and the other on the deformation of the Minkowski space-time. This allows us to set intriguing connections between these two (a priori different) classes of experiments. In particular, in either case the superluminal propagation can be described as a tunneling and is related to evanescent waves.

  20. Field experiments to determine wave propagation principles and mechanical properties of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Stephan; Gebhard, Felix; Dual, Jürg; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-04-01

    To understand the release of snow avalanches by explosions one needs to know how acoustic waves travel above and within the snowpack. Hitherto, wave propagation was investigated in the laboratory with small samples or in the field in the shock wave region. We developed a measurement system and layout to derive wave attenuation in snow, wave speeds and elastic moduli on small-scale (1-2 m) field experiments to close the gap between the lab scale (0.1 m) and the scale of artificial release (10-100 m). We used solid explosives and hammer blows to create the load and accelerometers to measure the resulting wave within the snowpack. The strong attenuation we observed indicates that we measured the second longitudinal wave which propagates through the pore space. The wave speeds, however, corresponded to the speeds of the first longitudinal wave within the ice skeleton. The elastic moduli were high on the order of several tens of MPa for lower densities (150 kg m-3) and agreed well with earlier lab studies, in particular for the higher densities 250-400 kg m-3). However, the scatter was rather large as expected for in-situ experiments in the layered snow cover. In addition, we measured accelerations during propagation saw test experiments. The propagation of cracks during this type of snow instability test has mainly been studied by analysing the bending of the slab (due to the saw cut) using particle tracking velocimetry. We used the accelerometers to measure crack propagation speeds. The wave speeds were slightly higher for most experiments than reported previously. Furthermore, in some experiments, we encountered to different wave types with one propagating at a higher speed. This finding may be interpreted as the actual crack propagation and the settling of the weak layer (collapse wave). Our results show that field measurements of propagation properties are feasible and that crack propagation as observed during propagation saw tests may involve different processes

  1. Experiments in Error Propagation within Hierarchal Combat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Bayesian Information Criterion CNO Chief of Naval Operations DOE Design of Experiments DOD Department of Defense MANA Map Aware Non-uniform Automata ...ground up” approach. First, it develops a mission-level model for one on one submarine combat in Map Aware Non-uniform Automata (MANA) simulation, an... Automata (MANA), an agent based simulation that can model the different postures of submarines. It feeds the results from MANA into stochastic

  2. Experiment demonstration of backward-propagating surface plasmon resonance mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yuying; Dai, Hailang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is the physical process of surface plasmon excitation. The polarization sensitivity of the coupling efficiency and control of the directionality of SPR are facing challenges. We have experimentally demonstrated a new plasmonic coupler that overcomes these challenges using nano scale particles on a silver film. Our device is based on the Mie scattering of SPR and achieves a complete bidirectional excitation. The proposed design can be used to create sensors with both bidirectional and unidirectional launching of SPR, and consequently, can be extended to a broad range of applications in biosensor systems.

  3. NICARE I HF propagation experiment results and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argo, P.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Carlos, Robert

    1992-04-01

    The NICARE I chemical release created a large electron density depletion in the nighttime F region of the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 300 km which persisted for at least 30 min. A three-dimensional ray-tracing code (TRACKER) predicted that the lenslike refractive perturbation would create new off-axis modes in long-distance HF radio paths which reflected in the ionosphere near the depletion. Channel measurements during this experiment bear this out. The multipath created by these new modes induced an increased fading rate on the received signals. Analysis of the time history of the direction of arrival of the new modes indicates that after the initial expansion of the release the western edge continued to move westward while the eastward edge remained stable in location. This behavior is consistent with model predictions of the behavior of the depletion.

  4. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  5. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François, E-mail: francois.coulouvrat@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7190, Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  6. Sound propagation in dry granular materials : discrete element simulations, theory, and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study sound wave propagation through different types of dry confined granular systems is studied. With three-dimensional discrete element simulations, theory and experiments, the influence of several micro-scale properties: friction, dissipation, particle rotation, and contact disorder, on

  7. UNIX-based data management system for the Mobile Satellite Propagation Experiment (PiFEx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented for handling data resulting from Mobile Satellite propagation experiments such as the Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) conducted by JPL. This method uses the UNIX operating system and C programming language. The data management system is implemented on a VAX minicomputer. The system automatically divides the large data file housing data from various experiments under a predetermined format into various individual files containing data from each experiment. The system also has a number of programs written in C and FORTRAN languages to allow the researcher to obtain meaningful quantities from the data at hand.

  8. Non-Local Propagation of Correlations in Quantum Systems with Long-Range Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-10

    can be sent through a quantumchannel15. Recent experi- mental work has observed linear (that is, Lieb–Robinson-like) correlation growth over six...later times. Associated data and theoretical results are similarly coloured to guide the eye. Error bars, 1 s.d. RESEARCH LETTER 2 0 0 | N A T U R E | V

  9. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold film embedded...

  10. Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in photonic band gap structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas; Nikolajsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We study the interaction of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs), excited at telecommunication wavelengths, with photonic crystals (PCs) formed by periodic arrays of gold bumps that are arranged in a triangular lattice and placed symmetrically on both sides of a thin gold fil embedded ...

  11. Blue and fin whale call source levels and propagation range in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M

    2007-08-01

    Blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus) produce high-intensity, low-frequency calls, which probably function for communication during mating and feeding. The source levels of blue and fin whale calls off the Western Antarctic Peninsula were calculated using recordings made with calibrated, bottom-moored hydrophones. Blue whales were located up to a range of 200 km using hyperbolic localization and time difference of arrival. The distance to fin whales, estimated using multipath arrivals of their calls, was up to 56 km. The error in range measurements was 3.8 km using hyperbolic localization, and 3.4 km using multipath arrivals. Both species produced high-intensity calls; the average blue whale call source level was 189+/-3 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 25-29 Hz, and the average fin whale call source level was 189+/-4 dB re:1 microPa-1 m over 15-28 Hz. Blue and fin whale populations in the Southern Ocean have remained at low numbers for decades since they became protected; using source level and detection range from passive acoustic recordings can help in calculating the relative density of calling whales.

  12. Simulating the Long-Distance Propagation of Intense Beams in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gilson, Erik P; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) makes use of a compact Paul trap configuration with quadrupolar oscillating wall voltages to simulate the propagation of intense charged particle beams over distances of many kilometers through magnetic alternating-gradient transport systems. The simulation is possible because of the similarity between the transverse dynamics of particles in the two systems. One-component pure cesium ion plasmas have been trapped that correspond to normalized intensity parameters s < 0.8, where s is the ratio of the square of the plasma frequency to twice the square of the average transverse focusing frequency. The PTSX device confines the plasma for hundreds of milliseconds, which is equivalent to beam propagation over tens of kilometers. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the oscillating confining voltage waveform has been modified as a function of time. A comparison is made between abrupt changes in amplitude and adiabatic changes in amplitude. T...

  13. Rainwater propagation through snowpack during rain-on-snow sprinkling experiments under different snow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Juras

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of rainwater propagation and runoff generation during rain-on-snow (ROS events are still insufficiently known. Understanding storage and transport of liquid water in natural snowpacks is crucial, especially for forecasting of natural hazards such as floods and wet snow avalanches. In this study, propagation of rainwater through snow was investigated by sprinkling experiments with deuterium-enriched water and applying an alternative hydrograph separation technique on samples collected from the snowpack runoff. This allowed us to quantify the contribution of rainwater, snowmelt and initial liquid water released from the snowpack. Four field experiments were carried out during winter 2015 in the vicinity of Davos, Switzerland. Blocks of natural snow were isolated from the surrounding snowpack to inhibit lateral exchange of water and were exposed to artificial rainfall using deuterium-enriched water. The experiments were composed of four 30 min periods of sprinkling, separated by three 30 min breaks. The snowpack runoff was continuously gauged and sampled periodically for the deuterium signature. At the onset of each experiment antecedent liquid water was first pushed out by the sprinkling water. Hydrographs showed four pronounced peaks corresponding to the four sprinkling bursts. The contribution of rainwater to snowpack runoff consistently increased over the course of the experiment but never exceeded 86 %. An experiment conducted on a non-ripe snowpack suggested the development of preferential flow paths that allowed rainwater to efficiently propagate through the snowpack limiting the time for mass exchange processes to take effect. In contrast, experiments conducted on ripe isothermal snowpack showed a slower response behaviour and resulted in a total runoff volume which consisted of less than 50 % of the rain input.

  14. Rainwater propagation through snowpack during rain-on-snow sprinkling experiments under different snow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juras, Roman; Würzer, Sebastian; Pavlásek, Jirka; Vitvar, Tomáš; Jonas, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater propagation and runoff generation during rain-on-snow (ROS) events are still insufficiently known. Understanding storage and transport of liquid water in natural snowpacks is crucial, especially for forecasting of natural hazards such as floods and wet snow avalanches. In this study, propagation of rainwater through snow was investigated by sprinkling experiments with deuterium-enriched water and applying an alternative hydrograph separation technique on samples collected from the snowpack runoff. This allowed us to quantify the contribution of rainwater, snowmelt and initial liquid water released from the snowpack. Four field experiments were carried out during winter 2015 in the vicinity of Davos, Switzerland. Blocks of natural snow were isolated from the surrounding snowpack to inhibit lateral exchange of water and were exposed to artificial rainfall using deuterium-enriched water. The experiments were composed of four 30 min periods of sprinkling, separated by three 30 min breaks. The snowpack runoff was continuously gauged and sampled periodically for the deuterium signature. At the onset of each experiment antecedent liquid water was first pushed out by the sprinkling water. Hydrographs showed four pronounced peaks corresponding to the four sprinkling bursts. The contribution of rainwater to snowpack runoff consistently increased over the course of the experiment but never exceeded 86 %. An experiment conducted on a non-ripe snowpack suggested the development of preferential flow paths that allowed rainwater to efficiently propagate through the snowpack limiting the time for mass exchange processes to take effect. In contrast, experiments conducted on ripe isothermal snowpack showed a slower response behaviour and resulted in a total runoff volume which consisted of less than 50 % of the rain input.

  15. Outdoor Urban Propagation Experiment of a Handset MIMO Antenna with a Human Phantom located in a Browsing Stance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hayashi, Toshiteru; Ogawa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Outdoor radio propagation experiments are presented at 2.4 GHz, using a handset MIMO antenna with two monopoles and two planar inverted-F antennas (PIFAs), adjacent to a human phantom in browsing stance. The propagation test was performed in an urban area of a city, which resulted in non lineof...

  16. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid...... accelerometers and arrays of hydrophones inside are compared to the theoretical model for wave propagation. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical predictions is found........ The dispersion and attenuation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall. The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in stress wave transfer function experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion...

  17. Rupture propagation speed during earthquake faulting reproduced by large-scale biaxial friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, K.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes are generated by unstable frictional slip along pre-existing faults. Both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have shown that the rupture process involves an initial quasi-static phase, a subsequent accelerating phase and a main dynamic rupture phase. During the main phase, the rupture front propagates at either subshear or supershear velocity, which affects the seismic wave radiation pattern. An examination on what controls the speed is crucial for improvement of earthquake hazard mitigation. Thus We conducted stick-slip experiments on meter-scale Indian gabbro rocks to observe the rupture process of the unstable periodic slip events and to measure the rupture speed along the fault. The simulated fault plane is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width and ground by #200-300. The fault is applied at a constant normal stress of 6.7MPa and sheared parallel to the longitudinal direction of the fault at a slip rate of 0.1mm/s and up to a displacement of 40cm. The long, narrow fault geometry leads to in-plane shear rupture (mode II). in which the rupture front propagates in the direction of slip, which mimics large strike-slip earthquake faulting. Compressional-(Vp) and shear-(Vs) wave velocities of the rock sample are calculated to be 6.92km/s and 3.62km/s, respectively, based on the elastic properties (Young's modulus, 103GPa; Poisson's ratio, 0.331; Shear modulus, 38GPa). 32 biaxial strain gauges for shear strain and 16 single-axis strain gauges for normal strain were attached along the longitudinal direction of the fault at intervals of 5cm and 10cm, respectively. The local strain data were recorded at a sampling rate of 1MHz within 16 bit resolution. Load calls attached outside the fault plane measured the whole normal and shear forces applied on the fault plane, which was recorded by the same recording system. We have confirmed that the rupture process of unstable slip events consistsing of 1) an initial quasi-static phase where the slipped area

  18. Noise propagation effects in power supply distribution systems for high-energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteche, F.; Rivetta, C.; Iglesias, M.; Echeverria, I.; Pradas, A.; Arcega, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    High-energy physics experiments are supplied by thousands of power supply units placed in distant areas from the front-end electronics. The power supply units and the front-end electronics are connected through long power cables that propagate the output noise from the power supplies to the detector. This paper addresses the effect of long cables on the noise propagation and the impact that those cables have on the conducted emission levels required for the power supplies and the selection of EMI filters for the front-end electronic low-voltage input. This analysis is part of the electromagnetic compatibility based design focused on functional safety to define the type of cable, shield connections, EMI filters and power supply specifications required to ensure the successful integration of the detector and, specifically, to achieve the designed performance of the front-end electronics.

  19. Laboratory Experiments on Propagating Plasma Bubbles into Vacuum, Vacuum Magnetic Field, and Background Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the dynamics of plasma ``bubbles'' as they propagate through a variety of background media. These bubbles are formed by a pulsed coaxial gun with an externally applied magnetic field. Bubble parameters are typically ne ~1020 m-3, Te ~ 5 - 10 eV, and Ti ~ 10 - 15 eV. The structure of the bubbles can range from unmagnetized jet-like structures to spheromak-like structures with complex magnetic flux surfaces. Some of the background media the bubbles interact with are vacuum, vacuum with magnetic field, and other magnetized plasmas. These bubbles exhibit different qualitative behavior depending on coaxial gun parameters such as gas species, gun current, and gun bias magnetic field. Their behavior also depends on the parameters of the background they propagate through. Multi-frame fast camera imaging and magnetic probe data are used to characterize the bubble evolution under various conditions.

  20. Meteorological features leading to multipath propagation, observed in the PACEM 1 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, J.; Klapisz, C.

    1985-12-01

    Because multipath propagation constitutes a major source of impairments for line of sight radio links, the investigation of meteorological situations associated with it is of some importance. This paper describes the meteorological measurements carried out during the PACEM I experiment and discusses their accuracy. The usefulness of acoustic soundings and the use of a ray-tracing program are specially detailed points. The great variety of the features encountered calls for a long time derivation of statistical properties, and for further experimental data taking into account the nonhorizontal homogeneity of the atmospheric boundary layer along the radio link.

  1. Laser pulse propagation in a meter scale rubidium vapor/plasma cell in AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Joulaei, Atefeh; Berti, Nicolas; Kasparian, Jerome; Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of laser pulse propagating in a 3.5 cm Rb vapor cell in the linear dispersion regime by using a 1D model and a 2D code that has been modified for our special case. The 2D simulation finally aimed at finding laser beam parameters suitable to make the Rb vapor fully ionized to obtain a uniform, 10 m-long, at least 1 mm in radius plasma in the next step for the AWAKE experiment.

  2. An experiment to measure the one-way velocity of propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, P.; Torr, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experiment involving commercially available instrumentation to measure the velocity of the earth with respect to absolute space is described. The experiment involves the measurement of the one-way propagation velocity of electromagnetic radiation down a high-quality coaxial cable. It is demonstrated that the experiment is both physically meaningful and exceedingly simple in concept and in implementation. It is shown that with currently available commercial equipment one might expect to detect a threshold value for the component of velocity of the earth's motion with respect to absolute space in the equatorial plane of approximately 10 km/s, which greatly exceeds the velocity resolution required to detect the motion of the solar system with respect to the center of the galaxy.

  3. Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment for Japanese SELENE-2 landing mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Kunimori, H.; Araki, H.; Fuse, T.; Hanada, H.; Katayama, M.; Otsubo, T.; Sasaki, S.; Tazawa, S.; Tsuruta, S.; Funazaki, K.; Taniguchi, H.; Murata, K.

    2012-04-01

    We present the development status of the Lunar Laser Ranging experiment proposed to Japanese SELENE-2 lunar landing mission. The Lunar Laser Ranging measures the distance between laser link stations on the Earth and retroreflectors on the Moon, by detecting the time of flight of photons of high-powered laser emitted from the ground station. Since the Earth-Moon distance contains information of lunar orbit, lunar solid tides, and lunar orientation and rotation, we can estimate the inner structure of the Moon through orientation, rotation and tide. Retroreflectors put by the Apollo and Luna missions in 1970's are arrays of many small Corner Cube Prisms (CCP). Because of the tilt of these arrays from the Earth direction due to the optical libration, the returned laser pulse is broaden, causing the main range error of more than 1.5 cm ([1]). Therefore retroreflectors with larger single aperture are necessary for more accurate ranging, and we propose a large single retroreflector of hollow-type with 15 cm aperture. Larger aperture up to 20 cm might be favorable if more mass is permitted for payloads. To cancel the velocity aberration, a large, single aperture retroreflector needs small amount of offset angle between the reflecting planes to spoil the return beam pattern. This angle offset, called Dihedral Angle Offset (DAO) must be optimized to be less than 1 second of arc with 0.1 seconds of arc accuracy to accumulate more photons [2, 3]. The realization of such small DAO is challenging with current technology, therefore the development of fabrication method is important. As for the mirror material, some ceramic products (ZPF: Zero-expansion Pore-free ceramics or SiC: silicon carbide) are under consideration in terms of weight, hardness and handling. The thermal quality of the material can be evaluated by both the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion. The method to fasten three planes each other with precise DAO must be developed.

  4. Acoustic pulse propagation through stable atmospheric boundary layer: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunchuzov, Igor; Kulichkov, Sergey; Otrezov, Alexander; Perepelkin, Vitaly

    2004-05-01

    Mesoscale wind speed and temperature fluctuations with periods from 1 min to a few hours significantly affect a variability and turbulent regime of stable atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Their statistical characteristics are still poorly understood, although the knowledge of such statistics is required when modeling sound propagation through stable ABL. Several field experiments have been conducted to study the influence of mesoscale wind speed fluctuations on acoustic pulse propagation in stable ABL. The results of these experiments are presented in this work. A special acoustic source was used to generate acoustic pulses due to a detonation of air-propane mixture with a repetition period of 1 min or 30 s. The mean wind speed profiles and mesoscale wind fluctuations were measured by Doppler sodar up to a height of 300 m, and by anemometers placed on a 56-mast. From the measurements of the pulse travel time fluctuations at different distances from the source the statistical characteristics of the mesoscale wind fluctuations such as frequency spectra, coherences, horizontal phase speeds and scales have been obtained. Some of the obtained results are interpreted with a recently developed model of internal wave spectrum in a stably stratified atmosphere.

  5. Counter-propagating radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser and the formation of radiative precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, T.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Stehlé, C.; Burdiak, G. C.; Foster, J. M.; Skidmore, J.; Graham, P.; Gumbrell, E.; Patankar, S.; Spindloe, C.; Chaulagain, U.; Kozlová, M.; Larour, J.; Singh, R. L.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Velarde, P.; Danson, C.

    2017-06-01

    We present results from new experiments to study the dynamics of radiative shocks, reverse shocks and radiative precursors. Laser ablation of a solid piston by the Orion high-power laser at AWE Aldermaston UK was used to drive radiative shocks into a gas cell initially pressurised between 0.1 and 1.0 bar with different noble gases. Shocks propagated at 80 ± 10 km/s and experienced strong radiative cooling resulting in post-shock compressions of ×25 ± 2. A combination of X-ray backlighting, optical self-emission streak imaging and interferometry (multi-frame and streak imaging) were used to simultaneously study both the shock front and the radiative precursor. These experiments present a new configuration to produce counter-propagating radiative shocks, allowing for the study of reverse shocks and providing a unique platform for numerical validation. In addition, the radiative shocks were able to expand freely into a large gas volume without being confined by the walls of the gas cell. This allows for 3-D effects of the shocks to be studied which, in principle, could lead to a more direct comparison to astrophysical phenomena. By maintaining a constant mass density between different gas fills the shocks evolved with similar hydrodynamics but the radiative precursor was found to extend significantly further in higher atomic number gases (∼4 times further in xenon than neon). Finally, 1-D and 2-D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations are presented showing good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-02

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant.

  7. Broadband laser ranging precision and accuracy experiments with PDV benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenacci, Jared; Daykin, Ed; Howard, Marylesa; Lalone, Brandon; Miller, Kirk

    2017-06-01

    Broadband laser ranging (BLR) is a developmental diagnostic designed to measure the precise position of surfaces and particle clouds moving at velocities of several kilometers per second. Recent single stage gas gun experiments were conducted to quantify the precision and accuracy possible with a typical BLR system. For these experiments, the position of a mirrored projectile is measured relative to the location of a stationary optical flat (uncoated window) mounted within the gun catch tank. Projectile velocity is constrained to one-dimensional motion within the gun barrel. A collimating probe is aligned to be orthogonal to both the target window and the mirrored impactor surface. The probe is used to simultaneously measure the position and velocity with a BLR and conventional Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system. Since there is a negligible lateral component to the target velocity, coupled with strong signal returns from a mirrored surface, integrating the PDV measurement provides a high fidelity distance measurement reference to which the BLR measurement may be compared.

  8. TOUGH-RBSN simulator for hydraulic fracture propagation within fractured media: Model validations against laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kunhwi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Nakagawa, Seiji; Birkholzer, Jens

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents coupled hydro-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in complex fractured media using a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. The individual physical processes in the fracture propagation are represented by separate program modules: the TOUGH2 code for multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) model for mechanical and fracture-damage behavior, which are coupled with each other. Fractures are modeled as discrete features, of which the hydrological properties are evaluated from the fracture deformation and aperture change. The verification of the TOUGH-RBSN code is performed against a 2D analytical model for single hydraulic fracture propagation. Subsequently, modeling capabilities for hydraulic fracturing are demonstrated through simulations of laboratory experiments conducted on rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed network of pre-existing fractures. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted by changing the modeling parameters, such as viscosity of injected fluid, strength of pre-existing fractures, and confining stress conditions. The hydraulic fracturing characteristics attributed to the modeling parameters are investigated through comparisons of the simulation results.

  9. Full Range Advising: Transforming the Advisor-Advisee Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E., Jr.; Story, Joana S.; Fritz, Susan M.; Schinstock, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from the leadership literature, a new model for advising is proposed. Full range advising encompasses laissez-faire, management by exception, contingent rewards, and transformational behaviors. The relationships between full range advising and advisees' extra effort, satisfaction with the advisor, and advising effectiveness were examined.…

  10. A comparison between directly measured and inferred wave speeds from an acoustic propagation experiment in Currituck Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Megan S; Costley, R Daniel; Sagers, Jason D; Lee, Kevin M; McNeese, Andrew R; Hathaway, Kent K; Wilson, Preston S; Smith, Eric W

    2018-01-01

    An acoustic propagation experiment was conducted in Currituck Sound to characterize low-frequency propagation in a very-shallow-water estuarine environment. The water column properties were homogeneous over the study area, and the emphasis of this work is on understanding the propagation effects induced by the estuarine bed. During the experiment, low-frequency sound propagation measurements of waterborne sound and interface waves were acquired, and direct measurements of the compressional and shear wave properties were obtained at high frequencies. The propagation data consist of signals from a Combustive Sound Source recorded on bottom mounted geophones and a vertical line array of hydrophones. A statistical inference method was applied to obtain an estimate of the sediment compressional and shear wave speed profiles as a function of depth within the estuarine bed. The direct measurements were obtained in situ by inserting probes 30 cm into the sediment. Sediment acoustics models were fit to the high-frequency in situ data to enable comparison with the inferred low-frequency wave speeds. Overall, good agreement was found between the directly measured and inferred wave speeds for both the compressional and shear wave data.

  11. Fracture propagation during fluid injection experiments in shale at elevated confining pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mike; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Rutter, Ernest; Fauchille, Anne-Laure; Taylor, Rochelle; Lee, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale-gas has focused attention upon the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales. Fracture propagation trajectories in these materials depend on the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic in-situ stress field. However, there is a general paucity of available experimental data on their anisotropic mechanical, physical and fluid-flow properties, especially at elevated confining pressures. Here we report the results of laboratory-scale fluid injection experiments, for Whitby mudstone and Mancos shale (an interbedded silt and mudstone), as well as Pennant sandstone (a tight sandstone with permeability similar to shales), which is used an isotropic baseline and tight-gas sandstone analogue. Our injection experiments involved the pressurisation of a blind-ending central hole in an initially dry cylindrical sample. Pressurisation was conducted under constant volume-rate control, using silicone oils of various viscosities. The dependence of breakdown pressure on confining pressure was seen to be dependent on the rock strength, with the significantly stronger Pennant sandstone exhibiting much lower confining-pressure dependence of breakdown pressure than the weaker shales. In most experiments, a small drop in the injection pressure record was observed at what is taken to be fracture initiation, and in the Pennant sandstone this was accompanied by a small burst of acoustic energy. Breakdown was found to be rapid and uncontrollable after initiation if injection is continued, but can be limited to a slower (but still uncontrolled) rate by ceasing the injection of fluid after the breakdown initiation in experiments where it could be identified. A simplified 2-dimensional model for explaining these observations is presented in terms of the stress intensities at the tip of a pressurised crack. Additionally, we present a suite of supporting mechanical, flow and elastic

  12. Self-propagating exothermic reaction analysis in Ti/Al reactive films using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Seema, E-mail: seema.sen@tu-ilmenau.de [Technical University of Ilmenau, Department of Materials for Electronics, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Niederrhein University of Applied Science, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Reinarzstraße 49, 47805 Krefeld (Germany); Lake, Markus; Kroppen, Norman; Farber, Peter; Wilden, Johannes [Niederrhein University of Applied Science, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Reinarzstraße 49, 47805 Krefeld (Germany); Schaaf, Peter [Technical University of Ilmenau, Department of Materials for Electronics, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 5, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Development of nanoscale Ti/Al multilayer films with 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 molar ratios. • Characterization of exothermic reaction propagation by experiments and simulation. • The reaction velocity depends on the ignition potentials and molar ratios of the films. • Only 1Ti/3Al films exhibit the unsteady reaction propagation with ripple formation. • CFD simulation shows the time dependent atom mixing and temperature flow during exothermic reaction. - Abstract: This study describes the self-propagating exothermic reaction in Ti/Al reactive multilayer foils by using experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The Ti/Al foils with different molar ratios of 1Ti/1Al, 1Ti/2Al and 1Ti/3Al were fabricated by magnetron sputtering method. Microstructural characteristics of the unreacted and reacted foils were analyzed by using electronic and atomic force microscopes. After an electrical ignition, the influence of ignition potentials on reaction propagation has been experimentally investigated. The reaction front propagates with a velocity of minimum 0.68 ± 0.4 m/s and maximum 2.57 ± 0.6 m/s depending on the input ignition potentials and the chemical compositions. Here, the 1Ti/3Al reactive foil exhibits both steady state and unsteady wavelike reaction propagation. Moreover, the numerical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation shows the time dependent temperature flow and atomic mixing in a nanoscale reaction zone. The CFD simulation also indicates the potentiality for simulating exothermic reaction in the nanoscale Ti/Al foil.

  13. A computer model for estimating microwave propagation characteristics along earth-space paths in the 1-100 GHz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William C.

    A comprehensive, integrated, and transportable software package for the analysis of digital satellite links is presented. The most notable feature of this software is the inclusion of sophisticated models for attenuation and noise sources. The attenuation-source model takes into account losses due to rain, clouds, wet radomes, and multipath fading, as well as atmospheric absorption, defocusing, and scintillation. The noise-source model considers the radio noise due to the above absorptive losses, as well as extraterrestrial and man-made noise. Together, these models provide a fairly accurate representation of microwave propagation characteristics as they relate to satellite links. The software itself is designed to maximize the user's efficiency and minimize confusion. Menus are used extensively to guide the user through the program, and the use of prompting and input validity checking ensure the accuracy of all data entries. Color displays are used to present the data in an organized, easy-to-read format.

  14. Simple illustrations of range-dependence and 3-D effects by normal-mode sound propagation modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ivansson, Sven

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, the sound-speed profile has significant effects on underwater acoustic sound propagation. These effects can be quantified by normal-mode models, for example. The basic case is a laterally homogeneous medium, for which the sound speed and the density depend on depth only and not on horizontal position. Effects of horizontal medium-parameter variation can be quantified by coupled-mode models, with coupling between mode expansions for laterally homogeneous parts of the medium. In the present paper, these effects are illustrated for media with a particularly simple horizontal parameter variation such that mode shapes do not vary with horizontal position. The modal wavenumbers depend on horizontal position, however. At a vertical interface between regions with laterally homogeneous medium parameters, each mode is reflected as well as transmitted. For the media considered, reflection and transmission coefficients can be computed separately for each mode without mode coupling, and this is done recu...

  15. Phobos laser ranging: Numerical Geodesy experiments for Martian system science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, D.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Noomen, R.; Visser, P. N. A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Laser ranging is emerging as a technology for use over (inter)planetary distances, having the advantage of high (mm-cm) precision and accuracy and low mass and power consumption. We have performed numerical simulations to assess the science return in terms of geodetic observables of a hypothetical Phobos lander performing active two-way laser ranging with Earth-based stations. We focus our analysis on the estimation of Phobos and Mars gravitational, tidal and rotational parameters. We explicitly include systematic error sources in addition to uncorrelated random observation errors. This is achieved through the use of consider covariance parameters, specifically the ground station position and observation biases. Uncertainties for the consider parameters are set at 5 mm and at 1 mm for the Gaussian uncorrelated observation noise (for an observation integration time of 60 s). We perform the analysis for a mission duration up to 5 years. It is shown that a Phobos Laser Ranging (PLR) can contribute to a better understanding of the Martian system, opening the possibility for improved determination of a variety of physical parameters of Mars and Phobos. The simulations show that the mission concept is especially suited for estimating Mars tidal deformation parameters, estimating degree 2 Love numbers with absolute uncertainties at the 10-2 to 10-4 level after 1 and 4 years, respectively and providing separate estimates for the Martian quality factors at Sun and Phobos-forced frequencies. The estimation of Phobos libration amplitudes and gravity field coefficients provides an estimate of Phobos' relative equatorial and polar moments of inertia with an absolute uncertainty of 10-4 and 10-7, respectively, after 1 year. The observation of Phobos tidal deformation will be able to differentiate between a rubble pile and monolithic interior within 2 years. For all parameters, systematic errors have a much stronger influence (per unit uncertainty) than the uncorrelated Gaussian

  16. Ultrashort pulse-propagation effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier: Microscopic theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, S.; Borri, P.; Knorr, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present microscopic modeling and experimental measurements of femtosecond-pulse interactions in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Two novel nonlinear propagation effects are demonstrated: pulse breakup in the gain regime and pulse compression in the transparency regime. These propagation...... phenomena highlight the microscopic origin and important role of adiabatic following in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Fundamental light-matter interactions are discussed in detail and possible applications are highlighted....

  17. Positive streamer propagation due to background or photo ionization: Experiments and theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Nijdam (Sander); G. Wormeester (Gideon); U. Ebert (Ute)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPositive streamers in air are generally believed to propagate against the electron drift direction due to the nonlocal photo-ionization reaction. Photo-ionization is the ionization of O2 molecules by UV radiation from excited N2 molecules; therefore this reaction depends on the ratio

  18. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  19. Laser beam propagation experiments along and across a jet engine plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars; Seiffer, Dirk; Wendelstein, Norbert; Sucher, Erik

    2008-10-01

    Airplane based laser systems for DIRCM, active imaging and communication are important applications attracting considerable interest. The performance of these systems in directions where the laser beam points close to or through the exhaust plume from the jet engines may be severely reduced. A trial to study these phenomena using a downscaled jet-engine test rig was carried out. The results on propagation of laser beams along and across the plume from these trials are presented. For laser beams propagation along the engine axis an OPO based source producing co-propagating laser beams at 1.52 and 3.56 μm was used. The beams were projected on a screen and imaged with separate IR cameras to study beam wander and spot degradation. Propagation across the plume was studied with a 532 nm laser projected on a screen and imaged by a high speed camera. The engine thrust and the distance between the engine nozzle and the laser beams were varied to study the effects of changing conditions. Scaling to full size engines and performance implications for DIRCM is discussed.

  20. Viscothermal wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the accuracy, efficiency and range of applicability of various (approximate) models for viscothermal wave propagation are investigated. Models for viscothermal wave propagation describe thewave behavior of fluids including viscous and thermal effects. Cases where viscothermal effects

  1. Geomorphic evidences of lateral propagation and differential uplift of the two segments of frontal Siwalik range, central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, P. K.; Deopa, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Siwalik range forms the southernmost terrane of the Himalaya. The frontal mountains of this range rise abruptly against the vast Indo-Gangetic plains along the range-bounding Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT), which marks the present day principal displacement zone between Indian and Eurasian plates. With an aim of understanding the morphotectonics of different mountain segments in such a zone of intense tectonic activities, we have analyzed geomorphic indices like 'basin asymmetry factor' (AF), 'transverse topography asymmetry factor' (T), 'basin elongation ratio' (BR) and 'hypsometric integral' (HI) of fifty six drainage basins of 3rd streams in conjunction with 'mountain-front sinuosity' (Smf), 'valley-floor width to height ratio' (Vf) and drainage characteristics of the two large, neighboring segments of the frontal Siwalik mountains. Referred to here as the 'eastern segment' and 'western segment', these two mountain-segments are separated from each other and adjoining mountain-segments by antecedent streams of fourth and fifth order. In both the mountain-segments, the Smf values are mostly between 1.0-1.6 and, likewise, the Vf of most of the streams, calculated at a fix distance of 800m from the mountain-front, is invariably drainage basins and 65% of the eastern-segment's drainage basins indicate their down-tilting towards the west. The azimuths of the Ts of theses basins are not always in conformity with AF suggested down-tilting, but the azimuths of the larger magnitude Ts are by and large in conformity with the AF suggested down-tilting. However, the BR and HI values of all the drainage basins of a mountain-segment do not show any spatial variation. These results suggest that both the studied mountain-segments are actively uplifting, but with faster rate in their eastern part. Moreover, the drainage pattern and deflections in and around both the segments reveal their lateral progression from east to west.

  2. Interactions between propagating rifts and pre-existing linear rheological heterogeneities: insights from 3D analogue experiments of rotational extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Nicolas; Cruden, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Propagating rifts are a natural consequence of lithospheric plates that diverge with respect to each other about a pole of rotation. This process of "unzipping" is common in the geological record, but how rifts interact with pre-existing structures (i.e., with a non-homogeneous lithosphere) as they propagate is poorly understood. Here we report on a series of lithospheric-scale three-dimensional analogue experiments of rotational extension with in-built, variably oriented linear weak zones in the lithospheric mantle, designed to investigate the role that inherited structural or thermal weaknesses play in the localisation of strain and rifting. Surface strain and dynamic topography in the analogue models are quantified by high-resolution particle imaging velocimetry and digital photogrammetry, which allows us to characterise the spatio-temporal evolution of deformation as a function of the orientation of the linear heterogeneities in great detail. The results show that the presence of a linear zone of weakness oriented at low angles with respect to the rift axis (i.e., favourably oriented) produces strain localisation in narrow domains, which enhances the "unzipping" process prior to continental break up. Strong strain partitioning is observed when the linear heterogeneity is oriented at high angles with respect to the rift axis (i.e., unfavourably oriented). In these experiments, early sub-parallel V-shaped basins propagate towards the pole of rotation until they are abandoned and strain is transferred entirely to structures developed in the vicinity of the strongly oblique weak lithosphere zone boundary. The modelling also provides insights on how propagating rift branches that penetrate the weak linear zone boundary are aborted when strain is relayed onto structures that develop in rheologically weaker areas. The experimental results are summarised in terms of their evolution, patterns of strain localisation, and dynamic topography as a function of the

  3. Understanding the impact of electric vehicle driving experience on range anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Nadine; Franke, Thomas; Krems, Josef F

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the present research was to increase understanding of the phenomenon of range anxiety and to determine the degree to which practical experience with battery electric vehicles (BEVs) reduces different levels of range anxiety. Limited range is a challenge for BEV users. A frequently discussed phenomenon in this context is range anxiety. There is some evidence suggesting that range anxiety might be a problem only for inexperienced BEV drivers and, therefore, might decrease with practical experience. We compared 12 motorists with high BEV driving experience (M = 60,500 km) with 12 motorists who had never driven a BEV before. The test drive was designed to lead to a critical range situation (remaining range < trip length). We examined range appraisal and range stress (i.e., range anxiety) on different levels (cognitive, emotional, and behavioral). Experienced BEV drivers exhibited less negative range appraisal and range anxiety than inexperienced BEV drivers, revealing significant, strong effects for all but one variable. Hence, BEV driving experience (defined as absolute kilometers driven with a BEV) seems to be one important variable that predicts less range anxiety. In order to reduce range anxiety in BEV drivers even when there is a critical range situation, it is important to increase efficiency and effectiveness of the learning process.

  4. Analyses of internal tides generation and propagation over a Gaussian ridge in laboratory and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Paci, Alexandre; Auclair, Francis; Floor, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    Internal tides are suggested to play a major role in the sustaining of the global oceanic circulation [1][5]. Although the exact origin of the energy conversions occurring in stratified fluids is questioned [2], it is clear that the diapycnal energy transfers provided by the energy cascade of internal gravity waves generated at tidal frequencies in regions of steep bathymetry is strongly linked to the general circulation energy balance. Therefore a precise quantification of the energy supply by internal waves is a crucial step in forecasting climate, since it improves our understanding of the underlying physical processes. We focus on an academic case of internal waves generated over an oceanic ridge in a linearly stratified fluid. In order to accurately quantify the diapycnal energy transfers caused by internal waves dynamics, we adopt a complementary approach involving both laboratory and numerical experiments. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a 4m long tank of the CNRM-GAME fluid mechanics laboratory, well known for its large stratified water flume (e.g. Knigge et al [3]). The horizontal oscillation at precisely controlled frequency of a Gaussian ridge immersed in a linearly stratified fluid generates internal gravity waves. The ridge of e-folding width 3.6 cm is 10 cm high and spans 50 cm. We use PIV and Synthetic Schlieren measurement techniques, to retrieve the high resolution velocity and stratification anomaly fields in the 2D vertical plane across the ridge. These experiments allow us to get access to real and exhaustive measurements of a wide range of internal waves regimes by varying the precisely controlled experimental parameters. To complete this work, we carry out some direct numerical simulations with the same parameters (forcing amplitude and frequency, initial stratification, boundary conditions) as the laboratory experiments. The model used is a non-hydrostatic version of the numerical model Symphonie [4]. Our purpose is not only to

  5. Publications of the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, 1980-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Winokur

    1982-01-01

    Lists alphabetically, by author, publications of the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station for 1980 through 1989, including both subject matter and author Indexes. This publication continues the information shown in USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-6, “Publications of the Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, 1953-1973...

  6. Theory and experiment on electromagnetic-wave-propagation velocities in stacked superconducting tunnel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakai, S.; Ustinov, A. V.; Kohlstedt, H.

    1994-01-01

    focused on. Furthermore, under the assumption that all parameters of the layers are equal, analytic solutions for a generic N-fold stack are presented. The velocities of the waves in two- and three-junction stacks by Nb-Al-AlOx-Nb systems are experimentally obtained by measuring the cavity resonance......Characteristic velocities of the electromagnetic waves propagating in vertically stacked Josephson transmission are theoretically discussed. An equation for solving n velocities of the waves in an n Josephson-junction stack is derived. The solutions of two- and threefold stacks are especially...

  7. Paul trap experiment to simulate intense nonneutral beam propagation through a periodic focusing field configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, R C; Majeski, R; Qin, H; Shvets, G

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design concept for a compact Paul trap experimental configuration that fully simulates the collective processes and nonlinear transverse dynamics of an intense charged particle beam that propagates over large distances through a periodic quadrupole magnetic field. To summarize, a long nonneutral plasma column (L>=r sub p) is confined axially by applied DC voltages V[circ]=const. on end cylinders at z=+-L, and transverse confinement is provided by segmented cylindrical electrodes (at radius r sub w) with applied oscillatory voltages +-V sub 0 (t) over 90 deg. segments. Because the transverse focusing force is similar in waveform to that produced by a discrete set of periodic quadrupole magnets in a frame moving with the beam, the Paul trap configuration offers the possibility of simulating intense beam propagation in a compact experimental facility. The nominal operating parameters in the experimental design are: barium ions (A=137); plasma column length 2L=2 m; wall radius r sub w =10...

  8. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face/core int...... specimens. The measured crack growth rates have been used in Part II of this study to simulate fatigue crack growth in the sandwich tear test specimens.......In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face...... Correlation technique was used to locate the crack tip and monitor the crack growth. For the specimens with H45 core, unstable crack growth took place initially. Following the unstable propagation, the crack propagated in the core underneath the resin-rich cell layer approaching the interface. However...

  9. Twenty years experiences of Bamboo propagation at the potanical Garden of Cienfuegos, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio León Cabrera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bamboo plants have fascinated growers and have motivated several specialists in their study due to their beauty and many applications. They are mostly originated in tropical and subtropical regions of the planet. In Cuba, the level of endemism is low and there are primarily herbaceous size species. For this reason, tree-sized woody species present in Cuba were introduced mainly by the Harvard Botanical Garden, Cienfuegos Botanical Garden today. The main objective is to study the economic potential and adaptation under the climatic conditions of Cuba, overlooking the extensive use of these resources. In previous years the use of these species has only been for emerging and craft work and its extension in reforestation plans has been limited. In 1989 began the first steps to encourage the cultivation and application of this wonder plant in our country. In this paper we show the results achieved in the propagation of bamboo in twenty years of work under different conditions. This helps to diversify the results in several provinces of the country with prospects for a local bamboo economy. Besides, it encourages job opportunities, satisfaction of many basic needs and import substitutions. Keyword: Poaceas, reforest, woody plants

  10. A Final Year Physics Undergraduate Experiment on Ultrasound Propagation in Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluijs, M. J.; van der Sluijs, J. C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate physics experiment which permits the measurement of ultrasound velocity and absorption in liquid systems. A description of the tasks the student is expected to perform is also included. (HM)

  11. Nonlinear effects in infrasound propagation simulations

    OpenAIRE

    GAINVILLE, Olaf; Marsden, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In the framework of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, long range propagation of infrasound through the atmosphere is investigated using numerical models. The study problem is a cylindrical blast in an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Vertical profiles of temperature, wind and density obtained during the Misty Picture High explosive experiment conducted in May 1987 are used. The propagation is modeled using two codes. First, the full 2-D Navier-Stokes equations are so...

  12. Generalized lineal models for the analysis of binary data from propagation experiments of Brazilian orchids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Mora

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at applying the generalized linear models (GLM for the analysis of a germination experiment of Cattleya bicolor in which the response variable was binary. The purpose of this experiment was to assess the effects of the storage temperatures and culture mediums on the seed viability. The analyses of variance was also carried out either with or without the data transformation. All the statistical approaches indicated the importance of the storage temperature on the seed viability. But, the culture media and interaction effects were significant only by the GLM. Based on the GLM, the seeds stored at 10°C increased viability, in which the coconut medium achieved the best performance. The results emphasized the importance of adopting the GLM to improve the reliability in many situations where the response variable followed a non-normal distribution.A técnica de propagação in vitro é considerada efetiva para fins comerciais e de conservação de orquídeas. A metodologia de modelos lineares generalizados (MLG foi usada para analisar um experimento de germinação de Cattleya bicolor. O propósito do experimento foi avaliar os efeitos da temperatura de armazenamento e dos meios de cultivo sobre a germinação, cuja resposta foi considerada binária. Análise convencional com ou sem transformação de dados foram também realizados. Todas as abordagens estatísticas indicaram a importância da temperatura sobre a viabilidade das sementes. Entretanto, os efeitos de meios de cultivo e interação foram significativos apenas para MLG. As sementes armazenadas a 10°C incrementaram sua viabilidade, onde o meio a base de coco atingiu o melhor desempenho. Os resultados enfatizam a importância de adotar MLG, para melhorar a confiabilidade em situações onde a variável resposta segue uma distribuição distinta à normal.

  13. Simulations of collisionless counter-propagating plasma flows in support of two-wire implosion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Hamilton, Andrew; Plasma Physics Sensors Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    One of the simplest configurations leading to colliding plasma flows is created by driving strong currents through a pair of parallel wires. The azimuthal magnetic fields generated around each wire, and the Ohmic current dissipation and heating occurring upon wire evaporation, launches powerful radial outflows of magnetized plasmas. Upon colliding they form a flow pattern suggestive of magnetic field reconnection, and the development of various plasma instabilities. In the current effort, we analyzed collision of two high-temperature precursor light ion plasma flows via PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulations using LSP. The aim is to demonstrate the appearance of an electric field parallel to the direction of a plasma flow. This field appears in colliding plasma flows due to the charge separation and is associated with the Buneman instability. It is responsible for the creation of ExB drift of electrons. Next, an interaction between drifting electrons and unmagnetized ions, moving parallel to them, lead to excitation of a modified Buneman instability in the frequency range close to the Lower-Hybrid frequency. Simulation results will allow us to identify the characteristics of nonlinear density fluctuations that appear in the process of such an interaction. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  14. A Database for Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James

    1997-01-01

    The Propagation Models Database is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The database is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a database of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The database not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.

  15. Magnetic damping in poly-crystalline Co25Fe75: Ferromagnetic resonance vs. spin wave propagation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, H. S.; Schoen, M. A. W.; Mayer, T.; Decker, M. M.; Stigloher, J.; Weindler, T.; Meier, T. N. G.; Kronseder, M.; Back, C. H.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the investigation of the magnetic damping of a 10 nm thin, poly-crystalline Co25Fe75 film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements reveal a low intrinsic magnetic damping αintFMR=(1.5 ±0.1 ) ×10-3 . In contrast, in patterned micrometer wide stripes, spin wave (SW) propagation experiments performed by time resolved scanning magneto-optical Kerr microscopy yield attenuation lengths on the order of 5-8 μm. From this quantity, we deduce an effective magnetic SW damping αeffSW,exp=(3.9 ±0.3 ) ×10-3 . For the system studied, this significant difference between both damping parameters is attributed to the non-negligible extrinsic contributions (local inhomogeneities and two-magnon scattering) to the magnetic losses which manifest themselves as a distinct inhomogeneous FMR linewidth broadening. This explanation is supported by micromagnetic simulations. Our findings prove that poly-crystalline Co25Fe75 represents a promising binary 3d transition metal alloy to be employed in magnonic devices with much longer SW attenuation lengths compared to other metallic systems.

  16. Integrating physiological threshold experiments with climate modeling to project mangrove species' range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Parker, John D; Cook-Patton, Susan C; Feller, Ilka C; Williams, A Park; Kellner, James R

    2015-05-01

    Predictions of climate-related shifts in species ranges have largely been based on correlative models. Due to limitations of these models, there is a need for more integration of experimental approaches when studying impacts of climate change on species distributions. Here, we used controlled experiments to identify physiological thresholds that control poleward range limits of three species of mangroves found in North America. We found that all three species exhibited a threshold response to extreme cold, but freeze tolerance thresholds varied among species. From these experiments, we developed a climate metric, freeze degree days (FDD), which incorporates both the intensity and the frequency of freezes. When included in distribution models, FDD accurately predicted mangrove presence/absence. Using 28 years of satellite imagery, we linked FDD to observed changes in mangrove abundance in Florida, further exemplifying the importance of extreme cold. We then used downscaled climate projections of FDD to project that these range limits will move northward by 2.2-3.2 km yr(-1) over the next 50 years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Three- and two-dimensional simulations of counter-propagating shear experiments at high energy densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov; MacLaren, Stephan A.; Huntington, Channing M.; Raman, Kumar S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Doss, Forrest W.; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Three- and two-dimensional numerical studies have been carried out to simulate recent counter-propagating shear flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility. A multi-physics three-dimensional, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code is used. Using a Reynolds Averaging Navier-Stokes model, we show that the evolution of the mixing layer width obtained from the simulations agrees well with that measured from the experiments. A sensitivity study is conducted to illustrate a 3D geometrical effect that could confuse the measurement at late times, if the energy drives from the two ends of the shock tube are asymmetric. Implications for future experiments are discussed.

  18. FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH KINECT V2 SENSOR FOR CLOSE RANGE 3D MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lachat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available RGB-D cameras, also known as range imaging cameras, are a recent generation of sensors. As they are suitable for measuring distances to objects at high frame rate, such sensors are increasingly used for 3D acquisitions, and more generally for applications in robotics or computer vision. This kind of sensors became popular especially since the Kinect v1 (Microsoft arrived on the market in November 2010. In July 2014, Windows has released a new sensor, the Kinect for Windows v2 sensor, based on another technology as its first device. However, due to its initial development for video games, the quality assessment of this new device for 3D modelling represents a major investigation axis. In this paper first experiences with Kinect v2 sensor are related, and the ability of close range 3D modelling is investigated. For this purpose, error sources on output data as well as a calibration approach are presented.

  19. A wide-range model for simulation of pump-probe experiments with metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E., E-mail: povar@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Andreev, Nikolay E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Apfelbaum, Eugeny M. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Itina, Tatiana E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue Benoit Lauras, Bat. F, 42000, St-Etienne (France); Khishchenko, Konstatntin V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Kostenko, Oleg F. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Levashov, Pavel R. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Institutsky lane 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Veysman, Mikhail E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pump-probe experiments provide an integral test of the models in the theoretically difficult regime of warm dense matter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The target material motion is evident for heating by femtosecond pulses of intensity more than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase shift of S and P-polarized pulses is different because of separated zones of absorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in the pulse energy determination of {approx}10% gives substantial deflection of the theoretical curves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface target oxide films may result in bigger phase shift in experiment. - Abstract: High precision pump-probe experiments can provide a valuable information about material states out of equilibrium. A wide-range numerical model is used for the description of material response on ultrashort laser action. The model is developed on the basis of two-temperature hydrodynamics with heat transport, ionization, plasma expansion, electron-ion collisions and two-temperature equation of state for an irradiated substance. Comparison of experimental findings with the results of simulation is used both for the numerical model verification and for calculation of plasma thermodynamic parameters that cannot be measured directly in experiment. An aluminum target is heated by an intense 400 nm (2{omega}) pump laser pulse that is incident normal to the planar target. Weak S- and P-polarized probe pulses with wavelength 800 nm (1{omega}) are used for diagnostics of the plasma. Both probe pulses illuminate the target at a 45 Degree-Sign angle. Calculation of the reflectivity and phase shift of probe pulses with both polarizations are in good agreement with experiment.

  20. Vector wave propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, M; Brenner, K-H

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the scalar wave propagation method (WPM) to vector fields. The WPM [Appl. Opt.32, 4984 (1993)] was introduced in order to overcome the major limitations of the beam propagation method (BPM). With the WPM, the range of application can be extended from the simulation of waveguides to simulation of other optical elements like lenses, prisms and gratings. In that reference it was demonstrated that the wave propagation scheme provides valid results for propagation angles up to 85 degrees and that it is not limited to small index variations in the axis of propagation. Here, we extend the WPM to three-dimensional vectorial fields (VWPMs) by considering the polarization dependent Fresnel coefficients for transmission in each propagation step. The continuity of the electric field is maintained in all three dimensions by an enhanced propagation vector and the transfer matrix. We verify the validity of the method by transmission through a prism and by comparison with the focal distribution from vectorial Debye theory. Furthermore, a two-dimensional grating is simulated and compared with the results from three-dimensional RCWA. Especially for 3D problems, the runtime of the VWPM exhibits special advantage over the RCWA.

  1. Data Analysis Using the Side Muon Range Detector (SMRD) of the T2K Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haremza, Jeremiah; Minvielle, Ryan

    2010-10-01

    The goal of T2K (Tokai to Kamioka), a second generation long basline neutrino experiment, is to obtain an accurate measurement of θ13 - a parameter which determines the oscillation between muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos. The T2K 2.5^o off-axis near detector (ND280) is located 280 m from the beam target, and consists of 5 different sub-detectors which are encased in the UA1 magnet. The SMRD (Side Muon Range Detector), 1 of the 5 sub-detectors of the ND280, consists of slabs of 0.7 cm thick plastic scintillator material with embedded wavelength shifting fibers and each scintillator slab is sandwiched between the iron plates of the magnet yokes. The SMRD contributes to the measurement of the neutrino energy spectrum, triggers on cosmic ray muons for calibration, and identifies backgrounds. We present work on the following uses of the SMRD: (1) the general role of the SMRD in T2K analyses, (2) status of data quality considerations and data selection performance, (3) SMRD performance measurement with cosmic ray data and comparison with simulations, (4) extraction of neutrino cross-sections on Fe and comparison with simulations.

  2. Effects of multiple scatter on the propagation and absorption of electromagnetic waves in a field-aligned-striated cold magneto-plasma: implications for ionospheric modification experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Robinson

    Full Text Available A new theory of the propagation of low power electromagnetic test waves through the upper-hybrid resonance layer in the presence of magnetic field-aligned plasma density striations, which includes the effects of multiple scatter, is presented. The case of sinusoidal striations in a cold magnetoplasma is treated rigorously and then extended, in an approximate manner, to the broad-band striation spectrum and warm plasma cases. In contrast to previous, single scatter theories, it is found that the interaction layer is much broader than the wavelength of the test wave. This is due to the combined electric fields of the scattered waves becoming localised on the contour of a fixed plasma density, which corresponds to a constant value for the local upper-hybrid resonance frequency over the whole interaction region. The results are applied to the calculation of the refractive index of an ordinary mode test wave during modification experiments in the ionospheric F-region. Although strong anomalous absorption arises, no new cutoffs occur at the upper-hybrid resonance, so that in contrast to the predictions of previous single scatter theories, no additional reflections occur there. These results are consistent with observations made during ionospheric modification experiments at Tromsø, Norway.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; ionospheric irregularities Radio science (ionospheric propagation

  3. The Predictability of Large-Scale, Short-Period Ocean Variability in the Philippine Sea and the Influence of Such Variability on Long-Range Acoustic Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Norwegian ACOBAR ( Fram Strait) collaborations in the present case. These experiments have been conducted primarily by Peter Worcester and his group at the...existing publication that shows that any such effects are of practical consequence. Tomography in Fram Strait Part of this project was redirected toward...research on acoustics and tomography within Fram Strait, with permission from the program manager. This section describes the results of research

  4. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  5. Re-interpretation of the ERMINE-V experiment validation of fission product integral cross section in the fast energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current knowledge of nuclear data in the fast neutron energy range is not as good as in the thermal range, resulting in larger propagated uncertainties in integral quantities such as critical masses or reactivity effects. This situation makes it difficult to get the full benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation. Zero power facilities such as the French ZPR MINERVE have already demonstrated that they can contribute to significantly reduce those uncertainties thanks to dedicated experiments. Historically, MINERVE has been mainly dedicated to thermal spectrum studies. However, experiments involving fast-thermal coupled cores were also performed in MINERVE as part of the ERMINE program, in order to improve nuclear data in fast spectra for the two French SFRs: PHENIX and SUPERPHENIX. Some of those experiments have been recently revisited. In particular, a full characterization of ZONA-1 and ZONA-3, two different cores loaded in the ERMINE V campaign, has been done, with much attention paid to possible sources of errors. It includes detailed geometric descriptions, energy profiles of the direct and adjoint fluxes and spectral indices obtained thanks to Monte Carlo calculations and compared to a reference fast core configuration. Sample oscillation experiments of separated fission products such as 103Rh or 99Tc, which were part of the ERMINE V program, have been simulated using recently-developed options in the TRIPOLI-4 code and compared to the experimental values. The present paper describes the corresponding results. The findings motivate in-depth studies for designing optimized coupled-core conditions in ZEPHYR, a new ZPR which will replace MINERVE and will provide integral data to meet the needs of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors.

  6. Re-interpretation of the ERMINE-V experiment validation of fission product integral cross section in the fast energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Paul; Leconte, Pierre; Blaise, Patrick; Naymeh, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    The current knowledge of nuclear data in the fast neutron energy range is not as good as in the thermal range, resulting in larger propagated uncertainties in integral quantities such as critical masses or reactivity effects. This situation makes it difficult to get the full benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation. Zero power facilities such as the French ZPR MINERVE have already demonstrated that they can contribute to significantly reduce those uncertainties thanks to dedicated experiments. Historically, MINERVE has been mainly dedicated to thermal spectrum studies. However, experiments involving fast-thermal coupled cores were also performed in MINERVE as part of the ERMINE program, in order to improve nuclear data in fast spectra for the two French SFRs: PHENIX and SUPERPHENIX. Some of those experiments have been recently revisited. In particular, a full characterization of ZONA-1 and ZONA-3, two different cores loaded in the ERMINE V campaign, has been done, with much attention paid to possible sources of errors. It includes detailed geometric descriptions, energy profiles of the direct and adjoint fluxes and spectral indices obtained thanks to Monte Carlo calculations and compared to a reference fast core configuration. Sample oscillation experiments of separated fission products such as 103Rh or 99Tc, which were part of the ERMINE V program, have been simulated using recently-developed options in the TRIPOLI-4 code and compared to the experimental values. The present paper describes the corresponding results. The findings motivate in-depth studies for designing optimized coupled-core conditions in ZEPHYR, a new ZPR which will replace MINERVE and will provide integral data to meet the needs of Gen-III and Gen-IV reactors.

  7. Near-Field to Far-Field Uncertainty Propagation and Quantification of Ground Motions Generated by the Source Physics Experiments (SPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Pitarka, A.; Hurley, R.; Hirakawa, E. T.; Glenn, L.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    LLNL has developed a framework for uncertainty propagation and quantification using HPC numerical codes to simulate end-to-end, from source to receivers, the ground motions observed during the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) conducted in fractured granitic rock at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). SPE includes six underground chemical explosions designed with different yields initiated at different depths. To date we have successfully applied this framework to explain the near-field shear motions observed in the vicinity of SPE3 thru SPE5. However, systematic uncertainty propagation to the far-field seismic receiver has not been addressed yet. In the current study, we used a coupling between the non-linear inelastic hydrodynamic regime in the near-field and the seismic elastic regime in the far-field to conduct the analysis. Several realizations of the stochastic discrete fracture network were generated conditional to the observed sparse data. These realizations were then used to calculate the ground motions generated from the SPE shots up to the elastic radius. The latter serves as the handshake interface for the far-field simulations. By creating several realizations of near-field responses one can embed those sources into the far-field elastic wave code and further the uncertainty propagation to the receivers. We will present a full assessment from end-to-end for the near- and far-field measurements. Separate analyses of the effect of the different conceptual geological models are also carried over using a nested Monte Carlo scheme. We compare the observed frequency content at several gages with the simulated ones. We conclude that both regions experience different sampling of frequencies: small features are relevant to near-field simulations while larger feature are more dominant at the far-field. We finally rank the primary sensitive parameters for both regions to drive and refine the field characterization data collection.

  8. Optimization of a wave propagation algorithm for simulation of diffraction effects in a laser-induced uranium enrichment experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeaud, V.; La Hargue, J.P.; Mougery, F. [CS Communication and Systemes, 92 - Clamart (France); Benisti, D.; Comte, M.; Gauthier, P.; Lamare, J. de; Le Fur, J.F.; Petit, A. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Boulet, M.; Scheurer, B. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, 91 (France)

    2003-07-01

    In the frame of the research carried out in the SILVA project, simulation codes have been developed to study the interaction of a laser beam with a vapor containing two species having different atomic structures, one of these species being resonant with the laser frequency. The PRODIGE project consisted in an improvement over the existing codes that were aimed at accelerating the code and reaching the simulation of 3-dimensional effects. The improvements had two aspects: numerical improvement and parallelization. This paper focuses on numerical improvements. These were achieved thanks to an implicit scheme coupling the propagation of the laser and the time evolution of the non-resonant species in the vapor. For similar accuracies, the computation time was decreased by a factor of 40 as compared to predictor corrector integration schemes. (authors)

  9. Long-range beam-beam experiments in the relativistic heavy ion collider

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Milas, N; Robert-Demolaize, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-range beam-beam effects are a potential limit to the LHC performance with the nominal design parameters, and certain upgrade scenarios under discussion. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed and space is reserved in the LHC for such wires. Two current carrying wires were installed in RHIC to study the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects in a collider, as well as test the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The experimental data were used to benchmark simulations. We summarize this work.

  10. Short-Range Diffusion Experiments in Unstable Conditions over Inhomogeneous Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, Erik; Hedegaard, K.

    1978-01-01

    on a peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, and was sampled at ground-level positions distributed over a crosswind line about 1 km downwind. During the experiments, the turbulent wind velocity components were measured at the height of release with a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. The experiments...

  11. Simulation of guided-wave ultrasound propagation in composite laminates: Benchmark comparisons of numerical codes and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara A C; Wheeler, Kevin R; Hafiychuk, Vasyl N; Hafiychuk, Halyna; Timuçin, Doğan A

    2017-11-04

    Ultrasonic wave methods constitute the leading physical mechanism for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of solid composite materials, such as carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates. Computational models of ultrasonic wave excitation, propagation, and scattering in CFRP composites can be extremely valuable in designing practicable NDE and SHM hardware, software, and methodologies that accomplish the desired accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and coverage. The development and application of ultrasonic simulation approaches for composite materials is an active area of research in the field of NDE. This paper presents comparisons of guided wave simulations for CFRP composites implemented using four different simulation codes: the commercial finite element modeling (FEM) packages ABAQUS, ANSYS, and COMSOL, and a custom code executing the Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT). Benchmark comparisons are made between the simulation tools and both experimental laser Doppler vibrometry data and theoretical dispersion curves. A pristine and a delamination type case (Teflon insert in the experimental specimen) is studied. A summary is given of the accuracy of simulation results and the respective computational performance of the four different simulation tools. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The range of dynamic recrystallization of quartz - An updated correlation between nature and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipp, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Several microstructural correlations between natural and experimental conditions for dynamic recrystallization of quartz have been proposed (e.g., Hirth et al. 2001; Stipp et al. 2002), but an attempt to unify the different results and data sets is missing. Based on additional experiments and a statistical analysis of microstructural data (e.g., Stipp et al. 2006, 2010) four characteristic microstructural zones with corresponding recrystallized grain size (D) ranges can be identified. (I) D migration and subgrain rotation contribute to recrystallization, and that grain boundary sliding may operate at high strain (Stipp and Kunze, 2008). Comparable microstructures have not been observed in natural shear zones; their formation is not possible at greenschist facies conditions, because the required differential stresses would be larger than the confining pressure and so in conflict with the Goetze criterion (Kohlstedt et al. 1995). (II) D ˜3-35 µm: Experimental dislocation creep regimes 2 and 3 (Hirth and Tullis 1992), corresponding to the natural BLG zone of Stipp et al. (2002). Microstructures are again characterized by porphyroclasts with grain boundary bulges and small recrystallized grains. Compared to zone I, less strain is required to produce a considerable amount of recrystallized grains, forming "core-mantle microstuctures". (III) D ˜35-120 µm: Upper experimental dislocation creep regime 3, and natural SGR zone (Stipp et al. 2006, 2010). Microstructures are characterized by porphyroclastic ribbon grains and recrystallized grains which are about the same size or slightly larger than optical subgrains. Subgrain formation and dynamic recrystallization are initiated at low strain yielding "polygonization microstructures". (IV) D > 120 µm: The natural GBM zone (Stipp et al. 2002). Comparable microstructures have not been attained in experimentally deformed samples, because the required high temperatures and/or water contents cause partial melting

  13. Range-based underwater vehicle localization in the presence of unknown ocean currents: Theory and experiments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bayat, M.; Crasta, N.; Aguiar, A.P.; Pascoal, A.M.

    This paper addresses the problem of range-based autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) localization in the presence of unknown ocean currents. In the setup adopted, the AUV is equipped with an attitude and heading reference system, a depth sensor...

  14. Propagation Of Dense Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Peter J.; Davis, John F.

    1988-05-01

    A variety of schemes have been proposed over the last two decades for delivering lethal amounts of energy and/or momentum to targets such as missiles and high speed aircraft. Techniques have ranged from high energy lasers and high voltage charged-particle accelerators to less exotic but still challenging devices such as electromagnetic railguns. One class of technology involves the use of high speed plasmas. The primary attraction of such technology is the possibility of utilizing relatively compact accelerators and electrical power systems that could allow highly mobile and agile operation from rocket or aircraft platforms, or in special ordnance. Three years ago, R & D Associates examined the possibility of plasma propagation for military applications and concluded that the only viable approach consisted of long dense plasma jets, contained in radial equilibrium by the atmosphere, while propagating at speeds of about 10 km/s. Without atmospheric confinement the plasma density would diminish too rapidly for adequate range and lethality. Propagation of atmospherically-confined jets at speeds much greater than 10 km/s required significant increases in power levels and/or operating altitudes to achieve useful ranges. The present research effort has been developing the experimental conditions necessary to achieve reasonable comparison with theoretical predictions for plasma jet propagation in the atmosphere. Time-resolved measurements have been made of high speed argon plasma jets penetrating a helium background (simulating xenon jets propagating into air). Basic radial confinement of the jet has been observed by photography and spectroscopy and structures in the flow field resemble those predicted by numerical calculations. Results from our successful initial experiments have been used to design improved diagnostic procedures and arcjet source characteristics for further experiments. In experiments with a modified arcjet source, radial confinement of the jet is again

  15. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  16. Experiments on LHC long-range beam-beam compensation and crossing schemes at the CERN SPS in 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Roncarolo, F.; Wenninger, J.; /CERN; Sen, T.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Papaphilippou, Y.; /ESRF, Grenoble

    2005-05-01

    Experiments with two prototype long-range beam-beam compensators (current-carrying wires) during the 2004 CERN SPS run explored the efficiency of a proposed long-range beam-beam compensation for the LHC. In addition, the SPS compensators were also used to ''simulate'' the effect of different planes of crossing at two LHC interaction points. We present the experimental results and compare them with computer simulations.

  17. Medium-Range Dispersion Experiments Downwind from a Shoreline in Near Neutral Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five atmospheric dispersion experiments, all assigned Pasquill stability class D, were performed at Risø National Laboratory. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released at a height of 60 m from the Risø meteorological tower, situated on a peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, and was sampled...

  18. Rg propagation: Scatter versus Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M.; Phillips, W. S.; MacCarthy, J.

    2016-12-01

    At near local distances, the Rg seismic phase is often the largest seismic arrival for shallow sources. While Rg is classically defined for the period range of 8-12 s, we use the term generically to refer to short-period observations of Rayleigh waves from shallow sources [e.g. Langston, 1987; Bonner and Russell, 2013]. There is significant interest in using Rg as a basis for seismic discrimination and magnitude (e.g. Bonner and Russell, 2013). However, the propagation of this phase is poorly understood. At Nevada National Security Site, while Rg is well observed near the source, it quickly disappears at greater distances. This observation raises the fundamental question of how much of the Rg energy is simply attenuating versus scattering into other seismic phases. Understanding this is critical to interpreting not only the observed Rg seismic energy, but also the possible enrichment of other seismic phases resulting from Rg scattering. In this study, we use waveform data from the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment (BASE) and Source Physics Experiment (SPE) to investigate Rg propagation, looking to identify how much energy from the phase attenuates with distance and how much scatters into other seismic phases.

  19. Students' experiences of blended learning across a range of postgraduate programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Siobhan; Houghton, Catherine; Cooney, Adeline; Casey, Dympna

    2012-05-01

    The article describes the students' experiences of taking a blended learning postgraduate programme in a school of nursing and midwifery. The indications to date are that blended learning as a pedagogical tool has the potential to contribute and improve nursing and midwifery practice and enhance student learning. Little is reported about the students' experiences to date. Focus groups were conducted with students in the first year of introducing blended learning. The two main themes that were identified from the data were (1) the benefits of blended learning and (2) the challenges to blended learning. The blended learning experience was received positively by the students. A significant finding that was not reported in previous research was that the online component meant little time away from study for the students suggesting that it was more invasive on their everyday life. It is envisaged that the outcomes of the study will assist educators who are considering delivering programmes through blended learning. It should provide guidance for further developments and improvements in using Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and blended learning in nurse education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Range-Wide Experiment to Investigate Nutrient and Soil Moisture Interactions in Loblolly Pine Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney E. Will

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The future climate of the southeastern USA is predicted to be warmer, drier and more variable in rainfall, which may increase drought frequency and intensity. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda is the most important commercial tree species in the world and is planted on ~11 million ha within its native range in the southeastern USA. A regional study was installed to evaluate effects of decreased rainfall and nutrient additions on loblolly pine plantation productivity and physiology. Four locations were established to capture the range-wide variability of soil and climate. Treatments were initiated in 2012 and consisted of a factorial combination of throughfall reduction (approximate 30% reduction and fertilization (complete suite of nutrients. Tree and stand growth were measured at each site. Results after two growing seasons indicate a positive but variable response of fertilization on stand volume increment at all four sites and a negative effect of throughfall reduction at two sites. Data will be used to produce robust process model parameterizations useful for simulating loblolly pine growth and function under future, novel climate and management scenarios. The resulting improved models will provide support for developing management strategies to increase pine plantation productivity and carbon sequestration under a changing climate.

  1. Propagation of an electromagnetic wave in an absorbing anisotropic medium and infrared transmission of liquid crystals: comparison with experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, B K P; Sigarev, A A; Vij, J K; Goodby, J W

    2009-08-01

    The theory of the absorbance of a semi-infinite medium characterized by a second-rank dielectric tensor for the entire electromagnetic spectrum, as given by Scaife and Vij [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 174901 (2005)], is extended to include molecules of prolate spheriodal shape with longitudinal and transverse polarizabilities and to cover the case of elliptically polarized incident radiation. The theory is applied to the infrared transmission experiments of biaxial liquid crystals. It is found that the formula for the dependence on frequency and on angle of polarization of the absorbance A(omega,theta)= -log(10)[10(A(omega,0)) cos(2) theta + (10(-A(omega,pi/2)) sin(2) theta)] is unaffected by the anisotropy of the molecules and by the elliptical polarization of the incident radiation. A small (+/-5%) discrepancy between theory and experiment has been found for bands with high absorbances. It is found that this discrepancy does not depend on birefringence of the sample but may depend on the precise method of absorbance measurement and on effects at the surface of the cell containing the liquid crystal under test.

  2. Short-range dynamics and prediction of mesoscale flow patterns in the MISTRAL field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O.; Kaufmann, P.; Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In a limited area of about 50 km by 50 km with complex topography, wind measurements on a dense network were performed during the MISTRAL field experiment in 1991-1992. From these data the characteristic wind fields were identified by an automated classification method. The dynamics of the resulting twelve typical regional flow patterns is studied. It is discussed how transitions between the flow patterns take place and how well the transition probabilities can be described in the framework of a Markov model. Guided by this discussion, a variety of prediction models were tested which allow a short-term forecast of the flow pattern type. It is found that a prediction model which uses forecast information from the synoptic scale has the best forecast skill. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  3. Beam Propagation Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    Kiuttu C. A. Ekdahl N. F. Roderick F49620-81-C-0016 B. A. Sabol L. A. Wright D. J. Sullivan______________ 3 P;ERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS...pulse * transmission through the atmosphere remain unresolved. The complexity of beam propagation physics and air chemistry makes the prediction of beam...higher front velocities than predicted by Eq. (27). Fessenden et al. 1 6 measured vf - 0.77 v in a detailed series of experiments utilizing the FX-25

  4. Propagating separable equalities in an MDD store

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadzic, Tarik; Hooker, John N.; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present a propagator that achieves MDD consistency for a separable equality over an MDD (multivalued decision diagram) store in pseudo-polynomial time. We integrate the propagator into a constraint solver based on an MDD store introduced in [1]. Our experiments show that the new propagator pro...... provides substantial computational advantage over propagation of two inequality constraints, and that the advantage increases when the maximum width of the MDD store increases....

  5. A high-pressure vessel for X-ray diffraction experiments for liquids in a wide temperature range

    CERN Document Server

    Hosokawa, S

    2001-01-01

    An internally heated high-pressure vessel was developed for angle-dispersive X-ray scattering experiments on liquids at high-temperatures and high-pressures. It consists of a closed-end Al cylinder and a steel flange. Continuous windows made of Be cover a scattering angle range up to 55 deg. In combination with a single-crystal sapphire cell and a small heating system inside the vessel, we were able to carry out diffraction measurements for liquids in a wide temperature range up to 2000 K at high pressures up to 150 bars. Some of our recent X-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation, such as inelastic scattering, high-energy elastic scattering, and anomalous scattering, are also reported.

  6. Unified interpretation of superluminal behaviors in wave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Viliani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Ranfagni, C. [Facolta di Scienze Matematiche Fisiche e Naturali, Corso di Laurea in Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Mignani, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Edoardo Amaldi' , Universita degli Studi di Roma ' Roma Tre' , Via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Ruggeri, R. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: rocco.ruggeri@isc.cnr.it; Ricci, A.M. [Istituto per le Telecomunicazioni e l' Elettronica della Marina Militare ' Giancarlo Vallauri' (Mariteleradar), Viale Italia 72, 57100 Livorno (Italy)

    2007-10-29

    By using two approaches, we demonstrate that superluminal behaviors in wave propagation can be attributed to mechanisms acting in the near-field limit. One approach is based on complex waves, while the other relies on a path-integral treatment of stochastic motion. The results of the two approaches are comparable, and suitable for interpreting the data obtained in microwave experiments; these experiments, over a wide range of distances, show a time advance which, in any case, is limited to nanoseconds.

  7. Microwave Propagation Through Cultural Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Ahad

    The need to understand the interaction of microwaves with vegetation canopies has markedly increased in recent years. This is due to advances made in remote sensing science, microwave technology, and signal processing circuits. One class of the earth's vegetation cover is man-made canopies, such as agricultural fields, orchards, and artificial forests. Contrary to natural vegetation terrain, location, spacing, and density of plants in a man-made vegetation canopy are deterministic quantities. As a result, the semi-deterministic nature of cultural vegetation canopies violate the random assumption of the radiative transfer theory and leads to experimented results that are in variance with model calculations. Hence, an alternative approach is needed to model the interaction of microwaves with such canopies. This thesis examines the propagation behavior through a canopy of corn plants. The corn canopy was selected as a representative of cultural vegetation canopies that are planted in parallel rows with an approximately fixed spacing between adjacent plants. Several experimental measurements were conducted to determine the transmission properties of a corn canopy in the 1-10 GHz range. The measurements which included horizontal propagation through the canopy as well as propagation at oblique incidence, were performed for defoliated canopies and for canopies with leaves. Through experimental observations and model development, the propagation behavior was found to be strongly dependent on the wavelength and the path length. At a wavelength in the neighborhood of 20 cm, for example, it was found that scattering by the stalks was coherent in nature for waves propagating horizontally through the canopy, which necessitated the development of a coherent-field model that uses Bragg scattering to account for the observed interference pattern in the transmitted beam. As the wavelength is made shorter, the semi-random spacing between plants becomes significant relative to the

  8. A database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Choung

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Program supports academic research that models various propagation phenomena in the space research frequency bands. NASA supports such research via school and institutions prominent in the field. The products of such efforts are particularly useful for researchers in the field of propagation phenomena and telecommunications systems engineers. The systems engineer usually needs a few propagation parameter values for a system design. Published literature on the subject, such as the Cunsultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) publications, may help somewhat, but often times, the parameter values given in such publications use a particular set of conditions which may not quite include the requirements of the system design. The systems engineer must resort to programming the propagation phenomena model of interest and to obtain the parameter values to be used in the project. Furthermore, the researcher in the propagation field must then program the propagation models either to substantiate the model or to generate a new model. The researcher or the systems engineer must either be a skillful computer programmer or hire a programmer, which of course increases the cost of the effort. An increase in cost due to the inevitable programming effort may seem particularly inappropriate if the data generated by the experiment is to be used to substantiate the already well-established models, or a slight variation thereof. To help researchers and the systems engineers, it was recommended by the participants of NASA Propagation Experimenters (NAPEX) 15 held in London, Ontario, Canada on 28-29 June 1991, that propagation software should be constructed which will contain models and prediction methods of most propagation phenomenon. Moreover, the software should be flexible enough for the user to make slight changes to the models without expending a substantial effort in programming.

  9. Damage localisation and fracture propagation in granite: 4D synchrotron x-ray microtomographic observations from an in-situ triaxial deformation experiment at SOLEIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright-Taylor, Alexis; Fusseis, Florian; Butler, Ian; Flynn, Michael; King, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    To date, most studies of damage localisation and failure have utilised indirect techniques to visualise the pathway to failure. The advent of synchrotron tomography and x-ray transparent experimental cells provides for the first time the opportunity to image localisation and fracture propagation in-situ, in real time with spatial resolutions of a few microns. We present 4D x-ray microtomographic data collected during a triaxial deformation experiment carried out at the imaging beamline PSICHE at the French Synchrotron SOLEIL. The data document damage localisation and fracture propagation in a microgranite. The sample was deformed at 15 MPa confining pressure and 3x10-5 s-1 strain rate, in a novel, miniature, x-ray transparent, triaxial deformation apparatus, designed and built at the University of Edinburgh. We used a 2.97 mm diameter x 9.46 mm long cylindrical sample of Ailsa Craig microgranite, heat treated to 600 ˚ C to introduce flaws in the form of pervasive crack damage. As the sample was loaded to failure, 21 microtomographic volumes were acquired in intervals of 5-20 MPa (decreasing as failure approached), including one scan at peak differential stress of 200 MPa (1.4 kN end load) and three post-failure scans. The scan at peak stress contained the incipient fault, and the sample failed immediately when loading continued afterwards. During scanning, a constant stress level was maintained. Individual datasets were collected in ˜10 minutes using a white beam with an energy maximum at 66 keV in a spiral configuration. Reconstructions yielded image stacks with a dimension of 1700x1700x4102 voxels with a voxel size of 2.7 μm. We analysed damage localisation and fracture propagation in the time series data. Fractures were segmented from the image data using a Multiscale Hessian fracture filter [1] and analysed for their orientations, dimensions and spatial distributions and changes in these properties during loading. Local changes in volumetric and shear

  10. First operational experience with the LHC machine protection system when operating with beam energies beyond the 100MJ range

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Goddard, B; Lamont, M; Schmidt, R; Siemko, A; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has made remarkable progress during 2011, surpassing its ambitious goal for the year in terms of luminosity delivered to the LHC experiments. This achievement was made possible by a progressive increase of beam intensities by more than 5 orders of magnitude during the first months of operation, reaching stored beam energies beyond the 100MJ range at the end of the year, less than a factor of 4 from the nominal design value. The correct functioning of the machine protection systems is vital during the different operational phases, for initial operation and even more when approaching nominal beam parameters where already a small fraction of the stored energy is sufficient to damage accelerator equipment or experiments in case of uncontrolled beam loss. Safe operation of the machine in presence of such high intensity proton beams is guaranteed by the interplay of many different systems: beam dumping system, beam interlocks, beam instrumentation, equipment monitoring, colli...

  11. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, “National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,” (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  12. Propagation speed of gamma radiation in brass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcante, Jose T.P.D.; Silva, Paulo R.J.; Saitovich, Henrique

    2009-07-01

    The propagation speed (PS) of visible light -represented by a short frequency range in the large frame of electromagnetic radiations (ER) frequencies- in air was measured during the last century, using a great deal of different methods, with high precision results being achieved. Presently, a well accepted value, with very small uncertainty, is c= 299,792.458 Km/s) (c reporting to the Latin word celeritas: 'speed swiftness'). When propagating in denser material media (MM), such value is always lower when compared to the air value, with the propagating MM density playing an important role. Until present, such studies focusing propagation speeds, refractive indexes, dispersions were specially related to visible light, or to ER in wavelengths ranges dose to it, and with a transparent MM. A first incursion in this subject dealing with {gamma}-rays was performed using an electronic coincidence counting system, when the value of it's PS was measured in air, C{sub {gamma}}{sub (air)}298,300.15 Km/s; a method that went on with later electronic improvements. always in air. To perform such measurements the availability of a {gamma}-radiation source in which two {gamma}-rays are emitted simultaneously in opposite directions -as already used as well as applied in the present case- turns out to be essential to the feasibility of the experiment, as far as no reflection techniques could be used. Such a suitable source was the positron emitter {sup 22}Na placed in a thin wall metal container in which the positrons are stopped and annihilated when reacting with the medium electrons, in such way originating -as it is very well established from momentum/energy conservation laws - two gamma-rays, energy 511 KeV each, both emitted simultaneously in opposite directions. In all the previous experiments were used photomultiplier detectors coupled to NaI(Tl) crystal scintillators, which have a good energy resolution but a deficient time resolution for such purposes

  13. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  14. Mathematical Model and Calibration Experiment of a Large Measurement Range Flexible Joints 6-UPUR Six-Axis Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhi Zhao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays improving the accuracy and enlarging the measuring range of six-axis force sensors for wider applications in aircraft landing, rocket thrust, and spacecraft docking testing experiments has become an urgent objective. However, it is still difficult to achieve high accuracy and large measuring range with traditional parallel six-axis force sensors due to the influence of the gap and friction of the joints. Therefore, to overcome the mentioned limitations, this paper proposed a 6-Universal-Prismatic-Universal-Revolute (UPUR joints parallel mechanism with flexible joints to develop a large measurement range six-axis force sensor. The structural characteristics of the sensor are analyzed in comparison with traditional parallel sensor based on the Stewart platform. The force transfer relation of the sensor is deduced, and the force Jacobian matrix is obtained using screw theory in two cases of the ideal state and the state of flexibility of each flexible joint is considered. The prototype and loading calibration system are designed and developed. The K value method and least squares method are used to process experimental data, and in errors of kind Ι and kind II linearity are obtained. The experimental results show that the calibration error of the K value method is more than 13.4%, and the calibration error of the least squares method is 2.67%. The experimental results prove the feasibility of the sensor and the correctness of the theoretical analysis which are expected to be adopted in practical applications.

  15. Propagation phenomena in real world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fay, Damien; Gabryś, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    Propagation, which looks at spreading in complex networks, can be seen from many viewpoints; it is undesirable, or desirable, controllable, the mechanisms generating that propagation can be the topic of interest, but in the end all depends on the setting. This book covers leading research on a wide spectrum of propagation phenomenon and the techniques currently used in its modelling, prediction, analysis and control. Fourteen papers range over topics including epidemic models, models for trust inference, coverage strategies for networks, vehicle flow propagation, bio-inspired routing algorithms, P2P botnet attacks and defences, fault propagation in gene-cellular networks, malware propagation for mobile networks, information propagation in crisis situations, financial contagion in interbank networks, and finally how to maximize the spread of influence in social networks. The compendium will be of interest to researchers, those working in social networking, communications and finance and is aimed at providin...

  16. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter......-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. METHOD......: The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were...

  17. Application of steady state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable area duct: A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound propagation without flow in a rectangular duct with a converging-diverging area variation was studied experimentally and theoretically. The area variation was of sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections and induce modal scattering. The rms (root-mean-squared) pressure and phase angle on both the flat and curved surface were measured and tabulated. The steady state finite element theory and the transient finite difference theory are in good agreement with the data. It is concluded that numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large area variations.

  18. Short-time dynamics of lysozyme solutions with competing short-range attraction and long-range repulsion: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riest, Jonas; Nägele, Gerhard; Liu, Yun; Wagner, Norman J; Godfrin, P Douglas

    2018-02-14

    Recently, atypical static features of microstructural ordering in low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions have been extensively explored experimentally and explained theoretically based on a short-range attractive plus long-range repulsive (SALR) interaction potential. However, the protein dynamics and the relationship to the atypical SALR structure remain to be demonstrated. Here, the applicability of semi-analytic theoretical methods predicting diffusion properties and viscosity in isotropic particle suspensions to low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions is tested. Using the interaction potential parameters previously obtained from static structure factor measurements, our results of Monte Carlo simulations representing seven experimental lysoyzme samples indicate that they exist either in dispersed fluid or random percolated states. The self-consistent Zerah-Hansen scheme is used to describe the static structure factor, S(q), which is the input to our calculation schemes for the short-time hydrodynamic function, H(q), and the zero-frequency viscosity η. The schemes account for hydrodynamic interactions included on an approximate level. Theoretical predictions for H(q) as a function of the wavenumber q quantitatively agree with experimental results at small protein concentrations obtained using neutron spin echo measurements. At higher concentrations, qualitative agreement is preserved although the calculated hydrodynamic functions are overestimated. We attribute the differences for higher concentrations and lower temperatures to translational-rotational diffusion coupling induced by the shape and interaction anisotropy of particles and clusters, patchiness of the lysozyme particle surfaces, and the intra-cluster dynamics, features not included in our simple globular particle model. The theoretical results for the solution viscosity, η, are in qualitative agreement with our experimental data even at higher concentrations. We demonstrate that semi

  19. Neutrino Propagation in Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Blennow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the effects of neutrino propagation in the matter of the Earth relevant to experiments with atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos and aimed at the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and CP violation. These include (i the resonance enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter with constant or nearly constant density, (ii adiabatic conversion in matter with slowly changing density, (iii parametric enhancement of oscillations in a multilayer medium, and (iv oscillations in thin layers of matter. We present the results of semianalytic descriptions of flavor transitions for the cases of small density perturbations, in the limit of large densities and for small density widths. Neutrino oscillograms of the Earth and their structure after determination of the 1–3 mixing are described. A possibility to identify the neutrino mass hierarchy with the atmospheric neutrinos and multimegaton scale detectors having low energy thresholds is explored. The potential of future accelerator experiments to establish the hierarchy is outlined.

  20. Mineral weathering experiments to explore the effects of vegetation shifts in high mountain region (Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavris, Christian; Furrer, Gerhard; Dahms, Dennis; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Blum, Alex; Goetze, Jens; Wells, Aaron; Egli, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Climate change influences the evolution of soil and landscape. With changing climate, both flora and fauna must adapt to new conditions. It is unknown in many respects to what extent soils will react to warming and vegetation change. The aim of this study was to identify possible consequences for soils in a dry-alpine region with respect to weathering of primary minerals and leaching of elements under expected warming climate conditions due to shifts in vegetation. To achieve this, a field empirical approach was used in combination with laboratory weathering experiments simulating several scenarios. Study sites located in Sinks Canyon and in Stough Basin of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA, encompass ecotones that consist of tundra, forest, or sagebrush (from moist to dry, with increasing temperature, respectively). All soils are developed on granitoid moraines. The mineralogy of the soils along the altitudinal sequence was analysed using cathodoluminescence and X-ray diffraction, and revealed clear mineral transformations: biotite and plagioclase were both weathered to smectite while plagioclase also weathered to kaolinite. Cooler, wetter, altitude-dependent conditions seemed to promote weathering of these primary minerals. To test the impact of soil solutions from different ecotones on mineral weathering, aqueous extracts from topsoils (A horizons) were reacted with subsoils (B horizons) in batch experiments. Aqueous extracts of topsoil samples were generated for all three ecotones, and these solutions were characterized. For the batch experiments, the topsoil extracts were reacted for 1800 hours with the subsoil samples of the same ecotone, or with the subsoil samples from higher altitude ecotones. Solutions collected periodically during the experiments were measured using ICP-OES and ion chromatography. Dissolved Ca, Mg and K were mainly controlled by the chemical weathering of oligoclase, K-feldspar and biotite. With increasing altitude (and consequently

  1. Spatial Variability in Ozone and CO2 Flux during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand-Hunter, B.; Piedrahita, R.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Walker, J. T.; Hannigan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Air quality problems persist in the Northern Front-Range Metropolitan Area (NFRMA) of Colorado despite efforts to reduce emissions, and summertime ozone concentrations frequently exceed the NAAQS. Atmospheric modeling in the NFRMA is challenging due to the complex topography of the area, as well as diversity of pollutant sources (urban NOx and VOCs, power plants, oil and gas, agricultural emissions, biogenic emissions, and wildfires). An improved understanding of the local atmospheric chemistry will enable researchers to advance atmospheric models, which will subsequently be used to develop and test more effective air quality management strategies. The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) investigates this problem through detailed examination of atmospheric chemistry in the NFRMA. Our project specifically explores the spatial variability in ozone (O3) concentration and dry deposition within the FRAPPE study area. One source of uncertainty in atmospheric models is O3 flux, which varies spatially due to local meteorology and variation in ambient concentration and deposition velocity. Model grid cells typically range in size from 10-100 km and 100-500 km, for regional and global models, respectively, and accurate representations of an entire grid cell cannot always be achieved. Large spatial variability within a model grid cell can lead to poor estimates of trace-gas flux and concentration. Our research addresses this issue by measuring spatial variability in O3 flux using low-cost dry-deposition flux chambers. We are measuring O3 and CO2 flux with 5 low-cost flux chambers and one eddy-covariance tower. The eddy-covariance tower is located at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, CO. All 5 chambers are within a 8.3 x 6 km square, with one chamber collocated with the eddy-covariance tower, and the other 4 chambers at distances of 0.33, 1.14, 3.22, and 7.55 km from the tower. The largest distance between any two chambers is 8.5 km. All

  2. Reliability of knee joint range of motion and circumference measurements after total knee arthroplasty: does tester experience matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Christensen, Malene; Christensen, Stine Sommer; Olsen, Marie; Bandholm, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Two of the most utilized outcome measures to assess knee joint range of motion (ROM) and intra-articular effusion are goniometry and circumference, respectively. Neither goniometry nor circumference of the knee joint have been examined for both intra-tester and inter-tester in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-tester and inter-tester reliability of active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference in patients with TKA when administered by physiotherapists (testers) with different clinical experience. The design was an intra-tester, inter-tester and intra-day reliability study. Nineteen outpatients (10 females) having received a TKA were examined by an inexperienced and an experienced physiotherapist. Following a standardized protocol, active and passive knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were obtained using a universal goniometer and a tape measure, respectively. To establish reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and smallest real difference (SRD) were calculated. The knee joint ROM and circumference measurements were generally reliable (ICC > 0.8) within and between physiotherapists (except passive knee extension). Changes in knee joint ROM of more than 6.6 degrees and 10 degrees (except active knee flexion) and knee joint circumference of more than 1.0 cm and 1.63 cm represent a real clinical improvement (SRD) or deterioration for a single individual within and between physiotherapists, respectively. Generally, the experienced tester recorded larger knee joint ROM and lower circumference values than that of the inexperienced tester. In clinical practice, we suggest that repeated knee goniometric and circumferential measurements should be recorded by the same physiotherapist in individual patients with TKA. Tester experience appears not to influence the degree of reliability. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Cosmic Ray Propagation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, I. V.

    2004-01-01

    Astrophysics of cosmic rays and gamma rays depends very much on the quality of the data, which become increasingly accurate each year and therefore more constraining. While direct measurements of cosmic rays are possible in only one location on the outskirts of the Milky Way, the Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission provides insights into the spectra of cosmic rays in distant locations, therefore complementing the local cosmic-ray studies. This connection, however, requires extensive modeling and is yet to be explored in detail. The GUST mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2007 and is capable of measuring gamma-rays in the range 20 MeV - 300 GeV, will change the status quo dramatically. Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission gathered by GUST will require adequate theoretical models. The efforts will be rewarded by the wealth of information on cosmic ray spectra and fluxes in remote locations. In its turn, a detailed cosmic ray propagation model will provide a reliable basis for other studies such as search for dark matter signals in cosmic rays and diffuse gamma rays, spectrum and origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission, theories of nucleosynthesis and evolution of elements etc. In this talk, I will discuss what we can learn studying the cosmic ray propagation and diffuse gamma-ray emission.

  4. Epileptiform discharge propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mălîia, Mihai Dragos; Meritam, Pirgit; Scherg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    propagation was analyzed using sequential voltage-maps of the averaged spikes, and principal components analysis. When propagation was detected, sources were modeled both at onset and peak. RESULTS: Propagation occurred in half of the patients. The median time of propagation between onset and peak was 17 ms......OBJECTIVE: To investigate how often discharge propagation occurs within the spikes recorded in patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery, and to assess its impact on the accuracy of source imaging. METHODS: Data were analyzed from 50 consecutive patients who had presurgical workup. Discharge....... In 60% of the cases with propagation (15/25 patients) this remained in the same sub-lobar area where onset occurred. The accuracy of source imaging in cases of propagating spikes was 67% when only analyzing onset or peak. This was lower as compared to cases without propagation (79%). Combining source...

  5. Application of 'steady' state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable duct - A comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for sound propagation in a simulated infinite hard wall duct with a large change in duct cross sectional area. The data are conveniently tabulated for further use. The 'steady' state finite element theory of Astley and Eversman (1981) and the transient finite difference theory of White (1981) are in good agreement with the data for both the axial and transverse pressure profiles and the axial phase angle. Therefore, numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear to be ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large axial gradients in acoustic parameters. The measured energy reflection coefficient agrees with the values from the Astley-Eversman modal coupling model.

  6. Lattice photon propagator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P.; Hey, A.; Mandula, J.; Ogilvie, M.

    1987-10-22

    The fermion propagator in the Landau gauge is calculated for a U(1) lattice gauge theory. In the confined, strong coupling phase, the propagator resembles that of a massive particle. In the weak coupling phase, the propagator is that of a massless particle. An abrupt change occurs at the transition point. The results are compared to simulations of the gluon propagator in SU(3) lattice gauge theory.

  7. The lattice photon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, P.; Hey, A.; Mandula, J.; Ogilvie, M.

    1987-10-01

    The photon propagator in the Landau gauge is calculated for a U(1) lattice gauge theory. In the confined, strong coupling phase, the propagator resembles that of a massive particle. In the weak coupling phase, the propagator is that of a massless particle. An abrupt change occurs at the transition point. The results are compared to simulations of the gluon propagator in SU(3) lattice gauge theory.

  8. Wave propagation in ballistic gelatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarayan, Srinivasan S; Subhash, Ghatu

    2017-04-01

    Wave propagation characteristics in long cylindrical specimens of ballistic gelatine have been investigated using a high speed digital camera and hyper elastic constitutive models. The induced transient deformation is modelled with strain rate dependent Mooney-Rivlin parameters which are determined by modelling the stress-strain response of gelatine at a range of strain rates. The varying velocity of wave propagation through the gelatine cylinder is derived as a function of prestress or stretch in the gelatine specimen. A finite element analysis is conducted using the above constitutive model by suitably defining the impulse imparted by the polymer bar into the gelatine specimen. The model results are found to capture the experimentally observed wave propagation characteristics in gelatine effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Random matrix theory for underwater sound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegewisch, K. C.; Tomsovic, S.

    2012-02-01

    Ocean acoustic propagation can be formulated as a wave guide with a weakly random medium generating multiple scattering. Twenty years ago, this was recognized as a quantum chaos problem, and yet random matrix theory, one pillar of quantum or wave chaos studies, has never been introduced into the subject. The modes of the wave guide provide a representation for the propagation, which in the parabolic approximation is unitary. Scattering induced by the ocean's internal waves leads to a power-law random banded unitary matrix ensemble for long-range deep-ocean acoustic propagation. The ensemble has similarities, but differs, from those introduced for studying the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The resulting long-range propagation ensemble statistics agree well with those of full wave propagation using the parabolic equation.

  10. Exact nuclear data uncertainty propagation for fusion neutronics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochman, D., E-mail: rochman@nrg.e [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Koning, A.J.; Marck, S.C. van der [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Recently, we have presented an exact method (now called 'Total Monte Carlo') to propagate uncertainties of fundamental nuclear physics experiments, models and parameters to different types of criticality-safety benchmarks. We now show that such exact uncertainty calculations are directly relevant to the optimal and safe design of fusion reactors by applying this methodology to a series of fusion shielding benchmarks, namely those connected to the Oktavian, Fusion Neutronics Source and LLNL Pulsed Sphere experiments. Uncertainties on neutron and gamma leakage fluxes for 13 shielding benchmarks are obtained, in the mass range from {sup nat}Mg to {sup nat}W. Uncertainties for cross-sections, angular distributions, single- and double-differential emission spectra, and gamma-ray production cross-sections are considered in this uncertainty propagation scheme.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of the propagation of a discharge in a capillary tube in air at atmospheric pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Jánský, Jaroslav; Le Delliou, Pierre; Tholin, Fabien; Tardiveau, Pierre; Bourdon, Anne; Pasquiers, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of a pulsed air plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure propagating in a capillary glass tube. In this work, we have compared the discharge structures and the axial propagation velocities of discharges. First, we have studied a needle-to-plane configuration without tube. For applied voltages in the range 7 ? 18 kV, we have observed in experiments and in simulations that a plasma ball starts to develop around the needle tip. ...

  12. Probabilistic infrasound propagation using realistic atmospheric perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smets, P.S.M.; Evers, L.G.; Näsholm, S.P.; Gibbons, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates probabilistic infrasound propagation modeling using realistic perturbations. The ensembles of perturbed analyses, provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), include error variances of both model and assimilated observations. Ensemble spread

  13. PROPAGATION OF CYLINDRICAL WAVES IN POROELASTIC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorona Yu.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the harmonic axisymmetric wave propagation in poroelastic media. The computational formulas for the study of displacements and stresses that occur during vibrations in a wide frequency range are proposed.

  14. Modeling Propagation of Gas Path Damage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be tracked and modeled for a range of fault modes in some modules of commercial high bypass aircraft engines. To that...

  15. Vegetative propagation of Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don by leafy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the provision of clonally propagated superior genotypes of this species would be beneficial to farmers, investigations were conducted to optimize its vegetative propagation. In the study, the first experiment examining the effect of leaf area on propagation success involved cuttings with leaf areas of 0 (leafless), 20, 40, ...

  16. Vertical laser beam propagation through the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minott, P. O.; Bufton, J. L.; Schaefer, W. H.; Grolemund, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and its effects upon laser beams was investigated in a series of balloon borne, optical propagation experiments. These experiments were designed to simulate the space to ground laser link. An experiment to determine the amplitude fluctuation, commonly called scintillation, caused by the atmosphere was described.

  17. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  18. The search for forest facts: a history of the Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, 1926–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony. Godfrey

    2013-01-01

    In 1926, the California Forest Experiment Station, which later became the Pacific Southwest (PSW) Research Station, was established at the University of California, Berkeley. Today, the PSW Research Station represents the research and development branch of the USDA Forest Service in California and Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands. The PSW Research Station...

  19. Sound propagation in cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.; Polinder, H.; Lohman, W.; Zhou, H.; Borst, H.

    2009-01-01

    A new engineering model for sound propagation in cities is presented. The model is based on numerical and experimental studies of sound propagation between street canyons. Multiple reflections in the source canyon and the receiver canyon are taken into account in an efficient way, while weak

  20. Spread spectrum propagation prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbers, Raymond

    1989-02-01

    In order to efficiently model effects of terrain on wideband radio signals, several basic improvements to the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) propagation model were made. As a result of this effort a terrain sensitive propagation model capable of predicting the wideband channel transfer function, including the important channel characterization parameters, has been developed and validated against measurements.

  1. Propagation of Significant Figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lowell M.

    1985-01-01

    Shows that the rules of thumb for propagating significant figures through arithmetic calculations frequently yield misleading results. Also describes two procedures for performing this propagation more reliably than the rules of thumb. However, both require considerably more calculational effort than do the rules. (JN)

  2. Chiral Topological Superconductors Enhanced by Long-Range Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viyuela, Oscar; Fu, Liang; Martin-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2018-01-01

    We study the phase diagram and edge states of a two-dimensional p -wave superconductor with long-range hopping and pairing amplitudes. New topological phases and quasiparticles different from the usual short-range model are obtained. When both hopping and pairing terms decay with the same exponent, one of the topological chiral phases with propagating Majorana edge states gets significantly enhanced by long-range couplings. On the other hand, when the long-range pairing amplitude decays more slowly than the hopping, we discover new topological phases where propagating Majorana fermions at each edge pair nonlocally and become gapped even in the thermodynamic limit. Remarkably, these nonlocal edge states are still robust, remain separated from the bulk, and are localized at both edges at the same time. The inclusion of long-range effects is potentially applicable to recent experiments with magnetic impurities and islands in 2D superconductors.

  3. Reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenni, A. J.; Benedict, K. B.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Zhou, Y.; Sullivan, A.; Day, D.; Sive, B. C.; Zondlo, M. A.; Schichtel, B. A.; Vimont, J.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) took place in July-August 2014. This collaborative study was aimed at characterizing those processes which control air quality along Colorado's Front Range. Although the study was largely focused on ozone, an additional goal of the study included characterizing contributions from Front Range sources and long-range transport to total reactive nitrogen in Rocky Mountain National Park (ROMO). Import of reactive nitrogen into ROMO and other pristine, high elevation areas has the potential to negatively impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We present measurements of reactive nitrogen species measured within ROMO during FRAPPÉ, and compare these data to measurements made in the surrounding areas. At our monitoring site in ROMO, co-located with IMPROVE and CASTNet monitoring, measurements of NO, NO2, NOx, NOy, NH3, and total reactive nitrogen (TNx) were made at high time resolution. Additional measurements of NH3, HNO3 and PM2.5 ions were made at hourly resolution using a MARGA and also at 24-hour time resolution using URG denuder-filter pack sampling. Precipitation samples also were collected to quantify wet deposition of ammonium, nitrate, and organic nitrogen. Finally, measurements of organic gases were made using online gas chromatography and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. Preliminary results for ammonia show both a diel pattern, with concentrations increasing each morning, and a strong dependence on wind direction, implicating the importance of transport. Higher concentrations of NOx and NOy also were observed in the daytime, but in general these patterns differed from that of ammonia. Several upslope events were observed during the measurement period during which NOx, NH3, 2-propylnitrate, 2-butylnitrate, ethane, butane, and pentane were observed to increase in concentration along with ozone.

  4. Experiments and simulations show how long-range contacts can form in expanded unfolded proteins with negligible secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenli; Lyle, Nicholas; Luan, Bowu; Raleigh, Daniel P; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-02-05

    The sizes of unfolded proteins under highly denaturing conditions scale as N(0.59) with chain length. This suggests that denaturing conditions mimic good solvents, whereby the preference for favorable chain-solvent interactions causes intrachain interactions to be repulsive, on average. Beyond this generic inference, the broader implications of N(0.59) scaling for quantitative descriptions of denatured state ensembles (DSEs) remain unresolved. Of particular interest is the degree to which N(0.59) scaling can simultaneously accommodate intrachain attractions and detectable long-range contacts. Here we present data showing that the DSE of the N-terminal domain of the L9 (NTL9) ribosomal protein in 8.3 M urea lacks detectable secondary structure and forms expanded conformations in accord with the expected N(0.59) scaling behavior. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements, however, indicate the presence of detectable long-range contacts in the denatured-state ensemble of NTL9. To explain these observations we used atomistic thermal unfolding simulations to identify ensembles whose properties are consistent with all of the experimental observations, thus serving as useful proxies for the DSE of NTL9 in 8.3 M urea. Analysis of these ensembles shows that residual attractions are present under mimics of good solvent conditions, and for NTL9 they result from low-likelihood, medium/long-range contacts between hydrophobic residues. Our analysis provides a quantitative framework for the simultaneous observation of N(0.59) scaling and low-likelihood long-range contacts for the DSE of NTL9. We propose that such low-likelihood intramolecular hydrophobic clusters might be a generic feature of DSEs that play a gatekeeping role to protect against aggregation during protein folding.

  5. Sound Propagation in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith

    Propagation of sound close to the ground outdoors involves geometric spreading, air absorption, interaction with the ground, barriers, vegetation and refraction associated with wind and temperature gradients. After a brief survey of historical aspects of the study of outdoor sound and its applications, this chapter details the physical principles associated with various propagation effects, reviews data that demonstrate them and methods for predicting them. The discussion is concerned primarily with the relatively short ranges and spectra of interest when predicting and assessing community noise rather than the frequencies and long ranges of concern, for example, in infrasonic global monitoring or used for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Specific phenomena that are discussed include spreading losses, atmospheric absorption, diffraction by barriers and buildings, interaction of sound with the ground (ground waves, surface waves, ground impedance associated with porosity and roughness, and elasticity effects), propagation through crops, shrubs and trees, wind and temperature gradient effects, shadow zones and incoherence due to atmospheric turbulence. The chapter concludes by suggesting a few areas that require further research.

  6. Radio propagation measurement and channel modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Salous, Sana

    2013-01-01

    While there are numerous books describing modern wireless communication systems that contain overviews of radio propagation and radio channel modelling, there are none that contain detailed information on the design, implementation and calibration of radio channel measurement equipment, the planning of experiments and the in depth analysis of measured data. The book would begin with an explanation of the fundamentals of radio wave propagation and progress through a series of topics, including the measurement of radio channel characteristics, radio channel sounders, measurement strategies

  7. Spark channel propagation in a microbubble liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, V. A.; Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru; Vetchinin, S. P.; Pecherkin, V. Ya.; Son, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Experimental study on the development of the spark channel from the anode needle under pulsed electrical breakdown of isopropyl alcohol solution in water with air microbubbles has been performed. The presence of the microbubbles increases the velocity of the spark channel propagation and increases the current in the discharge gap circuit. The observed rate of spark channel propagation in microbubble liquid ranges from 4 to 12 m/s, indicating the thermal mechanism of the spark channel development in a microbubble liquid.

  8. The gluon propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandula, Jeffrey E.

    1999-07-01

    We discuss the current state of what is known non-perturbatively about the gluon propagator in QCD, with emphasis on the information coming from lattice simulations. We review specification of the lattice Landau gauge and the procedure for calculating the gluon propagator on the lattice. We also discuss some of the difficulties in non-perturbative calculations - especially Gribov copy issues. We trace the evolution of lattice simulations over the past dozen years, emphasizing how the improvement in computations has led not only to more precise determinations of the propagator, but has allowed more detailed information about it to be extracted.

  9. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  10. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km. For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars. Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  11. Millimeter Wave Radio Frequency Propagation Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-28

    Anechoic Chamber .................................. 47  3.4.1  10 GHz Transmitting System...Propagation Losses ............................................................. 67  4.2  Experiment 2 - Quantifying Model Accuracy in an Anechoic Chamber ...44  Figure 20. Actual Footage of the Experiment at 10, 20, 30, and 40 GHz within the Anechoic Chamber

  12. Experience-dependent enhancement of pitch-specific responses in the auditory cortex is limited to acceleration rates in normal voice range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, A; Gandour, J T; Suresh, C H

    2015-09-10

    The aim of this study is to determine how pitch acceleration rates within and outside the normal pitch range may influence latency and amplitude of cortical pitch-specific responses (CPR) as a function of language experience (Chinese, English). Responses were elicited from a set of four pitch stimuli chosen to represent a range of acceleration rates (two each inside and outside the normal voice range) imposed on the high rising Mandarin Tone 2. Pitch-relevant neural activity, as reflected in the latency and amplitude of scalp-recorded CPR components, varied depending on language-experience and pitch acceleration of dynamic, time-varying pitch contours. Peak latencies of CPR components were shorter in the Chinese than the English group across stimuli. Chinese participants showed greater amplitude than English for CPR components at both frontocentral and temporal electrode sites in response to pitch contours with acceleration rates inside the normal voice pitch range as compared to pitch contours with acceleration rates that exceed the normal range. As indexed by CPR amplitude at the temporal sites, a rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group only. Only over the right temporal site was amplitude greater in the Chinese group relative to the English. These findings may suggest that the neural mechanism(s) underlying processing of pitch in the right auditory cortex reflect experience-dependent modulation of sensitivity to acceleration in just those rising pitch contours that fall within the bounds of one's native language. More broadly, enhancement of native pitch stimuli and stronger rightward asymmetry of CPR components in the Chinese group is consistent with the notion that long-term experience shapes adaptive, distributed hierarchical pitch processing in the auditory cortex, and reflects an interaction with higher order, extrasensory processes beyond the sensory memory trace. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Restoring the azimuthal symmetry of lateral distributions of charged particles in the range of the KASCADE-Grande experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, O., E-mail: Octavian.Sima@kit.ed [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Rebel, H.; Haungs, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Toma, G. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Manailescu, C.; Morariu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Arteaga, J.C. [Universidad Michoacana, Morelia (Mexico); Bekk, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus South, Institut fuerExperimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Cosavella, F. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Souza, V. de [Universidade Sao Paolo, Sao Paolo (Brazil); Doll, P.; Engel, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Finger, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus South, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Glasstetter, R. [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich Physik, Wuppertal (Germany); Grupen, C. [Universitaet Siegen, Experimentelle Teilchenphysik, Siegen (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    The reconstruction of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) observed by particle detectors at the ground is based on the characteristics of observables like the lateral particle density and the arrival times. The lateral densities, inferred for different EAS components from detector data, are usually parameterised by applying various lateral distribution functions (LDFs). The LDFs are used in turn for evaluating quantities like the total number of particles or the density at particular radial distances. Typical expressions for LDFs anticipate azimuthal symmetry of the density around the shower axis. The deviations of the lateral particle density from this assumption arising from various reasons are smoothed out in the case of compact arrays like KASCADE, but not in the case of arrays like Grande, which only sample a smaller part of the azimuthal variation. KASCADE-Grande, an extension of the former KASCADE experiment, is a multi-component Extensive Air Shower (EAS) experiment located at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Campus North), Germany. The lateral distributions of charged particles are deduced from the basic information provided by the Grande scintillators - the energy deposits - first in the observation plane, then in the intrinsic shower plane. In all steps azimuthal dependences should be taken into account. As the energy deposit in the scintillators is dependent on the angles of incidence of the particles, azimuthal dependences are already involved in the first step: the conversion from the energy deposits to the charged particle density. This is done by using the Lateral Energy Correction Function (LECF) that evaluates the mean energy deposited by a charged particle taking into account the contribution of other particles (e.g. photons) to the energy deposit. By using a very fast procedure for the evaluation of the energy deposited by various particles we prepared realistic LECFs depending on the angle of incidence of the shower and on the radial and

  14. Effect of genomic long-range correlations on DNA persistence length: from theory to single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Julien; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Milani, Pascale; Audit, Benjamin; Vaillant, Cedric; Fontaine, Emeline; Mongelard, Fabien; Lavorel, Guillaume; St-Jean, Philippe; Bouvet, Philippe; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2010-04-22

    Sequence dependency of DNA intrinsic bending properties has been emphasized as a possible key ingredient to in vivo chromatin organization. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air and liquid to image intrinsically straight (synthetic), uncorrelated (hepatitis C RNA virus) and persistent long-range correlated (human) DNA fragments in various ionic conditions such that the molecules freely equilibrate on the mica surface before being captured in a particular conformation. 2D thermodynamic equilibrium is experimentally verified by a detailed statistical analysis of the Gaussian nature of the DNA bend angle fluctuations. We show that the worm-like chain (WLC) model, commonly used to describe the average conformation of long semiflexible polymers, reproduces remarkably well the persistence length estimates for the first two molecules as consistently obtained from (i) mean square end-to-end distance measurement and (ii) mean projection of the end-to-end vector on the initial orientation. Whatever the operating conditions (air or liquid, concentration of metal cations Mg(2+) and/or Ni(2+)), the persistence length found for the uncorrelated viral DNA underestimates the value obtained for the straight DNA. We show that this systematic difference is the signature of the presence of an uncorrelated structural intrinsic disorder in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) DNA fragment that superimposes on local curvatures induced by thermal fluctuations and that only the entropic disorder depends upon experimental conditions. In contrast, the WLC model fails to describe the human DNA conformations. We use a mean-field extension of the WLC model to account for the presence of long-range correlations (LRC) in the intrinsic curvature disorder of human genomic DNA: the stronger the LRC, the smaller the persistence length. The comparison of AFM imaging of human DNA with LRC DNA simulations confirms that the rather small mean square end-to-end distance observed, particularly for G

  15. Long- and/or short-range transportation of local Asian aerosols in DRAGON-Osaka Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    This work intends to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particles in East Asia, especially around AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) -Osaka site during Dragon Asia period in the spring of 2012, named Dragon-Osaka. It is known that the air pollution in East Asia becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Thus the precise observations of atmospheric particles in East Asia are desired. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. The population of the region is around 20 millions including neighbor prefectures. Therefore, air quality in the region is slightly bad compared to remote area due to industries and auto mobiles. In recent years, Asian dusts and anthropogenic small particles transported from China and cover those cities throughout year. AERONET Osaka site was established in 2002 on the campus of Kinki University. Nowadays, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), an SPM sampler (SPM-613D, Kimoto Electric, Japan) and others are available on the roof of a building. The site data are useful for algorithm development of aerosol retrieval over busy city. On the other hand, human activities in this region also emit the huge amount of pollutions, thus it is needed to investigate the local distribution of aerosols in this region. In order to investigate change of aerosol properties, PM-individual analysis is made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). SEM/EDX is an effective instrument to observe the surface microstructure and analyze the chemical composition of such materials as metals, powders, biological specimens, etc. We used sampling data from the SPM sampler at AERONET Osaka site. During a period of DRAGON-Asia, high concentrations of air pollutant were observed on the morning of March 11 in Fukue Island in the East China Sea. On the

  16. Bamboo in vitro propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yudith García- Ramírez; Marisol Freire-Seijo; Ortelio Hurtado

    2011-01-01

    ... the social problems of the countryside in Cuba. Traditional bamboo propagation is affected by long intervals of flowering, the limited stock of plant material, the low percentages of rooting and the limited existence of propagules...

  17. The red experiment: An assessment of boundary layer effects in a trade winds regime on microwave and infrared propagation over the sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, K.D.; Brooks, B.; Caffrey, P.; Clarke, A.; Cohen, L.; Crahan, K.; Davidson, K.; Jong, A. de; Leeuw, G. de; Dion, D.; Doss-Hammel, S.; Frederickson, P.; Friehe, C.; Hristov, T.; Khelif, D.; Moerman, M.; Reid, J.S.; Reising, S.; Smith, M.; Terrill, E.; Tsintikidis, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment was performed off of the Hawaiian Island of Oahu from late August to mid-September 2001 to test the hypothesis that a rough sea surface modifies the evaporation duct. Two land sites were instrumented, one with microwave receivers and the other with an

  18. Long Range River Discharge Forecasting Using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite to Predict Conditions for Endemic Cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, A.; Akanda, A. S.; Colwell, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Prediction of conditions of an impending disease outbreak remains a challenge but is achievable if the associated and appropriate large scale hydroclimatic process can be estimated in advance. Outbreaks of diarrheal diseases such as cholera, are related to episodic seasonal variability in river discharge in the regions where water and sanitation infrastructure are inadequate and insufficient. However, forecasting river discharge, few months in advance, remains elusive where cholera outbreaks are frequent, probably due to non-availability of geophysical data as well as transboundary water stresses. Here, we show that satellite derived water storage from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Forecasting (GRACE) sensors can provide reliable estimates on river discharge atleast two months in advance over regional scales. Bayesian regression models predicted flooding and drought conditions, a prerequisite for cholera outbreaks, in Bengal Delta with an overall accuracy of 70% for upto 60 days in advance without using any other ancillary ground based data. Forecasting of river discharge will have significant impacts on planning and designing intervention strategies for potential cholera outbreaks in the coastal regions where the disease remain endemic and often fatal.

  19. A new approach for the influence of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Jia, Min-Ping

    Many manufacturing processes can induce residual stresses in produced components. These residual stresses influence the mean stress during cyclic loading. The initial residual stresses induced during manufacturing change during fatigue damage. This paper presents a research on the change of residual stress distribution during fatigue crack propagation; the research predicts crack propagation by considering residual stress. An analysis approach for the change in residual stress distribution is established according to the diffusion theory of cavity, which is also used to investigate cracks with different orientations. Experiments are conducted to verify the prediction results of residual stress. A probability density function based on Weibull distribution is established to evaluate the accuracy of predicted residual stress. The influence of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation is considered the effective stress intensity factor range, which is calculated under the combined stress field of applied stress and residual stress. An analysis model of crack propagation is established. Furthermore, the model of crack propagation is used to estimate the velocity of crack propagation for the cases, same as the cases of residual stress prediction. The case studies show that the results are basically identical with the experimental results, indicating that the proposed approach is acceptable.

  20. Preliminary results of Terabit-per-second long-range free-space optical transmission Experiment THRUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giggenbach, D.; Poliak, J.; Mata-Calvo, R.; Fuchs, C.; Perlot, N.; Freund, R.; Richter, T.

    2015-10-01

    Future Very High Throughput Satellite Systems (VHTS) will perform at several Tbit/s throughput and thus face the challenge of limited feeder-link spectrum. Whereas with conventional RF feeder links several tens of ground gateway stations would be required, the total capacity can alternatively be linked through a single optical ground station using Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) techniques as known from terrestrial fiber communications. While intermittent link blockage by clouds can be compensated by ground station diversity, the optical uplink signal is directly affected by scintillation and beam wander induced by the atmospheric index-of-refraction turbulence. The transmission system must be capable to mitigate these distortions by according high-speed tracking and fading compensation techniques. We report on the design of a near-ground long-range (10km) atmospheric transmission test-bed which is, with its relatively low elevation of 1.8 degrees, exemplary for a worst case GEO uplink scenario. The transmitting side of the test-bed consists of a single telescope with a a fine pointing assembly in order to track the atmospheric angle-ofarrival and precisely aim towards the beacon of the receiver. On the other side of the test-bed, the receiver telescope is also capable of fine pointing by tracking the transmitted signal. The GEO uplink scenario is modelled by a precise scaling of the beam divergence and the receiver's field of view as well as by the beacon offset to model the point-ahead angle. In order to make the experimental test-bed correspond to an actual feeder link scenario, the link budget as well as the turbulence profile of the experimental scenario are modelled and compared to the GEO uplink. Several DWDM channels are multiplexed to reach the total link capacity of above one Tbit/s.

  1. Future changes in propagating and non-propagating diurnal rainfall over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, S.-Y. Simon

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of diurnal rainfall in the East Asian continent consist of a propagating regime over the Yangtze River and a non-propagating regime in southeast China. Simulations of these two diurnal rainfall regimes by 18 CMIP5 models were evaluated from the historical experiment of 1981-2005. The evaluation led to the identification of one model, the CMCC-CM that replicated the key characteristics of diurnal rainfall regimes including the propagation of moisture convergence. Using the CMCC-CM to assess the future (2076-2100) change of diurnal evolution and propagation projected by the RCP4.5 experiment, it was found that propagating diurnal rainfall will enhance and expand southward into the non-propagating regime in southeast China. This change in diurnal rainfall is attributed to the intensification of diurnal land-sea thermal contrast over eastern China and the southward shift of the upper-level jet stream over 20°-30°N. Similar projected changes in diurnal rainfall and associated large-scale dynamical mechanisms were also depicted by four other models (GFDL-ESM2G, GFDL-ESM2M, MRI-CGCM3, and MRI-ESM1) showing a higher skill in representing the diurnal rainfall regimes over East Asia. If such model projection holds true, southeast China will experience an increase in the eastward propagating diurnal rainfall, which could further impact Taiwan.

  2. ADVANCES IN THE PROPAGATION OF RAMBUTAN TREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA APARECIDA DE ANDRADE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The reality of Brazilian fruit farming is demonstrating increasing demand for sustainable information about native and exotic fruit, which can diversify and elevate the efficiency of fruit exploitation. Research on propagation of fruits tree is very important so that it can provide a protocol for suitable multiplication of this fruitful. Due to the great genetic diversity of rambutan plants, it is recommended the use of vegetative propagated plants. This research aimed to evaluate the propagation of rambutan by cuttings, layering and grafting, as well as seed germination and viability without storage. The results of this research indicate that this species can be successfully propagated by layering, grafting and seeds. We also observed that the germination percentage of seeds kept inside the fruits for six days were not influenced by the different substrates used in this experiment.

  3. Ultrasound propagation measurements and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Papadakis, E. P.; Fowler, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews three systems designed for accurately measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses. The three systems are presented in order of velocity-measuring precision: + or - 100 ns, + or - 1 ns, + or - 0.2 ns. Also included is a brief discussion of phase and group velocities, with reference to dispersive, highly attenuating materials. Measurement of attenuation by pulse-echo buffer rod techniques is described briefly. These techniques and instruments have been used to measure sound velocity and attenuation in a variety of materials and shapes, over a wide temperature range.

  4. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  5. Development of a quartz tuning-fork-based force sensor for measurements in the tens of nanoNewton force range during nanomanipulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oiko, V. T. A., E-mail: oiko@ifi.unicamp.br; Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Univ. Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas 13083-859 (Brazil); Martins, B. V. C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Silva, P. C. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, CNPEM, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Understanding the mechanical properties of nanoscale systems requires new experimental and theoretical tools. In particular, force sensors compatible with nanomechanical testing experiments and with sensitivity in the nN range are required. Here, we report the development and testing of a tuning-fork-based force sensor for in situ nanomanipulation experiments inside a scanning electron microscope. The sensor uses a very simple design for the electronics and it allows the direct and quantitative force measurement in the 1–100 nN force range. The sensor response is initially calibrated against a nN range force standard, as, for example, a calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy cantilever; subsequently, applied force values can be directly derived using only the electric signals generated by the tuning fork. Using a homemade nanomanipulator, the quantitative force sensor has been used to analyze the mechanical deformation of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles, where we analyzed forces in the 5–40 nN range, measured with an error bar of a few nN.

  6. Propagation Loss Assessment of the BEARING STAKE Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-28

    propagation loss models ( ASTRAL , RAY WAVE, and FACT) indicate that with some minor modifications the ASTRAL model is well suited for the prediction of... ASTRAL and RAY WAVE models. (C) ... 136 71. Propagation loss at 25 Hz as a function of range for a source depth of 91 in at Site 4. Also shown are...the corresponding propagation losses from the ASTRAL and RAY WAVE models. (C)... 137 72. Propagation loss at 39 Hz as a function of range at Site 4. (C

  7. Sound transmission at ground level in a short-grass prairie habitat and its implications for long-range communication in the swift fox Vulpes velox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darden, Safi K; Pedersen, Simon B; Larsen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    seem to persist to at least 400 m. Individual temporal features were very consistent to at least 400 m. The communication range of the barking sequences is likely to be farther than 400 m and it should be considered a long-ranging vocalization. However, relative to the large home ranges of swift foxes......The acoustic environment of swift foxes Vulpes velox vocalizing close to the ground and the effect of propagation on individual identity information in vocalizations were quantified in a transmission experiment in prairie habitat. Sounds were propagated (0.45 m above the ground) at distances up.......2-2.5 kHz propagated the furthest and the latter sweeps exhibited the best transmission properties for long-range propagation. Swift fox barking sequence elements are centered toward the lower end of this frequency range. Nevertheless, measurable individual spectral characteristics of the barking sequence...

  8. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  9. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  10. Mobile terawatt laser propagation facility (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Lawrence; Roumayah, Patrick; Bodnar, Nathan; Bradford, Joshua D.; Maukonen, Douglas; Richardson, Martin C.

    2017-03-01

    This presentation will describe the design and construction status of a new mobile high-energy femtosecond laser systems producing 500 mJ, 100 fs pulses at 10 Hz. This facility is built into a shipping container and includes a cleanroom housing the laser system, a separate section for the beam director optics with a retractable roof, and the environmental control equipment necessary to maintain stable operation. The laser system includes several innovations to improve the utility of the system for "in field" experiments. For example, this system utilizes a fiber laser oscillator and a monolithic chirped Bragg grating stretcher to improve system robustness/size and employs software to enable remote monitoring and system control. Uniquely, this facility incorporates a precision motion-controlled gimbal altitude-azimuth mount with a coudé path to enable aiming of the beam over a wide field of view. In addition to providing the ability to precisely aim at multiple targets, it is also possible to coordinate the beam with separate tracking/diagnostic sensing equipment as well as other laser systems. This mobile platform will be deployed at the Townes Institute Science and Technology Experimental Facility (TISTEF) located at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to utilize the 1-km secured laser propagation range and the wide array of meteorological instrumentation for atmospheric and turbulence characterization. This will provide significant new data on the propagation of high peak power ultrashort laser pulses and detailed information on the atmospheric conditions in a coastal semi-tropical environment.

  11. Automatic contour propagation in cine cardiac magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautvast, Gilion; Lobregt, Steven; Breeuwer, Marcel; Gerritsen, Frans

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a method for automatic contour propagation in cine cardiac magnetic resonance images. The method consists of a new active contour model that tries to maintain a constant contour environment by matching gray values in profiles perpendicular to the contour. Consequently, the contours should maintain a constant position with respect to neighboring anatomical structures, such that the resulting contours reflect the preferences of the user. This is particularly important in cine cardiac magnetic resonance images because local image features do not describe the desired contours near the papillary muscle. The accuracy of the propagation result is influenced by several parameters. Because the optimal setting of these parameters is application dependent, we describe how to use full factorial experiments to optimize the parameter setting. We have applied our method to cine cardiac magnetic resonance image sequences from the long axis two-chamber view, the long axis four-chamber view, and the short axis view. We performed our optimization procedure for each contour in each view. Next, we performed an extensive clinical validation of our method on 69 short axis data sets and 38 long axis data sets. In the optimal parameter setting, our propagation method proved to be fast, robust, and accurate. The resulting cardiac contours are positioned within the interobserver ranges of manual segmentation. Consequently, the resulting contours can be used to accurately determine physiological parameters such as stroke volume and ejection fraction.

  12. Rapid assessment of nonlinear optical propagation effects in dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyo, J. del; de la Cruz, A. Ruiz; Grace, E.; Ferrer, A.; Siegel, J.; Pasquazi, A.; Assanto, G.; Solis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser processing applications need fast approaches to assess the nonlinear propagation of the laser beam in order to predict the optimal range of processing parameters in a wide variety of cases. We develop here a method based on the simple monitoring of the nonlinear beam shaping against numerical prediction. The numerical code solves the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with nonlinear absorption under simplified conditions by employing a state-of-the art computationally efficient approach. By comparing with experimental results we can rapidly estimate the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients of the material. The validity of this approach has been tested in a variety of experiments where nonlinearities play a key role, like spatial soliton shaping or fs-laser waveguide writing. The approach provides excellent results for propagated power densities for which free carrier generation effects can be neglected. Above such a threshold, the peculiarities of the nonlinear propagation of elliptical beams enable acquiring an instantaneous picture of the deposition of energy inside the material realistic enough to estimate the effective nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients that can be used for predicting the spatial distribution of energy deposition inside the material and controlling the beam in the writing process. PMID:25564243

  13. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  14. Proceedings of the Fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) and the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Propagation Studies Miniworkshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX), supported by the NASA Propagation Program, is convened annually to discuss studies made on radio wave propagation by investigators from domestic and international organizations. The meeting was organized into three technical sessions. The first session was dedicated to Olympus and ACTS studies and experiments, the second session was focused on the propagation studies and measurements, and the third session covered computer-based propagation model development. In total, sixteen technical papers and some informal contributions were presented. Following NAPEX 15, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) miniworkshop was held on 29 Jun. 1991, to review ACTS propagation activities, with emphasis on ACTS hardware development and experiment planning. Five papers were presented.

  15. Thermal plumes in yield stress fluids : laboratory experiments and implications for diapirs and dike propagation in a soft crust or lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmeyer, A.; Davaille, A. B.; Gueslin, B.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2011-12-01

    Hot magma migrate through dikes in a solid/brittle crust or lithosphere, while hot instabilities rise as mushroom-shaped plumes in a viscous mantle. However, upwards migration of hot material in areas where the geological materials are "soft" (presenting solid as well as viscous properties) is still far from understood. These phenomena may play a crucial role in the dynamics of mid-ocean ridges, of volcanic systems or of the asthenosphere/lithosphere boundary. We present new laboratory experiments on the development of thermal plumes out of a localized source of heat in mixtures of water, glycerine and Carbopol. The resulting fluids are shear thinning and present a yield-stress, whereby flow occurs only if the local stress exceeds a critical value. Below this value, the fluid acts as an elastic solid. This is due to the existence of a continuous network of interacting micron-sized hydrogel particles. The fluid's rheological properties can be controlled by changing the proportion of Glycerol and water as well as the Carbopol concentration. We then systematically studied the influence of height and supplied heat. Depending on the Yield parameter Y0, which compares the thermally-induced stress to the yield stress, three different regimes are observed. For low Y0, no convection develops ; while for intermediate values, a small-scale convection cell appears and remains confined around the heater. For high Y0, thermal plumes develop. Their morphology differs from the mushroom-shape typically encountered in newtonian or in purely shear-thinning fluids. Combined temperature and velocity field measurements show that a plug flow develops within the plume thermal anomaly, therefore producing a rising finger- shape. Light scattering highlights the development of a damaged zone ahead of the diapir as it rises. Moreover, although the heat supply is continuous through time, the uplift of such plumes is not : the thermal anomaly marks some "pauses" as it rises through the gel

  16. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy: II. Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses of the LARES 2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Sindoni, Giampiero; Ries, John C.; Paolozzi, Antonio; Matzner, Richard; Koenig, Rolf; Paris, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    In the previous paper we have introduced the LARES 2 space experiment. The LARES 2 laser-ranged satellite is planned for a launch in 2019 with the new VEGA C launch vehicle of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), ESA and ELV. The main objectives of the LARES 2 experiment are accurate measurements of General Relativity, gravitational and fundamental physics and accurate determinations in space geodesy and geodynamics. In particular LARES 2 is aimed to achieve a very accurate test of frame-dragging, an intriguing phenomenon predicted by General Relativity. Here we report the results of Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analyses fully confirming an error budget of a few parts in one thousand in the measurement of frame-dragging with LARES 2 as calculated in our previous paper.

  17. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 5. Flood Wave Propagation-The Saint Venant Equations. P P Mujumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 5 May 2001 pp 66-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/05/0066-0073 ...

  18. Uncertainty Propagation in OMFIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sterling; Meneghini, Orso; Sung, Choongki

    2017-10-01

    A rigorous comparison of power balance fluxes and turbulent model fluxes requires the propagation of uncertainties in the kinetic profiles and their derivatives. Making extensive use of the python uncertainties package, the OMFIT framework has been used to propagate covariant uncertainties to provide an uncertainty in the power balance calculation from the ONETWO code, as well as through the turbulent fluxes calculated by the TGLF code. The covariant uncertainties arise from fitting 1D (constant on flux surface) density and temperature profiles and associated random errors with parameterized functions such as a modified tanh. The power balance and model fluxes can then be compared with quantification of the uncertainties. No effort is made at propagating systematic errors. A case study will be shown for the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations on the kinetic profiles and fluxes at the top of the pedestal. A separate attempt at modeling the random errors with Monte Carlo sampling will be compared to the method of propagating the fitting function parameter covariant uncertainties. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG2-95ER-54309, DE-SC 0012656.

  19. Short-range order of undercooled melts of PdZr 2 intermetallic compound studied by X-ray and neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Herlach, D. M.; Mauro, N. A.; Kelton, K. F.

    2013-05-01

    The short-range order in undercooled melts of the intermetallic Zr2Pd glass-forming alloy is investigated by combining electrostatic levitation (ESL) with high-energy X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. Experimentally determined structure factors are measured and analyzed with respect to various structures of short-range order. The comparative X-ray and neutron scattering experiments allow for investigations of topological and chemical short-range order. Based on these studies, no preference of a specific short-range order is found for the liquid Zr2Pd glass-forming alloy, even in the metastable state of the deeply undercooled melt. This is in agreement with an earlier report from X-ray diffraction and molecular-dynamics studies of a Zr75.5Pd24.5 liquid, which showed a broad distribution of cluster types. The results for the Zr2Pd liquid are discussed with respect to the glass-forming ability of this melt.

  20. Apparent superluminal behavior in wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, AD; Lande, A; Lautrup, B

    2001-01-01

    The apparent superluminal propagation of electromagnetic signals seen in recent experiments is shown to be the result of simple and robust properties of relativistic field equations. Although the wave front of a signal passing through a classically forbidden region can never move faster than light,

  1. Generation and propagation of intense supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, K; Christen, W; Even, U

    2011-06-30

    Computer simulations and experiments have been performed to quantify the effects of nozzle shape and skimmer placement on high-density supersonic jets. It is shown that the on axis beam intensity achieved is much higher than intensity achieved using standard sonic nozzles. Changes in skimmer design and positioning are required to allow this intense jet to propagate in a typical supersonic beam setup.

  2. The vegetative method of propagating Adenia cissampeloides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetative method of propagation was used for the experiments: cuttings from vines in an active growth phase and those from aged vines were made from the mother plant. The former cuttings were classified according to the thickness of the vines as 1 cm and 2 cm thick vines and the latter cuttings were 3 cm thick.

  3. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto C. Piqueira

    2010-01-01

    information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignorant-Spreader-Stifler rumor spreading model is studied. By using concepts from the Dynamical Systems Theory, stability of equilibrium points is established, according to propagation parameters and initial conditions. Some numerical experiments are conducted in order to validate the model.

  4. Sound propagation in fluids and neutron spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilhof, M.J.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1984-01-01

    Using a model kinetic equation the properties of very short wavelength sound modes in fluids are studied over a wide range of wavenumbers and densities. The main features, in particular propagation gaps at high densities, agree with those found in real fluids and molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  6. Propagation of Regional Phases in the Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    tamped [09 Mo-1n (dvnn-m) cx phi sri , at %h allow depthis and high frequeinc ies. that tile pres- Fig. 1 c 25 WALTrm A..: OsB3vSAoT op Ha I.Fw vcYP...with the latter having about 3 times Berger, J.. I.. N. Baker, J. N. Brune, J. 11. Iletcher, T. C. lanks , and F. L. Vernon, The Anza array: a high...tmotioni, J. G..ophys. Res , 84, underground tntclear explosionis, 1961-1970, Bull. Seisrnol. Sue It 2235-2242. 1979. 61, 1073-1098, 1971. f lanks , T. C

  7. Memoir of the Long Range Acoustic Propagation Program (LRAPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    developed by Dr. John Hanna for interpolating velocity profiles that worked very well. An interesting issue grew within the surveillance community...destroyer escorts), that the ambient noise was directional, showing some 10–15 dB variation with different azi- muths . This result proved to OPNAV and to

  8. Non-Line of Sight Sound Propagation Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chulsoo

    The parabolic equation (PE) method is a useful tool for describing outdoor sound propagation over flat, open, locally reacting ground with a realistic sound speed variation with altitude. The polar parabolic equation (POPE) method is presented here which is an extension of the PE to allow for propagation over irregular terrain (hills). A coordinate system which uses distance along the ground surface and height perpendicular to the surface is introduced into the PE. To verify the numerical accuracy of POPE, computational results are compared to the residue series solution for propagation over a curved surface with a homogeneous atmosphere and to results from a conformal mapping method. The results agree to within one dB. For sound propagation over a 30 m high smooth hill, POPE has been used to calculate transmission loss (TL) for constant sound speed profiles and for upward and downward refracting sound speed profiles. POPE calculations are compared to the experimental data from the Terrain Masking Experiment performed in the vicinity of Instrument Hill at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. POPE calculations predict a rapidly decreasing sound level along the masked side of the hill. The field far behind the hill becomes almost constant in level or decreases slowly with distance. The calculation predicts that rays shed along the hillside contribute to the sound level behind the hill and shows that the field level along the ground beyond the base of a hill is determined by the superposition of shedding of rays from the creeping wave and a wave along the flat surface. This effect is strongly affected by the hill shape (hillside) and ground impedance of the hill.

  9. Towards long-distance superluminal propagation in optical fibers via cascaded Brillouin lasing resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Li; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Tantan; Qin, Minglei; Liu, Jinmei

    2015-03-01

    Long distance superluminal propagation in optical fibers via cascaded Brillouin lasing oscillation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Gaussian pulses experience negative group-velocity superluminal propagation with the advancement of ~300ns in 20-m single mode fiber.

  10. Discovery of Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances by the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Tsuneta, S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in one or both of the chromosphere or transition region at a speed much higher than the sound speed. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of 2D images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly(alpha) line at a 0.6 s cadence. The fast propagating intensity disturbances are detected in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and at least 20 events are clearly detected in the field of view of 527'' x 527'' during the 5-minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km/s, and they are comparable to the local Alfven speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is of about 10'', and the widths are a few arcseconds, which is almost determined by the pixel size of 1.''03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation of the fast propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magneto-hydrodynamic fast mode waves.

  11. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  12. Analysis of Error Propagation Within Hierarchical Air Combat Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited ANALYSIS OF ERROR ...COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF ERROR PROPAGATION WITHIN HIERARCHICAL AIR COMBAT MODELS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...variance analysis , sampling methods, metamodeling, error propagation, Lanchester equations, agent- based simulation, design of experiments

  13. Topology optimization for transient wave propagation problems in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jonas; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Structures exhibiting band gap properties, i.e., having frequency ranges for which the structure attenuates propagating waves, have applications in damping of acoustic and elastic wave propagation and in optical communication. A topology optimization method for synthesis of such structures......, employing a time domain formulation, is developed. The method is extended to synthesis of pulse converting structures with possible applications in optical communication....

  14. Measurements of anisotropic sound propagation in glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    The attenuation coefficient and phase velocity of plane sound waves propagating in three perpendicular directions in glass wool were measured in the frequency range 50–10 000 Hz. For glass wool of mass density 14 kg/m3 at the frequency 1000 Hz, the attenuation constant for propagation perpendicular...

  15. Modeling Passive Propagation of Malwares on the WWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunbo, Liu; Chunfu, Jia

    Web-based malwares host in websites fixedly and download onto user's computers automatically while users browse. This passive propagation pattern is different from that of traditional viruses and worms. A propagation model based on reverse web graph is proposed. In this model, propagation of malwares is analyzed by means of random jump matrix which combines orderness and randomness of user browsing behaviors. Explanatory experiments, which has single or multiple propagation sources respectively, prove the validity of the model. Using this model, people can evaluate the hazardness of specified websites and take corresponding countermeasures.

  16. Propagation Model for Cosmic Ray Species in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Moskalenko, I. V.; Jones, F. C.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Strong, A. W.; Mashnik, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade there have been a number of space and balloon experiments with improved sensivity and statistics, which impose stricter constraints on cosmic ray propagation models. Propagation is the main issue in the interpretation of such data as antiproton and positron fluxes in cosmic rays, and diffuse gamma-ray emission. We develop a new propagation model that reproduces measurements of secondary antiprotons as well as primary and secondary nuclei. We will present results of our calculation of CR propagation in the Galaxy for this model using the GALPROP code.

  17. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector. Numerical experiments demonstrate that as the non-linearity of this relation gets stronger, the pulses propagating in silica become more immune to decay and distortion whereas the pulses propagating in free-space suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  18. Behavior of ultrasounds crossing perfluorocarbon liquids and random propagation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Random propagation times are able to model waves attenuation and velocity. It is true for electromagnetic waves (light, radar, guided propagation) and also for acoustics and ultrasounds (acoustics for high frequencies). About the latter, it can be shown that stable probability laws are well-fitted for frequencies up to dozens of megahertz in numerous cases. Nowadays, medical applications are performed using propagation through perfluorocarbon (PFC). Experiments were done to measure attenuations and phase changes. Using these results, this paper addresses the question to know if stable probability laws can be used to characterize the propagation of ultrasounds through PFC liquids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Heat-pulse propagation along nonequilibrium nanowires in thermomass theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellitto Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the consequences of the nonlinear terms in the heat-transport equation of the thermomass theory on heat pulses propagating in a nanowire in nonequilibrium situations. As a consequence of the temperature dependence of the speeds of propagation, in temperature ranges wherein the specific heat shows negligible variations, heat pulses will shrink (or extend spatially, and will increase (or decrease their average temperature when propagating along a temperature gradient. A comparison with the results predicted by a different theoretical proposal on the shape of a propagating heat pulse is made, too.

  20. Error Analysis and Propagation in Metabolomics Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Hunter N B

    2013-01-01

    Error analysis plays a fundamental role in describing the uncertainty in experimental results. It has several fundamental uses in metabolomics including experimental design, quality control of experiments, the selection of appropriate statistical methods, and the determination of uncertainty in results. Furthermore, the importance of error analysis has grown with the increasing number, complexity, and heterogeneity of measurements characteristic of 'omics research. The increase in data complexity is particularly problematic for metabolomics, which has more heterogeneity than other omics technologies due to the much wider range of molecular entities detected and measured. This review introduces the fundamental concepts of error analysis as they apply to a wide range of metabolomics experimental designs and it discusses current methodologies for determining the propagation of uncertainty in appropriate metabolomics data analysis. These methodologies include analytical derivation and approximation techniques, Monte Carlo error analysis, and error analysis in metabolic inverse problems. Current limitations of each methodology with respect to metabolomics data analysis are also discussed.

  1. Preventing Unofficial Information Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Zhengyi; Ouyang, Yi; Xu, Yurong; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia

    Digital copies are susceptible to theft and vulnerable to leakage, copying, or manipulation. When someone (or some group), who has stolen, leaked, copied, or manipulated digital documents propagates the documents over the Internet and/or distributes those through physical distribution channels many challenges arise which document holders must overcome in order to mitigate the impact to their privacy or business. This paper focuses on the propagation problem of digital credentials, which may contain sensitive information about a credential holder. Existing work such as access control policies and the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) assumes that qualified or certified credential viewers are honest and reliable. The proposed approach in this paper uses short-lived credentials based on reverse forward secure signatures to remove this assumption and mitigate the damage caused by a dishonest or honest but compromised viewer.

  2. Experiments on Learning by Back Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    network architecture . 2. The generation of an external error signal only after the network has settled. In order to understand the effects of these...M.P. Optimization by simulated annealing. Science 220:671-680, 1983. [Le Cun 85] Le Cun Y. Une prodedure d’apprentissage pour reseau a seuil

  3. Transionospheric Propagation Code (TIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Kelley, Thomas A.

    1990-10-01

    The Transionospheric Propagation Code is a computer program developed at Los Alamos National Lab to perform certain tasks related to the detection of VHF signals following propagation through the ionosphere. The code is written in FORTRAN 77, runs interactively and was designed to be as machine independent as possible. A menu format in which the user is prompted to supply appropriate parameters for a given task has been adopted for the input while the output is primarily in the form of graphics. The user has the option of selecting from five basic tasks, namely transionospheric propagation, signal filtering, signal processing, delta times of arrival (DTOA) study, and DTOA uncertainty study. For the first task a specified signal is convolved against the impulse response function of the ionosphere to obtain the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of four analytic forms for the input pulse or of supplying a tabular form. The option of adding Gaussian-distributed white noise of spectral noise to the input signal is also provided. The deterministic ionosphere is characterized to first order in terms of a total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path. In addition, a scattering model parameterized in terms of a frequency coherence bandwidth is also available. In the second task, detection is simulated by convolving a given filter response against the transionospheric signal. The user is given a choice of a wideband filter or a narrowband Gaussian filter. It is also possible to input a filter response. The third task provides for quadrature detection, envelope detection, and three different techniques for time-tagging the arrival of the transionospheric signal at specified receivers. The latter algorithms can be used to determine a TEC and thus take out the effects of the ionosphere to first order. Task four allows the user to construct a table of DTOAs vs TECs for a specified pair of receivers.

  4. Superluminal graviton propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Karim; Chapman, Shira; Darmé, Luc; Oz, Yaron

    2016-10-01

    We use the method of characteristics to study superluminal graviton (which we call the swift graviton) propagation in theories of higher-curvature gravity of the form (Riemann)2 , (Riemann)3 , ∇2(Riemann)2 and (Riemann)4 . We consider a p p -wave background. When probed by gravitons with an appropriate polarization, several of the gravitational theories under consideration exhibit characteristic hypersurfaces outside the flat spacetime light cone.

  5. Polarization Shaping for Control of Nonlinear Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Larocque, Hugo; Yao, Alison M.; Travis, Christopher; De Leon, Israel; Rubano, Andrea; Karimi, Ebrahim; Oppo, Gian-Luca; Boyd, Robert W.

    2016-12-01

    We study the nonlinear optical propagation of two different classes of light beams with space-varying polarization—radially symmetric vector beams and Poincaré beams with lemon and star topologies—in a rubidium vapor cell. Unlike Laguerre-Gauss and other types of beams that quickly experience instabilities, we observe that their propagation is not marked by beam breakup while still exhibiting traits such as nonlinear confinement and self-focusing. Our results suggest that, by tailoring the spatial structure of the polarization, the effects of nonlinear propagation can be effectively controlled. These findings provide a novel approach to transport high-power light beams in nonlinear media with controllable distortions to their spatial structure and polarization properties.

  6. SDEM modelling of fault-propagation folding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, O.R.; Egholm, D.L.; Poulsen, Jane Bang

    2009-01-01

    and variations in Mohr-Coulomb parameters including internal friction. Using SDEM modelling, we have mapped the propagation of the tip-line of the fault, as well as the evolution of the fold geometry across sedimentary layers of contrasting rheological parameters, as a function of the increased offset......Understanding the dynamics and kinematics of fault-propagation-folding is important for evaluating the associated hydrocarbon play, for accomplishing reliable section balancing (structural reconstruction), and for assessing seismic hazards. Accordingly, the deformation style of fault......-propagation-folding has already been the topic of a large number of empirical studies as well as physical and computational model experiments. However, with the newly developed Stress-based Discrete Element Method (SDEM), we have, for the first time, explored computationally the link between self-emerging fault patterns...

  7. Extension of Hybrid Scintillation Propagation Model to the case of field propagation in the ionosphere with highly anisotropic irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherm, Vadim E.; Zernov, Nikolay N.

    2017-07-01

    The detailed effects of the high-frequency radio wave propagation in a stochastic transionospheric propagation channel are discussed. This is a special case of propagation along or almost along the lines of the Earth's magnetic field. In this case, the ionospheric random irregularities of the electron density of the ionosphere may have very high values of the aspect ratio, which stands beyond the range of validity of the traditional analytical approaches utilized to treat the appropriate transionospheric propagation problems. In the consideration presented here, new analytical results are obtained for treating the problem under consideration. Based on the analytical results obtained, the previously developed Hybrid Scintillation Propagation Model is further extended, which also includes the software simulator of the signals propagating on the transionospheric paths with the random electron density irregularities highly elongated in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field.

  8. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  9. Stochastic model in microwave propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranfagni, A. [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Mugnai, D., E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it [“Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-11-28

    Further experimental results of delay time in microwave propagation are reported in the presence of a lossy medium (wood). The measurements show that the presence of a lossy medium makes the propagation slightly superluminal. The results are interpreted on the basis of a stochastic (or path integral) model, showing how this model is able to describe each kind of physical system in which multi-path trajectories are present. -- Highlights: ► We present new experimental results on electromagnetic “anomalous” propagation. ► We apply a path integral theoretical model to wave propagation. ► Stochastic processes and multi-path trajectories in propagation are considered.

  10. Assessment of a CFD model for short-range plume dispersion: Applications to the Fusion Field Trial 2007 (FFT-07) diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Ngae, Pierre; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the short-range plume dispersion under different atmospheric conditions can provide essential information for the development of source reconstruction methodologies that allows to retrieve the location and intensity of an unknown hazardous pollutant source. This process required a comprehensive assessment of the atmospheric dispersion models with tracer diffusion experiments in various stability conditions. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE is performed with the observations from available seven trials of single releases conducted in the Fusion Field Trail 2007 (FFT-07) tracer experiment. The CFD simulations are performed for each trial and it was observed that the CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE provides good agreement of the predicted concentrations with the observations in both stable and convective atmospheric conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the simulated results is performed by computing the statistical performance measures for the dispersion model evaluation. The CFD model predicts 65.4% of the overall concentration points within a factor of two to the observations. It was observed that the CFD model is predicting better in convective stability conditions in comparison to the trials conducted in stable stability. In convective conditions, 74.6% points were predicted within a factor of two to the observations which are higher than 59.3% concentration points predicted within a factor of two in the trials in stable atmospheric conditions.

  11. Temporal scaling in information propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-18

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  12. Temporal scaling in information propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junming; Li, Chao; Wang, Wen-Qiang; Shen, Hua-Wei; Li, Guojie; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-06-01

    For the study of information propagation, one fundamental problem is uncovering universal laws governing the dynamics of information propagation. This problem, from the microscopic perspective, is formulated as estimating the propagation probability that a piece of information propagates from one individual to another. Such a propagation probability generally depends on two major classes of factors: the intrinsic attractiveness of information and the interactions between individuals. Despite the fact that the temporal effect of attractiveness is widely studied, temporal laws underlying individual interactions remain unclear, causing inaccurate prediction of information propagation on evolving social networks. In this report, we empirically study the dynamics of information propagation, using the dataset from a population-scale social media website. We discover a temporal scaling in information propagation: the probability a message propagates between two individuals decays with the length of time latency since their latest interaction, obeying a power-law rule. Leveraging the scaling law, we further propose a temporal model to estimate future propagation probabilities between individuals, reducing the error rate of information propagation prediction from 6.7% to 2.6% and improving viral marketing with 9.7% incremental customers.

  13. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  14. Acoustical Wave Propagation in Sonic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Girip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss the technique of controlling the mechanical properties of sonic composites. The idea is to architecture the scatterers and material from which they are made, their number and geometry in order to obtain special features in their response to external waves. We refer to perfectly reflecting of acoustical waves over a desired range of frequencies or to prohibit their propagation in certain directions, or confining the waves within specified volumes. The internal structure of the material has to be chosen in such a way that to avoid the scattering of acoustical waves inside the material. This is possible if certain band-gaps of frequencies can be generated for which the waves are forbidden to propagate in certain directions. These bandgaps can be extended to cover all possible directions of propagation by resulting a full band-gap. If the band-gaps are not wide enough, their frequency ranges do not overlap. These band-gaps can overlap due to reflections on the surface of thick scatterers, as well as due to wave propagation inside them. growth.

  15. Energy model for rumor propagation on social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuo; Zhuang, Fuzhen; He, Qing; Shi, Zhongzhi; Ao, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    With the development of social networks, the impact of rumor propagation on human lives is more and more significant. Due to the change of propagation mode, traditional rumor propagation models designed for word-of-mouth process may not be suitable for describing the rumor spreading on social networks. To overcome this shortcoming, we carefully analyze the mechanisms of rumor propagation and the topological properties of large-scale social networks, then propose a novel model based on the physical theory. In this model, heat energy calculation formula and Metropolis rule are introduced to formalize this problem and the amount of heat energy is used to measure a rumor’s impact on a network. Finally, we conduct track experiments to show the evolution of rumor propagation, make comparison experiments to contrast the proposed model with the traditional models, and perform simulation experiments to study the dynamics of rumor spreading. The experiments show that (1) the rumor propagation simulated by our model goes through three stages: rapid growth, fluctuant persistence and slow decline; (2) individuals could spread a rumor repeatedly, which leads to the rumor’s resurgence; (3) rumor propagation is greatly influenced by a rumor’s attraction, the initial rumormonger and the sending probability.

  16. Mapping surface plasmon polariton propagation via counter-propagating light pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Christoph; Leißner, Till; Jauernik, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    In an interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (ITR-PEEM) experiment, the near-field associated with surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) can be locally sensed via interference with ultrashort laser pulses. Here, we present ITR-PEEM data of SPP propagation at a gold vacuum...

  17. Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend propagation and arm elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanassy, S; Botvinnik, A; Flash, T; Hochner, B

    2015-05-13

    The bend propagation involved in the stereotypical reaching movement of the octopus arm has been extensively studied. While these studies have analyzed the kinematics of bend propagation along the arm during its extension, possible length changes have been ignored. Here, the elongation profiles of the reaching movements of Octopus vulgaris were assessed using three-dimensional reconstructions. The analysis revealed that, in addition to bend propagation, arm extension movements involve elongation of the proximal part of the arm, i.e., the section from the base of the arm to the propagating bend. The elongations are quite substantial and highly variable, ranging from an average strain along the arm of -0.12 (i.e. shortening) up to 1.8 at the end of the movement (0.57 ± 0.41, n = 64 movements, four animals). Less variability was discovered in an additional set of experiments on reaching movements (0.64 ± 0.28, n = 30 movements, two animals), where target and octopus positions were kept more stationary. Visual observation and subsequent kinematic analysis suggest that the reaching movements can be broadly segregated into two groups. The first group involves bend propagation beginning at the base of the arm and propagating towards the arm tip. In the second, the bend is formed or present more distally and reaching is achieved mainly by elongation and straightening of the segment proximal to the bend. Only in the second type of movements is elongation significantly positively correlated with the distance of the bend from the target. We suggest that reaching towards a target is generated by a combination of both propagation of a bend along the arm and arm elongation. These two motor primitives may be combined to create a broad spectrum of reaching movements. The dynamical model, which recapitulates the biomechanics of the octopus muscular hydrostatic arm, suggests that achieving the observed elongation requires an extremely low ratio of longitudinal to transverse muscle

  18. Microscopic Mechanisms for Propagating Deformation Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Scott

    2001-03-01

    Alloys often deform through the propagation of slowly moving ( cm/s) fronts separating strained and unstrained regions. Theories for these Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) fronts are mostly on the macroscopic level, dealing with strains instead of dislocation populations. In these models diffusion, a possible mechanism for propagation, fails to produce front behavior consistent with experiments. Previous work* used a nonlocal strain-rate to successfully reproduce many different aspects of experimentally observed fronts. Ananthakrishna has proposed a set of equations that describe the evolution of different dislocation populations. These equations reproduce the temporal behavior of the PLC effect, serrated stress-strain curves accompanying smooth loading. It is natural to ask whether diffusive or other spatial coupling terms added to this model result in fronts. I will discuss simulations of these equations with added spatial terms and attempt to compare the results with experiments. *S. Franklin, F. Mertens, and M. Marder, Phys. Rev. E V. 62 (2000)

  19. QUENCH FRONT PROPAGATION IN THE ANNULAR CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stepanek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the quench front propagation during bottom core reflooding is crucial for the effective cooling during the LOCA accident. The results presented in this paper were obtained on an experimental loop with an annular test section. The test section consists of a vertical electrically heated stainless steel tube with outer diameter 9 mm and length of 1.7 m. The heated tube is placed inside a glass tube with the inner diameter 14.5 mm. Water mass flux during the reflooding is in the range from 100 kg.m−2.s−1 up to 140 kg.m−2.s−1 and the initial wall temperature of the stainless steel tube is in the range from 250 °C up to 800 °C. The presented results show the influence of the initial conditions on the quench front propagation and the complexity of the phenomenon.

  20. Free Range, Organic? Polish Consumers Preferences Regarding Information on Farming System and Nutritional Enhancement of Eggs: A Discrete Choice Based Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Żakowska-Biemans

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the structure of consumer preferences regarding information on farming system and nutritional enhancement of eggs to verify if consumers are willing to accept products combing sustainability and nutrition related claims. The data was collected within a CAPI (Computer Assisted Personal Interviews survey on a representative sample of 935 consumers responsible for food shopping. A discrete choice-based conjoint method was selected in eliciting consumer preferences among different product profiles with varying levels of attributes. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify four distinct clusters that differed significantly in terms of importance attached to production system attributes and socio-demographic profiles. The results of the experiment showed that price and farming system had the most significant mean relative importance in shaping consumers’ preferences, while other attributes such as nutrition and health claims, egg size, package size and hen breed were far less important. Free range eggs had the highest relative importance for consumers despite the fact that organic egg production systems are governed by much stricter animal welfare standards. Our segmentation revealed that two of our four clusters may be more easily reached by information on animal welfare related attributes in egg production than the others. The results of our study provide the policy makers and marketing practitioners with insights applicable for communication and pricing strategies for eggs with sustainability claims.

  1. A range of postmortem assault experiments conducted on a variety of denture labels used for the purpose of identification of edentulous individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Raymond; Pretty, Iain A

    2009-03-01

    Forensic organizations worldwide have recommended that dental prostheses should be labeled with at least the patient's name and preferably with further unique identifiers such as social security number, etc. The practice of denture marking has been conducted over many years and several denture marking systems have been reported in the dental literature. However, very little is known about the resilience of such systems to conditions experienced in the majority of post- and perimortem assaults. The purpose of this investigation therefore, was to expose a selection of 10 denture labels to a series of hostile environments. Results of the study indicate that the majority of the denture labeling systems appear capable of withstanding a range of common, and not so common postmortem assaults. With regard to thermal insult, however, most performed badly with the exception of a label constructed from stainless steel orthodontic band. However, another label in the form of an electronic RFID-tag performed above expectations in the majority of experiments. Furthermore, its cosmetic appearance has proven most popular with many patients.

  2. Scintillator counters with WLS fiber/MPPC readout for the side muon range detector (SMRD) of the T2K experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izmaylov, A., E-mail: izmaylov@inr.r [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Aoki, S. [Kobe University, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Blocki, J. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Brinson, J. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Dabrowska, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Danko, I. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Dziewiecki, M. [Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw 00-665 (Poland); Ellison, B. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Golyshkin, L. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Gould, R. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Hara, T. [Kobe University, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501 (Japan); Hartfiel, B. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Holeczek, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice 40-007 (Poland); Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Kielczewska, D. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, Warsaw 00-681 (Poland); Kisiel, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice 40-007 (Poland); Kozlowski, T. [A. Soltan Institute of Nuclear Studies, Warsaw 00-681 (Poland); Kudenko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Kurjata, R. [Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw 00-665 (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    The T2K neutrino experiment at J-PARC uses a set of near detectors to measure the properties of an unoscillated neutrino beam and neutrino interaction cross-sections. One of the sub-detectors of the near-detector complex, the side muon range detector (SMRD), is described in the paper. The detector is designed to help measure the neutrino energy spectrum, to identify background and to calibrate the other detectors. The active elements of the SMRD consist of 0.7 cm thick extruded scintillator slabs inserted into air gaps of the UA1 magnet yokes. The readout of each scintillator slab is provided through a single WLS fiber embedded into a serpentine-shaped groove. Two Hamamatsu multi-pixel avalanche photodiodes (MPPC's) are coupled to both ends of the WLS fiber. This design allows us to achieve a high MIP detection efficiency of greater than 99%. A light yield of 25-50 p.e./MIP, a time resolution of about 1 ns and a spatial resolution along the slab better than 10 cm were obtained for the SMRD counters.

  3. Scintillator counters with WLS fiber/MPPC readout for the side muon range detector (SMRD) of the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmaylov, A.; Aoki, S.; Blocki, J.; Brinson, J.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Dziewiecki, M.; Ellison, B.; Golyshkin, L.; Gould, R.; Hara, T.; Hartfiel, B.; Holeczek, J.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Kudenko, Yu.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Liu, J.; Marzec, J.; Metcalf, W.; Mijakowski, P.; Mineev, O.; Musienko, Yu.; Naples, D.; Nauman, M.; Northacker, D.; Nowak, J.; Paolone, V.; Posiadala, M.; Przewlocki, P.; Reid, J.; Rondio, E.; Shaykhiev, A.; Sienkiewicz, M.; Smith, D.; Sobczyk, J.; Stodulski, M.; Straczek, A.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, A.; Swierblewski, J.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Wachala, T.; Warner, D.; Yershov, N.; Yano, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.

    2010-11-01

    The T2K neutrino experiment at J-PARC uses a set of near detectors to measure the properties of an unoscillated neutrino beam and neutrino interaction cross-sections. One of the sub-detectors of the near-detector complex, the side muon range detector (SMRD), is described in the paper. The detector is designed to help measure the neutrino energy spectrum, to identify background and to calibrate the other detectors. The active elements of the SMRD consist of 0.7 cm thick extruded scintillator slabs inserted into air gaps of the UA1 magnet yokes. The readout of each scintillator slab is provided through a single WLS fiber embedded into a serpentine-shaped groove. Two Hamamatsu multi-pixel avalanche photodiodes (MPPC's) are coupled to both ends of the WLS fiber. This design allows us to achieve a high MIP detection efficiency of greater than 99%. A light yield of 25-50 p.e./MIP, a time resolution of about 1 ns and a spatial resolution along the slab better than 10 cm were obtained for the SMRD counters.

  4. COMSTAR Millimeter-Wave Propagation Measurements,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    downlink frequency. 2,3 In addition, NASA collected some simultan- eous 15- and 32-GHz attenuation data at the Rosman , North Carolina site. ATS-6...moving in azimuth and elevation when using suntrackers. Two NASA research satellites, ATS-5 and ATS-6, offered the first opportunity to utilize...communications, Proceedings of IEEE 63:1308-1331. 2. Ippolito, L.J. (1970) Millimeter-Wave Propagation Experiments Utilizing the ATS-5 Satellite, NASA

  5. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  6. Broadband unidirectional ultrasound propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2017-12-12

    A passive, linear arrangement of a sonic crystal-based apparatus and method including a 1D sonic crystal, a nonlinear medium, and an acoustic low-pass filter, for permitting unidirectional broadband ultrasound propagation as a collimated beam for underwater, air or other fluid communication, are described. The signal to be transmitted is first used to modulate a high-frequency ultrasonic carrier wave which is directed into the sonic crystal side of the apparatus. The apparatus processes the modulated signal, whereby the original low-frequency signal exits the apparatus as a collimated beam on the side of the apparatus opposite the sonic crystal. The sonic crystal provides a bandpass acoustic filter through which the modulated high-frequency ultrasonic signal passes, and the nonlinear medium demodulates the modulated signal and recovers the low-frequency sound beam. The low-pass filter removes remaining high-frequency components, and contributes to the unidirectional property of the apparatus.

  7. Propagation of Native Tree Species to Restore Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forests in SW China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBLF is a widespread vegetation type throughout East Asia that has suffered extensive deforestation and fragmentation. Selection and successful propagation of native tree species are important for improving ecological restoration of these forests. We carried out a series of experiments to study the propagation requirements of indigenous subtropical tree species in Southwest China. Seeds of 21 tree species collected from the natural forest were materials for the experiment. This paper examines the seed germination and seedling growth performance of these species in a nursery environment. Germination percentages ranged from 41% to 96% and were ≥50% for 19 species. The median length of germination time (MLG ranged from 24 days for Padus wilsonii to 144 days for Ilex polyneura. Fifteen species can reach the transplant size (≥15 cm in height within 12 months of seed collection. Nursery-grown seedlings for each species were planted in degraded site. Two years after planting, the seedling survival rate was >50% in 18 species and >80% in 12 species. Based on these results, 17 species were recommended as appropriate species for nursery production in forest restoration projects. Our study contributes additional knowledge regarding the propagation techniques for various native subtropical tree species in nurseries for forest restoration.

  8. Domain wall propagation in Fe-rich amorphous microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panina, L.V. [School of Comp. and Math., Univ. of Plymouth, Drake Circus, PL4 AA, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Ipatov, M.; Zhukova, V. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Zhukov, A., E-mail: arkadi.joukov@ehu.es [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-05-01

    The domain wall (DW) propagation in magnetically bistable Fe{sub 74}Si{sub 11}B{sub 13}C{sub 2} amorphous microwires with metallic nucleus diameters of 12-16 {mu}m has been investigated in order to explain high DW velocities observed in Sixtus-Tonks like experiments. In micrometric wires, the boundary between two head-to-head domains is very elongated. The DW mobility normal to the wall surface is reduced by the domain aspect ratio and is in the range of a few m/s/Oe in the linear regime. The experimental results in the viscous regime could be quantitatively explained in terms of the domain length and normal mobility limited by the eddy currents and spin relaxation losses.

  9. Generation and propagation of optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, David

    Optical vortices are singularities in phase fronts of laser beams. They are characterized by a dark core whose size (relative to the size of the background beam) may dramatically affect their behavior upon propagation. Previously, only large-core vortices have been extensively studied. The object of the research presented in this dissertation was to explore ways of generating small-core optical vortices (also called optical vortex filaments ), and to examine their propagation using analytical, numerical and experimental methods. Computer-generated holography enabled us to create arbitrary distributions of optical vortex filaments for experimental exploration. Hydrodynamic analogies were used to develop an heuristic model which described the dependence of vortex motion on other vortices and the background beam, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We predicted that pair of optical vortex filaments will rotate with angular rates inversely proportional to their separation distance (just like vortices in a fluid). We also reported the first experimental observation of this novel fluid-like effect. It was found, however, that upon propagation in linear media, the fluid-like rotation was not sustained owing to the overlap of diffracting vortex cores. Further numerical studies and experiments showed that rotation angle may be enhanced in nonlinear self-defocusing media. The results presented in this thesis offer us a better understanding of dynamics of propagating vortices which may result in applications in optical switching, optical data storage, manipulation of micro-particles and optical limiting for eye protection.

  10. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  11. Analysis of aircraft and satellite measurements from the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX-B to quantify long-range transport of East Asian sulfur to Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. van Donkelaar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We interpret a suite of satellite, aircraft, and ground-based measurements over the North Pacific Ocean and western North America during April–May 2006 as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B campaign to understand the implications of long-range transport of East Asian emissions to North America. The Canadian component of INTEX-B included 33 vertical profiles from a Cessna 207 aircraft equipped with an aerosol mass spectrometer. Long-range transport of organic aerosols was insignificant, contrary to expectations. Measured sulfate plumes in the free troposphere over British Columbia exceeded 2 μg/m3. We update the global anthropogenic emission inventory in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem and use it to interpret the observations. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD retrieved from two satellite instruments (MISR and MODIS for 2000–2006 are analyzed with GEOS-Chem to estimate an annual growth in Chinese sulfur emissions of 6.2% and 9.6%, respectively. Analysis of aircraft sulfate measurements from the NASA DC-8 over the central Pacific, the NSF C-130 over the east Pacific and the Cessna over British Columbia indicates most Asian sulfate over the ocean is in the lower free troposphere (800–600 hPa, with a decrease in pressure toward land due to orographic effects. We calculate that 56% of the measured sulfate between 500–900 hPa over British Columbia is due to East Asian sources. We find evidence of a 72–85% increase in the relative contribution of East Asian sulfate to the total burden in spring off the northwest coast of the United States since 1985. Campaign-average simulations indicate anthropogenic East Asian sulfur emissions increase mean springtime sulfate in Western Canada at the surface by 0.31 μg/m3 (~30% and account for 50% of the overall regional sulfate burden between 1 and 5 km. Mean measured daily surface sulfate concentrations taken in the Vancouver area increase by

  12. Adélie penguins coping with environmental change: Results from a natural experiment at the edge of their breeding range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Catherine; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G.; Lyber, Phil O'B.; Schine, Casey

    2014-01-01

    We investigated life history responses to extreme variation in physical environmental conditions during a long-term demographic study of Adélie penguins at 3 colonies representing 9% of the world population and the full range of breeding colony sizes. Five years into the 14-year study (1997–2010) two very large icebergs (spanning 1.5 latitude degrees in length) grounded in waters adjacent to breeding colonies, dramatically altering environmental conditions during 2001–2005. This natural experiment allowed us to evaluate the relative impacts of expected long-term, but also extreme, short-term climate perturbations on important natural history parameters that can regulate populations. The icebergs presented physical barriers, not just to the penguins but to polynya formation, which profoundly increased foraging effort and movement rates, while reducing breeding propensity and productivity, especially at the smallest colony. We evaluated the effect of a variety of environmental parameters during breeding, molt, migration and wintering periods during years with and without icebergs on penguin breeding productivity, chick mass, and nesting chronology. The icebergs had far more influence on the natural history parameters of penguins than any of the other environmental variables measured, resulting in population level changes to metrics of reproductive performance, including delays in nesting chronology, depressed breeding productivity, and lower chick mass. These effects were strongest at the smallest, southern-most colony, which was most affected by alteration of the Ross Sea Polynya during years the iceberg was present. Additionally, chick mass was negatively correlated with colony size, supporting previous findings indicating density-dependent energetic constraints at the largest colony. Understanding the negative effects of the icebergs on the short-term natural history of Adélie penguins, as well as their response to long-term environmental variation, are

  13. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  14. Aspects of HF radio propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Saillant

    2009-06-01

    .

    c Development of inversion techniques enabling backscatter ionograms obtained by an HF radar to be used

    to estimate the ionospheric electron density profile. This development facilitates the operation of over the horizon

    HF radars by enhancing the frequency management aspects of the systems.

    d Various propagation prediction techniques have been tested against measurements made over the trough

    path mentioned above, and also over a long-range path between Cyprus and the UK.

    e The effect of changes in the levels of ionospheric disturbances on the operational availability at various

    data throughput rates has been examined for the trough path mentioned earlier.

    The topics covered in this paper are necessarily brief, and the reader is referred to full papers referenced


  15. Study of interaction of ELF-ULF range (0.1-200 Hz) electromagnetic waves with the earth's crust and the ionosphere in the field of industrial power transmission lines (FENICS experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamaletdinov, A. A.; Shevtsov, A. N.; Velikhov, E. P.; Skorokhodov, A. A.; Kolesnikov, V. E.; Korotkova, T. G.; Ryazantsev, P. A.; Efimov, B. V.; Kolobov, V. V.; Barannik, M. B.; Prokopchuk, P. I.; Selivanov, V. N.; Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Kopytenko, E. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Petrishchev, M. S.; Sergushin, P. A.; Tereshchenko, P. E.; Samsonov, B. V.; Birulya, M. A.; Smirnov, M. Yu.; Korja, T.; Yampolski, Yu. M.; Koloskov, A. V.; Baru, N. A.; Poljakov, S. V.; Shchennikov, A. V.; Druzhin, G. I.; Jozwiak, W.; Reda, J.; Shchors, Yu. G.

    2015-12-01

    This article is devoted to describing the theory, technique, and first experimental results of a control source electromagnetic (CSEM) study of the Earth's crust and ionosphere with the use of two mutually orthogonal industrial transmission lines 109 and 120 km in length in the frame of FENICS (Fennoscandian Electrical Conductivity from Natural and Induction Control Source Soundings) experiment. The main part of the measurements is executed on the territory of the Fennoscandian shield at distances from the first hundreds kilometers up to 856 km from the source with the purpose of the deep electromagnetic sounding of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. According to the results of these studies clarifying the parameters of "normal" (standard) geoelectric section of the lithosphere to a depth of 60-70 km, the anisotropy parameters are evaluated and a geothermal and rheological interpretation in conjunction with the analysis of the seismic data is executed. Furthermore, to study the propagation of ELF-LLF waves (0.1-200 Hz) in an "Earth-Ionosphere" waveguide, the measurements are carried out apart from Fennoscandian shield at distances up to 5600 km from the source (in Ukraine, Spitsbergen, Poland, Kamchatka, and other areas). According to the results of these studies, the experimental estimates of the influence of the ionosphere and of the displacement currents on the propagation of ELF-ULF waves in the upper half-space at the different azimuths generation of the primary field are obtained.

  16. Macroscopic electrical propagation in the guinea pig urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, F T; Stephen, B; Lubbad, L; Morrison, J F B; Lammers, W J

    2014-07-15

    There is little knowledge about macroscopic electrical propagation in the wall of the urinary bladder. Recording simultaneously from a large number of extracellular electrodes is one technology that could be used to study the patterns of macroscopic electrical propagations. The urinary bladders from 14 guinea pigs were isolated and placed in an organ bath. A 16 × 4-electrode array was positioned at various sites on the serosal bladder surface, and recordings were performed at different intravesical volumes. In four experiments, carbachol (CCH; 10(-6) M), nifedipine (10 mM), or tetrodotoxin (TTX; 10(-6) M) was added to the superfusing fluid. After the experiments, the extracellular signals were analyzed and propagation maps were constructed. Electrical waves were detected at all sites on the bladder surface and propagated for a limited distance before terminating spontaneously. The majority of waves (>90%) propagated in the axial direction (i.e., from dome to base or vice versa). An increase in vesicle volume significantly decreased the conduction velocity (from 4.9 ± 1.5 to 2.7 ± 0.7 cm/s; P bladder surface. Two types of electrical activities were detected on the bladder surface: 1) electrical waves propagating preferentially in the axial direction and 2) electrical patches. The propagating electrical waves could form the basis for local spontaneous contractions in the bladder during the filling phase. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Wireless communications has seen explosive growth in recent decades, in a realm that is both broad and rapidly expanding to include satellite services, navigational aids, remote sensing, telemetering, audio and video broadcasting, high-speed data communications, mobile radio systems and much more. Propagation Engineering in Wireless Communications deals with the basic principles of radiowaves propagation for frequency bands used in radio-communications, offering descriptions of new achievements and newly developed propagation models. The book bridges the gap between theoretical calculations and approaches, and applied procedures needed for advanced radio links design. The primary objective of this two-volume set is to demonstrate the fundamentals, and to introduce propagation phenomena and mechanisms that engineers are likely to encounter in the design and evaluation of radio links of a given type and operating frequency. Volume one covers basic principles, along with tropospheric and ionospheric propagation,...

  18. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollny, Alexander; Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Peter Brinkmann, Ralf; Mussenbrock, Thomas [Institute of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-10-03

    Microcavity plasma arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities fabricated on p-Si wafers act as localized dielectric barrier discharges. When operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at 10 kHz, a strong interaction between individual cavities is observed leading to wave-like optical emission propagating along the surface of the array. This phenomenon is numerically investigated. The computed ionization wave propagates with a speed of 5 km/s, which agrees well with experiments. The wave propagation is due to the sequential drift of electrons followed by drift of ions between cavities seeded by photoemission of electrons by the plasma in adjacent cavities.

  19. Sound propagation in a continuously stratified laboratory ocean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Swinney, Harry L

    2017-05-01

    The propagation of sound in a density-stratified fluid is examined in an experiment with a tank of salty water whose density increases continuously from the fluid surface to the tank bottom. Measurements of the height dependence of the fluid density are used to calculate the height dependence of the fluid salinity and sound speed. The height-dependent sound speed is then used to calculate the refraction of sound rays. Sound propagation in the fluid is measured in three dimensions and compared with the ray analysis. This study provides a basis for laboratory modeling of underwater sound propagation in the fluctuating stratified oceans.

  20. Topographic effects on infrasound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mihan H; Gibson, Robert G; Walker, Bob E; McKenna, Jason; Winslow, Nathan W; Kofford, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Infrasound data were collected using portable arrays in a region of variable terrain elevation to quantify the effects of topography on observed signal amplitude and waveform features at distances less than 25 km from partially contained explosive sources during the Frozen Rock Experiment (FRE) in 2006. Observed infrasound signals varied in amplitude and waveform complexity, indicating propagation effects that are due in part to repeated local maxima and minima in the topography on the scale of the dominant wavelengths of the observed data. Numerical simulations using an empirically derived pressure source function combining published FRE accelerometer data and historical data from Project ESSEX, a time-domain parabolic equation model that accounted for local terrain elevation through terrain-masking, and local meteorological atmospheric profiles were able to explain some but not all of the observed signal features. Specifically, the simulations matched the timing of the observed infrasound signals but underestimated the waveform amplitude observed behind terrain features, suggesting complex scattering and absorption of energy associated with variable topography influences infrasonic energy more than previously observed. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  1. Results of Indoor Propagation Measurement Campaign at 1900 MHz

    OpenAIRE

    Zvanovec, S.; Klepal, M.; P. Pechac

    2001-01-01

    For the design of indoor picocellular systems in the frequency band of 1800/2100 MHz, a signal propagation modelling is needed. Empirical and semi-empirical models represent an efficient approach to the coverage prediction. For these models, suitable empirical parameters must be provided. The indoor propagation measurement campaign in the frequency range of 1900 MHz was carried out in several multi-floored buildings in Prague and Brno . For the campaign a special portable measurement system w...

  2. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  3. Improved Generalized Belief Propagation for Vision Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized belief propagation (GBP is a region-based belief propagation algorithm which can get good convergence in Markov random fields. However, the computation time is too heavy to use in practical engineering applications. This paper proposes a method to accelerate the efficiency of GBP. A caching technique and chessboard passing strategy are used to speed up algorithm. Then, the direction set method which is used to reduce the complexity of computing clique messages from quadric to cubic. With such a strategy the processing speed can be greatly increased. Besides, it is the first attempt to apply GBP for solving the stereomatching problem. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm can speed up by 15+ times for typical stereo matching problem and infer a more plausible result.

  4. Study on Knowledge Propagation in Complex Networks Based on Preferences, Taking Wechat as Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-hua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As platform based on users’ relationship to acquire, share, and propagate knowledge, Wechat develops very rapidly and becomes an important channel to spread knowledge. This new way to propagate knowledge is quite different from the traditional media way which enables knowledge to be spread surprisingly in Wechat. Based on complex network theory and the analysis of the factors which influence the knowledge propagation in Wechat, this paper summarizes the behavior preferences of Wechat users in knowledge propagation and establishes a Wechat knowledge propagation model. By the simulation experiment, this paper tests the model established and finds some important thresholds in knowledge propagation in Wechat. The findings are valuable for further studying the knowledge propagation in Wechat and provide theoretical proof for forecasting the scale and influence of knowledge propagation.

  5. The stratospheric arrival pair in infrasound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxler, Roger; Evers, Läslo G; Assink, Jelle; Blom, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The ideal case of a deep and well-formed stratospheric duct for long range infrasound propagation in the absence of tropospheric ducting is considered. A canonical form, that of a pair of arrivals, for ground returns of impulsive signals in a stratospheric duct is determined. The canonical form is derived from the geometrical acoustics approximation, and is validated and extended through full wave modeling. The full caustic structure of the field of ray paths is found and used to determine phase relations between the contributions to the wavetrain from different propagation paths. Finally, comparison with data collected from the 2005 fuel gas depot explosion in Buncefield, England is made. The correspondence between the theoretical results and the observations is shown to be quite good.

  6. Medium-Range Structural Organization of Phosphorus-Bearing Borosilicate Glasses Revealed by Advanced Solid-State NMR Experiments and MD Simulations: Consequences of B/Si Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2017-10-19

    The short and intermediate range structures of a large series of bioactive borophosphosilicate (BPS) glasses were probed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two BPS glass series were designed by gradually substituting SiO2 by B2O3 in the respective phosphosilicate base compositions 24.1Na2O-23.3CaO-48.6SiO2-4.0P2O5 ("S49") and 24.6Na2O-26.7CaO-46.1SiO2-2.6P2O5 ("S46"), the latter constituting the "45S5 Bioglass" utilized for bone grafting applications. The BPS glass networks are built by interconnected SiO4, BO4, and BO3 moieties, whereas P exists mainly as orthophosphate anions, except for a minor network-associated portion involving P-O-Si and P-O-B([4]) motifs, whose populations were estimated by heteronuclear (31)P{(11)B} NMR experimentation. The high Na(+)/Ca(2+) contents give fragmented glass networks with large amounts of nonbridging oxygen (NBO) anions. The MD-generated glass models reveal an increasing propensity for NBO accommodation among the network units according to BO4 B NMR experiments, which evidenced the presence of all three BO3-BO3, BO3-BO4, and BO4-BO4 connectivities, with B([3])-O-B([4]) bridges dominating. Notwithstanding that B([4])-O-B([4]) linkages are disfavored, both NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations established their presence in these modifier-rich BPS glasses, along with non-negligible B([4])-NBO contacts, at odds with the conventional structural view of borosilicate glasses. We discuss the relative propensities for intermixing of the Si/B/P network formers. Despite the absence of pronounced preferences for Si-O-Si bond formation, the glass models manifest subtle subnanometer-sized structural inhomogeneities, where SiO4 tetrahedra tend to self-associate into small chain/ring motifs embedded in BO3/BO4-dominated domains.

  7. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  8. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  9. Particle propagation in cosmological backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We study the quantum propagation of particles in cosmological backgrounds, by considering a doublet of massive scalar fields propagating in an expanding universe, possibly filled with radiation. We focus on the dissipative effects related to the expansion rate. At first order, we recover the expected result that the decay rate is determined by the local temperature. Beyond linear order, the decay rate has an additional contribution governed by the expansion parameter. This latter contribution is present even for stable particles in the vacuum. Finally, we analyze the long time behaviour of the propagator and briefly discuss applications to the trans-Planckian question.

  10. Nanoimprinted Long-range Surface Plasmon Polariton Waveguide Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Dan Mario; Boltasseva, A.; Nielsen, Theodor

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and performance of metal stripe waveguides embedded in a polymer, capable of supporting long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) propagation.......We report on the fabrication by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and performance of metal stripe waveguides embedded in a polymer, capable of supporting long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) propagation....

  11. Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study a new type of long-range correlations for waves propagating in a random medium. These correlations originate from scattering events which take place close to a point source. The scattered waves propagate by diffusion to distant regions. In this way long range correlations, between any pair of distant points, are ...

  12. Intra-cortical propagation of EEG alpha oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, Rikkert; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Deco, G.

    2014-01-01

    The most salient feature of spontaneous human brain activity as recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) are rhythmic fluctuations around 10 Hz. These alpha oscillations have been reported to propagate over the scalp with velocities in the range of 5–15 m/s. Since these velocities are in the range

  13. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  14. Flame propagation in two-dimensional solids: Particle-resolved studies with complex plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, S. O.; Yakovlev, E. V.; Couëdel, L.; Kryuchkov, N. P.; Lipaev, A. M.; Naumkin, V. N.; Kislov, A. Yu.; Ovcharov, P. V.; Zaytsev, K. I.; Vorob'ev, E. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Using two-dimensional (2D) complex plasmas as an experimental model system, particle-resolved studies of flame propagation in classical 2D solids are carried out. Combining experiments, theory, and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the mode-coupling instability operating in 2D complex plasmas reveals all essential features of combustion, such as an activated heat release, two-zone structure of the self-similar temperature profile ("flame front"), as well as thermal expansion of the medium and temperature saturation behind the front. The presented results are of relevance for various fields ranging from combustion and thermochemistry, to chemical physics and synthesis of materials.

  15. Propagation of two longitudinal waves in a cancellous bone with the closed pore boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsunori; Nagatani, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Keisuke; Matsukawa, Mami

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone (porous media) under the condition of closed pore boundaries was investigated. A cancellous bone and two plate-like cortical bones obtained from a racehorse were prepared. A water-immersion ultrasound technique in the MHz range and a three-dimensional elastic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method were used to investigate the waves. The experiments and simulations showed a clear separation of the incident longitudinal wave into fast and slow waves. The findings advance the evaluation of bones based on the two-wave phenomenon for in vivo assessment.

  16. The NASA radiowave propagation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarian, Faramaz

    The objectives of the NASA radiowave Propagation Program are to enable new satellite communication applications and to enhance existing satellite communication networks. These objectives are achieved by supporting radio wave propagation studies and disseminating the study results in a timely fashion. Studies initiated by this program in the 1980s enabled the infant concept of conducting mobile communications via satellite to reach a state of relative maturity in 1990. The program also supported the satellite communications community by publishing and revising two handbooks dealing with radio wave propagation effects for frequencies below and above 10 GHz, respectively. The program has served the international community through its support of the International Telecommunications Union. It supports state of the art work at universities. Currently, the program is focusing on the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) and its propagation needs. An overview of the program's involvement in the ACTS project is given.

  17. Radio Wave Propagation in Tunnels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jeho

    2000-01-01

    This report examines the radio propagation model for narrow and long tunnels. Modal analysis is used to model the path gain in 2-D and 3-D rectangular tunnels and the coupling loss of L, T and cross tunnels...

  18. Propagation engineering in wireless communications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic principles for understanding radio wave propagation for common frequency bands used in radio-communications. This includes achievements and developments in propagation models for wireless communication. This book is intended to bridge the gap between the theoretical calculations and approaches to the applied procedures needed for radio links design in a proper manner. The authors emphasize propagation engineering by giving fundamental information and explain the use of basic principles together with technical achievements. This new edition includes additional information on radio wave propagation in guided media and technical issues for fiber optics cable networks with several examples and problems. This book also includes a solution manual - with 90 solved examples distributed throughout the chapters - and 158 problems including practical values and assumptions.

  19. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  20. DISCOVERY OF UBIQUITOUS FAST-PROPAGATING INTENSITY DISTURBANCES BY THE CHROMOSPHERIC LYMAN ALPHA SPECTROPOLARIMETER (CLASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimizu, T.; Sakao, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Cirtain, J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Champey, P. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 301 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bueno, J. Trujillo; Ramos, A. Asensio, E-mail: masahito.kubo@nao.ac.jp [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2016-12-01

    High-cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment known as the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere or the transition region or both at a speed much higher than the speed of sound. The CLASP/SJ instrument provides a time series of two-dimensional images taken with broadband filters centered on the Ly α line at a 0.6 s cadence. The multiple fast-propagating intensity disturbances appear in the quiet Sun and in an active region, and they are clearly detected in at least 20 areas in a field of view of 527″ × 527″ during the 5 minute observing time. The apparent speeds of the intensity disturbances range from 150 to 350 km s{sup −1}, and they are comparable to the local Alfvén speed in the transition region. The intensity disturbances tend to propagate along bright elongated structures away from areas with strong photospheric magnetic fields. This suggests that the observed fast-propagating intensity disturbances are related to the magnetic canopy structures. The maximum distance traveled by the intensity disturbances is about 10″, and the widths are a few arcseconds, which are almost determined by a pixel size of 1.″03. The timescale of each intensity pulse is shorter than 30 s. One possible explanation for the fast-propagating intensity disturbances observed by CLASP is magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves.

  1. Modeling the Propagation of Mobile Phone Virus under Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively. PMID:25133209

  2. Modeling the propagation of mobile phone virus under complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wei, Xi-liang; Guo, Hao; An, Gang; Guo, Lei; Yao, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phone virus is a rogue program written to propagate from one phone to another, which can take control of a mobile device by exploiting its vulnerabilities. In this paper the propagation model of mobile phone virus is tackled to understand how particular factors can affect its propagation and design effective containment strategies to suppress mobile phone virus. Two different propagation models of mobile phone viruses under the complex network are proposed in this paper. One is intended to describe the propagation of user-tricking virus, and the other is to describe the propagation of the vulnerability-exploiting virus. Based on the traditional epidemic models, the characteristics of mobile phone viruses and the network topology structure are incorporated into our models. A detailed analysis is conducted to analyze the propagation models. Through analysis, the stable infection-free equilibrium point and the stability condition are derived. Finally, considering the network topology, the numerical and simulation experiments are carried out. Results indicate that both models are correct and suitable for describing the spread of two different mobile phone viruses, respectively.

  3. Design Change Model for Effective Scheduling Change Propagation Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Zhu; Ding, Guo-Fu; Li, Rong; Qin, Sheng-Feng; Yan, Kai-Yin

    2017-09-01

    Changes in requirements may result in the increasing of product development project cost and lead time, therefore, it is important to understand how requirement changes propagate in the design of complex product systems and be able to select best options to guide design. Currently, a most approach for design change is lack of take the multi-disciplinary coupling relationships and the number of parameters into account integrally. A new design change model is presented to systematically analyze and search change propagation paths. Firstly, a PDS-Behavior-Structure-based design change model is established to describe requirement changes causing the design change propagation in behavior and structure domains. Secondly, a multi-disciplinary oriented behavior matrix is utilized to support change propagation analysis of complex product systems, and the interaction relationships of the matrix elements are used to obtain an initial set of change paths. Finally, a rough set-based propagation space reducing tool is developed to assist in narrowing change propagation paths by computing the importance of the design change parameters. The proposed new design change model and its associated tools have been demonstrated by the scheduling change propagation paths of high speed train's bogie to show its feasibility and effectiveness. This model is not only supportive to response quickly to diversified market requirements, but also helpful to satisfy customer requirements and reduce product development lead time. The proposed new design change model can be applied in a wide range of engineering systems design with improved efficiency.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging, change detection, and stability assessment during the centerline trench levee seepage experiment using terrestrial light detection and ranging technology, Twitchell Island, California, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Howle, James; Bond, Sandra; Shriro, Michelle; Buck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A full scale field seepage test was conducted on a north-south trending levee segment of a now bypassed old meander belt on Twitchell Island, California, to understand the effects of live and decaying root systems on levee seepage and slope stability. The field test in May 2012 was centered on a north-south trench with two segments: a shorter control segment and a longer seepage test segment. The complete length of the trench area measured 40.4 meters (m) near the levee centerline with mature trees located on the waterside and landside of the levee flanks. The levee was instrumented with piezometers and tensiometers to measure positive and negative porewater pressures across the levee after the trench was flooded with water and held at a constant hydraulic head during the seepage test—the results from this component of the experiment are not discussed in this report. We collected more than one billion three-dimensional light detection and ranging (lidar) data points before, during, and after the centerline seepage test to assess centimeter-scale stability of the two trees and the levee crown. During the seepage test, the waterside tree toppled (rotated 20.7 degrees) into the water. The landside tree rotated away from the levee by 5 centimeters (cm) at a height of 2 m on the tree. The paved surface of the levee crown had three regions that showed subsidence on the waterside of the trench—discussed as the northern, central, and southern features. The northern feature is an elongate region that subsided 2.1 cm over an area with an average width of 1.35 m that extends 15.8 m parallel to the trench from the northern end of the trench to just north of the trench midpoint, and is associated with a crack 1 cm in height that formed during the seepage test on the trench wall. The central subsidence feature is a semicircular region on the waterside of the trench that subsided by as much as 6.2 cm over an area 3.4 m wide and 11.2 m long. The southern feature is an elongate

  5. Laser beam propagation through a jet aircraft engine's exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazetdinov, Vladmir S.; Starikov, Anatoly D.; Titterton, David H.

    2001-01-01

    One-, half- and ten-micron wavelength radiation was used to study laser beam propagation through turbojet aircraft engine exhaust. A feature of the methods was that instantaneous distributions of the beam intensity were recorded during the experiment. Analysis of experimental data has shown that turbulent stream has a dramatic impact on spatial characteristics of a laser beam. For example, the averaged angle divergence for 30-mm one-micron beam becomes about ten times higher than its diffraction divergence. Results of different experiments showed that the average angle divergence of the narrow one-micron beam disturbed by the jet plume is several times less than that of the ten-micron beam which is characterized by a large diffraction divergence, and that of the half-micron beam stronger subjected to disturbances. Experiments in which the beam crossed the plume close to a nozzle at (phi) = 90 degree(s), 45 degree(s) and 10 degree(s) have shown that angular divergence increases with decreasing cross-angle, practically doubling the value when coming from the maximal angle of (phi) = 90 degree(s) to the minimal (phi) = 10 degree(s). Mathematical models have been derived, based on the experimental studies. The value of the structural characteristic in a turbulent stream is in the range of Cn2~10-9m-2/3.

  6. Propagation in Diagonal Anisotropic Chirowaveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of electromagnetic wave propagation in parallel plate chirowaveguide is presented. The waveguide is filled with a chiral material having diagonal anisotropic constitutive parameters. The propagation characterization in this medium is based on algebraic formulation of Maxwell’s equations combined with the constitutive relations. Three propagation regions are identified: the fast-fast-wave region, the fast-slow-wave region, and the slow-slow-wave region. This paper focuses completely on the propagation in the first region, where the dispersion modal equations are obtained and solved. The cut-off frequencies calculation leads to three cases of the plane wave propagation in anisotropic chiral medium. The particularity of these results is the possibility of controlling the appropriate cut-off frequencies by choosing the adequate physical parameters values. The specificity of this study lies in the bifurcation modes confirmation and the possible contribution to the design of optical devices such as high-pass filters, as well as positive and negative propagation constants. This negative constant is an important feature of metamaterials which shows the phenomena of backward waves. Original results of the biaxial anisotropic chiral metamaterial are obtained and discussed.

  7. Can Neural Activity Propagate by Endogenous Electrical Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Shivacharan, Rajat S.; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that synaptic transmissions and gap junctions are the major governing mechanisms for signal traveling in the neural system. Yet, a group of neural waves, either physiological or pathological, share the same speed of ∼0.1 m/s without synaptic transmission or gap junctions, and this speed is not consistent with axonal conduction or ionic diffusion. The only explanation left is an electrical field effect. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous electric fields are sufficient to explain the propagation with in silico and in vitro experiments. Simulation results show that field effects alone can indeed mediate propagation across layers of neurons with speeds of 0.12 ± 0.09 m/s with pathological kinetics, and 0.11 ± 0.03 m/s with physiologic kinetics, both generating weak field amplitudes of ∼2–6 mV/mm. Further, the model predicted that propagation speed values are inversely proportional to the cell-to-cell distances, but do not significantly change with extracellular resistivity, membrane capacitance, or membrane resistance. In vitro recordings in mice hippocampi produced similar speeds (0.10 ± 0.03 m/s) and field amplitudes (2.5–5 mV/mm), and by applying a blocking field, the propagation speed was greatly reduced. Finally, osmolarity experiments confirmed the model's prediction that cell-to-cell distance inversely affects propagation speed. Together, these results show that despite their weak amplitude, electric fields can be solely responsible for spike propagation at ∼0.1 m/s. This phenomenon could be important to explain the slow propagation of epileptic activity and other normal propagations at similar speeds. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural activity (waves or spikes) can propagate using well documented mechanisms such as synaptic transmission, gap junctions, or diffusion. However, the purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation for experimental data showing that neural signals can propagate by means other than synaptic

  8. Single Neurons in the Avian Auditory Cortex Encode Individual Identity and Propagation Distance in Naturally Degraded Communication Calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Solveig C; Elie, Julie E; Mathevon, Nicolas; Theunissen, Frédéric E

    2017-03-29

    One of the most complex tasks performed by sensory systems is "scene analysis": the interpretation of complex signals as behaviorally relevant objects. The study of this problem, universal to species and sensory modalities, is particularly challenging in audition, where sounds from various sources and localizations, degraded by propagation through the environment, sum to form a single acoustical signal. Here we investigated in a songbird model, the zebra finch, the neural substrate for ranging and identifying a single source. We relied on ecologically and behaviorally relevant stimuli, contact calls, to investigate the neural discrimination of individual vocal signature as well as sound source distance when calls have been degraded through propagation in a natural environment. Performing electrophysiological recordings in anesthetized birds, we found neurons in the auditory forebrain that discriminate individual vocal signatures despite long-range degradation, as well as neurons discriminating propagation distance, with varying degrees of multiplexing between both information types. Moreover, the neural discrimination performance of individual identity was not affected by propagation-induced degradation beyond what was induced by the decreased intensity. For the first time, neurons with distance-invariant identity discrimination properties as well as distance-discriminant neurons are revealed in the avian auditory cortex. Because these neurons were recorded in animals that had prior experience neither with the vocalizers of the stimuli nor with long-range propagation of calls, we suggest that this neural population is part of a general-purpose system for vocalizer discrimination and ranging.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding how the brain makes sense of the multitude of stimuli that it continually receives in natural conditions is a challenge for scientists. Here we provide a new understanding of how the auditory system extracts behaviorally relevant information

  9. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  10. Dispersion Management of Propagating Waveguide Modes on the Water Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shenhe; Zhou, Jianying; Li, Yongyao; Shemer, Lev; Arie, Ady

    2017-04-07

    We report on the theoretical and experimental study of the generation of propagating waveguide modes on the water surface. These propagating modes are modulated in the transverse direction in a manner that satisfies boundary conditions on the walls of the water tank. It is shown that the propagating modes possess both anomalous and normal dispersion regimes, in contrast to the extensively studied zero mode that, in the case of deep water, only has normal dispersion with a fixed frequency independent dispersion coefficient. Importantly, by using a carrier frequency at which the group velocity dispersion crosses zero, a linear nonspreading and shape-preserving wave packet is observed. By increasing the wave steepness, nonlinear effects become pronounced, thereby enabling the first observation of linearly chirped parabolic water wave pulses in the anomalous dispersion regime. This parabolic wave maintains its linear frequency chirp and does not experience wave breaking during propagation.

  11. Achieving directional propagation of elastic waves via topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjie; Kang, Zhan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a study on topology optimization of novel material microstructural configurations to achieve directional elastic wave propagation through maximization of partial band gaps. A waveguide incorporating a periodic-microstructure material may exhibit different propagation properties for the plane elastic waves incident from different inlets. A topology optimization problem is formulated to enhance such a property with a gradient-based mathematical programming algorithm. For alleviating the issue of local optimum traps, the random morphology description functions (RMDFs) are introduced to generate random initial designs for the optimization process. The optimized designs finally converge to the orderly material distribution and numerical validation shows improved directional propagation property as expected. The utilization of linear two-dimension phononic crystal with efficient partial band gap is suitable for directional propagation with a broad frequency range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraille, O; Luding, S

    2008-11-01

    Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed in dense granular media with a narrow polydisperse size-distribution and a linear contact-force law. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves, is examined. A size variation comparable to the typical contact deformation already changes sound propagation considerably. The transmission spectrum becomes discontinuous, i.e., a lower frequency band is transmitted well, while higher frequencies are not, possibly due to attenuation and scattering. This behaviour is qualitatively reproduced for (i) Hertz non-linear contacts, for (ii) frictional contacts, (iii) for a range of smaller amplitudes, or (iv) for larger systems. This proves that the observed wave propagation and dispersion behaviour is intrinsic and not just an artifact of (i) a linear model, (ii) a frictionless packing, (iii) a large amplitude non-linear wave, or (iv) a finite size effect.

  13. Semisupervised kernel matrix learning by kernel propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Enliang; Chen, Songcan; Zhang, Daoqiang; Yin, Xuesong

    2010-11-01

    The goal of semisupervised kernel matrix learning (SS-KML) is to learn a kernel matrix on all the given samples on which just a little supervised information, such as class label or pairwise constraint, is provided. Despite extensive research, the performance of SS-KML still leaves some space for improvement in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. For example, a recent pairwise constraints propagation (PCP) algorithm has formulated SS-KML into a semidefinite programming (SDP) problem, but its computation is very expensive, which undoubtedly restricts PCPs scalability in practice. In this paper, a novel algorithm, called kernel propagation (KP), is proposed to improve the comprehensive performance in SS-KML. The main idea of KP is first to learn a small-sized sub-kernel matrix (named seed-kernel matrix) and then propagate it into a larger-sized full-kernel matrix. Specifically, the implementation of KP consists of three stages: 1) separate the supervised sample (sub)set X(l) from the full sample set X; 2) learn a seed-kernel matrix on X(l) through solving a small-scale SDP problem; and 3) propagate the learnt seed-kernel matrix into a full-kernel matrix on X . Furthermore, following the idea in KP, we naturally develop two conveniently realizable out-of-sample extensions for KML: one is batch-style extension, and the other is online-style extension. The experiments demonstrate that KP is encouraging in both effectiveness and efficiency compared with three state-of-the-art algorithms and its related out-of-sample extensions are promising too.

  14. The physical theory and propagation model of THz atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Yao, J. Q.; Xu, D. G.; Wang, J. L.; Wang, P.

    2011-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is extensively applied in diverse fields, such as space communication, Earth environment observation, atmosphere science, remote sensing and so on. And the research on propagation features of THz wave in the atmosphere becomes more and more important. This paper firstly illuminates the advantages and outlook of THz in space technology. Then it introduces the theoretical framework of THz atmospheric propagation, including some fundamental physical concepts and processes. The attenuation effect (especially the absorption of water vapor), the scattering of aerosol particles and the effect of turbulent flow mainly influence THz atmosphere propagation. Fundamental physical laws are illuminated as well, such as Lamber-beer law, Mie scattering theory and radiative transfer equation. The last part comprises the demonstration and comparison of THz atmosphere propagation models like Moliere(V5), SARTre and AMATERASU. The essential problems are the deep analysis of physical mechanism of this process, the construction of atmospheric propagation model and databases of every kind of material in the atmosphere, and the standardization of measurement procedures.

  15. Wave propagation and impact in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Anisotropic waves in composites are considered, taking into account wave speeds, wave surfaces, flexural waves in orthotropic plates, surface waves, edge waves in plates, and waves in coupled composite plates. Aspects of dispersion in composites are discussed, giving attention to pulse propagation and dispersion, dispersion in rods and plates, dispersion in a layered composite, combined material and structural dispersion, continuum theories for composites, and variational methods for periodic composites. The characteristics of attenuation and scattering processes are examined and a description is given of shock waves and impact problems in composites. A number of experiments are also reported.

  16. Laser beam propagation in nonlinear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    ""This is very unique and promises to be an extremely useful guide to a host of workers in the field. They have given a generalized presentation likely to cover most if not all situations to be encountered in the laboratory, yet also highlight several specific examples that clearly illustrate the methods. They have provided an admirable contribution to the community. If someone makes their living by designing lasers, optical parametric oscillators or other devices employing nonlinear crystals, or designing experiments incorporating laser beam propagation through linear or nonlinear media, then

  17. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D' Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  18. Propagation of Local Bubble Parameters of Subcooled Boiling Flow in a Pressurized Vertical Annulus Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, In-Cheol; Lee, Seung Jun; Youn, Young Jung; Park, Jong Kuk; Choi, Hae Seob; Euh, Dong Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    CMFD (Computation Multi-Fluid Dynamics) tools have been being developed to simulate two-phase flow safety problems in nuclear reactor, including the precise prediction of local bubble parameters in subcooled boiling flow. However, a lot of complicated phenomena are encountered in the subcooled boiling flow such as bubble nucleation and departure, interfacial drag of bubbles, lateral migration of bubbles, bubble coalescence and break-up, and condensation of bubbles, and the constitutive models for these phenomena are not yet complete. As a result, it is a difficult task to predict the radial profile of bubble parameters and its propagation along the flow direction. Several experiments were performed to measure the local bubble parameters for the validation of the CMFD code analysis and improvement of the constitutive models of the subcooled boiling flow, and to enhance the fundamental understanding on the subcooled boiling flow. The information on the propagation of the local flow parameters along the flow direction was not provided because the measurements were conducted at the fixed elevation. In SUBO experiments, the radial profiles of local bubble parameters, liquid velocity and temperature were obtained for steam-water subcooled boiling flow in a vertical annulus. The local flow parameters were measured at six elevations along the flow direction. The pressure was in the range of 0.15 to 0.2 MPa. We have launched an experimental program to investigate quantify the local subcooled boiling flow structure under elevated pressure condition in order to provide high precision experimental data for thorough validation of up-to-date CMFD codes. In the present study, the first set of experimental data on the propagation of the radial profile of the bubble parameters was obtained for the subcooled boiling flow of R-134a in a pressurized vertical annulus channel. An experimental program was launched for an in-depth investigation of a subcooled boiling flow in an elevated

  19. A local-ether model of propagation of electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, C.C. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, National Tsinghua University, Hsinchu (Taiwan)

    2001-07-01

    It is pointed out that the classical propagation model can be in accord with the Sagnac effect due to earth's rotational and orbital motions in the high-precision GPS (global positioning system) and interplanetary radar, if the reference frame of the classical propagation medium is endowed with a switchability according to the location of the wave. Accordingly, it is postulated that, as in the obsolete theory, electromagnetic waves propagate via a medium like the ether. However, the ether is not universal. It is proposed that in the region under sufficient influence of the gravity due to the earth, the sun, or another celestial body, there forms a local ether, which in turn is stationary with respect to the gravitational potential of the respective body. For earthbound and interplanetary propagation, the medium is stationary in a geocentric and a heliocentric inertial frame, respectively. An electromagnetic wave propagates at a constant speed with respect to the associated local ether, independent of the motions of source and receiver. Based on this local-ether model of wave propagation, a wide variety of earthbound, interplanetary, and interstellar propagation phenomena are accounted for. Strong evidence of this new classical model is its consistent account of the Sagnac effect due to earth's motions among GPS, the intercontinental microwave link, and the interplanetary radar. Moreover, as examined within the present precision, this model is still in accord with the Michelson-Morley experiment. To test the local-ether propagation model, a one-way-link rotor experiment is proposed. (orig.)

  20. A new laser-ranged satellite for General Relativity and space geodesy: I. An introduction to the LARES2 space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Sindoni, Giampiero; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John C.; Matzner, Richard; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Penrose, Roger; Rubincam, David; Paris, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    We introduce the LARES 2 space experiment recently approved by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES 2 satellite is planned for launch in 2019 with the new VEGA C launch vehicle of ASI, ESA and ELV. The orbital analysis of LARES 2 experiment will be carried out by our international science team of experts in General Relativity, theoretical physics, space geodesy and aerospace engineering. The main objectives of the LARES 2 experiment are gravitational and fundamental physics, including accurate measurements of General Relativity, in particular a test of frame-dragging aimed at achieving an accuracy of a few parts in a thousand, i.e., aimed at improving by about an order of magnitude the present state-of-the-art and forthcoming tests of this general relativistic phenomenon. LARES 2 will also achieve determinations in space geodesy. LARES 2 is an improved version of the LAGEOS 3 experiment, proposed in 1984 to measure frame-dragging and analyzed in 1989 by a joint ASI and NASA study.

  1. WISP Dark Matter eXperiment and Prospects for Broadband Dark Matter Searches in the $1\\,\\mu$eV--$10\\,$meV Mass Range

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, Dieter; Lobanov, Andrei; Ringwald, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Light cold dark matter consisting of weakly interacting slim (or sub-eV) particles (WISPs) has been in the focus of a large number of studies made over the past two decades. The QCD axion and axion-like particles with masses in the $0.1\\,\\mu$eV--$100\\,$meV are strong candidates for the dark matter particle, together with hidden photons with masses below $\\lesssim 100\\,$meV. This motivates several new initiatives in the field, including the WISP Dark Matter eXperiment (WISPDMX) and novel conceptual approaches for broad-band WISP searches using radiometry measurements in large volume chambers. First results and future prospects for these experiments are discussed in this contribution.

  2. Entanglement Growth in Quench Dynamics with Variable Range Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schachenmayer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying entanglement growth in quantum dynamics provides both insight into the underlying microscopic processes and information about the complexity of the quantum states, which is related to the efficiency of simulations on classical computers. Recently, experiments with trapped ions, polar molecules, and Rydberg excitations have provided new opportunities to observe dynamics with long-range interactions. We explore nonequilibrium coherent dynamics after a quantum quench in such systems, identifying qualitatively different behavior as the exponent of algebraically decaying spin-spin interactions in a transverse Ising chain is varied. Computing the buildup of bipartite entanglement as well as mutual information between distant spins, we identify linear growth of entanglement entropy corresponding to propagation of quasiparticles for shorter-range interactions, with the maximum rate of growth occurring when the Hamiltonian parameters match those for the quantum phase transition. Counterintuitively, the growth of bipartite entanglement for long-range interactions is only logarithmic for most regimes, i.e., substantially slower than for shorter-range interactions. Experiments with trapped ions allow for the realization of this system with a tunable interaction range, and we show that the different phenomena are robust for finite system sizes and in the presence of noise. These results can act as a direct guide for the generation of large-scale entanglement in such experiments, towards a regime where the entanglement growth can render existing classical simulations inefficient.

  3. Propagated repolarization of simulated action potentials in cardiac muscle and smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalloor Bijoy

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propagation of repolarization is a phenomenon that occurs in cardiac muscle. We wanted to test whether this phenomenon would also occur in our model of simulated action potentials (APs of cardiac muscle (CM and smooth muscle (SM generated with the PSpice program. Methods A linear chain of 5 cells was used, with intracellular stimulation of cell #1 for the antegrade propagation and of cell #5 for the retrograde propagation. The hyperpolarizing stimulus parameters applied for termination of the AP in cell #5 were varied over a wide range in order to generate strength / duration (S/D curves. Because it was not possible to insert a second "black box" (voltage-controlled current source into the basic units representing segments of excitable membrane that would allow the cells to respond to small hyperpolarizing voltages, gap-junction (g.j. channels had to be inserted between the cells, represented by inserting a resistor (Rgj across the four cell junctions. Results Application of sufficient hyperpolarizing current to cell #5 to bring its membrane potential (Vm to within the range of the sigmoidal curve of the Na+ conductance (CM or Ca++ conductance (SM terminated the AP in cell #5 in an all-or-none fashion. If there were no g.j. channels (Rgj = ∞, then only cell #5 repolarized to its stable resting potential (RP; -80 mV for CM and -55 mV for SM. The positive junctional cleft potential (VJC produced only a small hyperpolarization of cell #4. However, if many g.j. channels were inserted, more hyperpolarizing current was required (for a constant duration to repolarize cell #5, but repolarization then propagated into cells 4, 3, 2, and 1. When duration of the pulses was varied, a typical S/D curve, characteristic of excitable membranes, was produced. The chronaxie measured from the S/D curve was about 1.0 ms, similar to that obtained for muscle membranes. Conclusions These experiments demonstrate that normal antegrade propagation of

  4. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mixin based class and method combination mechanism with block structure propagation. Traditionally, mixins can be composed to form new classes, possibly merging the implementations of methods (as in CLOS). In our approach, a class or method combination operation may cause any...... number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...... for each member of the class family, and again by propagation implicitly compose each method from its aspects. As opposed to CLOS, this is type-checked statically; and as opposed to other systems for advanced class combination/ merging/weaving, it is integrated directly in the language, ensuring a clear...

  5. Signal propagation in nerve fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayko, Yuriy N.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the problem of signal propagation in nerve fiber is considered. Ohm losses and heat processes were taken into account. These permit to combine the two stages (metabolic and non-metabolic) of propagation and Na + and K + ions transmission through cell membrane due propagation. Electrodynamics of nerve fiber with losses is described by telegraph equations. Heat processes in fiber are described by an equation of entropy transfer. Ion motion at metabolic stage against the electro-chemical potential is described by negative conductance, responsible for the escape flow. The running- wave-type solutions of these equations are studied. An integral and an explicit solution of the given system are obtained. The solution represented by a series of quasi-harmonic pulses is investigated numerically. This proves the applicability of telegraph equation to the problem considered. Different types of solitary waves corresponding to various types of conductivity are also investigated.

  6. Propagation of Cigarette Static Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A propagation model of cigarette static burn at the cigarette periphery is proposed. Propagation of cigarette static burn is characterized by intermittent burn of the cigarette paper. The burning rate depends on the period of flash burn of the paper and is independent of the burning width. By measuring the local temperature near the front line of the burning propagation, the rate-determining step was identified as the time required to ignite the paper. A mathematical analysis was performed by calculating the heat transfer at the periphery during the paper heating period, and it was revealed that the thermal properties of the cigarette are the dominant factors of cigarette static burn. Modeling results showed good agreement with measured data.

  7. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  8. Trust Propagation in Small Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, Elizabeth; Seigneur, Jean-Marc; Chen, Yong

    2003-01-01

    do not scale well. We aim to develop trust-based security mechanisms using small world concepts to optimise formation and propagation of trust amongst entities in these vast networks. In this regard, we surmise that in a very large mobile ad hoc network, trust, risk, and recommendations can...... be propagated through relatively short paths connecting entities. Our work describes the design of trust-formation and risk-assessment systems, as well as that of an entity recognition scheme, within the context of the small world network topology....

  9. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  10. Predictive factors for obtaining a correct therapeutic range using antivitamin K anticoagulants: a tertiary center experience of patient adherence to anticoagulant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurcuţ R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruxandra Jurcuţ,1 Sebastian Militaru,1 Oliviana Geavlete,1 Nic Drăgotoiu,1 Sergiu Sipoş,1 Răzvan Roşulescu,2 Carmen Ginghină,1 Ciprian Jurcuţ2 1Prof Dr CC Iliescu Emergency Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 2Dr Carol Davila Central University Emergency Military Hospital, Bucharest, Romania Background: Patient adherence is an essential factor in obtaining efficient oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, a situation with a narrow therapeutic window. Therefore, patient education and awareness are crucial for good management. Auditing the current situation would help to identify the magnitude of the problem and to build tailored education programs for these patients. Methods: This study included 68 hospitalized chronically anticoagulated patients (mean age 62.6±13.1 years; males, 46% who responded to a 26-item questionnaire to assess their knowledge on VKA therapy management. Laboratory and clinical data were used to determine the international normalized ratio (INR at admission, as well as to calculate CHA2DS2-VASC and HAS-BLED scores for patients with atrial fibrillation. Results: The majority of patients (62% were receiving VKA for atrial fibrillation, the others for a mechanical prosthesis and previous thromboembolic disease or stroke. In the atrial fibrillation group, the mean CHA2DS2-VASC score was 3.1±1.5, while the average HAS-BLED score was 1.8±1.2. More than half of the patients (53% had an INR outside of the therapeutic range at admission, with the majority (43% having a low INR. A correct INR value was predicted by education level (higher education and the diagnostic indication (patients with mechanical prosthesis being best managed. Patients presenting with a therapeutic INR had a trend toward longer treatment duration than those outside the therapeutic range (62±72 months versus 36±35 months, respectively, P=0.06. There was no correlation between INR at admission

  11. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  12. Sub- and superluminal propagation of intense pulses in media with saturated and reverse absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, G S; Dey, Tarak Nath

    2004-05-21

    We develop models for the propagation of intense pulses in solid state media which can have either saturated absorption or reverse absorption. We model subluminal propagation in ruby and superluminal propagation in alexandrite as three and four level systems, respectively, coupled to Maxwell's equations. We present results well beyond the traditional pump-probe approach and explain the experiments of Bigelow et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 113903 (2003)]Science 301, 200 (2003)

  13. Gluon propagator at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandula, J.E.; Ogilvie, M.

    1988-01-28

    The Landau gauge gluon propagator at finite temperature above and below the deconfinement transition is measured using lattice Monte Carlo simulation. The color electric and magnetic masses are determined. The most striking result of the calculation is that the time component of the gluon field appears to acquire a vacuum expected value in the deconfined region.

  14. Near earth propagation: physics revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wert, R.; Goroch, A.; Worthington, E.; Wong, V.

    2007-04-01

    Both the military and consumer sectors are pursuing distributed networked systems and sensors. A major stumbling block to deployment of these sensors will be the radio frequency (RF) propagation environment within a few wavelengths of the earth. Increasing transmit power (battery consumption) is not a practical solution to the problem. This paper will discuss some of the physical phenomena related to the near earth propagation (NEP) problem. When radiating near the earth the communications link is subjected to a list of physical impairments. On the list are the expected Fresnel region encroachment and multipath reflections. Additionally, radiation pattern changes and near earth boundary layer perturbations exist. A significant amount of data has been collected on NEP. Disturbances in the NEP atmosphere can have a time varying attenuation related to the time of day and these discoveries will be discussed. Solutions, or workarounds, to the near earth propagation problem hinge on dynamic adaptive RF elements. Adaptive RF elements will allow the distributed sensor to direct energy, beam form, impedance correct, increase communication efficiency, and decrease battery consumption. Small electrically controllable elements are under development to enable antenna impedance matching in a dynamic environment. Additionally, small dynamic beam forming arrays are under development to focus RF energy in the direction of need. With an increased understanding of the near earth propagation problem, distributed autonomous networked sensors can become a reality within a few centimeters of the earth.

  15. Invisibility cloaking without superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perczel, Janos; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Tyc, Tomas, E-mail: jp394@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: tomtyc@physics.muni.cz, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Faculty of Science, Kotlarska 2 and Faculty of Informatics, Botanicka 68a, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    Conventional cloaking based on Euclidean transformation optics requires that the speed of light should tend to infinity on the inner surface of the cloak. Non-Euclidean cloaking still needs media with superluminal propagation. Here we show by giving an example that this is no longer necessary.

  16. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, B. W.

    1987-06-01

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity.

  17. Ultraviolet asymptotics of glueball propagators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Marco; Muscinelli, Samuele P.

    2013-08-01

    We point out that perturbation theory in conjunction with the renormalization group ( RG) puts a severe constraint on the structure of the large- N non-perturbative glueball propagators in SU( N) pure Y M, in QCD and in = 1 SU SY QCD with massless quarks, or in any confining asymptotically-free gauge theory massless in perturbation theory. For the scalar and pseudoscalar glueball propagators in pure Y M and QCD with massless quarks we check in detail the RG-improved estimate to the order of the leading and next-to-leading logarithms by means of a remarkable three-loop computation by Chetyrkin et al. We investigate as to whether the aforementioned constraint is satisfied by any of the scalar or pseudoscalar glueball propagators computed in the framework of the AdS String/ large- N Gauge Theory correspondence and of a recent proposal based on a Topological Field Theory underlying the large- N limit of Y M . We find that none of the proposals for the scalar or the pseudoscalar glueball propagators based on the AdS String/large- N Gauge Theory correspondence satisfies the constraint, actually as expected, since the gravity side of the correspondence is in fact strongly coupled in the ultraviolet. On the contrary, the Topological Field Theory satisfies the constraint that follows by the asymptotic freedom.

  18. Radio frequency propagation made easy

    CERN Document Server

    Faruque, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces Radio Frequency Propagation to a broad audience.  The author blends theory and practice to bring readers up-to-date in key concepts, underlying principles and practical applications of wireless communications.  The presentation is designed to be easily accessible, minimizing mathematics and maximizing visuals.

  19. Infrasound propagation in tropospheric ducts and acoustic shadow zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine D

    2017-10-01

    Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations governing acoustic propagation are performed to investigate infrasound propagation in the troposphere and into acoustic shadow zones. An existing nonlinear finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) solver that constrains input sound speed models to be axisymmetric is expanded to allow for advection and rigid, stair-step topography. The FDTD solver permits realistic computations along a given azimuth. It is applied to several environmental models to examine the effects of nonlinearity, topography, advection, and two-dimensional (2D) variations in wind and sound speeds on the penetration of infrasound into shadow zones. Synthesized waveforms are compared to a recording of a rocket motor fuel elimination event at the Utah Test and Training Range. Results show good agreement in the amplitude, duration, and spectra of synthesized and recorded waveforms for propagation through 2D atmospheric models whether or not topography, advection, or nonlinearity is explicitly included. However, infrasound propagation through a one-dimensional, range-averaged, atmospheric model yields waveforms with lower amplitudes and frequencies, suggesting that small-scale atmospheric variability causes significant scatter within the troposphere, leading to enhanced infrasound penetration into shadow zones. Thus, unresolved fine-scale atmospheric dynamics are not required to explain infrasound propagation into shadow zones.

  20. Role of weighting in the dynamics of front propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zekri, Nouredine, E-mail: zekri@univ-usto.dz [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Oran Mohamed Boudiaf, Département de Physique, LEPM, BP 1505 El Mnaouer, Oran (Algeria); Khelloufi, Khadidja; Zekri, Lotfi [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie d' Oran Mohamed Boudiaf, Département de Physique, LEPM, BP 1505 El Mnaouer, Oran (Algeria); Porterie, Bernard; Kaiss, Ahmed; Clerc, Jean-Pierre [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IUSTI UMR 7343, 13453, Marseille (France)

    2012-07-30

    Non-equilibrium front propagation in a two-dimensional network modelling wildfire propagation was studied. The model includes deterministic long-range interactions due to radiation and a time weighting procedure. Three weight-dependent propagation regimes were found: dynamical, static, and non-propagative. The dynamical regime shows saturation for small weight values and a percolation transition area depending on the weight and size of the interaction domain. From the scaling interface exponents, the model seems to belong to the dynamical percolation universality class. In the limit of static regime it belongs to the random deposition class. -- Highlights: ► Percolation model used includes the weighting procedure and long-range interactions (an interaction domain). The interaction strength is chosen to decrease inversely with the square distance. ► There is a weight threshold R{sub c} above which the front cannot propagate. ► At R{sub c} the percolation is static (usual percolation), and below this threshold it becomes dynamic. ► A generalized dependence of the percolation threshold on both the interaction size n{sub y} and the weight parameter R is proposed. ► A further study of the front dynamic scaling is added to this version and dynamic exponents determined.

  1. Assessment of the hybrid propagation model, Volume 1: Analysis of noise propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    This is the first of two volumes of a report on the Hybrid Propagation Model (HPM), an advanced prediction model for aviation noise propagation. This volume presents the noise level predictions for eleven different sets of propagation conditions, run...

  2. Luminescence of the (O2(a(1)Δ(g)))2 collisional complex in the temperature range of 90-315 K: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagidullin, M V; Pershin, A A; Azyazov, V N; Mebel, A M

    2015-12-28

    Experimental and theoretical studies of collision induced emission of singlet oxygen molecules O2(a(1)Δg) in the visible range have been performed. The rate constants, half-widths, and position of peaks for the emission bands of the (O2(a(1)Δg))2 collisional complex centered around 634 nm (2) and 703 nm (3) have been measured in the temperature range of 90-315 K using a flow-tube apparatus that utilized a gas-liquid chemical singlet oxygen generator. The absolute values of the spontaneous emission rate constants k2 and k3 are found to be similar, with the k3/k2 ratio monotonically decreasing from 1.1 at 300 K to 0.96 at 90 K. k2 slowly decreases with decreasing temperature but a sharp increase in its values is measured below 100 K. The experimental results were rationalized in terms of ab initio calculations of the ground and excited potential energy and transition dipole moment surfaces of singlet electronic states of the (O2)2 dimole, which were utilized to compute rate constants k2 and k3 within a statistical model. The best theoretical results reproduced experimental rate constants with the accuracy of under 40% and correctly described the observed temperature dependence. The main contribution to emission process (2), which does not involve vibrational excitation of O2 molecules at the ground electronic level, comes from the spin- and symmetry-allowed 1(1)Ag←(1)B3u transition in the rectangular H configuration of the dimole. Alternatively, emission process (3), in which one of the monomers becomes vibrationally excited in the ground electronic state, is found to be predominantly due to the vibronically allowed 1(1)Ag←2(1)Ag transition induced by the asymmetric O-O stretch vibration in the collisional complex. The strong vibronic coupling between nearly degenerate excited singlet states of the dimole makes the intensities of vibronically and symmetry-allowed transitions comparable and hence the rate constants k2 and k3 close to one another.

  3. Transplantation and direct sowing as methods of propagation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of Cordeauxia edulis Hemsley (yeheb) was assessed using two methods of propagation in glasshouse and in the field in 2006 and 2007 at Haramaya University, Ethiopia. In experiment 1, seedlings were transplanted into the field, with and without shade, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after germination.

  4. Initiation, proliferation and development of micro-propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rooting medium with an average root length of 2.4 cm. 100% hardening response was obtained in Peat moss after 21 days of transplantation in glass house. The experiments were designed in completely randomized pattern. Key words: Murashige and skoog's medium, proliferation, banana, micro propagation system.

  5. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co 678) grown in Ethiopia through shoot tip culture. Experiments on shoot multiplication and rooting were laid out in a completely randomized design with factorial treatment ...

  6. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co 678) grown in Ethiopia through shoot tip culture. Experiments on shoot multiplication and rooting were laid out in a completely randomized design with factorial treatment arrangements.

  7. Ubiquitous Fast Propagating Intensity Disturbances in Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Suematsu, Y.; Kano, R.; Bando, T.; Narukage, N.; Ishikawa, R.; Hara, H.; Giono, G.; Winebarger, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    High cadence observations by the slit-jaw (SJ) optics system of the sounding rocket experiment "the Chromospheric Lyman Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP)" reveal ubiquitous intensity disturbances that recurrently propagate in either the chromosphere, transition region, or both at a speed much higher than the sound speed.

  8. Efficient reduction of four-loop massless propagators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, T.; Ruijl, B.; Vermaseren, J. A. M.

    2017-11-01

    In the light of precision measurements at the LHC experiments, theory predictions including higher-order corrections have become more important. We have developed a program Forcer dedicated to analytical evaluation of four-loop massless propagator-type Feynman integrals via parametric integration-by-parts reduction. Some recent physics results obtained by Forcer are discussed.

  9. The Kauai Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael B.; Hursky, Paul; Siderius, Martin; Badiey, Mohsen; Caruthers, Jerald; Hodgkiss, William S.; Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Rouseff, Daniel; Fox, Warren; de Moustier, Christian; Calder, Brian; Kraft, Barbara J.; McDonald, Keyko; Stein, Peter; Lewis, James K.; Rajan, Subramaniam

    2004-11-01

    The Kauai Experiment was conducted from June 24 to July 9, 2003 to provide a comprehensive study of acoustic propagation in the 8-50 kHz band for diverse applications. Particular sub-projects were incorporated in the overall experiment 1) to study the basic propagation physics of forward-scattered high-frequency (HF) signals including time/angle variability, 2) to relate environmental conditions to underwater acoustic modem performance including a variety of modulation schemes such as MFSK, DSSS, QAM, passive-phase conjugation, 3) to demonstrate HF acoustic tomography using Pacific Missile Range Facility assets and show the value of assimilating tomographic data in an ocean circulation model, and 4) to examine the possibility of improving multibeam accuracy using tomographic data. To achieve these goals, extensive environmental and acoustic measurements were made yielding over 2 terabytes of data showing both the short scale (seconds) and long scale (diurnal) variations. Interestingly, the area turned out to be extremely active with a large mixed layer overlying a very dynamic lower channel. This talk will present an overview of the experiment and preliminary results.

  10. The Laplacian Gauge Gluon Propagator in $SU(N_{c})$

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Follana, E; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    We examine the gluon propagator in the Laplacian gauge in quenched lattice QCD as a function of the number of colours. We observe a weak dependence on $N_c$ over the whole momentum range. This implies an almost $N_c$-independent gluon pole mass in units of the string tension.

  11. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  12. Swell Propagation over Indian Ocean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchandra A. Bhowmick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Swells are the ocean surface gravity waves that have propagated out of their generating fetch to the distant coasts without significant attenuation. Therefore they contain a clear signature of the nature and intensity of wind at the generation location. This makes them a precursor to various atmospheric phenomena like distant storms, tropical cyclones, or even large scale sea breeze like monsoon. Since they are not affected by wind once they propagate out of their generating region, they cannot be described by regional wave models forced by local winds. However, their prediction is important, in particular, for ship routing and off shore structure designing. In the present work, the propagation of swell waves from the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean to the central and northern Indian Ocean has been studied. For this purpose a spectral ocean Wave Model (WAM has been used to simulate significant wave height for 13 years from 1993–2005 using NCEP blended winds at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1°. It has been observed that Indian Ocean, with average wave height of approximately 2–3 m during July, is mostly dominated by swell waves generated predominantly under the extreme windy conditions prevailing over the Southern Ocean and southern Indian Ocean. In fact the swell waves reaching the Indian Ocean in early or mid May carry unique signatures of monsoon arriving over the Indian Subcontinent. Pre-monsoon month of April contains low swell waves ranging from 0.5–1 m. The amplitudes subsequently increase to approximately 1.5–2 meters around 7–15 days prior to the arrival of monsoon over the Indian Subcontinent. This embedded signature may be utilized as one of the important oceanographic precursor to the monsoon onset over the Indian Ocean.

  13. Use of preservative-free hyaluronic acid (Hylabak® for a range of patients with dry eye syndrome: experience in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzhesky VV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Vsevolodovich Brjesky,1 Yury Fedorovich Maychuk,2 Alexey Vladimirovich Petrayevsky,3 Peter Gerrievich Nagorsky41Department of Ophthalmology, Pediatric State Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg, 2Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, Moscow, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Volgograd State Medical University, Volgograd, 4Novosibirsk Branch of the Federal State Institute MNTK Eye Microsurgery, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, RussiaAbstract: Artificial tear preparations are important in the management of dry eye syndrome. We present the findings from four recently published studies conducted in Russia assessing Hylabak® (marketed as Hyabak® in Europe, a preservative-free hyaluronic acid preparation, for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. All studies had an open, noncomparative design, but one compared the findings with those from 25 patients treated with Tear Naturale® in previous studies. A total of 134 children and adults were enrolled, and the etiologies of dry eye syndrome included contact lens use, intensive office work, adenovirus eye infection, postmenopausal status, persistent meibomian blepharitis, Sjögren's syndrome, phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, and refractive surgery. The patients were treated with Hylabak for 2 weeks to 2 months. All studies showed that Hylabak resulted in marked improvement as assessed by subjective sensations/complaints, Schirmer's test, Norn’s test, impression cytology and biomicroscopy, staining, and tear osmolarity. Greater benefits were also reported compared with Tear Naturale, including a faster onset of action. Hylabak was well tolerated. In conclusion, Hylabak provided rapid and safe relief from the signs and symptoms of dry eye syndrome, as well as improvement in objective measures, in a wide range of patients.Keywords: dry eye, eye drops, artificial tears, hyaluronic acid, Hylabak®, preservative-free

  14. Development of a safe ground to space laser propagation system for the optical communications telescope laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Janet P.

    2003-01-01

    Furthering pursuits in high bandwidth communications to future NASA deep space and neat-Earth probes, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is building the Optical communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) atop Table Mountain in Southern California. This R&D optical antenna will be used to develop optical communication strategies for future optical ground stations. Initial experiments to be conducted include propagating high-powered, Q-switched laser beams to retro-reflecting satellites. Yet laser beam propagation from the ground to space is under the cognizance of various government agencies, namely: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (ISHA) that is responsible for protecting workforce personnel; the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) responsible for protecting pilots and aircraft; and the Laser Clearinghouse of Space Command responsible for protecting space assets. To ensure that laser beam propagation from the OCTL and future autonomously operated ground stations comply with the guidelines of these organizations, JPL is developing a multi-tiered safety system that will meet the coordination, monitoring, and reporting functions required by the agencies. At Tier 0, laser operators will meet OSHA safety standards for protection and access to the high power lasers area will be restricted and interlocked. Tier 1, the area defined from the telescope dome out to a range of 3.4-km, will utilize long wave infrared camera sensors to alert operators of at risk aircraft in the FAA controlled airspace. Tier 2, defined to extend from 3.4-km out to the aircraft service ceiling in FAA airspace, will detect at risk aircraft by radar. Lastly, beam propagation into space, defined as Tier 3, will require coordination with the Laser Clearinghouse. A detailed description of the four tiers is presented along with the design of the integrated monitoring and beam transmission control system.

  15. Controlling single-photon Fock-state propagation through opaque scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, T.J.; Huisman, T.J.; Huisman, S.R.; Mosk, Allard; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2014-01-01

    The control of light scattering is essential in many quantum optical experiments. Wavefront shaping is a technique used for ultimate control over wave propagation through multiple-scattering media by adaptive manipulation of incident waves. We control the propagation of single-photon Fock states

  16. Anomalous infrasound propagation in a hot stratosphere and the existence of extremely small shadow zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, L.G.; Van Geyt, A.R.J.; Smets, P.; Fricke, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Long-range infrasound propagation strongly depends on the state of the stratosphere. Infrasound can be efficiently ducted between the Earth's surface and the stratopause under a favorable wind and temperature structure between 40 and 50 km altitude. Understanding infrasound propagation under

  17. Dynamic dependence to domain wall propagation through artificial spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2017-03-01

    Domain wall propagation dynamics has been studied in nanostructured artificial kagome spin-ice structures. A stripline circuit has been used to provide localized pulsed magnetic fields within the artificial spin-ice (ASI) structure. This provides control of the system through electrically assisted domain wall nucleation events. Synchronization of the pulsed fields with additional global magnetic fields and the use of a focused magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer allows our experiments to probe the domain wall transit through an extended ASI structure. We find that the propagation distance depends on the driving field revealing field-driven properties of domain walls below their intrinsic nucleation field.

  18. Fatigue crack propagation in steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klesnil, M.; Lukas, P.; Kunz, L. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie); Troshchenko, V.T.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Yasnij, P.V.; Skorenko, Y.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Prochnosti)

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation data were measured on 15Kh2NMFA steel of Czechoslovak and Soviet makes. The results obtained by two laboratories were compared with other available data regarding materials for pressure vessels of nuclear power plants. Crack propagation curves were measured at temperatures -60, 20 and 350 degC and the corresponding parameters of crack growth equation were found. Threshold values of stress intensity factor amplitude, Ksub(apz), and the influence of stress ratio R in the range of small crack rates were determined experimentally. Fractography revealed either transgranular or mixed transgranular and interaranular fracture modes depending on stress intensity amplitude Ksub(a) and the environment.

  19. Sound propagation over rigid porous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorth, Craig

    Two related topics are discussed: (1) the measurement of the acoustical characteristics of rigid porous materials, that is the impedance and propagation constant; and (2) the propagation of sound over the surface of a hard backed layer of such a material. A review of impedance measurement leads to the selection of an indirect method which is employed successfully on a wide range of surfaces. A numerical comparison of impedance models follows including a one-parameter semi-empirical model, a phenomenological model, and a microstructural model which relates several physical parameters of a material to the acoustical properties of a surface. The models differ in their prediction of the acoustical properties of a low porosity material. A numerical comparison of the solutions of point source propagation in the presence of a porous media indicates that the 'extended' Weyl van der Pol approximation is reliable over short source receiver distances. The study is extended to examine the phenomenon of the acoustical surface wave. Three experimental techniques are used to produce new evidence for the existence of such a wave which shows good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The indirect method is used to obtain impedances and model parameters for a wide variety of surfaces varying from soils to fiberglass and which are compared with the results of an impedance technique and with standing wave tube measurements. The indirect method of impedance is employed together with the microstructural model and the propagation model examined earlier in studies of the acoustical properties of porous road surfaces. It proves possible to use the indirect method both to determine the microstructural parameters and to classify the acoustical properties of such a previous surface when the sound source is either a loudspeaker point source or a vehicle. The results of the parameter determination are validated by a series of non-acoustical measurements. With regard only to the excess

  20. Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

    2005-11-01

    In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

  1. Label Propagation via Teaching-to-Learn and Learning-to-Teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Tao, Dacheng; Liu, Wei; Liu, Liu; Yang, Jie

    2017-06-01

    How to propagate label information from labeled examples to unlabeled examples over a graph has been intensively studied for a long time. Existing graph-based propagation algorithms usually treat unlabeled examples equally, and transmit seed labels to the unlabeled examples that are connected to the labeled examples in a neighborhood graph. However, such a popular propagation scheme is very likely to yield inaccurate propagation, because it falls short of tackling ambiguous but critical data points (e.g., outliers). To this end, this paper treats the unlabeled examples in different levels of difficulties by assessing their reliability and discriminability, and explicitly optimizes the propagation quality by manipulating the propagation sequence to move from simple to difficult examples. In particular, we propose a novel iterative label propagation algorithm in which each propagation alternates between two paradigms, teaching-to-learn and learning-to-teach (TLLT). In the teaching-to-learn step, the learner conducts the propagation on the simplest unlabeled examples designated by the teacher. In the learning-to-teach step, the teacher incorporates the learner's feedback to adjust the choice of the subsequent simplest examples. The proposed TLLT strategy critically improves the accuracy of label propagation, making our algorithm substantially robust to the values of tuning parameters, such as the Gaussian kernel width used in graph construction. The merits of our algorithm are theoretically justified and empirically demonstrated through experiments performed on both synthetic and real-world data sets.

  2. Quantum noise and superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segev, Bilha [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, (Israel); Milonni, Peter W. [Theoretical Division (T-4), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Babb, James F. [Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Chiao, Raymond Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Causal ''superluminal'' effects have recently been observed and discussed in various contexts. The question arises whether such effects could be observed with extremely weak pulses, and what would prevent the observation of an ''optical tachyon.'' Aharonov, Reznik, and Stern (ARS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2190 (1998)] have argued that quantum noise will preclude the observation of a superluminal group velocity when the pulse consists of one or a few photons. In this paper we reconsider this question both in a general framework and in the specific example, suggested by Chiao, Kozhekin, and Kurizki (CKK) [Phys. Rev. 77, 1254 (1996)], of off-resonant, short-pulse propagation in an optical amplifier. We derive in the case of the amplifier a signal-to-noise ratio that is consistent with the general ARS conclusions when we impose their criteria for distinguishing between superluminal propagation and propagation at the speed c. However, results consistent with the semiclassical arguments of CKK are obtained if weaker criteria are imposed, in which case the signal can exceed the noise without being ''exponentially large.'' We show that the quantum fluctuations of the field considered by ARS are closely related to superfluorescence noise. More generally, we consider the implications of unitarity for superluminal propagation and quantum noise and study, in addition to the complete and truncated wave packets considered by ARS, the residual wave packet formed by their difference. This leads to the conclusion that the noise is mostly luminal and delayed with respect to the superluminal signal. In the limit of a very weak incident signal pulse, the superluminal signal will be dominated by the noise part, and the signal-to-noise ratio will therefore be very small. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  3. Interprocedural Analysis with Lazy Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Holm; Møller, Anders; Thiemann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We propose lazy propagation as a technique for flow- and context-sensitive interprocedural analysis of programs with objects and first-class functions where transfer functions may not be distributive. The technique is described formally as a systematic modification of a variant of the monotone fr...... framework and its theoretical properties are shown. It is implemented in a type analysis tool for JavaScript where it results in a significant improvement in performance....

  4. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  5. Laser ranging based on electro-optic switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Liren; Wang, Jiming; Lang, Haitao; Pan, Weiqing

    2006-09-01

    Based on electro-optic switch effect in crystal, a novel laser ranging method is proposed. CW-laser emitted by laser transmitter propagates forward to the measured target, after being reflected by the target, and then goes back to the transmitter. Close to the transmitter, a special mono-block LiNbO3 crystal is added into the round-trip light beams. High-voltage pulses with the sharp enough changes in rising edges are loaded on the crystal. Based on electro-optic effect, double refraction and internal double reflection effect in crystal, the crystal cuts off the round-trip light beams, and reflects a light pulse cut out by the crystal to a detector aside from the original beam path. The pulse width T is the period that laser propagates forward and back between the crystal and the target. The feasibility of the new idea is proved by our experiments and a brand-new way for the laser ranging is provided.

  6. Modeling beam propagation and frequency conversion for the beamlet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    The development of the Beamlet laser has involved extensive and detailed modeling of laser performance and beam propagation to: (1) predict the performance limits of the laser, (2) select system configurations with higher performance, (3) analyze experiments and provide guidance for subsequent laser shots, and (4) design optical components and establish component manufacturing specifications. In contrast to modeling efforts of previous laser systems such as Nova, those for Beamlet include as much measured optical characterization data as possible. This article concentrates on modeling of beam propagation in the Beamlet laser system, including the frequency converter, and compares modeling predictions with experimental results for several Beamlet shots. It briefly describes the workstation-based propagation and frequency conversion codes used to accomplish modeling of the Beamlet.

  7. Modeling of Reverberant Radio Channels Using Propagation Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Troels; Steinbock, Gerhard; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2012-12-01

    In measurements of in-room radio channel responses an avalanche effect can be observed: earliest signal components, which appear well separated in delay, are followed by an avalanche of components arriving with increasing rate of occurrence, gradually merging into a diffuse tail with exponentially decaying power. We model the channel as a propagation graph in which vertices represent transmitters, receivers, and scatterers, while edges represent propagation conditions between vertices. The recursive structure of the graph accounts for the exponential power decay and the avalanche effect. We derive a closed form expression for the graph's transfer matrix. This expression is valid for any number of interactions and is straightforward to use in numerical simulations. We discuss an example where time dispersion occurs only due to propagation in between vertices. Numerical experiments reveal that the graph's recursive structure yields both an exponential power decay and an avalanche effect.

  8. Modeling of Reverberant Radio Channels Using Propagation Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Steinböck, Gerhard; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2012-01-01

    decaying power. We model the channel as a propagation graph in which vertices represent transmitters, receivers, and scatterers, while edges represent propagation conditions between vertices. The recursive structure of the graph accounts for the exponential power decay and the avalanche effect. We derive......In measurements of in-room radio channel responses, an avalanche effect can be observed: earliest signal components, which appear well separated in delay, are followed by an avalanche of components arriving with increasing rate of occurrence, gradually merging into a diffuse tail with exponentially...... a closed-form expression for the graph's transfer matrix. This expression is valid for any number of interactions and is straightforward to use in numerical simulations. We discuss an example where time dispersion occurs only due to propagation in between vertices. Numerical experiments reveal...

  9. All electrical propagating spin wave spectroscopy with broadband wavevector capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciubotaru, F., E-mail: Florin.Ciubotaru@imec.be [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Departement Electrotechniek (ESAT), Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Devolder, T. [Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France); Manfrini, M.; Adelmann, C.; Radu, I. P. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-07-04

    We developed an all electrical experiment to perform the broadband phase-resolved spectroscopy of propagating spin waves in micrometer sized thin magnetic stripes. The magnetostatic surface spin waves are excited and detected by scaled down to 125 nm wide inductive antennas, which award ultra broadband wavevector capability. The wavevector selection can be done by applying an excitation frequency above the ferromagnetic resonance. Wavevector demultiplexing is done at the spin wave detector thanks to the rotation of the spin wave phase upon propagation. A simple model accounts for the main features of the apparatus transfer functions. Our approach opens an avenue for the all electrical study of wavevector-dependent spin wave properties including dispersion spectra or non-reciprocal propagation.

  10. Wave Propagation inside Random Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaojun

    =-x/l where l is the transport mean free path. The result does not depend on the sample length, which is counterintuitive yet remarkably simple. More supprisingly, the linear fall-off of energy profile holds for totally disordered random 1D layered samples in simulations where the LDOS is uniform as well as for single mode random waveguide experiments and 1D nearly periodic samples where the LDOS is suppressed in the middle of the sample. The generalization of the transmission matrix to the interior of quasi-1D random samples, which is defined as the field matrix, and its eigenvalues statistics are also discussed. The maximum energy deposition at a location is not the intensity of the first transmission eigenchannel but the eigenvalue of the first energy density eigenchannels at that cross section, which can be much greater than the average value. The contrast, which is the ratio of the intensity at the focused point to the background intensity, in optimal focusing is determined by the participation number of the energy density eigenvalues and its inverse gives the variance of the energy density at that cross section in a single configuration. We have also studied topological states in photonic structures. We have demonstrated robust propagation of electromagnetic waves along reconfigurable pathways within a topological photonic metacrystal. Since the wave is confined within the domain wall, which is the boundary between two distinct topological insulating systems, we can freely steer the wave by reconstructing the photonic structure. Other topics, such as speckle pattern evolutions and the effects of boundary conditions on the statistics of transmission eigenvalues and energy profiles are also discussed.

  11. Functional reentrant waves propagate outwardly in cardiac tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Yunfan [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021 (United States)]. E-mail: yug2002@med.cornell.edu; Christini, David J. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021 (United States) and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021 (United States)]. E-mail: dchristi@med.cornell.edu

    2004-10-18

    The dynamical nature of cardiac arrhythmias has been investigated for decades by researchers from a wide range of disciplines. One long-standing unsettled issue involves whether the mechanism of functional reentry should be described by the 'leading-circle' hypothesis or the 'spiral-wave' hypothesis, which rely on inward and outward wave propagation, respectively. To address this issue, we investigated two-dimensional FitzHugh-Nagumo type models and found that inwardly propagating waves could occur in the spontaneous oscillatory mode, but not the excitable mode. However, such spontaneous oscillatory behavior is characterized by small-amplitude, sinusoidal oscillations that are fundamentally different from the stimulus-driven, excitable behavior of cardiac myocytes. This finding suggests that inward wave propagation, which is posited by the leading-circle hypothesis for the purpose of maintaining functional reentry, is unlikely to occur in cardiac tissue.

  12. Nanoscale thermoelectrical detection of magnetic domain wall propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzysteczko, Patryk; Wells, James; Fernández Scarioni, Alexander; Soban, Zbynek; Janda, Tomas; Hu, Xiukun; Saidl, Vit; Campion, Richard P.; Mansell, Rhodri; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cowburn, Russell P.; Nemec, Petr; Kazakova, Olga; Wunderlich, Joerg; Schumacher, Hans Werner

    2017-06-01

    In magnetic nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) magnetic domain walls (DWs) are narrow and can move rapidly driven by current induced torques. This enables important applications like high-density memories for which the precise detection of the position and motion of a propagating DW is of utmost interest. Today's DW detection tools are often limited in resolution, require complex instrumentation, or can only be applied on specific materials. Here we show that the anomalous Nernst effect provides a simple and powerful tool to precisely track the position and motion of a single DW propagating in a PMA nanowire. We detect field and current driven DW propagation in both metallic heterostructures and dilute magnetic semiconductors over a broad temperature range. The demonstrated spatial accuracy below 20 nm is comparable to the DW width in typical metallic PMA systems.

  13. Subluminal and superluminal pulse propagation influenced by strong nonlinear effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zengguang; Qi, Yihong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Jingtao; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for control of pulse propagation from subluminal to superluminal in a four-level Λ-type atomic system. With the relatively intense probe laser and the appropriate detuning of control field, the medium exhibits much lower absorption in the spectral ranges where the dispersion changes from normal to abnormal in the double electromagnetically induced transparency system than in the single electromagnetically induced transparency system. The transmission intensity can be enhanced by several times for the subluminal pulse propagation and by several orders of magnitude for the superluminal pulse propagation without the large distortion in the former compared with those in the latter. We attribute the dramatic absorption reduction to the enhanced nonlinear effects.

  14. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    -driven, rotating or time-varying directivity function at runtime. Unlike previous approaches, the listener directivity approach can be used to compute spatial audio (3D audio) for a moving, rotating listener at interactive rates. Lastly, we propose an efficient GPU-based time-domain solver for the wave equation that enables wave simulation up to the mid-frequency range in tens of minutes on a desktop computer. It is demonstrated that by carefully mapping all the components of the wave simulator to match the parallel processing capabilities of the graphics processors, significant improvement in performance can be achieved compared to the CPU-based simulators, while maintaining numerical accuracy. We validate these techniques with offline numerical simulations and measured data recorded in an outdoor scene. We present results of preliminary user evaluations conducted to study the impact of these techniques on user's immersion in virtual environment. We have integrated these techniques with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus Rift head-mounted display, and Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustics effects and spatial audio in the virtual environment.

  15. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  16. Propagation models for computing biochemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Henzinger, Thomas A; Mateescu, Maria

    2011-01-01

    We introduce propagation models, a formalism designed to support general and efficient data structures for the transient analysis of biochemical reaction networks. We give two use cases for propagation abstract data types: the uniformization method and numerical integration. We also sketch an implementation of a propagation abstract data type, which uses abstraction to approximate states.

  17. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biot 's theory for wave propagation in saturated porous solid is modified to study the propagation of thermoelastic waves in poroelastic medium. Propagation of plane harmonic waves is considered in isotropic poroelastic medium. Relations are derived among the wave-induced temperature in the medium and the ...

  18. Helicon propagation in n-type germanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Særmark, Knud; Pederson, N. Falsig; Lebech, Jens

    1966-01-01

    A report on preliminary experimental results on propagation of helicon waves in n-type Ge is given. Propagation in the (1, 1, 1)- and (1, 0, 0) - directions is considered. The experimental results show that helicon propagation in these directions in n-type Ge may take place under circumstances wh...

  19. 49 CFR 195.111 - Fracture propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fracture propagation. 195.111 Section 195.111... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.111 Fracture propagation. A carbon dioxide pipeline system must be designed to mitigate the effects of fracture propagation. [Amdt. 195-45, 56 FR 26926, June 12, 1991] ...

  20. Interactive Sound Propagation using Precomputation and Statistical Approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Lakulish

    Acoustic phenomena such as early reflections, diffraction, and reverberation have been shown to improve the user experience in interactive virtual environments and video games. These effects arise due to repeated interactions between sound waves and objects in the environment. In interactive applications, these effects must be simulated within a prescribed time budget. We present two complementary approaches for computing such acoustic effects in real time, with plausible variation in the sound field throughout the scene. The first approach, Precomputed Acoustic Radiance Transfer, precomputes a matrix that accounts for multiple acoustic interactions between all scene objects. The matrix is used at run time to provide sound propagation effects that vary smoothly as sources and listeners move. The second approach couples two techniques---Ambient Reverberance, and Aural Proxies---to provide approximate sound propagation effects in real time, based on only the portion of the environment immediately visible to the listener. These approaches lie at different ends of a space of interactive sound propagation techniques for modeling sound propagation effects in interactive applications. The first approach emphasizes accuracy by modeling acoustic interactions between all parts of the scene; the second approach emphasizes efficiency by only taking the local environment of the listener into account. These methods have been used to efficiently generate acoustic walkthroughs of architectural models. They have also been integrated into a modern game engine, and can enable realistic, interactive sound propagation on commodity desktop PCs.

  1. ICRF antenna coupling and wave propagation in a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of experiments are reported pertaining to the excitation, propagation, and damping of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) in the Caltech Research Tokamak. Complex impedance studies on five different RF antennas addressed the nature of the anomalous density-dependent background loading observed previously in several laboratories. A model proposed successfully explained many of the observed impedance characteristics solely in terms of particle collection and rectification through the plasma sheath surrounding the antenna electrode. The toroidal eigenmodes were studied in detail with magnetic field probes. A surprising result was that all of the antennas, both magnetic and electric in nature, coupled to the eigenmodes with comparable efficiency with respect to the antenna excitation current. Wave damping was investigated and found to be considerably higher than predicted by a variety of physical mechanisms. A numerical model of the wave equations permitting an arbitrary radial density profile was developed, and a possible mechanism for enhanced cyclotron damping due to density perturbations was proposed.

  2. Application of biotechnology to the papaya propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laisyn Posada-Pérez

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The papaya (Carica papaya L. is one of the most world wide consumed fruit. The use of the biotechnology as a tool in the micropropagation of elite plant in this specie can be an alternative to acelarate its multiplication, as well as the comercial scale introduction of new varieties and hybrids. This work has as objetive to approach a general overview of the principal scientific considerations about the plant biotechnology use as a tool for the papaya in vitro propagation and conservation. Also, in this work, are showed some experience of the researchersfrom the Institute of Plants Biotechnology , that have a practical complement to this review. Key words: Carica papaya, hybrid IBP 42-99, in vitro preservation, micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis

  3. Influence of plasma turbulence on microwave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhn, A.; Holzhauer, E.; Leddy, J.; Thomas, M. B.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2016-11-01

    It is not fully understood how electromagnetic waves propagate through plasma density fluctuations when the size of the fluctuations is comparable with the wavelength of the incident radiation. In this paper, the perturbing effect of a turbulent plasma density layer on a traversing microwave beam is simulated with full-wave simulations. The deterioration of the microwave beam is calculated as a function of the characteristic turbulence structure size, the turbulence amplitude, the depth of the interaction zone and the size of the waist of the incident beam. The maximum scattering is observed for a structure size on the order of half the vacuum wavelength. The scattering and beam broadening was found to increase linearly with the depth of the turbulence layer and quadratically with the fluctuation strength. Consequences for experiments and 3D effects are considered.

  4. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  5. A model for wideband HF propagation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, L. E.; Hoffmeyer, J. A.

    1993-11-01

    Expressions to model the sky wave propagation conditions that occur in a HF communication link are presented. The model is intended not only for narrowband applications but also for wideband systems such as those using spread spectrum techniques. A discussion of the background leading to the present development effort is followed by a description of the method used to derive the model transfer function. Analytic expressions for the impulse response and the scattering function are given, and the introduction of random processes into the model is described. Comparisons of scattering functions from the model and from measurements are shown for spread-F conditions ranging from mild to intense and for both an auroral path and a midlatitude path.

  6. Protein aggregates stimulate macropinocytosis facilitating their propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerbury, Justin J

    2016-03-03

    Temporal and spatial patterns of pathological changes such as loss of neurons and presence of pathological protein aggregates are characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These patterns are consistent with the propagation of protein misfolding and aggregation reminiscent of the prion diseases. There is a surge of evidence that suggests that large protein aggregates of a range of proteins are able to enter cells via macropinocytosis. Our recent work suggests that this process is activated by the binding of aggregates to the neuron cell surface. The current review considers the potential role of cell surface receptors in the triggering of macropinocytosis by protein aggregates and the possibility of utilizing macropinocytosis pathways as a therapeutic target.

  7. Advanced simulations of x-ray beam propagation through CRL transfocators using ray-tracing and wavefront propagation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltser, Jana; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Vickery, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses (CRL) are widely used to manipulate synchrotron radiation beams. Accurate modelling of X-ray beam propagation through individual lenses and through "transfocators" composed of a large number of CRLs is of high importance, since it allows for comprehensive optimization...... of X-ray beamline designs for particular user experiments. In this work we used the newly developed McXtrace ray-tracing package and the SRW wave-optics code to simulate the beam propagation of X-ray undulator radiation through such a "transfocator" as implemented at ID- 11 at ESRF. By applying two...... complementary simulation methods, we were able to obtain comparable results (e.g. the beam's focused properties) and also to provide a complete description of X-ray beam propagation through the CRLs and other optical components. However, some discrepancies between the results acquired by both methods (e...

  8. Propagation of low-quality laser beams in turbulent air: new fast simulation methods and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Thomas; Spindler, Gerhard; Becker, Peter; Grünewald, Karin; Pargmann, Carsten; Duschek, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Novel inherently fast methods basing upon fundamental Gaussian modes are presented to numerically simulate the propagation behavior of a low-quality laser beam, i.e., a beam characterized by a high quality factor M^2, in turbulent air. Actually, for a given initial diameter, beam wandering and spread at the target position is calculated. Test results are checked against respective simulations using higher-order mode beams having clearly defined quality factors and nearly perfect agreement is demonstrated. Experiments performed on the German Aerospace Center (DLR) laser test range at Lampoldshausen near Stuttgart satisfactorily accord with the predictions of the proposed simulation techniques.

  9. Light propagation in linear optical media

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, Glen D; Guha, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Light Propagation in Linear Optical Media describes light propagation in linear media by expanding on diffraction theories beyond what is available in classic optics books. In one volume, this book combines the treatment of light propagation through various media, interfaces, and apertures using scalar and vector diffraction theories. After covering the fundamentals of light and physical optics, the authors discuss light traveling within an anisotropic crystal and present mathematical models for light propagation across planar boundaries between different media. They describe the propagation o

  10. Tropospheric radiowave propagation beyond the horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Du Castel, François

    1966-01-01

    Tropospheric Radiowave Propagation Beyond the Horizon deals with developments concerning the tropospheric propagation of ultra-short radio waves beyond the horizon, with emphasis on the relationship between the theoretical and the experimental. Topics covered include the general conditions of propagation in the troposphere; general characteristics of propagation beyond the horizon; and attenuation in propagation. This volume is comprised of six chapters and begins with a brief historical look at the various stages that have brought the technique of transhorizon links to its state of developmen

  11. Understanding the Physical Optics Phenomena by Using a Digital Application for Light Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Sosa, Daniel-Esteban; Angel-Toro, Luciano, E-mail: dsierras@eafit.edu.co, E-mail: langel@eafit.edu.co [Grupo de Optica Aplicada, Universidad EAFIT, 1 Medellin (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the light propagation on the basis of the Huygens-Fresnel principle stands for a fundamental factor for deeper comprehension of different physical optics related phenomena like diffraction, self-imaging, image formation, Fourier analysis and spatial filtering. This constitutes the physical approach of the Fourier optics whose principles and applications have been developed since the 1950's. Both for analytical and digital applications purposes, light propagation can be formulated in terms of the Fresnel Integral Transform. In this work, a digital optics application based on the implementation of the Discrete Fresnel Transform (DFT), and addressed to serve as a tool for applications in didactics of optics is presented. This tool allows, at a basic and intermediate learning level, exercising with the identification of basic phenomena, and observing changes associated with modifications of physical parameters. This is achieved by using a friendly graphic user interface (GUI). It also assists the user in the development of his capacity for abstracting and predicting the characteristics of more complicated phenomena. At an upper level of learning, the application could be used to favor a deeper comprehension of involved physics and models, and experimenting with new models and configurations. To achieve this, two characteristics of the didactic tool were taken into account when designing it. First, all physical operations, ranging from simple diffraction experiments to digital holography and interferometry, were developed on the basis of the more fundamental concept of light propagation. Second, the algorithm was conceived to be easily upgradable due its modular architecture based in MATLAB (registered) software environment. Typical results are presented and briefly discussed in connection with didactics of optics.

  12. Radio wave propagation and parabolic equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Apaydin, Gokhan

    2018-01-01

    A thorough understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation is fundamental to the development of sophisticated communication and detection technologies. The powerful numerical methods described in this book represent a major step forward in our ability to accurately model electromagnetic wave propagation in order to establish and maintain reliable communication links, to detect targets in radar systems, and to maintain robust mobile phone and broadcasting networks. The first new book on guided wave propagation modeling and simulation to appear in nearly two decades, Radio Wave Propagation and Parabolic Equation Modeling addresses the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation generally, with a specific focus on radio wave propagation through various media. The authors explore an array of new applications, and detail various v rtual electromagnetic tools for solving several frequent electromagnetic propagation problems. All of the methods described are presented within the context of real-world scenari...

  13. Acoustic Environment of Haro Strait: Preliminary Propagation Modeling and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher D; Wolfson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements and acoustic propagation modeling for the frequency range 1 10 kHz are combined to analyze the acoustic environment of Haro Strait of Puget Sound, home to the southern resident killer whales...

  14. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  15. Information propagation on modular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Park, Kwangho; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2006-03-01

    Networks with a community (or modular) structure underlie many social and biological phenomena. In such a network individuals tend to form sparsely linked local communities, each having dense internal connections. We investigate the dynamics of information propagation on modular networks by using a three-state epidemic model with a unit spreading rate (i.e., the probability for a susceptible individual to be “infected” with the information is one). We find a surprising, resonancelike phenomenon: the information lifetime on the network can be maximized by the number of modules. The result can be useful for optimizing or controlling information spread on social or biological networks.

  16. Continuous propagation of microalgae. III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, D. T.; Fredrickson, A. G.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    Data are presented which give the specific photosynthetic rate and the specific utilization rates of urea and carbon dioxide as functions of specific growth rate for Chlorella. A mathematical model expresses a set of mass balance relations between biotic and environmental materials. Criteria of validity are used to test this model. Predictive procedures are complemented by a particular model of microbial growth. Methods are demonstrated for predicting substrate utilization rates, production rates of extracellular metabolites, growth limiting conditions, and photosynthetic quotients from propagator variables.

  17. Self-Averaging Expectation Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Opper, Manfred; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    We investigate the problem of approximate inference using Expectation Propagation (EP) for large systems under some statistical assumptions. Our approach tries to overcome the numerical bottleneck of EP caused by the inversion of large matrices. Assuming that the measurement matrices...... are realizations of specific types of random matrix ensembles – called invariant ensembles – the EP cavity variances have an asymptotic self-averaging property. They can be pre-computed using specific generating functions which do not require matrix inversions. We demonstrate the performance of our approach...

  18. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  19. Co- and Counter- propagating fields in an four level `N-scheme'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narducci, Frank A.; Davis, Jon P.

    2012-06-01

    A four level ``N-scheme'' atomic system consists of a standard λ EIT configuration with an additional level being driven by an additional switch field. We theoretically extend our earlier studies of this model to include a counter-propagating, weak probe field. We investigate the dispersion experienced by the weak probe under a variety of conditions including cold and warm samples, as well as weak and strong switching fields. We find conditions in which the forward propagating probe field experiences normal dispersion while the backward propagating field experiences negative dispersion. We examine regions of high dispersion with vanishing absorption. We discuss applications of our results to high-dispersion gyroscopes.

  20. Dynamics in Layer Models of Solid Flame Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldushin, A. P.; Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B. J.; Gokoglu, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    the two waves alternately advancing and receding as they propagate. This wave is the analog of the spinning wave on the surface of a circular cylinder; (iii) finally, there is a region of bistability between the in phase and antiphase waves. with each having its own domain of attraction, so that which of the two behaviors occur depends on the condition of initiation of the wave. The results of our computations indicate a qualitative similarity in the behavior of combustion waves in the layer model and in the full 2D model. Specifically, due to the similarity between the small alpha wave behavior in the layer model and the large diameter behavior in the model of waves on the surface of a cylinder, we are able to predict the behavior of the mean velocity for the waves on the cylinder, where computations of the full problem can be rather difficult. We also compute solutions for three or more layers. The results of our computations prompt us to predict that, while planar uniformly propagating waves are unstable, the wave will be quasiplanar, i.e., the resulting spinning waves have very low amplitude hot spots, and travel with the velocity close to that of the uniformly propagating wave. Such waves may be difficult to distinguish from uniformly propagating waves in experiments. We also find that for both the layer model and full 2D problem, steady-state time-dependent waves, e.g., pulsating and spinning wave, have a conserved quantity H which characterizes the excess energy in the wave, just as in the case of uniformly propagating waves. The quantity H, which is generated by dissipation, does not vary in time and is proportional to the diffusivity and caloricity of the system, and inversely proportional to the mean wave velocity.

  1. Quantum propagation across cosmological singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Steffen; Turok, Neil

    2017-05-01

    The initial singularity is the most troubling feature of the standard cosmology, which quantum effects are hoped to resolve. In this paper, we study quantum cosmology with conformal (Weyl) invariant matter. We show that it is natural to extend the scale factor to negative values, allowing a large, collapsing universe to evolve across a quantum "bounce" into an expanding universe like ours. We compute the Feynman propagator for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds exactly, identifying curious pathologies in the case of curved (open or closed) universes. We then include anisotropies, fixing the operator ordering of the quantum Hamiltonian by imposing covariance under field redefinitions and again finding exact solutions. We show how complex classical solutions allow one to circumvent the singularity while maintaining the validity of the semiclassical approximation. The simplest isotropic universes sit on a critical boundary, beyond which there is qualitatively different behavior, with potential for instability. Additional scalars improve the theory's stability. Finally, we study the semiclassical propagation of inhomogeneous perturbations about the flat, isotropic case, at linear and nonlinear order, showing that, at least at this level, there is no particle production across the bounce. These results form the basis for a promising new approach to quantum cosmology and the resolution of the big bang singularity.

  2. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  3. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-11-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  4. Quantification and Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Michael E.

    The use of several uncertainty quantification and propagation methodologies is investigated in the context of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) uncertainties and its impact on critical reactor assemblies. First, the first-order, linear Kalman filter is used as a nuclear data evaluation and uncertainty quantification tool combining available PFNS experimental data and a modified version of the Los Alamos (LA) model. The experimental covariance matrices, not generally given in the EXFOR database, are computed using the GMA methodology used by the IAEA to establish more appropriate correlations within each experiment. Then, using systematics relating the LA model parameters across a suite of isotopes, the PFNS for both the uranium and plutonium actinides are evaluated leading to a new evaluation including cross-isotope correlations. Next, an alternative evaluation approach, the unified Monte Carlo (UMC) method, is studied for the evaluation of the PFNS for the n(0.5 MeV)+Pu-239 fission reaction and compared to the Kalman filter. The UMC approach to nuclear data evaluation is implemented in a variety of ways to test convergence toward the Kalman filter results and to determine the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Ultimately, the UMC approach is shown to be comparable to the Kalman filter for a realistic data evaluation of the PFNS and is capable of capturing the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Next, the impact that the PFNS uncertainties have on important critical assemblies is investigated. Using the PFNS covariance matrices in the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data library, the uncertainties of the effective multiplication factor, leakage, and spectral indices of the Lady Godiva and Jezebel critical assemblies are quantified. Using principal component analysis on the PFNS covariance matrices results in needing only 2-3 principal components to retain the PFNS uncertainties. Then, using the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) on the uncertain output

  5. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  6. New hardware and software platform for experiments on a HUBER-5042 X-ray diffractometer with a DISPLEX DE-202 helium cryostat in the temperature range of 20-300 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, A. P.; Antipin, A. M.; Verin, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    Huber-5042 diffractometer with a closed-cycle Displex DE-202 helium cryostat is a unique scientific instrument for carrying out X-ray diffraction experiments when studying the single crystal structure in the temperature range of 20-300 K. To make the service life longer and develop new experimental techniques, the diffractometer control is transferred to a new hardware and software platform. To this end, a modern computer; a new detector reader unit; and new control interfaces for stepper motors, temperature controller, and cryostat vacuum pumping system are used. The system for cooling the X-ray tube, the high-voltage generator, and the helium compressor and pump for maintaining the desired vacuum in the cryostat are replaced. The system for controlling the primary beam shutter is upgraded. A biological shielding is installed. The new program tools, which use the Linux Ubuntu operating system and SPEC constructor, include a set of drivers for control units through the aforementioned interfaces. A program for searching reflections from a sample using fast continuous scanning and a priori information about crystal is written. Thus, the software package for carrying out the complete cycle of precise diffraction experiment (from determining the crystal unit cell to calculating the integral reflection intensities) is upgraded. High quality of the experimental data obtained on this equipment is confirmed in a number of studies in the temperature range from 20 to 300 K.

  7. Propagation engineering in radio links design

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemi, Abdollah; Ghasemi, Farshid

    2013-01-01

    Propagation Engineering in Radio Link Design covers the basic principles of radiowaves propagation in a practical manner.  This fundamental understanding enables the readers to design radio links efficiently. This book elaborates on new achievements as well as recently developed propagation models.  This is in addition to a comprehensive overview of fundamentals of propagation in various scenarios. It examines theoretical calculations, approaches and applied procedures needed for radio links design. The authors study and analysis of the main propagation phenomena and its mechanisms based on the recommendations of International Telecommunications Union, (ITU). The book has been organized in 9 chapters and examines the role of antennas and passive reflectors in radio services, propagation mechanisms related to radar, satellite, short distance, broadcasting and trans-horizon radio links, with two chapters devoted to radio noise and main  parameters of radio link design. The book presents some 278 illustration...

  8. Dynamic range in the C. elegans brain network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulos, Chris G.

    2016-01-01

    We study external electrical perturbations and their responses in the brain dynamic network of the Caenorhabditis elegans soil worm, given by the connectome of its large somatic nervous system. Our analysis is inspired by a realistic experiment where one stimulates externally specific parts of the brain and studies the persistent neural activity triggered in other cortical regions. In this work, we perturb groups of neurons that form communities, identified by the walktrap community detection method, by trains of stereotypical electrical Poissonian impulses and study the propagation of neural activity to other communities by measuring the corresponding dynamic ranges and Steven law exponents. We show that when one perturbs specific communities, keeping the rest unperturbed, the external stimulations are able to propagate to some of them but not to all. There are also perturbations that do not trigger any response. We found that this depends on the initially perturbed community. Finally, we relate our findings for the former cases with low neural synchronization, self-criticality, and large information flow capacity, and interpret them as the ability of the brain network to respond to external perturbations when it works at criticality and its information flow capacity becomes maximal.

  9. Laser beam propagation in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The optical effects of atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of low power laser beams are reviewed in this paper. The optical effects are produced by the temperature fluctuations which result in fluctuations of the refractive index of air. The commonly-used models of index-of-refraction fluctuations are presented. Laser beams experience fluctuations of beam size, beam position, and intensity distribution within the beam due to refractive turbulence. Some of the observed effects are qualitatively explained by treating the turbulent atmosphere as a collection of moving gaseous lenses of various sizes. Analytical results and experimental verifications of the variance, covariance and probability distribution of intensity fluctuations in weak turbulence are presented. For stronger turbulence, a saturation of the optical scintillations is observed. The saturation of scintillations involves a progressive break-up of the beam into multiple patches; the beam loses some of its lateral coherence. Heterodyne systems operating in a turbulent atmosphere experience a loss of heterodyne signal due to the destruction of coherence.

  10. Cross-Sensor Calibration of the GAI Long Range Detection Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Boeck, William; Goodman, Steven J.; Cummins, K.; Cramer, J.

    1999-01-01

    The long range component of the North American Lightning Detection Network has been providing experimental data products since July 1996, offering cloud-to-ground lightning coverage throughout the Atlantic and Western Pacific oceans, as well as south to the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The network experiences a strong decrease in detection efficiency with range, which is also significantly modulated by differential propagation under day, night and terminator-crossing conditions. A climatological comparison of total lightning data observed by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and CG lightning observed by the long range network is conducted, with strict quality control and allowance for differential network performance before and after the activation of the Canadian Lightning Detection Network. This yields a first-order geographic estimate of long range network detection efficiency and its spatial variability. Intercomparisons are also performed over the continental US, allowing large scale estimates of the midlatitude climatological IC:CG ratio and its possible dependence on latitude.

  11. Radio Channel Modelling Using Stochastic Propagation Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution the radio channel model proposedin [1] is extended to include multiple transmitters and receivers.The propagation environment is modelled using randomgraphs where vertices of a graph represent scatterers and edgesmodel the wave propagation between scatterers. Furthermore,we develop a closed form analytical expression for the transfermatrix of the propagation graph. It is shown by simulation thatimpulse response and the delay-power spectrum of the graphexhibit exponentiall...

  12. Learning Affinity via Spatial Propagation Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Sifei; De Mello, Shalini; Gu, Jinwei; Zhong, Guangyu; Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Kautz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose spatial propagation networks for learning the affinity matrix for vision tasks. We show that by constructing a row/column linear propagation model, the spatially varying transformation matrix exactly constitutes an affinity matrix that models dense, global pairwise relationships of an image. Specifically, we develop a three-way connection for the linear propagation model, which (a) formulates a sparse transformation matrix, where all elements can be the output from a...

  13. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  14. Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation through Causal Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing   data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT When an electromagnetic pulse travels through a dispersive material each frequency of the transmitted pulse changes in both...amplitude and phase, and each frequency at its own rate. As a consequence, broadband pulses propagating in dispersive material experience

  15. System Acquires And Displays Signal-Propagation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeeman, John C.; Remaklus, P. William

    1991-01-01

    Electronic system acquires, controls processing of, and displays data from experiments on propagation of phase-coherent radio signals at frequencies of 12, 20, and 30 GHz. Acquisition equipment coordinates flow of data from multiple input channels to computer. Software provides for multi-tasking and for interactive graphical displays, including easy-to-use windows and pulldown menus with mouse input. Offers outstanding accuracy; acquires and displays data and controls associated equipment, all in real time.

  16. Picard Trajectory Approximation Iteration for Efficient Orbit Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0203 Picard Trajectory Approximation Iteration for Efficient Orbit Propagation John Junkins TEXAS ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION...Junkins, J., “Terminal Convergence Approximation Modified Chebyshev Picard Iteration for Efficient Numerical Integration of Orbital Trajectories ...problem, separated by an orbital period (these differ only in sign and along a particular Keplerian u trajectory , these sign switches occur when the

  17. Radio Propagation into Modern Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2014-01-01

    constructions. These materials are used in favor of achieving a proper level of thermal isolation, but it has been noticed that they can impact heavily on radio signal propagation. This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of the outdoor-to-indoor attenuation experienced in several modern constructions...... compared to an old building. The measurements are performed for frequencies from 800 MHz to 18 GHz with the aim of identifying the frequency dependence and the impact of the new materials on not only the cellular frequency bands used today (mainly below 3 GHz), but also the potential future bands (above 3...... GHz). The results show a material dependent and a frequency dependent attenuation, with an average increase of 20-25 dB in modern constructions compared to the old construction, which presents a low and almost constant attenuation below 10 dB. The different measurement results and observations...

  18. Acoustic energy propagation around railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Petra

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with the issues of acoustic energy propagation around railways. The research subject was noise emission spreading into the surroundings during the passage of trains over a directly travelled steel bridge construction. Noise emissions were measured using direct measurements in the field. The measurements were performed in two measurement profiles. The noise exposures A LAE measured near the steel bridge construction were compared against the noise exposures A LAE captured on an open track. From the difference of these data, the noise level of the steel bridge structure was determined. Part of the research was to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction of the railway track superstructure on the acoustic situation in the given section of the railway track. The article describes the methodology of measurements, including the processing and evaluation of measured data. The article points out the noise levels of the steel bridge construction and assesses changes in the acoustic situation after the reconstruction.

  19. Pulse Propagation on close conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, A

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and reflection of arbitrarily shaped pulses on non-dispersive parallel conductors of finite length with user defined cross section is simulated employing the discretized telegraph equation. The geometry of the system of conductors and the presence of dielectric material determine the capacities and inductances that enter the calculation. The values of these parameters are found using an iterative Laplace equation solving procedure and confirmed for certain calculable geometries including the line charge inside a box. The evolving pulses and the resulting crosstalk can be plotted at any instant and - in the Mathematica notebook version of this report - be looked at in an animation. As an example a differential pair of microstrips as used in the ATLAS vertex detector is analysed.

  20. Research Topics on Cluttered Environments Interrogation and Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    theory can explain a significant component of seismic attenuation . An important question to answer is then how the O’Doherty-Anstey theory...long range propagation, turbulence, precursor, apparent attenuation U U U UU Knut Solna 949-391-8388 FINAL REPORT: AFOSR PROJECT: RESEARCH TOPICS...medium, can be inferred from (incoherent) reflections. The issue of intrinsic versus apparent attenuation is a long standing question regarding waves in

  1. Passive models of viscothermal wave propagation in acoustic tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Stefan; Harrison, Reginald; Kergomard, Jean; Lombard, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A continued fraction expansion to the immittances defining viscothermal wave propagation in a cylindrical tube has been presented recently in this journal, intended as a starting point for time domain numerical method design. Though the approximation has the great benefit of passivity, or positive realness under truncation, its convergence is slow leading to approximations of high order in practice. Other passive structures, when combined with optimisation methods, can lead to good accuracy over a wide frequency range, and for relatively low order.

  2. Detail Enhancement for Infrared Images Based on Propagated Image Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Yishu Peng; Yunhui Yan; Jiuliang Zhao

    2016-01-01

    For displaying high-dynamic-range images acquired by thermal camera systems, 14-bit raw infrared data should map into 8-bit gray values. This paper presents a new method for detail enhancement of infrared images to display the image with a relatively satisfied contrast and brightness, rich detail information, and no artifacts caused by the image processing. We first adopt a propagated image filter to smooth the input image and separate the image into the base layer and the detail layer. Then,...

  3. Transient Topology Optimization of Two-Dimensional Elastic Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    A tapering device coupling two monomodal waveguides is designed with the topology optimization method based on transient wave propagation. The gradient-based optimization technique is applied to predict the material distribution in the tapering area such that the squared output displacement (a...... measure for transmission) in the taper is maximized. High transmission in a large frequency range is gained by use of incident wave packets. To avoid nondiscrete properties in the design domain a density filtering technique is employed....

  4. Control of seed borne diseasees in organic seed propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Borgen, Anders

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The key control measure of plant diseases in organic agriculture is crop rotation, mixed cropping and moderate fertilization. A wide range of plant diseases can be controlled or minimized in this way. However, at least one group of plant diseases, the seed borne diseases, cannot. The seed borne diseases are not transmitted through the soil, and crop rotation is therefore an insufficient tool. Mixed cropping is impractical in seed propagation, where seed purity according to the...

  5. A Generalized Affinity Propagation Clustering Algorithm for Nonspherical Cluster Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Teng; Li, Yongjie

    2015-01-01

    Clustering analysis aims to discover the underlying clusters in the data points according to their similarities. It has wide applications ranging from bioinformatics to astronomy. Here, we proposed a Generalized Affinity Propagation (G-AP) clustering algorithm. Data points are first organized in a sparsely connected in-tree (IT) structure by a physically inspired strategy. Then, additional edges are added to the IT structure for those reachable nodes. This expanded structure is subsequently t...

  6. Propagation handbook for wireless communication system design

    CERN Document Server

    Crane, Robert K

    2003-01-01

    PROPAGATION PHENOMENA AFFECTING WIRELESS SYSTEMS Types of SystemsDesign Criteria Antenna Considerations Propagation Effects Propagation Models Model Verification Statistics and RiskList of Symbols ReferencesPROPAGATION FUNDAMENTALSMaxwell's EquationsPlane Waves Spherical Waves Reflection and Refraction Geometrical OpticsRay TracingScalar Diffraction Theory Geometrical Theory of Diffraction List of Symbols ReferencesABSORPTION Molecular Absorption Absorption on a Slant Path ACTS Statistics List of Symbols ReferencesREFRACTION Ray BendingPath Delay ScintillationList of Symbols ReferencesATTENUAT

  7. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  8. Stochastic and epistemic uncertainty propagation in LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clavreul, Julie; Guyonnet, Dominique; Tonini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    When performing uncertainty propagation, most LCA practitioners choose to represent uncertainties by single probability distributions and to propagate them using stochastic methods. However, the selection of single probability distributions appears often arbitrary when faced with scarce information...... manner and apply it to LCA. A case study is used to show the uncertainty propagation performed with the proposed method and compare it to propagation performed using probability and possibility theories alone.Basic knowledge on the probability theory is first recalled, followed by a detailed description...

  9. Effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of re-bar corrosion in pure carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiep Dang, Vu; François, Raoul; L'Hostis, Valérie

    2013-07-01

    This paper deals with effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation. The ring shaped mortar samples with 8 mm steel bar inside were cracked with different crack widths ranging from 12 micrometers to 600 micrometers and then subjected to carbon dioxide environment for different terms to assess the carbonation profile in cracks and along the interface between steel and concrete, damaged by the internal pressure applied to the ring samples. After carbonation of interface, ring samples were submitted to wetting-drying cycles to study the propagation of corrosion and the effect of corrosion products on healing and then repassivation of steel bar or corrosion cracks development. Results show that irrespective of width of cracks, the carbon dioxide reaches the interface between steel and mortar and propagates along this interface. The samples then subjected to wetting-drying cycles exhibit corrosion development all along the interface,the appearance of oxides does not lead to create corrosion cracks for the duration of the experiments.

  10. Effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of re-bar corrosion in pure carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L’Hostis Valérie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation. The ring shaped mortar samples with 8 mm steel bar inside were cracked with different crack widths ranging from 12 micrometers to 600 micrometers and then subjected to carbon dioxide environment for different terms to assess the carbonation profile in cracks and along the interface between steel and concrete, damaged by the internal pressure applied to the ring samples. After carbonation of interface, ring samples were submitted to wetting-drying cycles to study the propagation of corrosion and the effect of corrosion products on healing and then repassivation of steel bar or corrosion cracks development. Results show that irrespective of width of cracks, the carbon dioxide reaches the interface between steel and mortar and propagates along this interface. The samples then subjected to wetting-drying cycles exhibit corrosion development all along the interface,the appearance of oxides does not lead to create corrosion cracks for the duration of the experiments.

  11. Apparent superluminal neutrino propagation caused by nonlinear coherent interactions in matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brustein, Ram, E-mail: ramyb@bgu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); CAS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, 80333 Muenchen (Germany); Semikoz, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri.semikoz@apc.univ-paris7.fr [APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); INR RAS, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-05

    Quantum coherence can significantly increase the strength of the forward scattering of neutrinos propagating through the Earth and interacting with matter. The index of refraction of the neutrinos propagating in a medium and hence their phase velocity is determined by the forward scattering. So, depending on the nature of the interaction of neutrinos with matter, their phase velocity can be larger than the speed of light in vacuum. We show that such effects can explain the apparent superluminal propagation of muon neutrinos found recently by the OPERA experiment. Our proposal explains why the neutrino oscillations and the propagation of neutrinos from supernova 1987A are unaffected. It can be verified by changing the amount of neutrino coherence or by changing the composition of matter in which they propagate.

  12. Quantum electrodynamic theory of the cardiac excitation propagation I: construction of quantum electrodynamics in the bidomain

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Sehun

    2013-01-01

    To provide a unified theoretical framework ranging from a cellular-level excitation mechanism to organic-level geometric propagation, a new theory inspired by quantum electrodynamic theory for light propagation is proposed by describing the cardiac excitation propagation as the continuation of absorption and emission of charged ions by myocardial cells. By the choice of gauge and the membrane current density, a set of Maxwell's equations with a charge density and a current density is constructed in macroscopic bidomain and is shown to be equivalent to the diffusion-reaction system with the B. van der Pol oscillator. The derived Maxwell's equations for the excitation propagation obeys the conservational laws of the number of the cations, energy and momentum, but the total charge is not conserved. The Lagrangian is derived to reveal that the trajectory and wavefront of the excitation propagation are the same as the electrodynamic wave if ion channels work uniformly. From the second quantization, the Hamiltonian...

  13. Current diffusion and normal zone propagation inside the aluminum stabilized superconductor of ATLAS model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; Pellegatta, M; ten Kate, H H J

    2003-01-01

    The normal zone propagation inside the B/sub O/ model coil of the ATLAS Toroidal magnet has been measured over a large range of applied currents. Typical values for the longitudinal propagation vary from 0.3 to 15 m/s at 8 and 24 kA, respectively. A new analytical expression for the longitudinal quench propagation inside superconducting cables is presented. It describes the propagation inside superconducting wires as well as the propagation inside large stabilized superconductors. It is found that in the limit case of high currents, the stabilizer functions only as a heat-sink. The model is compared to experimental data and a good correlation is found. (10 refs).

  14. Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Fatma; Røyne, Anja; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, François

    2013-01-01

    The slow propagation of cracks, also called subcritical crack growth, is a mechanism of fracturing responsible for a ductile deformation of rocks under crustal conditions. In the present study, the double-torsion technique was used to measure the effect of fluid chemistry on the slow propagation of cracks in calcite single crystals at room temperature. Time-lapse images and measurements of force and load-point displacement allowed accurate characterization of crack velocities in a range of 10- 8 to 10- 4 m/s. Velocity curves as a function of energy-release rates were obtained for different fluid compositions, varying NH4Cl and NaCl concentrations. Our results show the presence of a threshold in fluid composition, separating two regimes: weakening conditions where the crack propagation is favored, and strengthening conditions where crack propagation slows down. We suggest that electrostatic surface forces that modify the repulsion forces between the two surfaces of the crack may be responsible for this behavior.

  15. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  16. Beam Propagator for Weather Radars, Modules 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-10-08

    This program simulates the beam propagation of weather radar pulses under particular and realistic atmospheric conditions (without using the assumption of standard refraction conditions). It consists of two modules: radiosondings_refract_index_many.pro (MAIN MODULE) beam_propagation_function.pro(EXTERNAL FUNCTION) FOR THE MAIN MODULE, THE CODE DOES OUTPUT--INTO A FILE--THE BEAM HEIGHT AS A FUNCTION OF RANGE. THE RADIOSONDE INPUT FILES SHOULD BE ALREADY AVAILABLE BY THE USER. FOR EXAMPLE, RADIOSONDE OBSERVATION FILES CAN BE OBTAINED AT: RADIOSONDE OBSERVATIONS DOWNLOADED AT "http://weather.uwyo.edu/upperair/soounding.html" OR "http://jervis.pyr.ec.gc.ca" THE EXTERNAL FUNCTION DOES THE ACTUAL COMPUTATION OF BEAM PROPAGATION. IT INCLUDES CONDITIONS OF ANOMALOUS PROPAGATION AND NEGATIVE ELEVATION ANGLES. THE EQUATIONS USED HERE WERE DERIVED BY EDWIN CAMPOS, BASED ON THE SNELL-DESCARTES LAW OF REFRACTION, CONSIDERING THE EARTH CURVATURE. THE PROGRAM REQUIRES A COMPILER FOR THE INTERACTIVE DATA LANGUAGE (IDL). DESCRIPTION AND VALIDATION DETAILS HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE PEER-REVIEWED SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE, AS FOLLOWS: Campos E. 2012. Estimating weather radar coverage over complex terrain, pp.26-32, peer reviewed, in Weather Radar and Hydrology, edited by Moore RJ, Cole SJ and Illingworth AJ. International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) Press, IAHS Publ. 351. ISBN 978-1-907161-26-1.

  17. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  18. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  19. Solution of Heliospheric Propagation: Unveiling the Local Interstellar Spectra of Cosmic-ray Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, M. J.; Torre, S. Della; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Vacca, G. La; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M. [INFN, Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Jóhannesson, G. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Kachelriess, M. [Institutt for fysikk, NTNU, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Masi, N.; Quadrani, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Moskalenko, I. V.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ostapchenko, S. S. [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    Local interstellar spectra (LIS) for protons, helium, and antiprotons are built using the most recent experimental results combined with state-of-the-art models for propagation in the Galaxy and heliosphere. Two propagation packages, GALPROP and HelMod, are combined to provide a single framework that is run to reproduce direct measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species at different modulation levels and at both polarities of the solar magnetic field. To do so in a self-consistent way, an iterative procedure was developed, where the GALPROP LIS output is fed into HelMod, providing modulated spectra for specific time periods of selected experiments to compare with the data; the HelMod parameter optimization is performed at this stage and looped back to adjust the LIS using the new GALPROP run. The parameters were tuned with the maximum likelihood procedure using an extensive data set of proton spectra from 1997 to 2015. The proposed LIS accommodate both the low-energy interstellar CR spectra measured by Voyager 1 and the high-energy observations by BESS, Pamela, AMS-01, and AMS-02 made from the balloons and near-Earth payloads; it also accounts for Ulysses counting rate features measured out of the ecliptic plane. The found solution is in a good agreement with proton, helium, and antiproton data by AMS-02, BESS, and PAMELA in the whole energy range.

  20. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  1. Three-dimensional simulation of ultrasound propagation through trabecular bone structures measured by synchrotron microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossy, Emmanuel [Laboratoire d' Optique Physique, ESPCI, CNRS UPR 5, Paris (France); Padilla, Frederic [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS UMR 7623, Universite Paris 6, Paris (France); Peyrin, Francoise [CREATIS CNRS, UMR 5515, Inserm, U630, INSA, Lyon (France); ESRF, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Laugier, Pascal [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Parametrique, CNRS UMR 7623, Universite Paris 6, Paris (France)

    2005-12-07

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of ultrasound transmission were performed through 31 trabecular bone samples measured by synchrotron microtomography. The synchrotron microtomography provided high resolution 3D mappings of bone structures, which were used as the input geometry in the simulation software developed in our laboratory. While absorption (i.e. the absorption of ultrasound through dissipative mechanisms) was not taken into account in the algorithm, the simulations reproduced major phenomena observed in real through-transmission experiments in trabecular bone. The simulated attenuation (i.e. the decrease of the transmitted ultrasonic energy) varies linearly with frequency in the MHz frequency range. Both the speed of sound (SOS) and the slope of the normalized frequency-dependent attenuation (nBUA) increase with the bone volume fraction. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one samples exhibited negative velocity dispersion. One sample was rotated to align the main orientation of the trabecular structure with the direction of ultrasonic propagation, leading to the observation of a fast and a slow wave. Coupling numerical simulation with real bone architecture therefore provides a powerful tool to investigate the physics of ultrasound propagation in trabecular structures. As an illustration, comparison between results obtained on bone modelled either as a fluid or a solid structure suggested the major role of mode conversion of the incident acoustic wave to shear waves in bone to explain the large contribution of scattering to the overall attenuation.

  2. Three-dimensional simulation of ultrasound propagation through trabecular bone structures measured by synchrotron microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Padilla, Frédéric; Peyrin, Françoise; Laugier, Pascal

    2005-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of ultrasound transmission were performed through 31 trabecular bone samples measured by synchrotron microtomography. The synchrotron microtomography provided high resolution 3D mappings of bone structures, which were used as the input geometry in the simulation software developed in our laboratory. While absorption (i.e. the absorption of ultrasound through dissipative mechanisms) was not taken into account in the algorithm, the simulations reproduced major phenomena observed in real through-transmission experiments in trabecular bone. The simulated attenuation (i.e. the decrease of the transmitted ultrasonic energy) varies linearly with frequency in the MHz frequency range. Both the speed of sound (SOS) and the slope of the normalized frequency-dependent attenuation (nBUA) increase with the bone volume fraction. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one samples exhibited negative velocity dispersion. One sample was rotated to align the main orientation of the trabecular structure with the direction of ultrasonic propagation, leading to the observation of a fast and a slow wave. Coupling numerical simulation with real bone architecture therefore provides a powerful tool to investigate the physics of ultrasound propagation in trabecular structures. As an illustration, comparison between results obtained on bone modelled either as a fluid or a solid structure suggested the major role of mode conversion of the incident acoustic wave to shear waves in bone to explain the large contribution of scattering to the overall attenuation.

  3. Propagation of electrical activity in uterine muscle during pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabotti, C; Mischi, M

    2015-02-01

    The uterine muscle (the myometrium) plays its most evident role during pregnancy, when quiescence is required for adequate nourishment and development of the foetus, and during labour, when forceful contractions are needed to expel the foetus and the other products of conception. The myometrium is composed of smooth muscle cells. Contraction is initiated by the spontaneous generation of electrical activity at the cell level in the form of action potentials. The mechanisms underlying uterine quiescence during pregnancy and electrical activation during labour remain largely unknown; as a consequence, the clinical management of preterm contractions during pregnancy and inefficient uterine contractility during labour remains suboptimal. In an effort to improve clinical management of uterine contractions, research has focused on understanding the propagation properties of the electrical activity of the uterus. Different perspectives have been undertaken, from animal and in vitro experiments up to clinical studies and dedicated methods for non-invasive parameter estimation. A comparison of the results is not straightforward due to the wide range of different approaches reported in the literature. However, previous studies unanimously reveal a unique complexity as compared to other organs in the pattern of uterine electrical activity propagation, which necessarily needs to be taken into consideration for future studies to be conclusive. The aim of this review is to structure current variegated knowledge on the properties of the uterus in terms of pacemaker position, pattern, direction and speed of the electrical activity during pregnancy and labour. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multiphysics Models: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0200 Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multiphysics Models Daniel Tartakovsky UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...2016 Title: Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multi-Physics Models Subtitle: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in...and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multi-Physics Models Task: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in Energetic Materials AFOSR award: FA9550-12-1

  5. Comparative Pathogenicity of Liver Homogenate and Cell Culture Propagated Hydropericardium Syndrome Virus in Broiler Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmad, S. Zaman1, M. H. Mushtaq*, A. A. Anjum1 and M. Akram1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative pathogenicity of liver homogenate and cell culture propagated agents of hydropericardium syndrome was studied in broiler birds. In Experiment I, 25-day-old while in experiment II, broiler birds at different ages were inoculated through different routes. In Experiment I, liver homogenate caused 64% mortality through intramuscular route and 33.33% mortality through oral route. The cell culture propagated HPS virus caused 60 and 13.33% mortality in broiler birds through intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. In Experiment II, none of the day-old-chicks died when challenged with liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus through S/C and oral route. The liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus caused higher mortality in different age groups of broiler birds through s/c route compared to oral route. The values of hemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV showed highly significant (P<0.05 reduction indicating anemia. The values of Hb and PCV of the broiler birds inoculated with infectious liver homogenate were significantly lower as compared to birds inoculated with cell culture propagated HPS virus. The results indicated that the liver homogenate is more pathogenic than cell culture propagated HPS virus. These changes may be due to adoptability of the original FAdVs (fowl adenovirus after continued passages in the culture of chicken embryo liver cells. Importance of this study in vaccine production is also discussed.

  6. Surface plasmon propagation near an index step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, C.E.H.; Berger, Charles E.H.; Kooyman, R.P.H.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Propagation effects of surface plasmons on the surface plasmon microscopy (SPM) image of an area around the edge of a cover layer were studied as a function of the wavelength. A phenomenological model that describes these effects of surface plasmon propagation on the observed reflectance is

  7. Content Propagation in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blenn, N.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents methods and techniques to analyze content propagation within online social networks (OSNs) using a graph theoretical approach. Important factors and different techniques to analyze and describe content propagation, starting from the smallest entity in a network, representing a

  8. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  9. Propagation testing multi-cell batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orendorff, Christopher J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Steele, Leigh Anna Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spangler, Scott Wilmer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of single point or single cell failures in multi-cell batteries is a significant concern as batteries increase in scale for a variety of civilian and military applications. This report describes the procedure for testing failure propagation along with some representative test results to highlight the potential outcomes for different battery types and designs.

  10. Wave Beam Propagation Through Density Fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balakin, A. A.; Bertelli, N.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbations induced by edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beams propagating in fusion plasmas are studied by means of a quasi-optical code. The effects of such fluctuations are illustrated here by showing the beam propagation in the case of single harmonic perturbations to the

  11. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    playing a crucial role in non-destructive evaluation. (NDE) of composite materials and structures. The studies of ... diffusion type heat equation used in this study predicted infinite speed for propagation of ther- mal signals. ..... the NDE problems involving wave propagation in thermoelastic porous solids. When supported with.

  12. Bolus propagation in pig ureter in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Mastrigt (Ron); E.A. Tauecchio

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPig ureters were made to propagate injected fluid boluses by electrical stimulation in vitro. The propagation velocity was determined from EMG measurements made at several points along the ureter. It was found that this velocity varied both along the ureter and as a function of time, and

  13. VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION OF Adansonia digitata (L.) USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ridwan

    Cuttings dipped in Indole-3-butylic Acid (with a concentration of 150mg/L) planted in sawdust media (SD/IBA/150mg/L) had the best result of all the variables assessed and therefore recommended for vegetative propagation of A. digitata. Key word: Vegetative propagation, Growth hormone, Rooting media. INTRODUCTION.

  14. Telegrapher's equation with variable propagation speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Masoliver, Jaume, 1951-; Weiss, George H. (George Herbert), 1930-

    1994-01-01

    All derivations of the one-dimensional telegraphers equation, based on the persistent random walk model, assume a constant speed of signal propagation. We generalize here the model to allow for a variable propagation speed and study several limiting cases in detail. We also show the connections of this model with anomalous diffusion behavior and with inertial dichotomous processes.

  15. A vector model for error propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Geraldo, L.P.

    1989-03-01

    A simple vector model for error propagation, which is entirely equivalent to the conventional statistical approach, is discussed. It offers considerable insight into the nature of error propagation while, at the same time, readily demonstrating the significance of uncertainty correlations. This model is well suited to the analysis of error for sets of neutron-induced reaction cross sections. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Radio Channel Modelling Using Stochastic Propagation Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution the radio channel model proposed in [1] is extended to include multiple transmitters and receivers. The propagation environment is modelled using random graphs where vertices of a graph represent scatterers and edges model the wave propagation between scatterers. Furthermore...

  17. Modal expansions for infrasound propagation and their implications for ground-to-ground propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxler, Roger; Assink, Jelle; Velea, Doru

    2017-02-01

    The use of expansions in vertical eigenmodes for long range infrasound propagation modeling in the effective sound speed approximation is investigated. The question of convergence of such expansions is related to the maximum elevation angles that are required. Including atmospheric attenuation leads to a non-self-adjoint vertical eigenvalue problem. The use of leading order perturbation theory for the modal attenuation is compared to the results of numerical solutions to the non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem and conditions under which the perturbative result is expected to be valid are obtained. Modal expansions are obtained in the frequency domain; broadband signals must be modeled through Fourier reconstruction. Such broadband signal reconstruction is investigated and the relation between bandwidth, wavetrain duration, and frequency sampling is discussed.

  18. Roughness at the depinning threshold for a long-range elastic string.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Alberto; Krauth, Werner

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we compute to high precision the roughness exponent zeta of a long-range elastic string, at the depinning threshold, in a random medium. Our numerical method exploits the analytic structure of the problem ("no-passing" theorem), but avoids direct simulation of the evolution equations. The roughness exponent has recently been studied by simulations, functional renormalization-group calculations, and by experiments (fracture of solids, liquid meniscus in 4He). Our result zeta=0.388 +/- 0.002 is significantly larger than what was stated in previous simulations, which were consistent with a one-loop renormalization-group calculation. Furthermore, the data are incompatible with the experimental results for crack propagation in solids and for a 4He contact line on a rough substrate. This implies that the experiments cannot be described by pure harmonic long-range elasticity in the quasistatic limit.

  19. Lightninig Induced Sferics Correlated with Whistler Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compston, A. J.; Said, R.; Linscott, I.; Inan, U. S.; Parrot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lightning discharges generate broadband electromagnetic pulses, known as sferics, that efficiently propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Some sferic energy can escape the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and propagate in a whistler mode, enabled by Earth's magnetic field, through the ionosphere. In this presentation, we correlate lightning discharge location and time data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in the United States with burst mode electric field measurements from the DEMETER spacecraft to quantify and model whistler propagation through the ionosphere. Using the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model for electron density and the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model for magnetic field, we compare measured propagation with the Full Wave Method (FWM) finite element numerical code developed by N. G. Lehtinen and U. S. Inan. While a few studies have analyzed whistler propagation through the ionosphere using spacecraft measurements, spacecraft data have yet to be compared with the FWM as we have done here.

  20. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  1. Solar and nuclear physics uncertainties in cosmic-ray propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2017-11-01

    Recent data released by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment on the primary spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios in cosmic rays (CRs) can pose tight constraints to astrophysical models of CR acceleration and transport in the Galaxy, thereby providing a robust baseline of the astrophysical background for a dark matter search via antimatter. However, models of CR propagation are affected by other important sources of uncertainties, notably from solar modulation and nuclear fragmentation, that cannot be improved with the sole use of the AMS data. The present work is aimed at assessing these uncertainties and their relevance in the interpretation of the new AMS data on the boron-to-carbon (B /C ) ratio. Uncertainties from solar modulation are estimated using improved models of CR transport in the heliosphere constrained against various types of measurements: monthly resolved CR data collected by balloon-born or space missions, interstellar flux data from the Voyager-1 spacecraft, and counting rates from ground-based neutron monitor detectors. Uncertainties from nuclear fragmentation are estimated using semiempirical cross-section formulas constrained by measurements on isotopically resolved and charge-changing reactions. We found that a proper data-driven treatment of solar modulation can guarantee the desired level of precision, in comparison with the improved accuracy of the recent data on the B /C ratio. On the other hand, nuclear uncertainties represent a serious limiting factor over a wide energy range. We therefore stress the need for establishing a dedicated program of cross-section measurements at the O (100 GeV ) energy scale.

  2. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    . Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential propagation was assessed by high-resolution optical mapping in monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, containing approximately 20......% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, action potential propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pH(i) 6.2) caused a loss...... of action potential propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E-treated cells, although at a slower rate. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2...

  3. In vitro propagation of jojoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Apóstolo, Nancy M

    2013-01-01

    Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis (Link) Schn.) is a nontraditional crop in arid and semi-arid areas. Vegetative propagation can be achieved by layering, grafting, or rooting semi-hardwood cuttings, but the highest number of possible propagules is limited by the size of the plants and time of the year. Micropropagation is highly recommended strategy for obtaining jojoba elite clones. For culture initiation, single-node explants are cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) supplemented with Gamborg's vitamins (B5), 11.1 μM BA (N(6)-benzyl-adenine), 0.5 μM IBA (indole-3-butyric acid), and 1.4 μM GA(3) (gibberellic acid). Internodal and apical cuttings proliferate on MS medium containing B5 vitamins and 4.4 μM BA. Rooting is achieved on MS medium (half strength mineral salt) amended with B5 vitamins and 14.7 μM IBA during 7 days and transferred to develop in auxin-free rooting medium. Plantlets are acclimatized using a graduated humidity regime on soil: peat: perlite (5:1:1) substrate. This micropagation protocol produces large numbers of uniform plants from selected genotypes of jojoba.

  4. Active control of multi-modal propagation of tonal noise in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The active control of tonal noise propagating in ducts at frequencies where many modes are able to propagate is considered. The final objective of the work reported is to cancel the prominent 450-500 Hz blade passing frequency of the rotary suction fans found in chimney stacks of power stations...... of between 20 and 50 dB was obtained under laboratory conditions at frequencies where up to twenty-five modes were able to propagate. The final experiments carried out in an out-of-use chimney stack showed slightly poorer results and a number of explanations for this discrepancy are discussed....

  5. COMPARATIVE RESEARCH OF VARIOUS METHODS FOR DETERMINING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE REFLECTED FROM A SCATTERING DIFFRACTION SCREEN IN THE PROPAGATION OF A RADIO SIGNAL IN THE EARTH-IONOSPHERE CHANNEL IN THE SHORT-WAVE RANGE OF RADIO WAVES WITH USE OF THE EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT OF COHERENT RECEPTION OF A GROUND-BASED MEASURING COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Yu. Belov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of the earth’s surface by remote sensing in the short-wave band can provide quick identification of some characteristics of natural systems. This band range allows one to diagnose subsurface aspects of the earth, as the scattering parameter is affected by irregularities in the dielectric permittivity of subsurface structures. The new method is suggested. This method based on the organization of the monitoring probe may detect changes in these environments, for example, to assess seismic hazard, hazardous natural phenomena, changes ecosystems, as well as some man-made hazards and etc. The problem of measuring and accounting for the scattering power of the earth’s surface in the short-range of radio waves is important for a number of purposes, such as diagnosing properties of the medium, which is of interest for geological, environmental studies. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating the parameters of incoherent signal/noise ratio. The paper presents the results of comparison of the measurement method from the point of view of their admissible relative analytical errors. A comparative analysis and shows that the analytical (relative accuracy of the determination of this parameter new method on the order exceeds the widely-used standard method. Analysis of admissible relative analytical error of estimation of this parameter allowed to recommend new method instead of standard method

  6. Event-triggered Decision Propagation in Proximity Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik eSarkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel event-triggered formulation as an extension of the recently develo-ped generalized gossip algorithm for decision/awareness propagation in mobile sensor networksmodeled as proximity networks. The key idea is to expend energy for communication (messagetransmission and reception only when there is any event of interest in the region of surveillance.The idea is implemented by using an agent’s belief about presence of a hotspot as feedback tochange its probability of (communication activity. In the original formulation, the evolution ofnetwork topology and the dynamics of decision propagation were completely decoupled whichis no longer the case as a consequence of this feedback policy. Analytical results and numeri-cal experiments are presented to show a significant gain in energy savings with no change inthe first moment characteristics of decision propagation. However, numerical experiments showthat the second moment characteristics may change and theoretical results are provided forupper and lower bounds for second moment characteristics. Effects of false alarms on networkformation and communication activity are also investigated.

  7. Tsunami propagation modelling – a sensitivity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tkalich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Indian Ocean (2004 Tsunami and following tragic consequences demonstrated lack of relevant experience and preparedness among involved coastal nations. After the event, scientific and forecasting circles of affected countries have started a capacity building to tackle similar problems in the future. Different approaches have been used for tsunami propagation, such as Boussinesq and Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NSWE. These approximations were obtained assuming different relevant importance of nonlinear, dispersion and spatial gradient variation phenomena and terms. The paper describes further development of original TUNAMI-N2 model to take into account additional phenomena: astronomic tide, sea bottom friction, dispersion, Coriolis force, and spherical curvature. The code is modified to be suitable for operational forecasting, and the resulting version (TUNAMI-N2-NUS is verified using test cases, results of other models, and real case scenarios. Using the 2004 Tsunami event as one of the scenarios, the paper examines sensitivity of numerical solutions to variation of different phenomena and parameters, and the results are analyzed and ranked accordingly.

  8. Multiview Boosting With Information Propagation for Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Aved, Alex J; Seetharaman, Guna; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2017-01-04

    Multiview learning has shown promising potential in many applications. However, most techniques are focused on either view consistency, or view diversity. In this paper, we introduce a novel multiview boosting algorithm, called Boost.SH, that computes weak classifiers independently of each view but uses a shared weight distribution to propagate information among the multiple views to ensure consistency. To encourage diversity, we introduce randomized Boost.SH and show its convergence to the greedy Boost.SH solution in the sense of minimizing regret using the framework of adversarial multiarmed bandits. We also introduce a variant of Boost.SH that combines decisions from multiple experts for recommending views for classification. We propose an expert strategy for multiview learning based on inverse variance, which explores both consistency and diversity. Experiments on biometric recognition, document categorization, multilingual text, and yeast genomic multiview data sets demonstrate the advantage of Boost.SH (85%) compared with other boosting algorithms like AdaBoost (82%) using concatenated views and substantially better than a multiview kernel learning algorithm (74%).

  9. Simplifications of a damping model for wave propagation in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    The wave propagation through porous materials is in general modelled with a classical Biot’s approach. A drawback of this way of modeling is, that it is empirical and very specific experiments are necessary to determine the parameters required. Therefore we do present an alternative approach based...... of wave propagation are identified and the damping is assessed, where only the attenuation of the fluid originated waves was analyzed....

  10. Wave Propagation and Dynamic Fracture in Laser Shock-Loaded Solid Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Rességuier, Thibaut de; Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel; LESCOUTE, Emilien; Berthe, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fracture in shock-loaded materials is governed by the propagation, reflection and interactions of stress waves. Post-shock analyses of the residual damage observed in samples recovered from laser shock experiments, less destructive than more conventional techniques, can provide valuable insight into key aspects of wave propagation prior to fracture, such as the effects of structural anisotropy, the role of lateral waves associated to edge effects, or the influence of polymorphic phase...

  11. Surface plasmon polariton propagation along a 90 degrees bent line defect in a periodically corrugated metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Volkov, V.S.; Leosson, Kristjan

    2001-01-01

    is investigated by using near-field optical microscopy. We find that, in the range of 720-750 nm, the SPP mode propagating along a 2.5-mum-wide and 7-mum-long line defect of GammaM orientation is well confined within the width of similar to3 mum, while the SPP propagation inside the periodic structure...

  12. Time-domain simulations of sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere over an impedance ground

    OpenAIRE

    Cotté, Benjamin; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Finite-difference time-domain simulations of broadband sound propagation in a stratified atmosphere are presented. A method recently proposed to obtain an impedance time-domain boundary condition is implemented in a linearized Euler equations solver, which enables to study long range sound propagation over an impedance ground. Some features of the pressure pulse evolution with time are analyzed in both upward-and downward-refracting conditions, and the time-domain simu...

  13. Laser propagation and compton scattering in parabolic plasma channel

    CERN Document Server

    Dongguo, L; Yokoya, K; Hirose, T

    2003-01-01

    A Gaussian laser beam propagating in a parabolic plasma channel is discussed in this paper. For a weak laser, plasma density perturbation induced by interaction between the laser field and plasma is very small, the refractive index can be assumed to be constant with respect to time variable. For a parabolic plasma channel, through the static propagation equation, we obtain an analytical solution of the profile function of the Gaussian laser beam for an unmatched case and give the general condition for the matched case. As the laser intensity increases, an effect due to strong laser fields is included. We discuss how to design and select the distribution of plasma density for a certain experiment in which a plasma channel is utilized to guide a laser beam. The number of scattered photons (X-rays) generated through Compton backscattering in a plasma channel is discussed. (author)

  14. Doppler reflectometry for the investigation of poloidally propagating density perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, M.; Baldzuhn, J.; Kurzan, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Association, Garching (Germany); Holzhauer, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaforschung

    1999-09-15

    A modification of microwave reflectometry is discussed where the direction of observation is tilted with respect to the normal onto the reflecting surface. The experiment is similar to scattering where a finite resolution in k-space exists but keeps the radial localization of reflectometry. The observed poloidal wavenumber is chosen by Bragg's condition via the tilt anglethe resolution in k-space is determined by the antenna pattern. From the Doppler shift of the reflected wave the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations is obtained. The diagnostic capabilities of Doppler reflectometry are investigated using full wave code calculations. The method offers the possibility to observe changes in the poloidal propagation velocity of density perturbations and their radial shear with a temporal resolution of about 10{mu}s. (authors)

  15. Stability of a laminar flame front propagating within a tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamandra, G.D.; Maiorov, N.I.

    1983-01-01

    This study examines the deformation of a flame propagating in a semi-closed horizontal tube under the action of perturbations artifically created on the flame surface by brief action of a transverse electrical field on the combustion zone. The experiments were performed in a tube with square section 36 x 36 mm, with electrodes on the upper and lower walls for application of an electric field to the combustion zone. A high negative voltage was applied to the upper electrode for a regulated time interval, with the lower electrode grounded. Concludes that development of artificially created perturbations on the surface of a flame propagating in a semiclosed horizontal tube has been observed; the magnitude of the perturbations increases by an exponential law; fine scale perturbations on the flame surface are suppressed by coarse scale perturbations; and the stable curved form of the flame front in the tube is ensured by the stabilizing action of the tube walls.

  16. Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colvin, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yogo, A [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Kemp, G. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matsukuma, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Tanaka, N. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Zhang, Z. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Koga, K. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Tosaki, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Nishimura, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2016-03-15

    The nanostructure of very-low-density aerogels (< 10 mg/cm3) affects the laser heating and propagation of the subsequent heat front. Simulations treat these materials as an atomistic medium without any structure differentiating between near-solid-density material and voids. Thus, simulations fail to predict the effects of the aerogel’s physical micro or nanostructure on the laser-matter interaction. We have designed an experiment using the GEKKO XII laser and ILE diagnostics to characterize the ionization-wave propagation and x-ray yield from aerogel and mass-matched gaseous targets as the laser passes through each. By design, the gas and aerogel targets will have identical densities and identical effective ionization states.

  17. Conformal surface plasmons propagating on ultrathin and flexible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaopeng; Cui, Tie Jun; Martin-Cano, Diego; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J

    2013-01-02

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are localized surface electromagnetic waves that propagate along the interface between a metal and a dielectric. Owing to their inherent subwavelength confinement, SPPs have a strong potential to become building blocks of a type of photonic circuitry built up on 2D metal surfaces; however, SPPs are difficult to control on curved surfaces conformably and flexibly to produce advanced functional devices. Here we propose the concept of conformal surface plasmons (CSPs), surface plasmon waves that can propagate on ultrathin and flexible films to long distances in a wide broadband range from microwave to mid-infrared frequencies. We present the experimental realization of these CSPs in the microwave regime on paper-like dielectric films with a thickness 600-fold smaller than the operating wavelength. The flexible paper-like films can be bent, folded, and even twisted to mold the flow of CSPs.

  18. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  19. Catalytic diversity in self-propagating peptide assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omosun, Tolulope O.; Hsieh, Ming-Chien; Childers, W. Seth; Das, Dibyendu; Mehta, Anil K.; Anthony, Neil R.; Pan, Ting; Grover, Martha A.; Berland, Keith M.; Lynn, David G.

    2017-08-01

    The protein-only infectious agents known as prions exist within cellular matrices as populations of assembled polypeptide phases ranging from particles to amyloid fibres. These phases appear to undergo Darwinian-like selection and propagation, yet remarkably little is known about their accessible chemical and biological functions. Here we construct simple peptides that assemble into well-defined amyloid phases and define paracrystalline surfaces able to catalyse specific enantioselective chemical reactions. Structural adjustments of individual amino acid residues predictably control both the assembled crystalline order and their accessible catalytic repertoire. Notably, the density and proximity of the extended arrays of enantioselective catalytic sites achieve template-directed polymerization of new polymers. These diverse amyloid templates can now be extended as dynamic self-propagating templates for the construction of even more complex functional materials.

  20. Effects of moisture on ultrasound propagation in cement mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Taeho; Li, Shuaili; Achenbach, Jan; Qu, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    In concrete structures, moisture is often a major cause of chemically related degradations such as alkaline-silica reaction. To develop ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques for monitoring such chemical degradations, it is necessary to understand how moisture affects the propagation of ultrasound in concrete. To this end, the objective of this paper is to experimentally determine the correlation between the moisture content in cement mortar and ultrasonic wave propagation. Specifically, effects of moisture on the ultrasonic phase velocity and attenuation are examined. It is found that, for the cement mortar samples considered in this study, moisture has negligible effect on the ultrasonic phase velocity. However, moisture can significantly increase the attenuation of ultrasound in cement mortar even in the sub-MHz frequency range.

  1. Photonic bandgap structures for long-range surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons (LR-SPPs) along periodically thickness-modulated metal stripes embedded in dielectric is studied both theoretically and experimentally for light wavelengths in the telecom range. We demonstrate that symmetric (with respect to the film surface) nm...... of achieving a full bandgap (in the surface plane) for LR-SPPs are also discussed....

  2. Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Infinite range correlations of intensity in random media. A RETZKER and B SHAPIRO. Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel. Abstract. We study a new type of long-range correlations for waves propagating in a random medium. These correlations originate from scattering events ...

  3. Tilt anisoplanatism in extended turbulence propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Eric P.; Whiteley, Matthew R.; Das, Shashikala T.; Welsh, Byron M.

    2003-04-01

    The use of high-energy laser (HEL) weapon systems in tactical air-to-ground target engagements offers great promise for revolutionizing the USAF's war-fighting capabilities. Laser directed-energy systems will enable ultra-precision strike with minimal collateral damage and significant stand-off range for the aerial platform. The tactical directed energy application differs in many crucial ways from the conventional approach used in missile defense. Tactical missions occur at much lower altitudes and involve look-down to low-contrast ground targets instead of a high-contrast boosting missile. At these lower altitudes, the strength of atmospheric turbulence is greatly enhanced. Although the target slant ranges are much shorter, tactical missions may still involve moderate values of the Rytov number (0.1-0.5), and small isoplanatic angles compared to the diffraction angle. With increased density of air in the propagation path, and the potential for slow-moving or stationary ground targets, HEL-induced thermal blooming will certainly be a concern. In order to minimize the errors induced by tracking through thermal blooming, offset aimpoint tracking can be used. However, this will result in significant tilt anisoplanatism, thus degrading beam stabilization on target. In this paper we investigate the effects of extended turbulence on tracking (or tilt) anisoplanatism using theory and wave optics simulations. The simulations show good agreement with geometric optics predictions at angles larger than about 5 micro-radians (asymptotic regime) while at smaller angles the agreement is poor. We present a theoretical basis for this observation.

  4. Investigation of Statistical Inference Methodologies Through Scale Model Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    3rd Underwater Acoustics Conference and Exhibition, edited by J. S. Papadakis and L. Bjorno, 3–12 (2015). [14] H. Weinberg and R. Burridge...Exhibition, edited by J. S. Papadakis and L. Bjorno, 3-12 (2015) [UACE presentation and proceedings paper]. J. D. Sagers, “Measurements of three-dimensional

  5. Light Experiment data - Snake River sockeye salmon captive propagation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the early 1990s, Redfish Lake sockeye salmon from the Sawtooth Basin in Idaho were on the brink of extinction, and they were listed as endangered under the US...

  6. Laser Propagation Experiments - Aerosol and Stagnation Zone Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    thermal blooming is ot the measured intensity but rather the intensity norma - lized by that which ould be incident to the detector in the absence of...Mass Transfer 8, 575 (1965). 52 R77-992578-13 REFERENCES FOR SECTION B (CONT’D) 16. F. c. GUbhardt and D. C. Smith. IEEE J. Q. E. QE-7, 63 (1971). 17. A

  7. DAASM Project-High Latitude Aircraft HF Propagation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-19

    äystemsrESSA eters of High Frequency 5ky-V Tech. HepoH EHL UO-m-Vb. Bibl. K.. et al(1970) Digital Interpreting Goniometrie Ionospheric Sounder. AFCRL...described in detail. It was found that the frequency-averaging technique provided a very efficient and reliable means of cross-spectral estimation, and... reliable method of mode identification. 7. Elkins, T..I. (19731 An Empirical Model of the Polar Ionosphere. Survey in Geophysics, No. 26T

  8. Laser ranging based on electro-optic effect in crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Liu, Liren; Wang, Jiming; Pan, Weiqing

    2005-08-01

    Based on electro-optic effect in crystal, a novel laser ranging method is proposed. A special designed mono-block LiNbO3 crystal is laid after the laser transmitter. The CW-laser emitted from the transmitter propagates through the crystal and travels forward to the measured target. After being reflected by the target, the laser goes back and crosses the same crystal. Electric pulses with the steep enough edges are loaded on the crystal. Based on electro-optic effect, double refraction and internal double reflection effect in crystal, the crystal cuts off the round-trip light beams, and reflects a light pulse cut out by the crystal to a detector aside from the original beam path. The pulse width T is the period that laser goes forward and back between the crystal and the target. From the T one can get the measured range R. The feasibility of this method is proved by our experiments and a brand-new way for the laser ranging is provided.

  9. Pole solutions for flame front propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with solving mathematically the unsteady flame propagation equations. New original mathematical methods for solving complex non-linear equations and investigating their properties are presented. Pole solutions for flame front propagation are developed. Premixed flames and filtration combustion have remarkable properties: the complex nonlinear integro-differential equations for these problems have exact analytical solutions described by the motion of poles in a complex plane. Instead of complex equations, a finite set of ordinary differential equations is applied. These solutions help to investigate analytically and numerically properties of the flame front propagation equations.

  10. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  11. Understorey fire propagation and tree mortality on adjacent areas to an Amazonian deforestation fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Carvalho; C.A. Gurgel Veras; E.C. Alvarado; D.V. Sandberg; S.J. Leite; R. Gielow; E.R.C. Rabelo; J.C. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Fire characteristics in tropical ecosystems are poorly documented quantitatively in the literature. This paper describes an understorey fire propagating across the edges of a biomass burn of a cleared primary forest. The experiment was carried out in 2001 in the Amazon forest near Alta Floresta, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, as part of biomass burning experiments...

  12. Controlling emission and propagation of light with photonic band gap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeganegi Dastgerdi, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    In certain three-dimensional crystals, a frequency range exist for all polarizations for which light is not allowed to propagate in any direction, called the 3D photonic band gap: a frequency range where the density of vacuum fluctuations vanishes in an ideal infinitely large and perfect system. The

  13. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line.

  14. Special Topics in Optical Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    pour un cas tris simple, celul do cinq points alignis rocovant uno onde qui a travers6 une atmosphire perturbie. 5. SURFACES CORRECTRICES Salt filo...rleure A M4 (vecteurs dipendants). Si le rang de B,(19) est inf~rleur A celul de B (go) 11 est impossible d’annuler les erreurs :on ne dispose pas d un

  15. Benchmark cases for outdoor sound propagation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attenborough, K.; Taherzadeh, S.; Bass, H.E.; Di, X.; Raspet, R.; Becker, G.R.; Gdesen, A.; Chrestman, A.; Daigle, G.A.; Esp‚rance, A. L; Gabillet, Y.; Gilbert, K.E.; Li, Y.L.; White, J.; Naz, P.; Noble, J.M.; Hoof, H.A.J.M. van

    1995-01-01

    The computational tools available for prediction of sound propagation through the atmosphere have increased dramatically during the past decade. The numerical techniques include analytical solutions for selected index of refraction profiles, ray trace techniques which include interaction with a

  16. Superluminal propagation: Light cone and Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugnai, D. [' Nello Carrara' Institute of Applied Physics, CNR Florence Research Area, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)]. E-mail: d.mugnai@ifac.cnr.it

    2007-05-14

    Superluminal behavior has been extensively studied in recent years, especially with regard to the topic of superluminality in the propagation of a signal. Particular interest has been devoted to Bessel-X waves propagation, since some experimental results showed that these waves have both phase and group velocities greater that light velocity c. However, because of the lack of an exact definition of signal velocity, no definite answer about the signal propagation (or velocity of information) has been found. The present Letter is a short note that deals in a general way with this vexed question. By analyzing the field of existence of the Bessel X-pulse in pseudo-Euclidean spacetime, it is possible to give a general description of the propagation, and to overcome the specific question related to a definition of signal velocity.

  17. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  18. A solid state lightning propagation speed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Rust, W. David

    1989-01-01

    A device to measure the propagation speeds of cloud-to-ground lightning has been developed. The lightning propagation speed (LPS) device consists of eight solid state silicon photodetectors mounted behind precision horizontal slits in the focal plane of a 50-mm lens on a 35-mm camera. Although the LPS device produces results similar to those obtained from a streaking camera, the LPS device has the advantages of smaller size, lower cost, mobile use, and easier data collection and analysis. The maximum accuracy for the LPS is 0.2 microsec, compared with about 0.8 microsecs for the streaking camera. It is found that the return stroke propagation speed for triggered lightning is different than that for natural lightning if measurements are taken over channel segments less than 500 m. It is suggested that there are no significant differences between the propagation speeds of positive and negative flashes. Also, differences between natural and triggered dart leaders are discussed.

  19. ADVANCES IN PEACH, NECTARINE AND PLUM PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEWTON ALEX MAYER

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nursery trees of stone fruits (Prunus spp. are traditionally produced by union of two distinct genotypes - the rootstock and the scion - which, by grafting, form a composite plant that will be maintained throughout of all plant life. In Brazil, the rootstocks are predominantly seed propagated and therefore usually results in heterogeneous trees for vigor and edaphic adaptation. However, with advances in rootstock breeding programs that released cultivars and certification in several countries (notably in Europe, the system will come gradually evolving for vegetative propagation (cuttings and tissue culture and use of seeds of selected rootstocks with specific characteristics and potted nursery trees production. For scion cultivar propagation, the budding system (with its many variations has predominantly been adopted in major producing countries. This review had as objective to comment main propagation methods adopted for rootstocks and scion in peach, nectarine and plum, and recent technical progress obtained as well as the needs of improvement for nursery tree production.

  20. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  1. Entropy Generation Analysis of Wildfire Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Guelpa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Entropy generation is commonly applied to describe the evolution of irreversible processes, such as heat transfer and turbulence. These are both dominating phenomena in fire propagation. In this paper, entropy generation analysis is applied to a grassland fire event, with the aim of finding possible links between entropy generation and propagation directions. The ultimate goal of such analysis consists in helping one to overcome possible limitations of the models usually applied to the prediction of wildfire propagation. These models are based on the application of the superimposition of the effects due to wind and slope, which has proven to fail in various cases. The analysis presented here shows that entropy generation allows a detailed analysis of the landscape propagation of a fire and can be thus applied to its quantitative description.

  2. Propagation of inflationary shocks in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Rodríguez Vargas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present an estimation of propagation effects of inflationary shocks to groups and specific products of the CPI using a SVAR framework.  We found significant propagation effects for 6 out of the 12 groups of the CPI, which together account for 72% of the basket.  These groups include those related to food, home apparel and housekeeping services and transportation. The estimations suggest that shocks to Food and Non-Alcoholic Beverages and to fuels are passed through entirely to the rest of the CPI basket. The majority of the most important propagation effects occur between 6 and 10 months after the shocks.  This includes propagation effects stemming from shocks to fuels, products with regulated price, tradables and the IPPI index.

  3. Propagating semantic information in biochemical network models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To enable automatic searches, alignments, and model combination, the elements of systems biology models need to be compared and matched across models. Elements can be identified by machine-readable biological annotations, but assigning such annotations and matching non-annotated elements is tedious work and calls for automation. Results A new method called "semantic propagation" allows the comparison of model elements based not only on their own annotations, but also on annotations of surrounding elements in the network. One may either propagate feature vectors, describing the annotations of individual elements, or quantitative similarities between elements from different models. Based on semantic propagation, we align partially annotated models and find annotations for non-annotated model elements. Conclusions Semantic propagation and model alignment are included in the open-source library semanticSBML, available on sourceforge. Online services for model alignment and for annotation prediction can be used at http://www.semanticsbml.org.

  4. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants.

  5. Measurement and Analysis of Multiple Output Transient Propagation in BJT Analog Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas J.-H.; Khachatrian, A.; Warner, J. H.; Buchner, S. P.; McMorrow, D.; Clymer, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The propagation of Analog Single Event Transients (ASETs) to multiple outputs of Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJTs) Integrated Circuits (ICs) is reported for the first time. The results demonstrate that ASETs can appear at several outputs of a BJT amplifier or comparator as a result of a single ion or single laser pulse strike at a single physical location on the chip of a large-scale integrated BJT analog circuit. This is independent of interconnect cross-talk or charge-sharing effects. Laser experiments, together with SPICE simulations and analysis of the ASET's propagation in the s-domain are used to explain how multiple-output transients (MOTs) are generated and propagate in the device. This study demonstrates that both the charge collection associated with an ASET and the ASET's shape, commonly used to characterize the propagation of SETs in devices and systems, are unable to explain quantitatively how MOTs propagate through an integrated analog circuit. The analysis methodology adopted here involves combining the Fourier transform of the propagating signal and the current-source transfer function in the s-domain. This approach reveals the mechanisms involved in the transient signal propagation from its point of generation to one or more outputs without the signal following a continuous interconnect path.

  6. Research on Propagation Model of Malicious Programs in Ad Hoc Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin GAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ad Hoc wireless network faces more security threats than traditional network due to its P2P system structure and the limited node resources. In recent years, malicious program has become one of the most important researches on international network security and information security. The research of malicious programs on wireless network has become a new research hotspot in the field of malicious programs. This paper first analyzed the Ad Hoc network system structure, security threats, the common classification of malicious programs and the bionic propagation model. Then starting from the differential equations of the SEIR virus propagation model, the question caused by introducing the SEIR virus propagation model in Ad Hoc wireless network was analyzed. This paper improved the malicious program propagation model through introducing the network topology features and concepts such as immunization delay, and designed an improved algorithm combined with the dynamic evolution of malware propagation process. Considering of the network virus propagation characteristics, network characteristics and immunization strategy to improve simulation model experiment analysis, the experimental results show that both the immunization strategy and the degrees of node can affect the propagation of malicious program.

  7. Propagating nonpremixed edge-flames in a counterflow, annular slot burner under DC electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Tran, Vu Manh

    2016-09-11

    Characteristics of propagating nonpremixed edge-flames were investigated in a counterflow, annular slot burner. A high-voltage direct current (DC) was applied to the lower part of the burner and the upper part was grounded, creating electric field lines perpendicular to the direction of edge-flame propagation. Upon application of an electric field, an ionic wind is caused by the migration of positive and negative ions to lower and higher electrical potential sides of a flame, respectively. Under an applied DC, we found a significant decrease in edge-flame displacement speeds unlike several previous studies, which showed an increase in displacement speed. Within a moderate range of field intensity, we found effects on flame propagation speeds to be negligible after correcting the flame displacement speed with respect to the unburned flow velocity ahead of the flame edge. This indicates that the displacement speed of an edge-flame strongly depends on ionic wind and that an electric field has little or no impact on propagation speed. The ionic wind also influenced the location of the stoichiometric contour in front of the propagating edge in a given configuration such that a propagating edge was relocated to the higher potential side due to an imbalance between ionic winds originating from positive and negative ions. In addition, we observed a steadily wrinkled flame following transient propagation of the edge-flame, a topic for future research. © 2016 The Combustion Institute

  8. Point cloud-based survey for cultural heritage – An experience of integrated use of range-based and image-based technology for the San Francesco convent in Monterubbiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meschini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at presenting some results of a point cloud-based survey carried out through integrated methodologies based on active and passive 3D acquisition techniques for processing 3D models. This experiment is part of a research project still in progress conducted by an interdisciplinary team from the School of Architecture and Design of Ascoli Piceno and funded by the University of Camerino. We describe an experimentation conducted on the convent of San Francesco located in Monterubbiano town center (Marche, Italy. The whole complex has undergone a number of substantial changes since the year of its foundation in 1247. The survey was based on an approach blending range-based 3D data acquired by a TOF laser scanner and image-based 3D acquired using an UAV equipped with digital camera in order to survey some external parts difficult to reach with TLS. The integration of two acquisition methods aimed to define a workflow suitable to process dense 3D models from which to generate high poly and low poly 3D models useful to describe complex architectures for different purposes such as photorealistic representations, historical documentation, risk assessment analyses based on Finite Element Methods (FEM.

  9. Point cloud-based survey for cultural heritage - An experience of integrated use of range-based and image-based technology for the San Francesco convent in Monterubbiano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschini, A.; Petrucci, E.; Rossi, D.; Sicuranza, F.

    2014-06-01

    The paper aims at presenting some results of a point cloud-based survey carried out through integrated methodologies based on active and passive 3D acquisition techniques for processing 3D models. This experiment is part of a research project still in progress conducted by an interdisciplinary team from the School of Architecture and Design of Ascoli Piceno and funded by the University of Camerino. We describe an experimentation conducted on the convent of San Francesco located in Monterubbiano town center (Marche, Italy). The whole complex has undergone a number of substantial changes since the year of its foundation in 1247. The survey was based on an approach blending range-based 3D data acquired by a TOF laser scanner and image-based 3D acquired using an UAV equipped with digital camera in order to survey some external parts difficult to reach with TLS. The integration of two acquisition methods aimed to define a workflow suitable to process dense 3D models from which to generate high poly and low poly 3D models useful to describe complex architectures for different purposes such as photorealistic representations, historical documentation, risk assessment analyses based on Finite Element Methods (FEM).

  10. Optical Propagation in Anisotropic Metamaterials (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    OPTICAL PROPAGATION ANALYSIS USING BERREMAN MATRIX METHOD Figure 2 shows a TM polarized plane wave propagating in the − plane from free space...respectively, inside the anisotropic metamaterial. TM represents the component of the wave vector in the metamaterial for TM polarization and...or alternatively, refractive index and characteristic impedance. These properties depend not only on the wavelength and polarization but also the

  11. Error Propagation in a System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegel, Kirk (Inventor); Bhatt, Devesh (Inventor); Oglesby, David V. (Inventor); Madl, Gabor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present subject matter can enable the analysis of signal value errors for system models. In an example, signal value errors can be propagated through the functional blocks of a system model to analyze possible effects as the signal value errors impact incident functional blocks. This propagation of the errors can be applicable to many models of computation including avionics models, synchronous data flow, and Kahn process networks.

  12. Modeling of nonlinear propagation in fiber tapers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    A full-vectorial nonlinear propagation equation for short pulses in tapered optical fibers is developed. Specific emphasis is placed on the importance of the field normalization convention for the structure of the equations, and the interpretation of the resulting field amplitudes. Different...... numerical schemes for interpolation of fiber parameters along the taper are discussed and tested in numerical simulations on soliton propagation and generation of continuum radiation in short photonic-crystal fiber tapers....

  13. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  14. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    OpenAIRE

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.

    2010-01-01

    Compartmental epidemiological models have been developed since the 1920s and successfully applied to study the propagation of infectious diseases. Besides, due to their structure, in the 1960s an interesting version of these models was developed to clarify some aspects of rumor propagation, considering that spreading an infectious disease or disseminating information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed) epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignoran...

  15. The Gluon Propagator without lattice Gribov copies

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Follana, E; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2001-01-01

    We study the gluon propagator on the lattice using the Laplacian gauge which is free of lattice Gribov copies. We compare our results with those obtained in the Landau gauge on the lattice, as well as with various approximate solutions of the Dyson Schwinger equations. We find a finite value $\\sim (250 \\rm{MeV})^{-2}$ for the zero-momentum propagator, and a pole mass $\\sim 640 \\pm 110$ MeV.

  16. Affinity Propagation Clustering Using Path Based Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Jiang; Yuliang Liao; Guoxian Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental task in data mining. Affinity propagation clustering (APC) is an effective and efficient clustering technique that has been applied in various domains. APC iteratively propagates information between affinity samples, updates the responsibility matrix and availability matrix, and employs these matrices to choose cluster centers (or exemplars) of respective clusters. However, since it mainly uses negative Euclidean distance between exemplars and samples as the simila...

  17. Observations of Obliquely Propagating Electron Bernstein Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R. J.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Stenzel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation.......Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation....

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  19. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  20. Rumor propagation on networks with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixia; Li, Deyu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on growth and preferential attachment mechanism, we give a network generation model aiming at generating networks with community structure. There are three characteristics for the networks generated by the generation model. The first is that the community sizes can be nonuniform. The second is that there are bridge hubs in each community. The third is that the strength of community structure is adjustable. Next, we investigate rumor propagation behavior on the generated networks by performing Monte Carlo simulations to reveal the influence of bridge hubs, nonuniformity of community sizes and the strength of community structure on the dynamic behavior of the rumor propagation. We find that bridge hubs have outstanding performance in propagation speed and propagation size, and larger modularity can reduce rumor propagation. Furthermore, when the decay rate of rumor spreading β is large, the final density of the stiflers is larger if the rumor originates in larger community. Additionally, when on networks with different strengths of community structure, rumor propagation exhibits greater difference in the density of stiflers and in the peak prevalence if the decay rate β is larger.