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Sample records for range perfluorooctanoic acid

  1. Perfluorooctanoic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, P.; Wexler, P.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 335-67-1) is used in fluoropolymer production and firefighting foams and persists in the environment. Human exposure to PFOA is mostly through the diet. PFOA primarily affects the liver and can cause developmental and reproductive toxic effects in test animals.

  2. Perfluorooctanoic acid for shotgun proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Rao Kadiyala

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe the novel use of a volatile surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, for shotgun proteomics. PFOA was found to solubilize membrane proteins as effectively as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. PFOA concentrations up to 0.5% (w/v did not significantly inhibit trypsin activity. The unique features of PFOA allowed us to develop a single-tube shotgun proteomics method that used all volatile chemicals that could easily be removed by evaporation prior to mass spectrometry analysis. The experimental procedures involved: 1 extraction of proteins in 2% PFOA; 2 reduction of cystine residues with triethyl phosphine and their S-alkylation with iodoethanol; 3 trypsin digestion of proteins in 0.5% PFOA; 4 removal of PFOA by evaporation; and 5 LC-MS/MS analysis of the resulting peptides. The general applicability of the method was demonstrated with the membrane preparation of photoreceptor outer segments. We identified 75 proteins from 1 µg of the tryptic peptides in a single, 1-hour, LC-MS/MS run. About 67% of the proteins identified were classified as membrane proteins. We also demonstrate that a proteolytic (18O labeling procedure can be incorporated after the PFOA removal step for quantitative proteomic experiments. The present method does not require sample clean-up devices such as solid-phase extractions and membrane filters, so no proteins/peptides are lost in any experimental steps. Thus, this single-tube shotgun proteomics method overcomes the major drawbacks of surfactant use in proteomic experiments.

  3. Comparison of perfluorooctanoic acid mobility in soil with and without alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a fully fluorinated organic compound (C8HF15O2) that is widely used in consumer products as a surfactant because of its chemical resistance to stains, grease, and water. Perfluorooctanoic acid is a persistent organic pollutant because it is globally distributed, stab...

  4. Alternative Fluoropolymers to Avoid the Challenges Associated with Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo,J.; Resnick, P.; Efimenko, K.; Genzer, J.; DeSimones, J.

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of stain-resistant coating materials leads to the release of biopersistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) to the environment. In order to find the environmentally friendly substitutes, we have designed and synthesized a series of nonbiopersistant fluorinated polymers containing perfluorobutyl groups in the side chains. The surface properties of the new coating materials were characterized by static and dynamic contact angle measurements. The new coating materials demonstrate promising hydrophobic and oleophobic properties with low surfaces tensions. The wetting properties and surface structure of the polymers were tuned by varying the 'spacer' structures between the polymer backbones and the perfluorinated groups of the side chains. The relationship between orientations of the fluorinated side chains and performances of polymer surfaces were further investigated by near-edge X-ray fine absorption structure (NEXAFS) experiments and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  5. Photodegradation of perfluorooctanoic acid by 185 nm vacuum ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Peng-yi; Liu, Jian

    2007-01-01

    The photodegradation of persistent and bioaccumulative perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water by 185 nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light was examined to develop an effective technology to deal with PFOA pollution. PFOA degraded very slowly under irradiation of 254 nm UV light. However, 61.7% of initial PFOA was degraded by 185 nm VUV light within 2 h, and defluorination ratio reached 17.1%. Pseudo first-order-kinetics well simulated its degradation and defluorination. Besides, fluoride ion formed in water, 4 shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), that is, perfluoroheptanoic acid, perfluorohexanoic acid, perfluoropentanoic acid, and perfluorobutanoic acid. These were identified as intermediates by LC-MS measurement. These PFCAs consecutively formed and further degraded with irradiation time. According to the mass balance calculation, no other byproducts were formed. It was proposed that PFCAs initially are decarboxylated by 185 nm light, and the radical thus formed reacts with water to form shorter-chain PFCA with one less CF2 unit.

  6. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Perfluorooctanoic Acid During Gestation and Lactation in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a processing aid for the polymerization of commercially valuable fluoropolymers. Its widespread environmental distribution, presence in human blood, and adverse effects in animal toxicity studies have triggered attention to its potential adverse e...

  7. Pharmacokinetic Modeling Of Perfluorooctanoic Acid During Gestation And Lactation In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used industrially as a processing aid in the polymerization of commercially valuable fluoropolymers. Its widespread environmental distribution, presence in human serum, and adverse effects in animal toxicity studies have triggered attention to its...

  8. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) contamination from textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supreeyasunthorn, Phenpimuk; Boontanon, Suwanna K; Boontanon, Narin

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in textiles and to determine PFOS and PFOA contamination in textile washing water. Quantification analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of 32 textile samples by methanol extraction revealed that the average concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were 0.18 µg m(-2) (0.02 to 0.61 µg m(-2)) and 2.74 µg m(-2) (0.31 to 14.14 µg m(-2)), respectively. Although the average concentration of PFOS found in textile samples was below European Union (EU) Commission regulations (textile samples had PFOA concentrations exceeding 1 µg m(-2). Thus, based on these results, the concentration of PFOA in products should also be regulated. Experiments on PFOS and PFOA leaching into washing water were conducted. The maximum concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were measured after the first washing; the concentrations gradually decreased with each subsequent washing. PFOS and PFOA migrated from textiles and were released into the environment, with disappearance percentages of 29.8% for PFOS and 99% for PFOA. The data presented in this study showed that textiles could be a significant direct and indirect source of PFOS and PFOA exposure for both humans and the environment.

  9. Interaction of perfluorooctanoic acid with human serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Fang-Fang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA has become a significant issue in many aspects of environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences because it may have serious effects on the endocrine, immune and nervous systems and can lead to embryonic deformities and other diseases. Human serum albumin (HSA is the major protein component of blood plasma and is called a multifunctional plasma carrier protein because of its ability to bind an unusually broad spectrum of ligands. Results The interaction of PFOA with HSA was investigated in the normal physiological condition by equilibrium dialysis, fluorospectrometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and circular dichroism (CD. The non-covalent interaction is resulted from hydrogen bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic stack. PFOA binding to HSA accorded with two-step binding model with the saturation binding numbers of PFOA, only 1 in the hydrophobic intracavity of HSA and 12 on the exposed outer surface. The interaction of PFOA with HSA is spontaneous and results in change of HSA conformation. The possible binding sites were speculated. Conclusion The present work suggested a characterization method for the intermolecular weak interaction. It is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of perfluorochemicals when combined with biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and the other experiments.

  10. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure triggers oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Kamendulis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is used in the manufacture of many industrial and commercial products. PFOA does not readily decompose in the environment, and is biologically persistent. Human epidemiologic and animal studies suggest that PFOA exposure elicits adverse effects on the pancreas. While multiple animal studies have examined PFOA-mediated toxicity in the liver, little is known about the potential adverse effects of PFOA on the pancreas. To address this, we treated C57Bl/6 mice with vehicle, or PFOA at doses of 0.5, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg BW/day for 7 days. Significant accumulation of PFOA was found in the serum, liver and pancreas of PFOA-treated animals. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed focal ductal hyperplasia in mice treated with 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg BW/day PFOA, while inflammation was observed only in the high dose group. Elevated serum levels of amylase and lipase were observed in the 2.5 mg/kg BW/day PFOA treatment group. In addition, PFOA exposure resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the level of the lipid peroxidation product 8-iso-PGF2α and induction of the antioxidant response genes Sod1, Sod2, Gpx2 and Nqo1. Our findings provide additional evidence that the pancreas is a target organ for PFOA-mediated toxicity and suggest that oxidative stress may be a mechanism through which PFOA induces histopathological changes in the pancreas.

  11. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  12. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2 are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V, the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE, and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2 are negatively correlated.

  13. Absorption and excretion of 14C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)in angus cattle (Bos taurus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), are environmentally persistent industrial chemicals often found in biosolids. Application of these biosolids to pastures raises concern about accumulation of PFOA in the edible tissues of food animals. Because data on the absorp...

  14. Modeling the Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorooctanoic Acid During Gestation and Lactation In Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used as a processing aid for the production of commercially valuable fluoropolymers and fluoroelastomers. It has been widely detected in biological organisms including humans whose estimated blood levels are in the low ppb levels for the general U...

  15. Demographic, reproductive, and dietary determinants of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations in human colostrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jusko, T.A.; Oktapodas, M.; Palkovičová Murinová, L.; Babjaková, J.; Verner, M.A.; DeWitt, J.C.; Babinská, K.; Thevenet-Morrison, K.; Čonka, K.; Drobná, B.; Thurston, S.W.; Lawrence, B.P.; Dozier, A.M.; Jarvinen-Seppo, K.M.; Patayová, H.; Trnovec, T.; Legler, J.; Hertz-Picciotto, I.; Lamoree, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    To determine demographic, reproductive, and maternal dietary factors that predict perfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) concentrations in breast milk, we measured perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in 184

  16. Effect of initial solution pH on photo-induced reductive decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chao-Jie; Chen, Pei; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2014-07-01

    The effects of initial solution pH on the decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with hydrated electrons as reductant were investigated. The reductive decomposition of PFOA depends strongly on the solution pH. In the pH range of 5.0-10.0, the decomposition and defluorination rates of PFOA increased with the increase of the initial solution pH. The rate constant was 0.0295 min(-1) at pH 10.0, which was more than 49.0 times higher than that at pH 5.0. Higher pH also inhibits the generation of toxic intermediates during the PFOA decomposition. For example, the short-chain PFCAs reached a lower maximum concentration in shorter reaction time as pH increasing. The peak areas of accumulated fluorinated and iodinated hydrocarbons detected by GC/MS under acidic conditions were nearly 10-100 times more than those under alkaline conditions. In short, alkaline conditions were more favorable for photo-induced reduction of PFOA as high pH promoted the decomposition of PFOA and inhibited the accumulation of intermediate products. The concentration of hydrated electron, detected by laser flash photolysis, increased with the increase of the initial pH. This was the main reason why the decomposition of PFOA in the UV-KI system depended strongly on the initial pH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancing decomposition rate of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbonate radical assisted sonochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan Thi, Lan-Anh; Do, Huu-Tuan; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2014-09-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a recalcitrant organic pollutant in wastewater because of its wide range of applications. Technologies for PFOA treatment have recently been developed. In this study, PFOA decomposition by sonochemical treatment was investigated to determine the effects of NaHCO3 concentrations, N2 saturation, and pH on decomposition rates and defluorination efficiencies. The results showed that PFOA decomposition by ultrasound treatment only (150 W, 40 kHz), with or without saturated N2, was decomposition and defluorination efficiencies of PFOA, however, greatly increased with the addition of carbonate radical reagents. PFOA was completely decomposed after 4h of sonochemical treatment with a carbonate radical oxidant and saturated N2. Without saturated N2, PFOA was also decomposed to a high (98.81%) degree. The highest PFOA decomposition and defluorination efficiencies occurred in N2 saturated solution containing an initial NaHCO3 concentration of 30 mM. Sonodecomposition of PFOA with CO3(-) radical was most favorable in a slightly alkaline environment (pH=8.65). There isn't any shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids detected except fluorine ions in final reaction solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Masaki, E-mail: mohno@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Mino A, Esteban R. [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Kose, Tomohiro [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Okuda, Tetsuji [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan); Nakai, Satoshi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Kawata, Kuniaki [Faculty of Applied Life Sciences, Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, 265-1, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Nishijima, Wataru [Environmental Research and Management Center, Hiroshima University, 1-5-3 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8513 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed based on ferric ion performance. • Complete decomposition of PFOA was confirmed in strongly acidic conditions. • Fe{sup 2+} changed to Fe{sup 3+} to restore chemical equilibrium in this condition. • Fe{sup 3+} was only produced from Fe{sup 2+} by hydroxyl radical in weakly acidic conditions. • The Fe{sup 3+} regeneration mechanisms resulted in the performance of Fe{sup 3+} for PFOA. - Abstract: The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe{sup 3+} ion. Although Fe{sup 3+} ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe{sup 2+} ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe{sup 2+} ion will change to Fe{sup 3+} ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH){sup 2+}. At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe{sup 3+} ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH){sup 2+} under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe{sup 3+} regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  19. Occurrence of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid and histopathology in eels from north Italian waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giari, Luisa; Guerranti, Cristiana; Perra, Guido; Lanzoni, Mattia; Fano, Elisa Anna; Castaldelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    A perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFAS) biomonitoring study was conducted in European eel (Anguilla anguilla) in Italy for the first time. Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations were assessed in the organs of 35 wild eels from two locations, the highly impacted Po River and the Comacchio Lagoon along the north-western Adriatic coast. PFAS were extracted by ion-pairing liquid extraction procedure and measured using high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. There were no significant differences in mean PFAS concentrations (p>0.05) between samples from the two sites. PFOS and PFOA were detectable (>0.4ngg(-1) wet weight, w.w) in 73% and 31% of the total samples, respectively. PFOS concentrations ranged from PFAS levels were observed in blood and the lowest in muscle. Histology showed macrophage aggregates and hepatocytic vacuolation in some liver samples. No tissue anomalies were seen in the gonads, suggesting no reproductive impairment. The PFAS contamination levels observed were comparable to, or lower than, those reported in fish in other European countries, seeming to indicate that PFAS pollution of the study area is not remarkable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass balance investigation of perfluorooctanoic acid PFOA environmental levels, emissions and sinks in the northern hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, I.T.; Prevedouros, K. [Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden); Buck, R.C.; Korzeniowski, S.H. [Dupont Chemical Solutions, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFAS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and their precursors are found in a wide array of environmental samples, and have no known degradation mechanisms. PFCAs have been used for over 50 years as processing aids in the manufacture of fluoropolymers. PFASs and fluorotelomer products are used in a wide variety of products and industrial processes. This study provided a detailed account of direct and indirect sources of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the environment. A mass balance investigation between sources and amounts residing in the northern hemisphere was conducted, and the magnitude of historical removal processes was estimated. It was hypothesized that the majority of historical PFOA production use, and emissions occurred in the northern hemisphere. The study considered both direct and indirect sources. Production and emissions were calculated from a number of published and unpublished chemical industry data. A mass balance computation was performed to estimate historical PFOA emissions with existing environmental levels and historical losses. A literature search was used to estimate representative PFOA levels in sediments and biota. The study confirmed the importance of surface water compartments for PFOA storage. Important sink processes included physical mixing and sedimentation to the deep oceans and sediment burial. Maximum and minimum ranges of the sum of the total environmental inventory and historical sink processes overlapped the ranges of emission estimates. It was concluded that a quantitative comparison of the atmospheric transport of PFOA precursors and the aquatic transport of the substances showed that ocean transport is the most significant transport routes of PFOAs. 13 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  1. Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Fish Fillet Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Paiano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS and perfluorooctanoic (PFOA acid are persistent contaminants which can be found in environmental and biological samples. A new and fast analytical method is described here for the analysis of these compounds in the edible part of fish samples. The method uses a simple liquid extraction by sonication, followed by a direct determination using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The linearity of the instrumental response was good, with average regression coefficients of 0.9971 and 0.9979 for PFOS and PFOA, respectively, and the coefficients of variation (CV of the method ranged from 8% to 20%. Limits of detection (LOD were 0.04 ng/g for both the analytes and recoveries were 90% for PFOS and 76% for PFOA. The method was applied to samples of homogenized fillets of wild and farmed fish from the Mediterranean Sea. Most of the samples showed little or no contamination by perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid, and the highest concentrations detected among the fish species analyzed were, respectively, 5.96 ng/g and 1.89 ng/g. The developed analytical methodology can be used as a tool to monitor and to assess human exposure to perfluorinated compounds through sea food consumption.

  2. Rapid fluorometric determination of perfluorooctanoic acid by its quenching effect on the fluorescence of quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Huang, Aizhen; Wang, Nan, E-mail: nwang@hust.edu.cn; Zheng, Guan; Zhu, Lihua

    2015-05-15

    Analysis of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) usually requires a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, which is expensive and time-consuming. In the present work, water-soluble CdS quantum dots (QDs) were employed to develop a simple and rapid fluorometric method for the determination of PFOA. Strongly fluorescent CdS QDs were prepared by using 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a stabilizer. It was observed that PFOA strongly quenched the fluorescence emission of the MPA-CdS QDs because PFOA promotes the aggregation of MPA-CdS QDs through a fluorine–fluorine affinity interaction. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity of MPA-CdS QDs was observed to decrease linearly with an increase in the concentration of PFOA from 0.5 to 40 μmol L{sup −1}, with a limit of detection of 0.3 μmol L{sup −1}. This new method was successfully implemented for the analysis of PFOA-spiked textile samples, with recoveries ranging from 95% to 113%. - Highlights: • PFOA significantly quenched the fluorescence emission of quantum dots (QDs). • A rapid and simple fluorescence sensor was proposed for determining PFOA by QDs. • PFOA determination could be completed within approximately 10 min. • The developed method had a working range of 0.5 to 40 μmol L{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.3 μmol L{sup −1}.

  3. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) - main concerns and regulatory developments in Europe from an environmental point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierke, Lena [Federal Environment Agency, Dessau-Rosslau (Germany); Leuphana University of Lueneburg, Lueneburg (Germany); Staude, Claudia; Biegel-Engler, Annegret; Drost, Wiebke; Schulte, Christoph [Federal Environment Agency, Dessau-Rosslau (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are the most investigated substances of the group of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs). Whereas for PFOS regulatory measures are already in force on international level (inclusion in Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants) such activities are missing for PFOA. The environmental concerns of PFOA, which are summarized in the present study, underline the necessity of regulatory measures on an international level for PFOA. Since it seems more likely to agree on a regulation within the European Union first, a regulatory strategy based on the European chemicals regulation REACH (EC No. 1907/2006), is discussed in the present study. PFOA is persistent in the environment, ubiquitous present in surface waters, and subject to long-range transport. It accumulates in biota, especially in top predators. PFOA is increasingly analyzed in food items, and in drinking water. PFOA's intrinsic properties such as its persistency (P), its potential for bioaccumulation (B) and its toxicity (T) suggest that PFOA is a promising candidate for being identified as a Substance of Very High Concern (SVHC) under REACH. Because of the dispersive occurrence of PFOA in the environment, the presence in imported products, and the use of PFCs, which can degrade to PFOA in various consumer products, a restriction under REACH seems to be the most effective regulatory measure to minimize human and environmental exposure to PFOA in the European Union. Due to its intrinsic properties, PFOA fulfills the REACH PBT-criteria. The next regulatory step will be the identification of PFOA and its ammonium salt (APFO) as SVHC according to REACH and the addition to the REACH Candidate List. As a second step, a restriction proposal will be prepared to include both substances and precursors into REACH Annex XVII. (orig.)

  4. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Masaki; Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi; Mino A, Esteban R; Kose, Tomohiro; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Kawata, Kuniaki; Nishijima, Wataru

    2014-03-15

    The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe(3+) ion. Although Fe(3+) ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe(2+) ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe(2+) ion will change to Fe(3+) ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH)(2+). At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe(3+) ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe(2+) ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH)(2+) under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe(3+) regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrochemical surface modification technique to impede mild steel corrosion using perfluorooctanoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha H Natarj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work demonstrated that corrosion inhibition efficiency of electrochemically generated organic coat is remarkably effective than self-assembled monolayer (SAM generated by dip coating technique. Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA is used to modify mild steel surface for effective protection. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and contact angle measurements substantiate the modification of mild steel surface and its effect on surface hydrophobicity. A comparison between electrochemical properties of PFOA SAM generated by dip coat method (DC-PFOA and PFOA coat generated by electrochemical method (EC-PFOA is presented. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the corrosion protection efficiency of EC-PFOA (91% is much superior to DC-PFOA (28%.

  6. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  7. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghua Yin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C, persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH. The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs.

  8. Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in vacuum cleaner dust collected in Japanese homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Takatah, Yumiko; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2003-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are shown to be globally distributed, environmentally persistent and bioaccumulative. Although there is evidence that these compounds exist in the serum of non-occupationally exposed humans, the pathways leading to the presence of PFOS and PFOA are not well characterized. The concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in the vacuum cleaner dust collected in Japanese homes were measured. The compounds were detected in all the dust samples and the ranges were 11-2500 ng g(-1) for PFOS and 69-3700 ng g(-1) for PFOA. It was ascertained that PFOS and PFOA were present in the dust in homes, and that the absorption of the dust could be one of the exposure pathways of the PFOS and PFOA to humans. With regard to risk management, it is important to consider the usage of PFOS and PFOA in the indoor environment in order to avoid further pollution.

  9. Screening of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria based on gastrointestinal properties and perfluorooctanoate toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiali; Wang, Fan; Xu, Qi; Yin, Boxing; Fang, Dongsheng; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q; Wang, Gang; Chen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The consumption of lactic acid bacteria capable of binding or degrading food-borne carcinogens may reduce human exposure to these deleterious compounds. In this study, 25 Lactobacillus strains isolated from human, plant, or dairy environments were investigated for their potential probiotic capacity against perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) toxicity. The PFOA binding, tolerance ability, and acid and bile salt tolerance were investigated and assessed by principal component analysis. Additionally, the effect of different pH levels and binding times was assessed. These strains exhibited different degrees of PFOA binding; the strain with the highest PFOA binding capability was Lactobacillus plantarum CCFM738, which bound to 49.40 ± 1.5 % of available PFOA. This strain also exhibited relatively good cellular antioxidative properties, acid and bile salt tolerance, and adhesion to Caco-2 cells. This study suggests that L. plantarum CCFM738 could be used as a potential probiotic in food applications against PFOA toxicity.

  10. Vertical eddy diffusion as a key mechanism for removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the global surface oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, R.; Jurado Cojo, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325788227; Dijkstra, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467; Dachs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Here we estimate the importance of vertical eddy diffusion in removing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the surface Ocean and assess its importance as a global sink. Measured water column profiles of PFOA were reproduced by assuming that vertical eddy diffusion in a 3-layer ocean model is the sole

  11. The Exposure Experience: Ohio River Valley Residents Respond to Local Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, J Matthew; Brown, Phil; Brody, Julia Green; Ryan, Serena

    2016-09-01

    This article explores the "exposure experience" of participants who received their personal results in a biomonitoring study for perfluorooctanoic acid. Exposure experience is the process of identifying, understanding, and responding to chemical contamination. When biomonitoring studies report results to participants, those participants generate an exposure experience that identifies hidden contaminants and helps level informational imbalances between polluters and affected communities. Participants welcomed the opportunity to learn their exposure results, reporting no psychological harm following report-back. They wove health, economic, and political considerations into their interpretation of results and their present views of past impact. Participants framed their experiences by a half-century of dependence on the chemical industry's economic benefits, leading them to considerable acceptance of chemical exposure as a tradeoff for jobs and the local economy. Our findings show that the exposure experience is an ongoing process that influences social action, with new activism being generated by exposure and health studies. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  12. Involvement of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Liver Injury Caused by Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is widely present in the environment and has been reported to induce hepatic toxicity in animals and humans. In this study, mice were orally administered different concentrations of PFOA (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day. Histological examination showed that the exposure to PFOA for 14 consecutive days led to serious hepatocellular injury and obvious inflammatory cell infiltration. In addition, malondialdehyde formation and hydrogen peroxide generation, indicators of oxidative stress, were significantly induced by PFOA treatment in the liver of mice. Furthermore, hepatic levels of interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and C-reactive protein, markers of inflammatory response, were markedly increased by exposure to PFOA in mice. These results demonstrated that PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity may be involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory response in mice.

  13. Perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate in the sediment of the Roter Main river, Bayreuth, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Anna M.; Gerstmann, Silke [Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Bayreuth, Universitaetsstr. 30, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Frank, Hartmut [Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, University of Bayreuth, Universitaetsstr. 30, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)], E-mail: encetox@uni-bayreuth.de

    2008-12-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems. Their sources are known but few studies about their accumulation potential in river sediments exist. The aim of this study is to assess the concentrations of PFOA and PFOS in sediments in relation to their levels in river water receiving effluent from a waste water treatment plant (WWTP). PFOS accumulates by a factor of about 40 relative to river water, PFOA only up to threefold. In contrast to previous suggestions, in this case the enrichment on sediment is not correlated to the total organic carbon contents. - River sediments constitute a sink of perfluorinated surfactants released from the waste water treatment plant.

  14. Reductive defluorination of perfluorooctanoic acid by hydrated electrons in a sulfite-mediated UV photochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhou; Tang, Heqing; Wang, Nan; Zhu, Lihua

    2013-11-15

    A method for reductive degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was established by using a sulfite/UV process. This process led to a PFOA removal of 100% at about 1h and a defluorination ratio of 88.5% at reaction time of 24h under N2 atmosphere, whereas the use of either UV irradiation or SO3(2-) alone induced little defluorination of PFOA under the same conditions. It was confirmed that the reductive defluorination of PFOA was achieved by hydrated electrons being generated from the photo-conversion of SO3(2-) as a mediator. Theoretical reaction kinetic analysis demonstrated that the generation of hydrated electrons was promoted by increasing either SO3(2-) concentration or solution pH, leading to the acceleration of the PFOA defluorination. Accompanying the reduction of PFOA, a small amount of short-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids, less fluorinated carboxylic acids and perfluorinated alkyl sulfonates were generated, all of which were able to be further degraded with further releasing of fluoride ions. Based on the generation, accumulation and distribution of intermediates, hydrated electrons induced defluorination pathway of PFOA was proposed in a sulfite-mediated UV photochemical system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ferric ion mediated photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by 254 nm UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100085 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Pengyi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zpy@tsinghua.edu.cn; Pan Gang; Chen Hao [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Aquatic Chemistry, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The great enhancement of ferric ion on the photochemical decomposition of environmentally persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) under 254 nm UV light was reported. In the presence of 10 {mu}M ferric ion, 47.3% of initial PFOA (48 {mu}M) was decomposed and the defluorination ratio reached 15.4% within 4 h reaction time. While the degradation and defluorination ratio greatly increased to 80.2% and 47.8%, respectively, when ferric ion concentration increased to 80 {mu}M, and the corresponding half-life was shortened to 103 min. Though the decomposition rate was significantly lowered under nitrogen atmosphere, PFOA was efficiently decomposed too. Other metal ions like Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} also slightly improved the photochemical decomposition of PFOA under irradiation of 254 nm UV light. Besides fluoride ion, other intermediates during PFOA decomposition including formic acid and five shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with C7, C6, C5, C4 and C3, respectively, were identified and quantified by IC or LC/MS. The mixture of PFOA and ferric ion had strong absorption around 280 nm. It is proposed that PFOA coordinates with ferric ion to form a complex, and its excitation by 254 nm UV light leads to the decomposition of PFOA in a stepwise way.

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid exposure for 28 days affects glucose homeostasis and induces insulin hypersensitivity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengmin; Zhang, Hongxia; Zheng, Fei; Sheng, Nan; Guo, Xuejiang; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are widely used in many applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Because of the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes, including obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, concern has arisen about the roles of environmental pollutants in such diseases. Earlier epidemiologic studies showed a potential association between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and glucose metabolism, but how PFOA influences glucose homeostasis is still unknown. Here, we report on the modulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-serine/threonine protein kinase (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway in the livers of mice after 28 d of exposure to PFOA. Compared with normal mice, PFOA exposure significantly decreased the expression of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein and affected the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway in the liver. Tolerance tests further indicated that PFOA exposure induced higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice. Biochemical analysis revealed that PFOA exposure reduced hepatic glycogen synthesis, which might be attributed to gluconeogenesis inhibition. The levels of several circulating proteins were altered after PFOA exposure, including proteins potentially related to diabetes and liver disease. Our results suggest that PFOA affected glucose metabolism and induced insulin hypersensitivity in mice.

  17. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions.

  18. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by iron and niobium co-doped titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renan Estrellan, Carl, E-mail: estrellan.c.ac@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Salim, Chris; Hinode, Hirofumi [Department of International Development Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    The photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solution using Fe and Nb co-doped TiO{sub 2} (Fe:Nb-TiO{sub 2}) prepared by sol-gel method was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of Fe:Nb-TiO{sub 2} towards PFOA degradation was compared to that of pure TiO{sub 2} synthesized using the same method, and that of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst, Aeroxide TiO{sub 2} P25 (AO-TiO{sub 2} P25). The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, DRS, BET-N{sub 2} adsorption isotherm, and SEM-EDX techniques and the data were correlated to the photocatalytic activity. Fe:Nb-TiO{sub 2} showed the highest activity compared to the undoped TiO{sub 2} and the commercially available TiO{sub 2}. Such activity was attributable to the effects of co-doping both on the physico-chemical properties and surface interfacial charge transfer mechanisms. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length and fluoride ions were identified as photocatalytic reaction intermediates and products.

  19. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous periodate with VUV and UV light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, M.H.; Wang, B.B.; Yu, H.S.; Wang, L.L.; Yuan, S.H. [Environmental Science Research Institution, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, J., E-mail: chenjing@mail.hust.edu.cn [Environmental Science Research Institution, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous periodate (IO{sub 4}{sup -}) was investigated under two types of low-pressure mercury lamps: one emits at 254 nm light (UV light) and the other emits both 254 nm and 185 nm light (VUV light). PFOA decomposed efficiently under VUV light irradiation while it decomposed poorly under UV light irradiation. The addition of IO{sub 4}{sup -} significantly increased the rate of decomposition and defluorination of PFOA irradiated with UV light whereas it decreased both processes under VUV irradiation. Reactive radical (IO{sub 3}{center_dot}) generated by photolysis of IO{sub 4}{sup -} initiated the oxidation of PFOA in UV process. Aquated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), generated from water homolysis, scavenged IO{sub 4}{sup -} resulting in decrease of reactive radical species production and PFOA decomposition. The shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) formed in a stepwise manner from long-chain PFCAs.

  20. Uptake of perfluorooctanoic acid by Caco-2 cells: Involvement of organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Osamu; Fujii, Yukiko; Haraguchi, Koichi; Kato, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Endo, Tetsuya

    2017-08-05

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal absorption of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was investigated using Caco-2 cells. The uptake of PFOA from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells was fast, and pH, temperature, and concentration dependent, but Na+ independent. Coincubation with sulfobromophthalein (BSP), glibenclamide, estron-3-sulfate, cyclosporine A or rifamycin SV, which are typical substrates or inhibitors of organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs), significantly decreased the uptake of PFOA. However, coincubation with probenecid or p-aminohippuric acid, typical substrates of organic anion transporters, did not decrease the uptake of PFOA. Furthermore, coincubation with l-lactic acid or benzoic acid, substrates of monocarboxylic acid transporters, did not decrease PFOA uptake. The relationship between the initial uptake of PFOA and its concentration was saturable, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated process. The calculated Km and uptake clearance (Vmax/Km) values for PFOA were 8.3μM and 55.0μL/mg protein/min, respectively. This clearance value was about 3-fold greater than that of the non-saturable uptake clearance (Kd: 18.1μL/mg protein/min). Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that BSP competitively inhibits the uptake of PFOA, with a Ki value of 23.1μM. These results suggest that the uptake of PFOA from the apical membranes of Caco-2 cells could be, at least in part, mediated by OATPs along with BSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Life cycle analysis of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its salts in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jing; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Giesy, John P; Sweetman, Andrew J; Li, Qifeng

    2017-04-01

    China has been the largest producer and emitter of perfluorooctanoic acid and its salts (PFOA/PFO). However, the flows of PFOA/PFO from manufacture and application to the environment are indistinct, especially flows from waste treatment sites to the environment. Here, a life cycle analysis of PFOA/PFO is conducted in which all major flows of PFOA/PFO have been characterized for 2012. Processes related to uses and possible releases of PFOA/PFO include manufacture and use, waste management, and environmental storage. During manufacture and use, emission from application was the most important (117.0 t), regardless of whether it flowed first to waste treatment facilities or was directly released to the environment, followed by manufacture of PFOA/PFO (3.9 t), while flows from the service life and end of life of consumer products were the lowest (1.2 t). Among five waste treatment routes, flows through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were the highest (10.6 t), which resulted in 12.8 t of PFOA/PFO being emitted into the environment. Masses of PFOA/PFO emission were estimated to be 96.3 t to the hydrosphere, 25.6 t to the atmosphere, and 3.2 t to soils. Therefore, control over reduction of PFOA/PFO should focus on application of reliable alternatives and emission reduction from WWTPs using effective treatment techniques.

  2. Nitrogen dioxide radicals mediated mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous nitrate solution with UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aimin; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Peifeng; Cai, Lejuan; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2017-12-01

    Effective decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has received increasing attention in recent years because of its global occurrence and resistance to most conventional treatment processes. In this study, the complete mineralization of PFOA was achieved by the UV-photolysis of nitrate aqueous solution (UV/Nitrate), where the in-situ generated nitrogen dioxide radicals (NO2) efficiently mediated the degradation of PFOA. In particular, when the twinborn hydroxyl radicals were scavenged, the production of more NO2 radicals realized the complete mineralization of PFOA. DFT calculations further confirm the feasibility of PFOA removal with NO2. Near-stoichiometric equivalents of fluoride released rather than the related intermediates were detected in solution after decomposition of PEOA, further demonstrating the complete degradation of PFOA. Possible PFOA degradation pathways were proposed on the basis of experimental results. This work offers an efficient strategy for the complete mineralization of perfluorinated chemicals, and also sheds light on the indispensable roles of nitrogen dioxide radicals for environmental pollutants removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Different nanostructured In₂O₃ for photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenmin; Zhang, Pengyi; Shao, Tian; Wang, Jinlong; Jin, Ling; Li, Xiaoyun

    2013-09-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), an emerging persistent organic pollutant, recently receives worldwide concerns including methods for its efficient decomposition. Three kinds of nanostructured In₂O₃ materials including porous microspheres, nanocubes and nanoplates were obtained by dehydration of the corresponding In(OH)₃ nanostructures at 500 °C for 2 h. The In(OH)₃ nanostructures with different morphologies were solvothermally synthesized by using different mixed solvents. As-obtained In₂O₃ nanomaterials showed great photocatalytic activity for PFOA decomposing. The decomposition rates of PFOA by different In₂O₃ materials, i.e. porous microspheres, nanoplates and nanocubes were 74.7, 41.9 and 17.3 times as fast as that by P25 TiO2, respectively. The In₂O₃ porous microspheres showed the highest activity, by which the half-life of PFOA was shortened to 5.3 min. The roles of surface oxygen vacancies on the adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA were discussed, and it was found that In₂O₃ materials with higher oxygen vacancy defects show better activity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid exposure through fish consumption in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barbarossa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs are pollutants of anthropic origin with possible side effects on human health. Diet, and in particular fish and seafood, is considered the major intake pathway for humans. The present study investigated the levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA contamination in twenty-five samples of fresh fillet of five widely consumed fish species purchased from large retailers in Italy, to be used for an estimation of the Italian population exposure to these contaminants. PFOS and PFOA were found in all samples, at concentrations up to 1896 (mean=627 ng/kg and 487 ng/kg (mean=75 ng/kg, respectively, confirming the role of fish as high contributor to human exposure. However, a remarkable inter-species variability was observed, and multiple factors were suggested as potentially responsible for such differences, suggesting that the preferential consumption of certain species could likely increase the intake, and thus the exposure. The exposure estimates for both average and high fish consumers resulted far below the tolerable daily intakes for PFOS and PFOA in all age groups, confirming the outcomes of EFSA’s scientific report. In particular, the calculated total dietary exposure for the 95th percentile consumers belonging to the toddler age class, the most exposed group, resulted equal to 9.72 ng/kg body weight (BW/day for PFOS and 8.39 ng/kg BW/day for PFOA.

  5. Perfluorooctanoic acid degradation in the presence of Fe(III) under natural sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dandan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resource and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Xiu, Zongming [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Liu, Fei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Water Resource and Environmental Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Gang [Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas-Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Adamson, Dave; Newell, Charles [GSI Environmental Inc., Houston, TX 77098 (United States); Vikesland, Peter [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tsai, Ah-Lim [Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas-Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Pedro J., E-mail: alvarez@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • PFOA was photo-chemically decomposed in the presence of Fe(III) and natural sunlight. • An alternative reaction pathway involves hydroxyl radical as confirmed by EPR. • Common oxidant-persulfate increased PFOA defluorination extent. -- Abstract: Due to the high bond dissociation energy (BDE) of C-F bonds (116 kcal/mol), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a highly recalcitrant pollutant. Herein, we demonstrate a novel method to decompose PFOA in the presence of sunlight and ferric iron (Fe(III)). Under such conditions, 97.8 ± 1.7% of 50 μM PFOA decomposed within 28 days into shorter-chain intermediates and fluoride (F{sup −}), with an overall defluorination extent of 12.7 ± 0.5%. No PFOA was removed under visible light, indicating that UV radiation is required for PFOA decomposition. Spectroscopic analysis indicates that the decomposition reaction is likely initiated by electron-transfer from PFOA to Fe(III), forming Fe(II) and an unstable organic carboxyl radical. An alternative mechanism for the formation of this organic radical involves hydroxyl radicals, detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The observation that PFOA can be degraded by Fe(III) under solar irradiation provides mechanistic insight into a possibly overlooked natural attenuation process. Because Fe(III) is abundant in natural waters and sunlight is essentially free, this work represents a potentially important step toward the development of simple and inexpensive remediation strategies for PFOA-contaminated water.

  6. Photochemical reactivity of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in conditions representing surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaalgamaa, Sanna, E-mail: sanna.vaalgamaa@helsinki.fi [Department of Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Vaehaetalo, Anssi V. [Department of Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Coastal Zone Research Team, Aronia Research and Development Institute, Novia University of Applied Sciences and Abo Akademi University, Raseborgsvaegen 9, FI-10600 Ekenaes (Finland); Perkola, Noora; Huhtala, Sami [Finnish Environment Institute, Research and Innovation Laboratory, Hakuninmaantie 6 (P.O. Box 149), FI-00251 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    Potential of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) to degrade via indirect photolysis in aquatic solution under conditions representing surface water was studied. Globally distributed and bioaccumulative PFOA does not absorb solar radiation by itself, but may be potentially photochemically transformed by the natural sensitizers such as dissolved organic matter (DOM), nitrate or ferric iron. Reaction solutions containing purified water, fulvic acid (representing DOM), nitrate, ferric iron or sea water from the Baltic Sea were spiked with PFOA and irradiated with an artificial sun (290-800 nm). In comparison similar samples were also irradiated under UV radiation at 254 nm in order to study the direct photolysis. UV radiation at 254 nm decomposed PFOA to perfluoroheptanoic-, perfluorohexanoic- and perfluoropentanoic acids. The samples irradiated with an artificial sun contained no decomposition products and no decrease in PFOA concentration was observed. According to the detection limit of the products and typical solar radiation at the surface of ocean, the photochemical half-life for PFOA was estimated to be at least 256 years at the depth of 0 m, > 5000 years in the mixing layer of open ocean and > 25,000 years in coastal ocean. This is significantly more than the previously reported photochemical half-life of PFOA (> 0.96 years). - Research highlights: {yields} UV-vis irradiation (290-800 nm) with natural sensitizers did not promote decomposition of PFOA. {yields} The photochemical half-life of PFOA is at least 256 years at the depth of 0 m. {yields} In the mixing layer of open ocean the photochemical half-life is > 5000 years. {yields} In coastal ocean PFOA photochemical half-life is more than 25,000 years.

  7. Reductive defluorination of perfluorooctanoic acid by hydrated electrons in a sulfite-mediated UV photochemical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Zhou [Key Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials Science of the State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tang, Heqing, E-mail: tangheqing@mail.scuec.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials Science of the State Ethnic Affairs Commission and Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Nan, E-mail: nwang83@sina.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Lihua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A new reductive method for PFOA defluorination was established by sulfite-mediated photolysis. • The defluorination of PFOA was dependent on sulfite concentration and solution pH. • A defluorination ratio of PFOA as high as 88.5% was achieved after reaction of 24 h. • A few of perfluorinated sulfonates were detected as intermediates during the degradation of PFOA. • A mechanism was proposed for the reductive defluorination of PFOA by hydrated electrons. -- Abstract: A method for reductive degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was established by using a sulfite/UV process. This process led to a PFOA removal of 100% at about 1 h and a defluorination ratio of 88.5% at reaction time of 24 h under N{sub 2} atmosphere, whereas the use of either UV irradiation or SO{sub 3}{sup 2−} alone induced little defluorination of PFOA under the same conditions. It was confirmed that the reductive defluorination of PFOA was achieved by hydrated electrons being generated from the photo-conversion of SO{sub 3}{sup 2−} as a mediator. Theoretical reaction kinetic analysis demonstrated that the generation of hydrated electrons was promoted by increasing either SO{sub 3}{sup 2−} concentration or solution pH, leading to the acceleration of the PFOA defluorination. Accompanying the reduction of PFOA, a small amount of short-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids, less fluorinated carboxylic acids and perfluorinated alkyl sulfonates were generated, all of which were able to be further degraded with further releasing of fluoride ions. Based on the generation, accumulation and distribution of intermediates, hydrated electrons induced defluorination pathway of PFOA was proposed in a sulfite-mediated UV photochemical system.

  8. Removal of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate via ozonation under alkaline condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen, E-mail: yuchenlin@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Chang, Cheng-Yi [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Hong, P.K. Andy [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Hsueh, Han-Fang [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PFOA and PFOS are degraded by O{sub 3} or O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment at pH 11. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of PFOA and PFOS by O{sub 3} or O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under alkaline condition is enhanced when the compounds are pretreated by 15 min of ozonation at ambient pH (4-5). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PFOA and PFOS removal by O{sub 3} or O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 11 was efficient relative to existing methods in terms of energy and contact time. - Abstract: The elimination of recalcitrant, ubiquitous perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is desirable for reducing potential human health and environmental risks. We here report the degradation of PFOA and PFOS by 85-100% via ozonation under alkaline condition being studied at environmentally relevant contaminant concentrations of 50 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 5 mg L{sup -1}, with enhanced removal rates by addition of hydrogen peroxide. Enhanced removal is achieved by ozonation pretreatment for 15 min at the ambient pH (i.e. 4-5), followed by elevation of pH to 11 and continued ozonation treatment for 4 h. The ozonation pretreatment resulted in increased degradation of PFOA by 56% and PFOS by 42%. The results indicated hydroxyl radical-driven degradation of PFOA and PFOS in both treatments by ozone and peroxone under alkaline conditions. Wastewaters from electronics and semiconductor fabrication plants in the Science Park of Hsinchu city, Taiwan containing PFOA and PFOS have been readily treated by ozonation under alkaline condition. Treatment of PFAAs by ozone or peroxone proves to be efficient in terms of energy requirement, contact time, and removal rate.

  9. Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by ultraviolet light irradiation with Pb-modified titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Meng-Jia [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lo, Shang-Lien, E-mail: sllo@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Yu-Chi [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71 Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Jeff [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92834 (United States); Wu, Chung-Hsin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien Kung Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA was studied. • UV/Pb–TiO{sub 2} system show much better activity than UV/ TiO{sub 2} system. • Photocatalytic half-life of PFOA was shortened to 1.3 h. • Lower pHs result in an increase in removal efficiency of PFOA. • The by-products of the PFOA decomposition reactions are detailed. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, C{sub 7}H{sub 15}COOH) is widely used in industrial and commercial applications. It has become a global concern due to its widespread occurrence in water bodies and adverse environmental impact. PFOA could not be effectively removed by the conventional UV/TiO{sub 2} system. This study synthesized Pb-modified TiO{sub 2} catalyst and used it as a catalyst with light irradiation for PFOA decomposition. It was found that the Pb–TiO{sub 2} catalyst could produce traps to capture photo-induced electrons or holes that lead to better photocatalytic efficiencies. Rate constant values for PFOA decomposition by the UV/TiO{sub 2} and UV/Pb–TiO{sub 2} systems were determined to be 0.0158 and 0.5136 h{sup −1}, respectively. The PFOA decomposition in the UV/Pb–TiO{sub 2} system is 32.5 times faster than that in the UV/TiO{sub 2} system. The UV/Pb–TiO{sub 2} system yielded a better performance than those of the UV/Fe-TiO{sub 2} and UV/Cu-TiO{sub 2} systems. During the reaction, PFOA decomposed stepwisely into shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids and F{sup −}.

  10. Peroxisomal Enzymes and 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine in Rat Liver Treated with Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Abdellatif

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although peroxisome proliferators are considered non-genotoxic agents, most of them, nevertheless, were found to promote and/or induce, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in rodents. The aim of the present study is, first, to investigate whether the peroxisome proliferator perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA possesses inherent liver cancer promoting activity, and second, to study the possible mechanisms involved. To acheive these aims two protocols have been applied, a biphasic protocol (initiation by diethyl-nitrozamine (DEN 200 mg/kg i.p. followed by treatment with 0.005% or 0.02% perflourooctanoic acid (PFOA for 14 and 25 weeks and a triphasic initiation, selection-promotion (IS protocol (initiation by giving 200 mg/kg DEN i.p. followed by a selection procedure for 2 weeks consisting of giving 0.03% 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF in diet. In the middle of this treatment a single oral dose of carbon tetrachloride (2.0 ml/kg was given, followed by giving diet containg 0.015% of PFOA for 25 weeks. After applying both protocols, our results showed slight increase in the catalase activity while acyl CoA oxidase activity was markedly increased. Both experiments indicated that PFOA has a liver cancer promoting activity. Other groups of rats were given either basal diet or diet containing 0.02% PFOA. Five or nine weeks later they were sacrificed and the levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine in the isolated DNA were estimated. The data showed a slight nonetheless insignificant increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. From the present data, it is concluded that PFOA is a true liver cancer promoter that may not require extensive initial DNA damage for its promoting activity.

  11. Occurrence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate in Milk and Yogurt and Their Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhenni; Lu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zilong; Li, Shanman; Wang, Gehui; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-10-21

    Although perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) have been identified in milk and dairy products in many regions, knowledge on their occurrence in Xinjiang (China) is rare. This study was conducted to measure the levels of PFOA and PFOS in milk and yogurt from Xinjiang and to investigate the average daily intake (ADI) of these two compounds. PFOA and PFOS levels were analyzed using ultrasonic extraction with methanol and solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Retail milk and yogurt samples present higher detection rates (39.6% and 48.1%) and mean concentrations (24.5 and 31.8 ng/L) of PFOS than those of PFOA (33.0% and 37.0%; 16.2 and 22.6 ng/L, respectively). For raw milk samples, only PFOS was detected. The differences in the levels of the two compounds between samples from the north and south regions were observed, and northern regions showed higher pollution levels than southern regions. On the basis of the retail milk measurements and consumption data, the ADIs of PFOA and PFOS for Xinjiang adults were calculated to be 0.0211 and 0.0318 ng/kg/day, respectively. Furthermore, the estimated intakes of PFOA and PFOS varied among different groupings (age, area, gender, and race) and increased with increasing age. Relevant hazard ratios were found to be far less than 1.0, and this finding suggested that no imminent health damages were produced by PFOA and PFOS intake via milk and yogurt consumption in the Xinjiang population.

  12. Perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate in Michigan and New York waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, E.; Kannan, K. [Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY (United States); Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a perfluorinated organic contaminant, has become the subject of many recent investigations. PFOS and its precursor compounds have been used in a wide variety of consumer and industrial products. Other related perfluorinated compounds have also been reported to occur in the environment. For example, perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) is an impurity associated with PFOS. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has found widespread use as an emulsifier for polymerization of fluoropolymers. These perfluorinated alkylated substances (PASs) are known to be resistant to degradation. Water analysis of PFOS and PFOA has been carried out with several methods. The most commonly used methods involve solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by HPLC-MS-MS. Method detection limits for PFOS and PFOA varied between 5 and 17 ng/L and 9 and 25 ng/L respectively. Generally PFOS and PFOA concentrations in ambient waters, with no point source of pollution, are less than 5 ng/L. We have developed a method using the Oasis HLB solid phase cartridge to achieve the required method detection limits. We have measured PFOS and PFOA concentration in surface waters collected from Michigan and New York. PFOS and PFOA have been detected in the blood and liver of fish at {mu}g/L concentrations both in Japan and the USA. The current ion-pairing, liquid/liquid extraction method is suitable for these concentrations and we have measured PFOS and PFOA in the livers of fish from Michigan and New York waters. We have compared the data for fish and water concentrations and calculated bioaccumulation factors.

  13. Occurrence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate in Milk and Yogurt and Their Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenni Xing

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS have been identified in milk and dairy products in many regions, knowledge on their occurrence in Xinjiang (China is rare. This study was conducted to measure the levels of PFOA and PFOS in milk and yogurt from Xinjiang and to investigate the average daily intake (ADI of these two compounds. PFOA and PFOS levels were analyzed using ultrasonic extraction with methanol and solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Retail milk and yogurt samples present higher detection rates (39.6% and 48.1% and mean concentrations (24.5 and 31.8 ng/L of PFOS than those of PFOA (33.0% and 37.0%; 16.2 and 22.6 ng/L, respectively. For raw milk samples, only PFOS was detected. The differences in the levels of the two compounds between samples from the north and south regions were observed, and northern regions showed higher pollution levels than southern regions. On the basis of the retail milk measurements and consumption data, the ADIs of PFOA and PFOS for Xinjiang adults were calculated to be 0.0211 and 0.0318 ng/kg/day, respectively. Furthermore, the estimated intakes of PFOA and PFOS varied among different groupings (age, area, gender, and race and increased with increasing age. Relevant hazard ratios were found to be far less than 1.0, and this finding suggested that no imminent health damages were produced by PFOA and PFOS intake via milk and yogurt consumption in the Xinjiang population.

  14. β-Cyclodextrin Attenuates Perfluorooctanoic Acid Toxicity in the Zebrafish Embryo Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jo Weiss-Errico

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA has been linked to negative health outcomes including cancer, thyroid disease, infertility, and developmental delays. β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD, a cyclic sugar, has been previously shown to form strong host–guest complexes with PFOA, and is proposed as a means of environmental remediation with respect to this widespread contaminant. In the present study, β-CD was directly examined with regards to possible attenuation of the toxicity of PFOA specifically employing the zebrafish (Danio rerio embryo model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to various concentrations of PFOA without β-CD, and with equimolar (1:1 and excess (2:1 molar ratios of β-CD to PFOA, and assessed for lethality and developmental toxicity through seven days post-fertilization (dpf. Rapid onset of lethality with limited morphological abnormalities was observed at relatively low concentrations of PFOA (LC50 ≈ 50 ppm, along with effects on morphometric and neurobehavioral parameters in surviving embryos. A highly significant difference (p < 0.0001 was observed between the 2:1 treatment, and both 1:1 and PFOA only treatments, with respect to lethal concentration and apparent neurobehavioral effects, suggesting an effectively reduced toxicity of the fully complexed PFOA. In contrast, however, neither β-CD treatment reduced developmental toxicity with respect to the morphometric endpoint (i.e., interocular distance. Whereas LC50 of PFOA alone did not change over 7 dpf, the 1:1 and 2:1 values decreased slightly over time, suggesting either delayed or alternative toxic effects on later developmental stages at presumptively lowered levels. This study, therefore, indicates β-CD may be an effective agent to reduce toxicity of and mitigate environmental health concerns associated with PFOA, but that further study is required to elucidate the mechanism of complexation as it relates to the attenuation of toxicity.

  15. Deriving environmental quality standards for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and related short chain perfluorinated alkyl acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Sara; Conti, Daniela; Crebelli, Riccardo; Polesello, Stefano; Rusconi, Marianna; Mazzoni, Michela; Preziosi, Elisabetta; Carere, Mario; Lucentini, Luca; Ferretti, Emanuele; Balzamo, Stefania; Simeone, Maria Gabriella; Aste, Fiorella

    2017-02-05

    The evidence that in Northern Italy significant sources of perfluoroalkylacids (PFAA) are present induced the Italian government to establish a Working Group on Environmental Quality Standard (EQS) for PFAA in order to include some of them in the list of national specific pollutants for surface water monitoring according to the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC). The list of substances included perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and related short chain PFAA such as perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluoropentanoate (PFPeA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) and perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), which is a substitute of perfluorooctanesulfonate. For each of them a dossier collects available data on regulation, physico-chemical properties, emission and sources, occurrence, acute and chronic toxicity on aquatic species and mammals, including humans. Quality standards (QS) were derived for the different protection objectives (pelagic and benthic communities, predators by secondary poisoning, human health via consumption of fishery products and water) according to the European guideline. The lowest QS is finally chosen as the relevant EQS. For PFOA a QS for biota was derived for protection from secondary poisoning and the corresponding QS for water was back-calculated, obtaining a freshwater EQS of 0.1μgL(-1). For PFBA, PFPeA, PFHxA and PFBS threshold limits proposed for drinking waters were adopted as EQS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymers with binary functional monomers for the selective removal of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengmei; Wang, Lei; Tian, Ying; Wu, Fengchang; Deng, Chaobing; Guo, Qingwei; Sun, Hongwen; Lu, Shaoyong

    2017-09-22

    This work describes a novel method for the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using 2-(trifluoromethyl) acrylic acid (TFMAA) and 4-vinyl pyridine (4-Vpy) as binary functional monomers, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as template, and ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker in the presence of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN). The binary functional monomer MIPs were applied to selective recognition for PFOA and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) from aqueous environment. The MIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microscopic electrophoresis. Thereafter, the adsorption capacity and selectivity of the synthesized MIPs for PFOA and PFOS were evaluated by batch adsorption experiments. The maximum adsorption capacities of the MIPs for PFOA and PFOS were 6.42 and 6.27mg/g, respectively. It was also found that the adsorption capacities remained constant with increasing the solution pH in the range of 2.0-5.0, and then decreased when the pH was further increased. Finally, the novel MIPs can be reused after five cycles of adsorption-desorption-adsorption with no significant decrease of removal rate and have an effective performance in selective removal of PFOA and PFOS in real lake water samples. All the results indicate that the binary functional monomer MIPs have great potential to remove PFOA and PFOS in aqueous environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by transition-metal modified titanium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Meng-Jia; Lo, Shang-Lien, E-mail: sllo@ntu.edu.tw; Lee, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chang-Chieh

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Cu–TiO{sub 2} catalysts show much better catalytic activity than TiO{sub 2}. • The PFOA decomposition efficiencies reached 91% with UV/Cu–TiO{sub 2} system. • The intermediates of the PFOA decomposition reactions are detailed. - Abstract: Transition-metal modified TiO{sub 2} was used in a UV reactor to assist in decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solutions. Comparing TiO{sub 2} and two types of metal-modified TiO{sub 2} (Fe–TiO{sub 2} and Cu–TiO{sub 2}), Cu–TiO{sub 2} exhibited the highest catalytic activity during PFOA decomposition and defluorination. After 12 h of reaction, the PFOA decomposition and defluorination efficiencies by the UV/Cu–TiO{sub 2} system reached 91% and 19%, respectively. PFOA was decomposed into fluoride ions (F{sup −}) and shorter perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) such as C{sub 6}F{sub 13}COOH, C{sub 5}F{sub 11}COOH, C{sub 4}F{sub 9}COOH, C{sub 3}F{sub 7}COOH, C{sub 2}F{sub 5}COOH and CF{sub 3}COOH. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-zero-order kinetics were used to model the decomposition and defluorination of PFOA, respectively. Rate constant values of PFOA decomposition for the UV/TiO{sub 2}, UV/Fe–TiO{sub 2}, and UV/Cu–TiO{sub 2} systems were 0.0001, 0.0015, and 0.0031 min{sup −1}, respectively, while rate constant values of PFOA defluorination for the UV/Fe–TiO{sub 2}, and UV/Cu–TiO{sub 2} systems were 0.0048 and 0.0077 mg/L·min{sup −1}, respectively. The photocatalysts were prepared by a photodeposition synthesis method and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction and UV–vis spectrophotometry. The Fe–TiO{sub 2} and Cu–TiO{sub 2} catalysts exhibited considerably higher activities than that of TiO{sub 2}. The experimental results have demonstrated that the UV/Fe–TiO{sub 2} and UV/Cu–TiO{sub 2} systems could produce traps to capture photo-induced electrons, thereby reduce electron

  18. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for the Involvement of Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects linked to liver cancer through the nuclear recep...

  19. Sorption of a branched nonylphenol isomer and perfluorooctanoic acid on geosorbents and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengliang

    2011-10-13

    As metabolites of organic surfactants, both nonylphenol (NP) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are toxic and ubiquitous in the environment. Their sorption on soils and sediments is of importance for their fate and transport in the environment. Especially in China, there is still a lack of consolidated knowledge on the sorption behavior of NP and PFOA on geosorbents such as Yangtze River sediments. Thus, the present thesis investigates the sorption of a branched NP isomer [4-(1-ethyl-1, 3-dimethylpentyl) phenol] (NP111) and PFOA on Yangtze River sediments and their model components, i.e. a clay mineral (illite), metal oxides (goethite and {delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and organic matter (isolated from Yangtze River sediments and commercial organic matter) by both batch and dialysis techniques. NP111 is the most environmentally relevant NP isomer and its fate in the environment is unknown. Because PFOA is weakly adsorbed on geosorbents, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were studied as promising adsorbents. One of the MWCNTs studied contained traces of metal catalyst on the outer surface. Sorption isotherms of NP111 and PFOA on the sediments and their model components were fitted well by the Freundlich model. Sorption of NP111 on the sediments depended largely on their organic carbon content, resulting in organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K{sub OC}) values between 6.3 x 10{sup 3} and 1.1 x 10{sup 4} L kg{sup -1}. The sorption of NP111 on {delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and illite was comparable to that on sediments, but significantly lower than that on goethite. In contrast, the sorption of PFOA on the sediments was significantly lower. The affinity of PFOA to goethite and {delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was slightly higher than to the sediments, but it was negligible to natural organic matter and illite. The results suggest that the organic carbon content of the sediments plays a dominant role in the sorption of NP111, whereas goethite acts as a potential sink

  20. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and...

  1. Water dissociation in a radio-frequency electromagnetic field with ex situ electrodes—decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid and tetrahydrofuran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jens; Holzer, Frank; Kraus, Markus; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Roland, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The application of radio waves with a frequency of 13.56 MHz on electrolyte solutions in a capillary reactor led to the formation of reactive hydrogen and oxygen species and finally to molecular oxygen and hydrogen. This process of water splitting can be principally used for the elimination of hazardous chemicals in water. Two compounds, namely perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and tetrahydrofuran, were converted using this process. Their main decomposition products were highly volatile and therefore transferred to a gas phase, where they could be identified by GC-MS analyses. It is remarkable that the chemical reactions could benefit from both the oxidizing and reducing species formed in the plasma process, which takes place in gas bubbles saturated with water vapor. The breaking of C-C and C-F bonds was proven in the case of PFOA, probably initiated by electron impacts and radical reactions.

  2. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhinan; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Li, Fujun; Wang, Yixong; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2016-10-11

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a common environmental pollutant that has been associated with various diseases, including cancer. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying PFOA-induced endometrial cancer cell invasion and migration. PFOA treatment enhanced migration and invasion by human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells, which correlated with decreased E-cadherin expression, a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PFOA also induced activation of ERK1/2/mTOR signaling. Treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, antagonized the effects of PFOA and reversed the effects of PFOA activation in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer. Consistent with these results, pre-treatment with rapamycin abolished PFOA-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling.

  3. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Yan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Ruse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Chaojie, E-mail: myrazh@mail.tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Ruse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li Fei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Ruse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Bo Xiaowen [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Guangfu; Zhou Qi [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Ruse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2009-09-30

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1 h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion.

  4. Serum perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA concentrations in normal and hyperlipidemic female hamsters dosed orally with ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO for up to 30 days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E. Everds

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In epidemiology studies, the presence of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA in human blood has been associated with higher serum cholesterol concentrations. A possible explanation for these results is that elevated serum cholesterol might reduce clearance of PFOA. In this study, female hamsters, which transport and regulate cholesterol in a manner similar to humans, were fed normal diet or diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol and 10% coconut oil (high-fat diet resulting in hyperlipidemia throughout the study in supplemented animals. Hamsters on either a normal and high-fat diet were given oral doses of 0.1, 1.0, or 10 mg APFO/kg for 30 days. Serum PFOA concentrations evaluated 24 h after 1, 10, 20, and 30 doses of APFO were not altered in hyperlipidemic hamsters compared to those fed normal diet. For a given dose group, serum concentrations of PFOA were highest following the 10 doses (except for the 10 mg/kg group where concentrations were the highest after the first dose and were lowest after 20 and 30 doses. Under the condition of this study, higher serum lipids did not affect the absorption and clearance of serum PFOA. Serum PFOA concentrations declined over the course of the study despite continued daily dosing with APFO. This does not support the hypothesis that higher serum lipids might increase the retention of PFOA in the body.

  5. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid by a wide band gap p-block metal oxyhydroxide InOOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjing; Wu, Miaomiao; Yang, Jingwen; Wang, Zhengmei; Chen, Mindong; Teng, Fei

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we prepared a new wide band gap semiconductor, p-block metal oxyhydroxide InOOH, which exhibits efficient activity for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) degradation under mild conditions and UV light irradiation. The apparent rate constant for PFOA degradation by InOOH is 27.6 times higher than that for P25 titania. Results show that ionized PFOA (C7F15COO-) can be adsorbed much more efficiently on the surface of InOOH than P25. Then, the adsorbed C7F15COO- can be decomposed directly by photo-generated holes to form C7F15COOrad radicals. This process is the key step for the photocalytic degradation of PFOA. Major degradation intermediates, fluoride ions and perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter chain lengths were detected during PFOA degradation. A possible pathway for photocatalytic degradation of PFOA is proposed based on the experimental results. Therefore, this studies indicates a potential new material and method for the efficient treatment of PFCA pollutants under mild conditions.

  6. An energy-efficient process for decomposing perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane sulfonic acids using dc plasmas generated within gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuoka, K; Sasaki, K; Hayashi, R, E-mail: yasuoka@ee.titech.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are environmentally harmful and persistent substances. Their decomposition was investigated using dc plasmas generated within small gas bubbles in a solution. The plasma characteristics including discharge voltage, voltage drop in the liquid, plasma shape and the emission spectrum were examined with different gases. The decomposition rate and energy efficiency were evaluated by measuring the concentration of fluoride and sulfate ions released from PFOA/PFOS molecules. The concentration of fluoride ions and energy efficiency in the treatment of a PFOS solution were 17.7 mg l{sup -1} (54.8% of the initial amount of fluorine atoms) and 26 mg kWh{sup -1}, respectively, after 240 min of operation. The addition of scavengers of hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons showed little effect on the decomposition. The decomposition processes were analyzed with an assumption that positive species reacted with PFOA/PFOS molecules at the boundary of the plasma-solution surface. This type of plasma showed a much higher decomposition energy efficiency compared with energy efficiencies reported in other studies.

  7. Effects of pH on photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in different atmospheres by 185nm vacuum ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Pengyi

    2014-11-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a persistent organic pollutant, receives increasing concerns due to its worldwide occurrence and resistance to most conventional treatment processes. The photochemical decomposition by 185nm vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) is one of the efficient methods for PFOA decomposition. The effects of pH on PFOA decomposition in nitrogen atmosphere or oxygen atmosphere were investigated. At its original pH (4.5) of PFOA aqueous solution, PFOA decomposed efficiently both in nitrogen and in oxygen atmosphere. However, when the pH increased to 12.0, PFOA decomposition was greatly inhibited in oxygen atmosphere, while it was greatly accelerated in nitrogen atmosphere with a very short half-life time (9min). Furthermore, fluorine atoms originally contained in PFOA molecules were almost completely transformed into fluoride ions. Two decomposition pathways have been proposed to explain the PFOA decomposition under different conditions. In acidic and neutral solutions, PFOA predominantly decomposes via the direct photolysis in both atmospheres; while in the alkaline solution and in the absence of oxygen, the decomposition of PFOA is mainly induced by hydrated electrons. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Photochemical defluorination of aqueous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis and VUV-Fenton photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Hong; Cheng, Jian-Hua; You, Xia; Liang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Yong-You

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is extremely persistent and bioaccumulative in the environment; thus, it is very urgent to investigate an effective and moderate technology to treat the pollution of PFOA. In this study, a process combined iron and granular activated carbon (Fe(0)/GAC) micro-electrolysis with VUV-Fenton system is employed for the remediation of PFOA. Approximately 50 % PFOA (10 mg L(-1)) could be efficiently defluorinated under the following conditions: pH 3.0, dosage of Fe 7.5 g L(-1), dosage of GAC 12.5 g L(-1), and concentration of H2O2 22.8 mmol L(-1). Meanwhile, during the process, evident defluorination was observed and the concentration of fluoride ion was eventually 3.23 mg L(-1). The intermediates including five shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), i.e., C7, C6, C5, C4, and C3, were also analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) and defluorination mechanisms of PFOA was proposed, which involved photochemical of OH·, direct photolysis (185-nm VUV), and photocatalytic degradation of PFOA in the presence of Fe(3+) (254-nm UV).

  9. High fat diet feeding exaggerates perfluorooctanoic acid-induced liver injury in mice via modulating multiple metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Tan

    Full Text Available High fat diet (HFD is closely linked to a variety of health issues including fatty liver. Exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, a synthetic perfluorinated carboxylic acid, also causes liver injury. The present study investigated the possible interactions between high fat diet and PFOA in induction of liver injury. Mice were pair-fed a high-fat diet (HFD or low fat control with or without PFOA administration at 5 mg/kg/day for 3 weeks. Exposure to PFOA alone caused elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP levels and increased liver weight along with reduced body weight and adipose tissue mass. HFD alone did not cause liver damage, but exaggerated PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity as indicated by higher plasma ALT and AST levels, and more severe pathological changes including hepatocyte hypertrophy, lipid droplet accumulation and necrosis as well as inflammatory cell infiltration. These additive effects of HFD on PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity correlated with metabolic disturbance in liver and blood as well as up-regulation of hepatic proinflammatory cytokine genes. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that both serum and hepatic metabolite profiles of PFOA, HFD, or HFD-PFOA group were clearly differentiated from that of controls. PFOA affected more hepatic metabolites than HFD, but HFD showed positive interaction with PFOA on fatty acid metabolites including long chain fatty acids and acylcarnitines. Taken together, dietary high fat potentiates PFOA-induced hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammation and necrotic cell death by disturbing hepatic metabolism and inducing inflammation. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that HFD increases the risk of PFOA in induction of hepatotoxicity.

  10. Demographic, reproductive, and dietary determinants of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations in human colostrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusko, Todd A.; Oktapodas, Marina; Murinová, L’ubica Palkovičová; Babinská, Katarina; Babjaková, Jana; Verner, Marc-André; DeWitt, Jamie C.; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Čonka, Kamil; Drobná, Beata; Chovancová, Jana; Thurston, Sally W.; Lawrence, B. Paige; Dozier, Ann M.; Järvinen, Kirsi M.; Patayová, Henrieta; Trnovec, Tomáš; Legler, Juliette; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Lamoree, Marja H.

    2017-01-01

    To determine demographic, reproductive, and maternal dietary factors that predict perfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) concentrations in breast milk, we measured perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) concentrations, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in 184 colostrum samples collected from women participating in a cohort study in eastern Slovakia between 2002 and 2004. During their hospital delivery stay, mothers completed a food frequency questionnaire, and demographic and reproductive data were also collected. PFOS and PFOA predictors were identified by optimizing multiple linear regression models using Akaike’s information criterion (AIC). The geometric mean concentration in colostrum was 35.3 pg/ml for PFOS and 32.8 pg/ml for PFOA., In multivariable models, parous women had 40% lower PFOS (95% CI: −56 to −17%) and 40% lower PFOA (95% CI: −54 to −23%) concentrations compared with nulliparous women. Moreover, fresh/frozen fish consumption, longer birth intervals, and Slovak ethnicity were associated with higher PFOS and PFOA concentrations in colostrum. These results will help guide the design of future epidemiologic studies examining milk PFAS concentrations in relation to health endpoints in children. PMID:27244128

  11. Perfluorooctanoic acid affects endocytosis involving clathrin light chain A and microRNA-133b-3p in mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yin; Wang, Jianshe; Guo, Xuejiang; Yan, Shengmin; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an abundant perfluoroalkyl substance widely applied in industrial and consumer products. Among its potential health hazards, testicular toxicity is of major concern. To explore the potential effect of miRNA on post-translational regulation after PFOA exposure, changes in miRNAs were detected via miRNA array. Seventeen miRNAs were differentially expressed (eight upregulated, nine downregulated) in male mouse testes after exposure to 5mg/kg/d of PFOA for 28d (>1.5-fold and Pendocytosis and blood-testis barrier (BTB) processes. These changes were further verified by immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Endocytosis-related genes were selected for qPCR analysis, with many found to be significantly changed after PFOA treatment, including epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8), Eps15, cortactin, cofilin, espin, vinculin, and zyxin. We further predicted the potential interaction between changed miRNAs and proteins, which indicated that miRNAs might play a role in the post-translational regulation of gene expression after PFOA treatment in mouse testes. Among them, miR-133b-3p/clathrin light chain A (CLTA) was selected and verified in vitro by transfection and luciferase activity assay. Results showed that PFOA exposure affects endocytosis in mouse testes and that CLTA is a potential target of miR-133b-3p. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective Removal of Perfluorooctanoic Acid Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Modified TiO2 Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals have attracted worldwide concern owing to their wide occurrence and resistance to most conventional treatment processes. In this work, a novel photocatalyst was fabricated by modifying TiO2 nanotube arrays with molecularly imprinted polymers. The molecularly imprinted polymer-modified TiO2 nanotubes (MIP-TiO2 NTs were characterized and tested for the selective removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA from water. The amount of PFOA adsorbed by the MIP-TiO2 NTs was as high as 0.8125 μg/cm2. PFOA decomposition and defluorination by the MIP-TiO2 NTs reached 84% and 30.2% after 8 h reaction, respectively. The Freundlich model and pseudo-first-order kinetics were used to describe the observed adsorption and decomposition of PFOA, respectively. Compared with TiO2 NTs and nonmolecularly imprinted polymer-modified TiO2 NTs, the MIP-TiO2 NTs exhibited not only a higher PFOA degradation rate but also enhanced selectivity for target chemicals. The MIP-TiO2 NTs could also selectively and rapidly remove PFOA from secondary effluent, exhibiting a decomposition of 81.1%, almost as high as that observed in pure water. Investigation of the effects of scavengers on the photocatalytic reaction indicated that photogenerated holes were the main oxidant for PFOA decomposition, and the PFOA degradation mechanism and pathway were proposed.

  13. Highly efficient removal of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution by H2O2-enhanced electrocoagulation-electroflotation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrocoagulation (EC technique was used to investigate the removal performance of aqueous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA with relatively high concentration as simulating the wastewater from organic fluorine industry. A comparison was done with the similar amount of coagulant between EC and chemical coagulation process. PFOA removal obtained was higher with EC process, especially for Fe anode. Several factors were studied to optimize the EC process. At the optimal operating parameters including 37.5 mA/cm2 of current density, initial pH 3.77, and 180 rpm of mixing speed, 93% of PFOA could be removed with 100 mg/L of initial concentration after 90-min electrolysis. Furthermore, the remove efficiency could be obviously improved by H2O2 intermittent addition, which removed more than 99% of PFOA within 40-min EC. It could be attributed to that H2O2 facilitated the oxidative transformation from ferrous to ferric ion. In addition, the adsorptive removal of aqueous PFOA on Fe flocs during EC was also verified by fourier transform infrared spectra.

  14. Carboxymethyl chitosan modulates the genotoxic risk and oxidative stress of perfluorooctanoic acid in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagr Kh. Abdel-Gawad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is one of the most commonly used perfluorinated compounds. Being a persistent environmental pollutant, it can accumulate in human tissues via various exposure routes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the protective role of carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC against PFOA-induced toxicity at the genetic and protein levels in Nile tilapia using the biochemistry analysis, SDS–PAGE electrophoresis, comet assay and RFLP–PCR methods. The results indicated that exposure to PFOA in water (30 mg/L for 30 days resulted in a significant increase in ALT, AST, BUN, creatinine accompanied with a significant decrease in total protein and albumin. PFOA also increased DNA damage in electrophoresis condition and induced DNA and protein polymorphic band in comparison to control fish. CMC alone at 1% and 2% (W/W in fish diets did not induce any alterations in the biochemical parameters, DNA or protein levels compared to the control group. Furthermore, CMC succeeded to decrease the toxicity of PFOA in a dose dependent manner. It could be concluded that PFOA induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in fish similar to those reported in mammals. CMC is a promising candidate and has a protective effect against-PFOA induced in vivo DNA damage and protein alteration in Nile tilapia. This effect might be attributable to its ability to decrease intracellular ROS and its antioxidant properties.

  15. Enhanced degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid using dielectric barrier discharge with La/Ce-doped TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanping; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Lijun; Guo, Yongbo; Mu, Qinglin; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2017-06-01

    A synergistic system of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) combined with La/Ce-TiO 2 was developed to investigate the decomposition performance of the environmentally persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). The La/Ce-TiO 2 was modified by sol-gel method and characterized by XRD, SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray. The effects of PFOA concentration, applied voltage, initial pH, liquid conductivity, and additives on the removal rate of PFOA were explored. The results showed that the La/Ce-TiO 2 exhibited excellent catalytic effects on PFOA degradation in DBD system. When the applied voltage, PFOA concentration, pH value, and solution volume were 75 V, 100 mg/L, 3.63, and 1000 mL, respectively, the removal efficiency of PFOA was up to 97.5% by adding La 4 Ce 1 -TiO 2 in DBD. The corresponding defluorination ratio, TOC removal, and decomposition yield were 62.2%, 57.3%, and 37 g/kWh, respectively. Furthermore, five main intermediates including CF 3 (CF 2 ) 6 H, CF 3 (CF 2 ) 5 COOH, CF 3 (CF 2 ) 5 COH, CF 3 (CF 2 ) 4 COOH, and CF 3 CF 2 CF 3 were identified with LC-MS, and the degradation pathways of PFOA were proposed. The degradation mechanisms revealed that hydroxyl radicals play a significant role in the degradation of PFOA in the synergistic system.

  16. Activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid for 28 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengmin; Wang, Jianshe; Dai, Jiayin

    2015-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids are widely used in numerous industrial and commercial applications due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Although perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is associated with hepatomegaly through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activation, liver fat accumulation and changes in gene expression related to fatty acid metabolism could still be found in PPARα-null mice exposed to PFOA. To explore the potential effects of PFOA on sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) activity, male mice were dosed with either Milli-Q water or PFOA at doses of 0.08, 0.31, 1.25, 5, and 20 mg/kg/day by gavage for 28 days. Liver total cholesterol concentrations and PFOA contents showed a dose-dependent decrease and increase, respectively. Transcriptional activity of PPARα and SREBPs was significantly enhanced in livers. Protein expression analyzed by Western blotting showed that PFOA exposure stimulated SREBP maturation. Furthermore, proteins blocked SREBP precursor transport, insulin-induced gene 1 (INSIG1) and INSIG2 proteins, as well as a protein-mediated nuclear SREBP proteolysis, F-box and WD-40 domain protein 7, decreased in mouse liver exposed to PFOA. The expression levels of the miR-183-96-182 cluster, which is possibly involved in a regulatory loop intermediated by SREBPs maturation, were also increased in the mouse liver after PFOA exposure. We also observed that PFOA induced lipid content and PPARα in Hepa 1-6 cells after exposure to PFOA for 72 h but SREBPs were not activated in vitro. These results demonstrated that SREBPs were maturated by activating the miR-183-96-182 cluster-SREBP regulatory loop in PFOA-exposed mouse liver.

  17. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) but not perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) showed DNA damage in comet assay on Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kosuke; Oashi, Takahiro; Oami, Kazunori; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe; Saito, Norimitsu; Sato, Itaru; Tsuda, Shuji

    2010-12-01

    Persistent perfluorinated organic compounds such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are distributed widely in the global environment including wildlife and human. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity of PFOS and PFOA using the novel in vivo comet assay developed for Paramecium caudatum. For the comet assay, large nuclei squeezed out of the paramecia with 0.25 M sucrose containing 0.6% Triton X-100 were embedded in a layer of agarose gel placed over the slide glass. N-methyl-N´-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) were successfully used for positive controls. Productions of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also measured in paramecia. PFOS did not cause DNA damage on any conditions examined. On the other hand, 12 and 24 hr exposure to PFOA (100 µM) increased DNA migration in electrophoresis condition at pH 13, but not at pH 12.1, suggesting that the DNA damage may be alkali labile site (such as apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site). Exposure of paramecia to 100 µM PFOA for 1, 3 and 24 hr and to 10 µM PFOA for 24 hr significantly increased intracellular ROS. Under the same condition, however, 8-OH-dG level was not affected by PFOA. The PFOA-induced DNA damage was not abolished by the application of 100 µM GSH which completely inhibited the increase of intracellular ROS. In conclusion, the PFOA-induced in vivo DNA damage was first shown in paramecia, and the DNA damage might not be directly attributable to increase in intracellular ROS.

  18. Metabolic Profiling of Chicken Embryos Exposed to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA and Agonists to Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mattsson

    Full Text Available Untargeted metabolic profiling of body fluids in experimental animals and humans exposed to chemicals may reveal early signs of toxicity and indicate toxicity pathways. Avian embryos develop separately from their mothers, which gives unique possibilities to study effects of chemicals during embryo development with minimal confounding factors from the mother. In this study we explored blood plasma and allantoic fluid from chicken embryos as matrices for revealing metabolic changes caused by exposure to chemicals during embryonic development. Embryos were exposed via egg injection on day 7 to the environmental pollutant perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, and effects on the metabolic profile on day 12 were compared with those caused by GW7647 and rosiglitazone, which are selective agonists to peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. Analysis of the metabolite concentrations from allantoic fluid by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA showed clear separation between the embryos exposed to GW7647, rosiglitazone, and vehicle control, respectively. In blood plasma only GW7647 caused a significant effect on the metabolic profile. PFOA induced embryo mortality and increased relative liver weight at the highest dose. Sublethal doses of PFOA did not significantly affect the metabolic profile in either matrix, although single metabolites appeared to be altered. Neonatal mortality by PFOA in the mouse has been suggested to be mediated via activation of PPARα. However, we found no similarity in the metabolite profile of chicken embryos exposed to PFOA with those of embryos exposed to PPAR agonists. This indicates that PFOA does not activate PPAR pathways in our model at concentrations in eggs and embryos well above those found in wild birds. The present study suggests that allantoic fluid and plasma from chicken embryos are useful and complementary matrices for exploring effects on the metabolic

  19. Highly efficient electrochemical degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by F-doped Ti/SnO{sub 2} electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo, E-mail: boyang@szu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Chaojin [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Yu, Gang, E-mail: yg-den@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhuo, Qiongfang [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, The Ministry of Environment Protection, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Deng, Shubo [School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jinhua [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Hong [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A novel SnO{sub 2} electrode is prepared by F doping instead of the traditional Sb doping. • SnF{sub 4} as single-source precursor is used to fabricate the long-life Ti/SnO{sub 2}–F anode. • F-doped Ti/SnO{sub 2} anode possesses high OEP and decomposition ability for PFOA. • Further mechanistic detail of PFOA degradation on Ti/SnO{sub 2}–F electrode is proposed. - Abstract: The novel F-doped Ti/SnO{sub 2} electrode prepared by SnF{sub 4} as the single-source precursor was used for electrochemical degradation of aqueous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Higher oxidation reactivity and significantly longer service life were achieved for Ti/SnO{sub 2}–F electrode than Ti/SnO{sub 2}–X (X = Cl, Br, I, or Sb) electrode, which could decomposed over 99% of PFOA (50 mL of 100 mg L{sup −1}) within 30-min electrolysis. The property of Ti/SnO{sub 2}–F electrode and its electrooxidation mechanism were investigated by XRD, SEM–EDX, EIS, LSV, and interfacial resistance measurements. We propose that the similar ionic radii of F and O as well as strong electronegativity of F caused its electrochemical stability with high oxygen evolution potential (OEP) and smooth surface to generate weakly adsorbed ·OH. The preparation conditions of electrode were also optimized including F doping amount, calcination temperature, and dip coating times, which revealed the formation process of electrode. Additionally, the major mineralization product, F{sup −}, and low concentration of shorter chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) were detected in solution. So the reaction pathway of PFOA electrooxidation was proposed by intermediate analysis. These results demonstrate that Ti/SnO{sub 2}–F electrode is promising for highly efficient treatment of PFOA in wastewater.

  20. Occupational exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and serum levels of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in an aging population from upstate New York: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Eva M; Bloom, Michael S; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Yucel, Recai M; Shrestha, Srishti; Fitzgerald, Edward F

    2018-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are environmentally persistent amphiphilic compounds. Exposure to two PFASs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is linked to specific occupations and industries. This study examines the contribution of past occupational PFAS exposure to serum PFOS and PFOA levels among 154 older adults in New York State. Serum PFOS and PFOA levels were compared to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Potential occupational exposure to any PFAS was determined from work histories, reviewed by an industrial hygienist, and assessed in relation to current serum PFOS and PFOA levels using exposure probability, duration and cumulative exposure. We observed 25% higher serum PFOS and 80% higher PFOA levels in study participants compared to NHANES. No participants reported PFAS chemical manufacturing work, but n = 68 reported work in occupations and industries known to use PFASs. We found that participants with high cumulative workplace exposure had 34% higher serum PFOS levels compared to participants without occupational exposure, adjusted for age, sex and income. Serum PFOS levels were 26% higher for participants with longer occupational exposure durations. The probability of occupational PFAS exposure metric was not associated with serum PFOS. Serum PFOA was not associated with any measure of occupational exposure. Occupational exposure may contribute to total PFOS body burden in this study population, even among workers not directly involved in manufacturing PFASs. PFAS exposure assessments should evaluate the workplace as a potential source, even when workplace exposures are assumed to be low or moderate.

  1. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO{sub 2} in the presence of oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan, E-mail: wang_yuan@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Pengyi [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: In the presence of oxalic acid, perfluoroocatanoic acid (PFOA) was effectively decomposed over TiO{sub 2} with the irradiation of 254 nm UV light under nitrogen atmosphere. A possible reductive mechanism induced by carboxyl anion radicals (CO{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) and photogenerated electron was proposed. Highlights: {yields} Perfluoroocatanoic acid (PFOA) was decomposed effectively over TiO{sub 2} with the irradiation of 254 nm UV light under nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of oxalic acid. {yields} Photogenerated electrons and carboxyl anion radicals (CO{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) had the ability to induce the reductive decomposition of PFOA. {yields} Carboxyl anion radicals (CO{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) in the photocatalytic process was confirmed by the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. {yields} The results of the addition of potassium persulfate (K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}), as an electron acceptor, validated the action of photogenerated electrons for the decomposition of PFOA. - Abstract: Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of perfluoroocatanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO{sub 2} under 254 nm UV light was investigated. Adding oxalic acid as a hole-scavenger significantly accelerated PFOA decomposition under nitrogen atmosphere. Fluoride ion, formic acid and six shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) bearing C{sub 2}-C{sub 7} were identified as intermediates. When using perchloric acid (HClO{sub 4}) as a replacement of oxalic acid to maintain the same pH of the reaction solution, PFOA did not decomposition efficiently. Compared with oxalic acid, potassium iodide (KI, another hole-scavenger) also led to a slower PFOA decomposition, while the addition of an electron acceptor (potassium persulfate, K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) obviously inhibited PFOA decomposition. This suggested that oxalic acid played more than one role in PFOA decomposition rather than simply providing acidity and acting as a hole

  2. Using bamboo charcoal as solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the ultratrace-level determination of perfluorooctanoic acid in water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ru-Song; Wang, Xia; Wang, Xu; Lin, Jin-Ming; Yuan, Jin-Peng; Chen, Li-Zong

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, bamboo charcoal, a new kind of material with special microporous and biological characteristics, has attracted great attention in many application fields. In this paper, the potential of bamboo charcoal to act as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbent for the enrichment of the environmental pollutant perfluorooctanoic acid, which is one of the newest types of persistent organic pollutants in the environment, has been investigated. Important factors that may influence the enrichment efficiency--such as the eluent and its volume, the flow rate of the sample, the pH of the sample and the sample volume--were investigated and optimized in detail. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection for PFOA was 0.2 ng L(-1). The experimental results indicated that this approach gives good linearity (R(2) = 0.9995) over the range 1-1000 ng L(-1) and good reproducibility, with a relative standard deviation of 4.0% (n = 5). The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of real water samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. The average spiked recoveries were in the range 79.5-118.3%. All of the results indicate that the proposed method could be used for the determination of PFOA at ultratrace levels in water samples.

  3. The role of PPAR alpha in perfluorooctanoic acid induced developmental cardiotoxicity and l-carnitine mediated protection-Results of in ovo gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Jiang, Qixiao; Geng, Min; Zhu, Li; Xia, Yunqiu; Khanal, Aashish; Wang, Chunbo

    2017-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a persistent organic pollutant. This study established an in ovo peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) silencing model in chicken embryo heart, and investigated the role of PPAR alpha in PFOA induced developmental cardiotoxicity. The in ovo silencing was achieved by introducing lentivirus expressing PPAR alpha siRNA into ED2 chicken embryo via microinjection (0.05ul/g egg weight). Transfection efficacy was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy and western blotting. To assess the developmental cardiotoxicity, cardiac function (heart rate) and morphology (right ventricular wall thickness) were measured in D1 hatchling chickens. 2mg/kg (egg weight) PFOA exposure at ED0 induced significant elevation of heart rate and thinning of right ventricular wall thickness in D1 hatchling chickens. PPAR alpha silencing did not prevent PFOA-induced elevation of heart rate; however, it did significantly increase the right ventricular wall thickness as compared to PFOA exposed animals. Meanwhile, PPAR alpha silencing did not abolish the protective effects exerted by exposure to 100mg/kg (egg weight) l-carnitine. In conclusion, PFOA-induced heart rate elevation is likely PPAR alpha independent, while the right ventricular wall thinning seems to be PPAR alpha dependent. The protective effects of l-carnitine do not require PPAR alpha. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Environmental Pollutants Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid Upregulate Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) in Brown-Fat Mitochondria Through a UCP1-Dependent Reduction in Food Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Mattsson, Charlotte L; Petrovic, Natasa; Rahman Qazi, Mousumi; Csikasz, Robert I; Chang, Shu-Ching; Butenhoff, John; DePierre, Joseph W; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The environmental pollutants perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) cause a dramatic reduction in the size of the major adipose tissue depots and a general body weight decrease when they are added to the food of mice. We demonstrate here that this is mainly due to a reduction in food intake; this reduction was not due to food aversion. Remarkably and unexpectedly, a large part of the effect of PFOA/PFOS on food intake was dependent on the presence of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in the mice. Correspondingly, PFOA/PFOS treatment induced recruitment of brown adipose tissue mitochondria: increased oxidative capacity and increased UCP1-mediated oxygen consumption (thermogenesis). In mice pair-fed to the food intake during PFOA/PFOS treatment in wildtype mice, brown-fat mitochondrial recruitment was also induced. We conclude that we have uncovered the existence of a regulatory component of food intake that is dependent upon brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity. The possible environmental consequences of this novel PFOA/PFOS effect (a possible decreased fitness) are noted, as well as the perspectives of this finding on the general understanding of control of food intake control and its possible extension to combatting obesity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Investigation of the Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS on Apoptosis and Cell Cycle in a Zebrafish (Danio rerio Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effects of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS on apoptosis and cell cycle in a zebrafish (Danio rerio liver cell line (ZFL. Treatment groups included a control group, PFOA-IC50, PFOA-IC80, PFOS-IC50 and PFOS-IC80 groups. IC50 and IC80 concentrations were identified by cellular modeling and MTT assays. mRNA levels of p53, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3 and NF-κB p65 were detected by qPCR. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry and the protein levels of p53, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3 and NF-κB p65 were determined by western blotting. Both PFOA and PFOS inhibited the growth of zebrafish liver cells, and the inhibition rate of PFOS was higher than that of PFOA. Bcl-2 expression levels in the four groups were significantly higher than the control group and Bcl-2 increased significantly in the PFOA-IC80 group. However, the expression levels of Bax in the four treatment groups were higher than the control group. The percentage of cell apoptosis increased significantly with the treatment of PFOA and PFOS (p < 0.05. Cell cycle and cell proliferation were blocked in both the PFOA-IC80 and PFOS-IC80 groups, indicating that PFOA-IC80 and PFOS-IC50 enhanced apoptosis in ZFL cells.

  6. Histopathologic Changes in the Uterus, Cervix and Vagina of Immature CD-1 Mice Exposed to Low Doses of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in a Uterotrophic Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Darlene; Reed, Casey E.; Moore, Alicia B.; Gibbs-Flournoy, Eugene A.; Hines, Erin P.; Wallace, Elizabeth A.; Stanko, Jason P.; Lu, Yi; Jefferson, Wendy N.; Newbold, Retha R.; Fenton, Suzanne E.

    2011-01-01

    The estrogenic and antiestrogenic potential of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was assessed using an immature mouse uterotrophic assay and by histologic evaluation of the uterus, cervix and vagina following treatment. Female offspring of CD-1 dams were weaned at 18 days old and assigned to groups of equal weight, and received 0, 0.01, 0.1, or 1 mg PFOA/kg BW/d by gavage with or without 17-β estradiol (E2, 500 μg/kg/d) from PND18-20 (n=8/treatment/block). At 24 hr after the third dose (PND 21), uteri were removed and weighed. Absolute and relative uterine weights were significantly increased in the 0.01 mg/kg PFOA only group. Characteristic estrogenic changes were present in all E2-treated mice; however, they were minimally visible in the 0.01 PFOA only mice. These data suggest that at a low dose PFOA produces minimal histopathologic changes in the reproductive tract of immature female mice, and does not antagonize the cellular effects of E2. PMID:22146484

  7. Molecular characterization of cytochrome P450 1A and 3A and the effects of perfluorooctanoic acid on their mRNA levels in rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) gills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yong; Wang Jianshe; Wei Yanhong; Zhang Hongxia; Liu Yang [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai Jiayin [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China)], E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn

    2008-07-07

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a potentially toxic perfluorinated compound (PFC), has been widely disseminated in the environment. In the present study, rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus) exposed to PFOA exhibited histopathological gill damage, including epithelial hyperplasia of the lamellae, inflammatory cell infiltration, and lamellar fusion. Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) play a central role in the metabolism and biotransformation of a wide range of endogenous substrates and foreign compounds. Thus, we studied the CYPs and the effects of waterborne PFOA on their corresponding mRNA levels in the gills of rare minnows. Two novel CYP cDNAs (CYP1A and CYP3A) were identified in rare minnow and their mRNAs were ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined. Upregulation of CYP3A mRNA was observed in the gills of male rare minnows exposed to 30 mg/L PFOA, while no significant changes occurred in exposed females. In contrast, down regulation of CYP1A mRNA was detected in the gills of male and female minnows exposed to PFOA. However, the effect of PFOA on gill mRNA levels of their potential regulators, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) for CYP1A, and pregnane X receptor (PXR) for CYP3A, were not consistent with the observed effects of PFOA on the corresponding CYP mRNA concentrations. This suggests a different or more complex transcriptional regulation of CYP expression following PFOA exposure.

  8. Changes in the levels of l-carnitine, acetyl-l-carnitine and propionyl-l-carnitine are involved in perfluorooctanoic acid induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qixiao; Wang, Chunbo; Xue, Chan; Xue, Lingfang; Wang, Meiting; Li, Changhao; Deng, Ziwen; Wang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a persistent organic pollutant, is associated with developmental toxicity. This study investigated the mechanism of PFOA-induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo, focusing on the interactions between developmental exposure to PFOA and the levels of l-carnitine (LC), acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) and propionyl-l-carnitine (PLC) in the heart. To evaluate the developmental cardiotoxicity, fertile chicken eggs were exposed to 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5mg/kg PFOA via air cell injection. Furthermore, exposure to 2mg/kg PFOA, with or without 100mg/kg LC were applied to investigate the effects of LC supplement. The results of functional and morphological assessments confirmed PFOA induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryo, which could be alleviated by co-exposure to LC. LC-MS/MS results also revealed remarkable decrease in LC, ALC and PLC levels in embryonic day six (ED6) chicken embryo hearts as well as LC level in embryonic day fifteen (ED15) chicken embryo hearts following developmental exposure to 2mg/kg PFOA. Meanwhile, co-exposure to 100mg/kg LC significantly elevated the levels of LC, ALC and PLC in chicken embryo hearts. Significantly elevated expression level of carnitine acetyltransferase (CRAT) in PFOA-exposed ED6 chicken embryo hearts was observed via western blotting, while LC co-exposure counteracted such changes. In conclusion, changes in the levels of LC, ALC and PLC in early embryonic stages are associated with PFOA induced developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryos. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Programming of metabolic effects in C57BL/6JxFVB mice by in utero and lactational exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esterik, J C J; Bastos Sales, L; Dollé, M E T; Håkansson, H; Herlin, M; Legler, J; van der Ven, L T M

    2016-03-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is known to cause developmental toxicity and is a suggested endocrine disrupting compound (EDC). Early life exposure to EDCs has been implicated in programming of the developing organism for chronic diseases later in life. Here we study perinatal metabolic programming by PFOA using an experimental design relevant for human exposure. C57BL/6JxFVB hybrid mice were exposed during gestation and lactation via maternal feed to seven low doses of PFOA at and below the NOAEL used for current risk assessment (3-3000 µg/kg body weight/day). After weaning, offspring were followed for 23-25 weeks without further exposure. Offspring showed a dose-dependent decrease in body weight from postnatal day 4 to adulthood. Growth under high fat diet in the last 4-6 weeks of follow-up was increased in male and decreased in female offspring. Both sexes showed increased liver weights, hepatic foci of cellular alterations and nuclear dysmorphology. In females, reductions in perigonadal and perirenal fat pad weights, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were also observed. Endocrine parameters, such as glucose tolerance, serum insulin and leptin, were not affected. In conclusion, our study with perinatal exposure to PFOA in mice produced metabolic effects in adult offspring. This is most likely due to disrupted programming of metabolic homeostasis, but the assayed endpoints did not provide a mechanistic explanation. The BMDL of the programming effects in our study is below the current point of departure used for calculation of the tolerable daily intake.

  10. The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide in Perfluorooctanoic Acid-Induced Developmental Cardiotoxicity and l-Carnitine Mediated Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA is an environmental contaminant that could induce developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo, which may be alleviated by l-carnitine. To explore the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO in such changes and the potential effects of l-carnitine, fertile chicken eggs were exposed to PFOA via an air cell injection, with or without l-carnitine co-treatment. The ROS and NO levels in chicken embryo hearts were determined with electron spin resonance (ESR, and the protein levels of the nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in chicken embryo hearts were assessed with western blotting. The results of ESR indicated that PFOA exposure induced an elevation in the ROS levels in ED19 chicken embryo hearts and hatchling chicken hearts, while l-carnitine could alleviate such changes. Meanwhile, increased NO levels were observed in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts following PFOA exposure, while l-carnitine co-treatment exerted modulatory effects. Western blotting revealed that p65 translocation in ED19 embryo hearts and hatchling hearts was enhanced by PFOA, while l-carnitine co-treatment alleviated such changes. iNOS expression levels in ED19 embryo hearts followed the same pattern as NO levels, while a suppression of expression was observed in hatchling hearts exposed to PFOA. ROS/NF-κB p65 and iNOS/NO seem to be involved in the late stage (ED19 and post hatch of PFOA-induced developmental cardiotoxicity in a chicken embryo. l-carnitine could exert anti-oxidant and NO modulatory effects in the developing chicken embryo hearts, which likely contribute to its cardioprotective effects.

  11. Home produced eggs: An important pathway of human exposure to perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) around a fluorochemical industrial park in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongqiao; Shi, Yajuan; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Meng; Sweetman, Andrew; Jones, Kevin; Johnson, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Dietary intake is considered to be a major pathway of human exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs). Chicken egg is an important contributor to the Chinese diet. In the present study, PFAAs in home produced eggs (HPEs) and commercially produced eggs (CPEs) surrounding a fluorochemical industrial park (FIP) in China were investigated. PFAAs in HPEs decreased with increasing distance from the FIP. HPEs were much more contaminated than CPEs, with PFAAs in CPEs comparable to or lower than those in HPEs from 20km away from the FIP. PFOA concentrations in HPEs were higher than the levels of PFOA in eggs from other studies reported so far. For the first time, PFBA was reported in eggs and detected in all egg samples. PFOA and PFBA were the predominant forms in HPEs, while PFOA, PFBA and PFOS dominated in CPEs. For PFOA, estimated daily intakes (EDI) were 233ng/kg·bw/day for adults and 657ng/kg·bw/day for children who consume HPEs at households about 2km away from the FIP. The EDI of PFOA for children via HPEs exceeded the reference dose value (333ng/kg·bw/day) proposed by the Environmental Working Group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification and quantification of linear and branched isomers of perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane sulfonic acids in contaminated groundwater in the veneto region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizzaro, Alessandro; Zaggia, Alessandro; Fant, Massimo; Conte, Lino; Falletti, Luigi

    2018-01-19

    Perfluoroalkylated acids (PFAAs) are ubiquitous xenobiotic substances characterized by high persistency, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity. They have generated global concern because of their widespread presence both in water and biota compartments. In the past four years, alarming levels of these pollutants have been found in both surface and groundwater collected in an area covering more than 150 square kilometers in the south-western part of the province of Vicenza (Veneto region, Italy). One of the sources of the contamination recognized by local authorities is a fluorochemicals production plant that produced PFAAs since late sixties by electrochemical fluorination involving the obtainment of a complex mixture of linear and branched isomers. Branched isomers account for a significant part of total long chain homologues (22%-35%). Because of the potential threat to public health and the absence of specific limits set for these pollutants by Directive 98/83/EC, local authorities have established the following performance limits for drinking water: 90 ng L -1 for PFOA + PFOS, (reduced to 40 ng L -1 in the most contaminated municipalities), 30 ng L -1 for PFOS and 300 ng L -1 for the sum of all other PFAAs. Given the non-negligible incidence of branched isomers, it appears very important to correctly identify and quantify their contribution to total PFAAs. A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem spectrometry LC-MS/MS method, coupled with solid phase extraction, was developed to identify and quantify 25 PFAAs including six branched isomers of PFOS and four branched isomers of PFOA. Expanded uncertainty, recovery and precision were determined and found to agree with the reference EPA method 537:2009. The quantification limit is comprised in the 1-5 ng L -1 range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of perfluorooctanoate for potential genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Butenhoff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA is a fully fluorinated eight-carbon fatty acid analog with exceptional stability toward degradation that has been used as an industrial surfactant and has been detected in environmental and biological matrices. Exposures to PFOA in the workplace and in the environment have continuously stimulated investigations into its potential human health hazards. In this article, the results of fifteen unpublished genotoxicity assays conducted with perfluorooctanoate (as either the linear or linear/branched ammonium salt (APFO or the linear/branched sodium salt are reported and include: seven mutation assays (three in vitro reverse mutation assays with histidine auxotrophic strains of Salmonella typhimurium, two in vitro reverse mutation assays with the tryptophan auxotrophic Escherichia coli WP2uvr strain, one in vitro mitotic recombination (gene conversion assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4, and an in vitro Chinese hamster ovary (CHO HGPRT forward mutation assay; seven studies to assess potential for chromosomal damage (three in vitro CHO chromosomal aberration studies, an in vitro human whole blood lymphocyte chromosomal aberration study, and three in vivo mouse micronucleus assays; and an in vitro C3H 10T1/2 cell transformation assay. Although PFOA has not been demonstrated to be metabolized, all in vitro assays were conducted both in the presence and in the absence of a mammalian hepatic microsomal activation system. These assays were originally described in twelve contract laboratory reports which have been available via the United States Environmental Protection Agency public docket (Administrative Record 226 for over a decade; however, the details of these assays have not been published previously in the open scientific literature. With the exception of limited positive findings at high and cytotoxic concentrations in some assay trials which reflected the likely consequence of cytotoxic disruption of normal cellular

  14. Reference Ranges for Serum Uric Acid among Healthy Assamese People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to establish reference ranges for serum uric acid among healthy adult Assamese population. Samples from 1470 aged 35–86 years were used to establish age and sex related reference range by the centile method (central 95 percentile for serum uric acid level. There were 51% (n=754 males and 49% (n=716 females; 75.9% (n=1115 of them were from urban area and the rest 24.1% (n=355 were from the rural area. Majority of the population were nonvegetarian (98.6%, n=1450 and only 1.4% (n=20 were vegetarian. The mean age, weight, height, and uric acid of the studied group were 53.6±11.3 years, 62.6±10.5 kg, 160±9.4 cm, and 5.5±1.4 mg/dL, respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the mean value of the abovementioned parameters between male and female. The observed reference range of uric acid in the population is 2.6–8.2 mg/dL which is wider than the current reference range used in the laboratory. Except gender (P<0.0001, we did not find any significant relation of uric acid with other selected factors.

  15. Long Range Chiral Imprinting of Cu(110) by Tartaric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, T J; Pushkarev, V; Wei, D; Lucci, F R; Sholl, D S; Gellman, A J; Sykes, E C. H.

    2013-10-31

    Restructuring of metals by chiral molecules represents an important route to inducing and controlling enantioselective surface chemistry. Tartaric acid adsorption on Cu(110) has served as a useful system for understanding many aspects of chiral molecule adsorption and ordering on a metal surface, and a number of chiral and achiral unit cells have been reported. Herein, we show that given the appropriate annealing treatment, singly deprotonated tartaric acid monolayers can restructure the Cu metal itself, and that the resulting structure is both highly ordered and chiral. Molecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy reveals that singly deprotonated tartaric acid extracts Cu atoms from the Cu(110) surface layer and incorporates them into highly ordered, chiral adatom arrays capped by a continuous molecular layer. Further evidence for surface restructuring comes from images of atom-deep trenches formed in the Cu(110) surface during the process. These trenches also run in low symmetry directions and are themselves chiral. Simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images are consistent with the appearance of the added atom rows and etched trenches. The chiral imprinting results in a long-range, highly ordered unit cell covering the whole surface as confirmed by low energy electron diffraction. Details of the restructuring mechanism were further investigated via time-lapse imaging at elevated temperature. This work reveals the stages of nanoscale surface restructuring and offers an interesting method for chiral modification of an achiral metal surface.

  16. TOWARD A RISK ASSESSMENT OF PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS),and fluorotelomer alcoholsare surfactants that have wide applications in industrial and consumer products. Various fluorotelomer alcohols are known to be metabolized to perfluo...

  17. Determination of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate in water matrices by inline matrix elimination liquid chromatography with reversed phase separation and suppressed conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, N Harihara; Manigandan, P; Wille, Andrea; Radhakrishnan, Ganga

    2011-09-01

    This work describes a new method for the determination of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in water matrices by suppressed conductivity detection. Separation was achieved by isocratic elution on a reversed-phase column thermostated at 45°C using an aqueous mobile phase containing boric acid and acetonitrile. The PFOA and PFOS content in the water matrix were quantified by a pre-concentration technique. For the concentration range of 1 to 15 ng/mL and 2 to 30 ng/mL, the linear calibration curve for PFOA and PFOS yielded coefficients of determination (R(2)) of 0.9995 and 0.9985, respectively. The relative standard deviations were smaller than 1.5% for PFOA and PFOS. The retention-time precision of four consecutive 12 h injections was smaller than 0.641% and 0.818%, respectively. The presence of common divalent cations, such as calcium, magnesium, and iron in water matrices impairs PFOS recovery. This drawback was overcome by applying inline matrix elimination method. The optimized method was successfully applied for drinking water, ground water, and seawater samples.

  18. Sorbic Hydroxamic Acid, an Antifungal Agent Effective over a Wide pH Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudman, W. F.

    1963-01-01

    Sorbic hydroxamic acid was prepared from sorbic acid by esterification and treatment with hydroxylamine (mp 133 to 135 C, pKa 8.8). Its ultraviolet spectrum in acid solution had a single absorption maximum at 262 mμ; in alkaline solution the maximal absorption shifted to 255 mμ and significant absorption appeared at 280 to 300 mμ. At concentrations of 0.1% (w/v), sorbic hydroxamic acid prevented the growth of Aspergillus niger, Penicillium notatum, Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium herbarum, and a Rhizopus species in grape juice over the pH range 3.6 to 9.2, although sorbic acid was not effective at pH 5.7 and above. PMID:16349636

  19. Associations of in Utero Exposure to Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids with Human Semen Quality and Reproductive Hormones in Adult Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because...

  20. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  1. Thioarsenides: a case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Wallace, A. F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.; Rosso, K. M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local-energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4S n ( n = 3, 4 and 5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions, and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals (vdW) bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis-base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis-acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long-range Lewis acid-base-directed vdW interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long-range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  2. Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Maternal Serum and Indices of Fetal Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Cathrine C; Bech, Bodil H; Nohr, Ellen A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies indicated an association between intrauterine exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and lower birth weight. However, these perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have to some extent been substituted by other compounds on which little is known...

  3. Efficiencies of acid catalysts in the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over a range of combined severity factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae-Won Lee; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    Dicarboxylic organic acids have properties that differ from those of sulfuric acid during hydrolysis of lignocellulose. To investigate the effects of different acid catalysts on the hydrolysis and degradation of biomass compounds over a range of thermochemical pretreatments, maleic, oxalic and sulfuric acids were each used at the same combined severity factor (CSF)...

  4. Thyroid disruption by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coperchini, F; Awwad, O; Rotondi, M; Santini, F; Imbriani, M; Chiovato, L

    2017-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are two fluorinated compounds widely used in industry because of their useful chemical characteristics. They were identified as endocrine disruptors due to their ability to interfere with thyroid function. The resistance of PFOA and PFOS to environmental degradation, their bio-accumulation in food chains, and their long half-life raised concern in the scientific community, and several studies were performed with the aim to establish the real dangerousness of these compounds for the human health. The present review will focus on the effects of PFOA and PFOS on the thyroid gland taking into account in vitro experiments, animal studies, and human data. PFOS and PFOA reduce the circulating levels of thyroid hormones in diet-exposed animals, mainly by increasing their metabolic clearance rate. An accumulation of PFOS and PFOA was documented in thyroid cells, and a cytotoxic effect was observed after exposure to extremely high concentrations of these compounds. In environmentally exposed communities and in the general population, the most consistent effect of exposure to PFOA, and to a less extent to PFOS, is the occurrence of hypothyroidism. Women and children appear to be more at risk of developing mild thyroid failure. Pregnant women with circulating thyroid antibodies might be at risk of developing subclinical hypothyroidism, mainly when exposed at high doses of PFOS. The relative risks for thyroid cancer in people exposed to PFOA and PFOS were low and based on a few cases. Moreover, there was no consistent finding across all or even most studies.

  5. Intensification of sonochemical degradation of ammonium perfluorooctanoate by persulfate oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feifei; Guo, Weilin; Wang, Anqi; Leng, Yanqiu; Li, Helian

    2014-03-01

    Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) is an emerging environmental pollutant attracting significant attention due to its global distribution, high persistence, and bioaccumulation properties. The decomposition of APFO in aqueous solution with a combination of persulfate oxidant and ultrasonic irradiation was investigated. The effects of operating parameters, such as ultrasonic power, persulfate concentration, APFO concentration, and initial media pH on APFO degradation were discussed. In the absence of persulfate, 35.5% of initial APFO in 46.4 μmol/L solution under ultrasound irradiation, was decomposed rapidly after 120 min with the defluorination ratio reaching 6.73%. In contrast, when 10 mmol/L persulfate was used, 51.2% of initial APFO (46.4 μmol/L) was decomposed and the defluorination ratio reached 11.15% within 120 min reaction time. Enhancement of the decomposition of APFO can be explained by acceleration of substrate decarboxylation, induced by sulfate radical anions formed from the persulfate during ultrasonic irradiation. The SO4(-•)/APFO reactions at the bubble-water interface appear to be the primary pathway for the sonochemical degradation of the perfluorinated surfactants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Occurrence of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctanesulfonate in the Korean water system: Implication to water intake exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung-Kyu, E-mail: skkim89@gmail.com [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (BK-21), Seoul National University, Kwanak-gu Shilim-dong, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kho, Young Lim [School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Eulji University (Korea, Republic of); Shoeib, Mahiba [Environment Canada, Science and Technology Branch, Ontario (Canada); Kim, Kyoung-Soo, E-mail: skysil99@empal.com [Center for Chemical Safety Management, Chonbuk National University, 664-141 ga Dukjin-dong Duckjin-gu, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Ryul [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (BK-21), Seoul National University, Kwanak-gu Shilim-dong, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Eun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong-Seung [Environmental Policy Division, Korea Environment Institute, Eunpyung-ku, Bulkwang-dong 613-2, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) measured in surface running waters indicated the existence of different emission sources in eight main city basins. The tap water reflected the contamination pattern and levels in their corresponding source water basins. The daily intakes through tap water consumption ranged from <0.01 to 0.73 ng kg{sup -1} d{sup -1} for perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and <0.01 to 0.08 ng kg{sup -1} d{sup -1} for perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS). Tap water intake-derived exposure accounted for 8.6%-101% (for PFOA) and while <10% (for PFOS) of total daily exposure, which was estimated from Korean serum concentrations using a pharmacokinetic model. Our findings indicate that tap water intake could be an important contributor to PFOA exposure in Korean populations; accordingly, additional efforts are necessary to improve the removal efficiency of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in the water purification process. However, more fundamentally the aim would be to reduce the discharge of PFCs from potential sources within the basin. - Highlights: > Tap waters reflected the source-water contamination caused by local emission source. > Tap water intake-derived exposure was significant for PFOA while not for PFOS. > For PFOA, human exposure was strongly associated with ambient water contamination. > Efforts are necessary to improve PFOA removal efficiency and reduce its discharge. - Tap water intake accounted for a significant portion of total PFOA exposure for Korean citizens living along the river contaminated by the highest PFOA in this study.

  7. Impact of Exposure Uncertainty on the Association between Perfluorooctanoate and Preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanasi, Raghavendhran; Shin, Hyeong-Moo; Vieira, Verónica M; Savitz, David A; Bartell, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty in exposure estimates from models can result in exposure measurement error and can potentially affect the validity of epidemiological studies. We recently used a suite of environmental models and an integrated exposure and pharmacokinetic model to estimate individual perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) serum concentrations and assess the association with preeclampsia from 1990 through 2006 for the C8 Health Project participants. The aims of the current study are to evaluate impact of uncertainty in estimated PFOA drinking-water concentrations on estimated serum concentrations and their reported epidemiological association with preeclampsia. For each individual public water district, we used Monte Carlo simulations to vary the year-by-year PFOA drinking-water concentration by randomly sampling from lognormal distributions for random error in the yearly public water district PFOA concentrations, systematic error specific to each water district, and global systematic error in the release assessment (using the estimated concentrations from the original fate and transport model as medians and a range of 2-, 5-, and 10-fold uncertainty). Uncertainty in PFOA water concentrations could cause major changes in estimated serum PFOA concentrations among participants. However, there is relatively little impact on the resulting epidemiological association in our simulations. The contribution of exposure uncertainty to the total uncertainty (including regression parameter variance) ranged from 5% to 31%, and bias was negligible. We found that correlated exposure uncertainty can substantially change estimated PFOA serum concentrations, but results in only minor impacts on the epidemiological association between PFOA and preeclampsia. Avanasi R, Shin HM, Vieira VM, Savitz DA, Bartell SM. 2016. Impact of exposure uncertainty on the association between perfluorooctanoate and preeclampsia in the C8 Health Project population. Environ Health Perspect 124:126-132; http://dx.doi.org/10

  8. Formation of C7F15COOH (PFOA) and other perfluorocarboxylic acids during the atmospheric oxidation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallington, T. J.; Hurley, M. D.; Xia, J.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations using a three-dimensional global atmospheric chemistry model (IMPACT) indicate that n-C8F17CH2CH2-OH (widely used in industrial and consumer products) degrades in the atmosphere to give perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFOA is persistent......, bioaccumulative, and potentially toxic Molar yields of PFOA depend on location and season, are in the range of 1-10 and are of the correct order of magnitude to explain the observed levels in Arctic fauna. Fluorotelomer alcohols such as n-C8F17CH2CH2OH appear to be a significant global source of persistent...

  9. NMR assignments and the acid-base characterization of the pomegranate ellagitannin punicalagin in the acidic pH-range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszni, Márta; Marosi, Attila; Larive, Cynthia K

    2013-07-01

    In exploring the capability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for pomegranate juice analysis, the eight aromatic singlet resonances of α- and β-punicalagin were clearly identified in the (1)H NMR spectra of juice samples. The four downfield resonances were found to be sensitive to small pH changes around pH 3.50 where the NMR spectra of the juice samples were recorded. To understand this unusual behavior, the (1)H and (13)C resonance assignments of the punicalagin anomers were determined in aqueous solution and pH titrations with UV and (1)H NMR detection carried out to characterize the acid-base properties of punicalagin over the pH range 2-8. Simultaneous fitting of all of the pH-sensitive (1)H NMR signals produced similar but significantly different pKa values for the first two deprotonation equilibria of the gallagic acid moiety of the punicalagin α- (pKa1 = 4.57 ± 0.02, pKa2 = 5.63 ± 0.03) and β- (pKa1 = 4.36 ± 0.01, pKa2 = 5.47 ± 0.02) anomers. Equivalent pKa values, (α : 6.64 ± 0.01, β : 6.63± 0.01) were measured for the third deprotonation step involving the ellagic acid group, in good agreement with a prior literature report. The punicalagin anomer equilibrium readjusts in parallel with the proton dissociation steps as the pH is raised such that β-punicalagin becomes the most abundant anomer at neutral pH. The unusual upfield shifts observed for the glucose H3 and H5 resonances with increasing pH along with the shift in the α/β anomer equilibrium are likely the consequence of a conformational rearrangement.

  10. Bilateral uric acid nephrolithiasis and ureteral hypertrophy in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Robert A.; Bildfell, Rob; Henny, Charles J.; Buhler, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of uric acid nephrolithiasis in a free-ranging river otter (Lontra canadensis). A 7 yr old male river otter collected from the Skagit River of western Washington (USA) had bilateral nephrolithiasis and severely enlarged ureters (one of 305 examined [0.33%]). The uroliths were 97% uric acid and 3% protein. Microscopic changes in the kidney were confined to expansion of renal calyces, minor loss of medullary tissue, and multifocal atrophy of the cortical tubules. No inflammation was observed in either kidney or the ureters. The ureters were enlarged due to marked hypertrophy of smooth muscle plus dilation of the lumen. Fusion of the major calyces into a single ureteral lumen was several cm distal to that of two adult male otters used as histopathologic control specimens. This case report is part of a large contaminant study of river otters collected from Oregon and Washington. It is important to understand diseases and lesions of the otter as part of our overall evaluation of this population.

  11. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 2 Amino Acid Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Cao, T.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Berger, E. L.; Messenger, S.; Clemett, S. J.; Aponte, J. C.; Elsila, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble, unstructured kerogen-like components, as well as structured nano-globules of macromolecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Due to the differences in extractability of soluble and insoluble organic materials, the analysis methods for each differ and are often performed independently. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses, when performed concurrently, can provide a wider understanding of spatial distribution, and elemental, structural and isotopic composition of organic material in primitive meteorites. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques in combination with in situ microscale observation, we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in the primitive CR2 chondrite Miller Range (MIL) 090657. In accompanying abstracts (Cao et al. and Messenger et al.) we discuss insoluble organic material in the samples. By performing the consortium studies, we aim to improve our understanding of the relationship between the meteorite minerals and the soluble and insoluble organic phases and to delineate which species formed within the meteorite and those that formed in nebular or presolar environments. In this abstract, we present the results of amino acid analyses of MIL 090657 by ultra performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acids are of interest because they are essential to life on Earth, and because they are present in sufficient structural, enantiomeric and isotopic diversity to allow insights into early solar system chemical processes. Furthermore, these are among the most isotopically anomalous species, yet at least some fraction are thought to have formed by aqueously-mediated processes during parent body alteration.

  12. Perfluorooctanoate: Placental and lactational transport pharmacokinetics in rats.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Mylchreest, E.; Gannon, S. A.; Butenhoff, J. L.; Kennedy, G.L., Jr.

    2005-07-01

    This study was conducted to develop a quantitative understanding of the potential for gestational and lactational transfer of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in the rat. Time-mated female rats were dosed by oral gavage once daily at concentrations of 3, 10, or 30 mg/kg/day of the ammonium salt of PFOA (APFO) starting on gestation (G) day 4 and continuing until sacrifice. On days 10, 15, and 21G, five rats per dose level were sacrificed and blood samples were collected 2h post-dose. Embryos were collected on day 10G, amniotic fluid, placentas, and embryos/fetuses were collected on days 15 and 21G, and fetal blood samples were collected on day 21G. Five rats per dose level were allowed to deliver and nurse their litters, and on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 post-partum (PP) milk and blood samples of maternal and pup were collected 2h post-dose. All samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) for PFOA concentration. Concentrations of PFOA in maternal plasma and milk attained steady state during the sampling interval. The steady-state concentrations in maternal plasma were 10-15, 25-30, and 60-75 microg/mL in rats receiving 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg, respectively. Steady-state concentrations in milk were approximately 10 times less than those in maternal plasma. The concentration of PFOA in fetal plasma on day 21G was approximately half the steady-state concentration in maternal plasma. The milk concentrations appeared to be generally comparable to the concentrations in pup plasma. Pup plasma concentrations decreased from day 3PP to day 7PP, and were similar on days 7, 14, and 21PP at all dose levels. PFOA was detected in placenta (days 15 and 21G), amniotic fluid (days 15 and 21G), embryo (days 10 and 15G), and fetus (day 21G). These pharmacokinetics allow estimation of the dose to developing and nursing rat offspring following maternal exposure.

  13. Estimation and validation of biomarker-based exposures for historical ammonium perfluorooctanoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreckmann, Kim H; Sakr, Carine J; Leonard, Robin C; Dawson, Barbara J

    2009-09-01

    Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) exposures were estimated for use in an occupational mortality study using detailed work histories of cohort members and an exposure reconstruction model developed from occupational information and serum PFO(-) data collected in 2004 as part of a cross-sectional health survey. Measured serum PFO(-) levels of the health survey participants were linked with the job title held by the individuals at the time of sampling. The median, range, and distribution of serum levels were calculated to determine the typical exposure intensity for each job title. High variability was observed in the serum levels of workers within the same job titles. In addition, working in many "APFO-use" jobs did not result in higher exposure than working in "no APFO-use" jobs. Each job title was then assigned to one of three relative APFO job exposure categories (low, medium, or high). Participants' length of time in their job was examined in relation to their serum PFO(-) level and found unlikely to contribute to misclassification of job titles within exposure categories. The mean of the serum PFO(-) measurements for each job exposure category served as the mean intensity factor. Subsequently, the job exposure categories were applied to all historical job titles of the mortality cohort based on their correspondence with job titles represented in the health survey. The resulting job exposure matrix was validated with additional historical blood data collected between 1979 through 2002 from voluntary participants in a separate biomonitoring program. The validation analyses showed general agreement between estimated and measured exposure, reflecting the within-job-title variability observed in measured serum levels used to classify job exposure.

  14. Δ12-Fatty acid desaturase from Candida parapsilosis is a multifunctional desaturase producing a range of polyunsaturated and hydroxylated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Buček

    Full Text Available Numerous Δ12-, Δ15- and multifunctional membrane fatty acid desaturases (FADs have been identified in fungi, revealing great variability in the enzymatic specificities of FADs involved in biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Here, we report gene isolation and characterization of novel Δ12/Δ15- and Δ15-FADs named CpFad2 and CpFad3, respectively, from the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis. Overexpression of CpFad3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains supplemented with linoleic acid (Δ9,Δ12-18:2 and hexadecadienoic acid (Δ9,Δ12-16:2 leads to accumulation of Δ15-PUFAs, i.e., α-linolenic acid (Δ9,Δ12,Δ15-18:3 and hexadecatrienoic acid with an unusual terminal double bond (Δ9,Δ12,Δ15-16:3. CpFad2 produces a range of Δ12- and Δ15-PUFAs. The major products of CpFad2 are linoleic and hexadecadienoic acid (Δ9,Δ12-16:2, accompanied by α-linolenic acid and hexadecatrienoic acid (Δ9,Δ12,Δ15-16:3. Using GC/MS analysis of trimethylsilyl derivatives, we identified ricinoleic acid (12-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid as an additional product of CpFad2. These results demonstrate that CpFAD2 is a multifunctional FAD and indicate that detailed analysis of fatty acid derivatives might uncover a range of enzymatic selectivities in other Δ12-FADs from budding yeasts (Ascomycota: Saccharomycotina.

  15. A Description of Reference Ranges for Organic Acids in Urine Samples from A Pediatric Population in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyfi, Fatemeh; Lukacs, Zoltan; Varasteh, Abdolreza

    2017-10-01

    Organic acids refer to a family of compounds that are intermediates in a variety of metabolic pathways. Many organic acids are present in urine from clinically normal individuals. Elevated levels of urine organic acids cause to the organic acidurias, disorders in which some metabolic pathways in organic acid metabolism are blocked. The present work identified major and minor urinary acidic metabolites in normal subjects, and their quantitative ranges in a pediatric population of Iran. Two hundred and fifty-one healthy subjects, including 132 males and 119 females, from 2 days to 15 years of age were enrolled. Urinary organic acids were extracted from urine with organic solvents and identified and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results provide a foundation on which to check results for patients with potentially abnormal organic acidurias. By this method 98 organic acids were identified in a pediatric population of Iran. The present work identifies and quantifies major and minor urinary metabolites excreted by normal subjects. We also analyzed urine from 30 patients with organic acid metabolism abnormalities and compared the concentrations of specific organic acids with those from urines of normal individuals.

  16. Long range transport of air pollutants in Europe and acid precipitation in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Nordo

    1976-01-01

    Observations show that pollutants from large emission sources may cause significant air concentrations 500 to 1000 miles away. Very acid precipitation occurs in such periods. The scavenging is often intensified by the topography. Case studies will be presented, with special emphasis on acid precipitation in Scandinavia. Large scale dispersion models have been developed...

  17. Phenotypic Dichotomy Following Developmental Exposure to Perfluorooctanic Acid (PFOA) Exposure in CD-1 Mice: Low Doses Induce Elevated Serum, Leptin, Insulin, and Overweight in Mid-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The synthetic surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a proven developmental toxicant in mice, causing prenatal pregnancy loss, increased neonatal mortality, delayed eye opening, and abnormal mammary gland growth in animals exposed during fetal life. PFOA is found in the ser...

  18. Perfluoroalkyl chemicals and elevated serum uric acid in US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anoop Shankar, Jie Xiao, Alan DucatmanDepartment of Community Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV, USABackground: Perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, are man-made chemicals that have been detected in the blood of over 98% of the US population. Serum uric acid is a novel biomarker, even mild elevations of which has been implicated in the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. We examined the relationship of serum perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, and elevated uric acid levels in a representative sample of US adults.Methods: We examined 3883 participants from the 1999–2000 and 2003–2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys,a representative, multiethnic population-based survey of noninstitutionalized US adults. Serum perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate were analyzed as quartiles. The main outcome was hyperuricemia.Results: We found that serum levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals, including perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate, were positively associated with hyperuricemia. This association appeared to be independent of confounders such as age, gender, race-ethnicity, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared with subjects in quartile 1 (referent, the multivariate odds ratio for hyperuricemia among subjects in quartile 4 was 1.97 (95% confidence interval 1.44–2.70, P < 0.0001 for perfluorooctanoic acid and 1.48% (95% confidence interval 0.99–2.22, P = 0.0433 for perfluorooctane sulfonate. This observed association persisted in subgroup analysis by gender and body mass index.Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of perfluoroalkyl chemicals are associated with hyperuricemia even at low perfluoroalkyl chemical exposure levels as seen in the US

  19. Kinetic Study of the Hydrolisys of Phenyl Perfluorooctanoate in Water: Deaggregation Effect of b-Cyclodextrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Fernández

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the hydrolysis of phenyl perfluorooctanoate was studied at pH 6.00 and 9.90 in water. The substrate is aggregated under all working reaction conditions, which is indicated from the decrease in the reaction rate when the substrate concentration is raised. The addition of β-cyclodextrin produces the deaggregation of the ester catalyzing the reaction.

  20. Lipid and fatty acid composition of mesocarp and seed of avocado fruits harvested at northern range in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, Fumio; Matsuyama, Kaori; Abe, Shin; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Itoh, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The lipid and fatty acid composition of the mesocarp and seed of avocado fruit grown and harvested in Japan, which is located at the northern range of the avacado, was investigated and compared to an imported avocado purchased commercially. The potential of the avocado mesocarp as an agricultural product in Japan was also explored. Total lipids (TL) accounted for approximately 20% of the mesocarp. Further analysis showed that the neutral lipid (NL) fraction accounted for at least 95% of the TL, and almost 90% of NL was triacylglycerol. Monoenoic acids accounted for at least 65% of the total fatty acids, and oleic acid, which is regarded as an especially important functional component of avacado accounted for approximately 50% of the monounsaturated fatty acids. A comparison of the Japanese avocado cultivars and an imported avocado cultivar in the present study revealed no significant differences in the lipid and fatty acid compositions. Therefore, production of avocado fruit, which is rich in various nutritional components, is expected to be increased on a larger number of farms in Japan in the future. It is believed to be necessary to carry out further verification, such as the establishment of a cultivation technique adoptable to Japan, examination of optimal soil and land features, and cultivar selection.

  1. Extreme soil acidity from biodegradable trap and skeet targets increases severity of pollution at shooting ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTee, Michael R; Mummey, Daniel L; Ramsey, Philip W; Hinman, Nancy W

    2016-01-01

    Lead pollution at shooting ranges overshadows the potential for contamination issues from trap and skeet targets. We studied the environmental influence of targets sold as biodegradable by determining the components of the targets and sampling soils at a former sporting clay range. Targets comprised approximately 53% CaCO3, 41% S(0), and 6% modifiers, and on a molar basis, there was 2.3 times more S(0) than CaCO3. We observed a positive correlation between target cover and SO4(2-) (ρ=0.82, Psoil pH (ρ=0.62, P=0.006). For sites that had pH values below 3, 24tons of lime per 1000tons of soil would be required to raise soil pH to 6.5. Lime-facilitated pH increases would be transitory because S(0) would continue to oxidize to H2SO4 until the S(0) is depleted. This study demonstrates that biodegradable trap and skeet targets can acidify soil, which has implications for increasing the mobility of Pb from shotgun pellets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of meat type, sex and storage time on fatty acid profile of free range Dalmatian turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Mauric

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dalmatian turkey is a slow growing breed kept in free range systems. It is a type of “old fashioned poultry” whose meat is present on the market and accepted by consumers. However, no information about its meat quality and fatty acid profile is available. The chemical composition of the meat was influenced by gender and meat type and these differences could be important from the consumer’s point of view. Fatty acid composition was characterized by the predominance of n6 fatty acids, especially C18:2n6 and a high n6/n3 ratio. Increased time of storage strongly reduced the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC PUFA and increased atherogenicity and thrombogenicity indices (AI and TI in thigh tissue. The content of beneficial n3 PUFA was influenced by meat type, with lower values of C18:3n3 and higher values of LC PUFA in the breast compared to the thighs. The potential intake of LC PUFA of comercial turkey in the human diet was lower in comparison to poultry fed with complete feed mixtures. An interesting fact was the higher DHA values in comparison with DPA values in breast tissue, which is characteristic of old poultry breeds. The Dalmatian turkey is a highly valued traditional product and an important archaic breed for gene preservation and biodiversity. Nevertheless, Dalmatian turkey meat could be even further improved by minimal dietary manipulation to become a product with additional health promoting effects.

  3. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  4. Serum concentration comparisons of amino acids, fatty acids, lipoproteins, vitamins A and E, and minerals between zoo and free-ranging giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Debra A; Koutsos, Elizabeth A; Ellersieck, Mark R; Griffin, Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Serum concentrations of amino acids, fatty acids, lipoproteins, vitamins A and E, and minerals in zoo giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) were compared to values obtained from free-ranging giraffes in an effort to identify potential nutritional differences in the zoo population. Zoo giraffes have a specific set of maladies that may be nutritionally related, including peracute mortality, energy malnutrition, pancreatic disease, urolithiasis, hoof disease, and severe intestinal parasitism. Dietary requirements for giraffes are not known; invasive studies used with domestic animals cannot be performed on zoo animals. Though domestic animal standards are often used to evaluate nutritional health of exotic animals, they may not be the most appropriate standards to use. Serum samples from 20 zoo giraffes at 10 zoological institutions in the United States were compared to previously collected samples from 24 free-ranging giraffes in South Africa. Thirteen of the zoo animal samples were collected from animals trained for blood collection, and seven were banked samples obtained from a previous serum collection. Dietary information was also collected on each zoo giraffe; most zoo giraffe diets consisted of alfalfa-based pellets (acid detergent fiber-16), alfalfa hay, and browse in varying quantities. Differences between zoo and free-ranging giraffes, males and females, and adults and subadults were analyzed with the use of a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial and Fisher's Least Significant Difference (LSD) for mean separation. Of the 84 parameters measured, 54 (60%) were significantly different (P giraffes. Nine (11%) items were significantly different (P giraffe diets is needed to address the differences seen in this study and the potentially related health problems.

  5. Production of Jet Fuel-Range Hydrocarbons from Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin over Super Lewis Acid Combined with Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Current address: Center of Biomass Engineering/College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 PR China; Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Kuhn, Eric [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Yang, Bin [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-11-14

    Super Lewis acids containing the triflate anion [e.g., Hf(OTf)4, Ln(OTf)3, In(OTf)3, Al(OTf)3] and noble metal catalysts (e.g., Ru/C, Ru/Al2O3) formed efficient catalytic systems to generate saturated hydrocarbons from lignin in high yields. In such catalytic systems, the metal triflates mediated rapid ether bond cleavage through selective bonding to etheric oxygens while the noble metal catalyzed subsequent hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions. Near theoretical yields of hydrocarbons were produced from lignin model compounds by the combined catalysis of Hf(OTf)4 and ruthenium-based catalysts. When a technical lignin derived from a pilot-scale biorefinery was used, more than 30 wt % of the hydrocarbons produced with this catalytic system were cyclohexane and alkylcyclohexanes in the jet fuel range. Super Lewis acids are postulated to strongly interact with lignin substrates by protonating hydroxyl groups and ether linkages, forming intermediate species that enhance hydrogenation catalysis by supported noble metal catalysts. Meanwhile, the hydrogenation of aromatic rings by the noble metal catalysts can promote oxygenation reactions catalyzed by super Lewis acids.

  6. Production of Jet Fuel-Range Hydrocarbons from Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin over Super Lewis Acid Combined with Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Current address: Center of Biomass Engineering/College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 PR China; Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Kuhn, Eric [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Yang, Bin [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-11-14

    Super Lewis acids containing the triflate anion (e.g. Hf(OTf)4, Ln(OTf)3, Al(OTf)3) and noble metal catalysts (e.g. Ru/C, Ru/Al2O3) formed efficient catalytic systems to generate saturated hydrocarbons from lignin in high yields. In such catalytic systems, the metal triflates mediated rapid ether bond cleavage via selective bonding to etheric oxygens while the noble metal catalysed subsequent hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions. Near theoretical yields of hydrocarbons were produced from lignin model compounds by the combined catalysis of Hf(OTf)4 and ruthenium-based catalysts. When a technical lignin derived from a pilot-scale biorefinery was used, more than 30 wt% of the hydrocarbons produced with this catalytic system were cyclohexane and alkylcyclohexanes in the jet fuel range. Super Lewis acids are postulated to strongly interact with lignin substrates via protonating hydroxyls and ether linkages, forming intermediate species that enhance hydrogenation catalysis by supported noble metal catalysts. Meanwhile, the hydrogenation of aromatic rings by the noble metal catalysts can promote oxygenation reactions catalysed by super Lewis acids.

  7. A critical assessment of soil amendments (slaked lime/acidic fertilizer) for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conesa, Hector M.; Gonzalez-Alcaraz, Maria N. [Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnologia Agraria; Wieser, Mirjam; Studer, Bjoern; Schulin, Rainer [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. of Terrestrial Ecosystems

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The effects of the addition of an acidic fertilizer solution and/or slaked lime (5.5 g Ca(OH){sub 2}kg{sup -1}) on a slightly acidic shooting range soil (pH 6.1, % organic carbon 5.4) with moderate metal (e.g., 620 mg kg{sup -1} Pb) and metalloid (17 mg kg{sup -1} Sb) concentrations on metal and Sb solubility and plant accumulation were investigated. Materials and methods: In a pot experiment, we grew Plantago lanceolata, Lolium perenne and Triticum aestivum. The pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and metal and Sb concentrations in the leachate were monitored. Results and discussion: The addition of slaked lime increased the soil pH from 6.1 to 7.2 and the DOC from 100 to 300 mg l{sup -1}. In contrast to Sb, we found a correlation between DOC and soluble Cu concentrations. The addition of the acidic fertilizer significantly increased Mn- and Pb-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations. Slaked lime decreased at first, Pb-, Mn- Ni- and Zn-NaNO{sub 3} extractable concentrations, but with time, these concentrations increased. Metal accumulation in shoots was in general low. The highest concentrations were obtained in shoots of L. perenne for Mn (135 mg kg{sup -1} DW). Spikes of T. aestivum accumulated more Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn than shoots. Grains of T. aestivum had higher Zn concentrations (up to 37 mg kg{sup -1}) than spikes and shoots (up to 22 and 19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively). Antimony concentrations were always below 2 mg kg{sup -1} for the three species studied. Conclusions: Under these growing conditions, these three plant species showed to be suitable for the phytomanagement of moderately contaminated shooting range areas. (orig.)

  8. Reduced bone breakage and increased bone strength in free range laying hens fed omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplemented diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlton, John F; Wilkins, Lindsay J; Toscano, Michael J; Avery, Nick C; Knott, Lynda

    2013-02-01

    The omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the immediate precursors to a number of important mediators of immunity, inflammation and bone function, with products of omega-6 generally thought to promote inflammation and favour bone resorption. Western diets generally provide a 10 to 20-fold deficit in omega-3 PUFAs compared with omega-6, and this is thought to have contributed to the marked rise in incidence of disorders of modern human societies, such as heart disease, colitis and perhaps osteoporosis. Many of our food production animals, fed on grains rich in omega-6, are also exposed to a dietary deficit in omega-3, with perhaps similar health consequences. Bone fragility due to osteoporotic changes in laying hens is a major economic and welfare problem, with our recent estimates of breakage rates indicating up to 95% of free range hens suffer breaks during lay. Free range hens housed in full scale commercial systems were provided diets supplemented with omega-3 alpha linolenic acid, and the skeletal benefits were investigated by comparison to standard diets rich in omega-6. There was a significant 40-60% reduction in keel bone breakage rate, and a corresponding reduction in breakage severity in the omega-3 supplemented hens. There was significantly greater bone density and bone mineral content, alongside increases in total bone and trabecular volumes. The mechanical properties of the omega-3 supplemented hens were improved, with strength, energy to break and stiffness demonstrating significant increases. Alkaline phosphatase (an osteoblast marker) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (an osteoclast marker) both showed significant increases with the omega-3 diets, indicating enhanced bone turnover. This was corroborated by the significantly lower levels of the mature collagen crosslinks, hydroxylysyl pyridinoline, lysyl pyridinoline and histidinohydroxy-lysinonorleucine, with a corresponding significant shift in the mature

  9. Carryover of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from soil to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Heyn, J; Thiele, H; Hüther, J; Failing, K; Georgii, S; Brunn, H

    2009-08-01

    Within the scope of a joint project to study soil-to-plant carryover of polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), five cultivated plants (spring wheat, oats, potatoes, maize, and perennial ryegrass) were sown or planted in Mitscherlich pots. Six variants per species were used, each with a different concentration level of PFOA and PFOS (from 0.25 to 50 mg/kg as aqueous solution) to detect possible concentration dependence in the transfer of these two PFCs from soil to plant. PFOA and PFOS were detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after appropriate sample preparation (partial drying, mincing, homogenizing, extraction). Since PFOA and PFOS presently represent the most widely studied PFCs, they are classified as "leading compounds." The results show that concentrations of PFOA/PFOS in the plants vary greatly, depending on the concentrations applied to the soil. PFOA values were higher than PFOS values in all plants except potatoes, in which these differences could be quite substantial. From the results presented here it can be seen that uptake and storage are much more intensive in the vegetative portion of the plant than relocation in the storage organs. This is particularly evident from the the comparison of concentrations found in the grain and ear and those in the straw or rest of the plant in spring wheat, oats, and maize. Transfer from "soil to crops" provides a possible explanation for the presence of PFCs in foodstuffs and in human body fluids such as blood, plasma, serum, or breast milk. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a statistically significant, concentration-dependent carryover of PFOA and PFOS in crop plants can take place, which would provide a potential entrance point for these substances into the food chain.

  10. Modeling the Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) During Gestation and Lactation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    To address the pharmacokinetics of PFOA during gestation and lactation, a biologically supported dynamic model was developed. A two compartment system linked via placental blood flow described gestation, while milk production linked the dam to a pup litter compartment during lact...

  11. Disposition of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Pregnant and Lactating CD-1 Mice and Their Pups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies in mice prenatally-exposed to PFOA demonstrate growth and developmental effects, including impaired body weight gain and mammary gland development, delayed eye opening, and increased mortality. Those dose dependent effects appeared to worsen if offspring exposed ...

  12. Ultrasound-enhanced electrochemical mineralization of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous solutions: Assessed by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Bonyadinejad

    2016-01-01

    Materials and Methods: The CCD was performed using three different variables such as current density (CD (mA/cm 2 , pH, and supporting electrolyte (EL concentration (mM. The total organic carbon (TOC removal was determined as an indicator of PFOA mineralization. A Shimadzu TOC analyzer was used to measure the TOC of the samples. The Ti/PbO 2 electrode was prepared using the electrochemical deposition method. In order to enhance the electrochemical mineralization, ultrasonic (US radiation was used. The US frequency was 20 kHz. Results: The optimum conditions for PFOA mineralization in synthetic solution were EL concentration of 94 mM, pH of 2, and CD of 83.64 mA/cm 2 , which resulted in complete TOC removal. The results indicated that the most effective factor for PFOA mineralization was CD. Besides, the TOC removal efficiency significantly increased with increasing CD. Conclusions: Under optimum conditions, the mineralization of PFOA was almost completed after 90 min of sonoelectrolysis. Therefore, sonoelectrolysis was found to be a more effective technique for mineralization of an environmentally persistent compound.

  13. Aromatic amino acids required for pili conductivity and long-range extracellular electron transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Madeline; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Leang, Ching; Smith, Jessica A; Patel, Pranav; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona; Synoeyenbos-West, Oona; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-03-12

    It has been proposed that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires conductive pili for long-range electron transport to Fe(III) oxides and for high-density current production in microbial fuel cells. In order to investigate this further, we constructed a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated Aro-5, which produced pili with diminished conductivity. This was accomplished by modifying the amino acid sequence of PilA, the structural pilin protein. An alanine was substituted for each of the five aromatic amino acids in the carboxyl terminus of PilA, the region in which G. sulfurreducens PilA differs most significantly from the PilAs of microorganisms incapable of long-range extracellular electron transport. Strain Aro-5 produced pili that were properly decorated with the multiheme c-type cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, pili preparations of the Aro-5 strain had greatly diminished conductivity and Aro-5 cultures were severely limited in their capacity to reduce Fe(III) compared to the control strain. Current production of the Aro-5 strain, with a graphite anode serving as the electron acceptor, was less than 10% of that of the control strain. The conductivity of the Aro-5 biofilms was 10-fold lower than the control strain's. These results demonstrate that the pili of G. sulfurreducens must be conductive in order for the cells to be effective in extracellular long-range electron transport. Extracellular electron transfer by Geobacter species plays an important role in the biogeochemistry of soils and sediments and has a number of bioenergy applications. For example, microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxide is one of the most geochemically significant processes in anaerobic soils, aquatic sediments, and aquifers, and Geobacter organisms are often abundant in such environments. Geobacter sulfurreducens produces the highest current densities of any known pure culture, and close relatives are often the most abundant organisms colonizing anodes

  14. Community exposure to perfluorooctanoate: relationships between serum concentrations and exposure sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Edward Anthony; Shofer, Frances Susan; Zhang, Hong; Freeman, David; Desai, Chintan; Shaw, Leslie Michael

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine serum (perfluorooctanoate [PFOA]) in residents near a fluoropolymer production facility: the contributions from air, water, and occupational exposures, personal and dietary habits, and relationships to age and gender. The authors conducted questionnaire and serum PFOA measurements in a stratified random sample and volunteers residing in locations with the same residential water supply but with higher and lower potential air PFOA exposure. Serum (PFOA) greatly exceeded general population medians. Occupational exposure from production processes using PFOA and residential water had additive effects; no other occupations contributed. Serum (PFOA) depended on the source of residential drinking water, and not potential air exposure. For public water users, the best-fit model included age, tap water drinks per day, servings of home-grown fruit and vegetables, and carbon filter use. Residential water source was the primary determinant of serum (PFOA).

  15. Influence of pasture intake on the fatty acid composition, and cholesterol, tocopherols, and tocotrienols content in meat from free-range broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, P I P; Alves, S P; Bessa, R J B; Ferreira, L M A; Gama, L T; Brás, J L A; Fontes, C M G A; Prates, J A M

    2008-01-01

    Over the last centuries, Western diets acquired a dramatic imbalance in the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) to saturated fatty acids (SFA) with a concomitant reduction in the dietary proportion of n-3 PUFA. Pastures are a good source of n-3 fatty acids, although the effect of forage intake in the fatty acid profile of meat from free-range chicken remains to be evaluated. In addition, it is unknown if consumer interest in specialty poultry products derived from free-range or organic production systems is accompanied by a greater nutritional quality of these products. In this study, broilers of the RedBro Cou Nu x RedBro M genotype were fed on a cereal-based diet in portable floorless pens located either on subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) or white clover (Trifolium repens) pastures. Control birds were maintained at the same site in identical pens but had no access to pasture. The capacity of ingested forage to modulate broiler meat fatty acid profiles and the meat content of total cholesterol, tocopherols, and tocotrienols was investigated in broiler chicks slaughtered at d 56. The results suggested that pasture intake (vitamin E homologue profiles of meat from free-range broilers. However, breast meat from birds with free access to pasture presented lower levels of the n-6 and n-3 fatty acid precursors linoleic acid (18:2n-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3), respectively. In spring the levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) in breast meat were significantly greater in birds consuming pastures, which suggests greater conversion of alpha-linolenic acid into eicosapentaenoic acid in these birds. Finally, when compared with meat from slower-growing genotypes obtained under the conventional European free-range production systems with slaughtering at d 81, meat from birds of the Ross genotype raised intensively and slaughtered at d 35 seemed to have greater nutritional quality.

  16. Acidic pH shock induces the expressions of a wide range of stress-response genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Soon-Kwang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental signals usually enhance secondary metabolite production in Streptomycetes by initiating complex signal transduction system. It is known that different sigma factors respond to different types of stresses, respectively in Streptomyces strains, which have a number of unique signal transduction mechanisms depending on the types of environmental shock. In this study, we wanted to know how a pH shock would affect the expression of various sigma factors and shock-related proteins in S. coelicolor A3(2. Results According to the results of transcriptional and proteomic analyses, the major number of sigma factor genes were upregulated by an acidic pH shock. Well-studied sigma factor genes of sigH (heat shock, sigR (oxidative stress, sigB (osmotic shock, and hrdD that play a major role in the secondary metabolism, were all strongly upregulated by the pH shock. A number of heat shock proteins including the DnaK family and chaperones such as GroEL2 were also observed to be upregulated by the pH shock, while their repressor of hspR was strongly downregulated. Oxidative stress-related proteins such as thioredoxin, catalase, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and osmotic shock-related protein such as vesicle synthases were also upregulated in overall. Conclusion From these observations, an acidic pH shock was considered to be one of the strongest stresses to influence a wide range of sigma factors and shock-related proteins including general stress response proteins. The upregulation of the sigma factors and shock proteins already found to be related to actinorhodin biosynthesis was considered to have contributed to enhanced actinorhodin productivity by mediating the pH shock signal to regulators or biosynthesis genes for actinorhodin production.

  17. Perfluorooctanoate suppresses spheroid attachment on endometrial epithelial cells through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and down-regulation of Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hilda; Cheung, Tsz-Yan; Kodithuwakku, Suranga P; Chai, Joyce; Yeung, William S B; Wong, Chris K C; Lee, Kai-Fai

    2013-12-01

    Exposure of animals to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a surfactant used in emulsion polymerization processes causes early pregnancy loss, delayed growth and development of fetuses. The mechanisms of action are largely unknown. We studied the effect of PFOA on implantation using an in vitro spheroid-endometrial cell co-culture model. PFOA (10-100μM) significantly reduced Jeg-3 spheroid attachment on RL95-2 endometrial cells. PFOA also suppressed β-catenin expression in Jeg-3 cells. The Wnt agonist Wnt3a stimulated β-catenin expression in Jeg-3 cells and reversed the PFOA suppression of the spheroid attachment. The putative PFOA receptors (PPARα, β, γ) present in both cell lines were not affected by PFOA (0.01-100μM). The PPARα antagonist MK886 restored the β-catenin and E-cadherin expression levels in Jeg-3 cells and reversed the suppression of the spheroid attachment caused by PFOA. Taken together, PFOA suppresses spheroid attachment through PPARα and Wnt signaling pathways via down-regulation of β-catenin and E-cadherin expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Yeow, John T.W., E-mail: jyeow@uwaterloo.ca [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10–200 keV and 1–20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  19. Enhanced adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate by bamboo-derived granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shubo; Nie, Yao; Du, Ziwen; Huang, Qian; Meng, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-23

    A bamboo-derived granular activated carbon with large pores was successfully prepared by KOH activation, and used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from aqueous solution. The granular activated carbon prepared at the KOH/C mass ratio of 4 and activation temperature of 900°C had fast and high adsorption for PFOS and PFOA. Their adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 24h, which was attributed to their fast diffusion in the micron-sized pores of activated carbon. This granular activated carbon exhibited the maximum adsorbed amount of 2.32mmol/g for PFOS and 1.15mmol/g for PFOA at pH 5.0, much higher than other granular and powdered activated carbons reported. The activated carbon prepared under the severe activation condition contained many enlarged pores, favorable for the adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. In addition, the spent activated carbon was hardly regenerated in NaOH/NaCl solution, while the regeneration efficiency was significantly enhanced in hot water and methanol/ethanol solution, indicating that hydrophobic interaction was mainly responsible for the adsorption. The regeneration percent was up to 98% using 50% ethanol solution at 45°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  1. Prenatal exposure to perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and maternally reported developmental milestones in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Chunyuan; McLaughlin, Joseph K; Lipworth, Loren; Olsen, Jørn

    2008-10-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are fluorinated organic compounds present in the general population at low concentrations. Animal studies have shown that they may affect neuromuscular development at high concentrations. We investigated the association between plasma levels of PFOS and PFOA in pregnant women and motor and mental developmental milestones of their children. We randomly selected 1,400 pairs of pregnant women and their children from the Danish National Birth Cohort. PFOS and PFOA were measured in maternal blood samples taken in early pregnancy. Apgar score was abstracted from the National Hospital Discharge Register in Denmark. Developmental milestones were reported by mothers using highly structured questionnaires when the children were around 6 months and 18 months of age. Mothers who had higher levels of PFOA and PFOS gave birth to children who had similar Apgar scores and reached virtually all of the development milestones at the same time as children born to mothers with lower exposure levels. Children who were born to mothers with higher PFOS levels were slightly more likely to start sitting without support at a later age. We found no convincing associations between developmental milestones in early childhood and levels of PFOA or PFOS as measured in maternal plasma early in pregnancy.

  2. Effects of perfluorooctanoate and perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure on hepatoma Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiao-Zhong; Hu, De-Cong [Technology Center of Hubei Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Wuhan (China)

    2009-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are emerging compounds of concern. They are widely distributed in the environment, wildlife and human. Concern has been raised over their possible adverse effects on human health. This study was designed to determine cytotoxic effects of two important PFCs, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), in a single and a mixture of them exposure to Hep G2 cells. The results showed that PFOA and PFOS (50-200 {mu}mol/l) induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), dissipation of mitochondria membrane potential and apoptosis of Hep G2 cells. Moreover, activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase were increased, whereas activities of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased. Glutathione content was reduced. Differential expression of genes, such as p53, Bcl-2, caspase-9, was evident in PFOA or PFOS exposure groups. The possible mechanism was that they could overwhelm homeostasis of antioxidative systems, boost ROS generation, impact mitochondria, and affect genes expression of apoptotic regulators, which resulted in start-ups of apoptosis program. Cells exposed to mixture of PFOA and PFOS and each of them showed non-apoptotic rate significant difference, which indicated that the combined effect of two compounds was summation effect, but neither synergistic nor antagonistic effect. (orig.)

  3. Theoretical study of interactions between cysteine and perfluoropropanoic acid in gas and aqueous phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Tiffani M.; Doskocz, Jacek; Wright, Terrance; Hill, Glake A.

    The interaction of perfluoropropanoic acid (PFPA) with the amino acid cysteine was investigated using density functional theory. Previous studies suggest that the peroxisome proliferator chemical, perfluorooctanoic acid, is circulated throughout the body by way of sulfur-containing amino acids. We present conformational analysis of the interactions of PFPA, a small model of perfluorooctanoic acid, with the sulfur-containing amino acid which occur by the process of hydrogen bonding, in which the hydrogen of the sulfhydryl group interacts with the carboxyl oxygen, and the amino nitrogen forms a hydrogen bond with the hydrogen of the bond OH group of the fluorinated alkyl. We also show in our structures a recently characterized weak nonbonded interaction between divalent sulfur and a main chain carboxyl oxygen in proteins. B3LYP calculated free energies and interaction energies predict low-energy, high-interaction conformations for complex systems of perfluorinated fatty acid interactions with cysteine.

  4. Acetalated Dextran: A Tunable and Acid-Labile Biopolymer with Facile Synthesis and a Range of Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Eric M; Pino, Erica N; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2017-02-08

    Acetalated dextran (Ac-DEX) is a tunable acid-labile biopolymer with facile synthesis, aptly designed for the formulation of microparticles for vaccines and immune modulation. Tunability of degradation is achieved based on the kinetics of reaction and the molecular weight of the parent dextran polymer. This tunability translated to differential rates of activation of CD8+ T cells in an in vitro ovalbumin model and illustrated that acid-labile polymer can activate CD8+ T cells at an increased rate compared to acid-insensitive polymers. In addition, Ac-DEX has been used to encapsulate small molecules, deliver nucleotides, transport inorganic molecules, formulate immune modulating therapies and vaccines, and trigger pH responsive constructs for therapy. Here we highlight the properties and results of Ac-DEX nano-/microparticles as well as the use of the polymer in other constructs and chemistries.

  5. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide with a long-range order and tunable cell sizes by phosphoric acid anodization on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawathanawises, Krissada; Cheng, Xuanhong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been explored for various applications due to its regular cell arrangement and relatively easy fabrication processes. However, conventional two-step anodization based on self-organization only allows the fabrication of a few discrete cell sizes and formation of small domains of hexagonally packed pores. Recent efforts to pre-pattern aluminum followed with anodization significantly improve the regularity and available pore geometries in AAO, while systematic study of the anodization condition, especially the impact of acid composition on pore formation guided by nanoindentation is still lacking. In this work, we pre-patterned aluminium thin films using ordered monolayers of silica beads and formed porous AAO in a single-step anodization in phosphoric acid. Controllable cell sizes ranging from 280 nm to 760 nm were obtained, matching the diameters of the silica nanobead molds used. This range of cell size is significantly greater than what has been reported for AAO formed in phosphoric acid in the literature. In addition, the relationships between the acid concentration, cell size, pore size, anodization voltage and film growth rate were studied quantitatively. The results are consistent with the theory of oxide formation through an electrochemical reaction. Not only does this study provide useful operational conditions of nanoindentation induced anodization in phosphoric acid, it also generates significant information for fundamental understanding of AAO formation. PMID:24535886

  6. Insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows across a range of body condition scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Hostens, M; Van Eetvelde, M; Hermans, K; Moerman, S; Bogaert, H; Depreester, E; Van den Broeck, W; Opsomer, G

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present research was to determine the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism in dry dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS). Ten pregnant Holstein Friesian dairy cows (upcoming parity 2 to 5) were selected based on BCS at the beginning of the study (2mo before expected parturition date). During the study, animals were monitored weekly for BCS and backfat thickness and in the last 2wk, blood samples were taken for determination of serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration. Animals underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test in the third week before the expected parturition date. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test consisted of 4 consecutive insulin infusions with increasing insulin doses: 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 5mIU/kg per minute. For each insulin infusion period, a steady state was defined as a period of 30min where no or minor changes of the glucose infusion were necessary to keep the blood glucose concentration constant and near basal levels. During the steady state, the glucose infusion rate [steady state glucose infusion rate (SSGIR) in µmol/kg per minute] and NEFA concentration [steady state NEFA concentration (SSNEFA) in mmol/L] were determined and reflect the insulin response of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Dose response curves were created based on the insulin concentrations during the steady state and the SSGIR or SSNEFA. The shape of the dose response curves is determined by the concentration of insulin needed to elicit the half maximal effect (EC50) and the maximal SSGIR or the minimal SSNEFA for the glucose or fatty acid metabolism, respectively. The maximal SSGIR was negatively associated with variables reflecting adiposity of the cows (BCS, backfat thickness, NEFA concentration during the dry period, and absolute weight of the different adipose depots determined after euthanasia and dissection of the different depots), whereas the EC50 of the glucose metabolism was

  7. Predicted toxicity of naphthenic acids present in oil sands process-affected waters to a range of environmental and human endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Jones, David; Galloway, Tamara S; Rowland, Steven J

    2012-05-15

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are considered to be a major toxic component of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) and are also widely used for industrial processes. The effects of previously identified NAs (54 in total), together with six alkylphenols, were modelled for a range of environmental and human toxicity related endpoints using ADMET predictor™ software. In addition to the models, experimental CALUX® assays were performed on seven tricyclic diamondoid acids. Most of the NAs modelled were predicted to have lethal median concentrations (LC(50)) >100 μM for the three aquatic species modelled. Polycyclic acids containing a single aromatic ring were predicted to be the most toxic to fathead minnows with LC(50)s typically ca 1 μM. Some of these compounds were also predicted to be the most carcinogenic (based on rat and mouse models), possess human estrogenic and androgenic activity and potentially disrupt reproductive processes. Some aliphatic pentacyclic acids also were predicted to exhibit androgenic activity and, uniquely amongst the compounds tested, act as substrates for the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP3A4. Consistent with the models' predictions for the tricyclic acids, no estrogenic or androgenic activity was detected by ER/AR CALUX®. Further experimental validation of the predictions should now be performed for the compounds highlighted by the models (e.g. priority should perhaps be focused on the polycyclic monoaromatic acids and the aliphatic pentacyclic acids). If shown to be accurate, these compounds can then be targeted for toxicity reduction remediation efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Systematic comparisons of various spectrophotometric and colorimetric methods to measure concentrations of protein, peptide and amino acid: detectable limits, linear dynamic ranges, interferences, practicality and unit costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Watcharatanyatip, Kamolwan; Homvises, Teerada; Jaturongkakul, Kewalee; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-30

    There is limited and inconclusive information regarding detectable limits and linear dynamic ranges of various quantitative protein assays. We thus performed systematic comparisons of seven commonly used methods, including direct spectrophotometric quantitation at λ205 and λ280 nm (A205 and A280, respectively), bicinchoninic acid (BCA), Biuret, Bradford, Lowry and Ninhydrin methods. Purified BSA, porcine kidney extract, tryptic digested peptides derived from purified BSA, and glycine, were used as representative purified protein, complex protein mixture, peptide and amino acid, respectively. Bradford method was the most sensitive assay (LOD=0.006 mg/ml) and had the widest range of detectability (LOD-UOD=0.006-100mg/ml) for purified protein and complex protein mixture. For peptide, A205, A280, Lowry and Ninhydrin methods had a comparable LOD (0.006 mg/ml), but Ninhydrin method had the widest detectability range (LOD-UOD=0.006-100mg/ml). For amino acid, A205 and Ninhydrin methods had a comparable LOD (0.006 mg/ml), but A205 had a wider detectability range (LOD-UOD=0.006-6.250 mg/ml). Biuret method offered the widest linear dynamic range for purified protein and complex protein mixture (0.391-100mg/ml), A280 offered the widest linear dynamic range for peptide (0.024-6.250 mg/ml), and Ninhydrin method offered the widest linear dynamic range for amino acid (0.024-0.195 mg/ml). Both Laemmli's and 2-D lysis buffers had dramatic interfering effects on all assays. Concerning the practicality and unit costs, A205 and A280 were the most favorable. Among the colorimetric methods, Bradford method consumed the least amount of samples and shortest analytical time with the lowest unit cost. These are the most extensive comparative data of commonly used quantitative protein assays that will be useful for selecting the most suitable method for each study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-range regulation by shared retinoic acid response elements modulates dynamic expression of posterior Hoxb genes in CNS development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngwook; Mullan, Hillary E; Krumlauf, Robb

    2014-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signaling plays an important role in determining the anterior boundary of Hox gene expression in the neural tube during embryogenesis. In particular, RA signaling is implicated in a rostral expansion of the neural expression domain of 5׳ Hoxb genes (Hoxb9-Hoxb5) in mice. However, underlying mechanisms for this gene regulation have remained elusive due to the lack of RA responsive element (RARE) in the 5׳ half of the HoxB cluster. To identify cis-regulatory elements required for the rostral expansion, we developed a recombineering technology to serially label multiple genes with different reporters in a single bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector containing the mouse HoxB cluster. This allowed us to simultaneously monitor the expression of multiple genes. In contrast to plasmid-based reporters, transgenic BAC reporters faithfully recapitulated endogenous gene expression patterns of the Hoxb genes including the rostral expansion. Combined inactivation of two RAREs, DE-RARE and ENE-RARE, in the BAC completely abolished the rostral expansion of the 5׳ Hoxb genes. Knock-out of endogenous DE-RARE lead to significantly reduced expression of multiple Hoxb genes and attenuated Hox gene response to exogenous RA treatment in utero. Regulatory potential of DE-RARE was further demonstrated by its ability to anteriorize 5׳ Hoxa gene expression in the neural tube when inserted into a HoxA BAC reporter. Our data demonstrate that multiple RAREs cooperate to remotely regulate 5׳ Hoxb genes during CNS development, providing a new insight into the mechanisms for gene regulation within the Hox clusters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Perfluoroalkyl acids in surface sediments of the East China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Wen; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Ze-Ming; Jian, Shan

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of 17 target PFAA analytes was determined in surface sediments (n = 37) of the East China Sea and potential influencing factors were examined. ΣPFAAs ranged from 0.41 ng/g dw to 3.06 ng/g dw, with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) as the most abundant perfluorocarboxylic acid and perfluoroalkyl sulfonate, respectively. PFAAs in the sediments were strongly influenced by terrigenous input. Analysis of the relationship between dynamic influence factors and PFAA concentrations showed that the characteristics of PFAA distribution were rather complex. ΣPFAA concentrations and TOC were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). Circumfluence also influenced the whole PFAA distribution and seasonal variation. In addition, correlation analysis suggested that log Koc values increased with increasing perfluoroalkyl chain length. Given the rapid economic development of eastern coastal cities of China, the environmental hazards of land source pollution cannot be ignored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Occurrence and fate of perfluorinated acids in two wastewater treatment plants in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaojie; Yan, Hong; Li, Fei; Zhou, Qi

    2015-02-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) have drawn much attention due to their environmental persistence, ubiquitous existence, and bioaccumulation potential. The discharge of wastewater effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a significant source of PFAs to the environment. In this study, wastewater and sludge samples were collected from two WWTPs in Shanghai, China, to investigate the contamination level and fate of PFAs in different stages of processing. The total concentrations of PFAs (∑PFAs) in influent from plants A and B were 2,452 and 292 ng L(-1), respectively. Perfluoropentanoic acid (1,520 ± 80 ng L(-1) in plant A and 89.2 ± 12.1 ng L(-1) in plant B) was the predominant PFA in influent waters, followed by perfluorooctanoic acid. The concentration of ∑PFAs ranged from 75.0 to 126.0 ng g(-1) dry weight in sludge samples from plant B, with perfluorooctanesulfonic acid as the predominant contaminant. The concentrations and fate of PFAs in different WWTPs vary. The ∑PFAs entering plant A decreased significantly in the final effluent of activated sludge process, while that in plant B increased significantly in the final effluent of sequencing batch reactor system. The concentration changes could be due to the sorption onto sludge, or the degradation of PFAs precursors.

  12. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the dynamics of organofluorine interactions with a dissolved humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Simpson, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of the interactions between organofluorine compounds and humic acids will contribute to an improved understanding of the role that Natural Organic Matter plays as a mediator in the fate, transport and distribution of these contaminants in the environment. Here, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based diffusion measurements are used to estimate the association dynamics between dissolved humic acid and selected organofluorine compounds: pentafluoroaniline, pentafluorophenol, potassium perfluorooctane sulfonate, and perfluorooctanoic acid. Under the conditions used here, the strength of the association with humic acid increases linearly as temperature decreases for all compounds except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits divergent behavior with a non-linear decrease in the extent of interaction as temperature decreases. A general interaction mechanism controlled largely by desolvation effects is suggested for all compounds examined here except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits a specific mode of interaction consistent with a proteinaceous binding site. Reverse Heteronuclear Saturation Transfer Difference NMR is used to confirm the identity and nature of the humic acid binding sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serum perfluoroalkyl acids and time to pregnancy in nulliparous women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies on the exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and female fertility have provided conflicting results. We aimed to investigate the association between several PFAAs and time to pregnancy among nulliparous women. METHODS: From 2008 to 2013, we included 1372 women from...... pregnancy) by multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Median levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate were 8.3 and 2.0ng/mL. Overall, no obvious associations were found between any PFAAs and fecundability or infertility. Adjusted fecundability ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.......09 (0.92-1.29) for perfluorooctane sulfonate and 1.10 (0.93-1.30) for perfluorooctanoate (highest versus lowest quartile). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of an association between present serum levels of PFAAs and longer time to pregnancy or infertility in nulliparous women. This study further adds...

  14. Development of a LC-MS/MS Method for the Simultaneous Detection of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates in a Range of Biological Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Al Kadhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well-established that perturbations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle play an important role in the metabolic transformation occurring in cancer including that of the prostate. A method for simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of TCA cycle intermediates in body fluids, tissues, and cultured cell lines of human origin was developed using a common C18 reversed-phase column by LC-MS/MS technique. This LC-MS/MS method for profiling TCA cycle intermediates offers significant advantages including simple and fast preparation of a wide range of human biological samples. The analytical method was validated according to the guideline of the Royal Society of Chemistry Analytical Methods Committee. The limits of detection were below 60 nM for most of the TCA intermediates with the exception of lactic and fumaric acids. The calibration curves of all TCA analytes showed linearity with correlation coefficients r2>0.9998. Recoveries were >95% for all TCA analytes. This method was established taking into consideration problems and limitations of existing techniques. We envisage that its application to different biological matrices will facilitate deeper understanding of the metabolic changes in the TCA cycle from in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies.

  15. Preliminary report of an ongoing phase I/II dose range, safety and efficacy study of iodine-123-phenylpentadecanoic acid for the identification of viable myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C L

    1994-04-01

    An agent that can accurately and cost-effectively identify viable myocardium is needed to select the patients most likely to benefit from myocardial revascularization. Iodine-123-phenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) is a synthetic radiolabeled fatty acid that has shown promise in evaluating patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). IPPA has unique metabolic properties that may make it superior to other single-photon agents used for this task. A Phase I/II study is underway to evaluate safety, dose range and efficacy of IPPA in assessing viability and predicting functional recovery after revascularization. Patients between the ages of 21 and 75 with angiographically documented CAD, who were being referred for coronary revascularization, were recruited. The patients were randomized to receive 2, 4 or 6 mCi of IPPA and then underwent sequential SPECT imaging at 4, 12, 20, 28 and 36 min after injection. Radionuclide ventriculography and perfusion imaging were performed before and again 8 wk after revascularization. Myocardial metabolic activity of IPPA was analyzed and compared to the preinjection and postejection fractions. There were no significant adverse effects from the administration of IPPA. Image quality was dose-dependent; the 2-mCi dose was not consistently acceptable for quantitative analysis. These preliminary data show that IPPA is safe and can produce myocardial images of good quality when 4 mCi or more are used. Early results are encouraging but more experience will be needed to define the role of IPPA in identifying myocardial viability.

  16. Detection of Amine Impurity and Quality Assessment of the MALDI Matrix α-Cyano-4-Hydroxy-Cinnamic Acid for Peptide Analysis in the amol Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechthaler, Justyna; Pittenauer, Ernst; Schaub, Tanner M.; Allmaier, Günter

    2013-05-01

    We have studied sample preparation conditions to increase the reproducibility of positive UV-MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of peptides in the amol range. By evaluating several α-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (CHCA) matrix batches and preparation protocols, it became apparent that two factors have a large influence on the reproducibility and the quality of the generated peptide mass spectra: (1) the selection of the CHCA matrix, which allows the most sensitive measurements and an easier finding of the "sweet spots," and (2) the amount of the sample volume deposited onto the thin crystalline matrix layer. We have studied in detail the influence of a contaminant, coming from commercial CHCA matrix batches, on sensitivity of generated peptide mass spectra in the amol as well as fmol range of a tryptic peptide mixture. The structure of the contaminant, N, N-dimethylbutyl amine, was determined by applying MALDI-FT-ICR mass spectrometry experiments for elemental composition and MALDI high energy CID experiments utilizing a tandem mass spectrometer (TOF/RTOF). A recrystallization of heavily contaminated CHCA batches that reduces or eliminates the determined impurity is described. Furthermore, a fast and reliable method for the assessment of CHCA matrix batches prior to tryptic peptide MALDI mass spectrometric analyses is presented.

  17. Geochemistry and microbial community composition across a range of acid mine drainage impact and implications for the Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havig, Jeff R.; Grettenberger, Christen; Hamilton, Trinity L.

    2017-06-01

    Streams impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD, also known as acid rock drainage) represent local environmental and ecological disasters; however, they may also present an opportunity to study microbial communities in environments analogous to past conditions. Neoarchean continents had streams and rivers replete with detrital pyrites. Following the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, Cyanobacteria colonized streams and rivers on continental surfaces. The combination of labile detrital pyrite grains and locally produced O2 generated by Cyanobacteria produced ideal conditions for pyrite oxidation similar to that found at modern AMD-impacted sites. To explore the connection of modern sites to ancient conditions, we sampled sites that exhibited a range of AMD-impact (e.g., pH from 2.1 to 7.9 [Fe2+] up to 5.2 mmol/L [SO42-] from 0.3 to 52.4 mmol/L) and found (i) nearly all analytes correlated to sulfate concentration; (ii) all sites exhibited the predominance of a single taxon most closely related to Ferrovum myxofaciens, an Fe-oxidixing betaproteoabacterium capable of carbon and nitrogen fixation, and (iii) signs of potential inorganic carbon limitation and nitrogen cycling. From these findings and building on the work of others, we present a conceptual model of continental surfaces during the Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic linking local O2 production to pyrite oxidation on continental surfaces to sulfate production and delivery to nearshore environments. The delivery of sulfate drives sulfate reduction and euxinia—favoring anoxygenic photosynthesis over cyanobacterial O2 generation in near-continent/shelf marine environments.

  18. Use of preservative-free hyaluronic acid (Hylabak® for a range of patients with dry eye syndrome: experience in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzhesky VV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Vsevolodovich Brjesky,1 Yury Fedorovich Maychuk,2 Alexey Vladimirovich Petrayevsky,3 Peter Gerrievich Nagorsky41Department of Ophthalmology, Pediatric State Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg, 2Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, Moscow, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Volgograd State Medical University, Volgograd, 4Novosibirsk Branch of the Federal State Institute MNTK Eye Microsurgery, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, RussiaAbstract: Artificial tear preparations are important in the management of dry eye syndrome. We present the findings from four recently published studies conducted in Russia assessing Hylabak® (marketed as Hyabak® in Europe, a preservative-free hyaluronic acid preparation, for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. All studies had an open, noncomparative design, but one compared the findings with those from 25 patients treated with Tear Naturale® in previous studies. A total of 134 children and adults were enrolled, and the etiologies of dry eye syndrome included contact lens use, intensive office work, adenovirus eye infection, postmenopausal status, persistent meibomian blepharitis, Sjögren's syndrome, phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, and refractive surgery. The patients were treated with Hylabak for 2 weeks to 2 months. All studies showed that Hylabak resulted in marked improvement as assessed by subjective sensations/complaints, Schirmer's test, Norn’s test, impression cytology and biomicroscopy, staining, and tear osmolarity. Greater benefits were also reported compared with Tear Naturale, including a faster onset of action. Hylabak was well tolerated. In conclusion, Hylabak provided rapid and safe relief from the signs and symptoms of dry eye syndrome, as well as improvement in objective measures, in a wide range of patients.Keywords: dry eye, eye drops, artificial tears, hyaluronic acid, Hylabak®, preservative-free

  19. Paper-based solid-phase multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay with tunable dynamic range using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-08-06

    A multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay on a paper-based platform is presented using multicolor immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize two types of QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) and red-emitting QDs (rQDs) served as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) acceptors. The gQD/Cy3 FRET pair served as an internal standard, while the rQD/A647 FRET pair served as a detection channel, combining the control and analytical test zones in one physical location. Hybridization of dye-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity for FRET sensitized emission from the acceptor dyes, which served as an analytical signal. Hybridization assays in the multicolor format provided a limit of detection of 90 fmol and an upper limit of dynamic range of 3.5 pmol. The use of an array of detection zones was designed to provide improved analytical figures of merit compared to that which could be achieved on one type of array design in terms of relative concentration of multicolor QDs. The hybridization assays showed excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides. Selectivity of the two-plex hybridization assay was demonstrated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 50:1. Additionally, it is shown that the use of preformed QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates and consideration of the relative number density of the two types of QD-probe conjugates in the two-color assay format is advantageous to maximize assay sensitivity and the upper limit of dynamic range.

  20. A cross-sectional study on trans-fatty acids and risk markers of CHD among middle-aged men representing a broad range of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgit M.; Nielsen, Marie M.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA), especially industrially produced TFA (I-TFA), has been associated with the risk of CHD through influence on serum lipid levels. Other causal pathways remain less investigated. In the present cross-sectional study of middle-aged men representing a broad range...... of BMI, the association between intake of TFA, I-TFA and ruminant TFA (R-TFA) and obesity-associated risk markers of CHD was assessed. The study comprised 393 Danish men (median age 49 years) with a median BMI of 28·4 kg/m2. Intake of TFA was estimated based on 7 d dietary records, whereas outcomes...... pressure and insulin homeostasis. Among middle-aged men with a generally low intake of TFA, neither I-TFA nor R-TFA was significantly related to obesity-associated risk markers of CHD. The decreased average intake of I-TFA in Denmark since 1995 is suggested to effectively prevent occurrence of the adverse...

  1. Dose-ranging pilot randomized trial of amino acid mixture combined with physical activity promotion for reducing abdominal fat in overweight adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasai H

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Sasai,1–3,* Keisuke Ueda,4,5,* Takehiko Tsujimoto,6,7 Hiroyuki Kobayashi,1 Chiaki Sanbongi,4 Shuji Ikegami,4 Yoshio Nakata1 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 2Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 3Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo, 4Food Science Research Laboratories, Meiji Co., Ltd., Odawara, Kanagawa, 5Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, 6Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 7Faculty of Human Sciences, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effective dose of an amino acid mixture comprising arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine combined with physical activity promotion in reducing abdominal fat among overweight adults.Methods: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, pilot trial was conducted in Mito, Japan, from January through April 2016, and the data were analyzed from May through November 2016. The study participants were 35 overweight adults, aged 20–64 years, with no regular exercise habit. Participants were randomly assigned to high-dose (3,000 mg/d, n=9, medium-dose (1,500 mg/d, n=9, low-dose (750 mg/d, n=8, or placebo (0 mg/d, n=9 groups, and the test beverage containing the amino acid mixture or placebo was administered for 12 weeks. All participants maintained a physically active lifestyle during the study period through monthly physical activity promotion sessions and smartphone-based self-monitoring with wearable trackers. Primary outcomes were changes in abdominal total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat areas, assessed by computed tomography.Results: Of the 35 enrolled participants, 32 completed the 12-week follow-up visit. The intention-to-treat analysis revealed that the changes in abdominal total fat

  2. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids in human breast milk from Spain and estimation of infant's daily intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motas Guzmàn, Miguel [Área de Toxicología, Universidad de Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Clementini, Chiara [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, Via Mattioli, 4, 53100 Siena (Italy); Pérez-Cárceles, Maria Dolores; Jiménez Rejón, Sandra [Department of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Murcia & Instituto Murciano de Investigacion Biomedica (IMIB), (IMIB-VIRGEN DE LA ARRIXACA), Murcia (Spain); Cascone, Aurora; Martellini, Tania [Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Guerranti, Cristiana [University of Siena, Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, Via Mattioli, 4, 53100 Siena (Italy); Bioscience Research Center, Via Aurelia Vecchia 32, 58015 Orbetello, GR (Italy); Cincinelli, Alessandra, E-mail: acincinelli@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Human milk samples were collected from 67 mothers in 2014 at a Primary Care Centre in Murcia (Spain) and analyzed for perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs). Concentrations measured for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoDA) ranged from < LOQ (< 10 ng/L) to 397 ng/L with a mean concentration of 66 ± 68 ng/L and a median of 29 ng/L. The presence of these compounds was revealed in 50 samples out of 67 analyzed. Influence of number of pregnancies and food habits on PFCAs concentrations was also investigated. Statistically significant differences in PFCA levels were found when the women were divided into maternal age classes and into the categories primiparae and multiparae. A greater transfer of PFC during breastfeeding by primiparous was evidenced and thus a higher exposure to these contaminants for the first child. Moreover, it was possible to hypothesize that the content of PFCs is in general correlated to the eating habits of donors and, in particular, with the fish consumption. Finally, PFOA daily intakes and risk index (RI) were estimated for the first six months of life and we found that ingestion rates of PFOA did not exceed the tolerable daily intake (TDI) recommended by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). - Graphical abstract: Figure SI 1. Concentrations (ng/L) of PFCs recovered in 67 samples of human breast milk. - Highlights: • Perfluorinated carboxylic acids were analyzed in a set of 67 breast milk samples collected from Spanish women. • PFOA appeared as the major contributor to the total perfluorinated carboxylic acids. • PFOA concentrations were significantly higher in milk of primiparous participants. • PFOA daily intake and risk index were estimated for the firsts six month of life.

  3. Long-chain alkanes and fatty acids from Ludwigia octovalvis weed leaf surface waxes as short-range attractant and ovipositional stimulant to Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2017-06-01

    The importance of leaf surface wax compounds from the rice-field weed Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven (Onagraceae) was determined in the flea beetle Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Extraction, thin layer chromatography and GC-MS and GC-FID analyses of surface waxes of young, mature and senescent leaves revealed 20, 19 and 19 n-alkanes between n-C15 and n-C35, respectively; whereas 14, 14 and 12 free fatty acids between C12:0 and C22:0 fatty acids were identified in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. Tricosane was predominant n-alkane in young and mature leaves, whilst eicosane predominated in senescent leaves. Heneicosanoic acid, palmitic acid and docosanoic acid were the most abundant free fatty acids in young, mature and senescent leaves, respectively. A. cyanea females showed attraction to 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes compared with young or senescent leaves in a short glass Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. The insects were attracted to a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively, comparable with the proportions as present in 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes. A. cyanea also laid eggs on a filter paper moistened with 0.25 mature leaf equivalent surface waxes or a synthetic blend of 0.90, 1.86, 1.83, 1.95, 0.50 and 0.18 µg ml-1 petroleum ether of hexadecane, octadecane, eicosane, tricosane, palmitic acid and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively. This finding could provide a basis for monitoring of the potential biocontrol agent in the field.

  4. Pathology review of proliferative lesions of the exocrine pancreas in two chronic feeding studies in rats with ammonium perfluorooctanoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Caverly Rae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two chronic dietary studies, conducted years apart, with ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO in Sprague Dawley rats have been previously reported. Although both included male 300 ppm dietary dose groups, only the later study, conducted in 1990–1992 by Biegel et al., reported an increase in proliferative lesions (hyperplasia and adenoma of the acinar pancreas. An assessment of the significance of the differences between both studies requires careful consideration of: the diagnostic criteria for proliferative acinar cell lesions of the rat pancreas (for example, the diagnosis of pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia versus adenoma is based on the two-dimensional size of the lesion rather than distinct morphological differences; the basis for those criteria in light of their relevance to biological behavior; and the potential diagnostic variability between individual pathologists for difficult-to-classify lesions. A pathology peer review of male exocrine pancreatic tissues from the earlier study, conducted in 1981–1983 by Butenhoff et al., was undertaken. This review identified an increase in acinar cell hyperplasia but not adenoma or carcinoma in the earlier study. Both studies observed a proliferative response in the acinar pancreas which was more pronounced in the study by Biegel et al. Definitive reasons for the greater incidence of proliferative lesions in the later study were not identified, but some possible explanations are presented herein. The relevance of this finding to human risk assessment, in the face of differences in the biological behavior of human and rat pancreatic proliferative lesions and the proposed mechanism of formation of these lesions, are questionable.

  5. A global survey of perfluorinated acids in oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Taniyasu, Sachi; Horii, Yuichi; Petrick, Gert; Gamo, Toshitaka

    2005-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids and their salts have emerged as an important class of global environmental contaminants. Biological monitoring surveys conducted using tissues of marine organisms reported the occurrence of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and related perfluorinated compounds in biota from various seas and oceans, including the Arctic and the Antarctic Oceans. Occurrence of perfluorinated compounds in remote marine locations is of concern and indicates the need for studies to trace sources and pathways of these compounds to the oceans. Determination of sub-parts-per-trillion (ng/L) or parts-per-quadrillion (pg/L) concentrations of aqueous media has been impeded by relatively high background levels arising from procedural or instrumental blanks. Our research group has developed a reliable and highly sensitive analytical method by which to monitor perfluorinated compounds in oceanic waters. The method developed is capable of detecting PFOS, perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHS), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), and perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA) at a few pg/L in oceanic waters. The method was applied to seawater samples collected during several international research cruises undertaken during 2002-2004 in the central to eastern Pacific Ocean (19 locations), South China Sea and Sulu Seas (five), north and mid Atlantic Ocean (12), and the Labrador Sea (20). An additional 50 samples of coastal seawater from several Asian countries (Japan, China, Korea) were analyzed. PFOA was found at levels ranging from several thousands of pg/L in water samples collected from coastal areas in Japan to a few tens of pg/L in the central Pacific Ocean. PFOA was the major contaminant detected in oceanic waters, followed by PFOS. Further studies are being conducted to elucidate the distribution and fate of perfluorinated acids in oceans.

  6. Variation of photoautotrophic fatty acid production from a highly CO2 tolerant alga, Chlorococcum littorale, with inorganic carbon over narrow ranges of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masaki; Takenaka, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Photoautotrophic fatty acid production of a highly CO2 -tolerant green alga Chlorococcum littorale in the presence of inorganic carbon at 295 K and light intensity of 170 µmol-photon m(-2) s(-1) was investigated. CO2 concentration in the bubbling gas was adjusted by mixing pure gas components of CO2 and N2 to avoid photorespiration and β-oxidation of fatty acids under O2 surrounding conditions. Maximum content of total fatty acid showed pH-dependence after nitrate depletion of the culture media and increased with the corresponding inorganic carbon ratio. Namely, [HCO3 (-) ]/([CO2 ]+n[ CO32-]) ratio in the culture media was found to be a controlling factor for photoautotrophic fatty acid production after the nitrate limitation. At a CO2 concentration of 5% (vol/vol) and a pH of 6.7, the fatty acid content was 47.8 wt % (dry basis) at its maximum that is comparable with land plant seed oils. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Influence of triethyl phosphate on phosphatase activity in shooting range soil: Isolation of a zinc-resistant bacterium with an acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Sandra; Brigmon, Robin L

    2017-03-01

    Phosphatase-mediated hydrolysis of organic phosphate may be a viable means of stabilizing heavy metals via precipitation as a metal phosphate in bioremediation applications. We investigated the effect of triethyl phosphate (TEP) on soil microbial-phosphatase activity in a heavy-metal contaminated soil. Gaseous TEP has been used at subsurface sites for bioremediation of organic contaminants but not applied in heavy-metal contaminated areas. Little is known about how TEP affects microbial activity in soils and it is postulated that TEP can serve as a phosphate source in nutrient-poor groundwater and soil/sediments. Over a 3-week period, TEP amendment to microcosms containing heavy-metal contaminated soil resulted in increased activity of soil acid-phosphatase and repression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating a stimulatory effect on the microbial population. A soil-free enrichment of microorganisms adapted to heavy-metal and acidic conditions was derived from the TEP-amended soil microcosms using TEP as the sole phosphate source and the selected microbial consortium maintained a high acid-phosphatase activity with repression of alkaline phosphatase. Addition of 5mM zinc to soil-free microcosms had little effect on acid phosphatase but inhibited alkaline phosphatase. One bacterial member from the consortium, identified as Burkholderia cepacia sp., expressed an acid-phosphatase activity uninhibited by high concentrations of zinc and produced a soluble, indigo pigment under phosphate limitation. The pigment was produced in a phosphate-free medium and was not produced in the presence of TEP or phosphate ion, indicative of purple acid-phosphatase types that are pressed by bioavailable phosphate. These results demonstrate that TEP amendment was bioavailable and increased overall phosphatase activity in both soil and soil-free microcosms supporting the possibility of positive outcomes in bioremediation applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in water and sediment from the coastal regions of Shandong peninsula, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Wang, Shiliang; Cao, Xuezhi; Cao, Yuanxin; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jinfeng

    2017-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been observed in various environmental matrices globally in recent years. In this study, the levels, spatial distribution tendencies, and partitioning characteristics of the target 12 PFAAs were investigated in water and sediment from the coastal regions of Shandong peninsula in China, and two sediment core samples were also collected to study the vertical and historical variation of PFAAs. The ranges (means) of total PFAA concentrations were 23.69-148.48 ng/L (76.11 ng/L) in the water and 1.30-11.17 ng/g (5.93 ng/g) in the surface sediment, respectively. Among the target 12 PFAAs, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the dominant component in water, followed by perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA). PFOS, perfluoroundecanoic acid, and PFOA were the dominant components in sediment. For their spatial distribution, higher levels of PFAAs were found at the locations close to much developed cities. The PFAA concentrations showed an overall decreasing tendency with depth increase in the two sediment cores, which indicates that the extent of PFAAs pollution is aggravating trend in recent years. Results of the partition coefficient (K d ) show that the compounds with longer carbon chains (C ≥ 7) generally had higher K d values, which suggest that long-chain PFAAs are prone to be adsorbed by sediment. In addition, the Log K d of PFHxA, PFOA, and PFOS were significantly and positively correlated to the salinity of the water. The results of risk assessment suggest appreciable risk of PFAAs to the local ecosystem.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of a range of probiotics against pathogens: evidence for the effects of organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero-Sariñena, Sandra; Barlow, Janine; Costabile, Adele; Gibson, Glenn R; Rowland, Ian

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of fifteen selected strains belonging to the Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Lactococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus genera against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. In vitro antibacterial activity was initially investigated by an agar spot method. Results from the agar spot test showed that most of the selected strains were able to produce active compounds on solid media with antagonistic properties against Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile. These results were also confirmed when cell-free culture supernatants (CFCS) from the putative probiotics were used in an agar well diffusion assay. Neutralization of the culture supernatants with alkali reduced the antagonistic effects. These experiments are able to confirm the capacity of potential probiotics to inhibit selected pathogens. One of the main inhibitory mechanisms may result from the production of organic acids from glucose fermentation and consequent lowering of culture pH. This observation was confirmed when the profile of organic acids was analysed demonstrating that lactic and acetic acid were the principal end products of probiotic metabolism. Furthermore, the assessment of the haemolytic activity and the susceptibility of the strains to the most commonly used antimicrobials, considered as basic safety aspects, were also studied. The observed antimicrobial activity was mainly genus-specific, additionally significant differences could be observed among species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Survey of Exposure Level and Lifestyle Factors for Perfluorooctanoate and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate in Human Plasma from Selected Residents in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhee Eom

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Following few decades of commercial use, perfluorooctanoate (PFOA and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS have been found in human blood and serum. We determined the amounts of PFOA and PFOS in human plasma (n = 183 and the effects of multiple uses of food-contact materials and smoking habits and alcohol consumption using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS. For the paper cups, the PFOA level in the plasma of the heavy user group was 1.37 times higher than that of the light user group. However, no association between the effects of multiple uses of food-contact materials and the plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS was found, except for paper cups. Active smokers had lower plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS than non-smokers. We show that multiple uses of food-contact materials do not appear to be a significant source of PFOA and PFOS.

  11. Uptake and elimination of perfluorinated phosphonic acids in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'eon, Jessica C; Mabury, Scott A

    2010-06-01

    The mono- and di-substituted perfluorinated phosphonic acids (mono-PFPAs and di-PFPAs) are high production volume fluorinated surfactants. Mono-PFPAs have been observed in Canadian surface waters and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. The first observation of the di-PFPAs in the environment is reported here, with the observation of the C6/C6 and C6/C8 di-PFPAs in the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) WWTP sludge standard reference material (SRM) 2781. To characterize the risk associated with human exposure to the mono-PFPAs and di-PFPAs, we determined uptake and elimination parameters in the rat. After oral gavage all of the mono-PFPA and di-PFPA congeners were observed in the blood of the dosed animals. Half-lives after intraperitoneal dosing ranged from 0.96 +/- 0.11 to 2.8 +/- 0.5 days for the mono-PFPAs and 1.8 +/- 0.1 to 9.3 +/- 1.5 days for the di-PFPAs. These half-lives are of similar magnitude to those for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 8 to 30 days in male rats) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 6 days in male rats and 1 hour in female rats). Both PFOS and PFOA have human half-lives on the order of years, and so the mono-PFPAs and di-PFPAs may also have significant lifetimes in the human body. The analysis of paired whole blood and plasma samples demonstrated that the mono-PFPAs may bind to blood cells underestimating their concentration in plasma and sera samples. The biological fate of the mono-PFPAs and di-PFPAs determined here suggest there is the potential for human exposure and that if exposure does occur, they may be long-lived in the body. Copyright 2010 SETAC.

  12. Investigation of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles as Acid-base pH Indicators and Their Transition pH Ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Byoung Gue; Jo, Ji Hee; Yu, Jin Won; Lim, Jong Kuk [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Monitoring of pH, especially under highly alkaline conditions, is necessary in various processes in the industrial, biotechnological, agricultural, and environmental fields. However, few pH indicators that can function at highly alkaline levels are available, and most of which are organic-based pH indicators. Several years ago, it was reported that gold nanoparticles prepared using trisodium citrate dihydrate were rapidly aggregated at pH values higher than ⁓ 12.7. A shift of surface plasmon resonance for such aggregated gold nanoparticles can be applied to pH indicators, allowing for the substitution of traditional organic-based pH indicators. The most important characteristic of pH indicators is the transition pH range. Herein, gold and silver nanoparticles are prepared using different reducing agents, and their transition pH ranges are examined. The results showed that all nanoparticles prepared in this study exhibit similar transition pH ranges spanning 11.9 - 13.0, regardless of the nanoparticle material, reducing agents, and concentration.

  13. Foodstuff analyses show that seafood and water are major perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) sources to humans in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jin-Ju; Lee, Ji-Woo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung-Kyu [Department of Marine Science, College of Natural Sciences, Incheon National University, Incheon, 406-772 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: jeoh@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 16 PFAAs in 397 samples of 66 food types and 34 tap water samples were analyzed. • Dietary exposure to PFAAs was estimated by using the PFAAs measured concentrations. • The major contributors of PFAAs dietary exposure were confirmed. - Abstract: We measured concentrations of PFAAs in 397 foods, of 66 types, in Korea, and determined the daily human dietary PFAAs intake and the contribution of each foodstuff to that intake. The PFAAs concentration in the 66 different food types ranged from below the detection limit to 48.3 ng/g. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) were the dominant PFAAs in fish, shellfish, and processed foods, while perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and short-chain PFCAs dominated dairy foodstuffs and beverages. The Korean adult dietary intake ranges, estimated for a range of scenarios, were 0.60–3.03 and 0.17–1.68 ng kg{sup −1} bw d{sup −1} for PFOS and PFOA, respectively, which were lower than the total daily intake limits suggested by European Food Safety Authority (PFOS: 150 ng kg{sup −1} bw d{sup −1}; PFOA: 1500 ng kg{sup −1} bw d{sup −1}). The major contributors to PFAAs dietary exposure varied with subject age and PFAAs. For example, fish was a major contributor of PFOS but dairy foods were major contributors of PFOA. However, tap water was a major contributor to PFOA intake when it was the main source of drinking water (rather than bottled water)

  14. Polymerizing Pyrrole Coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) Conductive Nanofibrous Conduit Combined with Electric Stimulation for Long-Range Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jialin; Sun, Binbin; Liu, Shen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunyang; Mo, Xiumei; Che, Junyi; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES) are both promising methods to support neuron adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few work on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PPY/PLCL) in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microscope. Rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15 mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1 h per day at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits' combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. Polymerizing pyrrole coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL conductive nanofibrous conduit combined with electric stimulation for long-range peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES are both promising methods to support neurons adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few works on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone (PPY/PLCL in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR. Rat pheochromyctoma (PC12 cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15-mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1h per day at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  16. Mass energy-absorption coefficients and average atomic energy-absorption cross-sections for amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, Chaitali V., E-mail: chaitalimore89@gmail.com; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina P., E-mail: pravinapawar4@gmail.com [Department of physics, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad 431004 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Mass attenuation coefficients of amino acids such as n-acetyl-l-tryptophan, n-acetyl-l-tyrosine and d-tryptophan were measured in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The measured attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine the mass energy-absorption coefficients (σ{sub a,en}) and average atomic energy-absorption cross sections (μ{sub en}/ρ) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in good agreement.

  17. Opinion of the Scientific Panel on Contaminants in the Food chain on perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and their salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benford, D.; de Boer, J.; Carere, A.; di Domenico, A.; Johansson, N.; Schrenk, D.; Schoeters, G.; de Voogt, P.; Dellatte, E.

    2008-01-01

    Perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) is the collective name for a vast group of fluorinated compounds, including oligomers and polymers, which consist of neutral and anionic surface active compounds with high thermal, chemical and biological inertness. Perfluorinated compounds are generally

  18. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARa and T- and B-cell targeting

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dosing information, body weights during exposure and immune system endpoints. This dataset is associated with the following publication: DeWitt, J., W. Williams , J....

  19. Biomonitoring of perfluoroalkyl acids in human urine and estimates of biological half-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Beesoon, Sanjay; Zhu, Lingyan; Martin, Jonathan W

    2013-09-17

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are persistent and bioaccumulative compounds that have been associated with adverse health outcomes. In human blood, PFAAs exist as both linear and branched isomers, yet for most linear homologues, and for all branched isomers, elimination rates are unknown. Paired blood and urine samples (n = 86) were collected from adults in China. They were analyzed by a sensitive isomer-specific method that permitted the detection of many PFAAs in human urine for the first time. For all PFAAs except perfluoroundecanoate (PFUnA), levels in urine correlated positively with levels in blood. Perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) were excreted more efficiently than perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs) of the same carbon chain-length. In general, shorter PFCAs were excreted more efficiently than longer ones, but for PFSAs, perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS, a C8 compound) was excreted more efficiently than perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS, a C6 compound). Among PFOS and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) isomers, major branched isomers were more efficiently excreted than the corresponding linear isomer. A one-compartment model was used to estimate the biological elimination half-lives of PFAAs. Among all PFAAs, the estimated arithmetic mean elimination half-lives ranged from 0.5 ± 0.1 years (for one branched PFOA isomer, 5m-PFOA) to 90 ± 11 years (for one branched PFOS isomer, 1m-PFOS). Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for short PFCAs (C ≤ 8), but for longer PFCAs, PFOS and PFHxS, other routes of excretion likely contribute to overall elimination. Urinary concentrations are good biomarkers of the internal dose, and this less invasive strategy can therefore be used in future epidemiological and biomonitoring studies. The very long half-lives of long-chain PFCAs, PFHxS, and PFOS isomers in humans stress the importance of global and domestic exposure mitigation strategies.

  20. Time trends of perfluorinated alkyl acids in serum from Danish pregnant women 2008-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Bach, Cathrine C; Long, Manhai

    2016-01-01

    (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA). We found that the serum levels of all seven PFAAs decreased during the period from 2008 to 2013; on average PFHxS decreased with 7.0% per year, PFHpS with 14.......8%, PFOS with 9.3%, PFOA with 9.1%, PFNA with 6.2%, PFDA with 6.3%, and PFUnA with 7.1% per year. Adjustment for maternal age, body mass index (BMI), educational level and gestational age at blood sampling did not change the time trends much. To our knowledge, we are the first to report decreasing trends...

  1. Variation of the stability of complexes of Al(III) with a fulvic acid extracted from a humic cambisol soil in the pH range three to five

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteves da Silva, J.C.G.; Machado, A.A.S.C. [LAQUIPAI, Porto (Portugal). Faculdade de Ciencias; Ramos, M.A.; Arce, F. [Univ. de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica; Rey, F. [Univ. de Vigo (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica

    1997-09-01

    The interaction of the aluminum ion [Al(III)] with the major constituent of soil organic matter, fulvic acids (FA), was investigated in the acid pH range. The complexation of a FA extracted from a humic cambisol soil (at a concentration of 80 mg/L) when titrated with Al(III) were monitored directly by synchronous fluorescence (SyF) spectroscopy at five pH values (3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0), at 25 C and with 0.1 N KNO{sub 3}. Inverted second derivative SyF data were preprocessed by a self-modeling mixture analysis method to obtain fluorescence enhancement profiles as a function of the increasing Al(III) concentration. Assuming that the concentration of complexes formed between Al(III) and FA is proportional to the fluorescence intensity, these profiles were adjusted to a 1:1 complexation model and the following conditional stability constants (log K{sub c}) were calculated (standard deviation in parenthesis), pH = 3.0, 4.3 (1); pH = 3.5, 4.3 (1); pH = 4.0, 5.0 (1); pH = 4.5, 5.1 (3); and pH = 5.0, 5.3 (2). These constants show that the stability of the complexes decreases markedly at pH < 4. The environmental implication of this result is that an increase in the extent of the dissociation of the Al(III) + FA complexes is expected at pH < 4, increasing the free Al(III) concentration and probably its ecotoxicity.

  2. Efficient treatment of perfluorohexanoic acid by nanofiltration followed by electrochemical degradation of the NF concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Álvaro; Gorri, Daniel; Urtiaga, Ane

    2017-04-01

    The present study was aimed at the development of a strategy for removing and degrading perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) from industrial process waters at concentrations in the range 60-200 mg L(-1). The treatment train consisted of nanofiltration (NF) separation followed by electrochemical degradation of the NF concentrate. Using a laboratory-scale system and working in the total recirculation mode, the DowFilm NF270 membrane provided PFHxA rejections that varied in the range 96.6-99.4% as the operating pressure was increased from 2.5 to 20 bar. The NF operation in concentration mode enabled a volume reduction factor of 5 and increased the PFHxA concentration in the retentate to 870 mg L(-1). Results showed that the increase in PFHxA concentration and the presence of calcium sulfate salts did not induce irreversible membrane fouling. The NF retentate was treated in a commercial undivided electrochemical cell provided with two parallel flow-by compartments separated by bipolar boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode, BDD counter anode, and counter cathode. Current densities ranging from 20 to 100 A m(-2) were examined. The electrochemical degradation rate of PFHxA reached 98% and was accompanied by its efficient mineralization, as the reduction of total organic carbon was higher than 95%. Energy consumption, which was 15.2 kWh m(-3) of treated NF concentrate, was minimized by selecting operation at 50 A m(-2). While most of the previous research on the treatment of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) focused on the removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), these compounds have been phased out by chemical manufacturers. Our findings are relevant for the treatment of PFHxA, which appears to be one of the present alternatives to long-chain PFASs thanks to its lower bioaccumulative potential than PFOA and PFOS. However, PFHxA also behaves as a persistent pollutant. Moreover, our results highlight the potential of combining

  3. Prenatal Phthalate, Perfluoroalkyl Acid, and Organochlorine Exposures and Term Birth Weight in Three Birth Cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenters, Virissa; Portengen, Lützen; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2015-01-01

    biomarkers of environmental exposure and birth weight. METHODS: We evaluated a cohort of 1,250 term (≥ 37 weeks gestation) singleton infants, born to 513 mothers from Greenland, 180 from Poland, and 557 from Ukraine, who were recruited during antenatal care visits in 2002‒2004. Secondary metabolites...... of diethylhexyl and diisononyl phthalates (DEHP, DiNP), eight perfluoroalkyl acids, and organochlorines (PCB-153 and p,p´-DDE) were quantifiable in 72‒100% of maternal serum samples. We assessed associations between exposures and term birth weight, adjusting for co-exposures and covariates, including prepregnancy...... body mass index. To identify independent associations, we applied the elastic net penalty to linear regression models. RESULTS: Two phthalate metabolites (MEHHP, MOiNP), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and p,p´-DDE were most consistently predictive of term birth weight based on elastic net penalty...

  4. Size distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, α-dicarbonyls, sugars, WSOC, OC, EC and inorganic ions in atmospheric particles over Northern Japan: implication for long-range transport of Siberian biomass burning and East Asian polluted aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Agarwal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the size-segregated chemical composition of aged organic aerosols in the western North Pacific rim, day- and night-time aerosol samples were collected in Sapporo, Japan during summer 2005 using an Andersen impactor sampler with 5 size bins: Dp<1.1, 1.1–2.0, 2.0–3.3, 3.3–7.0, >7.0 μm. Samples were analyzed for the molecular composition of dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, α-dicarbonyls, and sugars, together with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, organic carbon (OC, elemental carbon (EC and inorganic ions. Based on the analyses of backward trajectories and chemical tracers, we found that during the campaign, air masses arrived from Siberia (a biomass burning source region on 8–9 August, from China (an anthropogenic source region on 9–10 August, and from the East China Sea/Sea of Japan (a mixed source receptor region on 10–11 August. Most of the diacids, ketoacids, dicarbonyls, levoglucosan, WSOC, and inorganic ions (i.e., SO42−, NH4+ and K+ were enriched in fine particles (PM1.1 whereas Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl peaked in coarse sizes (>1.1 μm. Interestingly, OC, most sugar compounds and NO3 showed bimodal distributions in fine and coarse modes. In PM1.1, diacids in biomass burning-influenced aerosols transported from Siberia (mean: 252 ng m−3 were more abundant than those in the aerosols originating from China (209 ng m−3 and ocean (142 ng m−3, whereas SO42− concentrations were highest in the aerosols from China (mean: 3970 ng m−3 followed by marine- (2950 ng m−3 and biomass burning-influenced (1980 ng m−3 aerosols. Higher loadings of WSOC (2430 ng m−3 and OC (4360 ng m−3 were found in the fine mode, where biomass-burning products such as

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance and LC/MS characterization of native and new mass-labeled fluorinated telomer alcohols, acids and unsaturated acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, G.; Chittim, B.; McAlees, A.; Yeo, B. [Wellington Laboratories Inc., Guelph, ON (Canada); Ellis, D.; Mabury, S.; Stock, N. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada); Halldorson, T.; Tomy, G. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); McCrindle, R. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    A variety of fluorinated compounds are used in a multitude of consumer products because of their ability to repel water and oil, resistance to heat, and chemical inertness. Recently, scientists and regulators have begun raising concerns about the potential health and environmental impact of perfluorinated compounds. Exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids, such as Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), has been identified as a potential human health concern. A study has shown that telomer alcohols such as 2-perfluorooctylethanol can be metabolized by living organisms or biodegrade under environmental conditions to sequentially give the saturated fluorinated telomer acid (2- perfluorooctylethanoic acid), then the unsaturated telomer acid (2H-Perfluorooct-2-enoic acid), and eventually PFOA. Additional experimental work is necessary to determine the extent, if any, to which telomer product degradation may be a source of PFOA. The analysis for fluorinated compounds in environmental samples is performed, primarily, using LC/MS techniques. These analyses have been hindered by the lack of any commercially available mass-labeled fluorinated compounds for use as surrogates and thus may be restricting the amount of research conducted in this area. We have now synthesized the mass-labeled perfluoroalkyl telomer alcohols and the corresponding acids and unsaturated acids. We report in this study their 1H-, 2H-, 19F- and 13C-NMR characterizations along with GC/MS and LC/MS data and evaluation of their use as surrogate standards.

  6. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  7. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  8. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  9. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  10. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  11. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  12. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  13. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  14. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  15. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  16. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  17. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  18. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  19. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  20. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  1. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  2. The effects of long (C20/22) and short (C18) chain omega-3 fatty acids on keel bone fractures, bone biomechanics, behavior, and egg production in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, M J; Booth, F; Wilkins, L J; Avery, N C; Brown, S B; Richards, G; Tarlton, J F

    2015-05-01

    Keel fractures in the laying hen are the most critical animal welfare issue facing the egg production industry, particularly with the increased use of extensive systems in response to the 2012 EU directive banning conventional battery cages. The current study is aimed at assessing the effects of 2 omega-3 (n3) enhanced diets on bone health, production endpoints, and behavior in free-range laying hens. Data was collected from 2 experiments over 2 laying cycles, each of which compared a (n3) supplemented diet with a control diet. Experiment 1 employed a diet supplemented with a 60:40 fish oil-linseed mixture (n3:n6 to 1.35) compared with a control diet (n3:n6 to 0.11), whereas the n3 diet in Experiment 2 was supplemented with a 40:60 fish oil-linseed (n3:n6 to 0.77) compared to the control diet (n3:n6 to 0.11). The n3 enhanced diet of Experiment 1 had a higher n3:n6 ratio, and a greater proportion of n3 in the long chain (C20/22) form (0.41 LC:SC) than that of Experiment 2 (0.12 LC:SC). Although dietary treatment was successful in reducing the frequency of fractures by approximately 27% in Experiment 2, data from Experiment 1 indicated the diet actually induced a greater likelihood of fracture (odds ratio: 1.2) and had substantial production detriment. Reduced keel breakage during Experiment 2 could be related to changes in bone health as n3-supplemented birds demonstrated greater load at failure of the keel, and tibiae and humeri that were more flexible. These results support previous findings that n3-supplemented diets can reduce fracture likely by increasing bone strength, and that this can be achieved without detriment to production. However, our findings suggest diets with excessive quantities of n3, or very high levels of C20/22, may experience health and production detriments. Further research is needed to optimize the quantity and type of n3 in terms of bone health and production variables and investigate the potential associated mechanisms. © 2015

  3. Demonstration of the Colour Range of Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, G. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a box that is filled with indicator of a particular concentration. A little acid is added to one side and a little alkali to the other so that the complete colour range of the indicator is observable. (GS)

  4. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  5. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries...... in optimal O(k) time. The structure uses O(n) words of space and can be constructed in O(n logn) time. The data structure can be extended to solve the online version of the problem, where the elements in A[i..j] are reported one-by-one in sorted order, in O(1) worst-case time per element. The problem...... is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  6. Occurrence of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in N.E. Spanish surface waters and their removal in a drinking water treatment plant that combines conventional and advanced treatments in parallel lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Cintia; Ventura, Francesc; Martin-Alonso, Jordi; Caixach, Josep

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are two emerging contaminants that have been detected in all environmental compartments. However, while most of the studies in the literature deal with their presence or removal in wastewater treatment, few of them are devoted to their detection in treated drinking water and fate during drinking water treatment. In this study, analyses of PFOS and PFOA have been carried out in river water samples and in the different stages of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) which has recently improved its conventional treatment process by adding ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis in a parallel treatment line. Conventional and advanced treatments have been studied in several pilot plants and in the DWTP, which offers the opportunity to compare both treatments operating simultaneously. From the results obtained, neither preoxidation, sand filtration, nor ozonation, removed both perfluorinated compounds. As advanced treatments, reverse osmosis has proved more effective than reverse electrodialysis to remove PFOA and PFOS in the different configurations of pilot plants assayed. Granular activated carbon with an average elimination efficiency of 64±11% and 45±19% for PFOS and PFOA, respectively and especially reverse osmosis, which was able to remove ≥99% of both compounds, were the sole effective treatment steps. Trace levels of PFOS (3.0-21 ng/L) and PFOA (water were significantly lowered in comparison to those measured in precedent years. These concentrations represent overall removal efficiencies of 89±22% for PFOA and 86±7% for PFOS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Barnathan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known fatty acids with a D5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32 and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19. Finally, the D5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs. This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between D5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs.

  8. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  9. Comparative hepatotoxicity of 6:2 fluorotelomer carboxylic acid and 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonic acid, two fluorinated alternatives to long-chain perfluoroalkyl acids, on adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nan; Zhou, Xiujuan; Zheng, Fei; Pan, Yitao; Guo, Xuejiang; Guo, Yong; Sun, Yan; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-08-01

    Due to their structural similarities, 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonic acid (6:2 FTSA) and 6:2 fluorotelomer carboxylic acid (6:2 FTCA) are often used as alternatives to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), respectively. With limited health risk data and 6:2 FTSA detection in water and sludge, the toxicity of these chemicals is of growing concern. Here, adult male mice were exposed with 5 mg/kg/day of 6:2 FTCA or 6:2 FTSA for 28 days to investigate their hepatotoxicological effects. In contrast to 6:2 FTCA, 6:2 FTSA was detected at high and very high levels in serum and liver, respectively, demonstrating bioaccumulation potential and slow elimination. Furthermore, 6:2 FTSA induced liver weight increase, inflammation, and necrosis, whereas 6:2 FTCA caused no obvious liver injury, with fewer significantly altered genes detected compared with that of 6:2 FTSA (39 vs. 412). Although PFOA and PFOS commonly activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), 6:2 FTSA induced an increase in PPARγ and related proteins, but not in lipid metabolism-related genes such as PPARα. Our results showed that 6:2 FTCA and 6:2 FTSA exhibited weak and moderate hepatotoxicity, respectively, compared with that reported for legacies PFOA and PFOS.

  10. Quantitative characterization of short- and long-chain perfluorinated acids in solid matrices in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Chaojie; Qu, Yan; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ling; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Qi

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) have been recognized as emerging environmental pollutants because of their widespread occurrences, persistence, and bioaccumulative and toxicological effects. PFAs have been detected in aquatic environment and biota in China, but the occurrences of these chemicals have not been reported in solid matrices in China. In the present study, short- and long-chain PFAs (C2-C14) have been quantitatively determined in solid matrices including sediments, soils and sludge collected in Shanghai, China. The results indicate that sludge contains more PFAs than sediments and soils, and the total PFAs concentrations in sediments, soil and sludge are 62.5-276 ng g(-1), 141-237 ng g(-1) and 413-755 ng g(-1), respectively. In most cases, trifluoroacetic acid was the major PFA and accounted for 22-90% of the total PFAs. Although the levels of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) were not only lower than trifluoroacetic acid, but also lower than some short-chain PFCAs (PFAs, respectively. Meanwhile, unlike previous studies, PFOS levels were not always higher than PFOA in solids collected in Shanghai, China. Given that some short-chain PFAs such as trifluoroacetic acid are mildly phytotoxic and their higher levels in solid matrices were collected in Shanghai, China, these chemicals should be included in future environmental monitoring efforts.

  11. Lewis Acid Organocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Oksana; Tabassum, Sobia; Wilhelm, René

    The term Lewis acid catalysts generally refers to metal salts like aluminium chloride, titanium chloride and zinc chloride. Their application in asymmetric catalysis can be achieved by the addition of enantiopure ligands to these salts. However, not only metal centers can function as Lewis acids. Compounds containing carbenium, silyl or phosphonium cations display Lewis acid catalytic activity. In addition, hypervalent compounds based on phosphorus and silicon, inherit Lewis acidity. Furthermore, ionic liquids, organic salts with a melting point below 100 °C, have revealed the ability to catalyze a range of reactions either in substoichiometric amount or, if used as the reaction medium, in stoichiometric or even larger quantities. The ionic liquids can often be efficiently recovered. The catalytic activity of the ionic liquid is explained by the Lewis acidic nature of their cations. This review covers the survey of known classes of metal-free Lewis acids and their application in catalysis.

  12. Perfluoroalkyl acids and time to pregnancy revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Liew, Zeyan; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated an association between plasma perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and longer time to pregnancy (TTP) in a sample from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC, 1996-2002). In this study we investigated this association in a new sampl...

  13. Determination of Sialic Acids by Acidic Ninhydrin Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yao,Kenzabroh; Ubuka,Toshihiko

    1987-01-01

    A new acidic ninhydrin method for determining free sialic acids is described. The method is based on the reaction of sialic acids with Gaitonde's acid ninhydrin reagent 2 which yields a stable color with an absorption maximum at 470 nm. The standard curve is linear in the range of 5 to 500 nmol of N-acetylneuraminic acid per 0.9 ml of reaction mixture. The reaction was specific only for sialic acids among the various sugars and sugar derivatives examined. Some interference of this method by c...

  14. A review of sources, multimedia distribution and health risks of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Meng, Jing; Liu, Shijie; Lu, Yonglong; Khim, Jong Seong; Giesy, John P

    2015-06-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been recognized as emerging pollutants because of their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment, biota and humans. In order to investigate their sources, fate and environmental effects, a great number of surveys have been carried out over the past several years. In the present review, we summarized the status of sources and emission, concentration, distribution and risks of PFAAs in China. Concentrations of PFAAs, especially perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in various environmental media including water, sediment, soil, rain, snow and organisms, as well as human tissues are summarized based on the available data. Concentrations of PFAAs in aquatic systems are higher in relatively more industrialized and urbanized areas than those from the less populated and remote regions in China, indicating that their emission and distribution are closely related to regional urbanization and industrialization. PFAAs and related products have been widely used over the past several decades, which have brought about high concentrations detected in environmental matrixes, biota and even local residents. Ecological risk assessment of PFAAs is still less developed in China. Most existing studies compared concentrations of PFAAs to guideline values derived for single species to evaluate the risk. In order to reveal the transport, partitioning and degradation of PFAAs in the environment, further studies on their behavior, fate, bioaccumulation and adverse effects in different trophic levels should be conducted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Examining the PM6 semiempirical method for pKa prediction across a wide range of oxyacids

    OpenAIRE

    Sierra Rayne; Kaya Forest; Ken J. Friesen

    2009-01-01

    The pK~a~ estimation ability of the semiempirical PM6 method was evaluated across a broad range of oxyacids and compared to results obtained using the SPARC software program. Compound classes under consideration included acetic acids, alicyclic and aromatic heterocyclic acids, benzoic acids, boronic acids, hydroxamic acids, oximes, peroxides, peroxyacids, phenols, α-saturated acids, α-saturated alcohols, sulfinic acids, α-unsaturated acids, and α-unsaturated alcohols. ...

  16. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A.; Miller, Wilson H.; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L. John

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at –30°C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function. PMID:19154961

  17. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  18. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops ...

  19. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  20. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  1. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  2. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  3. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  4. The use of carbon adsorbents for the removal of perfluoroalkyl acids from potable reuse systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Mandu; Dickenson, Eric R V

    2017-10-01

    Bench- and pilot-scale sorption tests were used to probe the performance of several biochars at removing perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) from field waters, compared to granular activated carbon (GAC). Screening tests using organic matter-free water resulted in hardwood (HWC) (Kd = 41 L g-1) and pinewood (PWC) (Kd = 49 L g-1) biochars having the highest perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) removal performance that was comparable to bituminous coal GAC (Kd = 41 L g-1). PWC and HWC had a stronger affinity for PFOA sorbed in Lake Mead surface water (KF = 11 mg(1-n) Ln g-1) containing a lower (2 mg L-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration than in a tertiary-filtered wastewater (KF = 8 mg(1-n) Ln g-1) with DOC of 4.9 mg L-1. A pilot-scale study was performed using three parallel adsorbers (GAC, anthracite, and HWC biochar) treating the same tertiary-filtered wastewater. Compared to HWC, and anthracite, GAC was the most effective in mitigating perfluoropentanoic acid (PFPnA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PHxA), PFOA, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), and DOC (45-67% removed at 4354 bed volumes) followed by HWC, and then anthracite. Based on bench- and pilot-scale results, shorter-chain PFAA [perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), PFPnA, or PFHxA] were more difficult to remove with both biochar and GAC than the longer-chain, PFOS and PFOA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Microbial Growth on Subsurface Perfluoroalkyl Acid Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, T. S.; Higgins, C. P.; Sharp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport of poly and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the presence of active microbial communities has not been widely investigated. These emerging contaminants are commonly utilized in aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) and have often been detected in groundwater. This study explores the transport of a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), in microbially active settings. Single point organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients derived by exposing inactive cellular material to PFASs result in more than an order of magnitude increase in sorption compared to soil organic carbon sorption coefficients found in literature. For example, the sorption coefficients for PFOS are 4.05±0.07 L/kg and 2.80±0.08 L/kg for cellular organic carbon and soil organic carbon respectively. This increase in sorption, coupled with enhanced extracellular polymeric substance production observed during growth of a common hydrocarbon degrading soil microbe exposed to source-level concentrations of PFASs (10 mg/L of 11 analytes, 110 mg/L total) may result in PFAS retardation in situ. To address the upscaling of this phenomenon, flow-through columns packed with low-organic carbon sediment and biostimulated with 10 mg/L glucose were exposed to PFAS concentrations from 15 μg/L to 10 mg/L of each 11 analytes. Breakthrough and tailing of each analyte was measured and modeled with Hydrus-1D to explore sorption coefficients over time for microbially active columns.

  6. Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) with isomer analysis in the commercial PFOS and PFOA products in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yifeng; Yang, Liping; Chu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Lingyan

    2015-05-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been widely used in consumer and industrial products for decades and are widely detected in the environment and humans all over the world. The information on the isomeric profiles of commercial products is important to identify the manufacturing origins of PFAAs in the environment. For the first time, the PFAA compositions and isomeric profiles of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) were reported in three PFOS and five PFOA commercial products manufactured in China. The purity of the three PFOS products was 76.7-80.6%. The major impurity in the PFOS products is PFOA, which contributes more than 10%. Other impurities include perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) and perfluoroheptanoate acids (PFHpA). The percentage of linear PFOS (n-PFOS) in the three products was 66.2-71.9%, similar to that in the product manufactured by 3M (70.3%). The purity of the five PFOA products was relatively high (94.0-95.8%), and the major impurity was PFOS (2.06-3.09%). The percentage of n-PFOA in the five PFOA products was 76.4-77.9%, which was similar to that in the 3M PFOA (78%). Although it is widely accepted that telomerization is currently the predominant manufacturing method for PFOA, yielding an isomerically pure and linear product, the results in the present study suggest that electrochemical fluorination is still used by some manufacturers in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of salinity and organic matter on the partitioning of perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAs) to clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Junho; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Lim, Byung J; An, Kwang Guk; Kim, Sang Don

    2011-06-01

    The influence of salinity and organic matter on the distribution coefficient (K(d)) for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in a brackish water-clay system was studied. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) for PFAs onto inorganic clay surfaces increased with salinity, providing evidence for electrostatic interaction for the sorption of PFAs, whereas the relationship between K(d) and organic carbon content (f(oc)) suggested that hydrophobic interaction is the primary driving force for the sorption of PFAs onto organic matter. The organic carbon normalized adsorption coefficient (K(oc)) of PFAs can be slightly overestimated due to the electrostatic interaction within uncoated inorganic surfaces. In addition, the dissolved organic matter released from coated clay particles seemed to solvate PFA molecules in solution, which contributed to a decrease in K(d). A positive relationship between K(d) and salinity was apparent, but an empirical relationship for the 'salting-out' effect was not evident. The K(d) values of PFAs are relatively small compared with those reported for persistent organic pollutants. Thus, sorption may not be a significant route of mass transfer of PFAs from water columns in estuarine environments. However, enhancement of sorption of PFAs to particulate matter at high salinity values could evoke potential risks to benthic organisms in estuarine areas.

  8. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  9. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  10. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  11. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  12. Osprey Range - CWHR [ds601

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  13. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  14. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges

  15. Footprints of Urban Micro-Pollution in Protected Areas: Investigating the Longitudinal Distribution of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Wildlife Preserves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio A Rodriguez-Jorquera

    Full Text Available Current approaches to protect biodiversity by establishing protected areas usually gloss over water pollution as a threat. Our objective was to determine the longitudinal and seasonal distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs in water column and sediments from a wastewater dominated stream that enters preservation areas. Water samples were collected along the longitudinal section (six sites, 1000 m away from each other of the stream during the dry and wet seasons. Sediments were collected from three sites along the stream from three depths. Water and sediments were analyzed for PFAAs using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Eleven PFAAs with 5 to 14 carbon atoms were detected in the water column at all sampling points, with a minor reduction at the last point suggesting a dilution effect. The most detected PFAAs was PFOS, followed by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA. Seasonal differences in PFAAs concentrations suggested contribution of stormwater runoff during the wet season. All analyzed PFAAs in sediments were under the limit of quantification, likely due to the high proportion of sand and low organic matter. However, high concentrations of PFAAs were detected in the water column inside the protected areas, which includes PFOS in concentrations considered not safe for avian wildlife. Water samples appear to be more relevant than sediments to determine PFAAs micro-pollution in water bodies with sandy sediments. Inclusion of a management plans on micro-pollution research, monitoring, and mitigation is recommended for protected areas.

  16. Associations of in utero exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids with human semen quality and reproductive hormones in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested, Anne; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Olsen, Sjurdur Frodi; Bonde, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Susanne Lund; Halldorsson, Thorhallur Ingi; Becher, Georg; Haug, Line Småstuen; Ernst, Emil Hagen; Toft, Gunnar

    2013-04-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), persistent chemicals with unique water-, dirt-, and oil-repellent properties, are suspected of having endocrine-disrupting activity. The PFAA compounds perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) are found globally in humans; because they readily cross the placental barrier, in utero exposure may be a cause for concern. We investigated whether in utero exposure to PFOA and PFOS affects semen quality, testicular volume, and reproductive hormone levels. We recruited 169 male offspring (19-21 years of age) from a pregnancy cohort established in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1988-1989, corresponding to 37.6% of the eligible sons. Each man provided a semen sample and a blood sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, total sperm count, motility, and morphology, and blood samples were used to measure reproductive hormones. As a proxy for in utero exposure, PFOA and PFOS were measured in maternal blood samples from pregnancy week 30. Multivariable linear regression analysis suggested that in utero exposure to PFOA was associated with lower adjusted sperm concentration (ptrend = 0.01) and total sperm count (ptrend = 0.001) and with higher adjusted levels of luteinizing hormone (ptrend = 0.03) and follicle-stimulating hormone (ptrend = 0.01). PFOS did not appear to be associated with any of the outcomes assessed, before or after adjustment. The results suggest that in utero exposure to PFOA may affect adult human male semen quality and reproductive hormone levels.

  17. Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in indoor and outdoor dusts around a mega fluorochemical industrial park in China: Implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongqiao; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Pei; Shi, Yajuan; Li, Qifeng; Zhou, Yunqiao; Johnson, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of fluorochemicals can lead to high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) contaminating the surrounding environment and consequently elevated exposure to the local residents. In this study, measurements of PFAAs associated with indoor and outdoor dusts around a mega fluorochemical industrial park (FIP) were made. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and short-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (C4-C7 PFCAs) were the predominant forms in all samples. The signature of the PFAAs in dusts in the local area matched that found within the FIP complex. The contamination plume in the local area could be linked to the prevailing wind direction starting from the FIP. The dust concentrations decreased exponentially with distance from the FIP (noticeably in the first 5km). PFAAs contamination could be detected at the furthest location, 20km away from the FIP. The concentrations of PFAAs were higher in indoor dust (73-13,500ng/g, median: 979ng/g) than those in outdoor dust (5-9495ng/g, median: 62ng/g) at every location. The highest estimated daily intake of PFOA via dust ingestion (26.0ng/kg·bw/day) was for toddlers (2-5years) living 2km away from the FIP, which is posing human health risk, though exposure remains within the provisional tolerable daily intake values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  19. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  20. Metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids directly activate uncoupling protein 1 in brown-fat mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) can display fatty acid-like activity in biological systems. The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue is physiologically (re)activated by fatty acids, including octanoate. This leads to bioenergetically uncoupled energy dissipation (heat production, thermogenesis). We have examined here the possibility that PFOA/PFOS can directly (re)activate UCP1 in isolated mouse brown-fat mitochondria. In wild-type brown-fat mitochondria, PFOS and PFOA overcame GDP-inhibited thermogenesis, leading to increased oxygen consumption and dissipated membrane potential. The absence of this effect in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-ablated mice indicated that it occurred through activation of UCP1. A competitive type of inhibition by increased GDP concentrations indicated interaction with the same mechanistic site as that utilized by fatty acids. No effect was observed in heart mitochondria, i.e., in mitochondria without UCP1. The stimulatory effect of PFOA/PFOS was not secondary to non-specific mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or to ROS production. Thus, metabolic effects of perfluorinated fatty acids could include direct brown adipose tissue (UCP1) activation. The possibility that this may lead to unwarranted extra heat production and thus extra utilization of food resources, leading to decreased fitness in mammalian wildlife, is discussed, as well as possible negative effects in humans. However, a possibility to utilize PFOA-/PFOS-like substances for activating UCP1 therapeutically in obesity-prone humans may also be envisaged.

  1. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  2. Desert Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    Entries qualify for inclusion if they were conducted in whole or part at the Desert Experimental Range (DER, also known as the Desert Range Experiment Station) or were based on DER research in whole or part. They do not qualify merely by the author having worked at the DER when the research was performed or prepared. Entries were drawn from the original abstracts or...

  3. Intestinal metabolism of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enser, M

    1965-08-01

    1. The effect of concentration on the oxidation and incorporation into lipids of lauric acid and linoleic acid by rings of rat small intestine has been studied in vitro. 2. In the absence of glucose, the oxidation of lauric acid in the range 0.01-5.0mm showed a maximum at 0.1mm. In the presence of glucose the maximum was at 0.5mm. The oxidation of linoleic acid in the presence of glucose increased throughout the concentration range 0.01-5.0mm. 3. The incorporation of lauric acid into lipids was maximal at 0.5-0.6mm in the presence of glucose, but at 10mm in the absence of glucose. At 0.8mm-lauric acid, in the presence of glucose, over 75% of the incorporated lauric acid was in triglycerides, but at 10mm they only contained 30%. The incorporation of glucose carbon into glycerides paralleled the incorporation of lauric acid. 4. In the range 0.01-2.5mm-linoleic acid the quantity incorporated into lipids increased. In the range 0.01-0.4mm linoleic acid was incorporated predominantly into triglycerides, but between 0.4 and 1.0mm most was in diglycerides, and between 2.5 and 5.0mm most was in monoglycerides. 5. The relationship of fatty acid concentration to the mechanism of absorption is discussed, together with the correlation between the distribution of the absorbed fatty acids within the tissue lipids and the lipase activity of intestinal mucosa.

  4. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  5. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....

  6. Perfluoroalkyl acids in aqueous samples from Germany and Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Umer; Schulze, Stefanie; Slawik, Christian; Böhme, Alexander; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of chemicals in the environment is important to control their fate and to protect human health, flora, and fauna. Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been detected frequently in different environmental compartments during the last 15 years and have drawn much attention because of their environmental persistence, omnipresence, and bioaccumulation potential. Water is an important source of their transport. In the present study, distributions of PFAAs in river water, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and tap water from eastern part of Germany and western part of Kenya were investigated. Eleven perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and five perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) were analyzed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Sum of mean concentrations of eight PFAAs detected in drinking tap water from Leipzig was 11.5 ng L-1, dominated by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 6.2 ng L-1). Sums of mean riverine concentrations of PFAAs detected in Pleiße/White Elster, Saale, and Elbe (Germany) were 24.8, 54.3, and 26.8 ng L-1, respectively. Annual flux of PFAAs from River Saale was estimated to be 164 ± 23 kg a-1. The effluent of WWTP in Halle was found to contain four times higher levels of PFAAs than river water and was dominated by perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) with 32 times higher concentration than the riverine level. It advocates that WWTPs are the point source of contaminating water bodies with PFAAs, and short-chain PFAAs are substituting long-chain homologues. Sums of mean riverine concentrations of PFAAs in Sosiani (Kenya) in samples from sparsely populated and densely populated areas were 58.8 and 109.4 ng L-1, respectively, indicating that population directly affected the emissions of PFAAs to surface waters. The discussion includes thorough review and comparison of recently published literature reporting occurrence of PFAAs in aqueous matrices. Graphical abstract Perfluoroalkyl acids in aqueous matrices.

  7. Reference Ranges & What They Mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle ... If you're trying to follow a healthy lifestyle, take test results that are within range as ...

  8. Kenai National Moose Range Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This book presents a summary of the history, wildlife, recreational opportunities, economic uses, and future plans for Kenai National Moose Range.

  9. Lead Poisoning at an Indoor Firing Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Ju

    2017-10-01

    In March 2014, a 39-year-old Korean male presented with a 6-month history of various nonspecific symptoms including dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, irritability, elevated blood pressure, palpitation, eyestrain, and tinnitus. His occupational history revealed that he had been working as an indoor firing range manager for 13 months; therefore, he was subjected to a blood lead level (BLL) test. The test results showed a BLL of 64 μg/dL; hence, he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and immediately withdrawn from work. As evident from the workplace environmental monitoring, the level of lead exposure in the air exceeded its limit (0.015-0.387 mg/m³). He received chelation treatment with calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 g/day) for 5 days without any adverse effects. In the follow-up results after 2 months, the BLL had decreased to 9.7 μg/dL and the symptoms resolved. This report represents the first occupational case of lead poisoning in firing ranges in Korea, and this necessitates institutional management to prevent the recurrence of poisoning through this route. Workplace environmental monitoring should be implemented for indoor firing ranges, and the workers should undergo regularly scheduled special health examinations. In clinical practice, it is essential to question the patient about his occupational history. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  10. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  11. Impact of treatment processes on the removal of perfluoroalkyl acids from the drinking water production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschauzier, Christian; Beerendonk, Erwin; Scholte-Veenendaal, Petra; De Voogt, Pim

    2012-02-07

    The behavior of polyfluoralkyl acids (PFAAs) from intake (raw source water) to finished drinking water was assessed by taking samples from influent and effluent of the several treatment steps used in a drinking water production chain. These consisted of intake, coagulation, rapid sand filtration, dune passage, aeration, rapid sand filtration, ozonation, pellet softening, granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration, slow sand filtration, and finished drinking water. In the intake water taken from the Lek canal (a tributary of the river Rhine), the most abundant PFAA were PFBA (perfluorobutanoic acid), PFBS (perfluorobutane sulfonate), PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate), and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid). During treatment, longer chain PFAA such as PFNA (perfluorononanoic acid) and PFOS were readily removed by the GAC treatment step and their GAC effluent concentrations were reduced to levels below the limits of quantitation (LOQ) (0.23 and 0.24 ng/L for PFOS and PFNA, respectively). However, more hydrophilic shorter chain PFAA (especially PFBA and PFBS) were not removed by GAC and their concentrations remained constant through treatment. A decreasing removal capacity of the GAC was observed with increasing carbon loading and with decreasing carbon chain length of the PFAAs. This study shows that none of the treatment steps, including softening processes, are effective for PFAA removal, except for GAC filtration. GAC can effectively remove certain PFAA from the drinking water cycle.The enrichment of branched PFOS and PFOA isomers relative to non branched isomers during GAC filtration was observed during treatment. The finished water contained 26 and 19 ng/L of PFBA and PFBS. Other PFAAs were present in concentrations below 4.2 ng/L The concentrations of PFAA observed in finished waters are no reason for concern for human health as margins to existing guidelines are sufficiently large.

  12. Quantitative characterization of short- and long-chain perfluorinated acids in solid matrices in Shanghai, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Chaojie, E-mail: myrazh@mail.tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Qu, Yan; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ling; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) have been recognized as emerging environmental pollutants because of their widespread occurrences, persistence, and bioaccumulative and toxicological effects. PFAs have been detected in aquatic environment and biota in China, but the occurrences of these chemicals have not been reported in solid matrices in China. In the present study, short- and long-chain PFAs (C2-C14) have been quantitatively determined in solid matrices including sediments, soils and sludge collected in Shanghai, China. The results indicate that sludge contains more PFAs than sediments and soils, and the total PFAs concentrations in sediments, soil and sludge are 62.5-276 ng g{sup -1}, 141-237 ng g{sup -1} and 413-755 ng g{sup -1}, respectively. In most cases, trifluoroacetic acid was the major PFA and accounted for 22-90% of the total PFAs. Although the levels of perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) were not only lower than trifluoroacetic acid, but also lower than some short-chain PFCAs (acid are mildly phytotoxic and their higher levels in solid matrices were collected in Shanghai, China, these chemicals should be included in future environmental monitoring efforts.

  13. Occurrence, temporal trends, and half-lives of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in occupational workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Yan; Cui, Lin; Wang, Thanh; Liang, Yong; Qu, Guangbo; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Yawei; Zhang, Aiqian; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-12-01

    Paired serum and urine samples were collected from workers in a fluorochemical plant from 2008 to 2012 (n = 302) to investigate the level, temporal trends, and half-lives of PFAAs in workers of a fluorochemical plant. High levels of perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) were detected in serum with median concentrations of 764, 427, and 1725 ng mL-1, respectively. The half-lives of PFAAs in workers were estimated by daily clearance rates and annual decline rates of PFAAs in serum by a first-order model. The geometric mean and median value for PFHxS, PFOA, and PFOS were 14.7 and 11.7, 4.1 and 4.0, 32.6 and 21.6 years, respectively, by the daily clearance rates, and they were 3.6, 1.7, and 1.9 years estimated by annual decline rates. The half-lives estimated by the limited clearance route information could be considered as the upper limits for PFAAs, however, the huge difference between two estimated approaches indicated that there were other important elimination pathways of PFAAs other than renal clearance in human. The half-lives estimated by annual decline rates in the present study were the shortest values ever reported, and the intrinsic half-lives might even shorter due to the high levels of ongoing exposure to PFAAs.

  14. Wide Operational Range Thermal Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, John H. (Inventor); McMurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bolometer system and method for detecting, at BLIP levels, presence of radiation over a broad range of wavelengths in an infrared spectrum and in a temperature range from 20 K to as high as room temperature. The radiation is received by a Si crystal having a region that is doped with one or more of In, Ga, S, Se, Te, B, Al, P, As and Sb in a concentration ratio in a range such as 5 x 10(exp -11) to 5 x 10(exp -6). Change in electrical resistance delta R due to receipt of the radiation is measured through a change in voltage difference or current within the crystal, and the quantity delta R is converted to an estimate of the amount of radiation received. Optionally, incident radiation having an energy high enough to promote photoconductivity is removed before detection.

  15. GEA CRDA Range Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-28

    E1, July-August 1998 18 3.3. Example 3: SatMex, Solidaridad 2, May-June 1998 27 3.4. Example 4: PanAmSat, Galaxy IV, May-June 1998 33 3.5...17 Millstone measurements residuals for Telstar 401 on Days 181-263. 26 3-18 Millstone measurement residuals for Solidaridad 1 on Days 141-153...with 29 SatMex range data. 3-19 Hermosillo B-- Solidaridad 1 range residuals through Days 135-144 with bias 30 removed. 3-20 Iztapalapa D

  16. Radio pill antenna range test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, W. F.; Kane, R. J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to investigate the potential of a proposed 'radio pill' beacon transmitter, a range test experiment was devised and carried out in the VHF frequency range. Calculations and previous work indicated that optimum sensitivity and, thus, distance would be obtained in this frequency range provided body radio-frequency (RF) absorption was not too great. A ferrite-core loop antenna is compatible with a pill geometry and has better radiation efficiency than an air core loop. The ferrite core may be a hollow cylinder with the electronics and batteries placed inside. However, this range test was only concerned with experimentally developing test range data on the ferrite core antenna itself. A one turn strap loop was placed around a 9.5 mm diameter by 18.3 mm long stack of ferrite cores. This was coupled to a 50 Omega transmission line by 76 mm of twisted pair line and a capacitive matching section. This assembly was excited by a signal generator at output levels of -10 to +10 dBm. Signals were received on a VHF receiver and tape recorder coupled to a 14 element, circularly polarized Yagi antenna at a height of 2.5 m. Field strength measurements taken at ranges of 440, 1100, and 1714 m. Maximum field strengths referenced to 0 dBm transmitter level were -107 to -110 dB at 440 m, -124 to -127 dBm at 1100 m, and -116 to -119 dBm at 1714 m when the antenna cylinder was horizontal. Field strengths with a vertical antenna were about 6 dB below these values. The latter transmit site was elevated and had a clear line-of-site path to the receiving site. The performance of this test antenna was better than that expected from method-of-moment field calculations. When this performance data is scaled to a narrow bandwidth receiving system, ground level receiving ranges of a few to 10 km can be expected. Clear line-of-sight ranges where either or both the transmitter and receiver are elevated could vary from several km to 100 km.

  17. Increasing levels of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in Arctic and North Atlantic marine mammals, 1984-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotander, Anna; Kärrman, Anna; van Bavel, Bert; Polder, Anuschka; Rigét, Frank; Auðunsson, Guðjón Atli; Víkingsson, Gísli; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Bloch, Dorete; Dam, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variations in concentrations of perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and sulfonic acids (PFSAs), including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) structural isomers, were examined in livers of pilot whale (Globicephala melas), ringed seal (Phoca hisida), minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) and in muscle tissue of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). The sampling spanned over 20 years (1984-2009) and covered a large geographical area of the North Atlantic and West Greenland. Liver and muscle samples were homogenized, extracted with acetonitrile, cleaned up using hexane and solid phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed by liquid chromatography with negative electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In general, the levels of the long-chained PFCAs (C9-C12) increased whereas the levels of PFOS remained steady over the studied period. The PFOS isomer pattern in pilot whale liver was relatively constant over the sampling years. However, in ringed seals there seemed to be a decrease in linear PFOS (L-PFOS) with time, going from 91% in 1984 to 83% in 2006. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved Range Searching Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2012-01-01

    by constructing a hard input set and query set, and then invoking Chazelle and Rosenberg's [CGTA'96] general theorem on the complexity of navigation in the pointer machine. For the group model, we show that input sets and query sets that are hard for range reporting in the pointer machine (i.e. by Chazelle...

  19. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  20. Mobile Lunar Laser Ranging Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intellect, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Harlan Smith, chairman of the University of Texas's Astronomy Department, discusses a mobile lunar laser ranging station which could help determine the exact rates of movement between continents and help geophysicists understand earthquakes. He also discusses its application for studying fundamental concepts of cosmology and physics. (Editor/RK)

  1. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    step 1. This image can be obtained through any digital holography processing technique and contains no range information. Since the penny has a... digital holography, laser, active imaging , remote sensing, laser imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8...30 15. Digital Hologram Image

  2. Mandibular movement range in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Felício, Cláudia Maria de

    2009-01-01

    identification of the mandibular movement range is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. However, there are few studies in children that focus on normal parameters or abnormalities. to determine the average range of mandibular movements in Brazilian children aged 6 to 12 years; to verify the difference between genders, in each age group, and between the different age groups: 6-8 years; 8.1-10 years; and 10.1-12 years. participants of the study were 240 healthy children selected among regular students from local schools of São Paulo State. The maximum mandibular opening, lateral excursion and protrusive movements, and deviation of the medium line, if present, were measured using a digital caliper. Student T test, Analysis of variance and Tukey test were considered significant for p mandibular opening; 7.71mm for lateral excursion to the right; 7.92mm for lateral excursion to the left; 7.45mm for protrusive movements. No statistical difference was observed between genders. There was a gradual increase in the range of mandibular movements, with significant differences mainly between the ages of 6-8 years and 10.1-12 years. during childhood the range of mandibular movements increases. Age should be considered in this analysis for a greater precision in the diagnosis.

  3. Valproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and spinal cord and can also cause lower intelligence in babies exposed to valproic acid before birth. ... all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any ...

  4. Carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Acid Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  6. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... okra, asparagus, fruits (such as bananas, melons, and lemons) beans, yeast, mushrooms, meat (such as beef liver ... after angioplasty. There is inconsistent evidence on the benefits of taking folic acid after a procedure to ...

  7. Adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulia, Danae; Leodopoulos, Ch; Gimouhopoulos, K; Rigas, F

    2009-12-15

    The adsorption of humic acid on bentonite from Milos Island (Greece) acid-treated with dilute H(2)SO(4) solutions over a concentration range between 0.25 and 13M has been studied. Bentonite activated with 3M sulfuric acid (AAS) showed a higher efficiency in removing humic acid from aqueous solutions and was selected for further investigation. The specific surface area of acid-activated bentonite was estimated using the methylene blue adsorption method. The morphology of untreated, activated, and HA-sorbed bentonite was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of humic acid onto bentonite activated with 3M H(2)SO(4) were studied using a batch adsorption technique. Acidic pH and high ionic strength proved to be favorable for the adsorption efficiency. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations and the isotherm constants were determined. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o)) of adsorption of humic acid onto acid-activated bentonite with 3M sulfuric acid were also evaluated.

  8. Short-range communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  9. Countering short range ballistic missiles

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, George W.; Ehiers, Mark A.; Marshall, Kneale T.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Concepts commonly found in ASW search are used to model the flow and detection of mobile launchers for short range ballistic missiles. Emphasis is on detection and destruction of the launcher before launch. The benefit of pre-hostility intelligence and pre-missile-launch prosecution, the backbone of successful ASW, is revealed through the analysis of a circulation model which reflects the standard operations of a third world mobile mi...

  10. Medium Range Forecasts Representation (and Long Range Forecasts?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, J.-C.

    2009-09-01

    The progress of the numerical forecasts urges us to interest us in more and more distant ranges. We thus supply more and more forecasts with term of some days. Nevertheless, precautions of use are necessary to give the most reliable and the most relevant possible information. Available in a TV bulletin or on quite other support (Internet, mobile phone), the interpretation and the representation of a medium range forecast (5 - 15 days) must be different from those of a short range forecast. Indeed, the "foresee-ability” of a meteorological phenomenon decreases gradually in the course of the ranges, it decreases all the more quickly that the phenomenon is of small scale. So, at the end of some days, the probability character of a forecast becomes very widely dominating. That is why in Meteo-France the forecasts of D+4 to D+7 are accompanied with a confidence index since around ten years. It is a figure between 1 and 5: the more we approach 5, the more the confidence in the supplied forecast is good. In the practice, an indication is supplied for period D+4 / D+5, the other one for period D+6 / D+7, every day being able to benefit from a different forecast, that is be represented in a independent way. We thus supply a global tendency over 24 hours with less and less precise symbols as the range goes away. Concrete examples will be presented. From now on two years, we also publish forecasts to D+8 / J+9, accompanied with a sign of confidence (" good reliability " or " to confirm "). These two days are grouped together on a single map because for us, the described tendency to this term is relevant on a duration about 48 hours with a spatial scale slightly superior to the synoptic scale. So, we avoid producing more than two zones of types of weather over France and we content with giving an evolution for the temperatures (still, in increase or in decline). Newspapers began to publish this information, it should soon be the case of televisions. It is particularly

  11. Perfluorinated alkylated acids in groundwater and drinking water: identification, origin and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschauzier, Christian; Raat, Klaasjan J; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; De Voogt, Pim

    2013-08-01

    Human exposure to perfluorinated alkylated acids (PFAA) occurs primarily via the dietary intake and drinking water can contribute significantly to the overall PFAA intake. Drinking water is produced from surface water and groundwater. Waste water treatment plants have been identified as the main source for PFAA in surface waters and corresponding drinking water. However, even though groundwater is an important source for drinking water production, PFAA sources remain largely uncertain. In this paper, we identified different direct and indirect sources of PFAA to groundwater within the catchment area of a public supply well field (PSWF) in The Netherlands. Direct sources were landfill leachate and water draining from a nearby military base/urban area. Indirect sources were infiltrated rainwater. Maximum concentrations encountered in groundwater within the landfill leachate plume were 1.8 μg/L of non branched perfluorooctanoic acid (L-PFOA) and 1.2 μg/L of perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA). Sum concentrations amounted to 4.4 μg/L total PFAA. The maximum concentration of ΣPFAA in the groundwater originating from the military camp was around 17 ng/L. Maximum concentrations measured in the groundwater halfway the landfill and the PWSF (15 years travel distance) were 29 and 160 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. Concentrations in the groundwater pumping wells (travel distance >25 years) were much lower: 0.96 and 3.5 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. The chemical signature of these pumping wells corresponded to the signature encountered in other wells sampled which were fed by water that had not been in contact with potential contaminant sources, suggesting a widespread diffuse contamination from atmospheric deposition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A national discharge load of perfluoroalkyl acids derived from industrial wastewater treatment plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee-Young; Seok, Hyun-Woo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hye-Ok; Choi, Sung-Deuk [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Kwang-Seol [Chemical Research Division, National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon 22689 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Eun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Levels of 11 perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), were measured in wastewater (influent and effluent) and sludge samples collected from 25 industrial wastewater treatment plants (I-WWTPs) in five industrial sectors (chemicals, electronics, metals, paper, and textiles) in South Korea. The highest ∑{sub 11}PFAAs concentrations were detected in the influent and effluent from the paper (median: 411 ng/L) and textile (median: 106 ng/L) industries, and PFOA and PFOS were the predominant PFAAs (49–66%) in wastewater. Exceptionally high levels of PFAAs were detected in the sludge associated with the electronics (median: 91.0 ng/g) and chemical (median: 81.5 ng/g) industries with PFOS being the predominant PFAA. The discharge loads of 11 PFAAs from I-WWTP were calculated that total discharge loads for the five industries were 0.146 ton/yr. The textile industry had the highest discharge load with 0.055 ton/yr (PFOA: 0.039 ton/yr, PFOS: 0.010 ton/yr). Municipal wastewater contributed more to the overall discharge of PFAAs (0.489 ton/yr) due to the very small industrial wastewater discharge compared to municipal wastewater discharge, but the contribution of PFAAs from I-WWTPs cannot be ignored. - Highlights: • 11 PFAAs in wastewater and sludge from 5 industrial sectors were investigated. • PFOA and PFOS were the dominant in wastewater while PFOS was predominant in sludge. • The total discharge loads from 5 industrial sectors 0.146 ton/yr. • The textile industry showed the highest discharge load with 0.055 ton/yr.

  13. Perfluorododecanoic Acid Induces Cognitive Deficit in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kohei; Matsuzaki, Hirokazu; Nukui, Sahoko; Okazaki, Mari; Sakai, Ayako; Kawashima, Yoichi; Kudo, Naomi

    2017-06-01

    The brain level of perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) was compared with those of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) in rats 9 days after a single oral dose (50 mg/kg). The PFDoA level in the brain was 44.0 ± 2.0 µg/g, which was higher than that in the serum (24.4 ± 1.0 µg/ml). In contrast, the concentrations of PFOA and PFDA in the brain were low (<0.8 and 4.7 ± 0.4 µg/g, respectively), and less than one-tenth of those in the serum. Next, to investigate the effects on brain function, the cognitive function alterations of PFOA, PFDA, and PFDoA were estimated by the novel object recognition test 5-6 days after dosing. A significant decrease in the discrimination index was observed in PFDoA-treated rats while no significant alteration was observed in PFDA- and PFOA-treated rats. The effects of PFDoA were further assessed by other behavioral tests. PFDoA-associated alteration was observed in the elevated-plus maze test, but not in the Y-maze test, open-field test, and forced swim test. A decrease in the discrimination index of the novel object recognition test was dependent on the PFDoA dose and the PFDoA concentration in the brain. PFDoA concentration in the brain was 28.6 ± 2.6 µg/g 30 days after dosing, and a decrease in discrimination index was observed. Taken together, these results suggest that PFDoA distributes in the brain easier than PFOA and PFDA and causes cognitive deficit. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare......-unilateral has an approximation ratio between 0.610 and 0.611, the best ordinal mechanism has an approximation ratio between 0.616 and 0.641, while the best mixed-unilateral mechanism has an approximation ratio bigger than 0.660. In particular, the best mixed-unilateral non-ordinal (i.e., cardinal) mechanism...

  15. Nonlinear dynamic range compression deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Goodhue, William; Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Kierstead, John

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a dynamic range image compression technique for nonlinear deconvolution; the impulse response of the distortion function and the noisy distorted image are jointly transformed to pump a clean reference beam in a two-beam coupling arrangement. The Fourier transform of the pumped reference beam contains the deconvolved image and its conjugate. In contrast to standard deconvolution approaches, for which noise can be a limiting factor in the performance, this approach allows the retrieval of distorted signals embedded in a very high-noise environment.

  16. Citric acid production patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Finogenova, Tatiana V

    2008-01-01

    Current Review article summarizes the developments in citric acid production technologies in East and West last 100 years. Citric acid is commercially produced by large scale fermentation mostly using selected fungal or yeast strains in aerobe bioreactors and still remains one of the runners in industrial production of biotechnological bulk metabolites obtained by microbial fermentation since about 100 years, reflecting the historical development of modern biotechnology and fermentation process technology in East and West. Citric acid fermentation was first found as a fungal product in cultures of Penicillium glaucum on sugar medium by Wehmer in 1893. Citric acid is an important multifunctional organic acid with a broad range of versatile uses in household and industrial applications that has been produced industrially since the beginning of 20(th) century. There is a great worldwide demand for citric acid consumption due to its low toxicity, mainly being used as acidulant in pharmaceutical and food industries. Global citric acid production has reached 1.4 million tones, increasing annually at 3.5-4.0% in demand and consumption. Citric acid production by fungal submerged fermentation is still dominating, however new perspectives like solid-state processes or continuous yeast processes can be attractive for producers to stand in today's strong competition in industry. Further perspectives aiming in the improvement of citric acid production are the improvement of citric acid producing strains by classical and modern mutagenesis and selection as well as downstream processes. Many inexpensive by-products and residues of the agro-industry (e.g. molasses, glycerin etc.) can be economically utilized as substrates in the production of citric acid, especially in solid-state fermentation, enormously reducing production costs and minimizing environmental problems. Alternatively, continuous processes utilizing yeasts which reach 200-250 g/l citric acid can stand in today

  17. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  18. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  19. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    data structure for answering range α-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where α ε (0,1). Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in O((lg n)/α) time, and updates in O((lg n)/α) amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to O......((lg n/(α lglg n)). For constant values of α, this improved query time matches an existing lower bound, for any data structure with polylogarithmic update time. We also generalize our data structure to handle sets of points in d-dimensions, for d ≥ 2, as well as dynamic arrays, in which each entry...

  20. Lead exposure in indoor firing ranges: environmental impact and health risk to the range users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudhaise, B A; Alzoubi, M A; Rabi, A Z; Alwash, R M

    1996-01-01

    Health risk from airborne lead exposure were evaluated in 54 trainees and 31 firearm instructors at two indoor firing ranges in Amman, Jordan. Airborne lead concentration was measured during shooting sessions of conventional lead ammunition. Venous blood was collected from the trainees, instructors and controls. The levels of blood lead (PbB) and the activity of amino levulinic acid dehydrogenase (ALAD) were measured. High concentrations of air lead that markedly exceeded the internationally adopted safe exposure levels were found on both ranges. Despite the absence of symptoms of lead poisoning, there was a significantly higher PbB in the instructors (19 +/- 7 micrograms/dl) and trainees (22.9 +/- 4.6 micrograms/dl) than in the controls (2.1 +/- 1.4 micrograms/dl). Furthermore, the activity of ALAD was significantly lower in both groups (29.2 +/- 1.3, 18.9 +/- 1.2 U/L, respectively) than in the controls (47.5 +/- 1.1 U/L) indicating a subcritical lead effect. In the trainees, levels of PbB rose from a pre-training mean of 2.2 to 22.9 micrograms/dl and the activity of ALAD decreased from 46.9 to 18.9 U/L. It is concluded that indoor firing range users are at risk of lead absorption and intoxication and, therefore, periodic biological monitoring of the frequent users of firing ranges is highly recommended. Environmental hygienic actions to control excessive emissions of lead on the ranges are also imperative.

  1. Perfluorinated chemicals in blood serum of inhabitants in central Poland in relation to gender and age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Pachocki, Krzysztof A; Hernik, Agnieszka; Struciński, Paweł; Czaja, Katarzyna; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G; Lenters, Virissa; Korcz, Wojciech; Minorczyk, Maria; Matuszak, Małgorzata; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to determine concentrations of seven selected perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs): perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic

  2. Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and anogenital distance at 3 months of age in a Danish mother-child cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Dorte Vesterholm; Priskorn, Lærke; Lassen, Tina Harmer

    2017-01-01

    In the Odense child cohort, serum concentrations of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) were measured in 638 pregnant women. Birth weight, head and abdominal...

  3. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    ...) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22...

  4. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), AMMONIUM, CHLOROPHYLL C, FLUORESCENCE and other profile, underway - surface and discrete sample data collected in the North Pacific Ocean on the RANGE RECOVERER, THOMAS G. THOMPSON and WECOMA cruises R0208, T0205 and others as part of the NEP project from 2000-05-30 to 2002-08-19 (NODC Accession 0115199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115199 includes profile, underway - surface, discrete sample, biological, physical and chemical data collected aboard the RANGE RECOVERER, THOMAS G....

  5. Crop bioaccumulation and human exposure of perfluoroalkyl acids through multi-media transport from a mega fluorochemical industrial park, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Lu, Yonglong; Shi, Yajuan; Wang, Pei; Jones, Kevin; Sweetman, Andrew J; Johnson, Andrew C; Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Yunqiao; Lu, Xiaotian; Su, Chao; Sarvajayakesavaluc, Suriyanarayanan; Khan, Kifayatullah

    2017-09-01

    Significant quantities of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are released to the environment from fluorochemical manufacturing processes through wastewater discharge and air emission in China, which may lead to human exposure and health risks through crop bioaccumulation from PFAAs-contaminated soil and irrigation water. This paper systematically studied the distribution and transport of PFAAs in agricultural soil, irrigation water and precipitation, followed by crop bioaccumulation and finally human exposure of PFAAs within a 10km radius around a mega-fluorochemical industrial park (FIP). Hotspots of contamination by PFAAs were found near the FIP and downstream of the effluent discharge point with the maximum concentrations of 641ng/g in agricultural soil, 480ng/g in wheat grain, 58.8ng/g in maize grain and 4,862ng/L in precipitation. As the distance increased from the FIP, PFAAs concentrations in all media showed a sharp initial decrease followed by a moderate decline. Elevated PFAA concentrations in soil and grains were still present within a radius of 10 km of the FIP. The soil contamination was associated with the presence of PFAAs in irrigation water and precipitation, and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the dominant PFAA component in soil. However, due to bioaccumulation preference, short-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), especially perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), became the major PFAA contaminants in grains of wheat and maize. The bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for both grains showed a decrease with increasing chain length of PFAAs (approximately 0.5 log decrease per CF2 group). Compared to maize grain, wheat grain showed higher BAFs, possibly related to its higher protein content. The PFCA (C4-C8) concentrations (on a log10 basis) in agricultural soil and grain were found to show a linear positive correlation. Local human exposure of PFOA via the consumption of contaminated grains represents a health risk for local residents, especially for

  6. Association between thyroid profile and perfluoroalkyl acids: Data from NHNAES 2007–2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ram B., E-mail: Jain.ram.b@gmail.com

    2013-10-15

    The effect of six perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), namely, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDE), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), 2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamide) acetic acid (MPAH), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) on the levels of six thyroid function variables, namely, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free and total thyroxine (FT4, TT4), free and total triiodothyronine (FT3, TT3), and thyroglobulin (TGN) was evaluated. Data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years 2007–2008 were used for this evaluation. TSH levels increased with increase in levels of PFOA (p<0.01). There were no statistically significant associations between the levels of FT3, and FT4 with the levels of any of the six PFAAs. Levels of TT3 were found to increase with the levels of PFOA (p=0.01) and TT4 levels were found to increase with increase in PFHxS levels (p<0.01). Males had statistically significantly higher levels of FT3 than females and females had statistically significantly higher levels of TT4 than males. As compared to non-Hispanics whites and Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks had lower levels of TSH, FT3, TT3, and TT4 but Hispanics had the lowest levels of TGN. Age was negatively associated with FT3 and TT3 but positively associated with FT4 and TT4. Non-smokers had higher levels of TSH and TT4 than smokers and smokers had higher levels of FT3 and TGN than non-smokers. Iodine deficiency was associated with increased levels of TSH, TT3, TT4, and TGN. -- Highlights: • Levels of total triiodothyronine were found to increase with the levels of PFOA. • Total thyroxine increased with increase in levels of perfluorohexane sulfonic acid. • There was a positive association between the levels of PFOA and TSH. • Iodine deficiency was associated with elevated levels of TSH, total T3 and T4. • Iodine deficiency was associated with elevated levels of thyroglobulin.

  7. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  8. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  9. Promoted degradation of perfluorooctanic acid by persulfate when adding activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu-Chi [Research Center for Environmental Pollution Prevention and Control Technology, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lo, Shang-Lien, E-mail: sllo@ntuedu.tw [Research Center for Environmental Pollution Prevention and Control Technology, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Rd., Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Jeff [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California State University, 800 North, State College Blvd., Fullerton (United States); Huang, Chin-Pao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • PFOA removal and defluorination with AC/PS are 12 and 19 times higher than PS only • AC can activate PS to accelerate the decomposition and mineralization of PFOA. • With AC/PS, a lower reaction temperature and a shorter reaction time would suffice • A 2-cycle schematic reaction mechanism was proposed to describe PS oxidation of PFOA. -- Abstract: Treatment of persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water using persulfate (PS) oxidation typically requires an elevated temperature or UV irradiation, which is energy-consuming. Under relatively low temperatures of 25–45 °C, activated carbon (AC) activated PS oxidation of PFOA was evaluated for its potential of practical applications. With presence of AC in PS oxidation, PFOA removal efficiency at 25 °C reached 682% with a high defluorination efficiency of 549% after 12 h and few intermediates of short-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were found. The removal and defluorination rates with the combined AC/PS system were approximately 12 and 19 times higher than those of the PS-only system, respectively. Activated carbon not only removes PFOA through adsorption, but also activates PS to form sulfate radicals that accelerate the decomposition and mineralization of PFOA. The activation energy for PS oxidation of PFOA was reduced from 668 to 261 kJ/mol by the catalytic effect of AC, which implies a lower reaction temperature and a shorter reaction time would suffice. A 2-cycle schematic reaction mechanism was used to describe PS oxidation of PFOA with the generation of various intermediates and end-products.

  10. Radioimmunoassay for jasmonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoefel, H.D.; Brueckner, C.; Kramell, R.; Sembdner, G.; Schreiber, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Halle/Saale. Inst. fuer Biochemie der Pflanzen)

    1984-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the natural plant growth regulator jasmonic acid (JA) was developed. The antiserum was raised in rabbits against (+-)-JA linked to bovine serum albumin. As tracer tritium labelled (+-)-JA (spec. act. 7.4 x 10/sup 9/ Bq x mmol/sup -1/) was used. Cross-reactivity studies with compounds structurally related to JA demonstrated the antiserum to be specific for JA, abscisic acid normally present in the same extract does not interfer. The RIA has a detection limit of 2 ng (-)-JA methylester, a measuring range 2-200 ng, and no extensive purification is required prior to estimation. Therefore, in JA analysis the RIA described is superior to GC, HPLC, and bioassay. This new method has been employed for studies on the distribution of JA in different plant organs of the broad bean, Vicia faba L.

  11. The Electrochemical Behavior of Phosphoric-Acid-Doped Poly(perfluorosulfonic Acid) Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Savinell, Robert F; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Highly conductive phosphoric-acid-doped poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) membranes have long been known to malfunction in fuel cells. This is investigated and found to be due to failure of the anode, in which a limiting current is observed in the very low current-density range. It is proposed...... that the strongly acidic sulfonic acid groups protonate the phosphoric acid under anhydrous conditions, forming excess proton defects that are involved in proton conduction by means of the vehicle mechanism. The slow back-diffusion of phosphoric acid molecules as proton carriers thus limits the long...

  12. Effects of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendong; Yang, Hongwei; Wang, Xiaochang; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Wanpeng

    2010-01-01

    This article focused on the influences of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation in drinking water. Factors including the concentration of residual chlorine and pH value had been concerned. Aluminum species investigated in the experiments included inorganic mononuclear, organic mononuclear, mononuclear, polymer, soluble, and suspended forms. It was found that the effects of fulvic acid and humic acid on aluminum speciation depended mainly on their molecular weight. Fulvic acid with molecular weight less than 5000 Dalton had little influence on aluminum speciation; while fulvic acid with molecular weight larger than 5000 Dalton and humic acid would increase the concentration of soluble aluminum significantly even at concentration below 0.5 mg/L (calculated as TOC). Aluminum species, in the present of fulvic acid with molecular weight larger than 5000 Dalton and humic acid, were more stable than that in the present of fluvic acid with molecular mass less than 5000 Dalton, and varied little with reaction time. Within pH range 6.5-7.5, soluble aluminum increased notably in water with organic matter. As the concentration of residual chlorine increased, the effects of fulvic acid and humic acid became weak. The reactions between humic acid, fulvic acid with large molecular weight, and aluminum were considered to be a multi-dentate coordination process. With the consideration of aluminum bioavailability, reducing the concentration of fulvic acid and humic acid and keeping the pH value among 6.5-7.5 were recommended during drinking water treatment.

  13. Ferrocenylphosphonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhang Yang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Fe(C5H5(C5H6O3P], the phosphate group is bonded to the ferrocene unit with a P—C bond length of 1.749 (3 Å. In the crystal, six ferrocenylphosphonic acid molecules are connected by 12 strong intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds, leading to the formation of a highly distorted octahedral cage. The volume of the octahedral cage is about 270 Å3.

  14. Kinetics of aluminum-fulvic acid complexation in acidic waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.

    1987-06-01

    A fluorescence technique has been used to study the complex formation kinetics of aluminum with a single metal-free fulvic acid isolated from an Adirondack Mountain forest soil. In the pH range of 3.0-4.5, two kinetically distinguishable components of the fulvic acid mixture have been identified, which define two types of average aluminum binding sites. Both fulvic acid average sites conform to a bidentate chelating binding site kinetic analysis, from which rate and equilibrium parameters have been obtained. From comparison of rate and equilibrium constants of aluminum-salicyclic acid complexation, the authors conclude that the faster reacting component of fulvic acid probably contains salicyclic acid type aluminum binding sites. Results are also compared with those of an aluminum-fluoride kinetic study. Fulvic acid and fluoride react with aluminum by the same mechanism and therefore have the same pH dependence. The dependence of the rate on temperature is, however, quite different for the two reactions. The environmental implications of these findings are discussed. 45 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  15. The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Maternal Essential and Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids during Pregnancy and the Birth Weight of Their Offspring: The Hokkaido Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tamie; Goudarzi, Houman; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Okada, Emiko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Itoh, Sachiko; Araki, Atsuko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty acids (FAs) are essential for fetal growth. Exposure to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) may disrupt FA homeostasis, but there are no epidemiological data regarding associations of PFCs and FA concentrations. Objectives We estimated associations between perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)/perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) concentrations and maternal levels of FAs and triglyceride (TG) and birth size of the offspring. Methods We analyzed 306 mother–child pairs in this birth cohort between 2002 and 2005 in Japan. The prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels were measured in maternal serum samples by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal blood levels of nine FAs and TG were measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and TG E-Test Wako kits, respectively. Information on infants’ birth size was obtained from participant medical records. Results The median PFOS and PFOA levels were 5.6 and 1.4 ng/mL, respectively. In the fully adjusted model, including maternal age, parity, annual household income, blood sampling period, alcohol consumption, and smoking during pregnancy, PFOS but not PFOA had a negative association with the levels of palmitic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, and arachidonic acids (p perfluorinated chemicals with maternal essential and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy and the birth weight of their offspring: the Hokkaido Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:1038–1045; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408834 PMID:25840032

  16. Organic acids in naturally colored surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1966-01-01

    Most of the organic matter in naturally colored surface waters consists of a mixture of carboxylic acids or salts of these acids. Many of the acids color the water yellow to brown; however, not all of the acids are colored. These acids range from simple to complex, but predominantly they are nonvolatile polymeric carboxylic acids. The organic acids were recovered from the water by two techniques: continuous liquid-liquid extraction with n-butanol and vacuum evaporation at 50?C (centigrade). The isolated acids were studied by techniques of gas, paper, and column chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. About 10 percent of the acids recovered were volatile or could be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Approximately 30 of these carboxylic acids were isolated, and 13 of them were individually identified. The predominant part of the total acids could not be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Infrared examination of many column chromatographic fractions indicated that these nonvolatile substances are primarily polymeric hydroxy carboxylic acids having aromatic and olefinic unsaturation. The evidence suggests that some of these acids result from polymerization in aqueous solution. Elemental analysis of the sodium fusion products disclosed the absence of nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens.

  17. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... conception and during early pregnancy . What Is Folic Acid? Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  18. New and simple synthesis of acid azides, ureas and carbamates from carboxylic acids: application of peptide coupling agents EDC and HBTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshbabu, Vommina V; Lalithamba, H S; Narendra, N; Hemantha, H P

    2010-02-21

    Conversion of carboxylic acids into acid azides using peptide coupling agents, EDC and HBTU is described. The procedure is efficient, practical and applicable to a diverse range of carboxylic acids including N-protected amino acids. Using the same reagents, one-pot synthesis of ureas, dipeptidyl urea esters and carbamates from acids has also been achieved.

  19. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  20. Formation of volatile chemicals from thermal degradation of less volatile coffee components: quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon-Kwan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-05-12

    The less volatile constituents of coffee beans (quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid) were roasted under a stream of nitrogen, air, or helium. The volatile degradation compounds formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeic acid produced the greatest amount of total volatiles. Quinic acid and chlorogenic acid produced a greater number of volatiles under the nitrogen stream than under the air stream. These results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not play an important role in the formation of volatile compounds by the heat degradation of these chemicals. 2,5-Dimethylfuran formed in relatively large amounts (59.8-2231.0 microg/g) in the samples obtained from quinic acid and chlorogenic acid but was not found in the samples from caffeic acid. Furfuryl alcohol was found in the quinic acid (259.9 microg/g) and caffeic acid (174.4 microg/g) samples roasted under a nitrogen stream but not in the chlorogenic sample. The three acids used in the present study do not contain a nitrogen atom, yet nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds, pyridine, pyrrole, and pyrazines, were recovered. Phenol and its derivatives were identified in the largest quantities. The amounts of total phenols ranged from 60.6 microg/g (quinic acid under helium) to 89893.7 microg/g (caffeic acid under helium). It was proposed that phenol was formed mainly from quinic acid and that catechols were formed from caffeic acid. Formation of catechol from caffeic acid under anaerobic condition indicates that the reaction participating in catechol formation was not oxidative degradation.

  1. Shifts in production of perfluoroalkyl acids affect emissions and concentrations in the environment of the Xiaoqing River Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Lu, Yonglong, E-mail: yllu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Wang, Tieyu [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Meng, Jing; Li, Qifeng; Zhu, Zhaoyun [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Yajun [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); College of Biological Sciences and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Ruoshi [State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Giesy, John P. [Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences and Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Mass loads demonstrated a greater pattern of increasing PFAAs emissions. • High levels of PFOA were identified near a fluoropolymer facility. • Production activities that could generate PFOA emissions were analyzed. • Partitioning coefficients decreased with high levels of short-chain PFCAs in water. - Abstract: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been widely used in surfactant applications, especially as processing acids for fluoropolymer production. This study provides an analysis of sources of certain PFAAs emitted from the intensive fluoropolymer facilities in the Xiaoqing River Basin of China. Concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) as great as 0.97 mg/L in surface water and 10.5 μg/g dry weight in surface sediment have been detected near the effluent of one facility (F1) that produces polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and other fluoropolymers with massive capacity. With the great emission of PFAAs to water in natural conditions, the log K{sub OC} values decreased for short-chain PFCAs. Mass loads of PFAAs indicated that emissions of PFAAs from other facilities or sources were much less than those from F1, which emitted 174 kg/d of PFAAs including 159 kg/d of PFOA to the rivers. Even though production and emissions of PFOA have been strictly controlled in other countries since 2006, production of PFOA as well as several other fluoropolymers that use PFOA as processing aids has been increasing at F1 in recent years. We recommended that production shift should be taken into consideration in PFOA elimination actions.

  2. New bioactive fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  3. Ascorbic acid induced atrazine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaojing; Huang, Xiaopeng; Ai, Zhihui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-04-05

    In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation efficiency and the degradation mechanism of atrazine in the presence of ascorbic acid at different pH values. Although atrazine could be degraded by ascorbic acid in a wide pH range from 4 to 12, its degradation under either acidic (pH≤4) or alkaline (pH≥12) condition was more efficient than under neutral condition (pH=7). This pH dependent atrazine degradation was related to the reactive characteristic of atrazine and the reductive activity of ascorbic acid. The ascorbic acid induced atrazine degradation pathways at different pH were investigated by comparing the atrazine degradation intermediates with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and ion chromatography. It was found that more products were detected in presence of ascorbic acid at alkaline condition. The appearance of chloride ions confirmed the dechlorination of atrazine by ascorbic acid in the absence of molecular oxygen, while its dechlorination efficiency reached highest at pH 12. These results can shed light on the application of AA for the organic pollutant remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Erucic acid rapeseed: 1. Prospects of improvements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanyal, Anushree; Pinochet, Xavier; Merrien, André; Laustriat, Marie; Decocq, Guillaume; Fine, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In the current context of boosting production of high erucic acid rapeseed, because of the wide range of its industrial applications, this literature review is designed to provide a general overview...

  5. Evaluation of fatty acid and amino acid compositions in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) grown in different geographical locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Rokayya; Lianzhou, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ma, Ying; Jing, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%), since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%), it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT) unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18-43.26%), linoleic acid (32.22-43.07%), linolenic acid (6.79-12.34%), stearic acid (6.36-7.73%), oleic acid (4.31-6.98%), arachidic acid (ND-3.48%), margaric acid (1.44-2.16%), pentadecylic acid (0.63-0.92%), and myristic acid (0.21-0.49%). Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  6. Evaluation of Fatty Acid and Amino Acid Compositions in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Grown in Different Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokayya Sami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Okra has different uses as a food and a remedy in traditional medicine. Since it produces many seeds, distribution of the plant is also quite easy. Although seed oil yield is low (4.7%, since the linoleic acid composition of the seed oil is quiet high (67.5%, it can still be used as a source of (UNSAT unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, samples of okra grown in four different locations were analyzed to measure fatty acid and amino acid compositions. The content of the lipid extraction ranged from 4.34% to 4.52% on a dry weight basis. Quantitatively, the main okra fatty acids were palmitic acid (29.18–43.26%, linoleic acid (32.22–43.07%, linolenic acid (6.79–12.34%, stearic acid (6.36–7.73%, oleic acid (4.31–6.98%, arachidic acid (ND–3.48%, margaric acid (1.44–2.16%, pentadecylic acid (0.63–0.92%, and myristic acid (0.21–0.49%. Aspartic acid, proline, and glutamic acids were the main amino acids in okra pods, while cysteine and tyrosine were the minor amino acids. Statistical methods revealed how the fatty acid and amino acid contents in okra may be affected by the sampling location.

  7. An introduction to peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Egholm, M

    1999-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) is a powerful new biomolecular tool with a wide range of important applications. PNA mimics the behaviour of DNA and binds complementary nucleic acid strands. The unique chemical, physical and biological properties of PNA have been exploited to produce powerful biomolec...

  8. Trans Fatty Acids in Bakery Products from 14 European Countries: The TRANSFAIR Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp van - Baart, M.-A.; Couet, C.; Cuadrado, C.; Kafatos, A.; Stanley, J.; Poppel, G. van

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of bakery products from 14 European countries was analyzed with particular emphasis ontransfatty acids. The proportion oftransfatty acids in cookies and biscuits ranged from <1 to 28%.Transfatty acids content in sweet pastry ranged from practically 0 to 33%. Croissants and

  9. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  10. Amino Acid Transport in a Polyaromatic Amino Acid Auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greasham, Randolph L.; Moat, Albert G.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of growth of a polyaromatic auxotrophic mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was inhibited by several amino acids, whereas growth of the parent prototroph was unaffected. A comparative investigation of amino acid transport in the two strains employing 14C-labeled amino acids revealed that the transport of amino acids in S. cerevisiae was mediated by a general transport system responsible for the uptake of all neutral as well as basic amino acids. Both auxotrophic and prototrophic strains exhibited stereospecificity for l-amino acids and a Km ranging from 1.5 × 10−5 to 5.0 × 10−5 M. Optimal transport activity occurred at pH 5.7. Cycloheximide had no effect on amino acid uptake, indicating that protein synthesis was not a direct requirement for amino acid transport. Regulation of amino acid transport was subject to the concentration of amino acids in the free amino acid pool. Amino acid inhibition of the uptake of the aromatic amino acids by the aromatic auxotroph did not correlate directly with the effect of amino acids on the initiation of growth of the auxotroph but provides a partial explanation of this effect. PMID:4580574

  11. Proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Zeng, Ling; Xu, Youhou; Sun, Yulin; Chen, Ziming; Fan, Sigang

    2016-01-01

    Fish maws are commonly recommended and consumed in Asia over many centuries because it is believed to have some traditional medical properties. This study highlights and provides new information on the proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid composition of fish maws of Cynoscion acoupa, Congresox talabonoides and Sciades proops. The results indicated that fish maws were excellent protein sources and low in fat content. The proteins in fish maws were rich in functional amino acids (FAAs) and the ratio of FAAs and total amino acids in fish maws ranged from 0.68 to 0.69. Among species, croaker C. acoupa contained the most polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapntemacnioc acid, showing the lowest value of index of atherogenicity and index of thrombogenicity, showing the highest value of hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic ratio, which is the most desirable.

  12. Examining confounding by diet in the association between perfluoroalkyl acids and serum cholesterol in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuladottir, Margret; Ramel, Alfons; Rytter, Dorte; Haug, Line Småstuen; Sabaredzovic, Azemira; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I

    2015-11-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) have consistently been associated with higher cholesterol levels in cross sectional studies. Concerns have, however, been raised about potential confounding by diet and clinical relevance. To examine the association between concentrations of PFOS and PFOA and total cholesterol in serum during pregnancy taking into considerations confounding by diet. 854 Danish women who gave birth in 1988-89 and provided a blood sample and reported their diet in week 30 of gestation. Mean serum PFOS, PFOA and total cholesterol concentrations were 22.3 ng/mL, 4.1 ng/mL and 7.3 mmol/L, respectively. Maternal diet was a significant predictor of serum PFOS and PFOA concentrations. In particular intake of meat and meat products was positively associated while intake of vegetables was inversely associated (P for trend values. After adjustment for dietary factors both PFOA and PFOS were positively and similarly associated with serum cholesterol (P for trend ≤0.01). For example, the mean increase in serum cholesterol was 0.39 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.09, 0.68) when comparing women in the highest to lowest quintile of PFOA concentrations. In comparison the mean increase in serum cholesterol was 0.61 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.17, 1.05) when comparing women in the highest to lowest quintile of saturated fat intake. In this study associations between PFOS and PFOA with serum cholesterol appeared unrelated to dietary intake and were similar in magnitude as the associations between saturated fat intake and serum cholesterol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Colored Range Searching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Roberto; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2014-01-01

    In colored range searching, we are given a set of n colored points in d ≥ 2 dimensions to store, and want to support orthogonal range queries taking colors into account. In the colored range counting problem, a query must report the number of distinct colors found in the query range, while...... an answer to the colored range reporting problem must report the distinct colors in the query range. We give the first linear space data structure for both problems in two dimensions (d = 2) with o(n) worst case query time. We also give the first data structure obtaining almost-linear space usage and o...

  14. Vanadyl complexes with ethylenedithiodiacetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, A. (Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Chimia Analitica)

    1981-12-01

    The complex formation between vanadyl ions and ethylenedithiodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/L) has been studied at 25/sup 0/C in 0.5 M-NaClO/sub 4/ as inert medium, by measuring the hydrogen ion concentration with a glass electrode. In acidic medium and in the investigated concentration ranges (2.07 mM<=Csub(M)<=7.50 mM, Csub(L) up to 12.5 mM)sup(*) the emf data can be explained assuming the equilibrium: VO/sup 2 +/ + L/sup 2 -/ reversible VOL log..beta.. /sub 101/ = 2.68 +-0.03.

  15. Chemical characterization of a polyphosphoric acid etchant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, T.J.

    1978-12-01

    Sensitivity of an orthophosphoric acid, a polyphosphoric acid, and an iron (III) chloride etchant to variations in process conditions was examined to determine the potential production application of the etchant system in the photolithographic fabrication of pure aluminum circuits. The effects of changes in temperature, orthophosphoric acid concentration, polyphosphoric acid concentration, iron (III) chloride concentration and dissolved aluminum concentration on etched circuit quality and etch rate were examined. The etchant system allows reasonable variation in preparation and circuit processing without drastically affecting the etched circuit quality. Control of the etchant can be maintained over a broad range of temperatures and compositions. 14 figures, 1 table.

  16. Dietary phenolic acids and ascorbic acid: Influence on acid-catalyzed nitrosative chemistry in the presence and absence of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combet, Emilie; El Mesmari, Aziza; Preston, Tom; Crozier, Alan; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2010-03-15

    Acid-catalyzed nitrosation and production of potentially carcinogenic nitrosative species is focused at the gastroesophageal junction, where salivary nitrite, derived from dietary nitrate, encounters the gastric juice. Ascorbic acid provides protection by converting nitrosative species to nitric oxide (NO). However, NO may diffuse into adjacent lipid, where it reacts with O(2) to re-form nitrosative species and N-nitrosocompounds (NOC). In this way, ascorbic acid promotes acid nitrosation. Using a novel benchtop model representing the gastroesophageal junction, this study aimed to clarify the action of a range of water-soluble antioxidants on the nitrosative mechanisms in the presence or absence of lipids. Caffeic, ferulic, gallic, or chlorogenic and ascorbic acids were added individually to simulated gastric juice containing secondary amines, with or without lipid. NO and O(2) levels were monitored by electrochemical detection. NOC were measured in both aqueous and lipid phases by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In the absence of lipids, all antioxidants tested inhibited nitrosation, ranging from 35.9 + or - 7.4% with gallic acid to 93 + or - 0.6% with ferulic acid. In the presence of lipids, the impact of each antioxidant on nitrosation was inversely correlated with the levels of NO they generated (R(2) = 0.95, pascorbic acid promoted nitrosation, whereas ferulic and caffeic acids markedly inhibited nitrosation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. WPC's Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin. The Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin describes the expected locations of high and low pressure centers, surface frontal...

  18. Range-Based Auto-Focus Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Maracel Systems and Software Technologies, LLC proposes a revolutionary Range-Based Auto Focus (RBAF) system that will combine externally input range, such as might...

  19. Preparation of a Highly Fluorophilic Phosphonium Salt and its Use in a Fluorous Anion-Exchanger Membrane with High Selectivity for Perfluorinated Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Paul G.; Anfang, Alyce C.; Bühlmann, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Fluorous solvents are the most nonpolar, nonpolarizable phases known, whereas ions are inherently polar. This makes it difficult to create salts that are soluble in a fluorous solvent. Here we present the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorophilic phosphonium salt, tris{3,5-bis[(perfluorooctyl)propyl]phenyl}methylphosphonium methyl sulfate. The salt has a solubility of at least 14 mM in perfluoro(perhydrophenanthrene), perfluoro(methylcyclohexane), and perfluorohexanes. It also shows immediate potential for use as a phase-transfer catalyst in fluorous biphasic catalysis, but in this work it is used as an anion exchanger site in the first potentiometric fluorous-membrane anion-selective electrode. The membrane sensor exhibited the exceptional selectivity of 3.9 × 1010 to 1 for perfluorooctanesulfonate over chloride, and of 2.5 × 107 to 1 for perfluorooctanoate over chloride. With improvements to the sensor’s detection limit and lifetime, it has the potential to be an attractive alternative to the expensive, time-consuming methods currently employed for measurement of perfluorinated acids. PMID:22072222

  20. Amino acid properties conserved in molecular evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold R Rudnicki

    Full Text Available That amino acid properties are responsible for the way protein molecules evolve is natural and is also reasonably well supported both by the structure of the genetic code and, to a large extent, by the experimental measures of the amino acid similarity. Nevertheless, there remains a significant gap between observed similarity matrices and their reconstructions from amino acid properties. Therefore, we introduce a simple theoretical model of amino acid similarity matrices, which allows splitting the matrix into two parts - one that depends only on mutabilities of amino acids and another that depends on pairwise similarities between them. Then the new synthetic amino acid properties are derived from the pairwise similarities and used to reconstruct similarity matrices covering a wide range of information entropies. Our model allows us to explain up to 94% of the variability in the BLOSUM family of the amino acids similarity matrices in terms of amino acid properties. The new properties derived from amino acid similarity matrices correlate highly with properties known to be important for molecular evolution such as hydrophobicity, size, shape and charge of amino acids. This result closes the gap in our understanding of the influence of amino acids on evolution at the molecular level. The methods were applied to the single family of similarity matrices used often in general sequence homology searches, but it is general and can be used also for more specific matrices. The new synthetic properties can be used in analyzes of protein sequences in various biological applications.

  1. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Air Facility Quantico in FY2008. RAICUZ studies at Townsend Range, Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, and Barry M Goldwater Range-West are on...representatives from Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah and other interested stakeholders. Part of the working group’s tactical

  2. Complexity in Acid-Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred; Hunger, Johannes

    2017-08-10

    Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid-base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid-base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid-base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid-base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid-base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Quantitative determination of epoxy acids, keto acids and hydroxy acids formed in fats and oils at frying temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmesat, S; Velasco, J; Dobarganes, M C

    2008-11-21

    A method based on derivatization to fatty acid methyl esters and GC is proposed for the quantitative analysis of hydroxy acids, keto acids and epoxy acids in fats and oils. Isolation of the analytes by solid-phase extraction is proposed to prevent analytical interferences caused by non-altered fatty acids naturally occurring in oils. In addition, hydrogenation is required before the GC analysis to improve repeatability. The analytical method was applied to thermoxidized samples of high linoleic sunflower oil, high oleic sunflower oil and high palmitic sunflower oil. Results showed total levels of these compounds in the order of mg/g of oil in samples with contents of polar compounds ranging from 6.7 to 25.7%. The compounds analyzed constituted major fractions of the oxidized fatty acids.

  4. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  5. Compressed Data Structures for Range Searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2015-01-01

    matrices and web graphs. Our contribution is twofold. First, we show how to compress geometric repetitions that may appear in standard range searching data structures (such as K-D trees, Quad trees, Range trees, R-trees, Priority R-trees, and K-D-B trees), and how to implement subsequent range queries......We study the orthogonal range searching problem on points that have a significant number of geometric repetitions, that is, subsets of points that are identical under translation. Such repetitions occur in scenarios such as image compression, GIS applications and in compactly representing sparse...... that supports range searching....

  6. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  7. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  8. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  9. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  10. [Composition of fatty acid in commercially available bottled vegetable oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Chen, Yuexiao; He, Mei; Yang, Yuexin

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the fatty acid composition of commercially available bottled vegetable oil, and to explore its characteristic composition and content and the proportion of specific fatty acids. A total of eight varieties of bottled vegetable oil which are popular in use or famous with local brand from eight districts of Beijing, Yunnan, Zhejiang, Hunan, Henan, Harbin, Jiangsu and Gansu were collected, and selected two different batches for each variety. After being saponified and methyl esterified, the fatty acids of vegetable oil samples were analyzed by Shimadzu GC2014 gas chromatography. The commercially available bottled vegetable oils were mainly consisted of palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. The average content of trans fatty acids was 1.05g/100g. The ratio of saturated fatty acids: monounsaturated fatty acids: polyunsaturated fatty acid (S: M: P) of vegetable oil samples was in the range of 1:1. 6-9. 4: 0.9-7.4; the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acid n-6 : n-3 was in the range of 0.37-289.5 : 1. The content of trans fatty acid in commercially available bottled vegetable oil was low, however, most of the proportion of fatty acid did not meet the standards suggested by the Chinese Nutrition Society, and most of vegetable oils are lack of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  11. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  12. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia-En Zhang; Jiayu Yu; Ying Ouyang

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period....

  13. Sialic Acid Receptors of Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Herrler, Georg; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acid linked to glycoproteins and gangliosides is used by many viruses as a receptor for cell entry. These viruses include important human and animal pathogens, such as influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, corona, noro, rota, and DNA tumor viruses. Attachment to sialic acid is mediated by receptor binding proteins that are constituents of viral envelopes or exposed at the surface of non-enveloped viruses. Some of these viruses are also equipped with a neuraminidase or a sialyl-O-acetyl-esterase. These receptor-destroying enzymes promote virus release from infected cells and neutralize sialic acid-containing soluble proteins interfering with cell surface binding of the virus. Variations in the receptor specificity are important determinants for host range, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses.

  14. Fatty acid omega‐oxidation as a rescue pathway for fatty acid oxidation disorders in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wanders, Ronald J. A; Komen, Jasper; Kemp, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can be degraded via different mechanisms including α‐, β‐ and ω‐oxidation. In humans, a range of different genetic diseases has been identified in which either mitochondrial FA...

  15. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  16. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  17. The application of glutamic acid alpha-decarboxylase for the valorization of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Biase, De Daniela; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of nitrogen containing bulk chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. On the pathway from glutamic acid to a range of molecules, the

  18. Nucleic Acid Therapy: from humble beginnings a dynamic technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Millroy, L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “nucleic acid therapy” encompasses a wide range of technologies for the treatment of a range of plant and animal ailments. As the name implies, it makes use of nucleic acid (either DNA or RNA) as a therapeutic agent. There are six branches...

  19. An algorithm for segmenting range imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments of the FY96 Cross Cutting and Advanced Technology (CC&AT) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The project focused on developing algorithms for segmenting range images. The image segmentation algorithm developed during the project is described here. In addition to segmenting range images, the algorithm can fuse multiple range images thereby providing true 3D scene models. The algorithm has been incorporated into the Rapid World Modelling System at Sandia National Laboratory.

  20. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Continuing to work with JIOR to provide a mobile service which can be deployed at the Urban Operations Complex ( UOC ) on Range 62. Electronic Combat...range; some means of facilitating IO play but no organic capability. NTTR continuing to work with JIOR to provide a mobile service to deploy at UOC ...no organic capability. Continuing to work with JIOR to provide a mobile service which can be deployed at the UOC . Collective Ranges Information

  1. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    no organic capability. HQ NTTR continues to work with JIOR to provide a mobile service which can be deployed at the Urban Operations Complex ( UOC ...NTTR continues to work with JIOR to provide a mobile service which can be deployed at the Urban Operations Complex ( UOC ) on Range 62. Electronic... UOC ) on Range 62. Electronic Combat Support h The range lacks a complete electronic target set. EA platforms do not get real-time feedback on their

  2. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Midya, Bikashkali; Evrard, Jérémie; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Ramirez Suarez, Oscar Leonardo; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Thir...

  3. Range contraction in large pelagic predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Boris; Tittensor, Derek P

    2011-07-19

    Large reductions in the abundance of exploited land predators have led to significant range contractions for those species. This pattern can be formalized as the range-abundance relationship, a general macroecological pattern that has important implications for the conservation of threatened species. Here we ask whether similar responses may have occurred in highly mobile pelagic predators, specifically 13 species of tuna and billfish. We analyzed two multidecadal global data sets on the spatial distribution of catches and fishing effort targeting these species and compared these with available abundance time series from stock assessments. We calculated the effort needed to reliably detect the presence of a species and then computed observed range sizes in each decade from 1960 to 2000. Results suggest significant range contractions in 9 of the 13 species considered here (between 2% and 46% loss of observed range) and significant range expansions in two species (11-29% increase). Species that have undergone the largest declines in abundance and are of particular conservation concern tended to show the largest range contractions. These include all three species of bluefin tuna and several marlin species. In contrast, skipjack tuna, which may have increased its abundance in the Pacific, has also expanded its range size. These results mirror patterns described for many land predators, despite considerable differences in habitat, mobility, and dispersal, and imply ecological extirpation of heavily exploited species across parts of their range.

  4. California Tiger Salamander Range - CWHR [ds588

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  5. Oregon Spotted Frog Range - CWHR [ds597

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  6. Caspian Tern Range - CWHR [ds604

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  7. Willow Flycatcher Range - CWHR [ds594

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  8. Western Pond Turtle Range - CWHR [ds598

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  9. Great Blue Heron Range - CWHR [ds609

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  10. Black Swift Range - CWHR [ds605

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  11. Bank Swallow Range - CWHR [ds606

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  12. Northern Leopard Frog Range - CWHR [ds593

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  13. Yellow Warbler Range - CWHR [ds607

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  14. Great Egret Range - CWHR [ds610

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  15. Black Rail Range - CWHR [ds595

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  16. Cascades Frog Range - CWHR [ds591

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  17. Western spadefoot Range - CWHR [ds590

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  18. Bald Eagle Range - CWHR [ds600

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  19. Close range photogrammetry and machine vision

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, KB

    1996-01-01

    This book presents the methodology, algorithms, techniques and equipment necessary to achieve real time digital photogrammetric solutions, together with contemporary examples of close range photogrammetry.

  20. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  1. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  2. Snowy Egret Range - CWHR [ds611

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  3. Giant Garter Snake Range - CWHR [ds599

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vector datasets of CWHR range maps are one component of California Wildlife Habitat Relationships (CWHR), a comprehensive information system and predictive model for...

  4. Risk assessment and source identification of perfluoroalkyl acids in surface and ground water: Spatial distribution around a mega-fluorochemical industrial park, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Li, Qifeng; Johnson, Andrew C; Sarvajayakesavalu, Suriyanarayanan; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can be released to water bodies during manufacturing and application of PFAA-containing products. In this study, the contamination pattern, attenuation dynamics, sources, pathways, and risk zoning of PFAAs in surface and ground water was examined within a 10km radius from a mega-fluorochemical industrial park (FIP). Among 12 detected PFAAs, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) dominated, followed by shorter-chained perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFAA-containing waste was discharged from the FIP, with levels reaching 1.86mg/L in the nearby rivers flowing to the Bohai sea together with up to 273μg/L in the local groundwater in the catchment. These levels constitute a human health risks for PFOA and other shorter-chained PFCAs within this location. The concentrations of ∑PFAAs in surface water strongly correlated with the local groundwater. The dominant pollution pathways of PFAAs included (i) discharge into surface water then to groundwater through seepage, and (ii) atmospheric deposition from the FIP, followed by infiltration to groundwater. As the distance increased from the source, PFAAs levels in groundwater showed a sharp initial decrease followed by a gentle decline. The contamination signal from the FIP site on PFAAs in groundwater existed within a radius of 4km, and at least 3km from the polluted Dongzhulong River. The major controlling factor in PFAA attenuation processes was likely to be dilution together with dispersion and adsorption to aquifer solids. The relative abundance of PFOA (C8) declined while those of shorter-chained PFCAs (C4-C6) increased during surface water seepage and further dispersion in groundwater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-05-26

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  6. Locked and unlocked nucleosides in functional nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doessing, Holger; Vester, Birte

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acids are able to adopt a plethora of structures, many of which are of interest in therapeutics, bio- or nanotechnology. However, structural and biochemical stability is a major concern which has been addressed by incorporating a range of modifications and nucleoside derivatives. This rev....... This review summarizes the use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) and un-locked nucleic acid (UNA) monomers in functional nucleic acids such as aptamers, ribozymes, and DNAzymes....

  7. Dilute acid pretreatment of corncob for efficient sugar production

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.S. Wang; Jae-Won Lee; Junyong Zhu; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous dilute acid pretreatments of corncob were conducted using cylindrical pressure vessels in an oil bath. Pretreatments were conducted in a temperature range of 160–190 °C with acid-solution-to-solid-corncob ratio of 2. The acid concentration (v/v) in the pretreatment solution was varied from 0% to 0.7%, depending on temperature. This gives acid charge on ovendry-...

  8. Serum uric acid and appropriate cutoff value for prediction of metabolic syndrome among Chinese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Mei-lin; Gao, Yu-xia; Wang, Xuan; Chang, Hong; Huang, Guo-wei

    2012-01-01

    The relation between serum uric acid and metabolic syndrome is observed not only with frank hyperuricemia but also with serum uric acid levels within the normal range. The current ?normal? range set for hyperuricemia often fails to identify patients with potential metabolic disorders. We investigate the association between serum uric acid within the normal range and incident metabolic syndrome risk, and further to determine the optimal cut-off value of serum uric acid for the diagnosis or pre...

  9. [Simultaneous determination of twenty-one organic acids in food by ion chromatography with eluent autogeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huaying; Lin, Fenghua; Sheng, Lina; Li, Yidan; Zhang, Qiong

    2007-01-01

    A novel ion chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous determination of organic acids in food samples including quinic acid, acetic acid, pyruvic acid, ketosuccinic acid, mannitic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, malic acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, fumaric acid, ascorbic acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, cinnamic acid, salicylic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, ferulic acid, cis-aconitic acid, trans-aconitic acid, beta-coumaric acid. 5 - 34 mmol/L KOH produced by an EG40 eluent autogenerator could achieve a flat baseline and lower background conductance when performing gradient elution. The flow rate was 0.6 - 2.5 mL/min and the injection volume was 25 microL. The separation was performed on an IonPac AS11 column and detected by suppressed conductivity with self-regenerating suppressor mode. The samples were prepared through extraction, decoloration and filtration before analysis. Twenty-one organic acids showed good linear relationship between the mass concentration and the peak area in the measurement ranges. The correlation coefficients were above 0.999 and the detection limits were 0.011 - 0.188 mg/L, and the average recoveries were 91.5% - 101.8%. The method is simple and rapid with good accuracy and reproducibility, and has been applied to determine twenty-one organic acids in diversiform samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Keisuke, E-mail: keisukekr@gmail.com [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Michio [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Oguma, Kumiko [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takada, Hideshige [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry (LOG), Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Takizawa, Satoshi [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  11. Ultrasonic range measurements on the human body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Droog, Adriaan; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory range estimation on the human body is important for the assessment of the performance of upper- and lower limb tasks outside a laboratory. In this paper an ultrasound sensor for estimating ranges on the human body is presented and validated during gait. The distance between the feet is

  12. 5 CFR 534.502 - Pay range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay range. 534.502 Section 534.502 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.502 Pay range. A pay rate fixed under this...

  13. Flinders Mountain Range, South Australia Province, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Classic examples of folded mountain ranges and wind erosion of geologic structures abound in the Flinders Mountain Range (30.5S, 139.0E), South Australia province, Australia. Winds from the deserts to the west gain speed as they blow across the barren surface and create interesting patterns as they funnel through the gullies and valleys.

  14. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Laysan Albatrosses , and the recovery of a shoreline/littoral zone when human traffic is limited to security vehicles and personnel. This range...Requirements Module (ARRM) and feed the Installation Status C-8 July 2007 2007 SUSTAINABLE RANGES REPORT Report-Natural Infrastructure (see

  15. On the validity range of piston theory

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meijer, M-C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available as the analytical validity range for linear piston theory as based in potential flows. The range of validity of single-term nonlinear extensions to the linear potential equation into the transonic and hypersonic regions is treated. A brief review of the development...

  16. Range management research, Fort Valley Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry A. Pearson; Warren P. Clary; Margaret M. Moore; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2008-01-01

    Range management research at the Fort Valley Experimental Forest during the past 100 years has provided scientific knowledge for managing ponderosa pine forests and forest-range grazing lands in the Southwest. Three research time periods are identified: 1908 to 1950, 1950 to 1978, and 1978 to 2008. Early research (1908-1950) addressed ecological effects of livestock...

  17. Undergraduate range management exam: 1999-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Undergraduate Range Management Exam (URME) has been administered to undergraduate students at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management since 1983, with students demonstrating their higher order learning skills and synthesis knowledge of the art and science of rangeland management. ...

  18. Selected Bibliography On Southern Range Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Campbell; L. K. Halls; H. P. Morgan

    1963-01-01

    The purpose of this bibliography is to list important publications relating directly to southern ranges, the domestic livestock and wildlife produced thereon, and the management of these lands, livestock, and wildlife. Range is defined as natural grassland, savannah, or forest that supports native grasses, forbs, or shrubs suitable as forage for livestock and game....

  19. New data structures for orthogonal range searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2000-01-01

    We present new general techniques for static orthogonal range searching problems in two and higher dimensions. For the general range reporting problem in R3, we achieve query time O(log n+k) using space O(n log1+ε n), where n denotes the number of stored points and k the number of points to be re...

  20. Tests of Gravity Using Lunar Laser Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Merkowitz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lunar laser ranging (LLR has been a workhorse for testing general relativity over the past four decades. The three retroreflector arrays put on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts and the French built arrays on the Soviet Lunokhod rovers continue to be useful targets, and have provided the most stringent tests of the Strong Equivalence Principle and the time variation of Newton’s gravitational constant. The relatively new ranging system at the Apache Point 3.5 meter telescope now routinely makes millimeter level range measurements. Incredibly, it has taken 40 years for ground station technology to advance to the point where characteristics of the lunar retroreflectors are limiting the precision of the range measurements. In this article, we review the gravitational science and technology of lunar laser ranging and discuss prospects for the future.

  1. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Broiler Chickens 2: Individual Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-07-20

    Little is known about broiler chicken ranging behaviour. Previous studies have monitored ranging behaviour at flock level but whether individual ranging behaviour varies within a flock is unknown. Using Radio Frequency Identification technology, we tracked 1200 individual ROSS 308 broiler chickens across four mixed sex flocks in two seasons on one commercial farm. Ranging behaviour was tracked from first day of range access (21 days of age) until 35 days of age in winter flocks and 44 days of age in summer flocks. We identified groups of chickens that differed in frequency of range visits: chickens that never accessed the range (13 to 67% of tagged chickens), low ranging chickens (15 to 44% of tagged chickens) that accounted for <15% of all range visits and included chickens that used the range only once (6 to 12% of tagged chickens), and high ranging chickens (3 to 9% of tagged chickens) that accounted for 33 to 50% of all range visits. Males spent longer on the range than females in winter (p < 0.05). Identifying the causes of inter-individual variation in ranging behaviour may help optimise ranging opportunities in free-range systems and is important to elucidate the potential welfare implications of ranging.

  2. Long-Range Persistence Techniques Evaluated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, A.; Malamud, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    Many time series in the Earth Sciences exhibit persistence (memory) where large values (small values) `cluster' together. Here we examine long-range persistence, where one value is correlated with all others in the time series. A time series is long-range persistent (a self-affine fractal) if the power spectral density scales with a power law. The scaling exponent beta characterizes the `strength' of persistence. We compare five common analysis techniques for quantifying long-range persistence: (a) Power-spectral analysis, (b) Wavelet variance analysis, (c) Detrended Fluctuation analysis, (d) Semivariogram analysis, and (e) Rescaled-Range (R/S) analysis. To evaluate these methods, we construct 26,000 synthetic fractional noises with lengths between 512 and 4096, different persistence strengths, different distributions (normal, log-normal, levy), and using different construction methods: Fourier filtering, discrete wavelets, random additions, and Mandelbrot `cartoon' Brownian motions. We find: (a) Power-spectral and wavelet analyses are the most robust for measuring long-range persistence across all beta, although `antipersistence' is over-estimated for non- Gaussian time series. (b) Detrended Fluctuation Analysis is appropriate for signals with long-range persistence strength beta between -0.2 and 2.8 and has very large 95% confidence intervals for non-Gaussian signals. (c) Semivariograms are appropriate for signals with long-range persistence strength between 1.0 and 2.8; it has large confidence intervals and systematically underestimates log-normal noises in this range. (d) Rescaled- Range Analysis is only accurate for beta of about 0.7. We conclude some techniques are much better suited than others for quantifying long-range persistence, and the resultant beta (and associated error bars on them) are sensitive to the one point probability distribution, the length of the time series, and the techniques used.

  3. Illuminating geographical patterns in species' range shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenouillet, Gaël; Comte, Lise

    2014-10-01

    Species' range shifts in response to ongoing climate change have been widely documented, but although complex spatial patterns in species' responses are expected to be common, comprehensive comparisons of species' ranges over time have undergone little investigation. Here, we outline a modeling framework based on historical and current species distribution records for disentangling different drivers (i.e. climatic vs. nonclimatic) and assessing distinct facets (i.e. colonization, extirpation, persistence, and lags) of species' range shifts. We used extensive monitoring data for stream fish assemblages throughout France to assess range shifts for 32 fish species between an initial period (1980-1992) and a contemporary one (2003-2009). Our results provide strong evidence that the responses of individual species varied considerably and exhibited complex mosaics of spatial rearrangements. By dissociating range shifts in climatically suitable and unsuitable habitats, we demonstrated that patterns in climate-driven colonization and extirpation were less marked than those attributed to nonclimatic drivers, although this situation could rapidly shift in the near future. We also found evidence that range shifts could be related to some species' traits and that the traits involved varied depending on the facet of range shift considered. The persistence of populations in climatically unsuitable areas was greater for short-lived species, whereas the extent of the lag behind climate change was greater for long-lived, restricted-range, and low-elevation species. We further demonstrated that nonclimatic extirpations were primarily related to the size of the species' range, whereas climate-driven extirpations were better explained by thermal tolerance. Thus, the proposed framework demonstrated its potential for markedly improving our understanding of the key processes involved in range shifting and also offers a template for informing management decisions. Conservation strategies

  4. Short range DFT combined with long-range local RPA within a range-separated hybrid DFT framework

    CERN Document Server

    Chermak, E; Mussard, Bastien; Angyan, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Selecting excitations in localized orbitals to calculate long-range correlation contributions to range-separated density-functional theory can reduce the overall computational effort significantly. Beyond simple selection schemes of excited determinants, the dispersion-only approximation, which avoids counterpoise-corrected monomer calculations, is shown to be particularly interesting in this context, which we apply to the random-phase approximation. The approach has been tested on dimers of formamide, water, methane and benzene.

  5. Storm surge and tidal range energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Matthew; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Robins, Peter; Evans, Paul; Neill, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The need to reduce carbon-based energy sources whilst increasing renewable energy forms has led to concerns of intermittency within a national electricity supply strategy. The regular rise and fall of the tide makes prediction almost entirely deterministic compared to other stochastic renewable energy forms; therefore, tidal range energy is often stated as a predictable and firm renewable energy source. Storm surge is the term used for the non-astronomical forcing of tidal elevation, and is synonymous with coastal flooding because positive storm surges can elevate water-levels above the height of coastal flood defences. We hypothesis storm surges will affect the reliability of the tidal range energy resource; with negative surge events reducing the tidal range, and conversely, positive surge events increasing the available resource. Moreover, tide-surge interaction, which results in positive storm surges more likely to occur on a flooding tide, will reduce the annual tidal range energy resource estimate. Water-level data (2000-2012) at nine UK tide gauges, where the mean tidal amplitude is above 2.5m and thus suitable for tidal-range energy development (e.g. Bristol Channel), were used to predict tidal range power with a 0D modelling approach. Storm surge affected the annual resource estimate by between -5% to +3%, due to inter-annual variability. Instantaneous power output were significantly affected (Normalised Root Mean Squared Error: 3%-8%, Scatter Index: 15%-41%) with spatial variability and variability due to operational strategy. We therefore find a storm surge affects the theoretical reliability of tidal range power, such that a prediction system may be required for any future electricity generation scenario that includes large amounts of tidal-range energy; however, annual resource estimation from astronomical tides alone appears sufficient for resource estimation. Future work should investigate water-level uncertainties on the reliability and

  6. 2008 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to the 2008 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. This year, along with full length articles concerning various subject areas, we have provided updates to standard subjects with links back to the 2007 original article. Additionally, we present summaries from the various NASA Range Safety Program activities that took place throughout the year, as well as information on several special projects that may have a profound impact on the way we will do business in the future. The sections include a program overview and 2008 highlights of Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy; Independent Assessments and Common Risk Analysis Tools Development; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch operations; a continuing overview of emerging Range Safety-related technologies; Special Interests Items that include recent changes in the ELV Payload Safety Program and the VAS explosive siting study; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. We have made a great effort to include the most current information available. We recommend that this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. This is the third year we have utilized this web-based format for the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition, and we hope you enjoy this year's product as well. It has been a very busy and productive year on many fronts as you will note as you review this report. Thank you to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the

  7. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  8. Expert systems and ballistic range data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Wayne; Steinhoff, Mark; Whyte, Robert; Brown, David; Choate, Jeff; Adelgren, Russ

    1992-07-01

    A program aimed at the development of an expert system for the reduction of ballistic range data is described. The program applies expert system and artificial intelligence techniques to develop a mathematically complex state-of-the-art spark range data reduction procedure that includes linear theory and six-degree-of-freedom analysis. The scope of the knowledge base includes both spin and statically stable vehicles. The expert system is expected to improve the quality of the data reduction process while reducing the work load on the senior range engineer.

  9. Remote sensing applications for range management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of satellite information for range management is discussed. The use of infrared photography and color photography for analysis of vegetation cover is described. The methods of interpreting LANDSAT imagery are highlighted and possible applications of such interpretive methods to range management are considered. The concept of using LANDSAT as a sampling frame for renewable natural resource inventories was examined. It is concluded that a blending of LANDSAT vegetation data with soils and digital terrain data, will define a basic sampling unit that is appropriate for range management utilization.

  10. 2-Hydroxy-6-isopropyl-3-methylbenzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Betz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C11H14O3, is a multiple-substituted derivative of benzoic acid. Intracyclic C—C—C angles span a range of 117.16 (19–122.32 (19°. Apart from intramolecular hydrogen bonds between hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, intermolecular hydrogen bonds are present in the crystal structure, the latter ones giving rise to centrosymmetric carboxylic acid dimers.

  11. Isoprene, sulphoxy radical-anions and acidity

    OpenAIRE

    K. J. Rudziński; L. Gmachowski; I. Kuznietsova

    2008-01-01

    Transformation of isoprene coupled with autoxidation of SIV in aqueous solutions was studied experimentally and by chemical-kinetic modelling over broad range of solution acidities (pH=3–9) to complement the research on aqueous-phase and heterogeneous transformation of isoprene reported recently by many laboratories. Isoprene significantly slowed down the autoxidation in acidic and basic solutions, and accelerated it slightly in neutral solutions. Simultaneously, ...

  12. ARDS following inhalation of hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, D P; Ambegaonkar, Rahul; Radhika, P; Sharma, Manish

    2011-02-01

    The clinical spectrum of Inhalation injury can range from mild cough to a devastating ARDS. We herewith present a patient who is a goldsmith by occupation and his work consists of dissolving gold in Hydrochloric acid. He had accidentally inhaled fumes of Hydrochloric acid and presented with cough and breathlessness, later on required mechanical ventilation for ARDS and improved. This highlights the importance of not to neglect mild symptoms like cough and dyspnea in such a scenario which may have some hidden catastrophe.

  13. Evaluation of fatty acid content of some Iranian fast foods with emphasis on trans fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Seddigheh; Nazari, Bahar; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Parkhideh, Sahar; Saberi, Salbali; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2009-01-01

    Although the disadvantages of trans fatty acids (TFAs) are widely mentioned, limited data are available on the TFAs contents of Iranian foods, including fast foods. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of common fatty acids in several fast foods in Iran, with specific focus on TFAs. The most commonly consumed fast foods in Iran: sausage, calbas, hamburgers and pizzas, were randomly selected seven times from products available in supermarkets and restaurants. Each time a 10 g sample was drawn and prepared for fatty acid analysis. Total and individual fatty acids were quantified according to standard methods by gas chromatography with 60 meter capillary column and flame ionization detector. The most common saturated fatty acids in Iranian fast foods is stearic acid (C18:0) which ranged from 14.0% to 20.9%. Saturated fatty acid content in calbas was significantly higher than that found in other groups. Trans fatty acids constitute almost 23.6% to 30.6% of total fatty acids of these products. The most common TFA in these fast foods was elaidic acid (C18:1 9t). Total cis unsaturated fatty acid content of tested fast foods varied from 25.3%(in sausage) to 46.8(in calbas) with oleic acid (C18:1 9c) followed by linoleic acid (C18:2) being the most common fatty acids in these products. This study showed higher TFAs contents in commercially available fast foods compared to the amounts recommended by dietary guidelines in Iran. Further studies must assess the effects of these fatty acids on human health.

  14. Levulinic acid production by two-step acid-catalyzed treatment of Quercus mongolica using dilute sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hanseob; Jang, Soo-Kyeong; Hong, Chang-Young; Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Su-Yeon; Lee, Soo Min; Choi, Joon Weon; Choi, In-Gyu

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to produce a levulinic acid by two-step acid-catalyzed treatment of Quercus mongolica and to investigate the effect of treatment parameter (reaction temperature range: 100-230°C; sulfuric acid (SA) concentration range: 0-2%) on the levulinic acid yield. After 1 st step acid-catalyzed treatment, most of the hemicellulosic C5 sugars (15.6gg/100gbiomass) were released into the liquid hydrolysate at the reaction temperature of 150°C in 1% SA; the solid fraction, which contained 53.5% of the C6 sugars, was resistant to further loss of C6 sugars. Subsequently, 2 nd step acid-catalyzed treatment of the solid fractions was performed under more severe conditions. Finally, 16.5g/100g biomass of levulinic acid was produced at the reaction temperature of 200°C in 2% SA, corresponding to a higher conversion rate than during single-step treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Kenai National Moose Range : Narrative report : 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  16. Long-Range Nondestructive Testing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of a long range, multi-point non-destructive system for the detection of subsurface flaws in metallic and composite materials of...

  17. Arctic National Wildlife Range, Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Arctic National Wildlife Range (ANWR) was established by executive order in 1960 for the purpose of preserving unique wildlife, wilderness and recreational...

  18. Range ecosystem management for natural areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes methods for managing range ecosystems in natural areas. Preserved natural areas on rangeland may, in a short time, be only those which received...

  19. Mountain ranges favour vigorous Atlantic meridional overturning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bablu Sinha; Adam T. Blaker; Joël J.-M. Hirschi; Sarah Bonham; Matthew Brand; Simon Josey; Robin S. Smith; Jochem Marotzke

    2012-01-01

      We use a global Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model (OAGCM) to show that the major mountain ranges of the world have a significant role in maintenance of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC...

  20. Final Range Wide Environmental Impact Statement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botdorf, Charles

    2001-01-01

    This Final Range Wide Environmental Impact Statement presents the impacts associated with the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of mission diversification and changes to land use for Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona...

  1. VT E911 road address range geocoder

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — VT E911 road address range geocoder. VCGI, in collaboration with the VT E911 Board, has created a suite of geocoding services that can be used to batch geocode...

  2. Compact ranges in antenna and RCS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audone, B.

    1989-09-01

    With the increased complexity and extended frequency range of operation model measurements and far field test ranges are no longer suitable to satisfy the demand of accurate testing. Moreover plane wave test conditions are required for Radar Cross Section (RCS) measurements which represent a key point in stealth technology. Compact ranges represent the best test facilities available presently since they allow for indoor measurements under far field conditions in real time without any calculation effort. Several types of compact ranges are described and compared discussing their relevant advantages with regard to RCS and antenna measurements. In parallel to measuring systems sophisticated computer models were developed with such a high level of accuracy that it is questionable whether experiments give better results than theory. Tests performed on simple structures show the correlation between experimental results and theoretical ones derived on the basis of GTD computer codes.

  3. Worst-Case Efficient Range Searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan

    2009-01-01

    In this tutorial we will describe some of the recent advances in the development of worst-case efficient range search indexing structures, that is, structures for storing a set of data points such that the points in a axis-parallel (hyper-) query rectangle can be found efficiently (with as few disk...... discuss the external priority search tree [8], which solves a restricted version of the two-dimensional version of the problem where the query rectangle is unbounded on one side. This structure is then used in a range tree index structure [8, 21] that answers general two-dimensional queries in the same......, 17], as well as recent index structures for higher-dimensional range search indexing [1]. We end by mentioning various R-tree variant [7, 18, 15] that can be used to solve the extended version of range search indexing where the queries as well as the data are (hyper-) rectangles. More comprehensive...

  4. Comparative analysis of planetary laser ranging concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, D.; Bauer, S.; Noomen, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Visser, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging is an emerging technology for tracking interplanetary missions, offering improved range accuracy and precision (mm-cm), compared to existing DSN tracking. The ground segment uses existing Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology, whereas the space segment is modified with an active system. In a one-way system, such as that currently being used on the LRO spacecraft (Zuber et al., 2010), only an active detector is required on the spacecraft. For a two-way system, such as that tested by using the laser altimeter system on the MESSENGER spacecraft en route to Mercury (Smith et al., 2006), a laser transmitter system is additionally placed on the space segment, which will asynchronously fire laser pulses towards the ground stations. Although the one-way system requires less hardware, clock errors on both the space and ground segments will accumulate over time, polluting the range measurements. For a two-way system, the range measurements are only sensitive to clock errors integrated over the the two-way light time.We investigate the performance of both one- and two-way laser range systems by simulating their operation. We generate realizations of clock error time histories from Allan variance profiles, and use them to create range measurement error profiles. We subsequently perform the orbit determination process from this data to quanitfy the system's performance. For our simulations, we use two test cases: a lunar orbiter similar to LRO and a Phobos lander similar to the Phobos Laser Ranging concept (Turyshev et al., 2010). For the lunar orbiter, we include an empirical model for unmodelled non-gravitational accelerations in our truth model to include errors ihe dynamics. We include the estimation of clock parameters over a number of arc lengths for our simulations of the one-way range system and use a variety of state arc durations for the lunar orbiter simulations.We perform Monte Carlo simulations and generate true error distributions for both

  5. Novel Polymers with Carboxylic Acid Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anders Daugaard; Malmström, Eva; Hvilsted, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Click chemistry has been used to prepare a range of novel polymers with pendant carboxylic acid side groups. Four azido carboxylic acids, either mono- or difunctional and aliphatic or aromatic, have been prepared and thoroughly characterized. Extensive model reactions with 1-ethyl-4-hydroxybenzene...... in the derivatized polymers and the glass-transition temperature has emerged: the aromatic carboxylic acids give high glass-transition temperatures (90–120 °C), and the aliphatic carboxylic acids give lower glass-transition temperatures (50–65 °C). © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part A: Polym Chem 44......, the simplest model for poly(4-hydroxystyrene), and the four azido carboxylic acids have been conducted to establish the proper reaction conditions and provide an analytical frame for the corresponding polymers. Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) moieties in three different polymers—poly(4-hydroxystyrene), poly(4...

  6. Hybrid gold single crystals incorporating amino acids

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Linfeng; Weber, Eva; Fitch, Andy N; Pokroy, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    Composite hybrid gold crystals are of profound interest in various research areas ranging from materials science to biology. Their importance is due to their unique properties and potential implementation, for example in sensing or in bio-nanomedicine. Here we report on the formation of hybrid organic-metal composites via the incorporation of selected amino acids histidine, aspartic acid, serine, glutamine, alanine, cysteine, and selenocystine into the crystal lattice of single crystals of gold. We used electron microscopy, chemical analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X ray diffraction to examine these composites. Crystal shape, as well as atomic concentrations of occluded amino acids and their impact on the crystal structure of gold, were determined. Concentration of the incorporated amino acid was highest for cysteine, followed by serine and aspartic acid. Our results indicate that the incorporation process probably occurs through a complex interaction of their individual functional groups with ...

  7. Adaptive and Approximate Orthogonal Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Wilkinson, Bryan Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ]. •We give an O(n loglog n)-space data structure for approximate 2-D orthogonal range counting that can compute a (1+δ)-factor approximation to the count in O(loglog n) time for any fixed constant δ>0. Again, our bounds match the state of the art for the 2-D orthogonal range emptiness problem. •Lastly...

  8. Vehicle Based Laser Range Finding in Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Juergen Horn; Rolf Adamek; Detlef Ehlert

    2009-01-01

    Laser rangefinders and laser scanners are widely used for industrial purposes and for remote sensing. In agriculture information about crop parameters like volume, height, and density can support the optimisation of production processes. In scientific papers the measurement of these parameters by low cost laser rangefinders with one echo has been presented for short ranges. Because the cross section area of the beam increases with the measuring range, it can be expected that laser rangefinder...

  9. Long-Range Order in β Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norvell, J.C.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1970-01-01

    The long-range order parameter M of β brass has been determined from measurements of the intensity of superlattice reflections of Bragg-scattered neutrons. Over the whole temperature range T=300 °K to T=Tc=736 °K, the data are in remarkable agreement with the prediction for the compressible Ising...... bcc lattice with only nearest-neighbor interactions. © 1970 The American Physical Society...

  10. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  11. Long range electrostatic forces in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbie, Matthew A; Smith, Alexander M; Dobbs, Howard A; Lee, Alpha A; Warr, Gregory G; Banquy, Xavier; Valtiner, Markus; Rutland, Mark W; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Perkin, Susan; Atkin, Rob

    2017-01-19

    Ionic liquids are pure salts that are liquid under ambient conditions. As liquids composed solely of ions, the scientific consensus has been that ionic liquids have exceedingly high ionic strengths and thus very short Debye screening lengths. However, several recent experiments from laboratories around the world have reported data for the approach of two surfaces separated by ionic liquids which revealed remarkable long range forces that appear to be electrostatic in origin. Evidence has accumulated demonstrating long range surface forces for several different combinations of ionic liquids and electrically charged surfaces, as well as for concentrated mixtures of inorganic salts in solvent. The original interpretation of these forces, that ionic liquids could be envisioned as "dilute electrolytes," was controversial, and the origin of long range forces in ionic liquids remains the subject of discussion. Here we seek to collate and examine the evidence for long range surface forces in ionic liquids, identify key outstanding questions, and explore possible mechanisms underlying the origin of these long range forces. Long range surface forces in ionic liquids and other highly concentrated electrolytes hold diverse implications from designing ionic liquids for energy storage applications to rationalizing electrostatic correlations in biological self-assembly.

  12. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  13. Acid tolerance mechanisms utilized by Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Robert; Cvitkovitch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1924 by J Clarke, Streptococcus mutans has been the focus of rigorous research efforts due to its involvement in caries initiation and progression. Its ability to ferment a range of dietary carbohydrates can rapidly drop the external environmental pH, thereby making dental plaque inhabitable to many competing species and can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid production by this oral pathogen would prove suicidal if not for its remarkable ability to withstand the acid onslaught by utilizing a wide variety of highly evolved acid-tolerance mechanisms. The elucidation of these mechanisms will be discussed, serving as the focus of this review. PMID:20210551

  14. Phlebotomy treatment for elimination of perfluoroalkyl acids in a highly exposed family: a retrospective case-series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Genuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs are a family of commonly used synthetic chemicals that have become widespread environmental contaminants. In human serum, perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS, perflurooctane sulfonate (PFOS, and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA are most frequently detected, in part owing to their long elimination half-lives of between 3.8 yrs (PFOA and 8.5 yrs (PFHxS. These PFAAs also cross the placenta and have been associated with developmental toxicity, and some are considered likely human carcinogens. Interventions to eliminate PFAAs in highly contaminated individuals would reduce future health risks, but minimal research has been conducted on methods to facilitate accelerated human clearance of these persistent substances. METHODS: Six patients with elevated serum concentrations from a single family were treated by intermittent phlebotomy over a 4-5 year period at intervals similar to, or less frequent than what is done for routine blood donation at Canadian Blood Services. The apparent elimination half-life (HLapp for PFHxS, PFOS, and PFOA in this treated population was calculated in each patient and compared to the intrinsic elimination half-lives (HLin from a literature reference population of untreated fluorochemical manufacturing plant retirees (n = 26, age >55 yrs. RESULTS: For all three PFAAs monitored during phlebotomy, HLapp in each of the family members (except the mother, who had a low rate of venesection was significantly shorter than the geometric mean HL measured in the reference population, and in some cases were even shorter compared to the fastest eliminator in the reference population. CONCLUSION: This study suggests significantly accelerated PFAA clearance with regular phlebotomy treatment, but the small sample size and the lack of controls in this clinical intervention precludes drawing firm conclusions. Given the minimal risks of intermittent phlebotomy, this may be an effective and safe clinical

  15. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  16. Reticle level compensation for long range effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Thiago; Browning, Clyde; Thornton, Martin J.; Vannufel, Cyril; Schiavone, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Proximity Effects in electron beam lithography impact feature dimensions, pattern fidelity and uniformity. Electron scattering effects are commonly addressed using a mathematical model representing the radial exposure intensity distribution induced by a point electron source, commonly named Point Spread Function (PSF). PSF models are usually employed for correcting "short-range" and "long-range" backscattering effects up to 10μm to 15μm. It is well known that there are also some process related phenomena impacting pattern uniformity that have a wider range (fogging, chemical mechanical polishing -CMP- effects, etc.) which impacts up to a few millimeters or more. There are a number of commercial strategies for mitigating such long range effects based on data density. However, those traditional ones are usually performed within a single chip on a reticle field and ignore the presence of adjacent fields, neglecting their influence. Full field reticles can contain several different designs or arrayed chips in a multitude of layout placements. Reticle level jobdeck placing each design at specific sites, independent of each other can be used to account for the density of each pattern that has a relative impact on its neighbors, even if they are several millimeters away from offending data. Therefore, full field density analysis accounting for scribe frames and all neighboring patterns is required for reaching fidelity control requirements such as critical dimension (CD) and line end shortening (LES) on the full plate. This paper describes a technique to compensate long range effects going across chip boundaries to the full reticle exposure field. The extreme long range effects are also represented with a model that is calibrated according to the characteristics of the user's process. Data correction can be based on dose and geometry modulation. Uniform pattern dimensional control matching the user's specific process long range variability can be achieved with the

  17. Trans fatty acids in dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries : the TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aro, A.; Amelsvoort, J. van; Becker, W.; Erp-Baart, M.A. van; Kafatos, A.; Leth, T.; Poppel, G. van

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of dietary fats and oils from 14 European countries was analyzed with particular emphasis on isomerictransfatty acids. The proportion oftransfatty acids in typical soft margarines and low-fat spreads ranged between 0.1 and 17% of total fatty acids and that

  18. FAD2 gene mutations significantly alter fatty acid composition in peanuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A panel of 55 peanut lines was analyzed for fatty acid composition with gas chromatography and also genotyped with SNP markers from the FAD2 genes by real-time PCR. Significant variation in fatty acid composition was identified and the ratio of oleic acid to linoleic acid (O/L) ranged from 1.23 to 5...

  19. Trans fatty acids in dairy and meat products from 14 European countries : the TRANSFAIR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aro, A.; Antoine, J.M.; Pizzoferrato, L.; Reykdal, O.; Poppel, G. van

    1998-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of dairy products and meat from 14 European countries was analyzed with particular emphasis ontransfatty acids. In cow's milk, butter, and cheese the proportions oftransfatty acids ranged between 3.2 and 6.2% of fatty acids. C18:1 isomers comprised about 60% and C16:1 and

  20. Individual differences in BEV drivers' range stress during first encounter of a critical range situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Rauh, Nadine; Krems, Josef F

    2016-11-01

    It is commonly held that range anxiety, in the form of experienced range stress, constitutes a usage barrier, particularly during the early period of battery electric vehicle (BEV) usage. To better understand factors that play a role in range stress during this critical period of adaptation to limited-range mobility, we examined individual differences in experienced range stress in the context of a critical range situation. In a field experiment, 74 participants drove a BEV on a 94-km round trip, which was tailored to lead to a critical range situation (i.e., small available range safety buffer). Higher route familiarity, trust in the range estimation system, system knowledge, subjective range competence, and internal control beliefs in dealing with technology were clearly related to lower experienced range stress; emotional stability (i.e., low neuroticism) was partly related to lower range stress. These results can inform strategies aimed at reducing range stress during early BEV usage, as well as contribute to a better understanding of factors that drive user experience in low-resource systems, which is a key topic in the field of green ergonomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optics At White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczek, Ron C.; Hayslett, Charles R.

    1985-11-01

    We present an overview of the optics and optical data gathering programs conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Activities at White Sands Missile Range have always been diverse - the first test conducted there was the world's first nuclear explosion. In the forty years since that event the range has hosted a large assortment of vehicles including V2, Nike, Aerobee, Space Shuttle, Cruise, and the Copperhead. The last three of these devices illustrate the difficulty of the White Sands optical data gathering task. One is acquired in orbit, one as it crosses through a mountain pass, and one as it issues from the muzzle of a cannon. A combination of optical, radar, video, computer, and communications technology has produced a versatile system that can satisfy the data gathering requirements of most range users. Another example of the diverse optics programs at the range is the development of the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF). Because of the nature of the systems being tested, the HELSTF is full of optics and optical systems including the TRW MIRACL laser and the Hughes SEA LITE Beam Director.

  2. Passive ranging of boost-phase missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Michael; Perram, Glen

    2007-04-01

    The depth of absorption bands in observed spectra of distant, bright sources can be used to estimate range to the source. Previous efforts in this area relied on Beer's Law to estimate range from observations of infrared CO II bands, with disappointing results. A modified approach is presented that uses band models and observations of the O II absorption band near 762 nm. This band is spectrally isolated from other atmospheric bands, which enables direct estimation of molecular absorption from observed intensity. Range is estimated by comparing observed values of band-average absorption, (see manuscript), against predicted curves derived from either historical data or model predictions. Accuracy of better than 0.5% has been verified in short-range (up to 3km) experiments using a Fourier transform interferometer at 1cm -1 resolution. A conceptual design is described for a small, affordable passive ranging sensor suitable for use on tactical aircraft for missile attack warning and time-to-impact estimation. Models are used to extrapolate experimental results (using 1 cm -1 resolution data) to analyze expected performance of this filter-based system.

  3. Linoleic acid uptake by isolated enterocytes: influence of alpha-linolenic acid on absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goré, J; Hoinard, C; Couet, C

    1994-10-01

    In a previous study we showed that intestinal uptake of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was carrier-mediated and we suggested that a plasma membrane fatty acid protein was involved in the transport of long-chain fatty acids. To further test this hypothesis, the mechanism of linoleic acid (18:2n-6) uptake by isolated intestinal cells was examined using a rapid filtration method and 20 mM sodium taurocholate as solubilizing agent. Under these experimental conditions transport of [1-14C]linoleic acid monomers in the concentration range of 2 to 2220 nM was saturable with a Vm of 5.1 +/- 0.6 nmol/mg protein/min and a Km of 183 +/- 7 nM. Experiments carried out in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, such as 2,4-dinitrophenol and antimycin A, suggested that an active, carrier-mediated mechanism was involved in the intestinal uptake of this essential fatty acid. The addition of excess unlabeled linoleic acid to the incubation medium led to a 89% decrease in the uptake of [1-14C]linoleic acid, while D-glucose did not compete for transport into the cell. Other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids added to the incubation mixture inhibited linoleic acid uptake by more than 80%. The presence of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) in the incubation medium caused the competitive inhibition (Ki = 353 nM) of linoleic acid uptake. The data are compatible with the hypothesis that intestinal uptake of both linoleic, and alpha-linolenic acid is mediated by a membrane carrier common to long-chain fatty acids.

  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of ...

  5. Uric Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Uric Acid Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Also Known As Serum Urate UA Formal Name Uric Acid This article was last reviewed on May 17, ...

  6. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease. Amino acids are "building blocks" that join together to form ...

  7. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  8. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  9. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  10. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... questions. We have answers. Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  11. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  12. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  13. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. ... before the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  15. Refractive index sensitivity in etched FBG in the visible range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Jean F.; Nadas, Rafael B.; Inácio, Patricia L.; Chiamenti, Ismael; Kamicawachi, Ricardo C.; Kalinowski, Hypolito José

    2017-08-01

    A visible fiber Bragg grating (Vis-FBG) with wavelength peak centered at 673.07 nm was inscribed in a multimode fiber designed for infrared (IR) operation using a femtosecond (fs) laser emitting at 248 nm. The fiber cladding is removed by chemical etching in hydrofluoric acid solution (40%). The sensor refractive index response is determined by dipping the sensor into diluted glycerin solution at different concentrations with refractive index range from 1.3328 to 1.4607. The Vis-FBG performance is compared with an IR etched FBG (EFBG) with similar diameter. The sensitivity found for the Vis-FBG sensor is 15.71nm/RIU with a 6.34 x 10-3 RIU resolution for a refractive index of 1.4607.

  16. Hip strength and range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosler, Andrea B.; Crossley, Kay M.; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the normal profiles for hip strength and range of motion (ROM) in a professional football league in Qatar, and examine the effect of leg dominance, age, past history of injury, and ethnicity on these profiles. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Methods Participants...... values are documented for hip strength and range of motion that can be used as reference profiles in the clinical assessment, screening, and management of professional football players. Leg dominance, recent past injury history and ethnicity do not need to be accounted for when using these profiles...... included 394 asymptomatic, male professional football players, aged 18–40 years. Strength was measured using a hand held dynamometer with an eccentric test in side-lying for hip adduction and abduction, and the squeeze test in supine with 45° hip flexion. Range of motion measures included: hip internal...

  17. Extended range interferometry based on wavefront shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczupak, M. L.; Salbut, L.

    2007-09-01

    There are many cases when absolute measurements of objects with large height differences or height discontinuity is needed. These measurements can not be covered by classical interferometry since the range of non-ambiguity is limited to half the optical wavelength. Several techniques have been already developed for extending of non-ambiguity range. However most of them is based on multi-wavelength methods which demands expensive light sources and special environment conditions. In this work the new interferometric technique for absolute measurements of large steps discontinuities is proposed. Variable wavefront of the illuminating beam and special procedure for calibration of the measurement volume are used for extending of the measurement range without using multispectral sources. Additionally, calibration of the measurement area simplifies fringe processing and quicken measures. Theoretical analysis of this technique, its numerical simulations and experimental verification are presented and discussed.

  18. The Nucleic Acid Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John; Feng, Zukang; Iype, Lisa; Schneider, Bohdan; Zardecki, Christine

    2002-06-01

    The Nucleic Acid Database was established in 1991 as a resource to assemble and distribute structural information about nucleic acids. Over the years, the NDB has developed generalized software for processing, archiving, querying and distributing structural data for nucleic acid-containing structures. The architecture and capabilities of the Nucleic Acid Database, as well as some of the research enabled by this resource, are presented in this article.

  19. Glycolic acid modulates the mechanical property and degradation of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Lan; Huang, Wei; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yan; Lu, Xi-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Lan; Yang, Bao-Feng; Dong, De-Li

    2010-01-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with controllable degradation properties is beneficial for a variety of applications. Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is a promising candidate of biomaterials; so we synthesize a series of poly(glycerol, sebacate, glycolic acid) (PGSG) with 1:2:0, 1:2:0.2, 1:2:0.4, 1:2:0.6, 1:2:1 mole ratio of glycerol, sebacate, and glycolic acid to elucidate the relation of doped glycolic acid to the degradation rate and mechanical properties. The microstructures of the polymers with different doping of glycolic acid were dissimilar. PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 displayed an integral degree of ordering, different to those with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0, 0.4, 0.6, and 1, which showed mild phase separation structure. The number, DeltaH(m), and temperature of the PGSG melting peaks tended to decrease with the increasing ratio of doped glycolic acid. In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that the degradation rate of PGSG with glycolic acid in the ratio of 0.2 was slowest, but in the ratio range of 0, 0.4, and 0.6, the degradation rate increased with the increase of glycolic acid. All PGSG samples displayed good tissue response and anticoagulant effects. Our data suggest that doping glycolic acid can modulate the microstructure and degree of crosslinking of PGS, thereby control the degradation rate of PGS.

  20. Acidification reversal in low mountain range streams of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucker, Carina; von Wilpert, Klaus; Puhlmann, Heike

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluates the acidification status and trends in streams of forested mountain ranges in Germany in consequence of reduced anthropogenic deposition since the mid 1980s. The analysis is based on water quality data for 86 long-term monitored streams in the Ore Mountains, the Bavarian Forest, the Fichtelgebirge, the Harz Mountains, the Spessart, the Black Forest, the Thuringian Forest, and the Rheinisches Schiefergebirge of Germany and the Vosges of France. Within the observation period, which starts for the individual streams between 1980 and 2001 and ends between 1990 and 2009, trends in chemical water quality were calculated with the Seasonal Mann Kendall Test. About 87% of the streams show significant (p < 0.05) negative trends in sulfate. The general reduction in acid deposition resulted in increased pH values (significant for 66% of the streams) and subsequently decreased base cation concentrations in the stream water (for calcium significant in 58% and magnesium 49% of the streams). Reaction products of acidification such as aluminum (significant for 50%) or manganese (significant for 69%) also decreased. Nitrate (52% with significant decrease) and chloride (38% with significant increase) have less pronounced trends and more variable spatial patterns. For the quotient of acidification, which is the ratio of the sum of base cations and the sum of acid anions, no clear trend is observed: in 44% of the monitored streams values significantly decreased and in 23% values significantly increased. A notable observation is the increasing DOC concentration, which is significant for 55% of the observed streams.

  1. Substrate range of benzylsuccinate synthase from Azoarcus sp. strain T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M

    1999-09-01

    Benzylsuccinate synthase, which catalyzes the anaerobic addition of the methyl carbon of toluene to fumarate, has recently been reported in several denitrifying and sulfate-reducing, toluene-degrading bacteria. In substrate range studies with partially purified benzylsuccinate synthase from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain T, benzylsuccinate analogs were observed as a result of fumarate addition to the following toluene surrogates: xylenes, monofluorotoluenes, benzaldehyde, and 1-methyl-1-cyclohexene (but not 4-methyl-l-cyclohexene or methylcyclohexane). Benzylsuccinate was also observed as a result of toluene addition to maleate, but no products were observed from assays with toluene and either crotonate or trans-glutaconate. Toluene-maleate addition, like toluene-fumarate addition, resulted in highly stereospecific formation of the (+)-benzylsuccinic acid enantiomer [(R)-2-benzyl-3-carboxypropionic acid]. The previously reported finding that the methyl H atom abstracted from toluene is retained in the succinyl moiety of benzylsuccinate was found to apply to several toluene surrogates. The implications of these observations for the mechanism of benzylsuccinate synthase will be discussed.

  2. Cross-Sectional Associations of Serum Perfluoroalkyl Acids and Thyroid Hormones in U.S. Adults: Variation According to TPOAb and Iodine Status (NHANES 2007–2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Glenys M.; Rauch, Stephen A.; Marie, Nathalie Ste; Mattman, Andre; Lanphear, Bruce P.; Venners, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFASs) are suspected thyroid toxicants, but results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Objectives: We examined associations between serum PFASs and thyroid hormones (THs) in a representative, cross-sectional sample of U.S. adults. We hypothesized that people with high thyroid peroxidase antibodies and low iodine would be more susceptible to PFAS-induced thyroid disruption. Methods: Our sample included 1,525 adults (≥ 18 years) from the 2007–2008 NHANES study with available serum PFASs and THs. We examined associations between four serum PFASs [perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), perfluorononanoate (PFNA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)], and serum THs [free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), fT3/fT4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total T3 (TT3), and total T4 (TT4)] using multivariable linear regression. We stratified subjects into four groups by two indicators of thyroid “stress”: thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb ≥ 9 IU/mL) and iodine status (PFAS–TH associations were not modified by high TPOAb or low iodine alone. However, PFHxS and PFOS were negatively associated (p PFAS-associated thyroid disruption in a subset of U.S. adults with high TPOAb (a marker of autoimmune hypothyroidism) and low iodine status, who may represent a vulnerable subgroup. However, the small sample size, cross-sectional design, and possibility of reverse causation are limitations of this work. Citation: Webster GM, Rauch SA, Ste Marie N, Mattman A, Lanphear BP, Venners SA. 2016. Cross-sectional associations of serum perfluoroalkyl acids and thyroid hormones in U.S. adults: variation according to TPOAb and iodine status (NHANES 2007–2008). Environ Health Perspect 124:935–942; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409589 PMID:26517287

  3. Range conditions for a spherical mean transform

    KAUST Repository

    Agranovsky, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The paper is devoted to the range description of the Radon type transform that averages a function over all spheres centered on a given sphere. Such transforms arise naturally in thermoacoustic tomography, a novel method of medical imaging. Range descriptions have recently been obtained for such transforms, and consisted of smoothness and support conditions, moment conditions, and some additional orthogonality conditions of spectral nature. It has been noticed that in odd dimensions, surprisingly, the moment conditions are superfluous and can be eliminated. It is shown in this text that in fact the same happens in any dimension.

  4. Distributed chaos and inertial ranges in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that appearance of inertial range of scales, adjacent to distributed chaos range, results in adiabatic invariance of an energy correlation integral for isotropic homogeneous turbulence and for buoyancy driven turbulence (with stable or unstable stratification, including Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone). Power spectrum of velocity field for distributed chaos dominated by this adiabatic invariant has a stretched exponential form $\\propto \\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{3/5}$. Results of recent direct numerical simulations have been used in order to support these conclusions.

  5. Current Trends in Satellite Laser Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Appleby, G. M.; Kirchner, G.; McGarry, J.; Murphy, T.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pierron, F.

    2010-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) techniques are used to accurately measure the distance from ground stations to retroreflectors on satellites and the moon. SLR is one of the fundamental techniques that define the international Terrestrial Reference Frame (iTRF), which is the basis upon which we measure many aspects of global change over space, time, and evolving technology. It is one of the fundamental techniques that define at a level of precision of a few mm the origin and scale of the ITRF. Laser Ranging provides precision orbit determination and instrument calibration/validation for satellite-borne altimeters for the better understanding of sea level change, ocean dynamics, ice budget, and terrestrial topography. Laser ranging is also a tool to study the dynamics of the Moon and fundamental constants. Many of the GNSS satellites now carry retro-reflectors for improved orbit determination, harmonization of reference frames, and in-orbit co-location and system performance validation. The GNSS Constellations will be the means of making the reference frame available to worldwide users. Data and products from these measurements support key aspects of the GEOSS 10-Year implementation Plan adopted on February 16, 2005, The ITRF has been identified as a key contribution of the JAG to GEOSS and the ILRS makes a major contribution for its development since its foundation. The ILRS delivers weekly additional realizations that are accumulated sequentially to extend the ITRF and the Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) series with a daily resolution. Additional products are currently under development such as precise orbits of satellites, EOP with daily availability, low-degree gravitational harmonics for studies of Earth dynamics and kinematics, etc. SLR technology continues to evolve toward the next generation laser ranging systems as programmatic requirements become more stringent. Ranging accuracy is improving as higher repetition rate, narrower pulse lasers and faster

  6. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  7. New range of heavy electric vehicle chassis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    A new range of electrically-powered vehicles is announced in the UK. The vehicles are a joint venture between the Electric Vehicle Division of Hydrotechniek and its Dutch associate, Creusen Elektro-Mechanische Industrie BV. The 867S and 968S are three-axle vehicles with four-wheel drive on the rear four wheels. At present the vehicles go 20 km/h and have an 80-km range. The speed is to be extended in the near future and a diesel-electric hybrid may be introduced. An 867S is to be fitted out as a mobile library.

  8. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  9. Free Space Ranging Utilizing Chaotic Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report our recent works on free space ranging with chaotic light. Using a laser diode with optical feedback as chaotic source, a prototype of chaotic lidar has been developed and it can achieve a range-independent resolution of 18 cm and measurable distance of 130 m at least. And its antijamming performance is presented experimentally and numerically. Finally, we, respectively, employ the wavelet denoising method and the correlation average discrete-component elimination algorithm to detect the chaotic signal in noisy environment and suppress the side-lobe noise of the correlation trace.

  10. Bearings Only Air-to-Air Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-25

    TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessarv and identify WIock numberl FIELD GROUP’ SUB- GIR Air to Air RangingRange Estimationt Min..a simtr Passive...by uarget rnge sad direction or by observer motion in the statistical behavior of the 4.2 &Awo 0*l LA Sqvwnr. Rmng IoiamIin. Since it hu alredy bin...lengths, sad while they indicate irreularty in the estimation processt, they do nix explain its source. Figure 22, whMc as typical of whet can arise

  11. Adsorption Behavior of Amino Acids on a Stainless Steel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura; Mimura; Okamoto; Sakiyama; Nakanishi

    2000-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of various amino acids on a stainless steel surface was investigated at 30 degrees C and over a pH range of 3-10. Acidic and basic amino acids except histidine adsorbed remarkably at pH 3-4 and 7-10, respectively, and showed Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption isotherms were investigated to analyze the interactions between amino acids and adsorption sites on the stainless steel. Hydrophobic amino acids and glycine showed only small adsorbed amounts at all pHs tested. For the acidic and basic amino acids, reversibility of the absorption and the influence of the ionic strength on the adsorption behavior were examined. The adsorption isotherms of the derivatives of aspartic acid were also measured in order to examine the contribution of the carboxylic groups of acidic amino acids to the adsorption. Furthermore, a Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic analysis and semiempirical molecular orbital calculation were carried out to analyze the ionization states and the configuration of the amino acids adsorbed on a stainless steel surface. These investigations suggest that the acidic and basic amino acids adsorb through two electrostatic interactions of two ionized groups in the amino acid with a stainless steel surface. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Broiler Chickens 1: Factors Related to Flock Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-07-20

    Little is known about the ranging behaviour of chickens. Understanding ranging behaviour is required to improve management and shed and range design to ensure optimal ranging opportunities. Using Radio Frequency Identification technology, we tracked 300 individual broiler chickens in each of four mixed sex ROSS 308 flocks on one commercial farm across two seasons. Ranging behaviour was tracked from the first day of range access (21 days of age) until 35 days of age in winter and 44 days of age in summer. Range use was higher than previously reported from scan sampling studies. More chickens accessed the range in summer (81%) than winter (32%; p < 0.05). On average, daily frequency and duration of range use was greater in summer flocks (4.4 ± 0.1 visits for a total of 26.3 ± 0.8 min/day) than winter flocks (3.2 ± 0.2 visits for a total of 7.9 ± 1.0 min/day). Seasonal differences were only marginally explained by weather conditions and may reflect the reduction in range exposure between seasons (number of days, hours per day, and time of day). Specific times of the day (p < 0.01) and pop-holes were favoured (p < 0.05). We provide evidence of relationships between ranging and external factors that may explain ranging preferences.

  13. Range-based covariance estimation using high-frequency data: The realized co-range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Bannouh (Karim); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick); M.P.E. Martens (Martin)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce the realized co-range, utilizing intraday high-low price ranges to estimate asset return covariances. Using simulations we find that for plausible levels of bid-ask bounce and infrequent and non-synchronous trading the realized co-range improves upon the realized covariance,

  14. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  15. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  16. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  19. Folic Acid Production by Engineered Ashbya gossypii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Amatriain, Cristina; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; López-Nicolás, Rubén; Ros, Gaspar; Jiménez, Alberto; Revuelta, José Luis

    2016-11-01

    Folic acid (vitamin B9) is the common name of a number of chemically related compounds (folates), which play a central role as cofactors in one-carbon transfer reactions. Folates are involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of nucleotides and amino acids, as well as supplying methyl groups to a broad range of substrates, such as hormones, DNA, proteins, and lipids, as part of the methyl cycle. Humans and animals cannot synthesize folic acid and, therefore, need them in the diet. Folic acid deficiency is an important and underestimated problem of micronutrient malnutrition affecting billions of people worldwide. Therefore, the addition of folic acid as food additive has become mandatory in many countries thus contributing to a growing demand of the vitamin. At present, folic acid is exclusively produced by chemical synthesis despite its associated environmental burdens. In this work, we have metabolically engineered the industrial fungus Ashbya gossypii in order to explore its potential as a natural producer of folic acid. Overexpression of FOL genes greatly enhanced the synthesis of folates and identified GTP cyclohydrolase I as the limiting step. Metabolic flux redirection from competing pathways also stimulated folic acid production. Finally, combinatorial engineering synergistically increased the production of different bioactive forms of the folic vitamin. Overall, strains were constructed which produce 146-fold (6595µg/L) more vitamin than the wild-type and by far represents the highest yield reported. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Perfluoroalkyl substances measured in breast milk and child neuropsychological development in a Norwegian birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forns, J.; Iszatt, N.; White, R.A.; Mandal, S.; Sabaredzovic, A.; Lamoree, M.H.; Thomsen, C.; Haug, L.S.; Stigum, H.; Eggesbo, M.

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are chemicals with potential neurotoxic effects although the current evidence is still limited. This study investigated the association between perinatal exposure to perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and neuropsychological

  1. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R; Aksan, Alptekin; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2015-10-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Synthesis of rosmarinic acid analogues in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yibin; Jiang, Jingjie; Bi, Huiping; Yin, Hua; Liu, Shaowei; Liu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    To produce rosmarinic acid analogues in the recombinant Escherichia coli BLRA1, harboring a 4-coumarate: CoA ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana (At4CL) and a rosmarinic acid synthase from Coleus blumei (CbRAS). Incubation of the recombinant E. coli strain BLRA1 with exogenously supplied phenyllactic acid (PL) and analogues as acceptor substrates, and coumaric acid and analogues as donor substrates led to production of 18 compounds, including 13 unnatural RA analogues. This work demonstrates the viability of synthesizing a broad range of rosmarinic acid analogues in E. coli, and sheds new light on the substrate specificity of CbRAS.

  3. Historical Biogeography Using Species Geographical Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Ignacio; Keil, Petr; Jetz, Walter; Crawford, Forrest W

    2015-11-01

    Spatial variation in biodiversity is the result of complex interactions between evolutionary history and ecological factors. Methods in historical biogeography combine phylogenetic information with current species locations to infer the evolutionary history of a clade through space and time. A major limitation of most methods for historical biogeographic inference is the requirement of single locations for terminal lineages, reducing contemporary species geographical ranges to a point in two-dimensional space. In reality, geographic ranges usually show complex geographic patterns, irregular shapes, or discontinuities. In this article, we describe a method for phylogeographic analysis using polygonal species geographic ranges of arbitrary complexity. By integrating the geographic diversification process across species ranges, we provide a method to infer the geographic location of ancestors in a Bayesian framework. By modeling migration conditioned on a phylogenetic tree, this approach permits reconstructing the geographic location of ancestors through time. We apply this new method to the diversification of two neotropical bird genera, Trumpeters (Psophia) and Cinclodes ovenbirds. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method (called rase) in phylogeographic reconstruction of species ancestral locations and contrast our results with previous methods that compel researchers to reduce the distribution of species to one point in space. We discuss model extensions to enable a more general, spatially explicit framework for historical biogeographic analysis. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Resources and Long-Range Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Waldo E.

    1973-01-01

    The author argues that forecasts of quick depletion of resources in the environment as a result of overpopulation and increased usage may not be free from error. Ignorance still exists in understanding the recovery mechanisms of nature. Long-range forecasts are likely to be wrong in such situations. (PS)

  5. Medium-range fire weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.O. Roads; K. Ueyoshi; S.C. Chen; J. Alpert; F. Fujioka

    1991-01-01

    The forecast skill of theNational Meteorological Center's medium range forecast (MRF) numerical forecasts of fire weather variables is assessed for the period June 1,1988 to May 31,1990. Near-surface virtual temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and a derived fire weather index (FWI) are forecast well by the MRF model. However, forecast relative humidity has...

  6. Optimal Static Range Reporting in One Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2001-01-01

    a query interval, we present an optimal data structure with linear space cost and with query time linear in the number of integers reported. This result holds in the unit cost RAM model with word size w and a standard instruction set. We also present a linear space data structure for approximate range...

  7. RANGE ECONOMICS RESEARCH (THE NATIONAL INTEREST)

    OpenAIRE

    Crom, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing interest in range economics research calls for a more tightly defined set of issues and a menu of research projects addressing these issues. This paper identifies major issues of national importance followed by a brief description of suggested research projects.

  8. Short range radio research in Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    The research and education by the Telecommunication Engineering Group at the University of Twente is dedicated to physical layer topics in communications. Three research tracks have prominence: Short Range Radio, Microwave Photonics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility. Arjan is active in the Short

  9. African Journal of Range and Forage Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Range & Forage Science (previously known as Proceedings of the Grassland Society of Southern Africa and Journal of the Grassland Society of Southern Africa) is the leading rangeland and pastoral journal in Africa, and serves as an important reference for anyone interested in the management and ...

  10. Controlling a wide range of flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Servo-operated valve and two flowmeters allow accurate control over 1,900:1 flow-rate range. It was developed as part of laboratory instrument for measuring properties of confined fluids under conditions analogous to those encountered in deep drilling operations.

  11. Look Ahead: Long-Range Learning Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Faced with an unsteady economy and fluctuating learning needs, planning a learning strategy designed to last longer than the next six months can be a tall order. But a long-range learning plan can provide a road map for success. In this article, four companies (KPMG LLP, CarMax, DPR Construction, and EMC Corp.) describe their learning plans, and…

  12. Great Basin Experimental Range: Annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Durant McArthur; Bryce A. Richardson; Stanley G. Kitchen

    2013-01-01

    This annotated bibliography documents the research that has been conducted on the Great Basin Experimental Range (GBER, also known as the Utah Experiment Station, Great Basin Station, the Great Basin Branch Experiment Station, Great Basin Experimental Center, and other similar name variants) over the 102 years of its existence. Entries were drawn from the original...

  13. Extended-range order in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Egami, T.; Hu, Rui-Zhong [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Howells, W.S. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    A new type of order is identified in complex glasses, characterized by diffraction peaks at values of the wave vector below those typical of intermediate-range order. Combined neutron and anomalous x-ray diffraction studies of one glass exhibiting this behavior, vitreous rubidium germanate, indicate it to be associated with chemical ordering of the two cations with respect to each other.

  14. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    research, tsunami warning/verification, and seismic / earthquake monitoring. The littoral nature of Navy training ranges and the unique types of...training. `` Completed Phases 1 (Mountainside Village) and 2 (Hillside Tunnels ) of four-phase urban training complex plan. Ongoing Progress

  15. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    research, climate research, tsunami warning/ verification, and seismic /earthquake monitoring. The littoral nature of Navy training ranges and the unique...Mountainside Village) and 2 (Hillside Tunnels ) of four-phase urban training complex plan. Ongoing Progress continuing into 2014. 252014 Sustainable

  16. Antenna induced range smearing in MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, B. J.; Johnston, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing stratosphere troposphere (ST) and mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars for higher resolution to study small-scale turbulent structures and waves. At present most ST and MST radars have resolutions of 150 meters or larger, and are not able to distinguish the thin (40 - 100 m) turbulent layers that are known to occur in the troposphere and stratosphere, and possibly in the mesosphere. However the antenna beam width and sidelobe level become important considerations for radars with superior height resolution. The objective of this paper is to point out that for radars with range resolutions of about 150 meters or less, there may be significant range smearing of the signals from mesospheric altitudes due to the finite beam width of the radar antenna. At both stratospheric and mesospheric heights the antenna sidelobe level for lear equally spaced phased arrays may also produce range aliased signals. To illustrate this effect the range smearing functions for two vertically directed antennas have been calculated, (1) an array of 32 coaxial-collinear strings each with 48 elements that simulates the vertical beam of the Poker Flat, Glaska, MST radar; and (2) a similar, but smaller, array of 16 coaxial-collinear strings each with 24 elements.

  17. Host range evaluation and morphological characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 29 isolates of Pseudoperonospora cubensis were collected from various cucurbit farms in West Malaysia. Sporangia of 13 isolates had the ability to germinate at 14°C and were used for host range (pathotype) study using leaf disc assay on a set of twelve cucurbit cultivars. Twelve different pathotypes of P. cubensis ...

  18. Engineering Biosensors with Dual Programmable Dynamic Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benmei; Zhang, Juntao; Ou, Xiaowen; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2018-01-10

    Although extensively used in all fields of chemistry, molecular recognition still suffers from a significant limitation: host-guest binding displays a fixed, hyperbolic dose-response curve, which limits its usefulness in many applications. Here we take advantage of the high programmability of DNA chemistry and propose a universal strategy to engineer biorecognition-based sensors with dual programmable dynamic ranges. Using DNA aptamers as our model recognition element and electrochemistry as our readout signal, we first designed a dual signaling "signal-on" and "signal-off" adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sensor composed of a ferrocene-labeled ATP aptamer in complex to a complementary, electrode-bound, methylene-blue labeled DNA. Using this simple "dimeric" sensor, we show that we can easily (1) tune the dynamic range of this dual-signaling sensor through base mutations on the electrode-bound DNA, (2) extend the dynamic range of this sensor by 2 orders of magnitude by using a combination of electrode-bound strands with varying affinity for the aptamers, (3) create an ultrasensitive dual signaling sensor by employing a sequestration strategy in which a nonsignaling, high affinity "depletant" DNA aptamer is added to the sensor surface, and (4) engineer a sensor that simultaneously provides extended and ultrasensitive readouts. These strategies, applicable to a wide range of biosensors and chemical systems, should broaden the application of molecular recognition in various fields of chemistry.

  19. Noncovalent-bonded 1D-3D supramolecular architectures from 2-methylquinoline/quinoline with monocarboxylic acid and dicarboxylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjun; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Li; Ye, XiangHang; Zheng, Lu; Li, JingWen; Jin, BinPeng; Wang, Daqi

    2014-10-01

    Studies concentrating on noncovalent weak interactions between the organic base of 2-methylquinoline/quinoline, and carboxylic acid derivatives have led to an increased understanding of the role 2-methylquinoline/quinoline have in binding with carboxylic acids. Here anhydrous multicomponent organic acid-base adducts of 2-methylquinoline/quinoline have been prepared with carboxylic acids that ranged from monocarboxylic acid to dicarboxylic acid such as p-nitrobenzoic acid, (4-chloro-phenoxy)-acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 5-bromosalicylic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, and 4-nitrophthalic acid. The seven crystalline complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, m.p., and elemental analysis. These structures adopted the hetero supramolecular synthons. Analysis of the crystal packing of 1-7 suggests that there are Nsbnd H⋯O, Osbnd H⋯N, and Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) between the acid and quinoline moieties in the studied compounds. Except the classical hydrogen bonding interactions, the secondary propagating interactions also play important roles in structure extension. These weak interactions combined, these compounds displayed 1D-3D framework structure.

  20. Inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in wider size range and aspect ratio range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-spherical particle sizing is very important in the aerosol science, and it can be determined by the light extinction measurement. This paper studies the effect of relationship of the size range and aspect ratio range on the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution by the dependent mode algorithm. The T matrix method and the geometric optics approximation method are used to calculate the extinction efficiency of the spheroids with different size range and aspect ratio range, and the inversion of spheroid particle size distribution in these different ranges is conducted. Numerical simulation indicates that a fairly reasonable representation of the spheroid particle size distribution can be obtained when the size range and aspect ratio range are suitably chosen.

  1. Comparison of range migration correction algorithms for range-Doppler processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Faruk

    2017-07-01

    The next generation digital radars are able to provide high-range resolution by the advancement of radar hardware technologies. These systems take advantage of coherent integration and Doppler processing technique to increase the target's signal-to-noise ratio. Due to the high-range resolution (small range cells) and fast target motion, a target migrates through multiple range cells within a coherent processing interval. Range cell migration (also known as range walk) occurs and degrades the coherent integration gain. There are many approaches in the literature to correct these unavoidable effects and focus the target in the range-Doppler domain. We demonstrate some of these methods on an operational frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar and point out practical issues in the application.

  2. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  3. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  4. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  5. Visual Control of Robots Using Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Torres

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, 3D-vision systems based on the time-of-flight (ToF principle have gained more importance in order to obtain 3D information from the workspace. In this paper, an analysis of the use of 3D ToF cameras to guide a robot arm is performed. To do so, an adaptive method to simultaneous visual servo control and camera calibration is presented. Using this method a robot arm is guided by using range information obtained from a ToF camera. Furthermore, the self-calibration method obtains the adequate integration time to be used by the range camera in order to precisely determine the depth information.

  6. Orthogonal Range Searching on the RAM, Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Larsen, Kasper Green; Patrascu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    We present a number of new results on one of the most extensively studied topics in computational geometry, orthogonal range searching. All our results are in the standard word RAM model: We present two data structures for 2-d orthogonal range emptiness. The first achieves O(n lg lg n) space and O...... the output size. This resolves two open problems (both appeared in Preparata and Shamos' seminal book): given a set of n axis-aligned rectangles in the plane, we can report all k enclosure pairs (i.e., pairs (r1,r2) where rectangle r1 completely encloses rectangle r2) in O(n lg n + k) expected time; given...

  7. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  8. Space Weather Effects on Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    War II, with heavy reliance on radar and radio as war-fighting tools, we encountered unexplained outages. You may have seen movies showing soldiers...individual meteorology offices, and the issues that each range might possibly encounter. You may have radars that can be directly affected by solar radio...may interact with atomic nuclei thus imparting a certain recoil energy and generating secondary particles. Both the recoiling nucleus and secondary

  9. Ranges of bimodule projections and conditional expectations

    CERN Document Server

    Pluta, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The algebraic theory of corner subrings introduced by Lam (as an abstraction of the properties of Peirce corners eRe of a ring R associated with an idempotent e in R) is investigated here in the context of Banach and C*-algebras. We propose a general algebraic approach which includes the notion of ranges of (completely) contractive conditional expectations on C*-algebras and on ternary rings of operators, and we investigate when topological properties are consequences of the algebraic assumpt...

  10. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay GORBACHUK; Mikhail LARIONOV; Aleksey FIRSOV; Nikolay SHATIL

    2014-01-01

    Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors) make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resis...

  11. Reference Physiological Ranges for Serum Biochemical Parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After complete assay, the data were subjected to both parametric and non parametric statistics for analyses with 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles considered as the lower and upper limits of reference ranges. Results: There were 331(66.1%) males and 170(33.9) females, with 359(71.7%) and 142(28.3) of them residing in the urban ...

  12. Short Rayleigh Range Free Electron Laser Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Wang, X J; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    An important requirement for a high average power laser system is a manageable power density on the first optical element. One possibility to achieve this is a single pass amplifier which generates a short Rayleigh range (SRL) light beam. We present design parameters and calculated performances for several SRL configurations. These include a simulation of the optically guided (pinched) MW class FEL [1], the scalloped beam FEL amplifier [2] and high gain TOK amplifiers we propose to explore at our SDL facility.

  13. Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Capacitive proximity sensor on robot arm detects nearby object via capacitive effect of object on frequency of oscillator. Sensing element part of oscillator circuit operating at about 20 kHz. Total capacitance between sensing element and ground constitutes tuning capacitance of oscillator. Sensor circuit includes shield driven by replica of alternating voltage applied to sensing element. Driven shield concentrates sensing electrostatic field in exterior region to enhance sensitivity to object. Sensitivity and dynamic range has corresponding 12-to-1 improvement.

  14. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Services (IGI&S) data proponency, Common Installation Picture, and Quality Assurance Plans ( QAPs ). Based on this guidance, all Army installations are...Sustainable Ranges Report July 2011 Support Center are defined in each layer’s geospatial data QAP . QAPs provide the definition, information about the...requirements for each of the data layers. QAPs are living documents and are maintained by the HQDA proponent with input from the installation data

  15. On the ranges of discrete exponentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Caragiu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Let a>1 be a fixed integer. We prove that there is no first-order formula ϕ(X in one free variable X, written in the language of rings, such that for any prime p with gcd(a,p=1 the set of all elements in the finite prime field Fp satisfying ϕ coincides with the range of the discrete exponential function t↦at(modp.

  16. On the ranges of discrete exponentials

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Caragiu; Mihai Caragiu

    2004-01-01

    Let a>1 be a fixed integer. We prove that there is no first-order formula ϕ(X) in one free variable X, written in the language of rings, such that for any prime p with gcd(a,p)=1 the set of all elements in the finite prime field Fp satisfying ϕ coincides with the range of the discrete exponential function t↦at(modp).

  17. Range of motion and cervical myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, J; Niederer, D; Fleckenstein, J; Vogt, L; Banzer, W

    2016-01-01

    Several studies investigating myofascial pain syndrome include assessments of range of motion (ROM) as a diagnostic criterion. However, the value of ROM in this context has not yet been evaluated in controlled clinical studies. We aimed to examine whether patients with myofascial pain syndrome display alterations of ROM when compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-two individuals (13 females, 9 males; aged 33.4 ± 13.9 yrs) afflicted with active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle as well as 22 age and sex matched healthy controls were included. All subjects underwent an examination of maximal active cervical ROM in flexion/extension assessed by means of a 3D ultrasonic movement analysis system (30 Hz; Zebris CMS 70). In the patients group, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the trigger points was determined using a pressure algometer. Maximum range of motion in the sagittal plane did not differ between individuals with MTrP (125.9 ± 23.2°, 95% CI: 116.2-135.6°) and asymptomatic subjects (128.2 ± 20.4°, 95% CI: 119.7-136.7°; p > .05). In patients, PPT (1.7 ± .6, 95% CI: 1.5-1.9) was not correlated with cervical mobility (r = -.13; p > .05). Based on these pilot data, range of motion in flexion/extension is not a valid criterion for the detection of myofascial trigger points. Additional research incorporating movement amplitudes in other anatomical planes and additional afflicted muscles should be conducted in order to further delineate the relative impact of MTrP on range of motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Depigmenting Effect of Kojic Acid Esters in Hyperpigmented B16F1 Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Firdaus B. Lajis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The depigmenting effect of kojic acid esters synthesized by the esterification of kojic acid using Rhizomucor miehei immobilized lipase was investigated in B16F1 melanoma cells. The depigmenting effect of kojic acid and kojic acid esters was evaluated by the inhibitory effect of melanin formation and tyrosinase activity on alpha-stimulating hormone- (α-MSH- induced melanin synthesis in B16F1 melanoma cells. The cellular tyrosinase inhibitory effect of kojic acid monooleate, kojic acid monolaurate, and kojic acid monopalmitate was found similar to kojic acid at nontoxic doses ranging from 1.95 to 62.5 μg/mL. However, kojic acid monopalmitate gave slightly higher inhibition to melanin formation compared to other inhibitors at doses ranging from 15.63 to 62.5 μg/mL. Kojic acid and kojic acid esters also show antioxidant activity that will enhance the depigmenting effect. The cytotoxicity of kojic acid esters in B16F1 melanoma cells was significantly lower than kojic acid at high doses, ranging from 125 and 500 μg/mL. Since kojic acid esters have lower cytotoxic effect than kojic acid, it is suggested that kojic acid esters can be used as alternatives for a safe skin whitening agent and potential depigmenting agents to treat hyperpigmentation.

  19. Long-range order in canary song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jeffrey E; Ivie, Elizabeth; Kligler, Laura; Gardner, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Bird songs range in form from the simple notes of a Chipping Sparrow to the rich performance of the nightingale. Non-adjacent correlations can be found in the syntax of some birdsongs, indicating that the choice of what to sing next is determined not only by the current syllable, but also by previous syllables sung. Here we examine the song of the domesticated canary, a complex singer whose song consists of syllables, grouped into phrases that are arranged in flexible sequences. Phrases are defined by a fundamental time-scale that is independent of the underlying syllable duration. We show that the ordering of phrases is governed by long-range rules: the choice of what phrase to sing next in a given context depends on the history of the song, and for some syllables, highly specific rules produce correlations in song over timescales of up to ten seconds. The neural basis of these long-range correlations may provide insight into how complex behaviors are assembled from more elementary, stereotyped modules.

  20. A Computational Approach to Competitive Range Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Markus F.; Poxleitner, Gabriele; Hebisch, Elke; Frey, Erwin; Opitz, Madeleine

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial communities represent complex and dynamic ecological systems. Environmental conditions and microbial interactions determine whether a bacterial strain survives an expansion to new territory. In our work, we studied competitive range expansions in a model system of three Escherichia coli strains. In this system, a colicin producing strain competed with a colicin resistant, and with a colicin sensitive strain for new territory. Genetic engineering allowed us to tune the strains' growth rates and to study their expansion in distinct ecological scenarios (with either cyclic or hierarchical dominance). The control over growth rates also enabled us to construct and to validate a predictive computational model of the bacterial dynamics. The model rested on an agent-based, coarse-grained description of the expansion process and we conducted independent experiments on the growth of single-strain colonies for its parametrization. Furthermore, the model considered the long-range nature of the toxin interaction between strains. The integration of experimental analysis with computational modeling made it possible to quantify how the level of biodiversity depends on the interplay between bacterial growth rates, the initial composition of the inoculum, and the toxin range.