WorldWideScience

Sample records for range gated imaging

  1. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments.

  2. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  3. Range-Image Acquisition for Discriminated Objects in a Range-gated Robot Vision System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Nak-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The imaging capability of a surveillance vision system from harsh low-visibility environments such as in fire and detonation areas is a key function to monitor the safety of the facilities. 2D and range image data acquired from low-visibility environment are important data to assess the safety and prepare appropriate countermeasures. Passive vision systems, such as conventional camera and binocular stereo vision systems usually cannot acquire image information when the reflected light is highly scattered and absorbed by airborne particles such as fog. In addition, the image resolution captured through low-density airborne particles is decreased because the image is blurred and dimmed by the scattering, emission and absorption. Active vision systems, such as structured light vision and projected stereo vision are usually more robust for harsh environment than passive vision systems. However, the performance is considerably decreased in proportion to the density of the particles. The RGI system provides 2D and range image data from several RGI images and it moreover provides clear images from low-visibility fog and smoke environment by using the sum of time-sliced images. Nowadays, the Range-gated (RG) imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security applications, especially in the visualization of invisible night and fog environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is, nowadays becoming more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of its compact portable configuration. In contrast to passive vision systems, this technology enables operation even in harsh environments like fog and smoke. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been

  4. Design and implementation of range-gated underwater laser imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wei-long; Zhang, Xiao-hui

    2014-02-01

    A range-gated underwater laser imaging system is designed and implemented in this article, which is made up of laser illumination subsystem, photoelectric imaging subsystem and control subsystem. The experiment of underwater target drone detection has been done, the target of distance 40m far from the range-gated underwater laser imaging system can be imaged in the pool which water attenuation coefficient is 0.159m-1. Experimental results show that the range-gated underwater laser imaging system can detect underwater objects effectively.

  5. The application of camera calibration in range-gated 3D imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-quan; Wang, Xian-wei; Zhou, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Range-gated laser imaging technology was proposed in 1966 by LF Gillespiethe in U.S. Army Night Vision Laboratory(NVL). Using pulse laser and intensified charge-coupled device(ICCD) as light source and detector respectively, range-gated laser imaging technology can realize space-slice imaging while restraining the atmospheric backs-catter, and in turn detect the target effectively, by controlling the delay between the laser pulse and strobe. Owing to the constraints of the development of key components such as narrow pulse laser and gated imaging devices, the research has been progressed slowly in the next few decades. Until the beginning of this century, as the hardware technology continues to mature, this technology has developed rapidly in fields such as night vision, underwater imaging, biomedical imaging, three-dimensional imaging, especially range-gated three-dimensional(3-D) laser imaging field purposing of access to target spatial information. 3-D reconstruction is the processing of restoration of 3-D objects visible surface geometric structure from three-dimensional(2-D) image. Range-gated laser imaging technology can achieve gated imaging of slice space to form a slice image, and in turn provide the distance information corresponding to the slice image. But to inverse the information of 3-D space, we need to obtain the imaging visual field of system, that is, the focal length of the system. Then based on the distance information of the space slice, the spatial information of each unit space corresponding to each pixel can be inversed. Camera calibration is an indispensable step in 3-D reconstruction, including analysis of the internal structure of camera parameters and the external parameters . In order to meet the technical requirements of the range-gated 3-D imaging, this paper intends to study the calibration of the zoom lens system. After summarizing the camera calibration technique comprehensively, a classic calibration method based on line is

  6. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  7. Moving target detection in flash mode against stroboscopic mode by active range-gated laser imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanyu; Wang, Xinwei; Sun, Liang; Fan, Songtao; Lei, Pingshun; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2018-01-01

    Moving target detection is important for the application of target tracking and remote surveillance in active range-gated laser imaging. This technique has two operation modes based on the difference of the number of pulses per frame: stroboscopic mode with the accumulation of multiple laser pulses per frame and flash mode with a single shot of laser pulse per frame. In this paper, we have established a range-gated laser imaging system. In the system, two types of lasers with different frequency were chosen for the two modes. Electric fan and horizontal sliding track were selected as the moving targets to compare the moving blurring between two modes. Consequently, the system working in flash mode shows more excellent performance in motion blurring against stroboscopic mode. Furthermore, based on experiments and theoretical analysis, we presented the higher signal-to-noise ratio of image acquired by stroboscopic mode than flash mode in indoor and underwater environment.

  8. Polarized Imaging Lidar Using Underwater Range Gating in a Multifunctional Remote Sensing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, G.; Trees, C.

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the design of a compact imaging underwater polarized LIDAR system using a new modular laser beam shaping technology, which ensures eye safe operation at significant optical power levels that were previously unattainable in such an eye safe mode. The system is based on an existing battery powered high efficiency compact range-gated system which can be operated from a variety of underwater vehicles including AUV's. A detailed analysis is presented of the procedure required to successfully extract information on the depth distribution of the inherent optical properties along with the shape of the phase function in the near forward direction. The effect of polarization in helping to constrain and improve the retrieval of these fundamental optical properties of the water column is also discussed. The LIDAR mode is shown to be only one of the many functionalities useful to oceanographic research, which can be implemented using the beam shaping technology described above. Beyond the improvement in range and image quality of gated imaging over conventional imaging in turbid waters, the application of gated-structured imaging can be shown to significantly improve range and precision of 3D bottom mapping near the turbid seabed environment. We will show that the spatial precision that is available is sufficient for seabed habitat mapping and litter identification required for an environmental impact evaluation.

  9. Influence of the particle size on polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of size of the scatterer on the image contrast for polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media is investigated here by Monte Carlo method. Circularly polarized light would be more efficient to eliminate the noise photons for both the isotropic medium as well as the anisotropic medium, as compared with linearly polarized light. The improvement in contrast is pronounced for isotropic medium using either linear or circular polarization. The plausible explanations for these observations are also presented.

  10. A new compact, cost-efficient concept for underwater range-gated imaging: the UTOFIA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Quincoces, Iñaki; Galparsoro, Ibon; Bald, Juan; Gabiña, Gorka; Visser, Andy; Jónasdóttir, Sigrun; Haugholt, Karl Henrik; Thorstensen, Jostein; Risholm, Petter; Thielemann, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Underwater Time Of Flight Image Acquisition system (UTOFIA) is a recently launched H2020 project (H2020 - 633098) to develop a compact and cost-effective underwater imaging system especially suited for observations in turbid environments. The UTOFIA project targets technology that can overcome the limitations created by scattering, by introducing cost-efficient range-gated imaging for underwater applications. This technology relies on a image acquisition principle that can extends the imaging range of the cameras 2-3 times respect to other cameras. Moreover, the system will simultaneously capture 3D information of the observed objects. Today range-gated imaging is not widely used, as it relies on specialised optical components making systems large and costly. Recent technology developments have made it possible a significant (2-3 times) reduction in size, complexity and cost of underwater imaging systems, whilst addressing the scattering issues at the same time. By acquiring simultaneous 3D data, the system allows to accurately measure the absolute size of marine life and their spatial relationship to their habitat, enhancing the precision of fish stock monitoring and ecology assessment, hence supporting proper management of marine resources. Additionally, the larger observed volume and the improved image quality make the system suitable for cost-effective underwater surveillance operations in e.g. fish farms, underwater infrastructures. The system can be integrated into existing ocean observatories for real time acquisition and can greatly advance present efforts in developing species recognition algorithms, given the additional features provided, the improved image quality and the independent illumination source based on laser. First applications of the most recent prototype of the imaging system will be provided including inspection of underwater infrastructures and observations of marine life under different environmental conditions.

  11. Multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle in the accumulation mode for three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2017-01-20

    Having laid the foundations of the multiple-wavelength range-gated active imaging principle in flash mode in a previous paper, we have been studying its use in accumulation mode. Whatever the mode, the principle consists of restoring the 3D scene directly in a single image at the moment of recording with a camera. Each emitted light pulse with a different wavelength corresponds to a visualized zone with a different distance in the scene. So each of these visualized zones is identified by a different wavelength. In flash mode, the camera shutter opens just once during the emission of light pulses with the different wavelengths. However, the energy constraints to restore scenes in three dimensions can lead to a change in the recording mode when moving from the flash mode to the accumulation mode. In this mode, the cycle, including a series of light pulses with the used wavelengths and an aperture of the camera shutter, is repeated several times for a given image recorded with the intensified camera. Each wavelength always corresponds to a visualized slice with a different distance in the scene. So, the accumulation enables increasing the illumination of every visualized slice. The modeling conducted in the previous paper must be completed to adapt it to this mode. The tests with a multiple-wavelength laser source confirmed the quality improvement of the recorded images for more remote scenes and validated the principle of restoring, directly in a color image, the three dimensions of a scene.

  12. 3D range-gated super-resolution imaging based on stereo matching for moving platforms and targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan

    2017-11-01

    3D range-gated superresolution imaging is a novel 3D reconstruction technique for target detection and recognition with good real-time performance. However, for moving targets or platforms such as airborne, shipborne, remote operated vehicle and autonomous vehicle, 3D reconstruction has a large error or failure. In order to overcome this drawback, we propose a method of stereo matching for 3D range-gated superresolution reconstruction algorithm. In experiment, the target is a doll of Mario with a height of 38cm at the location of 34m, and we obtain two successive frame images of the Mario. To confirm our method is effective, we transform the original images with translation, rotation, scale and perspective, respectively. The experimental result shows that our method has a good result of 3D reconstruction for moving targets or platforms.

  13. Electro-optic modulation methods in range-gated active imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Bo; Liu, Enhai; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-01-20

    A time-resolved imaging method based on electro-optic modulation is proposed in this paper. To implement range resolution, two kinds of polarization-modulated methods are designed, and high spatial and range resolution can be achieved by the active imaging system. In the system, with polarization beam splitting the incident light is split into two parts, one of which is modulated with cos(2) function and the other is modulated with sin(2) function. Afterward, a depth map can be obtained from two simultaneously received images by dual electron multiplying charge-coupled devices. Furthermore, an intensity image can also be obtained from the two images. Comparisons of the two polarization-modulated methods indicate that range accuracy will be promoted when the polarized light is modulated before beam splitting.

  14. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  15. Range-Gated LADAR Coherent Imaging Using Parametric Up-Conversion of IR and NIR Light for Imaging with a Visible-Range Fast-Shuttered Intensified Digital CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Research is presented on infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) sensitive sensor technologies for use in a high speed shuttered/intensified digital video camera system for range-gated imaging at ''eye-safe'' wavelengths in the region of 1.5 microns. The study is based upon nonlinear crystals used for second harmonic generation (SHG) in optical parametric oscillators (OPOS) for conversion of NIR and IR laser light to visible range light for detection with generic S-20 photocathodes. The intensifiers are ''stripline'' geometry 18-mm diameter microchannel plate intensifiers (MCPIIS), designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPIIS are designed for fast optical shattering with exposures in the 100-200 ps range, and are coupled to a fast readout CCD camera. Conversion efficiency and resolution for the wavelength conversion process are reported. Experimental set-ups for the wavelength shifting and the optical configurations for producing and transporting laser reflectance images are discussed.

  16. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  17. Development of a Compact Range-gated Vision System to Monitor Structures in Low-visibility Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Lyul; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Image acquisition in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, automatic vision system to monitor structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments such as the places of a fire and detonation is essential. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog and dust. To overcome the imaging distortion caused by obstacle materials, robust vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination through disturbance materials. One of active vision system is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from the blurred and darken light environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and range image data is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through disturbance materials, such as smoke particles and dust particles. In contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology enables operation even in harsh environments like low-visibility smoky environment. In this paper, a compact range-gated vision system is developed to monitor structures in low-visibility environment. The system consists of illumination light, a range-gating camera and a control computer. Visualization experiments are carried out in low-visibility foggy environment to see imaging capability.

  18. Time-gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering. Our studies on the contrast of time-gated ... Time-gated imaging; stimulated Raman scattering; image contrast. PACS Nos 42.30.-d; 42.65. ... scattering medium as compared to the ballistic or snake-like components, which essentially travel in the ...

  19. Modeling gated neutron images of THD capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Douglas Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grim, Gary P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilke, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, George L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loomis, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilde, Carl H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Tai - Sen F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Danly, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, Steven H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patel, M [LLNL; Sepke, S [LLNL; Hatarik, R [LLNL; Fittinghoff, D [LLNL; Bower, D [LLNL; Marinak, M [LLNL; Munro, D [LLNL; Moran, M [LLNL; Hilko, R [NSTEC; Frank, M [LLNL; Buckles, R [NSTEC

    2010-01-01

    Time gating a neutron detector 28m from a NIF implosion can produce images at different energies. The brighter image near 14 MeV reflects the size and symmetry of the capsule 'hot spot'. Scattered neutrons, {approx}9.5-13 MeV, reflect the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only {approx}1-7% of the neutrons. The gated detector records both the scattered neutron image, and, to a good approximation, an attenuated copy of the primary image left by scintillator decay. By modeling the imaging system the energy band for the scattered neutron image (10-12 MeV) can be chosen, trading off the decayed primary image and the decrease of scattered image brightness with energy. Modeling light decay from EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A leads to a preference from BCF99-55 for the first NIF detector, but DPAC 30 and Liquid A would be preferred if incorporated into a system. Measurement of the delayed light from the NIF scintillator using implosions at the Omega laser shows BCF99-55 to be a good choice for down-scattered imaging at 28m.

  20. Motion-gated acquisition for in vivo optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Hutteman, Merlijn; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-11-01

    Wide-field continuous wave fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime imaging, frequency domain photon migration, and spatially modulated imaging have the potential to provide quantitative measurements in vivo. However, most of these techniques have not yet been successfully translated to the clinic due to challenging environmental constraints. In many circumstances, cardiac and respiratory motion greatly impair image quality and/or quantitative processing. To address this fundamental problem, we have developed a low-cost, field-programmable gate array-based, hardware-only gating device that delivers a phase-locked acquisition window of arbitrary delay and width that is derived from an unlimited number of pseudo-periodic and nonperiodic input signals. All device features can be controlled manually or via USB serial commands. The working range of the device spans the extremes of mouse electrocardiogram (1000 beats per minute) to human respiration (4 breaths per minute), with timing resolution pig heart. This gating device should help to enable the clinical translation of promising new optical imaging technologies.

  1. Coherent interferometric imaging, time gating and beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcea, Liliana; Garnier, Josselin; Papanicolaou, George; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2011-06-01

    Coherent interferometric imaging is based on the backpropagation of local spacetime cross-correlations of array data and was introduced in order to improve images when the medium between the array and the object to be imaged is inhomogeneous and unknown (Borcea et al 2005 Inverse Problems 21 1419). Although this method has been shown to be effective and is well founded theoretically, the coherent interferometric imaging function is computationally expensive and therefore difficult to use. In this paper, we show that this function is equivalent to a windowed beamformer energy function, that is, a quadratic function that involves only time gating and time delaying signals in emission and in reception. In this form the coherent interferometric imaging can be implemented efficiently both in hardware and software, that is, at a computational cost that is comparable to the usual beamforming and migration imaging methods. We also revisit the trade-off between enhanced image stability and loss of resolution in coherent interferometry from the point of view of its equivalence to a windowed beamformer energy imaging function.

  2. The role of image guidance in respiratory gated radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Fredberg Persson, Gitte

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory gating for radiotherapy beam delivery is a widely available technique, manufactured and sold by most of the major radiotherapy machine vendors. Respiratory gated beam delivery is intended to limit the irradiation of tumours moving with respiration to selected parts of the respiratory...... is therefore of utmost importance for the safe introduction of respiratory gating. In this short overview, suitable image guidance strategies for respiratory gated radiotherapy are reviewed for two cancer sites; breast cancer and lung tumours....

  3. Image Filtering with Field Programmable Gate Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Šlenderis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The research examined the use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGA in image filtering. Experimental and theoretical researches were reviewed. Experiments with Cyclone III family FPGA chip with implemented NIOS II soft processor were considered. Image filtering was achieved with symmetrical and asymmetrical finite impulse response filters with convolution kernel. The system, which was implemented with 3×3 symmetrical filter, which was implemented using the hardware description language, uses 59% of logic elements of the chip and 10 multiplication elements. The system with asymmetrical filter uses the same amount of logic elements and 13 multiplication elements. Both filter systems consume approx. 545 mW of power. The system, which is designed for filter implementation in C language, uses 65% of all logical elements and consumes 729 mW of power.Article in Lithuanian

  4. Reference Range of Functional Data of Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Quantitative Gated SPECT of Cedars-Sinai and 4D-MSPECT of Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Various programs have been developed for gating of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Among the those program, the most popular program is the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS)? developed by Cedars-Sinai hospital and most recently released program is 4D-MSPECT? developed by university of Michigan. It is important to know the reference range of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT because it is necessary to determine abnormality of individual patient and echocardiographic data is different from those of gated SPECT. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT image was reconstructed by dual head gamma camera (Siemens, BCAM, esoft) as routine procedure and analyzed using QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program. All patients (M: F=9: 18, Age 69{+-}9 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded: previous angina or MI history, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes melitius, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain, hypertension and cardiomyopathy. Pre-test likelihood of all patients was low. (1) In stress gated SPECT by QGS?, EDV was 73{+-}25 ml, ESV 25{+-}14 ml, EF 67{+-}11 % and area of first frame of gating 106.4{+-}21cm{sup 2}. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 76{+-}26 ml, ESV 27{+-}15 ml, EF 66{+-}12 and area of first frame of gating 108{+-}20cm{sup 2}. (2) In stress gated SPECT by 4D-MSPECT?, EDV was 76{+-}28 ml, ESV 23{+-}16 ml, EF 72{+-}11 %, mass 115{+-}24 g and ungated volume 42{+-}15 ml. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 75{+-}27 ml, ESV 23{+-}12 ml, EF 71{+-}9%, mass 113{+-}25g and ungate dvolume 42{+-}15 ml, (3) s-EDV, s-EF, r-ESV and r-EF were significantly different between QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? (each p=0.016, p<0.001. p=0.003 and p=0.001). We determined the normal reference range of functional parameters by QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program to diagnose individually the abnormality of patients. And the reference ranges have to adopted to be patients by each specific gating program.

  5. Image quality in non-gated versus gated reconstruction of tongue motion using magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison using automated image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvey, Christopher; Orphanidou, C.; Coleman, J.; McIntyre, A.; Golding, S.; Kochanski, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    The use of gated or ECG triggered MR is a well-established technique and developments in coil technology have enabled this approach to be applied to areas other than the heart. However, the image quality of gated (ECG or cine) versus non-gated or real-time has not been extensively evaluated in the mouth. We evaluate two image sequences by developing an automatic image processing technique which compares how well the image represents known anatomy. Four subjects practised experimental poly-syllabic sentences prior to MR scanning. Using a 1.5 T MR unit, we acquired comparable gated (using an artificial trigger) and non-gated sagittal images during speech. We then used an image processing algorithm to model the image grey along lines that cross the airway. Each line involved an eight parameter non-linear equation to model of proton densities, edges, and dimensions. Gated and non-gated images show similar spatial resolution, with non-gated images being slightly sharper (10% better resolution, less than 1 pixel). However, the gated sequences generated images of substantially lower inherent noise, and substantially better discrimination between air and tissue. Additionally, the gated sequences demonstrate a very much greater temporal resolution. Overall, image quality is better with gated imaging techniques, especially given their superior temporal resolution. Gated techniques are limited by the repeatability of the motions involved, and we have shown that speech to a metronome can be sufficiently repeatable to allow high-quality gated magnetic resonance imaging images. We suggest that gated sequences may be useful for evaluating other types of repetitive movement involving the joints and limb motions. (orig.)

  6. Accumulation mode laser range-gated viewing in the eye-safe spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Yves; Bacher, Emmanuel; Schertzer, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    A laser range-gated viewing experiment in the eye-safe spectral region is demonstrated where a semiconductor based laser illuminator is associated with a corresponding image detector able to operate in high frequency and high sensitivity shutter mode. After experimental validations of the camera developed for accumulation operation, a high power semiconductor based illuminator has been designed and realized. This technology can be used to develop efficient, compact and high average power SWIR illuminators. Images of different scenes were recorded in a test tunnel and the results are compared to those recorded simultaneously with a solid state based laser illuminator working in flash mode. Both results are similar in terms of image intensity whereas semiconductor based recordings exhibits lower speckle noise and better homogeneity. These results open new opportunities for compact and efficient SWIR active imaging systems.

  7. Time-gated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we report the development of experimental set-up for timegated optical imaging through turbid media using stimulated Raman scattering. Our studies on the contrast of time-gated images show that for a given optical thickness, the image contrast is better for sample with lower scattering coefficient and higher ...

  8. Self-gated cardiac cine imaging using phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyunseok; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changheun; Park, HyunWook

    2017-03-01

    To obtain multiphase cardiac cine images with high resolution, a novel self-gating method for both cardiac and respiratory motions is proposed. The proposed method uses the phase of projection data obtained from a separate axial slice to measure cardiac and respiratory motion, after the acquisition of every k-space line in the image plane. Cardiac motion is estimated from the phase of the projection data passing through the aorta, which is amplified by superior-inferior directional bipolar gradients, whereas respiratory motion is estimated from the phase of the left-right directional projection data of the abdomen. To verify the proposed self-gating method, a simulation and in vivo steady state free precession cardiac imaging were performed. The proposed method provides high resolution multiphase cardiac cine images. Using the proposed self-gating method, the phase variation of the projection data offers information about cardiac and respiratory motions that is equivalent to external gating devices. The proposed method can capture time-resolved cardiac and respiratory motion from the phase information of the projection data. Because the projection data is obtained from a separate gating slice, the self-gating signals are not affected by imaging planes. Magn Reson Med 77:1216-1222, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Scanning gate imaging in confined geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Steinacher, R.; Kozikov, A. A.; Rössler, C.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on tunable electron backscattering investigated with the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. Using a channel defined by a pair of Schottky gates, the branched electron flow of ballistic electrons injected from a quantum point contact is guided by potentials of a tunable height well below the Fermi energy. The transition from injection into an open two-dimensional electron gas to a strongly confined channel exhibits three experimentally distinct regimes: one in whic...

  10. ROIC for gated 3D imaging LADAR receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Junling; Wang, Pan; Zhou, Jie; Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun

    2013-09-01

    Time of flight laser range finding, deep space communications and scanning video imaging are three applications requiring very low noise optical receivers to achieve detection of fast and weak optical signal. HgCdTe electrons initiated avalanche photodiodes (e-APDs) in linear multiplication mode is the detector of choice thanks to its high quantum efficiency, high gain at low bias, high bandwidth and low noise factor. In this project, a readout integrated circuit of hybrid e-APD focal plane array (FPA) with 100um pitch for 3D-LADAR was designed for gated optical receiver. The ROIC works at 77K, including unit cell circuit, column-level circuit, timing control, bias circuit and output driver. The unit cell circuit is a key component, which consists of preamplifier, correlated double Sampling (CDS), bias circuit and timing control module. Specially, the preamplifier used the capacitor feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) structure which has two capacitors to offer switchable capacitance for passive/active dual mode imaging. The main circuit of column-level circuit is a precision Multiply-by-Two circuit which is implemented by switched-capacitor circuit. Switched-capacitor circuit is quite suitable for the signal processing of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) due to the working characteristics. The output driver uses a simply unity-gain buffer. Because the signal is amplified in column-level circuit, the amplifier in unity-gain buffer uses a rail-rail amplifier. In active imaging mode, the integration time is 80ns. Integrating current from 200nA to 4uA, this circuit shows the nonlinearity is less than 1%. In passive imaging mode, the integration time is 150ns. Integrating current from 1nA to 20nA shows the nonlinearity less than 1%.

  11. Double-gated myocardial ASL perfusion imaging is robust to heart rate variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hung Phi; Yoon, Andrew J; Fong, Michael W; Saremi, Farhood; Barr, Mark L; Nayak, Krishna S

    2017-05-01

    Cardiac motion is a dominant source of physiological noise (PN) in myocardial arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion imaging. This study investigates the sensitivity to heart rate variation (HRV) of double-gated myocardial ASL compared with the more widely used single-gated method. Double-gating and single-gating were performed on 10 healthy volunteers (n = 10, 3F/7M; age, 23-34 years) and eight heart transplant recipients (n = 8, 1F/7M; age, 26-76 years) at rest in the randomized order. Myocardial blood flow (MBF), PN, temporal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and HRV were measured. HRV ranged from 0.2 to 7.8 bpm. Double-gating PN did not depend on HRV, while single-gating PN increased with HRV. Over all subjects, double-gating provided a significant reduction in global PN (from 0.20 ± 0.15 to 0.11 ± 0.03 mL/g/min; P = 0.01) and per-segment PN (from 0.33 ± 0.23 to 0.21 ± 0.12 mL/g/min; P < 0.001), with significant increases in global temporal SNR (from 11 ± 8 to 18 ± 8; P = 0.02) and per-segment temporal SNR (from 7 ± 4 to 11 ± 12; P < 0.001) without significant difference in measured MBF. Single-gated myocardial ASL suffers from reduced temporal SNR, while double-gated myocardial ASL provides consistent temporal SNR independent of HRV. Magn Reson Med 77:1975-1980, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Direct Imaging of Nanoscale Conductance Evolution in Ion-Gel-Gated Oxide Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Yuan, Hongtao; Wu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhuoyu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold Y; Lai, Keji

    2015-07-08

    Electrostatic modification of functional materials by electrolytic gating has demonstrated a remarkably wide range of density modulation, a condition crucial for developing novel electronic phases in systems ranging from complex oxides to layered chalcogenides. Yet little is known microscopically when carriers are modulated in electrolyte-gated electric double-layer transistors (EDLTs) due to the technical challenge of imaging the buried electrolyte-semiconductor interface. Here, we demonstrate the real-space mapping of the channel conductance in ZnO EDLTs using a cryogenic microwave impedance microscope. A spin-coated ionic gel layer with typical thicknesses below 50 nm allows us to perform high resolution (on the order of 100 nm) subsurface imaging, while maintaining the capability of inducing the metal-insulator transition under a gate bias. The microwave images vividly show the spatial evolution of channel conductance and its local fluctuations through the transition as well as the uneven conductance distribution established by a large source-drain bias. The unique combination of ultrathin ion-gel gating and microwave imaging offers a new opportunity to study the local transport and mesoscopic electronic properties in EDLTs.

  13. 4D optical coherence tomography of the embryonic heart using gated imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rothenberg, Florence; Roy, Debashish; Nikolski, Vladimir P.; Wilson, David L.; Efimov, Igor R.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2005-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging have been used to image and diagnose diseases of the human heart. By gating the acquisition of the images to the heart cycle (gated imaging), these modalities enable one to produce 3D images of the heart without significant motion artifact and to more accurately calculate various parameters such as ejection fractions [1-3]. Unfortunately, these imaging modalities give inadequate resolution when investigating embryonic development in animal models. Defects in developmental mechanisms during embryogenesis have long been thought to result in congenital cardiac anomalies. Our understanding of normal mechanisms of heart development and how abnormalities can lead to defects has been hampered by our inability to detect anatomic and physiologic changes in these small (structures of the living embryonic heart with high-resolution in two- and threedimensions. OCT offers higher resolution than ultrasound (30 um axial, 90 um lateral) and magnetic resonance microscopy (25 um axial, 31 um lateral) [4, 5], with greater depth penetration over confocal microscopy (200 um). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses back reflected light from a sample to create an image with axial resolutions ranging from 2-15 um, while penetrating 1-2 mm in depth [6]. In the past, OCT groups estimated ejection fractions using 2D images in a Xenopus laevis [7], created 3D renderings of chick embryo hearts [8], and used a gated reconstruction technique to produce 2D Doppler OCT image of an in vivo Xenopus laevis heart [9]. In this paper we present a gated imaging system that allowed us to produce a 16-frame 3D movie of a beating chick embryo heart. The heart was excised from a day two (stage 13) chicken embryo and electrically paced at 1 Hz. We acquired 2D images (B-scans) in 62.5 ms, which provides enough temporal resolution to distinguish end-contraction from end-relaxation. After acquiring the image set, we were able to measure the

  14. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  15. Imaging ligand-gated ion channels with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, I. D.; Orndorff, Rebecca L.; Gussin, Hélène; Mason, John N.; Blakely, Randy D.; Pepperberg, David R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we report two different methodologies for labeling ligand-gated receptors. The first of these builds upon our earlier work with serotonin conjugated quantum dots and our studies with pegilated quantum dots to reduce non specific binding. In this approach a pegilated derivative of muscimol was synthesized and attached via an amide linkage to quantum dots coated in an amphiphillic polymer derivative of poly acrylamide. These conjugates were used to image the GABA C receptor in oocytes. An alternative approach was used to image tissue sections to study nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the neuro muscular junction with biotinylated Bungerotoxin and streptavidin coated quantum dots.

  16. Retrospectively gated cardiac cine imaging with temporal and spatial acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Bruno; Hoge, W Scott; Chao, Tzu-Cheng; Zientara, Gary P; Chu, Renxin

    2011-05-01

    Parallel imaging methods are routinely used to accelerate the image acquisition process in cardiac cine imaging. The addition of a temporal acceleration method, whereby k-space is sampled differently for different time frames, has been shown in prior work to improve image quality as compared to parallel imaging by itself. However, such temporal acceleration strategies prove difficult to combine with retrospectively gated cine imaging. The only currently published method to feature such combination, by Hansen et al. [Magn Reson Med 55 (2006) 85-91] tends to be associated with prohibitively long reconstruction times. The goal of the present work was to develop a retrospectively gated cardiac cine method that features both parallel imaging and temporal acceleration, capable of achieving significant acceleration factors on commonly available hardware and associated with reconstruction times short enough for practical use in a clinical context. Seven cardiac patients and a healthy volunteer were recruited and imaged, with acceleration factors of 3.5 or 4.5, using an eight-channel product cardiac array on a 1.5-T system. The prescribed FOV value proved slightly too small in three patients, and one of the patients had a bigemini condition. Despite these additional challenges, good-quality results were obtained for all slices and all patients, with a reconstruction time of 0.98±0.07 s per frame, or about 20 s for a 20-frame slice, using a single processor on a single PC. As compared to using parallel imaging by itself, the addition of a temporal acceleration strategy provided much resistance to artifacts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbon Tube Electrodes for Electrocardiography-Gated Cardiac Multimodality Imaging in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Philippe; Goetz, Christian; Aubertin, Gaelle; Hubele, Fabrice; Sannié, Sébastien; Constantinesco, André

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a simple design of noninvasive carbon tube electrodes that facilitates electrocardiography (ECG) in mice during cardiac multimodality preclinical imaging. Both forepaws and the left hindpaw, covered by conductive gel, of mice were placed into the openings of small carbon tubes. Cardiac ECG-gated single-photon emission CT, X-ray CT, and MRI were tested (n = 60) in 20 mice. For all applications, electrodes were used in a warmed multimodality imaging cell. A heart rate of 563 ± 48 bpm was recorded from anesthetized mice regardless of the imaging technique used, with acquisition times ranging from 1 to 2 h. PMID:21333165

  18. SU-C-204-06: Surface Imaging for the Set-Up of Proton Post-Mastectomy Chestwall Irradiation: Gated Images Vs Non Gated Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batin, E; Depauw, N; MacDonald, S; Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Historically, the set-up for proton post-mastectomy chestwall irradiation at our institution started with positioning the patient using tattoos and lasers. One or more rounds of orthogonal X-rays at gantry 0° and beamline X-ray at treatment gantry angle were then taken to finalize the set-up position. As chestwall targets are shallow and superficial, surface imaging is a promising tool for set-up and needs to be investigated Methods: The orthogonal imaging was entirely replaced by AlignRT™ (ART) images. The beamline X-Ray image is kept as a confirmation, based primarily on three opaque markers placed on skin surface instead of bony anatomy. In the first phase of the process, ART gated images were used to set-up the patient and the same specific point of the breathing curve was used every day. The moves (translations and rotations) computed for each point of the breathing curve during the first five fractions were analyzed for ten patients. During a second phase of the study, ART gated images were replaced by ART non-gated images combined with real-time monitoring. In both cases, ART images were acquired just before treatment to access the patient position compare to the non-gated CT. Results: The average difference between the maximum move and the minimum move depending on the chosen breathing curve point was less than 1.7 mm for all translations and less than 0.7° for all rotations. The average position discrepancy over the course of treatment obtained by ART non gated images combined to real-time monitoring taken before treatment to the planning CT were smaller than the average position discrepancy obtained using ART gated images. The X-Ray validation images show similar results with both ART imaging process. Conclusion: The use of ART non gated images combined with real time imaging allows positioning post-mastectomy chestwall patients in less than 3 mm / 1°.

  19. Braiding by Majorana tracking and long-range CNOT gates with color codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litinski, Daniel; von Oppen, Felix

    2017-11-01

    Color-code quantum computation seamlessly combines Majorana-based hardware with topological error correction. Specifically, as Clifford gates are transversal in two-dimensional color codes, they enable the use of the Majoranas' non-Abelian statistics for gate operations at the code level. Here, we discuss the implementation of color codes in arrays of Majorana nanowires that avoid branched networks such as T junctions, thereby simplifying their realization. We show that, in such implementations, non-Abelian statistics can be exploited without ever performing physical braiding operations. Physical braiding operations are replaced by Majorana tracking, an entirely software-based protocol which appropriately updates the Majoranas involved in the color-code stabilizer measurements. This approach minimizes the required hardware operations for single-qubit Clifford gates. For Clifford completeness, we combine color codes with surface codes, and use color-to-surface-code lattice surgery for long-range multitarget CNOT gates which have a time overhead that grows only logarithmically with the physical distance separating control and target qubits. With the addition of magic state distillation, our architecture describes a fault-tolerant universal quantum computer in systems such as networks of tetrons, hexons, or Majorana box qubits, but can also be applied to nontopological qubit platforms.

  20. Influence of Respiratory Gating, Image Filtering, and Animal Positioning on High-Resolution Electrocardiography-Gated Murine Cardiac Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac parameters obtained from single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT images can be affected by respiratory motion, image filtering, and animal positioning. We investigated the influence of these factors on ultra-high-resolution murine myocardial perfusion SPECT. Five mice were injected with 99m technetium (99mTc-tetrofosmin, and each was scanned in supine and prone positions in a U-SPECT-II scanner with respiratory and electrocardiographic (ECG gating. ECG-gated SPECT images were created without applying respiratory motion correction or with two different respiratory motion correction strategies. The images were filtered with a range of three-dimensional gaussian kernels, after which end-diastolic volumes (EDVs, end-systolic volumes (ESVs, and left ventricular ejection fractions were calculated. No significant differences in the measured cardiac parameters were detected when any strategy to reduce or correct for respiratory motion was applied, whereas big differences (> 5% in EDV and ESV were found with regard to different positioning of animals. A linear relationship (p < .001 was found between the EDV or ESV and the kernel size of the gaussian filter. In short, respiratory gating did not significantly affect the cardiac parameters of mice obtained with ultra-high-resolution SPECT, whereas the position of the animals and the image filters should be the same in a comparative study with multiple scans to avoid systematic differences in measured cardiac parameters.

  1. Time-gated FLIM microscope for corneal metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Domingues, José Paulo; Quadrado, Maria João.; Morgado, António Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Detecting corneal cells metabolic alterations may prove a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent metabolic co-factors that allow the assessment of metabolic changes through non-invasive optical methods. These co-factors exhibit double-exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free-states. Corneal metabolism can be assessed by measuring the relative contributions of these two components. For that purpose, we have developed a wide-field time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope based on structured illumination and one-photon excitation to record FAD lifetime images from corneas. NADH imaging was not considered as its UV excitation peak is regarded as not safe for in vivo measurements. The microscope relies on a pulsed blue diode laser (λ=443 nm) as excitation source, an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera to acquire fluorescence signals and a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to implement the Structured Illumination technique. The system has a lateral resolution better than 2.4 μm, a field of view of 160 per 120 μm and an optical sectioning of 6.91 +/- 0.45 μm when used with a 40x, 0.75 NA, Water Immersion Objective. With this setup we were able to measure FAD contributions from ex-vivo chicken corneas collected from a local slaughterhouse..

  2. A new method for the study of velopharyngeal function using gated magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Alex A; Butman, John A; Mullick, Rakesh; Skopec, Marlene; Choyke, Peter

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess the feasibility of imaging the velopharynx of adult volunteers during repetitive speech, using gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although a number of investigators have used conventional MRI in the study of the human vocal tract, the mismatch between the lengthy time necessary to acquire sufficiently detailed images and the rapidity of movement of the vocal tract during speech has forced investigators to acquire images either while the subject is at rest or during sustained utterances. The technique used here acquired a portion of each image during repetitive utterances, building the full image over multiple utterance cycles. The velopharyngeal portal was imaged on a 1.5-Tesla GE Signa LX 8.2 platform with gated fast spoiled gradient echo protocol. An external 1-Hertz trigger was fed to the cardiac gate. Subjects synchronized utterance of consonant-vowel syllables to a flashing light synchronized with the external trigger. Each acquisition of 30 phases per second at a single-slice location took 22 to 29 seconds. Four consonant-vowel syllables (/pa/, /ma/, /sa/, and /ka/) were evaluated. Subjects vocalized throughout the acquisition, beginning 5 to 6 seconds beforehand to establish a regular rhythm. Imaging of the velopharyngeal portal was performed for sagittal, velopharyngeal axial (aligned perpendicular to the "knee" of the velum), axial, and coronal planes. Volumes were obtained by sequential acquisition of six to 10 slices (each with 30 phases) in the axial or sagittal planes during repetition of the /pa/ syllable. Spatiotemporal volumes of the single-slice data were sectioned to provide time-motion images (analogous to M-mode echocardiograms). Three-dimensional dynamic volume renderings of palate motion were displayed interactively (Vortex; CieMed, Singapore). A method suitable for the collection and visualization of four-dimensional information regarding monosyllabic speech using gated MRI was developed. These

  3. Full gate voltage range Lambert-function based methodology for FDSOI MOSFET parameter extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatsori, T. A.; Theodorou, C. G.; Ioannidis, E. G.; Haendler, S.; Josse, E.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2015-09-01

    A new full gate voltage range methodology using a Lambert W function based inversion charge model, for extracting the electrical parameters in FDSOI nano-MOSFET devices, has been developed. Split capacitance-voltage measurements carried out on 14 nm technology FDSOI devices show that the inversion charge variation with gate voltage can be well described by a Lambert W function. Based on the drain current equation in the linear region including the inversion charge described by the Lambert function of gate voltage and the standard mobility equation enables five electrical MOSFET parameters to be extracted from experimental Id-Vg measurements (ideality factor, threshold voltage, low field mobility, first and second order mobility attenuation factors). The extracted parameters were compared with those extracted by the well-known Y-function in strong inversion region. The present methodology for extracting the electrical MOSFET parameters was verified over a wide range of channel lengths on nano-scale FDSOI devices, demonstrating its simplicity, accuracy and robustness.

  4. A comparison study: image-based vs signal-based retrospective gating on microCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Salmon, Phil L.; Laperre, Kjell; Sasov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Retrospective gating on animal studies with microCT has gained popularity in recent years. Previously, we use ECG signals for cardiac gating and breathing airflow or video signals of abdominal motion for respiratory gating. This method is adequate and works well for most applications. However, through the years, researchers have noticed some pitfalls in the method. For example, the additional signal acquisition step may increase failure rate in practice. X-Ray image-based gating, on the other hand, does not require any extra step in the scanning. Therefore we investigate imagebased gating techniques. This paper presents a comparison study of the image-based versus signal-based approach to retrospective gating. The two application areas we have studied are respiratory and cardiac imaging for both rats and mice. Image-based respiratory gating on microCT is relatively straightforward and has been done by several other researchers and groups. This method retrieves an intensity curve of a region of interest (ROI) placed in the lung area on all projections. From scans on our systems based on step-and-shoot scanning mode, we confirm that this method is very effective. A detailed comparison between image-based and signal-based gating methods is given. For cardiac gating, breathing motion is not negligible and has to be dealt with. Another difficulty in cardiac gating is the relatively smaller amplitude of cardiac movements comparing to the respirational movements, and the higher heart rate. Higher heart rate requires high speed image acquisition. We have been working on our systems to improve the acquisition speed. A dual gating technique has been developed to achieve adequate cardiac imaging.

  5. High contrast ballistic imaging using femtosecond optical Kerr gate of tellurite glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenjiang; Zhou, Zhiguang; Lin, Aoxiang; Si, Jinhai; Zhan, Pingping; Wu, Bin; Hou, Xun

    2013-03-25

    We investigated the ballistic imaging technique using femtosecond optical Kerr gate of a tellurite glass. High contrast images of an object hidden behind turbid media were obtained. Compared to the conventional femtosecond optical Kerr gate using fused quartz, the optical Kerr gate using tellurite glass has more capacity to acquire high quality images of the object hidden behind a high optical density turbid medium. The experimental results indicated that the tellurite glass is a good candidate as the optical Kerr material for the ballistic imaging technique due to its large optical nonlinearity.

  6. Crosstalk in multi-collection-gate image sensors and its improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. Q.; Dao, V. T. S.; Shimonomura, K.; Kamakura, Y.; Etoh, T. G.

    2017-02-01

    Crosstalk in the backside-illuminated multi-collection-gate (BSI-MCG) image sensor was analyzed by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The BSI-MCG image sensor was proposed to achieve the temporal resolution of 1 ns. In this sensor, signal electrons generated by incident light near the back side travel to the central area of the pixel on the front side. Most of the signal electrons are collected by a collecting gate, to which a higher voltage is applied than that of other collection gates. However, due to spatial and temporal diffusion, some of the signal electrons migrate to other collection gates than the collecting gate, resulting in spatiotemporal crosstalk, i.e., mixture of signal electrons at neighboring collection gates and/or pixels. To reduce the crosstalk, the BSI-MCG structure is modified and the performance is preliminarily evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation. An additional donut-shaped N type implantation at the collection-gate area improves the potential gradient to the collecting gate, which reduces the crosstalk caused by the spatial diffusion. A multi-framing camera based on the BSI-MCG image sensor can be applied to Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). In this case, crosstalk reduces accuracy in estimation of the lifetimes of fluorophore samples. The inaccuracy is compensated in a post image processing based on a proposed impulse response method.

  7. Tunable Molecular Logic Gates Designed for Imaging Released Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Jessica L; Hettie, Kenneth S; Secor, Kristen E; Barman, Dipti N; Glass, Timothy E

    2015-08-03

    Tunable dual-analyte fluorescent molecular logic gates (ExoSensors) were designed for the purpose of imaging select vesicular primary-amine neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. ExoSensors are based on the coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold and rely on both neurotransmitter binding and the change in environmental pH associated with exocytosis to afford a unique turn-on fluorescence output. A pH-functionality was directly integrated into the fluorophore π-system of the scaffold, thereby allowing for an enhanced fluorescence output upon the release of labeled neurotransmitters. By altering the pH-sensitive unit with various electron-donating and -withdrawing sulfonamide substituents, we identified a correlation between the pKa of the pH-sensitive group and the fluorescence output from the activated fluorophore. In doing so, we achieved a twelvefold fluorescence enhancement upon evaluating the ExoSensors under conditions that mimic exocytosis. ExoSensors are aptly suited to serve as molecular imaging tools that allow for the direct visualization of only the neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously

  9. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  11. Optimizing bioimpedance measurement configuration for dual-gated nuclear medicine imaging: a sensitivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2011-07-01

    Motion artefacts due to respiration and cardiac contractions may deteriorate the quality of nuclear medicine imaging leading to incorrect diagnosis and inadequate treatment. Motion artefacts can be minimized by simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating, dual-gating. Currently, only cardiac gating is often performed. In this study, an optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration was determined for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating signal acquisition. The optimized configuration was located on anterolateral upper thorax based on sensitivity simulations utilizing a simplified thorax model. The validity of the optimized configuration was studied with six healthy volunteers. In the peak-to-peak and frequency content analyses the optimized configuration showed consistently higher peak-to-peak values and frequency content than other studied measurement configurations. This study indicates that the bioimpedance method has potential for the dual-gating in nuclear medicine imaging. The method would minimize the need of additional equipment, is easy for the technologists to use and comfortable for the patients.

  12. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castello, Marco [Nanobiophotonics, Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genoa, 16163 (Italy); DIBRIS, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 13, Genoa 16145 (Italy); Diaspro, Alberto [Nanobiophotonics, Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genoa, 16163 (Italy); Nikon Imaging Center, Via Morego 30, Genoa 16163 (Italy); Vicidomini, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.vicidomini@iit.it [Nanobiophotonics, Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genoa, 16163 (Italy)

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  13. Introduction to sensors for ranging and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Brooker, Graham

    2009-01-01

    ""This comprehensive text-reference provides a solid background in active sensing technology. It is concerned with active sensing, starting with the basics of time-of-flight sensors (operational principles, components), and going through the derivation of the radar range equation and the detection of echo signals, both fundamental to the understanding of radar, sonar and lidar imaging. Several chapters cover signal propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic energy, target characteristics, stealth, and clutter. The remainder of the book introduces the range measurement process, active ima

  14. A novel dual gating approach using joint inertial sensors: implications for cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Tadi, Mojtaba; Teuho, Jarmo; Lehtonen, Eero; Saraste, Antti; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero; Teräs, Mika

    2017-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique which may be considered as the state of art for the examination of cardiac inflammation due to atherosclerosis. A fundamental limitation of PET is that cardiac and respiratory motions reduce the quality of the achieved images. Current approaches for motion compensation involve gating the PET data based on the timing of quiescent periods of cardiac and respiratory cycles. In this study, we present a novel gating method called microelectromechanical (MEMS) dual gating which relies on joint non-electrical sensors, i.e. tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope. This approach can be used for optimized selection of quiescent phases of cardiac and respiratory cycles. Cardiomechanical activity according to echocardiography observations was investigated to confirm whether this dual sensor solution can provide accurate trigger timings for cardiac gating. Additionally, longitudinal chest motions originating from breathing were measured by accelerometric- and gyroscopic-derived respiratory (ADR and GDR) tracking. The ADR and GDR signals were evaluated against Varian real-time position management (RPM) signals in terms of amplitude and phase. Accordingly, high linear correlation and agreement were achieved between the reference electrocardiography, RPM, and measured MEMS signals. We also performed a Ge-68 phantom study to evaluate possible metal artifacts caused by the integrated read-out electronics including mechanical sensors and semiconductors. The reconstructed phantom images did not reveal any image artifacts. Thus, it was concluded that MEMS-driven dual gating can be used in PET studies without an effect on the quantitative or visual accuracy of the PET images. Finally, the applicability of MEMS dual gating for cardiac PET imaging was investigated with two atherosclerosis patients. Dual gated PET images were successfully reconstructed using only MEMS signals and both qualitative and quantitative

  15. Gating of hippocampal activity, plasticity, and memory by entorhinal cortex long-range inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Jayeeta; Zaremba, Jeffrey D; Cheung, Stephanie K; Hitti, Frederick L; Zemelman, Boris V; Losonczy, Attila; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2016-01-08

    The cortico-hippocampal circuit is critical for storage of associational memories. Most studies have focused on the role in memory storage of the excitatory projections from entorhinal cortex to hippocampus. However, entorhinal cortex also sends inhibitory projections, whose role in memory storage and cortico-hippocampal activity remains largely unexplored. We found that these long-range inhibitory projections enhance the specificity of contextual and object memory encoding. At the circuit level, these γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-releasing projections target hippocampal inhibitory neurons and thus act as a disinhibitory gate that transiently promotes the excitation of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by suppressing feedforward inhibition. This enhances the ability of CA1 pyramidal neurons to fire synaptically evoked dendritic spikes and to generate a temporally precise form of heterosynaptic plasticity. Long-range inhibition from entorhinal cortex may thus increase the precision of hippocampal-based long-term memory associations by assessing the salience of mnemonormation to the immediate sensory input. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract time-gated FLIM model was given, and important temporal parameters are shown as well. Aiming at different applications of steady and transient fluorescence processes, two different operation modes, timing and lifetime computing algorithm are designed. High resolution and high frame can be achieved by one-excitation one-sampling mode and least square algorithm for steady imaging applications. Correspondingly, one-excitation two-sampling mode and rapid lifetime determination algorithm contribute to transient fluorescence situations.

  17. Cardiac PET imaging in mice with simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongfeng; Rendig, Stephen; Siegel, Stefan; Newport, Danny F.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2005-07-01

    Gating firmware and software were developed for the microPET II small animal scanner. The measured cardiac and respiratory signals were collected and converted to TTL gating signals by a Biopac MP150 data acquisition system and sent to microPET II through two BNC connectors on the front panel. During acquisition, the coincidence monitor takes the average of the last eight gate input cycles and inserts this into the list mode data stream on the falling edge of the gating pulse. This value is then used to determine the current time interval of the next gate cycle when the list mode data are sorted into sinograms. The gating firmware and software were validated by an experiment using a rotating point source. Mouse heart (18F-FDG) and bone (18F-) imaging was performed with simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating. It was clearly demonstrated that the contractile function of the mouse heart can be studied by cardiac-gated imaging with microPET II. The left ventricular volumes at different times of the cardiac cycle were measured and the ejection fraction was calculated. In the bone scan, no detectable movement caused by heart contraction was observed. Respiratory motion was more subtle with virtually no motion for more than 75% of the respiratory cycle. The motion of the mouse heart and bones in the thorax caused by respiration was less than 1 mm. It appears with the current resolution of PET, and the small fraction of the respiratory cycle in which motion occurs, that respiratory gating is probably not necessary for most mouse cardiac studies.

  18. Feedback circuit design of an auto-gating power supply for low-light-level image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Yan, Bo; Zhi, Qiang; Ni, Xiao-bing; Li, Jun-guo; Wang, Yu; Yao, Ze

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces the basic principle of auto-gating power supply which using a hybrid automatic brightness control scheme. By the analysis of current as image intensifier to special requirements of auto-gating power supply, a feedback circuit of the auto-gating power supply is analyzed. Find out the reason of the screen flash after the auto-gating power supply assembled image intensifier. This paper designed a feedback circuit which can shorten the response time of auto-gating power supply and improve screen slight flicker phenomenon which the human eye can distinguish under the high intensity of illumination.

  19. High Resolution, Range/Range-Rate Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Visidyne proposes to develop a design for a small, lightweight, high resolution, in x, y, and z Doppler imager to assist in the guidance, navigation and control...

  20. Research for gate drive technology based on image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangqiang; Liu, Baiyu; Gou, Yongsheng

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the dynamic range and the signal-noise ratio of the image intensifier, keep the flux of the screen of image intensifier constant. In the article, introduced a design of the switching power supply and tested its performance. Firstly, used a sampling amplifier amplify the feedback current signals. The feedback signals were converted into square wave signals through a digital circuit. Then, using the MOSFET in the post stage circuit produced high voltage and high speed adjustable square pulses. The frequency of the pulse is 1 kHz, the speed of the cutting edge is 20ns and the amplitude is 200V. The photoelectron emission time of the photocathode is short when the width of the high speed pulse is narrow for strong illumination. On the contrary, the time is long when the width is wide for weak illumination. The number of photoelectron is a constant no matter what kind of the illumination. It keeps the flux reaching the phosphor screen constant.

  1. Database Description - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Database Description General information of database Database... name Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Alternative name - DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00954-0...iomedical Innovation 7-6-8, Saito-asagi, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-0085, Japan TEL:81-72-641-9826 Email: Database... classification Toxicogenomics Database Organism Taxonomy Name: Rattus norvegi... Article title: Author name(s): Journal: External Links: Original website information Database

  2. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  3. A low-cost universal cumulative gating circuit for small and large animal clinical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V.

    2008-02-01

    Image-assisted diagnosis and therapy is becoming more commonplace in medicine. However, most imaging techniques suffer from voluntary or involuntary motion artifacts, especially cardiac and respiratory motions, which degrade image quality. Current software solutions either induce computational overhead or reject out-of-focus images after acquisition. In this study we demonstrate a hardware-only gating circuit that accepts multiple, pseudo-periodic signals and produces a single TTL (0-5 V) imaging window of accurate phase and period. The electronic circuit Gerber files described in this article and the list of components are available online at www.frangionilab.org.

  4. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Retrospective Gating : Mathematical Modelling and Reconstruction Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Zwaan, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with some mathematical aspects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating human heart. In particular we investigate the so-called retrospective gating technique which is a non-triggered technique for data acquisition and reconstruction of (approximately) periodically

  5. Strip velocity measurements for gated x-ray imagers using short pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time- resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  6. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ~27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  7. Range estimation techniques in single-station thunderstorm warning sensors based upon gated, wideband, magnetic direction finder technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifer, Alburt E.; Hiscox, William L.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Neumann, William T.

    1991-01-01

    Gated, wideband, magnetic direction finders (DFs) were originally designed to measure the bearing of cloud-to-ground lightning relative to the sensor. A recent addition to this device uses proprietary waveform discrimination logic to select return stroke signatures and certain range dependent features in the waveform to provide an estimate of range of flashes within 50 kms. The enhanced ranging techniques are discussed which were designed and developed for use in single station thunderstorm warning sensor. Included are the results of on-going evaluations being conducted under a variety of meteorological and geographic conditions.

  8. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, K. S., E-mail: kssim@mmu.edu.my; Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  9. Noise-gating to Clean Astrophysical Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, C. E.

    2017-04-01

    I present a family of algorithms to reduce noise in astrophysical images and image sequences, preserving more information from the original data than is retained by conventional techniques. The family uses locally adaptive filters (“noise gates”) in the Fourier domain to separate coherent image structure from background noise based on the statistics of local neighborhoods in the image. Processing of solar data limited by simple shot noise or by additive noise reveals image structure not easily visible in the originals, preserves photometry of observable features, and reduces shot noise by a factor of 10 or more with little to no apparent loss of resolution. This reveals faint features that were either not directly discernible or not sufficiently strongly detected for quantitative analysis. The method works best on image sequences containing related subjects, for example movies of solar evolution, but is also applicable to single images provided that there are enough pixels. The adaptive filter uses the statistical properties of noise and of local neighborhoods in the data to discriminate between coherent features and incoherent noise without reference to the specific shape or evolution of those features. The technique can potentially be modified in a straightforward way to exploit additional a priori knowledge about the functional form of the noise.

  10. ISAR imaging using the instantaneous range instantaneous Doppler method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wazna, TM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging, the Range Instantaneous Doppler (RID) method is used to compensate for the nonuniform rotational motion of the target that degrades the Doppler resolution of the ISAR image. The Instantaneous Range...

  11. Development of a time-gated fluorescence lifetime microscope for in vivo corneal metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana F.; Batista, Ana; Castejón, Olga C.; Quadrado, Maria João.; Domingues, José Paulo; Morgado, Miguel

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic imaging can be a valuable tool in the early diagnosis of corneal diseases. Cell metabolic changes can be assessed through non-invasive optical methods due to the autofluorescence of metabolic co-factors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Both molecules exhibit double exponential fluorescence decays, with well-separated short and long lifetime components, which are related to their protein-bound and free states. Corneal metabolism can be monitored by measuring the relative contribution of these two components. Here we report on the development of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for in vivo measurement of FAD fluorescence lifetimes in corneal cells. The microscope is based on one-photon fluorescence excitation, through a pulsed blue diode laser. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is achieved using the Time-Gated technique. Structured illumination is used to improve the low axial resolution of wide-field time-gated FLIM. A Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is used to produce the sinusoidal patterns required by structural illumination. The DMD control is integrated with the acquisition software of the imaging system which is based on an ultra-high speed gated image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera. We present preliminary results concerning optical and timing performance of the fluorescence lifetime microscope. Preliminary tests with ex-vivo bovine corneas are also described.

  12. Prospective ECG triggering versus low-dose retrospective ECG-gated 128-channel CT coronary angiography: comparison of image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Q.; Yin, Y.; Hua, X.; Zhu, R.; Hua, J. [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Xu, J., E-mail: xujianr@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate image quality and radiation dose for 128-detector prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) compared with a low-dose retrospective ECG-gated imaging protocol. Materials and methods: Thirty-one and 47 patients suspected of having coronary artery disease were enrolled into groups examined using prospective and low-dose retrospective ECG-gated CT protocols respectively. All examinations were performed on a 128-detector CT system (Definition AS, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Prospective CTCA was performed using following parameters: tube voltage 100 kV; tube current 205 mAs; centre of acquisition window 70% of the RR interval. The tube current for low-dose retrospective ECG-gated CTCA was full dose during 40-70% of the RR interval and partial dose for the rest of RR interval. The pitch varied between 0.2 and 0.5 depending on heart rate and patient size. Image quality of coronary arteries was evaluated using a four-point grading scale. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of enhanced arteries and myocardium were also measured, corresponding contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated, and the radiation doses received were recorded. Results: There was a significant difference in the image quality scores between the retrospective and prospective gating protocols (Chi-square = 15.331, p = 0.009). There was no significant difference between the SNRs of the contrasted artery and myocardium in these two groups, but the CNRs were increased in the prospective group. The mean radiation dose of prospective gating group was 2.71 {+-} 0.67 mSv (range, 1.67-3.59 mSv), which was significantly lower than that of the retrospective group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Prospective CT angiography can achieve lower radiation dose than that of low-dose retrospective CT angiography, with preserved image quality.

  13. Electronic Time-Gated and Spectroscopic Near-Infrared Imaging of Lesions in Human Tissues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, S. K.; Alrubaiee, M.; Alfano, R. R.; Koutcher, J.; Savage, H.

    2000-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) transillumination imaging is used to investigate normal and cancerous tissues of human breast, thyroid, and parotid gland. The time-sliced imaging arrangement uses 130-fs, 1 kHz repetition-rate, 800 nm pulses from a Ti:sapphire laser and amplifier system for sample illumination and a CCD camera coupled to a gated image intensifier for recording two-dimensional (2D) images. Images recorded with earlier temporal slices of transmitted light highlight cancerous tissues while those recorded with later slices accentuate normal fibrous tissues. The spectroscopic imaging arrangement uses 1210-1300 nm tunable output of a Cr:forsterite laser for sample illumination, a Fourier space gate to discriminate against multiple-scattered light, and a NIR area camera to record 2D images. When light is tuned to a known absorption resonance of a particular tissue type, a marked enhancement in image contrast is observed which is indicative of the diagnostic potential of spectroscopic imaging.

  14. Respiratory signal generation for retrospective gating of cone-beam CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Stefan; Yaniv, Ziv

    2008-03-01

    We are currently investigating the acquisition of 4D cone-beam CT data using retrospective gating of the X-ray projection images. This approach requires a respiratory signal that is synchronized with image acquisition. To obtain such a signal we propose to use a spherical fiducial attached to the patient's skin surface such that it is visible in the images. A region of interest containing the fiducial is manually identified in an initial image and is then automatically detected in all other images. Subsequently, we perform an approximate spatial (3D) reconstruction of the marker location from its 2D locations. Finally, we compute a respiratory signal by projecting the 3D points onto the major axis estimated via principle component analysis. As this respiratory signal was obtained from the fiducial location in each of the images it is implicitly synchronized with image acquisition. We evaluate the robustness of our fiducial detection using an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom. To evaluate the quality of the estimated respiratory signal we use a motion platform that follows the respiratory motion obtained by tracking the skin surface of a volunteer. We show that our method generates a respiratory signal that is in phase with the ground truth signal, but suffers from inaccuracies in amplitude close to the anterior-posterior imaging setup where the primary direction of motion is perpendicular to the image plane. Thus, our method should only be used for phase based retrospective gating.

  15. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, John V [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-09

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  16. Dilation x-ray imager a new∕faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Barrios, M A; Felker, B; Smith, R F; Collins, G W; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Piston, K; Raman, K S; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2012-10-01

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ∼7 × 10(18) neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10171017 neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  18. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10{sup 17} neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  19. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Kilkenny, J D; Conder, A; Cerjan, C; Hagmann, C; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Moody, J; Teruya, A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Khater, H; Eckart, M J; Ayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10(17) neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  20. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  1. Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF [DIXI (Dilation x-ray imager) a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Bell, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ayers, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, R. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, T. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Piston, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hares, J. D. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-19

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ~7 1018 neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for DIXI, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [1] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. Lastly, the measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. 3D imaging without range information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. D.; Myatt, D. R.

    2010-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies have considerable potential for aiding military operations in areas such as reconnaissance, mission planning and situational awareness through improved visualisation and user-interaction. This paper describes the development of fast 3D imaging capabilities from low-cost, passive sensors. The two systems discussed here are capable of passive depth perception and recovering 3D structure from a single electro-optic sensor attached to an aerial vehicle that is, for example, circling a target. Based on this example, the proposed method has been shown to produce high quality results when positional data of the sensor is known, and also in the more challenging case when the sensor geometry must be estimated from the input imagery alone. The methods described exploit prior knowledge concerning the type of sensor that is used to produce a more robust output.

  3. Respiratory self-gated 3D UTE for lung imaging in small animal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibiletti, Marta; Bianchi, Andrea; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Wundrak, Stefan; Stiller, Detlef; Rasche, Volker

    2017-08-01

    To investigate retrospective respiratory gating of three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D UTE) lung acquisition in free-breathing rats using k-space center self gating signal (DC-SG) and 3D image-based SG (3D-Img-SG). Seven rats were investigated with a quasi-random 3D UTE protocol. Low-resolution time-resolved sliding-window images were reconstructed with a 3D golden-angle radial sparse parallel (GRASP) reconstruction to extract a 3D-Img-SG signal, whereas DC-SG was extracted from the center of k-space. Both signals were sorted into 10 respiratory bins. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and normalized signal intensity (NSI) in lung parenchyma, image sharpness, and lung volume changes were studied in the resulting images to show feasibility of the method. An algorithm for bulk movement identification and removal was implemented. Three-dimensional Img-SG allows reconstruction of different respiratory stages in all acquired datasets, showing clear differences in diaphragm position and significantly different lung volumes, SNR, and NSI in lung parenchyma. Improved sharpness in expiration images was observed compared to ungated images. DC-SG did not result in clear different diaphragm position in all cases. Bulk motion removal improved final image sharpness. Low-resolution 3D GRASP reconstruction allowed for extraction of an effective gating signal for 3D-Img-SG. The DC-SG method did not work in cases for which respiratory frequencies were inconsistent. Magn Reson Med 78:739-745, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Time-gated FRET nanoassemblies for rapid and sensitive intra- and extracellular fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Hamid Samareh; Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Lindén, Stina; Chen, Ting; Qiu, Xue; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Jennings, Travis L; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L; Hildebrandt, Niko; Miller, Lawrence W

    2016-06-01

    Time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using the unique material combination of long-lifetime terbium complexes (Tb) and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) provides many advantages for highly sensitive and multiplexed biosensing. Although time-gated detection can efficiently suppress sample autofluorescence and background fluorescence from directly excited FRET acceptors, Tb-to-QD FRET has rarely been exploited for biomolecular imaging. We demonstrate Tb-to-QD time-gated FRET nanoassemblies that can be applied for intra- and extracellular imaging. Immunostaining of different epitopes of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Tb- and QD-conjugated antibodies and nanobodies allowed for efficient Tb-to-QD FRET on A431 cell membranes. The broad usability of Tb-to-QD FRET was further demonstrated by intracellular Tb-to-QD FRET and Tb-to-QD-to-dye FRET using microinjection as well as cell-penetrating peptide-mediated endocytosis with HeLa cells. Effective brightness enhancement by FRET from several Tb to the same QD, the use of low nanomolar concentrations, and the quick and sensitive detection void of FRET acceptor background fluorescence are important advantages for advanced intra- and extracellular imaging of biomolecular interactions.

  5. Visual Control of Robots Using Range Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Torres

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, 3D-vision systems based on the time-of-flight (ToF principle have gained more importance in order to obtain 3D information from the workspace. In this paper, an analysis of the use of 3D ToF cameras to guide a robot arm is performed. To do so, an adaptive method to simultaneous visual servo control and camera calibration is presented. Using this method a robot arm is guided by using range information obtained from a ToF camera. Furthermore, the self-calibration method obtains the adequate integration time to be used by the range camera in order to precisely determine the depth information.

  6. Building accurate geometric models from abundant range imaging information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegert, Carl F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1997-08-01

    We define two simple metrics for accuracy of models built from range imaging information. We apply the metric to a model built from a recent range image taken at the laser radar Development and Evaluation Facility, Eglin AFB, using a scannerless range imager (SRI) from Sandia National Laboratories. We also present graphical displays of the residual information produced as a byproduct of this measurement, and discuss mechanisms that these data suggest for further improvement in the performance of this already impressive SRI.

  7. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  8. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  9. Prediction of carotid plaque characteristics using non-gated MR imaging: correlation with endarterectomy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, S; Sasaki, M; Ohba, H; Ogasawara, K; Kobayashi, M; Hitomi, J; Mori, K; Ohura, K; Yamaguchi, M; Kudo, K; Terayama, Y

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiographic gating, commonly used in MR carotid plaque imaging, can negatively affect intraplaque contrast if the TR is inappropriate. The present study aimed to determine whether a non-gated technique with appropriate TRs can accurately evaluate intraplaque characteristics in specimens excised by CEA. We prospectively examined 40 consecutive patients who underwent CEA (59-82 years of age) by using a 1.5T scanner. Axial T1WI with a TR of 500 ms and PDWI and T2WI with a TR of 3000 ms with a self-navigated rotating-blade scan instead of cardiac gating were obtained. Signal intensities of the plaque and adjacent muscle were measured, and the CR on T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI as well as the gray-scale median on US were correlated with the pathologic findings of the CEA specimens. On T1WI, the CRs of the carotid plaques differed significantly among groups in which the main components were histologically confirmed as fibrous tissue, lipid/necrosis, and hemorrhage (0.54-1.17, 1.16-1.53, and 1.40-2.29, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity for discriminating lipid/necrosis/hemorrhage from fibrous tissue were 96% and 100%, respectively. On T2WI, the CRs of plaques with lipid/necrosis were significantly higher than those of other groups, but the CRs on PDWI and the gray-scale median on US were not significantly different among the groups. Non-gated MR plaque imaging, particularly T1WI, can readily predict the intraplaque main components of the carotid artery with high sensitivity and specificity.

  10. High Fill-Factor Imagers for Neuromorphic Processing Enabled by Floating-Gate Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasler Paul

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In neuromorphic modeling of the retina, it would be very nice to have processing capabilities at the focal plane while retaining the density of typical active pixel sensor (APS imager designs. Unfortunately, these two goals have been mostly incompatible. We introduce our transform imager technology and basic architecture that uses analog floating-gate devices to make it possible to have computational imagers with high pixel densities. This imager approach allows programmable focal-plane processing that can perform retinal and higher-level bioinspired computation. The processing is performed continuously on the image via programmable matrix operations that can operate on the entire image or blocks within the image. The resulting dataflow architecture can directly perform computation of spatial transforms, motion computations, and stereo computations. The core imager performs computations at the pixel plane, but still holds a fill factor greater than 40 percent—comparable to the high fill factors of APS imagers. Each pixel is composed of a photodiode sensor element and a multiplier. We present experimental results from several imager arrays built in 0.5 m process (up to in an area of 4 millimeter squared.

  11. Target Image Matching Algorithm Based on Binocular CCD Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed target image in a subpixel level matching algorithm for binocular CCD ranging, which is based on the principle of binocular CCD ranging. In the paper, firstly, we introduced the ranging principle of the binocular ranging system and deduced a binocular parallax formula. Secondly, we deduced the algorithm which was named improved cross-correlation matching algorithm and cubic surface fitting algorithm for target images matched, and it could achieve a subpixel level matching for binocular CCD ranging images. Lastly, through experiment we have analyzed and verified the actual CCD ranging images, then analyzed the errors of the experimental results and corrected the formula of calculating system errors. Experimental results showed that the actual measurement accuracy of a target within 3 km was higher than 0.52%, which meet the accuracy requirements of the high precision binocular ranging.

  12. Assessment of left ventricular performance by ECG-gated SPECT. Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadamura, Eiji; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kubo, Shigeto; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Fujita, Toru; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-10-01

    In the measurement of a left ventricular volume, MIBI-QGS was compared with MRI. Because it became clear by the experiment using phantom that a volume calculated with QGS was smaller than the actual volume, data of clinical study were corrected. Subjects were 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Fourteen patients had anamnesis of myocardial infarct. ECG-gated SPECT was performed one hour after intravenous injection of MIBI (600 MBq) in rest. End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using QGS. Cine-MR image was obtained by using MR system of 1.5 Tesla within 1 week after SPECT. A condition was as follows; segmented k-space gradient echo with view sharing, TR=11 ms, TE=1.4 ms, flip angle 20 degree, field of view 32 cm, matrix 256 x 196, 8 lines per segment. LVEF, ESV and EF were analysed by Bland-Altman method, and the difference between MIBI-gated-SPECT and MRI was no problem. Horizontal dislocation image and vertical major axis dislocation image were provided. Minor axis crossing images of 10-12 slice were also filmed in order to cover all left ventricles. As a result, availability of MIBI-QGS became clear. Some factors which produces the measurement error are examined. (K.H.)

  13. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  14. Long lifetime near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for time-gated in vivo imaging of rare circulating cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragola, Alexandra; Bouccara, Sophie; Pezet, Sophie; Lequeux, Nicolas; Loriette, Vincent; Pons, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The in vivo detection of rare circulating cells using non invasive fluorescence imaging would provide a key tool to study migration of eg. tumoral or immunological cells. Fluorescence detection is however currently limited by a lack of contrast between the small emission of isolated, fast circulating cells and the strong autofluorescence background of the surrounding tissues. We present the development of near infrared emitting quantum dots (NIR-QDs) with long fluorescence lifetime for sensitive time-gated in vivo imaging of circulating cells. These QDs are composed of low toxicity ZnCuInSe/ZnS materials and made biocompatible using a novel multidentate imidazole zwitterionic block copolymer, ensuring their long term intracellular stability. Cells of interest can thus be labeled ex vivo with QDs, injected intravenously and imaged in the near infrared range. Excitation using a pulsed laser coupled to time-gated detection enables the efficient rejection of short lifetime (≈ ns) autofluorescence background and detection of long lifetime (≈ 150 ns) fluorescence from QD-labeled cells. We demonstrate efficient in vivo imaging of single fast-flowing cells, which opens opportunities for future biological studies. [1] M. Tasso et al, "Sulfobetaine-Vinylimidazole block copolymers: a robust quantum dot surface chemistry expanding bioimaging's horizons", ACS Nano, 9(11), 2015 [2] S. Bouccara et al, "Time-gated cell imaging using long lifetime near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for autofluorescence rejection", J Biomed Optc, 19(5), 2014

  15. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  16. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  17. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of the PeTrack motion tracking system for respiratory gating in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, Spencer; Chamberland, Marc J. P.; Klein, Ran; Xu, Tong; deKemp, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory gating is a common technique used to compensate for patient breathing motion and decrease the prevalence of image artifacts that can impact diagnoses. In this study a new data-driven respiratory gating method (PeTrack) was compared with a conventional optical tracking system. The performance of respiratory gating of the two systems was evaluated by comparing the number of respiratory triggers, patient breathing intervals and gross heart motion as measured in the respiratory-gated image reconstructions of rubidium-82 cardiac PET scans in test and control groups consisting of 15 and 8 scans, respectively. We found evidence suggesting that PeTrack is a robust patient motion tracking system that can be used to retrospectively assess patient motion in the event of failure of the conventional optical tracking system.

  18. Range-gated pulsed Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, W D; Carrigan, T A; Dooley, K J; Giddens, D P; Dykes, F D; Lazzara, A; Ray, J L; Ahmann, P A

    1983-02-01

    Range-gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) ultrasonography was utilized to study the effect of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on carotid arterial blood flow in small preterm infants. Carotid arterial flow velocity studies were performed on 23 preterm infants, sampling right and left carotid arteries. Studies on seven infants after PDA ligation and on seven who developed no evidence of PDA were used as controls. A strong relationship was demonstrated between diastolic reversal in the carotid arteries and PDA. The results of this study indicate that the RGPD flow velocity curve from the carotid artery is more sensitive than M-mode echocardiography or clinical examination in detecting PDA, and that PDA in small preterm infants is associated with a distinct abnormality in the carotid arterial flow pattern.

  19. Spectroscopically Well-Characterized RGD Optical Probe as a Prerequisite for Lifetime-Gated Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Eva Mathejczyk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Labeling of RGD peptides with near-infrared fluorophores yields optical probes for noninvasive imaging of tumors overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. An important prerequisite for optimum detection sensitivity in vivo is strongly absorbing and highly emissive probes with a known fluorescence lifetime. The RGD-Cy5.5 optical probe was derived by coupling Cy5.5 to a cyclic arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–d-phenylalanine–lysine (RGDfK peptide via an aminohexanoic acid spacer. Spectroscopic properties of the probe were studied in different matrices in comparison to Cy5.5. For in vivo imaging, human glioblastoma cells were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice, and in vivo fluorescence intensity and lifetime were measured. The fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of Cy5.5 were found to be barely affected on RGD conjugation but dramatically changed in the presence of proteins. By time domain fluorescence imaging, we demonstrated specific binding of RGD-Cy5.5 to glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. Discrimination of unspecific fluorescence by lifetime-gated analysis further enhanced the detection sensitivity of RGD-Cy5.5-derived signals. We characterized RGD-Cy5.5 as a strongly emissive and stable probe adequate for selective targeting of αvβ3 integrins. The specificity and thus the overall detection sensitivity in vivo were optimized with lifetime gating, based on the previous determination of the probes fluorescence lifetime under application-relevant conditions.

  20. Cellometer image cytometry as a complementary tool to flow cytometry for verifying gated cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksin, Dmitry; Kuksin, Christina Arieta; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2016-06-15

    Traditionally, many cell-based assays that analyze cell populations and functionalities have been performed using flow cytometry. However, flow cytometers remain relatively expensive and require highly trained operators for routine maintenance and data analysis. Recently, an image cytometry system has been developed by Nexcelom Bioscience (Lawrence, MA, USA) for automated cell concentration and viability measurement using bright-field and fluorescent imaging methods. Image cytometry is analogous to flow cytometry in that gating operations can be performed on the cell population based on size and fluorescent intensity. In addition, the image cytometer is capable of capturing bright-field and fluorescent images, allowing for the measurement of cellular size and fluorescence intensity data. In this study, we labeled a population of cells with an enzymatic vitality stain (calcein-AM) and a cell viability dye (propidium iodide) and compared the data generated by flow and image cytometry. We report that measuring vitality and viability using the image cytometer is as effective as flow cytometric assays and allows for visual confirmation of the sample to exclude cellular debris. Image cytometry offers a direct method for performing fluorescent cell-based assays but also may be used as a complementary tool to flow cytometers for aiding the analysis of more complex samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    OpenAIRE

    van Geuns, Robert Jan; Bruin, Hein; Rensing, Benno; Wielopolski, Piotr; Hulshoff, M.D.; Ooijen, Peter; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Feyter, Pim

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and volume rendering techniques may meet the necessary requirements for appropriate visualisation.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the diagnostic accuracy of respiratory gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fo...

  2. SEGMENTATION AND QUALITY ANALYSIS OF LONG RANGE CAPTURED IRIS IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Deshpande

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The iris segmentation plays a major role in an iris recognition system to increase the performance of the system. This paper proposes a novel method for segmentation of iris images to extract the iris part of long range captured eye image and an approach to select best iris frame from the iris polar image sequences by analyzing the quality of iris polar images. The quality of iris image is determined by the frequency components present in the iris polar images. The experiments are carried out on CASIA-long range captured iris image sequences. The proposed segmentation method is compared with Hough transform based segmentation and it has been determined that the proposed method gives higher accuracy for segmentation than Hough transform.

  3. WE-EF-303-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING- THERAPY): A Comprehensive Simulation of Image Guided Beam Gating for Liver Tumor Treatments Using Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Knopf, A; Weber, D; Lomax, A [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen-PSI, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of image guided beam gating for PBS liver treatments under realistic breathing conditions. Methods: We have previously proposed a Beams’ Eye View (BEV) X-ray image system as an online motion monitoring device for deriving a gating signal for PBS proton therapy. Using dedicated 4D dose calculations (4DDC), in this work we have simulated gated liver treatments using three amplitude-based gating windows (10/5/3mm) based on motion extracted from BEV imaging of fiducial markers or the diaphragm. In order to improve motion mitigation, BEV guided gating has also been combined with either volumetric (VS) or layered (LS) rescanning. Nine 4DCT(MRI) liver data-sets have been used for the investigation, which not only consider realistic patient geometries but also motion variations between different breathing cycles. All 4D plans have been quantified in terms of plan homogeneity in the PTV (D5-D95), the total estimated treatment time and the beam-on duty cycle. Results: Neither gating nor rescanning can fully retrieve a comparable plan homogeneity to the static case, and considerable reductions of the duty cycle (<10%) were observed as a Result motion variations when small gating windows are used. However, once combined with rescanning, dose homogeneity within 1% of the static plan could be achieved with reasonable prolongation of the treatment time for all 9 subjects. No differences were observed between the efficacy of layered or volumetric re-scanning, or of gating signals extracted from fiducial or diaphragm motions. However, layered rescanning may be preferred over volumetric rescanning when performed in combination with gating as it is generally more time-efficient and dosimetrically robust to patient and motion variations Conclusion Combining BEV beam gating with rescanning is an efficient and effective approach to treating mobile liver tumours, and is equally effective if either the diaphragm or fiducial markers are used as

  4. Full image-processing pipeline in field-programmable gate array for a small endoscopic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Sheikh Shanawaz; Sousa, L. Natércia; Ferreira, Nuno Fábio; Sousa, Ricardo M.; Santos, Joao; Wäny, Martin; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopy is an imaging procedure used for diagnosis as well as for some surgical purposes. The camera used for the endoscopy should be small and able to produce a good quality image or video, to reduce discomfort of the patients, and to increase the efficiency of the medical team. To achieve these fundamental goals, a small endoscopy camera with a footprint of 1 mm×1 mm×1.65 mm is used. Due to the physical properties of the sensors and human vision system limitations, different image-processing algorithms, such as noise reduction, demosaicking, and gamma correction, among others, are needed to faithfully reproduce the image or video. A full image-processing pipeline is implemented using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to accomplish a high frame rate of 60 fps with minimum processing delay. Along with this, a viewer has also been developed to display and control the image-processing pipeline. The control and data transfer are done by a USB 3.0 end point in the computer. The full developed system achieves real-time processing of the image and fits in a Xilinx Spartan-6LX150 FPGA.

  5. Range image registration using a photometric metric under unknown lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diego; Sugimoto, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    Based on the spherical harmonics representation of image formation, we derive a new photometric metric for evaluating the correctness of a given rigid transformation aligning two overlapping range images captured under unknown, distant, and general illumination. We estimate the surrounding illumination and albedo values of points of the two range images from the point correspondences induced by the input transformation. We then synthesize the color of both range images using albedo values transferred using the point correspondences to compute the photometric reprojection error. This way allows us to accurately register two range images by finding the transformation that minimizes the photometric reprojection error. We also propose a practical method using the proposed photometric metric to register pairs of range images devoid of salient geometric features, captured under unknown lighting. Our method uses a hypothesize-and-test strategy to search for the transformation that minimizes our photometric metric. Transformation candidates are efficiently generated by employing the spherical representation of each range image. Experimental results using both synthetic and real data demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed metric.

  6. Comparison of phase dyssynchrony analysis using gated myocardial perfusion imaging with four software programs: Based on the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group normal database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Kiso, Keisuke; Kinuya, Seigo; Garcia, Ernest V

    2017-04-01

    Left ventricular (LV) phase dyssynchrony parameters based on gated myocardial perfusion imaging varied among software programs. The aim of this study was to determine normal ranges and factors affecting phase parameters. Normal databases were derived from the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group (n = 69). The programs were Emory Cardiac Toolbox with SyncTool (ECTb), Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), Heart Function View (HFV), and cardioREPO (cREPO); parameters of phase standard deviation (PSD), 95% bandwidth, and entropy were compared with parameters with ECTb as a reference. PSD (degree) was 5.3 ± 3.3 for QGS (P software types. Based on normal ranges of phase dyssynchrony parameters in four software programs, dependency on genders, LV volume, and EF should be considered, indicating the need for careful comparison among different software programs.

  7. Electrocardiography-Gated Computed Tomography of the Bronchial Arteries With Iterative Image Reconstruction: Clinical Evaluation and Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Qiangqiang; Xu, Jun; Wang, Junling; Hao, Peng; Xu, Yikai

    The aim of this study was to apply electrocardiography (ECG)-gated prospective-triggered multidetector row computed tomography angiography with iterative model reconstruction (IMR) to optimize imaging of the bronchial arteries in patients with the chief complaint of hemoptysis. This was a prospective observational study. Between August 2015 and June 2016, we enrolled 31 consecutive patients with the chief complaint of hemoptysis who were scheduled to undergo computed tomography of the bronchial artery. Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups: group A, with filtered back-projection reconstruction; group B, with iDose reconstruction; and group C, with ECG-gated prospective-triggered multidetector row computed tomography angiography with IMR. Image quality, visibility, and traceability were compared. Image quality, including signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, visibility, and traceability, was best in group C. With the help of IMR and ECG-synchronized prospective-triggered technology, the bronchial artery anatomy can be accurately depicted in patients with massive hemoptysis.

  8. Range image segmentation for tree detection in forest scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bienert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To make a tree-wise analysis inside a forest stand, the trees have to be identified. An interactive segmentation is often labourintensive and time-consuming. Therefore, an automatic detection process will aspired using a range image. This paper presents a method for the segmentation of range images extracted from terrestrial laser scanner point clouds of forest stands. After range image generation the segmentation is carried out with a connectivity analysis using the differences of the range values as homogeneity criterion. Subsequently, the tree detection is performed interactively by analysing one horizontal image line. When passing objects with a specific width, the object indicates a potential tree. By using the edge points of a segmented pixel group the tree position and diameter is calculated. Results from one test site are presented to show the performance of the method.

  9. Time-gated imaging of near-infrared quantum dots for in vivo cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouccara, S.; Giovanelli, E.; Sitbon, G.; Lequeux, N.; Pons, T.; Loriette, V.; Fragola, A.

    2014-03-01

    In vivo cell tracking is a promising tool to improve our understanding of certain biological processes (circulating tumor cell migration, immune cell activity). Several cell tracking techniques have been developed like MRI or PET but remain ill adapted to detect rare and individual cells because of their low spatial resolution and limited sensitivity. Fluorescence detection is a promising alternative. Its sensitivity is however limited by the high tissue autofluorescence and poor visible light penetration depth. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel cell imaging modality, based on nearinfrared quantum dots (QDs) allowing long term cell labeling and a sensitive detection based on time-gated wide field fluorescence microscopy. We present the synthesis and characterization of Zn-Cu-In-Se / ZnS (core/shell) QDs composed of low toxicity materials. These QDs exhibit a bright emission centered around 800 nm, where absorption and scattering of tissues are minimal. These nanocrystals are coated with a new surface chemistry, which yields small, stable, bright and individual probes in the cell cytoplasm for several days after the labeling. These QDs also present a fluorescence lifetime much longer (150-200 ns) than tissue autofluorescence (5-10 ns). By combining a pulsed excitation source to a time-gated fluorescence imaging system, we show that we can efficiently discriminate the QD signal from autofluorescence and thus increase the detection sensitivity of labeled cells into tissues.

  10. Range imager performance comparison in homodyne and heterodyne operating modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Richard M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Cree, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Range imaging cameras measure depth simultaneously for every pixel in a given field of view. In most implementations the basic operating principles are the same. A scene is illuminated with an intensity modulated light source and the reflected signal is sampled using a gain-modulated imager. Previously we presented a unique heterodyne range imaging system that employed a bulky and power hungry image intensifier as the high speed gain-modulation mechanism. In this paper we present a new range imager using an internally modulated image sensor that is designed to operate in heterodyne mode, but can also operate in homodyne mode. We discuss homodyne and heterodyne range imaging, and the merits of the various types of hardware used to implement these systems. Following this we describe in detail the hardware and firmware components of our new ranger. We experimentally compare the two operating modes and demonstrate that heterodyne operation is less sensitive to some of the limitations suffered in homodyne mode, resulting in better linearity and ranging precision characteristics. We conclude by showing various qualitative examples that demonstrate the system's three-dimensional measurement performance.

  11. POTENTIALS OF IMAGE BASED ACTIVE RANGING TO CAPTURE DYNAMIC SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jutzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision and Remote Sensing. To this end, laser scanning is currently one of the dominating techniques to gather reliable 3D information. The scanning principle inherently needs a certain time interval to acquire the 3D point cloud. On the other hand, new active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique image-based active ranging is possible which allows capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. like walking pedestrians in a yard or moving vehicles. Unfortunately most of these range imaging sensors have strong technical limitations and are not yet sufficient for airborne data acquisition. It can be seen from the recent development of highly specialized (far-range imaging sensors – so called flash-light lasers – that most of the limitations could be alleviated soon, so that future systems will be equipped with improved image size and potentially expanded operating range. The presented work is a first step towards the development of methods capable for application of range images in outdoor environments. To this end, an experimental setup was set up for investigating these proposed possibilities. With the experimental setup a measurement campaign was carried out and first results will be presented within this paper.

  12. Cardiac-gated parametric images from82Rb PET from dynamic frames and direct 4D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Carson, Richard E

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac perfusion PET data can be reconstructed as a dynamic sequence and kinetic modeling performed to quantify myocardial blood flow, or reconstructed as static gated images to quantify function. Parametric images from dynamic PET are conventionally not gated, to allow use of all events with lower noise. An alternative method for dynamic PET is to incorporate the kinetic model into the reconstruction algorithm itself, bypassing the generation of a time series of emission images and directly producing parametric images. So-called "direct reconstruction" can produce parametric images with lower noise than the conventional method because the noise distribution is more easily modeled in projection space than in image space. In this work, we develop direct reconstruction of cardiac-gated parametric images for 82 Rb PET with an extension of the Parametric Motion compensation OSEM List mode Algorithm for Resolution-recovery reconstruction for the one tissue model (PMOLAR-1T). PMOLAR-1T was extended to accommodate model terms to account for spillover from the left and right ventricles into the myocardium. The algorithm was evaluated on a 4D simulated 82 Rb dataset, including a perfusion defect, as well as a human 82 Rb list mode acquisition. The simulated list mode was subsampled into replicates, each with counts comparable to one gate of a gated acquisition. Parametric images were produced by the indirect (separate reconstructions and modeling) and direct methods for each of eight low-count and eight normal-count replicates of the simulated data, and each of eight cardiac gates for the human data. For the direct method, two initialization schemes were tested: uniform initialization, and initialization with the filtered iteration 1 result of the indirect method. For the human dataset, event-by-event respiratory motion compensation was included. The indirect and direct methods were compared for the simulated dataset in terms of bias and coefficient of variation as a

  13. Data Analysis of the Gated-LEH X-Ray Imaging Diagnostic at the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Matthew; Chen, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The Gated Laser Entrance Hole (G-LEH) x-ray imaging diagnostic in use at the NIF offers a desirable combination of spatial and temporal resolution. By looking inside of NIF hohlraums with time resolution, G-LEH measures target features including LEH size and capsule size. A framework is presented for automated and systematic analysis of G-LEH images that measures several physical parameters of interest and their evolution over time. The results from these analyses enable comparisons with hohlraum models and allow model validation of LEH closure velocity and the extent of capsule blow-off. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost laser range finder for real-time range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Isa; Nakhmani, Arie

    2017-06-01

    Range imaging plays an essential role in many fields: 3D modeling, robotics, heritage, agriculture, forestry, reverse engineering. One of the most popular range-measuring technologies is laser scanner due to its several advantages: long range, high precision, real-time measurement capabilities, and no dependence on lighting conditions. However, laser scanners are very costly. Their high cost prevents widespread use in applications. Due to the latest developments in technology, now, low-cost, reliable, faster, and light-weight 1D laser range finders (LRFs) are available. A low-cost 1D LRF with a scanning mechanism, providing the ability of laser beam steering for additional dimensions, enables to capture a depth map. In this work, we present an unsynchronized scanning with a low-cost LRF to decrease scanning period and reduce vibrations caused by stop-scan in synchronized scanning. Moreover, we developed an algorithm for alignment of unsynchronized raw data and proposed range image post-processing framework. The proposed technique enables to have a range imaging system for a fraction of the price of its counterparts. The results prove that the proposed method can fulfill the need for a low-cost laser scanning for range imaging for static environments because the most significant limitation of the method is the scanning period which is about 2 minutes for 55,000 range points (resolution of 250x220 image). In contrast, scanning the same image takes around 4 minutes in synchronized scanning. Once faster, longer range, and narrow beam LRFs are available, the methods proposed in this work can produce better results.

  15. Color Sensitivity Multiple Exposure Fusion using High Dynamic Range Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Borole

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a high dynamic range imaging (HDRI method using a capturing camera image using normally exposure, over exposure and under exposure. We make three different images from a multiple input image using local histogram stretching. Because the proposed method generated three histogram-stretched images from a multiple input image, ghost artifacts that are the result of the relative motion between the camera and objects during exposure time, are inherently removed. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to a consumer compact camera to provide the ghost artifacts free HDRI. Experiments with several sets of test images with different exposures show that the proposed method gives a better performance than existing methods in terms of visual results and computation time.

  16. Aerial Triangulation Close-range Images with Dual Quaternion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Qinghong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion is presented. Using dual quaternion to represent the spiral screw motion of the beam in the space, the real part of dual quaternion represents the angular elements of all the beams in the close-range area networks, the real part and the dual part of dual quaternion represents the line elements corporately. Finally, an aerial triangulation adjustment model based on dual quaternion is established, and the elements of interior orientation and exterior orientation and the object coordinates of the ground points are calculated. Real images and large attitude angle simulated images are selected to run the experiments of aerial triangulation. The experimental results show that the new method for the aerial triangulation of close-range images based on dual quaternion can obtain higher accuracy.

  17. A novel track imaging system as a range counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Matsufuji, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kanayama, S. [Chiba University (Japan); Ishida, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kohno, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Koba, Y.; Sekiguchi, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Murakami, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    An image-intensified, camera-based track imaging system has been developed to measure the tracks of ions in a scintillator block. To study the performance of the detector unit in the system, two types of scintillators, a dosimetrically tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator EJ-240 and a CsI(Tl) scintillator, were separately irradiated with carbon ion ({sup 12}C) beams of therapeutic energy from HIMAC at NIRS. The images of individual ion tracks in the scintillators were acquired by the newly developed track imaging system. The ranges reconstructed from the images are reported here. The range resolution of the measurements is 1.8 mm for 290 MeV/u carbon ions, which is considered a significant improvement on the energy resolution of the conventional ΔE/E method. The detector is compact and easy to handle, and it can fit inside treatment rooms for in-situ studies, as well as satisfy clinical quality assurance purposes.

  18. Online full two-dimensional imaging of pulsed muon beams at J-PARC MUSE using a gated image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T. U.; Toyoda, A.; Higemoto, W.; Tajima, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Shimomura, K.

    2014-08-01

    A new muon beam profile monitor (MBPM) was developed to diagnose pulsed muon beams at J-PARC MUSE, mainly composed of a scintillation screen, a gated image intensifier (II), and a cooled CCD camera. The MBPM was designed to be compact so that it could be inserted into the bore of the μSR spectrometer in the D1 area and used concurrently. The spatial resolution of the MBPM was evaluated to be better than 1.4 mm, depending on the II gain. Such high-resolution muon beam profiles were obtained online for a positive muon beam with a kinetic energy of approximately 4 MeV. The contribution from the decay positrons to beam profiles was significantly reduced owing to the II gating. The linearity of the MBPM was evaluated on the basis of the number of decay positrons monitored by the μSR spectrometer. A linear response within a deviation of ±5% was confirmed over more than two orders of magnitude. In addition, a 3D imaging capability, used in vacuum, and immunity against moderate magnetic fields were demonstrated.

  19. Disocclusion of 3d LIDAR Point Clouds Using Range Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, P.; Aujol, J.-F.; Brédif, M.; Bugeau, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel framework for the disocclusion of mobile objects in 3D LiDAR scenes aquired via street-based Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS). Most of the existing lines of research tackle this problem directly in the 3D space. This work promotes an alternative approach by using a 2D range image representation of the 3D point cloud, taking advantage of the fact that the problem of disocclusion has been intensively studied in the 2D image processing community over the past decade. First, the point cloud is turned into a 2D range image by exploiting the sensor's topology. Using the range image, a semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on depth histograms is performed in order to select the occluding object to be removed. A variational image inpainting technique is then used to reconstruct the area occluded by that object. Finally, the range image is unprojected as a 3D point cloud. Experiments on real data prove the effectiveness of this procedure both in terms of accuracy and speed.

  20. DISOCCLUSION OF 3D LIDAR POINT CLOUDS USING RANGE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Biasutti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel framework for the disocclusion of mobile objects in 3D LiDAR scenes aquired via street-based Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS. Most of the existing lines of research tackle this problem directly in the 3D space. This work promotes an alternative approach by using a 2D range image representation of the 3D point cloud, taking advantage of the fact that the problem of disocclusion has been intensively studied in the 2D image processing community over the past decade. First, the point cloud is turned into a 2D range image by exploiting the sensor’s topology. Using the range image, a semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on depth histograms is performed in order to select the occluding object to be removed. A variational image inpainting technique is then used to reconstruct the area occluded by that object. Finally, the range image is unprojected as a 3D point cloud. Experiments on real data prove the effectiveness of this procedure both in terms of accuracy and speed.

  1. Accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals in free-breathing three-dimensional cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yan-Chun; Yang, Jie; Xie, Yao-Qin; Fu, Nan; Wang, Yi; Gao, Song

    2016-12-01

    Conventional multiple breath-hold two-dimensional (2D) balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) presents many difficulties in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, a self-gated free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) SSFP technique has been proposed as an alternative in many studies. However, the accuracy and effectiveness of self-gating signals have been barely studied before. Since self-gating signals are crucially important in image reconstruction, a systematic study of self-gating signals and comparison with external monitored signals are needed. Previously developed self-gated free-breathing 3D SSFP techniques are used on twenty-eight healthy volunteers. Both electrocardiographic (ECG) and respiratory bellow signals are also acquired during the scan as external signals. Self-gating signal and external signal are compared by trigger and gating window. Gating window is proposed to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of respiratory self-gating signal. Relative deviation of the trigger and root-mean-square-deviation of the cycle duration are calculated. A two-tailed paired t-test is used to identify the difference between self-gating and external signals. A Wilcoxon signed rank test is used to identify the difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers. The results demonstrate an excellent correlation (P = 0, R > 0.99) between self-gating and external triggers. Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no significant difference between peak and valley self-gating triggers for both cardiac (H = 0, P > 0.10) and respiratory (H = 0, P > 0.44) motions. The difference between self-gating and externally monitored signals is not significant (two-tailed paired-sample t-test: H = 0, P > 0.90). The self-gating signals could demonstrate cardiac and respiratory motion accurately and effectively as ECG and respiratory bellow. The difference between the two methods is not significant and can be explained. Furthermore, few ECG trigger errors

  2. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model...... contains statistical information of the variability of left ventricular shape. CAFU was adjusted based on the results from the analysis of five simulated gated-SPECT studies with well defined volumes of the left ventricle. The digital phantom NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) and the Monte-Carlo method...... agreement between QGS and CAFU. The findings of this study indicate that our new automated method for quantification of gated-SPECT images can accurately measure left ventricular volumes and EF....

  3. Calibration and control for range imaging in mobile robot navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorum, O.H. [Norges Tekniske Hoegskole, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Computer Systems and Telematics; Hoover, A. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering; Jones, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper addresses some issues in the development of sensor-based systems for mobile robot navigation which use range imaging sensors as the primary source for geometric information about the environment. In particular, we describe a model of scanning laser range cameras which takes into account the properties of the mechanical system responsible for image formation and a calibration procedure which yields improved accuracy over previous models. In addition, we describe an algorithm which takes the limitations of these sensors into account in path planning and path execution. In particular, range imaging sensors are characterized by a limited field of view and a standoff distance -- a minimum distance nearer than which surfaces cannot be sensed. These limitations can be addressed by enriching the concept of configuration space to include information about what can be sensed from a given configuration, and using this information to guide path planning and path following.

  4. Dosimetric validation of a magnetic resonance image gated radiotherapy system using a motion phantom and radiochromic film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, James M; Ginn, John S; O'Connell, Dylan P; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Cao, Minsong; Thomas, David H; Yang, Yingli; Lazea, Mircea; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel A

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on the target position. We present an evaluation of an MRI-guided radiotherapy system's gating performance using an MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Our evaluation is geared toward validation of our institution's clinical gating protocol which involves planning to a target volume formed by expanding 5 mm about the gross tumor volume (GTV) and gating based on a 3 mm window about the GTV. The motion phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved in the superior-inferior direction inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical planning target volume, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal trajectories and tumor trajectories measured during MRI-guided treatments were used. Similarity of the gated dose distribution to the planned, motion-frozen, distribution was quantified using the gamma technique. Without gating, gamma pass rates using 4%/3 mm criteria were 22-59% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 97.8% with 3%/3 mm gamma criteria. Using a 3 mm window and 10% allowed excursion, all of the patient tumor motion trajectories at actual speed resulting in at least 95% gamma pass rate at 4%/3 mm. Our results suggest that the device can be used to compensate respiratory motion using a 3 mm gating margin and 10% allowed excursion results in conjunction with repeated breath holds. Full clinical validation requires a comprehensive evaluation of tracking performance in actual patient images, outside the scope of this study. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics

  5. Ladar range image denoising by a nonlocal probability statistics algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhi-Wei; Li, Qi; Xiong, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    According to the characteristic of range images of coherent ladar and the basis of nonlocal means (NLM), a nonlocal probability statistics (NLPS) algorithm is proposed in this paper. The difference is that NLM performs denoising using the mean of the conditional probability distribution function (PDF) while NLPS using the maximum of the marginal PDF. In the algorithm, similar blocks are found out by the operation of block matching and form a group. Pixels in the group are analyzed by probability statistics and the gray value with maximum probability is used as the estimated value of the current pixel. The simulated range images of coherent ladar with different carrier-to-noise ratio and real range image of coherent ladar with 8 gray-scales are denoised by this algorithm, and the results are compared with those of median filter, multitemplate order mean filter, NLM, median nonlocal mean filter and its incorporation of anatomical side information, and unsupervised information-theoretic adaptive filter. The range abnormality noise and Gaussian noise in range image of coherent ladar are effectively suppressed by NLPS.

  6. Gated single-photon emission computed tomography: the present-day 'one-stop-shop' for cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciagra' , R. [Florence Univ., Firenze (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit Department of Clinical Physiopathology; Leoncini, M. [Misericordia e Dolce Hospital, Prato (Italy). Division of Cardiology

    2005-03-01

    Gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the current state-of-the-art approach to myocardial perfusion imaging. Initially, major emphasis was given to the improvement in diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease, because the evaluation of wall motion and thickening allows the recognition of attenuation artifacts and increases the observer's confidence. Different processing algorithm's make possible to perform a reproducible and reliable assessment of left ventricular (LV) function, which has been extensively validated against various reference methods. Several articles report the additional value of functional data derived from gated SPECT to increase the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging in particular patient groups, such a women, to enhance the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease and to permit the recognition of severe stenosis. An extensive literature indicates that gated SPECT allows a more accurate and reliable prognostic stratification of patients with known coronary artery disease. More recently, the peculiar contribution of gated SPECT in the assessment of myocardial variability has been demonstrated, with the possibility to evaluate in a single myocardial perfusion study the presence of preserved tracer uptake and the amount of contractile reserve through the acquisition of gated SPECT during inotropic stimulation with dobutamine. The most recent advance in the application of gated SPECT is the use of this technique for the reproducible assessment of LV functional changes, at follow-up or during inotropic stimulation, with perfusion data in the background. Various clinical settings, such as assessment of response to medical or re synchronization therapy in dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy, prediction of outcome in chronic coronary artery disease with LV remodeling, evaluation of different treatment strategies in acute myocardial infarction, could take

  7. Elimination of autofluorescence background from fluorescence tissue images by use of time-gated detection and the AzaDiOxaTriAngulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Ryan M; Stankowska, Dorota L; Maliwal, Badri P; Sørensen, Thomas Just; Laursen, Bo W; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu R; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Fudala, Rafal

    2013-02-01

    Sample autofluorescence (fluorescence of inherent components of tissue and fixative-induced fluorescence) is a significant problem in direct imaging of molecular processes in biological samples. A large variety of naturally occurring fluorescent components in tissue results in broad emission that overlaps the emission of typical fluorescent dyes used for tissue labeling. In addition, autofluorescence is characterized by complex fluorescence intensity decay composed of multiple components whose lifetimes range from sub-nanoseconds to a few nanoseconds. For these reasons, the real fluorescence signal of the probe is difficult to separate from the unwanted autofluorescence. Here we present a method for reducing the autofluorescence problem by utilizing an azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) dye with a fluorescence lifetime of approximately 15 ns, much longer than those of most of the components of autofluorescence. A probe with such a long lifetime enables us to use time-gated intensity imaging to separate the signal of the targeting dye from the autofluorescence. We have shown experimentally that by discarding photons detected within the first 20 ns of the excitation pulse, the signal-to-background ratio is improved fivefold. This time-gating eliminates over 96 % of autofluorescence. Analysis using a variable time-gate may enable quantitative determination of the bound probe without the contributions from the background.

  8. Characterization of a time-resolved non-contact scanning diffuse optical imaging system exploiting fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Sieno, Laura, E-mail: laura.disieno@polimi.it; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Pifferi, Antonio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mazurenka, Mikhail [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Hannoversches Zentrum für Optische Technologien, Nienburger Str. 17, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hoshi, Yoko [Department of Biomedical Optics, Medical Photonics Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Becker, Wolfgang [Becker and Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Martelli, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a system for non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging, based on small source-detector distance and high dynamic range measurements utilizing a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode. The system is suitable for imaging of diffusive media without any contact with the sample and with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm at 1 cm depth. In order to objectively assess its performances, we adopted two standardized protocols developed for time-domain brain imagers. The related tests included the recording of the instrument response function of the setup and the responsivity of its detection system. Moreover, by using liquid turbid phantoms with absorbing inclusions, depth-dependent contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio as well as lateral spatial resolution were measured. To illustrate the potentialities of the novel approach, the characteristics of the non-contact system are discussed and compared to those of a fiber-based brain imager.

  9. Using field programmable gate array hardware for the performance improvement of ultrasonic wave propagation imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Jaffry Syed [Hamdard University, Karachi (Pakistan); Abbas, Syed Haider; Lee, Jung Ryul [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Advanced Materials Research Team, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Recently, wave propagation imaging based on laser scanning-generated elastic waves has been intensively used for nondestructive inspection. However, the proficiency of the conventional software based system reduces when the scan area is large since the processing time increases significantly due to unavoidable processor multitasking, where computing resources are shared with multiple processes. Hence, the field programmable gate array (FPGA) was introduced for a wave propagation imaging method in order to obtain extreme processing time reduction. An FPGA board was used for the design, implementing post-processing ultrasonic wave propagation imaging (UWPI). The results were compared with the conventional system and considerable improvement was observed, with at least 78% (scanning of 100x100mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) to 87.5% (scanning of 200x200mm{sup 2} with 0.5 mm interval) less processing time, strengthening the claim for the research. This new concept to implement FPGA technology into the UPI system will act as a break-through technology for full-scale automatic inspection.

  10. Scanning gate imaging of two coupled quantum dots in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Hedberg, James; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grutter, Peter; Ishibashi, Koji

    2014-12-12

    Two coupled single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots in a multiple quantum dot system were characterized by using a low temperature scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique, at a temperature of 170 mK. The locations of single wall carbon nanotube quantum dots were identified by taking the conductance images of a single wall carbon nanotube contacted by two metallic electrodes. The single electron transport through single wall carbon nanotube multiple quantum dots has been observed by varying either the position or voltage bias of a conductive atomic force microscopy tip. Clear hexagonal patterns were observed in the region of the conductance images where only two sets of overlapping conductance rings are visible. The values of coupling capacitance over the total capacitance of the two dots, C(m)/C(1(2)) have been extracted to be 0.21 ∼ 0.27 and 0.23 ∼ 0.28, respectively. In addition, the interdot coupling (conductance peak splitting) has also been confirmed in both conductance image measurement and current-voltage curves. The results show that a SGM technique enables spectroscopic investigation of coupled quantum dots even in the presence of unexpected multiple quantum dots.

  11. Passive millimeter-wave imaging at short and medium range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, H.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Nötel, D.; Klöppel, F.; Pergande, P.; Stanko, S.

    2005-11-01

    During recent year's research on radiometric signatures, non-imaging, of the exhaust jet of missiles and imaging, on small vehicles in critical background scenarios were conducted by the mmW/submmW-group at FGAN-FHR. The equipment used for these investigations was of low technological status using simple single channel radiometers on a scanning pedestal. Meanwhile components of improved performance are available on a cooperative basis with the Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Fraunhofer-IAF). Using such components a considerable progress concerning the temperature resolution and image generation time could be achieved. Emphasis has been put on the development of a demonstrator for CWD applications and on an imaging system for medium range applications, up to 200 m. The short range demonstrator is a scanning system operating alternatively at 35 GHz or 94 GHz to detect hidden materials as explosives, guns, knifes beneath the clothing. The demonstrator uses a focal plane array approach using 4 channels in azimuth, while mechanical scanning is used for the elevation. The medium range demonstrator currently employs a single channel radiometer on a pedestal for elevation over azimuth scanning. To improve the image quality, methods have been implemented using a Lorentzian algorithm with Wiener filtering.

  12. Shadow correction in high dynamic range images for generating orthophotos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    High dynamic range imagery is widely used in remote sensing. With the widespread use of aerial digital cameras such as the DMC, ADS40, RMK-D, and UltraCamD, high dynamic range imaging is generally expected for generating minuteness orthophotos in digital aerial photogrammetry. However, high dynamic range images (12-bit, 4,096 gray levels) are generally compressed into an 8-bit depth digital image (256 gray levels) owing to huge amount of data and interface with peripherals such as monitors and printers. This means that a great deal of image data is eliminated from the original image, and this introduces a new shadow problem. In particular, the influence of shadows in urban areas causes serious problems when generating minuteness orthophotos and performing house detection. Therefore, shadow problems can be solved by addressing the image compression problems. There is a large body of literature on image compression techniques such as logarithmic compression and tone mapping algorithms. However, logarithmic compression tends to cause loss of details in dark and/or light areas. Furthermore, the logarithmic method intends to operate on the full scene. This means that high-resolution luminance information can not be obtained. Even though tone mapping algorithms have the ability to operate over both full scene and local scene, background knowledge is required. To resolve the shadow problem in digital aerial photogrammetry, shadow areas should be recognized and corrected automatically without the loss of luminance information. To this end, a practical shadow correction method using 12-bit real data acquired by DMC is investigated in this paper.

  13. Fourier phase analysis on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography: Range of phase spread and cut-off limits in normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaiah, Vijayaraghavan L; Harish, B; Sunil, Hv; Selvakumar, Job; Ravi, Kishore Ag; Nair, Gopinathan

    2011-07-01

    To define the range of phase spread on equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography (ERNV) in normal individuals and derive the cut-off limit for the parameters to detect cardiac dyssynchrony. ERNV was carried out in 30 individuals (age 53±23 years, 25 males and 5 females) who had no history of cardiovascular disease. They all had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 55-70%) as determined by echocardiography, were in sinus rhythm, with normal QRS duration (≤120 msec) and normal coronary angiography. First harmonic phase analysis was performed on scintigraphic data acquired in best septal view. Left and right ventricular standard deviation (LVSD and RVSD, respectively) and interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD), the absolute difference of mean phase angles of right and left ventricle, were computed and expressed in milliseconds. Mean + 3 standard deviation (SD) was used to derive the cut-off limits. Average LVEF and duration of cardiac cycle in the study group were 62.5%±5.44% and 868.9±114.5 msec, respectively. The observations of LVSD, RVSD and right and left ventricular mean phase angles were shown to be normally distributed by Shapiro-Wilk test. Cut-off limits for LVSD, RVSD and IVMD were calculated to be 80 msec, 85 msec and 75 msec, respectively. Fourier phase analysis on ERNV is an effective tool for the evaluation of synchronicity of cardiac contraction. The cut-off limits of parameters of dyssynchrony can be used to separate heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony from those without. ERNV can be used to select patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  14. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Jae; Ji, Seo-Won; Kang, Seok-Jae; Jung, Seung-Won; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2017-06-22

    In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR) images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV) HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV) HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  15. Stereo Vision-Based High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Differently-Exposed Image Pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Jae Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high dynamic range (HDR imaging method based on the stereo vision system is presented. The proposed method uses differently exposed low dynamic range (LDR images captured from a stereo camera. The stereo LDR images are first converted to initial stereo HDR images using the inverse camera response function estimated from the LDR images. However, due to the limited dynamic range of the stereo LDR camera, the radiance values in under/over-exposed regions of the initial main-view (MV HDR image can be lost. To restore these radiance values, the proposed stereo matching and hole-filling algorithms are applied to the stereo HDR images. Specifically, the auxiliary-view (AV HDR image is warped by using the estimated disparity between initial the stereo HDR images and then effective hole-filling is applied to the warped AV HDR image. To reconstruct the final MV HDR, the warped and hole-filled AV HDR image is fused with the initial MV HDR image using the weight map. The experimental results demonstrate objectively and subjectively that the proposed stereo HDR imaging method provides better performance compared to the conventional method.

  16. Two-Dimensional Spoiled Gradient-Recalled Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Liver Using Respiratory Navigator-Gating Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Hata, Hirofumi; Matsunaga, Keiji; Nakajima, Ai; Komi, Shotaro; Abe, Yutaka; Miyatake, Hiroki

    We assessed the feasibility of T1-weighted 2-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (2D SPGR) acquisition in steady-state imaging of the liver with various respiratory navigator gating techniques. A total of 12 healthy volunteers underwent in-phase and out-of-phase 2D SPGR imaging of the liver during breath-holding and free-breathing. Four techniques for respiratory navigation, 2 conventional navigator techniques and 2 self-navigator techniques, were used for free-breathing imaging. Good navigator waveforms were obtained in conventional navigation, whereas fluctuations were evident in self navigation. All of the 4 navigator-based methods provided better images in terms of background signals and visual image quality compared with images obtained with no respiratory control. However, differences remained in comparison with breath-holding. Superiority of self-navigation to conventional navigation was not shown. Navigator-gating techniques improved 2D SPGR images of the liver acquired during free-breathing, suggesting feasibility and beneficial effects, although navigator-based images were still inferior to breath-hold images.

  17. The emerging versatility of a scannerless range imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackos, J.; Bradley, B.; Nellums, B.; Diegert, C.

    1996-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is nearing the completion of the initial development of a unique type of range imaging sensor. This innovative imaging optical radar is based on an active flood-light scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is an all solid-state device (no moving parts) and offers significant size, performance, reliability, simplicity, and affordability advantages over other types of 3-D sensor technologies, including: scanned laser radar, stereo vision, and structured lighting. The sensor is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is very well suited for affordable application to a wide variety of military and commercial uses, including: munition guidance, target recognition, robotic vision, automated inspection, driver enhanced vision, collision avoidance, site security and monitoring, terrain mapping, and facility surveying. This paper reviews the sensor technology and its development for the advanced conventional munition guidance application, and discusses a few of the many other emerging applications for this new innovative sensor technology.

  18. Close-range imaging and research priorities in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Patias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1984, the European Union’s Framework Program for Research and Innovation has been the main instrument for funding research. Specific priorities, objectives and types of funded activities vary between funding periods. Horizon 2020 is the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly € 80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014–2020. H2020 is based on three pillars: (i Excellent science, (ii Industrial leadership, (iii Societal challenges. The current economic crisis in Europe and elsewhere leads to extended shortage of research budgets in national levels, which in turn leads researchers to search funds in the highly competitive transnational research instruments, as H2020. This paper : - draws the overall picture of Horizon 2020 - investigates the position of close-range imaging technologies, applications and research areas - presents the research challenges in H2020 that offer funding opportunities in close-range imaging

  19. Adaptive Optics for Satellite Imaging and Space Debris Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, F.; D'Orgeville, C.; Price, I.; Rigaut, F.; Ritchie, I.; Smith, C.

    Earth's space environment is becoming crowded and at risk of a Kessler syndrome, and will require careful management for the future. Modern low noise high speed detectors allow for wavefront sensing and adaptive optics (AO) in extreme circumstances such as imaging small orbiting bodies in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) at the Australian National University have been developing AO systems for telescopes between 1 and 2.5m diameter to image and range orbiting satellites and space debris. Strehl ratios in excess of 30% can be achieved for targets in LEO with an AO loop running at 2kHz, allowing the resolution of small features (system developed at RSAA consists of a high speed EMCCD Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a deformable mirror (DM), and realtime computer (RTC), and an imaging camera. The system works best as a laser guide star system but will also function as a natural guide star AO system, with the target itself being the guide star. In both circumstances tip-tilt is provided by the target on the imaging camera. The fast tip-tilt modes are not corrected optically, and are instead removed by taking images at a moderate speed (>30Hz) and using a shift and add algorithm. This algorithm can also incorporate lucky imaging to further improve the final image quality. A similar AO system for space debris ranging is also in development in collaboration with Electro Optic Systems (EOS) and the Space Environment Management Cooperative Research Centre (SERC), at the Mount Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, Australia. The system is designed for an AO corrected upward propagated 1064nm pulsed laser beam, from which time of flight information is used to precisely range the target. A 1.8m telescope is used for both propagation and collection of laser light. A laser guide star, Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and DM are used for high order correction, and tip-tilt correction provided by reflected sunlight from the target. The

  20. Feasibility of one-eighth time gated myocardial perfusion SPECT functional imaging using IQ-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caobelli, Federico; Thackeray, James T.; Bengel, Frank M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Hannover (Germany); Soffientini, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo [Fondazione Poliambulanza, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brescia (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    IQ-SPECT, an add-on to general purpose cameras based on multifocal collimation, can reduce myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) acquisition times to one-fourth that of standard procedures (to 12 s/view). In a phantom study, a reduction of the acquisition time to one-eighth of the standard time (to 6 s/view) was demonstrated as feasible. It remains unclear whether such a reduction could be extended to clinical practice. Fifty patients with suspected or diagnosed CAD underwent a 2-day stress-rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi MPI protocol. Two consecutive SPECT acquisitions (6 and 12 s/view) were performed. Electrocardiogram-gated images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction (AC). Polar maps were generated and visually scored by two blinded observers for image quality and perfusion in 17 segments. Global and regional summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS) were determined. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were calculated based on automated contour detection. Image quality was scored higher with the 12 s/view acquisition, both with and without AC. Summed scores were statistically comparable between the 6 s/view and the 12 s/view acquisition, both globally and in individual coronary territories (e.g. in images with AC, SSS were 6.6 ± 8.3 and 6.2 ± 8.2 with 6 s and 12 s/view, respectively, p = 0.10; SRS were 3.9 ± 5.6 and 3.5 ± 5.3, respectively, p = 0.19; and SDS were 2.8 ± 5.7 and 2.6 ± 5.7, respectively, p = 0.59). Both acquisitions allowed MPI-based diagnosis of CAD in 25 of the 50 patients (with AC). Calculated end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) were modestly higher with the 6 s/view acquisition than with the 12 s/view acquisition (EDV +4.8 ml at rest and +3.7 ml after stress, p = 0.003; ESV +4.1 ml at rest and +2.6 ml after stress, p = 0.01), whereas the ejection fraction did not differ (-1.2 % at rest, p = 0.20, and -0.9 % after stress, p = 0.27). Image quality and

  1. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  2. Full Waveform Analysis for Long-Range 3D Imaging Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace AndrewM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of 3D imaging systems based on laser radar (ladar offers significant advantages in defense and security applications. In particular, it is possible to retrieve 3D shape information directly from the scene and separate a target from background or foreground clutter by extracting a narrow depth range from the field of view by range gating, either in the sensor or by postprocessing. We discuss and demonstrate the applicability of full-waveform ladar to produce multilayer 3D imagery, in which each pixel produces a complex temporal response that describes the scene structure. Such complexity caused by multiple and distributed reflection arises in many relevant scenarios, for example in viewing partially occluded targets, through semitransparent materials (e.g., windows and through distributed reflective media such as foliage. We demonstrate our methodology on 3D image data acquired by a scanning time-of-flight system, developed in our own laboratories, which uses the time-correlated single-photon counting technique.

  3. A continuous current model of ultra-thin cylindrical surrounding-gate inversion-mode Si nanowire nMOSFETs considering a wide range of body doping concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoshi; Liu, Xi; Wu, Meile; Chuai, Rongyan; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Based on the approximated solution of Poisson's equation, we propose a continuous current model of ultra-thin fully depleted cylindrical surrounding-gate Si nanowire MOSFETs. It matches well with three-dimensional simulation results using SILVACO Atlas TCAD in a wide range (from intrinsic to high doping) of the body doping concentration without any empirical fitting parameters. It is valid for all the operation regions such as subthreshold, turn-on, linear and saturation.

  4. Time-gated FRET nanoassemblies for rapid and sensitive intra- and extracellular fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsari, Hamid Samareh; Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Lindén, Stina; Chen, Ting; Qiu, Xue; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919481; Jennings, Travis L; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L; Hildebrandt, Niko; Miller, Lawrence W

    Time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using the unique material combination of long-lifetime terbium complexes (Tb) and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) provides many advantages for highly sensitive and multiplexed biosensing. Although time-gated detection can efficiently suppress

  5. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects Nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutteridge, S

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. Thes...

  6. Dynamic arrythmia filtration for gated blood pool imaging: Validation against list - Mode technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Rocchini, A.; Wu-Connolly, L.

    1985-05-01

    Normal resting heart rate variation distort the diastolic portions of time-activity curves (TACs) generated from gated blood pool (GBP) images. This alters calculated measures of diastolic function e.g. peak filling rate (PFR). The authors compared diastolic filling parameters obtained by two methods of arrythmia removal, list-mode (LM) acquisition and a new approach, dynamic arrythima filtration (DAF). LM acquisition techniques reject beats of unusual cycle length, thus reducing the TAC distortions caused by heart rate variation but is time consuming and requires large amounts of disk storage. In DAF systems data is evaluated for cycle length in real-time and accepted or rejected immediately according to preset, operator determined cycle-length criteria, thus eliminating the need for post-processing of data and for large mass data storage. The authors prospectively determined EF, time to end-systole (TES), PFR, ad TPFR on 25 GBP patients. Camera and ECG data were sent simultaneously to 2 computers. One acquired data via LM and the other by DAF. Fluctuations in heart rate during GBP acquisition may cause errors in calculation of filling parameters. Both LM and DAF remove cycles of unusual length. DAF is less time consuming and technically demanding than LM and provides results which correlate closely with those obtained by LM.

  7. Grafting polyethylenimine with quinoline derivatives for targeted imaging of intracellular Zn(2+) and logic gate operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Shi, Yupeng; Chen, Junying; Wong, Chap-Mo; Zhang, Heng; Li, Mei-Jin; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent Zn(2+) probe which exhibited excellent biocompatibility, water solubility, and cell-membrane permeability, was facilely synthesized in a single step by grafting polyethyleneimine (PEI) with quinoline derivatives. The primary amino groups in the branched PEI can increase water solubility and cell permeability of the probe PEIQ, while quinoline derivatives can specifically recognize Zn(2+) and reduce the potential cytotoxicity of PEI. Basing on fluorescence off-on mechanism, PEIQ demonstrated excellent sensing capability towards Zn(2+) in absolute aqueous solution, where a high sensitivity with a detection limit as low as 38.1nM, and a high selectivity over competing metal ions and potential interfering amino acids, were achieved. Inspired by these results, elementary logic operations (YES, NOT and INHIBIT) have been constructed by employing PEIQ as the gate while Zn(2+) and EDTA as chemical inputs. Together with the low cytotoxicity and good cell-permeability, the practical application of PEIQ in living cell imaging was satisfactorily demonstrated, emphasizing its wide application in fundamental biology research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development of Gated Pinned Avalanche Photodiode Pixels for High-Speed Low-Light Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetar, Tomislav; De Munck, Koen; Haspeslagh, Luc; Rosmeulen, Maarten; Süss, Andreas; Puers, Robert; Van Hoof, Chris

    2016-08-15

    This work explores the benefits of linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs) in high-speed CMOS imaging as compared to different approaches present in literature. Analysis of APDs biased below their breakdown voltage employed in single-photon counting mode is also discussed, showing a potentially interesting alternative to existing Geiger-mode APDs. An overview of the recently presented gated pinned avalanche photodiode pixel concept is provided, as well as the first experimental results on a 8 × 16 pixel test array. Full feasibility of the proposed pixel concept is not demonstrated; however, informative data is obtained from the sensor operating under -32 V substrate bias and clearly exhibiting wavelength-dependent gain in frontside illumination. The readout of the chip designed in standard 130 nm CMOS technology shows no dependence on the high-voltage bias. Readout noise level of 15 e - rms, full well capacity of 8000 e - , and the conversion gain of 75 µV / e - are extracted from the photon-transfer measurements. The gain characteristics of the avalanche junction are characterized on separate test diodes showing a multiplication factor of 1.6 for red light in frontside illumination.

  9. Imaging Three-Dimensional Myocardial Mechanics Using Navigator-gated Volumetric Spiral Cine DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaodong; Spottiswoode, Bruce S.; Meyer, Craig H.; Kramer, Christopher M.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2010-01-01

    A navigator-gated 3D spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) pulse sequence for imaging 3D myocardial mechanics was developed. In addition, previously-described 2D post-processing algorithms including phase unwrapping, tissue tracking, and strain tensor calculation for the left ventricle (LV) were extended to 3D. These 3D methods were evaluated in 5 healthy volunteers, using 2D cine DENSE and historical 3D myocardial tagging as reference standards. With an average scan time of 20.5 ± 5.7 minutes, 3D data sets with a matrix size of 128 × 128 × 22, voxel size of 2.8 × 2.8 × 5.0 mm3, and temporal resolution of 32 ms were obtained with displacement encoding in three orthogonal directions. Mean values for end-systolic mid-ventricular mid-wall radial, circumferential, and longitudinal strain were 0.33 ± 0.10, −0.17 ± 0.02, and −0.16 ± 0.02, respectively. Transmural strain gradients were detected in the radial and circumferential directions, reflecting high spatial resolution. Good agreement by linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis was achieved when comparing normal strains measured by 2D and 3D cine DENSE. Also, the 3D strains, twist, and torsion results obtained by 3D cine DENSE were in good agreement with historical values measured by 3D myocardial tagging. PMID:20574967

  10. Time-resolved optical imaging through turbid media using a fast data acquisition system based on a gated CCD camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Andrea, Cosimo; Comelli, Daniela; Pifferi, Antonio; Torricelli, Alessandro; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo [INFM-Dipartimento di Fisica and IFN-CNR, Politecnico di Milano Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy)

    2003-07-21

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for the acquisition of time-resolved data for optical tomography. A fast gated CCD has been used as a parallel detector to acquire in one shot the light intensity exiting a phantom within a very short time slice. By using a pulsed illumination and repeating the acquisition at different delays, the time behaviour of the diffused transmittance can be recorded very quickly. Scattering inclusions embedded in a 5 cm thick phantom have been revealed by fitting a set of 120 images, delayed 50 ps from one another, with a mathematical model based on the random walk theory. Moreover, absorption inclusions have been detected in time-gated images taken at suitable delays.

  11. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratering, David; Baltes, Christof; Dörries, Carola; Rudin, Markus

    2010-07-21

    Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve) and left-ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass) in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled) data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high spatial resolution at sufficiently high CNR. The

  12. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  13. Semiconducting polymer dots doped with europium complexes showing ultranarrow emission and long luminescence lifetime for time-gated cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yu, Jiangbo; Deng, Ruiping; Rong, Yu; Fujimoto, Bryant; Wu, Changfeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-10-18

    Bright dots: Semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) doped with europium complexes possess line-like fluorescence emission, high quantum yield, and long fluorescence lifetime. The Pdots successfully labeled receptors on cells. The long fluorescence lifetime of the Pdots was used to distinguish them from other red fluorescence emitting nanoparticles, and improve the signal-to-noise ratio for time-gated cellular imaging. PVK=poly(9-vinylcarbazole). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Dynamic range compression and detail enhancement algorithm for infrared image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Liu, Songlin; Wang, Weihua; Chen, Zengping

    2014-09-10

    For infrared imaging systems with high sampling width applying to the traditional display device or real-time processing system with 8-bit data width, this paper presents a new high dynamic range compression and detail enhancement (DRCDDE) algorithm for infrared images. First, a bilateral filter is adopted to separate the original image into two parts: the base component that contains large-scale signal variations, and the detail component that contains high-frequency information. Then, the operator model for DRC with local-contrast preservation is established, along with a new proposed nonlinear intensity transfer function (ITF) to implement adaptive DRC of the base component. For the detail component, depending on the local statistical characteristics, we set up suitable intensity level extension criteria to enhance the low-contrast details and suppress noise. Finally, the results of the two components are recombined with a weighted coefficient. Experiment results by real infrared data, and quantitative comparison with other well-established methods, show the better performance of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the technique could effectively project a dim target while suppressing noise, which is beneficial to image display and target detection.

  15. Active resonant subwavelength grating for scannerless range imaging sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Nellums, Robert O.; Boye, Robert R.; Peters, David William

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start LDRD, we will present a design for a wavelength-agile, high-speed modulator that enables a long-term vision for the THz Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) sensor. It takes the place of the currently-utilized SRI micro-channel plate which is limited to photocathode sensitive wavelengths (primarily in the visible and near-IR regimes). Two of Sandia's successful technologies--subwavelength diffractive optics and THz sources and detectors--are poised to extend the capabilities of the SRI sensor. The goal is to drastically broaden the SRI's sensing waveband--all the way to the THz regime--so the sensor can see through image-obscuring, scattering environments like smoke and dust. Surface properties, such as reflectivity, emissivity, and scattering roughness, vary greatly with the illuminating wavelength. Thus, objects that are difficult to image at the SRI sensor's present near-IR wavelengths may be imaged more easily at the considerably longer THz wavelengths (0.1 to 1mm). The proposed component is an active Resonant Subwavelength Grating (RSG). Sandia invested considerable effort on a passive RSG two years ago, which resulted in a highly-efficient (reflectivity greater than gold), wavelength-specific reflector. For this late-start LDRD proposal, we will transform the passive RSG design into an active laser-line reflector.

  16. Impact of Real-Time Image Gating on Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Lung Tumors: A Simulation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehira, Takahiro [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Matsuura, Taeko, E-mail: matsuura@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujii, Takaaki [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ito, Yoichi M. [Department of Biostatistics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Miyamoto, Naoki [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Inoue, Tetsuya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Katoh, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi [Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of real-time-image gated proton beam therapy for lung tumors and to establish a suitable size for the gating window (GW). Methods and Materials: A proton beam gated by a fiducial marker entering a preassigned GW (as monitored by 2 fluoroscopy units) was used with 7 lung cancer patients. Seven treatment plans were generated: real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with GW sizes of ±1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 mm and free-breathing proton therapy. The prescribed dose was 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness)/10 fractions to 99% of the target. Each of the 3-dimensional marker positions in the time series was associated with the appropriate 4-dimensional computed tomography phase. The 4-dimensional dose calculations were performed. The dose distribution in each respiratory phase was deformed into the end-exhale computed tomography image. The D99 and D5 to D95 of the clinical target volume scaled by the prescribed dose with criteria of D99 >95% and D5 to D95 <5%, V20 for the normal lung, and treatment times were evaluated. Results: Gating windows ≤ ±2 mm fulfilled the CTV criteria for all patients (whereas the criteria were not always met for GWs ≥ ±3 mm) and gave an average reduction in V20 of more than 17.2% relative to free-breathing proton therapy (whereas GWs ≥ ±4 mm resulted in similar or increased V20). The average (maximum) irradiation times were 384 seconds (818 seconds) for the ±1-mm GW, but less than 226 seconds (292 seconds) for the ±2-mm GW. The maximum increased considerably at ±1-mm GW. Conclusion: Real-time-image gated proton beam therapy with a GW of ±2 mm was demonstrated to be suitable, providing good dose distribution without greatly extending treatment time.

  17. Determination of single-kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with CT urography versus renal dynamic imaging Gates method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shan; Ma, XianWu; Zhang, ChangZhu; Li, Qiang; Shi, WenWei; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, XiaoDong

    2018-03-01

    To present a single-kidney CT-GFR measurement and compare it with the renal dynamic imaging Gates-GFR. Thirty-six patients with hydronephrosis referred for CT urography and 99mTc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging were prospectively included. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The CT urography protocol included non-contrast, nephrographic, and excretory phase imaging. The total CT-GFR was calculated by dividing the CT number increments of the total urinary system between the nephrographic and excretory phase by the products of iodine concentration in the aorta and the elapsed time, then multiplied by (1- Haematocrit). The total CT-GFR was then split into single-kidney CT-GFR by a left and right kidney proportionality factor. The results were compared with single-kidney Gates-GFR by using paired t-test, correlation analysis, and Bland-Altman plots. Paired difference between single-kidney CT-GFR (45.02 ± 13.91) and single-kidney Gates-GFR (51.21 ± 14.76) was 6.19 ± 5.63 ml/min, purography and the value of haematocrit • A one-stop-shop CT technique without additional radiation dose.

  18. Pile volume measurement by range imaging camera in indoor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Range imaging (RIM camera is recent technology in 3D location measurement. The new study areas have been emerged in measurement and data processing together with RIM camera. It has low-cost and fast measurement technique compared to the current measurement techniques. However its measurement accuracy varies according to effects resulting from the device and the environment. The direct sunlight is affect measurement accuracy of the camera. Thus, RIM camera should be used for indoor measurement. In this study gravel pile volume was measured by SwissRanger SR4000 camera. The measured volume is acquired as different 8.13% from the known.

  19. Image Quality of Coronary Arteries on Non-electrocardiography-gated High-Pitch Dual-Source Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanie, Yuichiro; Sato, Shuhei; Tada, Akihiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate image quality of coronary artery imaging on non-electrocardiography (ECG)-gated high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and to assess factors affecting image quality. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 142 children with CHD who underwent non-ECG-gated high-pitch DSCT. The subjective image quality of the proximal coronary segments was graded using a five-point scale. A score coronary segments in children with CHD. Lower body weight was a factor that led to poorer image quality of the coronary arteries.

  20. Sensitivity of Image Features to Noise in Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer: Uncorrelated Noise Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jasmine A; Budzevich, Mikalai; Hunt, Dylan; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Dilling, Thomas J; Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2017-10-01

    The effect of noise on image features has yet to be studied in depth. Our objective was to explore how significantly image features are affected by the addition of uncorrelated noise to an image. The signal-to-noise ratio and noise power spectrum were calculated for a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner using a Ge-68 phantom. The conventional and respiratory-gated positron emission tomography/computed tomography images of 31 patients with lung cancer were retrospectively examined. Multiple sets of noise images were created for each original image by adding Gaussian noise of varying standard deviation equal to 2.5%, 4.0%, and 6.0% of the maximum intensity for positron emission tomography images and 10, 20, 50, 80, and 120 Hounsfield units for computed tomography images. Image features were extracted from all images, and percentage differences between the original image and the noise image feature values were calculated. These features were then categorized according to the noise sensitivity. The contour-dependent shape descriptors averaged below 4% difference in positron emission tomography and below 13% difference in computed tomography between noise and original images. Gray level size zone matrix features were the most sensitive to uncorrelated noise exhibiting average differences >200% for conventional and respiratory-gated images in computed tomography and 90% in positron emission tomography. Image feature differences increased as the noise level increased for shape, intensity, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix features in positron emission tomography and for gray-level co-occurrence matrix and gray-level size zone matrix features in conventional computed tomography. Investigators should be aware of the noise effects on image features.

  1. A hardened gated x-ray imaging diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S; Koch, J; Bradley, D K; Izumi, N; Bell, P; Holder, J; Stone, G; Prasad, R; MacKinnon, A; Springer, P; Landen, O L; Kyrala, G

    2010-10-01

    A gated x-ray detector is under development for use at the National Ignition Facility that is intended to provide plasma emission images in the presence of neutron yields up to 10(15) expected during inertial confinement fusion experiments with layered cryogenic targets. These images are expected to provide valuable time-resolved measurements of core and fuel symmetries. Additional capabilities of this instrument will include the ability to make spatially resolved electron temperature measurements. A description of this instrument and its operation is given with emphasis on features that differentiate it from previous designs.

  2. Feasibility of one-eighth time gated myocardial perfusion SPECT functional imaging using IQ-SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caobelli, Federico; Thackeray, James T; Soffientini, Alberto; Bengel, Frank M; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2015-11-01

    IQ-SPECT, an add-on to general purpose cameras based on multifocal collimation, can reduce myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) acquisition times to one-fourth that of standard procedures (to 12 s/view). In a phantom study, a reduction of the acquisition time to one-eighth of the standard time (to 6 s/view) was demonstrated as feasible. It remains unclear whether such a reduction could be extended to clinical practice. Fifty patients with suspected or diagnosed CAD underwent a 2-day stress-rest (99m)Tc-sestamibi MPI protocol. Two consecutive SPECT acquisitions (6 and 12 s/view) were performed. Electrocardiogram-gated images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction (AC). Polar maps were generated and visually scored by two blinded observers for image quality and perfusion in 17 segments. Global and regional summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS) were determined. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction were calculated based on automated contour detection. Image quality was scored higher with the 12 s/view acquisition, both with and without AC. Summed scores were statistically comparable between the 6 s/view and the 12 s/view acquisition, both globally and in individual coronary territories (e.g. in images with AC, SSS were 6.6 ± 8.3 and 6.2 ± 8.2 with 6 s and 12 s/view, respectively, p = 0.10; SRS were 3.9 ± 5.6 and 3.5 ± 5.3, respectively, p = 0.19; and SDS were 2.8 ± 5.7 and 2.6 ± 5.7, respectively, p = 0.59). Both acquisitions allowed MPI-based diagnosis of CAD in 25 of the 50 patients (with AC). Calculated end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) were modestly higher with the 6 s/view acquisition than with the 12 s/view acquisition (EDV +4.8 ml at rest and +3.7 ml after stress, p = 0.003; ESV +4.1 ml at rest and +2.6 ml after stress, p = 0.01), whereas the ejection fraction did not differ (-1.2 % at rest, p = 0.20, and -0

  3. Geometric feature-based multimodal image registration of contrast-enhanced cardiac CT with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Cheng, Victor Y; Hong, Byung-Woo; Ramesh, Amit; Berman, Daniel S; Karlsberg, Ronald P; Kuo, C-C Jay; Germano, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provide clinically complementary information in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fused anatomical and physiological data acquired sequentially on separate scanners can be coregistered to accurately diagnose CAD in specific coronary vessels. A fully automated registration method is presented utilizing geometric features from a reliable segmentation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) volumes, where regions of myocardium and blood pools are extracted and used as an anatomical mask to de-emphasize the inhomogeneities of intensity distribution caused by perfusion defects and physiological variations. A multiresolution approach is employed to represent coarse-to-fine details of both volumes. The extracted voxels from each level are aligned using a similarity measure with a piecewise constant image model and minimized using a gradient descent method. The authors then perform limited nonlinear registration of gated MPS to adjust for phase differences by automatic cardiac phase matching between CT and MPS. For phase matching, they incorporate nonlinear registration using thin-plate-spline-based warping. Rigid registration has been compared with manual alignment (n=45) on 20 stress/rest MPS and coronary CTA data sets acquired from two different sites and five stress CT perfusion data sets. Phase matching was also compared to expert visual assessment. As compared with manual alignment obtained from two expert observers, the mean and standard deviation of absolute registration errors of the proposed method for MPS were4.3±3.5, 3.6±2.6, and 3.6±2.1mm for translation and 2.1±3.2°, 0.3±0.8°, and 0.7±1.2° for rotation at site A and 3.8±2.7, 4.0±2.9, and 2.2±1.8mm for translation and 1.1±2.0°, 1.6±3.1°, and 1.9±3.8° for rotation at site B. The results for CT perfusion were 3.0±2.9, 3.5±2.4, and 2.8±1.0mm for translation and 3.0±2.4°, 0.6±0.9°, and 1

  4. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Erin E; Westervelt, Robert M [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars, E-mail: westervelt@seas.harvard.edu [Solid State Physics/the Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-05-06

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter{approx}30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  5. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E.; Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2011-05-01

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter≈30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  6. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Erin E; Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars; Westervelt, Robert M

    2011-05-06

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter ≈ 30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quantum dot near each metal lead. The SGM conductance images are used to disentangle information about individual quantum dots and then to characterize each quantum dot using spatially resolved energy-level spectroscopy.

  7. Range imaging results from polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Marius; Hoffmann, Peter; Rapp, Markus; Chen, Jenn-Shyong

    The range resolution of pulsed radars is usually limited by the transmitting pulse length and the sampling time. The so-called range imaging (RIM) has been developed to reduce these lim-itations. To apply this method the radar operates alternately over a set of distinct frequencies. Then the phase differences of the receiving signals can be used for optimization methods to generate high-resolution maps of reflections as function of range insight the pulse length. The technique has been implemented on the ALWIN VHF radar in Andenes (69) and the OSWIN VHF radar in Kühlungsborn (54N). Here we present results of the RIM method from measurements in polar mesosphere summer echoes -PMSE. These strong radar echoes are linked to ice particle clouds in the mesopause region. The dynamic of the PMSE can be reflected very well by RIM. The movement of PMSE and the edges of the extension can be tracked with a high altitude resolution. Comparisons between simultaneous measurements by RIM and by standard radar techniques demonstrate the advan-tages of RIM. Wave structures can be identified with RIM whereas they are not detectable with the lesser resolution of the standard measurements. Gravity wave parameter associated with these variations are estimated using the simultaneous measured velocity field.

  8. Strategies for registering range images from unknown camera positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Fausto; Rushmeier, Holly E.

    2000-03-01

    We describe a project to construct a 3D numerical model of Michelangelo's Florentine Pieta to be used in a study of the sculpture. Here we focus on the registration of the range images used to construct the model. The major challenge was the range of length scales involved. A resolution of 1 mm or less required for the 2.25 m tall piece. To achieve this resolution, we could only acquire an area of 20 by 20 cm per scan. A total of approximately 700 images were required. Ideally, a tracker would be attached to the scanner to record position and pose. The use of a tracker was not possible in the field. Instead, we used a crude-to-fine approach to registering the meshes to one another. The crudest level consisted of pairwise manual registration, aided by texture maps containing laser dots that were projected onto the sculpture. This crude alignment was refined by an automatic registration of laser dot centers. In this phase, we found that consistency constraints on dot matches were essential to obtaining accurate results. The laser dot alignment was refined by an automatic registration of laser dot centers. In this phase, we found that consistency constraints on dot matches were essential to obtaining accurate results. The laser dot alignment was further refined using a variation of the ICP algorithm developed by Besl and McKay. In the application of ICP to global registration, we developed a method to avoid one class of local minima by finding a set of points, rather than the single point, that matches each candidate point.

  9. A logic gate-based fluorogenic probe for Hg(2+) detection and its applications in cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiwen; Hu, Zhangjun; Chen, Zhiwen; Gao, Hong-Wen; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2016-05-05

    A new colorimetric and fluorogenic probe (RN3) based on rhodamine-B has been successfully designed and synthesized. It displays a selective response to Hg(2+) in the aqueous buffer solution over the other competing metals. Upon addition of Hg(2+), the solution of RN3 exhibits a 'naked eye' observable color change from colorless to red and an intensive fluorescence with about 105-fold enhancement. The changes in the color and fluorescence are ascribed to the ring-opening of spirolactam in rhodamine fluorophore, which is induced by a binding of the constructed receptor to Hg(2+) with the association and dissociation constants of 0.22 × 10(5) M(-1) and 25.2 μM, respectively. The Job's plot experiment determines a 1:1 binding stoichiometry between RN3 and Hg(2+). The resultant "turn-on" fluorescence in buffer solution, allows the application of a method to determine Hg(2+) levels in the range of 4.0-15.0 μM, with the limit of detection (LOD) calculated at 60.7 nM (3σ/slope). In addition, the fluorescence 'turn-off' and color 'fading-out' happen to the mixture of RN3-Hg(2+) by further addition of I(-) or S(2-). The reversible switching cycles of fluorescence intensity upon alternate additions of Hg(2+) and S(2-) demonstrate that RN3 can perform as an INHIBIT logic gate. Furthermore, the potential of RN3 as a fluorescent probe has been demonstrated for cellular imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A field-programmable gate array based system for high frame rate laser Doppler blood flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H C; Hayes-Gill, B R; Morgan, S P; Zhu, Y; Boggett, D; Huang, X; Potter, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a general embedded processing system implemented in a field-programmable gate array providing high frame rate and high accuracy for a laser Doppler blood flow imaging system. The proposed system can achieve a basic frame rate of flow images at 1 frame/second for 256 x 256 images with 1024 fast Fourier transform (FFT) points used in the processing algorithm. Mixed fixed-floating point calculations are utilized to achieve high accuracy but with a reasonable resource usage. The implementation has a root mean square deviation of the relative difference in flow values below 0.1% when compared with a double-precision floating point implementation. The system can contain from one or more processing units to obtain the required frame rate and accuracy. The performance of the system is significantly higher than other methods reported to date. Furthermore, a dedicated field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board has been designed to test the proposed processing system. The board is linked with a laser line scanning system, which uses a 64 x 1 photodetector array. Test results with various operating parameters show that the performance of the new system is better, in terms of noise and imaging speed, than has been previously achieved.

  11. Early myocardial damage assessment in dystrophinopathies using 99Tcm-MIBI gated myocardial perfusion imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Li Zhang,1,* Zhe Liu,2,* Ke-You Hu,3 Qing-Bao Tian,3 Ling-Ge Wei,4 Zhe Zhao,5 Hong-Rui Shen,5 Jing Hu5 1Department of Cardiovascular Disorders, 2Department of Geriatrics, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 3The Public Health Department, Hebei Medical University, 4Department of Nuclear Medicine, 5Department of Neuromuscular Disorders, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China *Li Zhang and Zhe Liu are first coauthors of this paper Background: Early detection of muscular dystrophy (MD-associated cardiomyopathy is important because early medical treatment may slow cardiac remodeling and attenuate symptoms of cardiac dysfunction; however, no sensitive and standard diagnostic method for MD at an earlier stage has been well-recognized. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the early diagnostic value of technetium 99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99Tcm-MIBI gated myocardial perfusion imaging (G-MPI for MD.Methods and results: Ninety-one patients underwent 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI examinations when they were diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD (n=77 or Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD; n=14. 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI examinations were repeated in 43 DMD patients who received steroid treatments for 2 years as a follow-up examination. Myocardial defects were observed in nearly every segment of the left ventricular wall in both DMD and BMD patients compared with controls, especially in the inferior walls and the apices by using 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI. Cardiac wall movement impairment significantly correlated with age in the DMD and BMD groups (rs=0.534 [P<0.05] and rs=0.784 [P<0.05], respectively. Intermittent intravenous doses of glucocorticoids and continuation with oral steroid treatments significantly improved myocardial function in DMD patients (P<0.05, but not in BMD patients.Conclusion: 99Tcm-MIBI G-MPI is a sensitive and safe approach for early evaluation of cardiomyopathy in patients with DMD or BMD

  12. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  13. An evaluation of range gated pulsed Doppler echocardiography for detecting pulmonary outflow tract obstruction in d-transposition of the great vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areias, J C; Goldberg, S J; Spitaels, S E; de Villeneuve, V H

    1978-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of range gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) echocardiography for detecting obstruction to the pulmonary outflow tract in children with d-transposition of the great vessels (d-TGV). Twenty-one children were randomly selected for those available with d-TGV and were studied by precordial and suprasternal RGPD echocardiography. Three were excluded, leaving a population of 18 subjects. The exclusive criterion used to judge the RGPD results was the output of the time interval histogram (TIH). Coherence of the TIH was considered to represent laminar flow. Dispersion of the TIH was considered evidence of flow disturbance and obstruction to the outflow tract. With the range gating feature, the first site of disturbance could be localized. Information was handled by a technique that decreased bias. RGPD results were then compared to diagnoses of the outflow tract established at cardiac catheterization or operation. Comparison of these results indicated that all seven children with obstruction were correctly identified by RGPD study, and the level of the first obstruction was correctly identified. With one exception, all children without pulmonary obstruction were correctly identified by the examination.

  14. Normal appearance of the esophagus in sagittal section. Measurement of the anteroposterior diameter with ECG gated MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Aiko; Nakashima, Kenshu; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-03-01

    Sagittal images are valuable for determining the location and local extent of esophageal tumors. However, the normal appearance of the esophagus in sagittal section has not yet been analyzed well, although there have been a few reports on normal esophagus in the axial plane. In this study, the anteroposterior (AP) diameter of normal thoracic esophagus was measured in sagittal images using ECG gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compared with that of cadavers. In 78 subjects, 222 of 234 portions (95%) were depicted well when the esophagus was divided into three portions (upper thoracic, middle thoracic, and lower thoracic and abdominal). Almost all the AP diameters (96%) were within 15-16 mm. The data correlated well with the measurements in cadavers. The AP diameter of normal thoracic esophagus in sagittal section was considered to be up to 16 mm. These results might be of clinical use to evaluate the location and extent of esophageal tumors. (author)

  15. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slotman Ben J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers, and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD. Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns.

  16. Gated viewing and high-accuracy three-dimensional laser radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a fast and high-accuracy three-dimensional (3-D) imaging laser radar that can achieve better than 1 mm range accuracy for half a million pixels in less than 1 s. Our technique is based on range-gating segmentation. We combine the advantages of gated viewing with our new fast...

  17. Automatic face segmentation and facial landmark detection in range images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona Segundo, Maurício; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga Regina Pereira; Queirolo, Chauã C

    2010-10-01

    We present a methodology for face segmentation and facial landmark detection in range images. Our goal was to develop an automatic process to be embedded in a face recognition system using only depth information as input. To this end, our segmentation approach combines edge detection, region clustering, and shape analysis to extract the face region, and our landmark detection approach combines surface curvature information and depth relief curves to find the nose and eye landmarks. The experiments were performed using the two available versions of the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database and the BU-3DFE database, in order to validate our proposed methodology and its advantages for 3-D face recognition purposes. We present an analysis regarding the accuracy of our segmentation and landmark detection approaches. Our results were better compared to state-of-the-art works published in the literature. We also performed an evaluation regarding the influence of the segmentation process in our 3-D face recognition system and analyzed the improvements obtained when applying landmark-based techniques to deal with facial expressions.

  18. Depth maps and high-dynamic range image generation from alternating exposure multiview images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yong Seok; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Lee, Sang Uk

    2017-07-01

    For stereo matching, it is hard to find accurate correspondence for saturated regions, such as too dark or too bright regions, because there is rarely reliable information to match. In this situation, conventional high-dynamic range (HDR) imaging techniques combining multiple exposures for each viewpoint can be adopted to generate well-exposed stereo images. This approach is, however, time-consuming and needs much memory to store multiple exposures for each viewpoint. We propose an efficient method to generate HDR multiview images as well as corresponding accurate depth maps. First, we take a single exposure for each viewpoint with alternating exposure setting, such as short and long exposure, as functions of viewpoint changes. Then, we compute an initial depth map for each view only using neighboring images that have the same exposure. To reduce the error of the initial depth maps for the saturated regions, we adopt the fusion move algorithm fusing neighboring depth maps that have different error regions. Finally, using the enhanced depth maps, we generate artifact-free and sharp HDR images using the joint bilateral filtering and a detail-transfer technique. Experimental results show that our method produces both consistent HDR images and accurate depth maps for various indoor and outdoor multiview images.

  19. Evaluation of three-dimensional navigator-gated whole heart MR coronary angiography: The importance of systolic imaging in subjects with high heart rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yenwen [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoinkawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Tadamura, Eiji [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoinkawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: et@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Yamamuro, Masaki [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoinkawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kanao, Shotaro [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoinkawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazuki [Department of Radiology, Sakazaki Clinic, 11 Nishinokyoshimoai-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8436 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoinkawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of heart rate (HR) on magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) image quality in diastolic and systolic phases. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers (9 men; 33 {+-} 9 years, HR 53-110 bpm), were evaluated with the electrocardiography and three-dimensional navigator-gating MRCA in a 1.5-T MR scanner (Avanto, Siemens) in diastolic and systolic phases (steady-state free precession; TR/TE/flip angle = 3.2 ms/1.6 ms/90{sup o}). The timing of scanning was individually adapted to the cardiac rest periods obtained in the prescanning, by visually identifying when the movement of right coronary artery was minimized during diastole and systole. Images of two phases were side-by-side compared on a four-point scale (from 1 = poor to 4 = excellent visibility; score of 3 or 4 as diagnostic). Results: Of 13 subjects with HR {<=}65 bpm (low HR group, mean 59.8 {+-} 4.9 bpm, range 53-65), the image quality scores were significantly better than that with higher heart rates (73.9 {+-} 9.0 bpm, range 68-110) in diastolic MRCA. The image quality was significantly improved during systole in high HR group. Overall, 91.3% of low HR group had MRCA image of diagnostic quality acquired at diastole, while 88.3% of high HR group had diagnostic images at systole by segmental analysis (p = NS). Conclusions: MRCA at systole offered superior quality in patients with high heart rates.

  20. Respiratory gated beam delivery cannot facilitate margin reduction, unless combined with respiratory correlated image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, S.S.; Boyer, A.L.; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: In radiotherapy of targets moving with respiration, beam gating is offered as a means of reducing the target motion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safe magnitude of margin reduction for respiratory gated beam delivery. MATERIALS/METHODS: The study is based on data...... for 17 lung cancer patients in separate protocols at Rigshospitalet and Stanford Cancer Center. Respiratory curves for external optical markers and implanted fiducials were collected using equipment based on the RPM system (Varian Medical Systems). A total of 861 respiratory curves represented external...... measurements over 30 fraction treatment courses for 10 patients, and synchronous external/internal measurements in single sessions for seven patients. Variations in respiratory amplitude (simulated coaching) and external/internal phase shifts were simulated by perturbation with realistic values. Variations...

  1. Development of patient-controlled respiratory gating system based on visual guidance for magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-In; Lee, Hanyoung; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jong Min

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a visual guidance patient-controlled (VG-PC) respiratory gating system for respiratory-gated magnetic-resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) and to evaluate the performance of the developed system. The near-real-time cine planar MR image of a patient acquired during treatment was transmitted to a beam projector in the treatment room through an optical fiber cable. The beam projector projected the cine MR images inside the bore of the ViewRay system in order to be visible to a patient during treatment. With this visual information, patients voluntarily controlled their respiration to put the target volume into the gating boundary (gating window). The effect of the presence of the beam projector in the treatment room on the image quality of the MRI was investigated by evaluating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity with the VG-PC gating system. To evaluate the performance of the developed system, we applied the VG-PC gating system to a total of seven patients; six patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and one patient received conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The projected cine MR images were visible even when the room light was on. No image data loss or additional time delay during delivery of image data were observed. Every indicator representing MRI quality, including SNR, uniformity, low-contrast detectability, high-contrast spatial resolution, and spatial integrity exhibited values higher than the tolerance levels of the manufacturer with the VG-PC gating system; therefore, the presence of the VG-PC gating system in the treatment room did not degrade the MR image quality. The average beam-off times due to respiratory gating with and without the VG-PC gating system were 830.3 ± 278.2 s and 1264.2 ± 302.1 s respectively (P = 0.005). Consequently, the total treatment times excluding

  2. Accelerated cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the mouse heart using self-gated parallel imaging strategies does not compromise accuracy of structural and functional measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörries Carola

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-gated dynamic cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR enables non-invasive visualization of the heart and accurate assessment of cardiac function in mouse models of human disease. However, self-gated CMR requires the acquisition of large datasets to ensure accurate and artifact-free reconstruction of cardiac cines and is therefore hampered by long acquisition times putting high demands on the physiological stability of the animal. For this reason, we evaluated the feasibility of accelerating the data collection using the parallel imaging technique SENSE with respect to both anatomical definition and cardiac function quantification. Results Findings obtained from accelerated data sets were compared to fully sampled reference data. Our results revealed only minor differences in image quality of short- and long-axis cardiac cines: small anatomical structures (papillary muscles and the aortic valve and left-ventricular (LV remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI were accurately detected even for 3-fold accelerated data acquisition using a four-element phased array coil. Quantitative analysis of LV cardiac function (end-diastolic volume (EDV, end-systolic volume (ESV, stroke volume (SV, ejection fraction (EF and LV mass in healthy and infarcted animals revealed no substantial deviations from reference (fully sampled data for all investigated acceleration factors with deviations ranging from 2% to 6% in healthy animals and from 2% to 8% in infarcted mice for the highest acceleration factor of 3.0. CNR calculations performed between LV myocardial wall and LV cavity revealed a maximum CNR decrease of 50% for the 3-fold accelerated data acquisition when compared to the fully-sampled acquisition. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of accelerated self-gated retrospective CMR in mice using the parallel imaging technique SENSE. The proposed method led to considerably reduced acquisition times, while preserving high

  3. SU-F-J-151: Evaluation of a Magnetic Resonance Image Gated Radiotherapy System Using a Motion Phantom and Radiochromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Ginn, J; O’Connell, D; Thomas, D; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided radiotherapy enables gating directly on target position for soft-tissue targets in the lung and abdomen. We present a dosimetric evaluation of a commercially-available FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system’s gating performance using a MRI-compatible respiratory motion phantom and radiochromic film. Methods: The MRI-compatible phantom was capable of one-dimensional motion. The phantom consisted of a target rod containing high-contrast target inserts which moved inside a body structure containing background contrast material. The target rod was equipped with a radiochromic film insert. Treatment plans were generated for a 3 cm diameter spherical target, and delivered to the phantom at rest and in motion with and without gating. Both sinusoidal and actual tumor trajectories (two free-breathing trajectories and one repeated-breath hold) were used. Gamma comparison at 5%/3mm was used to measure fidelity to the static target dose distribution. Results: Without gating, gamma pass rates were 24–47% depending on motion trajectory. Using our clinical standard of repeated breath holds and a gating window of 3 mm with 10% of the target allowed outside the gating boundary, the gamma pass rate was 99.6%. Relaxing the gating window to 5 mm resulted in gamma pass rate of 98.6% with repeated breath holds. For all motion trajectories gated with 3 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 64–100% (mean:87.5%). For a 5 mm margin and 10% allowed out, gamma pass rates were between 57–98% (mean: 82.49%), significantly lower than for 3 mm by paired t-test (p=0.01). Conclusion: We validated the performance of respiratory gating based on real-time cine MRI images with the only FDA-approved MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Our results suggest that repeated breath hold gating should be used when possible for best accuracy. A 3 mm gating margin is statistically significantly more accurate than a 5 mm gating margin.

  4. Processor for Real-Time Atmospheric Compensation in Long-Range Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-range imaging is a critical component to many NASA applications including range surveillance, launch tracking, and astronomical observation. However,...

  5. Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager on New Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Conard, S. J.; Hayes, J. R.; Morgan, M. F.; Noble, M.; Taylor, H. W.; Barnouin, O.; Boldt, J. D.; Darlington, E. H.; Grey, M. P.; Magee, T.; Rossano, E.; Schlemm, C.; Kosakowski, K. E.; Sampath, D.

    2012-10-01

    LORRI is the highest resolution imager on the New Horizons (NH) mission to Pluto and the Kuiper belt. LORRI produced superb images of Jupiter and its satellites even though those bodies are ~35 times brighter than bodies in the Pluto system.

  6. Respiratory-gated 18F-FDG PET imaging in lung cancer: effects on sensitivity and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daouk, Joel (Nuclear Medicine Dept. Amiens Univ. Hospital, Amiens (France); Medical School, Univ. of Picardy Jules Verne, Amiens (France)), email: bailly.pascal@chu-amiens.fr; Leloire, Marie (Medical School, Univ. of Picardy Jules Verne, Amiens (France)); Fin, Loic (Clinical Trial and Innovation Dept., Amiens Univ. Hospital, Amiens (France)) (and others)

    2011-07-15

    Background: Respiratory motion is known to deteriorate positron emission tomography (PET) images and may lead to potential diagnostic errors when a standardized uptake value (SUV) cut-off threshold is used to discriminate between benign and malignant lesions. Purpose: To evaluate and compare ungated and respiratory-gated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) methods for the characterization of pulmonary nodules. Material and Methods: The list-mode acquisition during respiratory-gated PET was combined with a short breath-hold CT scan to form the CT-based images. We studied 48 lesions in 43 patients. PET images were analyzed in terms of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and the lesion location. Results: Using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the optimal SUV cut-off thresholds for the ungated and CT-based methods were calculated to be 2.0 and 2.2, respectively. The corresponding sensitivity values were 83% and 92%, respectively, with a specificity of 67% for both methods. The two methods gave equivalent performance levels for the upper and middle lobes (sensitivity 93%, specificity 62%). They differed for the lower lobes, where the CT-based method outperformed the ungated method (sensitivity values of 90% and 70%, respectively, and a specificity of 73% with both methods) - especially for lesions smaller than 15 mm. Conclusion: The CT-based method increased sensitivity and did not diminish specificity, compared with the ungated method. It was more efficient than the ungated method for imaging the lower lobes and smallest lesions, which are most affected by respiratory motion

  7. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J

    2009-12-01

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 microm. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength approximately 22 microm) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  8. Pathological Images (SVS format) - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available resolution whole slide digital images of liver and kidney pathological specimens stained with hematoxylin-eo...Pathological Images in SVS format File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates-pathological-images/LATEST/images.../ File size: 25 TB (Total amount of SVS files) Simple search URL - Data acquisition method Digital images...o's ScanScope AT). Data analysis method - Number of data entries 52,879 entries Digital images in SVS format... can be viewed with Aperio's ImageScope viewer. ImageScope can be downloaded for free from http://www.aperio.com/download-images

  9. Iterative model reconstruction: improved image quality of low-tube-voltage prospective ECG-gated coronary CT angiography images at 256-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Seitaro; Weissman, Gaby; Vembar, Mani; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effects of a new model-based type of iterative reconstruction (M-IR) technique, the iterative model reconstruction, on image quality of prospectively gated coronary CT angiography (CTA) acquired at low-tube-voltage. Thirty patients (16 men, 14 women; mean age 52.2 ± 13.2 years) underwent coronary CTA at 100-kVp on a 256-slice CT. Paired image sets were created using 3 types of reconstruction, i.e. filtered back projection (FBP), a hybrid type of iterative reconstruction (H-IR), and M-IR. Quantitative parameters including CT-attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The visual image quality, i.e. graininess, beam-hardening, vessel sharpness, and overall image quality, was scored on a 5-point scale. Lastly, coronary artery segments were evaluated using a 4-point scale to investigate the assessability of each segment. There was no significant difference in coronary arterial CT attenuation among the 3 reconstruction methods. The mean image noise of FBP, H-IR, and M-IR images was 29.3 ± 9.6, 19.3 ± 6.9, and 12.9 ± 3.3 HU, respectively, there were significant differences for all comparison combinations among the 3 methods (p<0.01). The CNR of M-IR was significantly better than of FBP and H-IR images (13.5 ± 5.0 [FBP], 20.9 ± 8.9 [H-IR] and 39.3 ± 13.9 [M-IR]; p<0.01). The visual scores were significantly higher for M-IR than the other images (p<0.01), and 95.3% of the coronary segments imaged with M-IR were of assessable quality compared with 76.7% of FBP- and 86.9% of H-IR images. M-IR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality in prospectively gated coronary CTA using a low-tube-voltage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N

    2008-01-01

    measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours...... landmarks and 0.85 cm (+/-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55 cm (+/-0.19) and 0.72 cm (+/-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  11. In-Vivo High Dynamic Range Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    Current vector flow systems are limited in their detectable range of blood flow velocities. Previous work on phantoms has shown that the velocity range can be extended using synthetic aperture directional beamforming combined with an adaptive multi-lag approach. This paper presents a first invivo...

  12. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Jianlin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lloyd, Michael S. [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  13. Adaptive optics instrument for long-range imaging. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.M.

    1998-06-01

    The science and history of imaging through a turbulent atmosphere is reviewed in detail. Traditional methods for reducing the effects of turbulence are presented. A simplified method for turbulence reduction called the Sheared Coherent Interferometric Photography (SCIP) method is presented. Implementation of SCIP is discussed along with experimental results. Limitations in the use of this method are discussed along with recommendations for future improvements.

  14. Detection of left atrial myxoma by gated radionuclide cardiac imaging. [/sup 99m/Tc tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohost, G.M.; Pastore, J.O.; McKusick, K.A.; Chiotellis, P.N.; Kapellakis, G.Z.; Myers, G.S.; Dinsmore, R.E.; Block, P.C.

    1977-01-01

    Gated radionuclide cardiac blood pool scans (GCS) of end-systole and end-diastole or eight images subtending the entire cardiac cycle were performed on seven patients with left artrial myxomas documented by pulmonary cineangiography with left atrial follow-through. The echocardiogram was either suggestive or diagnostic in all patients. In addition to demonstration of the tumor (6 patients), the GCS detected three patterns of tumor motion: a defect which moved from the left atrium in end systole to the left ventricle in end diastole (2 patients); a defect which remained within the region of the left atrium but decreased in size between end diastole and end systole (3); and a defect which was observed within the region of the left ventricle in end diastole but disappeared in end systole (1). Thus, the GCS is a noninvasive method for detection and evaluation of motion of left atrial myxomas.

  15. Pathological Image Information - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p/archive/open-tggates-pathological-images/LATEST/open_tggates_pathological_image.zip File size: 370 KB Simp...UND_NAME Compound name ORGAN Organs evaluated in tests. Liver or Kidney. FILE_LOCATION FTP server path to the pathological images.... CAPTURE_NO/NO_OF_SAMPLE(n/n) The sequence number of scanned images

  16. Diagnosis of umbilical cord entanglement in a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy with spontaneous septostomy of the dividing membranes using dual-gate Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ayumu; Nakata, Masahiko; Oji, Ayako; Takano, Mayumi; Umemura, Nahomi; Nagasaki, Sumito; Maemura, Toshimitsu; Morita, Mineto

    2018-01-01

    Umbilical cord entanglement is the leading cause of fetal mortality in monoamniotic twin pregnancies and a pseudo monoamniotic environment. Published methods for detecting this complication include color Doppler and pulsed Doppler sonography; however, no method provides an absolute diagnosis. In this case, we report the diagnosis of umbilical cord entanglement using dual-gate Doppler imaging. A 35-year-old woman was referred to our hospital at 28 weeks of gestation for prenatal management because of diagnosis of a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy with spontaneous septostomy of the dividing membranes. Each fetus displayed normal fetal growth without obvious discordance and anatomical abnormalities. However, the dividing membrane was not detected, and an entangled cord was suspected. Dual-gate Doppler examination was carried out. Two regions of interest were considered at different areas of the umbilical arteries, and when each Doppler image showed two different heart rates at the same time, we considered this to be evidence of umbilical cord entanglement. Cesarean section was performed at 32 weeks of gestation and twins were delivered. The delivered umbilical cords had sixfold entanglement. In this case, dual-gate Doppler seems to have been more accurate than conventional single-gate Doppler for the diagnosis of cord entanglement because we confirmed two different heart rates at the same time with dual-gate Doppler.

  17. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  18. Self-gated CINE MRI for combined contrast-enhanced imaging and wall-stiffness measurements of murine aortic atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Adel, Brigit; van der Graaf, Linda M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Poelmann, Robert E.; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution contrast-enhanced imaging of the murine atherosclerotic vessel wall is difficult due to unpredictable flow artifacts, motion of the thin artery wall and problems with flow suppression in the presence of a circulating contrast agent. We applied a 2D-FLASH retrospective-gated CINE MRI

  19. Gated pinhole camera imaging of the high-energy ions emitted by a discharge produced Sn plasma for extreme ultraviolet generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielissen, K.; Sidelnikov, Y.; Glushkov, D.; Soer, W.A.; Banine V.Y.; Van der Mullen, J.J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The origin and nature of the high-energy ions emitted by a dischargeproduced plasma source are studied using gated pinhole camera imaging. Time-of-flight analysis in combination with Faraday cup measurements enables characterization of the high-velocity component of theionic debris. The use of an

  20. Monte Carlo Simulations of High-speed, Time-gated MCP-based X-ray Detectors: Saturation Effects in DC and Pulsed Modes and Detector Dynamic Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig Kruschwitz, Ming Wu, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2008-10-31

    We present here results of continued efforts to understand the performance of microchannel plate (MCP)–based, high-speed, gated, x-ray detectors. This work involves the continued improvement of a Monte Carlo simulation code to describe MCP performance coupled with experimental efforts to better characterize such detectors. Our goal is a quantitative description of MCP saturation behavior in both static and pulsed modes. We have developed a new model of charge buildup on the walls of the MCP channels and measured its effect on MCP gain. The results are compared to experimental data obtained with a short-pulse, high-intensity ultraviolet laser; these results clearly demonstrate MCP saturation behavior in both DC and pulsed modes. The simulations compare favorably to the experimental results. The dynamic range of the detectors in pulsed operation is of particular interest when fielding an MCP–based camera. By adjusting the laser flux we study the linear range of the camera. These results, too, are compared to our simulations.

  1. Comparison of implosion core metrics: A 10 ps dilation X-ray imager vs a 100 ps gated microchannel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.

    2016-11-01

    The dilation x-ray imager (DIXI) [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 83, 10E116 (2012); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 85, 11E504 (2014)] is a high-speed x-ray framing camera that uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps. This is a 10 × improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) (100 ps resolution), and otherwise only achievable with 1D streaked imaging. A side effect of the dramatically reduced gate width is the comparatively lower detected signal level. Therefore we implement a Poisson noise reduction with non-local principal component analysis method [J. Salmon et al., J. Math. Imaging Vision 48, 279294 (2014)] to improve the robustness of the DIXI data analysis. Here we present results on ignition-relevant experiments at the NIF using DIXI. In particular we focus on establishing that/when DIXI gives reliable shape metrics (P0, P2, and P4 Legendre modes, and their temporal evolution/swings).

  2. Lookup Table Hough Transform for Real Time Range Image Segmentation and Featureless Co-Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorte, B.G.H.; Sithole, G.

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses range image segmentation, particularly of data recorded by range cameras, such as the Microsoft Kinect and the Mesa Swissranger SR4000. These devices record range images at video frame rates and allow for acqui-sition of 3-dimensional measurement sequences that can be used for 3D

  3. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  4. Evaluation of the Respiratory Motion Effect in Small Animal PET Images with GATE Monte Carlo Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Susana; Almeida, Pedro; Jan, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to increased interest in in vivo small animal imaging. Small animal imaging has been applied frequently to the imaging of small animals (mice and rats), which are ubiquitous in modeling human diseases and testing treatments. The use of PET in small animals allows the use of subjects as their own control, reducing the interanimal variability....

  5. Applying the polarization memory effect in polarization-gated subsurface imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph; Yao, Gang

    2006-05-29

    Polarization memory is a well established phenomenon occurring when circularly polarized light propagates in turbid media of larger particles. Recent studies have demonstrated that the circularly cross-polarized imaging can significantly improve subsurface reflection contrast due to the polarization memory effect. We have found that such improvement is strongly influenced by the optical properties of the media. Circularly cross-polarized light provides superior image enhancement in low scattering media, but becomes inferior in high scattering media. Our experiments also demonstrate that polarization imaging provides no significant improvement to image resolution.

  6. HARDWARE REALIZATION OF CANNY EDGE DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR UNDERWATER IMAGE SEGMENTATION USING FIELD PROGRAMMABLE GATE ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEX RAJ S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Underwater images raise new challenges in the field of digital image processing technology in recent years because of its widespread applications. There are many tangled matters to be considered in processing of images collected from water medium due to the adverse effects imposed by the environment itself. Image segmentation is preferred as basal stage of many digital image processing techniques which distinguish multiple segments in an image and reveal the hidden crucial information required for a peculiar application. There are so many general purpose algorithms and techniques that have been developed for image segmentation. Discontinuity based segmentation are most promising approach for image segmentation, in which Canny Edge detection based segmentation is more preferred for its high level of noise immunity and ability to tackle underwater environment. Since dealing with real time underwater image segmentation algorithm, which is computationally complex enough, an efficient hardware implementation is to be considered. The FPGA based realization of the referred segmentation algorithm is presented in this paper.

  7. SIFT-based dense pixel tracking on 0.35 T cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy with application to gating optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Thomas R., E-mail: tmazur@radonc.wustl.edu, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu; Fischer-Valuck, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yuhe; Yang, Deshan; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H. Harold, E-mail: tmazur@radonc.wustl.edu, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To first demonstrate the viability of applying an image processing technique for tracking regions on low-contrast cine-MR images acquired during image-guided radiation therapy, and then outline a scheme that uses tracking data for optimizing gating results in a patient-specific manner. Methods: A first-generation MR-IGRT system—treating patients since January 2014—integrates a 0.35 T MR scanner into an annular gantry consisting of three independent Co-60 sources. Obtaining adequate frame rates for capturing relevant patient motion across large fields-of-view currently requires coarse in-plane spatial resolution. This study initially (1) investigate the feasibility of rapidly tracking dense pixel correspondences across single, sagittal plane images (with both moderate signal-to-noise and spatial resolution) using a matching objective for highly descriptive vectors called scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) descriptors associated to all pixels that describe intensity gradients in local regions around each pixel. To more accurately track features, (2) harmonic analysis was then applied to all pixel trajectories within a region-of-interest across a short training period. In particular, the procedure adjusts the motion of outlying trajectories whose relative spectral power within a frequency bandwidth consistent with respiration (or another form of periodic motion) does not exceed a threshold value that is manually specified following the training period. To evaluate the tracking reliability after applying this correction, conventional metrics—including Dice similarity coefficients (DSCs), mean tracking errors (MTEs), and Hausdorff distances (HD)—were used to compare target segmentations obtained via tracking to manually delineated segmentations. Upon confirming the viability of this descriptor-based procedure for reliably tracking features, the study (3) outlines a scheme for optimizing gating parameters—including relative target position and a

  8. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  10. GLOBAL IMAGE HEGEMONY: Istanbul’s Gated Communities as the New Marketing Icons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Kan Ülkü

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated how marketing strategies of the developing consumer  society has affected housing production in Istanbul as a corollary development of globalization in Turkey. We aim to analyze marketing strategies as active agents that shape the design of emerging gated communities in Istanbul through advertising media based on the theme of ‘an ideal life style,’ in the form of TV commercials, newspaper ads, publicity brochures etc. We focus on the representation and dissemination of this elusive ‘ideal’ to the public via the advertising campaigns of these housing settlements. Therefore the cases studied in the paper concentrates on the Turkish architectural scene after 1990, when consumer culture’s most significant impacts on architectural products are observed. Marketing of a new type of suburbanization in Turkey is concomitant with the rise of a new middle class having a high purchasing power and these housing projects are marketed via life style characteristics ‘desired’ by this class.

  11. SU-C-210-03: Impact of Breathing Irregularities On Gated Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiuma, D; Arheit, M; Schmelzer, P; Scheib, S [Varian Medical Systems, Imaging Laboratory GmbH, Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland); Buchsbaum, T; Pemler, P [Radioonkologie, Stadtspital Triemli, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of breathing irregularities on target location in gated treatments using amplitude and phase gating. Methods: 111 breathing patterns acquired using RPM system were categorized based on period and amplitude STD as regular (STD period ≤ 0.5 s, STD amplitude ≤ 1.5 mm), medium (0.5 s < STD period ≤ 1 s, 1.5 mm < STD amplitude ≤ 3 mm) and irregular (STD period > 1 s, STD amplitude > 3 mm). One pattern representative of the average defined population was selected per category and corresponding target motion reproduced using Quasar Respiratory Motion Phantom. Phantom in motion underwent 4D-CT scan with phase reconstruction. Gated window was defined at end of exhale and DRRs reconstructed in treatment planning at 40% (beam on) and 60% phase (beam off). Target location uncertainty was assessed by comparing gated kV triggered images continuously acquired at beam on/off on a True Beam 2.0 with corresponding DRRs. Results: Average target uncertainty with amplitude gating was in [0.4 – 1.9] mm range for the different scenarios with maximum STD of 1.2 mm for the irregular pattern. Average target uncertainty with phase gating was [1.1 – 2.2] mm for regular and medium patterns, while it increased to [3.6 – 9.6] mm for the irregular pattern. Live gated motion was stable with amplitude gating, while increasing with phase gating for the irregular pattern. Treatment duration range was [68 – 160] s with amplitude and [70 – 74] s with phase gating. Conclusion: Breathing irregularities were found to affect gated treatments only when using phase gating. For regular and medium patterns no significant difference was found between the two gating strategies. Amplitude gating ensured stable gated motion within the different patterns, thus reducing intra-fraction target location variability for the irregular pattern and resulting in longer treatment duration.

  12. 128-slice CT angiography of the aorta without ECG-gating: efficacy of faster gantry rotation time and iterative reconstruction in terms of image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Vincenzo; Garattoni, Monica; Buia, Francesco; Attina, Domenico; Lovato, Luigi; Zompatori, Maurizio [University Hospital ' ' S.Orsola' ' , Cardio-Thoracic-Vascular Department, Cardio-Thoracic Radiology Unit, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of non ECG-gated 128-slice CT angiography of the aorta (CTAA) with fast gantry rotation time and iterative reconstruction. Four hundred and eighty patients underwent non ECG-gated CTAA. Qualitative and quantitative image quality assessments were performed. Radiation dose was assessed and compared with the dose of patients who underwent ECG-gated CTAA (n = 126) and the dose of previous CTAA performed with another CT (n = 339). Image quality (aortic root-ascending portion) was average-to-excellent in more than 94 % of cases, without any non-diagnostic scan. For proximal coronaries, image quality was average-to-excellent in more than 50 %, with only 21.5 % of non-diagnostic cases. Quantitative analysis results were also good. Mean radiation dose for thoracic CTAA was 5.6 mSv versus 20.6 mSv of ECG-gated protocol and 20.6 mSv of 16-slice CTAA scans, with an average dose reduction of 72.8 % (p < 0.001). Mean radiation dose for thoracic-abdominal CTAA was 9.7 mSv, versus 20.9 mSv of 16-slice CTAA scans, with an average dose reduction of 53.6 % (p < 0.001). Non ECG-gated 128-slice CTAA is feasible and able to provide high quality visualization of the entire aorta without significant motion artefacts, together with a considerable dose and contrast media volume reduction. (orig.)

  13. Rapid mapping of digital integrated circuit logic gates via multi-spectral backside imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Adato, Ronen; Zangeneh, Mahmoud; Zhou, Boyou; Joshi, Ajay; Goldberg, Bennett; Unlu, M Selim

    2016-01-01

    Modern semiconductor integrated circuits are increasingly fabricated at untrusted third party foundries. There now exist myriad security threats of malicious tampering at the hardware level and hence a clear and pressing need for new tools that enable rapid, robust and low-cost validation of circuit layouts. Optical backside imaging offers an attractive platform, but its limited resolution and throughput cannot cope with the nanoscale sizes of modern circuitry and the need to image over a large area. We propose and demonstrate a multi-spectral imaging approach to overcome these obstacles by identifying key circuit elements on the basis of their spectral response. This obviates the need to directly image the nanoscale components that define them, thereby relaxing resolution and spatial sampling requirements by 1 and 2 - 4 orders of magnitude respectively. Our results directly address critical security needs in the integrated circuit supply chain and highlight the potential of spectroscopic techniques to addres...

  14. Laser range scanning for image-guided neurosurgery: investigation of image-to-physical space registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Aize; Thompson, R C; Dumpuri, P; Dawant, B M; Galloway, R L; Ding, S; Miga, M I

    2008-04-01

    In this article a comprehensive set of registration methods is utilized to provide image-to-physical space registration for image-guided neurosurgery in a clinical study. Central to all methods is the use of textured point clouds as provided by laser range scanning technology. The objective is to perform a systematic comparison of registration methods that include both extracranial (skin marker point-based registration (PBR), and face-based surface registration) and intracranial methods (feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, a combined geometry/intensity surface registration method, and a constrained form of that method to improve robustness). The platform facilitates the selection of discrete soft-tissue landmarks that appear on the patient's intraoperative cortical surface and the preoperative gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) image volume, i.e., true corresponding novel targets. In an 11 patient study, data were taken to allow statistical comparison among registration methods within the context of registration error. The results indicate that intraoperative face-based surface registration is statistically equivalent to traditional skin marker registration. The four intracranial registration methods were investigated and the results demonstrated a target registration error of 1.6 +/- 0.5 mm, 1.7 +/- 0.5 mm, 3.9 +/- 3.4 mm, and 2.0 +/- 0.9 mm, for feature PBR, cortical vessel-contour registration, unconstrained geometric/intensity registration, and constrained geometric/intensity registration, respectively. When analyzing the results on a per case basis, the constrained geometric/intensity registration performed best, followed by feature PBR, and finally cortical vessel-contour registration. Interestingly, the best target registration errors are similar to targeting errors reported using bone-implanted markers within the context of rigid targets. The experience in this study as with others is that brain shift can compromise extracranial

  15. Detection and evaluation of left atrial myxoma by gated radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Hiroki; Adachi, Haruhiko; Nakagawa, Hiroaki

    1985-05-01

    Radionuclide imaging plays an important role in diagnosising left atrial myxoma (LAM). We discussed diagnostic value of Fourier analysis with phase image and evaluated left ventricular filling function using indices such as 1/3 Filling Fraction, Rapid Filling Fraction and Peak Filling Rate derived from left ventricular volume curve. Equillibrium radionuclide angiocardiography was performed in 6 LAM patients. Phase delay in the basal portion of the left ventricle was shown in 5 of 6 LAM patients, and standard deviation of left ventricular phase was larger than these of controls. Left ventricular filling disturbance was suggested in 5 of 6 LAM patients. After surgical remove of myxoma phase delay was disappeared and standard deviation was normalized. And left ventricular filling was improved. We concluded that the phase image of Fourier analysis revealed a left atrial mass prolapsing in the left ventricule during the diastole, and that diastolic indices were useful for left ventricular filling disturbance due to LAM. (author).

  16. Improved Feature Detection in Fused Intensity-Range Images with Complex SIFT (ℂSIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Jutzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The real and imaginary parts are proposed as an alternative to the usual Polar representation of complex-valued images. It is proven that the transformation from Polar to Cartesian representation contributes to decreased mutual information, and hence to greater distinctiveness. The Complex Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (ℂSIFT detects distinctive features in complex-valued images. An evaluation method for estimating the uniformity of feature distributions in complex-valued images derived from intensity-range images is proposed. In order to experimentally evaluate the proposed methodology on intensity-range images, three different kinds of active sensing systems were used: Range Imaging, Laser Scanning, and Structured Light Projection devices (PMD CamCube 2.0, Z+F IMAGER 5003, Microsoft Kinect.

  17. TU-AB-BRA-10: Treatment of Gastric MALT Lymphoma Utilizing a Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System: Evaluation of Gating Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, T; Gach, H; Chundury, A; Fischer-Valuck, B; Huang, J; Thomas, M; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of real-time, real-anatomy tracking and gating for gastric lymphoma patients treated with magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) Methods: Over the last 2 years, 8 patients with gastric lymphoma were treated with 0.3-T, Co-60 MR-IGRT. Post-treatment analysis of real-time cine imaging in the sagittal plane during each patient’s treatment revealed significant motion of the stomach. While this motion was accounted for with generous PTV margins, the system’s capability for real-time, real-anatomy tracking could be used to reduce treatment margins by gating. However, analysis was needed for the feasibility of gating using only the single available sagittal imaging plane. While any plane may be chosen, if the stomach moves differently where it is not being observed, there may potentially be a mistreatment. To that end, imaging with healthy volunteers was done to ascertain stomach motion over 2–4 min by analyzing multiple parallel sagittal and coronal planes 0.75 cm apart. The stomach was contoured on every slice, and the mean displacement between pairs of contour centroids was used to determine the amount of overall motion. Results: The mean displacement of the centroid in the image plane was 4.3 ± 0.7 mm. The greatest observed motion was more medial with respect to the patient, and less motion laterally, which implies that gating on a plane located closer to MRI isocenter will provide the more conservative scenario as it will turn the radiation delivery off when the stomach is observed to move outside a predetermined boundary. Conclusion: The stomach was observed to move relatively uniformly throughout, with maximum extent of motion closer to where most MRI systems have the best spatial integrity (near isocenter). Analysis of possible PTV margins from the healthy volunteer study (coupled with previous patient data on interfraction volumetric stomach deformation) is pending.

  18. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  19. Coronary artery bypass graft imaging using ECG-gated multislice computed tomography: Comparison with catheter angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.K.G. [Cardiothoracic Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: moore@roger.go-legend.net; Sampson, C. [Cardiothoracic Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); MacDonald, S. [Cardiothoracic Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Moynahan, C. [Cardiothoracic Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Groves, D. [National Refractory Angina Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Chester, M.R. [National Refractory Angina Centre, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    AIM: To compare the value of multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) in imaging coronary artery bypass grafts (CABGs) by direct quantitative comparison with standard invasive angiography. METHODS: Using MSCT, 50 consecutive patients who had previously undergone CABG surgery and had recently undergone invasive angiography for recurrent angina pectoris, were studied further using MSCT after intravenous injection of non-ionic contrast agent; cardiac imaging was performed during a single breath-hold. Graft anatomy was quantified, using both quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and MSCT, by different investigators blinded to each other. Reproducibility was quantified using the standard error of the measurement expressed as a percentage in log-transformed values (CV%) and intraclass correlation (ICC). RESULTS: All 150 grafts were imaged using MSCT; only 4 patent grafts were not imaged using selective angiography. Good agreement was achieved between MSCT and QCA on assessment of proximal anastomoses (CV% 25.2, ICC 0.84), mid-vessel luminal diameter (CV% 15.5, ICC 0.91) and aneurysmal dilations (CV% 14.3). Reasonable agreement was reached on assessment of distal anastomoses (CV% 26.7, ICC 0.66) and categorization of distal run-off (ICC 0.73). Good agreement was observed for stenoses of over 50% luminal loss (CV% 8.7, ICC 0.97) but agreement on assessment of less severe lesions was poor (CV% 208.7, ICC 0.51). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that CABGs can be quantitatively evaluated using MSCT, and that significant lesions present in all CABG segments can be reliably identified. Agreement between MSCT and QCA for lesions of less than 50% luminal loss was poor.

  20. A compact wide-range spectrometer with image intensifier: unexpected advantages, new functions, and a variety of applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopov, Vladimir

    2012-05-01

    Gated intensified spectrometers are very efficient instruments not only in time-resolved applications but also in all other fields were traditional non-gated and non-intensified devices are so popular today. This paper describes the design and performance of a simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive wide-range gated intensified spectrometer that was conceived as a prototype for volume production. With 200-900 nm spectral range, 3 ns temporal resolution, variable optical gain up to 4000, repetition rate up to 200 kHz, spectral resolution 2 nm (0.9 nm with deconvolution), and affordable price, such a device may be useful for budget research laboratories working in the fields of cell biology, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, molecular kinetics, plasma diagnostics, materials characterization, combustion analysis, and forensic analysis.

  1. Time-gated cell imaging using long lifetime near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for autofluorescence rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouccara, Sophie; Fragola, Alexandra; Giovanelli, Emerson; Sitbon, Gary; Lequeux, Nicolas; Pons, Thomas; Loriette, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a promising technique for the detection of individual cell migration. Its sensitivity is, however, limited by a high tissue autofluorescence and a poor visible light penetration depth. In order to solve this problem, the fluorescence signal peak wavelength should lie in an absorption and diffusion free region and should be distinguishable, either spectrally or temporally, from the autofluorescence background. We present, here, the synthesis and characterization of low toxicity Zn-Cu-In-Se/ZnS core/shell quantum dots. Their fluorescence emission wavelength peaks around 800 nm, where the absorption and scattering of tissues are minimal. They are coated with a new ligand, which yields small, stable, and bright individual probes in the live cell cytoplasm, even 48 h after the labeling. Furthermore, these near-infrared-emitting quantum dots have a long fluorescence lifetime component (around 150 ns) compared to autofluorescence (advantage of this property and coupling these probes to a time-gated detection, we demonstrate efficiently the discrimination between the signal and short lifetime fluorescence such as the autofluorescence. This technique is supported by a method we developed, to massively stain cells that preserves the quantum dot stability and brightness for 48 h.

  2. Study on enhancing dynamic range of CCD imaging based on digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wang

    2009-05-01

    DMD used as SLM modulation area array CCD design is proposed in the paper. It can Solve a problem in exposing high-contrast scenes by ordinary CCD camera, with images appearing over-exposure or under exposure, bringing a loss of the details of the photo. The method adoptes a forecast imaging scene, CCD is purposely designed by way of more exposure regions and exposure times. Through modulation function of DMD micro-mirror, CCD is exposed with sub-region and time-sharing, at the same time a purposely designed structure of image data enhances the area CCD dynamic range. Experiments shows: This method not only improves visible quality of an image and clear details in the backlighting or highlight, but also enhances the dynamic range of image data. The high-quality image and high dynamic range data are real-time captured, the "fused" software is no longer required.

  3. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchun Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV. Right ventricular (RV morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with breath-hold 2D cine imaging in 7 healthy volunteers. Compared with 2D, the 3D RV functional measurements show a reduction of RV end-diastole volume (RVEDV by 10%, increase of RV end-systole volume (RVESV by 1.8%, reduction of RV systole volume (RVSV by 21%, and reduction of RV ejection fraction (RVEF by 12%. High correlations between the two techniques were found (RVEDV: 0.94; RVESV: 0.85; RVSV: 0.95; and RVEF: 0.89. Compared with 2D, the 3D image quality measurements show a small reduction in blood SNR, myocardium-blood CNR, myocardium contrast, and image sharpness. In conclusion, the proposed self-gated free-breathing 3D cardiac cine imaging technique provides comparable image quality and correlated functional measurements to those acquired with the multiple breath-hold 2D technique in RV.

  4. A high-speed two-frame, 1-2 ns gated X-ray CMOS imager used as a hohlraum diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Palmer, N.; Dayton, M.; Carpenter, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Claus, L. D.; Fang, L.; Hilsabeck, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimmel, M. W.; Robertson, G.; Rochau, G.; Sanchez, M. O.; Stahoviak, J. W.; Trotter, D. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    A novel x-ray imager, which takes time-resolved gated images along a single line-of-sight, has been successfully implemented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This Gated Laser Entrance Hole diagnostic, G-LEH, incorporates a high-speed multi-frame CMOS x-ray imager developed by Sandia National Laboratories to upgrade the existing Static X-ray Imager diagnostic at NIF. The new diagnostic is capable of capturing two laser-entrance-hole images per shot on its 1024 × 448 pixels photo-detector array, with integration times as short as 1.6 ns per frame. Since its implementation on NIF, the G-LEH diagnostic has successfully acquired images from various experimental campaigns, providing critical new information for understanding the hohlraum performance in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as the size of the laser entrance hole vs. time, the growth of the laser-heated gold plasma bubble, the change in brightness of inner beam spots due to time-varying cross beam energy transfer, and plasma instability growth near the hohlraum wall.

  5. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar [The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Physical Sciences, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Schneider, Michal E. [Monash University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Binns, David; Eu, Peter [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Our group has previously reported on the use of {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of {sup 68}Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p < 0.05). These values agreed with a visual inspection of the images with improved image coregistration around the lung bases. The diaphragmatic motion during the 4-D CT scan was highly variable with a range of 0.4-3.4 cm (SD 0.81 cm) in the right lung and 0-2.8 cm (SD 0.83 cm) in the left lung. Right-sided diaphragmatic nerve palsy was observed in 3 of 15 patients. {sup 68}Ga-VQ 4-D

  6. The CAOS camera platform: ushering in a paradigm change in extreme dynamic range imager design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-pixel imaging devices such as CCD, CMOS and Focal Plane Array (FPA) photo-sensors dominate the imaging world. These Photo-Detector Array (PDA) devices certainly have their merits including increasingly high pixel counts and shrinking pixel sizes, nevertheless, they are also being hampered by limitations in instantaneous dynamic range, inter-pixel crosstalk, quantum full well capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, spectral flexibility, and in some cases, imager response time. Recently invented is the Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) Camera platform that works in unison with current Photo-Detector Array (PDA) technology to counter fundamental limitations of PDA-based imagers while providing high enough imaging spatial resolution and pixel counts. Using for example the Texas Instruments (TI) Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to engineer the CAOS camera platform, ushered in is a paradigm change in advanced imager design, particularly for extreme dynamic range applications.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B J; Wielopolski, P A; Hulshoff, M D; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and

  8. PROVE GOES-8 Images of Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As part of the Prototype Validation Experiment (PROVE) at the Jornada Experimental Range, GOES-8 images were collected every 30 minutes for 15 days overlapping the...

  9. Fusing range and intensity images for generating dense models of three-dimensional environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Miró, Jaime Valls; Dissanayake., Gamini

    This paper presents a novel strategy for the construction of dense three-dimensional environment models by combining images from a conventional camera and a range imager. Ro- bust data association is ?rst accomplished by exploiting the Scale Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) technique on th...

  10. An automated wide-field time-gated optically sectioning fluorescence lifetime imaging multiwell plate reader for high-content analysis of protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibhai, Dominic; Kumar, Sunil; Kelly, Douglas; Warren, Sean; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an optically-sectioned FLIM multiwell plate reader that combines Nipkow microscopy with wide-field time-gated FLIM, and its application to high content analysis of FRET. The system acquires sectioned FLIM images in protein. It has been applied to study the formation of immature HIV virus like particles (VLPs) in live cells by monitoring Gag-Gag protein interactions using FLIM FRET of HIV-1 Gag transfected with CFP or YFP. VLP formation results in FRET between closely packed Gag proteins, as confirmed by our FLIM analysis that includes automatic image segmentation.

  11. Fast Hue and Range Preserving Histogram: Specification: Theory and New Algorithms for Color Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Mila; Steidl, Gabriele

    2014-07-16

    Color image enhancement is a complex and challenging task in digital imaging with abundant applications. Preserving the hue of the input image is crucial in a wide range of situations. We propose simple image enhancement algorithms which conserve the hue and preserve the range (gamut) of the R, G, B channels in an optimal way. In our setup, the intensity input image is transformed into a target intensity image whose histogram matches a specified, well-behaved histogram. We derive a new color assignment methodology where the resulting enhanced image fits the target intensity image. We analyse the obtained algorithms in terms of chromaticity improvement and compare them with the unique and quite popular histogram based hue and range preserving algorithm of Naik and Murthy. Numerical tests confirm our theoretical results and show that our algorithms perform much better than the Naik-Murthy algorithm. In spite of their simplicity, they compete with well-established alternative methods for images where hue-preservation is desired.

  12. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during carbon-ion irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Morishita, Yuki; Sekihara, Eri [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Higashi-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Akagi, Takashi; Yamashita, Tomohiro [Hygo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo 679-5165 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The authors previously reported successful luminescence imaging of water during proton irradiation and its application to range estimation. However, since the feasibility of this approach for carbon-ion irradiation remained unclear, the authors conducted luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation and estimated the ranges. Methods: The authors placed a pure-water phantom on the patient couch of a carbon-ion therapy system and measured the luminescence images with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device camera during carbon-ion irradiation. The authors also carried out imaging of three types of phantoms (tap-water, an acrylic block, and a plastic scintillator) and compared their intensities and distributions with those of a phantom containing pure-water. Results: The luminescence images of pure-water phantoms during carbon-ion irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured carbon-ion ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained by simulation. The image of the tap-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as that of the pure-water phantom. The acrylic block phantom’s luminescence image produced seven times higher luminescence and had a 13% shorter range than that of the water phantoms; the range with the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The plastic scintillator showed ∼15 000 times higher light than that of water. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during carbon-ion irradiation of water is not only possible but also a promising method for range estimation in carbon-ion therapy.

  14. Three-dimensional near-field MIMO array imaging using range migration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong; Yarovoy, Alexander G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a 3-D near-field imaging algorithm that is formulated for 2-D wideband multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) imaging array topology. The proposed MIMO range migration technique performs the image reconstruction procedure in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The algorithm is able to completely compensate the curvature of the wavefront in the near-field through a specifically defined interpolation process and provides extremely high computational efficiency by the application of the fast Fourier transform. The implementation aspects of the algorithm and the sampling criteria of a MIMO aperture are discussed. The image reconstruction performance and computational efficiency of the algorithm are demonstrated both with numerical simulations and measurements using 2-D MIMO arrays. Real-time 3-D near-field imaging can be achieved with a real-aperture array by applying the proposed MIMO range migration techniques.

  15. Adapting range migration techniques for imaging with metasurface antennas: analysis and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Mancera, Laura; Fromenteze, Thomas; Sleasman, Timothy; Boyarsky, Michael; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic metasurface antennas are planar structures that exhibit remarkable capabilities in controlling electromagnetic wave-fronts, advantages which are particularly attractive for microwave imaging. These antennas exhibit strong frequency dispersion and produce diverse radiation patterns. Such behavior presents unique challenges for integration with conventional imaging algorithms. We analyze an adapted version of the range migration algorithm (RMA) for use with dynamic metasurfaces in image reconstruction. Focusing on the the proposed pre-processing step, that ultimately allows a fast processing of the backscattered signal in the spatial frequency domain from which the fast Fourier transform can efficiently reconstruct the scene. Numerical studies illustrate imaging performance using both conventional methods and the adapted RMA, demonstrating that the RMA can reconstruct images with comparable quality in a fraction of the time. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithm as a fast reconstruction tool, and we analyze the limitations of the presented technique in terms of image quality.

  16. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  17. Prospective versus retrospective ECG gating for dual source CT of the coronary stent: Comparison of image quality, accuracy, and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Lei, E-mail: zhaolei219@sohu.com [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Zhang Zhaoqi; Fan Zhanming; Yang Lin; Du Jing [Beijing Anzhen Hospital of the Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: To compare image quality, diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of prospective and retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gated dual source computed tomography (DSCT) for the evaluation of the coronary stent, using conventional coronary angiography (CA) as a standard reference. Design, setting and patients: Sixty patients (heart rates {<=}70 bpm) with previous stent implantation who were scheduled for CA were divided in two groups, receiving either prospective or retrospective ECG gated DSCT separately. Two reviewers scored coronary stent image quality and evaluated stent lumen. Results: There was no significant difference in image quality between the two groups. In the prospective group, there were 86.4% (51/59) stents with interpretable images, in the retrospective group, there were 87.5% (49/56) stents with interpretable images. Image quality was not influenced by age, body mass index or heart rate in either group, but heart rate variability had a weak impact on the image quality of the prospective group. Image noise was higher in the prospective group, but this difference reached statistical significance only by using a smooth kernel reconstruction. Per-stent based sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were 100%, 84.1%, 68.2%, and 100%, respectively, in the prospective CT angiography group and 94.4%, 86.8%, 77.3%, and 97.1%, respectively, in the retrospective CT angiography group. There was a significant difference in the effective radiation dose between the two groups, mean effective dose in the prospective and retrospective group was 2.2 {+-} 0.5 mSv (1.5-3.2 mSv) and 14.6 {+-} 3.3 mSv (10.0-20.4 mSv) (p < .001) respectively. Conclusions: Compared with retrospective CT angiography, prospective CT angiography has a similar performance in assessing coronary stent patency, but a lower effective dose in selected patients with regular heart rates {<=}70 bpm.

  18. Supplementary Golay pair for range side lobe suppression in dual-frequency tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wu, Chi; Peng, Jun-Kai

    2015-02-01

    In dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging, the second harmonic signal at second harmonic (2f0) frequency and the inter-modulation harmonic signal at fundamental (f0) frequency are simultaneously imaged for spectral compounding. When the phase-encoded Golay pair is utilized to improve the harmonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), however, the DF imaging suffers from range side lobe artifacts due to spectral cross-talk with other harmonic components at DC and third harmonic (3f0) frequency. In this study, a supplementary Golay pair is developed to suppress the range side lobes in combination with the original Golay pair. Since the phase code of the DC interference cannot be manipulated, the supplementary Golay is designed to reverse the polarity of the 3f0 interference and the f0 signal while keeping the 2f0 signal unchanged. For 2f0 imaging, the echo summation of the supplementary and the original Golay can cancel the 3f0 interference. On the contrary, the echo difference between the two Golay pairs can eliminate the DC interference for f0 imaging. Hydrophone measurements indicate that the range side lobe level (RSLL) increases with the signal bandwidth of DF harmonic imaging. By using the combination of the two Golay pairs, the achievable suppression of RSLL can be 3 and 14 dB, respectively for the f0 and 2f0 harmonic signal. B-mode phantom imaging also verifies the presence of range side lobe artifacts when only the original Golay pair is utilized. In combination with the supplementary Golay pair, the artifacts are effectively suppressed. The corresponding range side lobe magnitude reduces by about 8 dB in 2f0 imaging but remains unchanged in f0 imaging. Meanwhile, the harmonic SNR improves by 8-10 dB and the contrast-to-noise ratio of harmonic image increases from about 1 to 1.2 by spectral compounding. For DF tissue harmonic imaging, the spectral cross-talk in Golay excitation results in severe range side lobe artifacts. To restore the image quality, two particular

  19. Determination of visual range during fog and mist using digital camera images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, John R; Moogan, Jamie C, E-mail: j.taylor@adfa.edu.a [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW-ADFA, Canberra ACT, 2600 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    During the winter of 2008, daily time series of images of five 'unit-cell chequerboard' targets were acquired using a digital camera. The camera and targets were located in the Majura Valley approximately 3 km from Canberra airport. We show how the contrast between the black and white sections of the targets is related to the meteorological range (or standard visual range), and compare estimates of this quantity derived from images acquired during fog and mist conditions with those from the Vaisala FD-12 visibility meter operated by the Bureau of Meteorology at Canberra Airport. The two sets of ranges are consistent but show the variability of visibility in the patchy fog conditions that often prevail in the Majura Valley. Significant spatial variations of the light extinction coefficient were found to occur over the longest 570 m optical path sampled by the imaging system. Visual ranges could be estimated out to ten times the distance to the furthest target, or approximately 6 km, in these experiments. Image saturation of the white sections of the targets was the major limitation on the quantitative interpretation of the images. In the future, the camera images will be processed in real time so that the camera exposure can be adjusted to avoid saturation.

  20. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  1. A comparative analysis of dynamic range compression techniques in IR images for maritime applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Acito, Nicola; Diani, Marco; Luison, Cristian; Olivieri, Monica; Barani, Gianni

    2013-05-01

    Modern thermal cameras acquire IR images with a high dynamic range because they have to sense with high thermal resolution the great temperature changes of monitored scenarios in specific surveillance applications. Initially developed for visible light images and recently extended for display of IR images, high dynamic range compression (HDRC) techniques aim at furnishing plain images to human operators for a first intuitive comprehension of the sensed scenario without altering the features of IR images. In this context, the maritime scenario represents a challenging case to test and develop HDRC strategies since images collected for surveillance at sea are typically characterized by high thermal gradients among the background scene and classes of objects at different temperatures. In the development of a new IRST system, Selex ES assembled a demonstrator equipped with modern thermal cameras and planned a measurement campaign on a maritime scenario so as to collect IR sequences in different operating conditions. This has led to build up a case record of situations suitable to test HDRC techniques. In this work, a survey of HDRC approaches is introduced pointing out advantages and drawbacks with focus on strategies specifically designed to display IR images. A detailed analysis of the performance is discussed in order to address the task of visualization with reference to typical issues of IR maritime images, such as robustness to the horizon effect and displaying of very warm objects and flat areas.

  2. Scanning gate imaging of quantum dots in 1D ultra-thin InAs/InP nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Erin E; Storm, Kristian; Samuelson, Lars; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    We use a scanning gate microscope (SGM) to characterize one-dimensional ultra-thin (diameter ≈ 30 nm) InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires containing a nominally 300 nm long InAs quantum dot defined by two InP tunnel barriers. Measurements of Coulomb blockade conductance versus backgate voltage with no tip present are difficult to decipher. Using the SGM tip as a charged movable gate, we are able to identify three quantum dots along the nanowire: the grown-in quantum dot and an additional quant...

  3. Analysis on expressible depth range of integral imaging based on degree of voxel overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Min; Choi, Ki-Hong; Min, Sung-Wook

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a practical method to analyze the expressible depth range of an integral imaging system based on image blur at defocused depths, which is one of the most noticeable image degradations, caused by overlaps among voxels in both the real and focused mode. In order to obtain the preferably precise area of overlaps among voxels at each depth, display pixels are regarded as surface light sources in the process of voxel size calculation. As a criterion for determining the range, we determine the tolerable limit of the overlaps among voxels to be at least resolved from each other. Based on this principle, several mathematical expressions about the expressible depth range can be derived in both the real mode and focused mode, and their feasibilities are demonstrated by several experiments. The analyses are processed based on both wave optics and ray optics.

  4. Improvement of range spatial resolution of medical ultrasound imaging by element-domain signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    The range spatial resolution is an important factor determining the image quality in ultrasonic imaging. The range spatial resolution in ultrasonic imaging depends on the ultrasonic pulse length, which is determined by the mechanical response of the piezoelectric element in an ultrasonic probe. To improve the range spatial resolution without replacing the transducer element, in the present study, methods based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) were proposed. The proposed methods were applied to echo signals received by individual transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe. The basic experimental results showed that the axial half maximum of the echo from a string phantom was improved from 0.21 mm (conventional method) to 0.086 mm (ML) and 0.094 mm (MUSIC).

  5. Computational ghost imaging of hot objects in long-wave infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-07-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) is an intriguing imaging modality to obtain the object information from the correlation calculations of spatial intensity fluctuations. In this letter, we report the computational GI of hot objects in the long-wave infrared range both in experiment and simulation. Without employing an independent light source, we reconstruct thermal images of objects only based on the intensity correlations of their thermal radiation at room temperature. By comparing different GI reconstruction algorithms, we demonstrate that GI with compressive sensing can efficiently obtain the thermal object information only with a single-pixel infrared camera, which might be applied to night-vision, environmental sensing, military detection, etc.

  6. Accelerated and navigator-gated look-locker imaging for cardiac T1 estimation (ANGIE): Development and application to T1 mapping of the right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bhairav B; Chen, Xiao; Bilchick, Kenneth C; Salerno, Michael; Epstein, Frederick H

    2015-01-01

    To develop a method for high-resolution cardiac T1 mapping. A new method, accelerated and navigator-gated look-locker imaging for cardiac T1 estimation (ANGIE), was developed. An adaptive acquisition algorithm that accounts for the interplay between navigator gating and undersampling patterns well-suited for compressed sensing was used to minimize scan time. Computer simulations, phantom experiments, and imaging of the left ventricle (LV) were used to optimize and evaluate ANGIE. ANGIE's high spatial resolution was demonstrated by T1 mapping of the right ventricle (RV). Comparisons were made to modified Look-Locker imaging (MOLLI). Retrospective reconstruction of fully sampled datasets demonstrated the advantages of the adaptive algorithm. For the LV, ANGIE measurements of T1 were in good agreement with MOLLI. For the RV, ANGIE achieved a spatial resolution of 1.2 × 1.2 mm(2) with a scan time of 157 ± 53 s per slice, and measured RV T1 values of 980 ± 96 ms versus 1076 ± 157 ms for lower-resolution MOLLI. ANGIE provided lower intrascan variation in the RV T1 estimate compared with MOLLI (P T1 mapping in clinically reasonable scan times. ANGIE opens the prospect of quantitative T1 mapping of thin cardiovascular structures such as the RV wall. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Influence of human body target's spectral characteristics on visual range of low light level image intensifiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ju; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Hui; Liu, Lei; Tao, Yuan-Yaun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on low light level (LLL) image intensifier's distance, based on the spectral characteristics of the night-sky radiation and the spectral reflective coefficients of common clothes, we established a equation of human body target's spectral reflective distribution, and analyzed the spectral reflective characteristics of different human targets wearing the clothes of different color and different material, and from the actual detection equation of LLL image intensifier distance, discussed the detection capability of LLL image intensifier for different human target. The study shows that the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on LLL image intensifier distance is mainly reflected in the average reflectivity rho(-) and the initial contrast of the target and the background C0. Reflective coefficient and spectral reflection intensity of cotton clothes are higher than polyester clothes, and detection capability of LLL image intensifier is stronger for the human target wearing cotton clothes. Experimental results show that the LLL image intensifiers have longer visual ranges for targets who wear cotton clothes than targets who wear same color but polyester clothes, and have longer visual ranges for targets who wear light-colored clothes than targets who wear dark-colored clothes. And in the full moon illumination conditions, LLL image intensifiers are more sensitive to the clothes' material.

  8. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B; Coverdale, C A; Nielsen, D S; Jones, M C; Deeney, C; Serrano, J D; Nielsen-Weber, L B; Meyer, C J; Apruzese, J P; Clark, R W; Coleman, P L

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  9. Effect of Tube Voltage (100 vs. 120 kVp) on Radiation Dose and Image Quality using Prospective Gating 320 Row Multi-detector Computed Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Atif N; Khosa, Faisal; Shuaib, Waqas; Nasir, Khurram; Blankstein, Ron; Clouse, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the following study is to evaluate the effect of reducing tube voltage from 120 to 100 kVp using prospective gating 320 row multi-detector computed tomography angiography on image quality and reduction in radiation dose. A total of 78 sequential patients were scanned with prospective electrocardiogram gating. A total of 45 patients (Group 1) with mean body mass index (BMI) 29 ± 2 and heart rate (HR) 57 ± 7 beats per minute (BPM) were scanned at 120 kVp. 33 patients (Group 2) with mean BMI 23 ± 3 and HR 58 ± 6 bpm were scanned at 100 kVp. Effective dose was calculated using dose length product and factor (k = 0.014). Quantitative assessment of image quality was calculated by measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) in the left ventricle and left main coronary artery. Two experienced cardiac radiologists using a three-point ordinal scale assessed subjectively image quality. In Group 1, the median radiation dose was 5.31 mSv (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.86-6.09) and for Group 2 (P = 0.009) the mean radiation dose was 3.71 mSv (95% CI: 2.76-4.87), representing 30% decrease in radiation dose. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for age, gender, HR, BMI, tube current and scan length, an absolute median reduction of 2.21 mSv (1.13-3.29 mSv) was noted in patients scanned with 100 kVp (P image quality (SNR and CNR) was not statistically significant between the groups. Subjective image quality was rated as good or excellent in 99% of coronary segments for both groups (P value was considered as non-significant). Our study suggests that radiation dose may be lowered from 120 to 100 kVp with preservation of image quality in patient's whose BMI is ≤27.

  10. ATCOM: accelerated image processing for terrestrial long-range imaging through atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt, Petersen F.; Paolini, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    Long-range video surveillance performance is often severely diminished due to atmospheric turbulence. The larger apertures typically used for video-rate operation at long-range are particularly susceptible to scintillation and blurring effects that limit the overall diffraction efficiency and resolution. In this paper, we present research progress made toward a digital signal processing technique which aims to mitigate the effects of turbulence in real-time. Our previous work in this area focused on an embedded implementation for portable applications. Our more recent research has focused on functional enhancements to the same algorithm using general-purpose hardware. We present some techniques that were successfully employed to accelerate processing of high-definition color video streams and study performance under nonideal conditions involving moving objects and panning cameras. Finally, we compare the real-time performance of two implementations using a CPU and a GPU.

  11. Investigation of the impact of water absorption on retinal OCT imaging in the 1060 nm range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Pedersen, Christian; Andersen, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the wavelength range around 1060 nm has become attractive for retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT), promising deep penetration into the retina and the choroid. The adjacent water absorption bands limit the useful bandwidth of broadband light sources, but until now...... sources for OCT....

  12. Short-Range Ultra-Wideband Imaging with Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuge, X.

    2010-01-01

    Compact, cost-efficient and high-resolution imaging sensors are especially desirable in the field of short-range observation and surveillance. Such sensors are of great value in fields of security, rescue and medical applications. Systems can be formed for various practical purposes, such as

  13. A comparison of interest point and region detectors on structured, range and texture images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    )) and corner based detectors (such as Hessian and Harris with both Affine/Laplace variants, SURF with determinant of Hessian based corners and SIFT with difference of Gaussians) acquired more than 90% mean average precision, whereas on range images, homogeneous region detector did not work well. TLR offered...... and textured images. It is also shown that in a bi-channel approach, combining surface and edge regions (MSER and TLR) boosts the overall performance. Among the descriptors, SIFT and SURF generally offer higher performance but low dimensional descriptors such as Steerable Filters follow closely.......This article presents an evaluation of the image retrieval and classification potential of local features. Several affine invariant region and scale invariant interest point detectors in combination with well known descriptors were evaluated. Tests on building, range and texture databases were...

  14. Retrospectively-gated CINE (23)Na imaging of the heart at 7.0 Tesla using density-adapted 3D projection reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetar, Ana; Hoffmann, Stefan H; Graessl, Andreas; Winter, Lukas; Waiczies, Helmar; Ladd, Mark E; Niendorf, Thoralf; Nagel, Armin M

    2015-11-01

    Implementation, evaluation and application of a pulse sequence for retrospectively-gated sodium magnetic resonance imaging of the human heart. Measurements were conducted at a magnetic field strength of 7.0 Tesla. A 3D projection reconstruction technique using a standard (ST) and a golden angle (GA) acquisition scheme for short echo time (23)Na MR was applied. Data were acquired continuously without cardiac triggering using a free breathing regime. Arbitrary phases of the cardiac cycle were reconstructed using synchronization with a physiological trigger signal and different temporal resolutions. Phantom measurements and examinations of healthy subjects were performed to evaluate the performance of the ST and GA acquisition schemes. A signal-to-background ratio (SBR)--that compromises both the signal-to-noise ratio and artifacts--was calculated for benchmarking the GA and ST scheme. In phantom measurements, the measured SBR of the GA acquisition scheme was up to 88% higher versus ST. Undersampling artifacts were reduced in GA compared to the ST sampling scheme. Whole heart coverage sodium images could be reconstructed with a nominal spatial resolution of (6 mm)(3) and a temporal resolution of Δt=0.1 s for covering the entire cardiac cycle. Changes in overall heart volume and myocardial wall thickness throughout the cardiac cycle were clearly visible in the reconstructed images. For the in vivo data and the imaging protocol used, GA provided a mean SBR of 38.0±5.5 while ST provided a mean SBR of 37.2±2.2. Retrospectively-gated CINE (23)Na imaging of the heart at 7.0 T using density-adapted 3D projection reconstruction is feasible. The GA acquisition scheme is superior to the ST acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New segmentation-based tone mapping algorithm for high dynamic range image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Weiwei; Guo, Huinan; Zhou, Zuofeng; Huang, Huimin; Cao, Jianzhong

    2017-07-01

    The traditional tone mapping algorithm for the display of high dynamic range (HDR) image has the drawback of losing the impression of brightness, contrast and color information. To overcome this phenomenon, we propose a new tone mapping algorithm based on dividing the image into different exposure regions in this paper. Firstly, the over-exposure region is determined using the Local Binary Pattern information of HDR image. Then, based on the peak and average gray of the histogram, the under-exposure and normal-exposure region of HDR image are selected separately. Finally, the different exposure regions are mapped by differentiated tone mapping methods to get the final result. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm achieve the better performance both in visual quality and objective contrast criterion than other algorithms.

  16. The New Approach of Using Image and Range Based Methods for Quality Control of Dimension Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levytskyi, Volodymyr

    2017-06-01

    The basis for the quality control of commodity dimension stone blocks for mining industry is the study of fracturing. The identification of fracturing in rock masses is one of the most important aspects in rock mass modelling. Traditional methods for determination properties of fracturing are difficult and hazardous. This paper describes a new approach of fracturing identification, based on image and range data, which realized by image processing and special software. In this article describes a method using new computer algorithms that allow for automated identification and calculation of fracturing parameters. Different digital filters for image processing and mathematical dependences are analyzed. The digital imaging technique has the potential for being used in real time applications. The purpose of this paper is the accurate and fast mapping of fracturing in some walls of the Bukinsky gabbro deposit.

  17. Image seeker simulation for short-range surface-to-surface missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Hun; Kang, Ho-Gyun

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents an image seeker simulation including image processing, servo control, target model, and missile trajectory. We propose a software architecture for a seeker embedded computer. It makes core processing algorithms including image processing reusable at the source level through multiple platforms. The embedded software simulator implemented in C/C++, the servo control simulator implemented in Matlab, and the integrated simulator combined the both simulators based on Windows Component Object Module (COM) technology is presented. The integrated simulation enables developers to practice an interactive study between image processing and servo control about missions including lock-on and target tracking. The implemented simulator can be operated in low cost computer systems. This can be used to algorithm development and analysis at the design, implementation, and evaluation. Simulation examples for a short range ground-to-ground missile seeker are presented.

  18. Polymer-free optode nanosensors for dynamic, reversible, and ratiometric sodium imaging in the physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckh, Timothy T; Mehta, Ankeeta A; Dubach, J Matthew; Clark, Heather A

    2013-11-28

    This work introduces a polymer-free optode nanosensor for ratiometric sodium imaging. Transmembrane ion dynamics are often captured by electrophysiology and calcium imaging, but sodium dyes suffer from short excitation wavelengths and poor selectivity. Optodes, optical sensors composed of a polymer matrix with embedded sensing chemistry, have been translated into nanosensors that selectively image ion concentrations. Polymer-free nanosensors were fabricated by emulsification and were stable by diameter and sensitivity for at least one week. Ratiometric fluorescent measurements demonstrated that the nanosensors are selective for sodium over potassium by ~1.4 orders of magnitude, have a dynamic range centered at 20 mM, and are fully reversible. The ratiometric signal changes by 70% between 10 and 100 mM sodium, showing that they are sensitive to changes in sodium concentration. These nanosensors will provide a new tool for sensitive and quantitative ion imaging.

  19. Quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movement using a stereoendoscope: accuracy and reliability of range images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Asuka; Mishima, Katsuaki; Shiraishi, Ruriko; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel method of producing accurate range images of the velopharynx using a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope to obtain detailed measurements of velopharyngeal movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between the distance from the endoscope to an object, elucidate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes, and determine the degree of blurring when using a jig to fix the endoscope. An endoscopic measuring system was developed in which a pattern projection system was incorporated into a commercially available 3D endoscope. After correcting the distortion of the camera images, range images were produced using pattern projection to achieve stereo matching. Graph paper was used to measure the appropriate distance from the camera to an object, the mesial buccal cusp of the right maxillary first molar was measured to clarify the range image stability, and an electric actuator was used to evaluate the measurement accuracy along the temporal axes. The measurement error was substantial when the distance from the camera to the subject was >6.5 cm. The standard error of the 3D coordinate value produced from 30 frames was within 0.1 mm (range, 0.01-0.08 mm). The measurement error of the temporal axes was 9.16% in the horizontal direction and 9.27% in the vertical direction. The optimal distance from the camera to an object is <6.5 cm. The present endoscopic measuring system can provide stable range images of the velopharynx when using an appropriate fixation method and enables quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movements.

  20. Performance Evaluation of an Automotive-Grade, High Speed Gate Driver for SiC FETs, Type UCC27531, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Kristen; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) devices are becoming widely used in electronic power circuits as replacement for conventional silicon parts due to their attractive properties that include low on-state resistance, high temperature tolerance, and high frequency operation. These attributes have a significant impact by reducing system weight, saving board space, and conserving power. In this work, the performance of an automotive-grade high speed gate driver with potential use in controlling SiC FETs (field-Effect Transistors) in converters or motor control applications was evaluated under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The investigations were carried out to assess performance and to determine suitability of this device for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature conditions.

  1. Raman imaging of carrier distribution in the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Enokida, I; Yamamoto, J; Furukawa, Y

    2018-02-02

    Raman images of carriers (positive polarons) at the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor (ILGT) fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) have been measured with excitation at 785 nm. The observed spectra indicate that carriers generated are positive polarons. The intensities of the 1415 cm -1 band attributed to polarons in the P3HT channel were plotted as Raman images; they showed the carrier density distribution. When the source-drain voltage V D is lower than the source-gate voltage V G (linear region), the carrier density was uniform. When V D is nearly equal to V G (saturation region), a negative carrier density gradient from the source electrode towards the drain electrode was observed. This carrier density distribution is associated with the observed current-voltage characteristics, which is not consistent with the "pinch-off" theory of inorganic semiconductor transistors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Positron range in PET imaging: an alternative approach for assessing and correcting the blurring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Le Loirec, Cindy; Champion, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron range impairs resolution in PET imaging, especially for high-energy emitters and for small-animal PET. De-blurring in image reconstruction is possible if the blurring distribution is known. Further, the percentage of annihilation events within a given distance from the point...... of positron emission is relevant for assessing statistical noise. Aims: The paper aims to determine positron range distribution relevant for blurring for seven medically relevant PET isotopes, 18F, 11C, 13N, 15O, 68Ga, 62Cu, and 82Rb, and derive empirical formulas for the distributions. The paper focuses...... on allowed-decay isotopes. Methods: It is argued that blurring at the detection level should not be described by positron range r, but instead the 2D-projected distance δ (equal to the closest distance between decay and line-of-response). To determine these 2D distributions, results from a dedicated positron...

  3. Stochastic calculus analysis of optical time-of-flight range imaging and estimation of radial motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Lee

    2017-07-01

    Time-of-flight range imaging is analyzed using stochastic calculus. Through a series of interpretations and simplifications, the stochastic model leads to two methods for estimating linear radial velocity: maximum likelihood estimation on the transition probability distribution between measurements, and a new method based on analyzing the measured correlation waveform and its first derivative. The methods are tested in a simulated motion experiment from (-40)-(+40)  m/s, with data from a camera imaging an object on a translation stage. In tests maximum likelihood is slow and unreliable, but when it works it estimates the linear velocity with standard deviation of 1 m/s or better. In comparison the new method is fast and reliable but works in a reduced velocity range of (-20)-(+20)  m/s with standard deviation ranging from 3.5 m/s to 10 m/s.

  4. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R; Diaz, Oliver; Young, Kenneth C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise in CR. The use of the

  5. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  6. Forward and backward tone mapping of high dynamic range images based on subband architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, Ines; Ouled Zaid, Azza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel High Dynamic Range (HDR) tone mapping (TM) system based on sub-band architecture. Standard wavelet filters of Daubechies, Symlets, Coiflets and Biorthogonal were used to estimate the proposed system performance in terms of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) image quality and reconstructed HDR image fidelity. During TM stage, the HDR image is firstly decomposed in sub-bands using symmetrical analysis-synthesis filter bank. The transform coefficients are then rescaled using a predefined gain map. The inverse Tone Mapping (iTM) stage is straightforward. Indeed, the LDR image passes through the same sub-band architecture. But, instead of reducing the dynamic range, the LDR content is boosted to an HDR representation. Moreover, in our TM sheme, we included an optimization module to select the gain map components that minimize the reconstruction error, and consequently resulting in high fidelity HDR content. Comparisons with recent state-of-the-art methods have shown that our method provides better results in terms of visual quality and HDR reconstruction fidelity using objective and subjective evaluations.

  7. High-dynamic range compressive spectral imaging by grayscale coded aperture adaptive filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Eduardo Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging system (CASSI is an imaging architecture which senses the three dimensional informa-tion of a scene with two dimensional (2D focal plane array (FPA coded projection measurements. A reconstruction algorithm takes advantage of the compressive measurements sparsity to recover the underlying 3D data cube. Traditionally, CASSI uses block-un-block coded apertures (BCA to spatially modulate the light. In CASSI the quality of the reconstructed images depends on the design of these coded apertures and the FPA dynamic range. This work presents a new CASSI architecture based on grayscaled coded apertu-res (GCA which reduce the FPA saturation and increase the dynamic range of the reconstructed images. The set of GCA is calculated in a real-time adaptive manner exploiting the information from the FPA compressive measurements. Extensive simulations show the attained improvement in the quality of the reconstructed images when GCA are employed.  In addition, a comparison between traditional coded apertures and GCA is realized with respect to noise tolerance.

  8. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  9. Long-range non-contact imaging photoplethysmography: cardiac pulse wave sensing at a distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.; Piasecki, Alyssa M.; Bowers, Margaret A.; Klosterman, Samantha L.

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses photo-optical sensors to measure variations in light absorption, caused by blood volume pulsations, to assess cardiopulmonary parameters including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, and respiration rate. Recently, researchers have studied the applications and methodology of imaging photoplethysmography. Basic research has examined some of the variables affecting data quality and accuracy of imaging photoplethysmography including signal processing, imager parameters (e.g. frame rate and resolution), lighting conditions, subject motion, and subject skin tone. This technology may be beneficial for long term or continuous monitoring where contact measurements may be harmful (e.g. skin sensitivities) or where imperceptible or unobtrusive measurements are desirable. Using previously validated signal processing methods, we examined the effects of imager-to-subject distance on one-minute, windowed estimates of pulse rate. High-resolution video of 22, stationary participants was collected using an enthusiast-grade, mirrorless, digital camera equipped with a fully-manual, super-telephoto lens at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters with simultaneous contact measurements of electrocardiography, and fingertip photoplethysmography. By comparison, previous studies have usually been conducted with imager-to-subject distances of up to only a few meters. Mean absolute error for one-minute, windowed, pulse rate estimates (compared to those derived from gold-standard electrocardiography) were 2.0, 4.1, and 10.9 beats per minute at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters, respectively. Long-range imaging presents several unique challenges among which include decreased, observed light reflectance and smaller regions of interest. Nevertheless, these results demonstrate that accurate pulse rate measurements can be obtained from over long imager-to-participant distances given these constraints.

  10. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  11. SINGLE IMAGE CAMERA CALIBRATION IN CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR SOLDER JOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Printed Circuit Boards (PCB play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  12. CLOSE RANGE HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING INTEGRATED WITH TERRESTRIAL LIDAR SCANNING APPLIED TO ROCK CHARACTERISATION AT CENTIMETRE SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Kurz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Compact and lightweight hyperspectral imagers allow the application of close range hyperspectral imaging with a ground based scanning setup for geological fieldwork. Using such a scanning setup, steep cliff sections and quarry walls can be scanned with a more appropriate viewing direction and a higher image resolution than from airborne and spaceborne platforms. Integration of the hyperspectral imagery with terrestrial lidar scanning provides the hyperspectral information in a georeferenced framework and enables measurement at centimetre scale. In this paper, three geological case studies are used to demonstrate the potential of this method for rock characterisation. Two case studies are applied to carbonate quarries where mapping of different limestone and dolomite types was required, as well as measurements of faults and layer thicknesses from inaccessible parts of the quarries. The third case study demonstrates the method using artificial lighting, applied in a subsurface scanning scenario where solar radiation cannot be utilised.

  13. Range image segmentation using Zernike moment-based generalized edge detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, S.; Mehrotra, R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors proposed a novel Zernike moment-based generalized step edge detection method which can be used for segmenting range and intensity images. A generalized step edge detector is developed to identify different kinds of edges in range images. These edge maps are thinned and linked to provide final segmentation. A generalized edge is modeled in terms of five parameters: orientation, two slopes, one step jump at the location of the edge, and the background gray level. Two complex and two real Zernike moment-based masks are required to determine all these parameters of the edge model. Theoretical noise analysis is performed to show that these operators are quite noise tolerant. Experimental results are included to demonstrate edge-based segmentation technique.

  14. High throughput holographic imaging-in-flow for the analysis of a wide plankton size range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourassowsky, Catherine; Dubois, Frank

    2014-03-24

    We developed a Digital Holographic Microscope (DHM) working with a partial coherent source specifically adapted to perform high throughput recording of holograms of plankton organisms in-flow, in a size range of 3 µm-300 µm, which is of importance for this kind of applications. This wide size range is achieved with the same flow cell and with the same microscope magnification. The DHM configuration combines a high magnification with a large field of view and provides high-resolution intensity and quantitative phase images refocusing on high sample flow rate. Specific algorithms were developed to detect and extract automatically the particles and organisms present in the samples in order to build holograms of each one that are used for holographic refocusing and quantitative phase contrast imaging. Experimental results are shown and discussed.

  15. Fusion of Building Information and Range Imaging for Autonomous Location Estimation in Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias K. Kohoutek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for autonomous location estimation and navigation in indoor environments using range images and prior scene knowledge from a GIS database (CityGML. What makes this task challenging is the arbitrary relative spatial relation between GIS and Time-of-Flight (ToF range camera further complicated by a markerless configuration. We propose to estimate the camera’s pose solely based on matching of GIS objects and their detected location in image sequences. We develop a coarse-to-fine matching strategy that is able to match point clouds without any initial parameters. Experiments with a state-of-the-art ToF point cloud show that our proposed method delivers an absolute camera position with decimeter accuracy, which is sufficient for many real-world applications (e.g., collision avoidance.

  16. Image analysis of gunshot residue on entry wounds. II--A statistical estimation of firing range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H; Cauchi, D M; Holden, J L; Allen, F C; Cordner, S; Thatcher, P

    1999-03-29

    A statistical investigation of the relationship between firing range and the amount and distribution of gunshot residue (GSR), used automated image analysis (IA) to quantify GSR deposit resulting from firings into pig skin, from distances ranging between contact and 45 cm. Overall, for a Ruger .22 semi-automatic rifle using CCI solid point, high velocity ammunition, the total area of GSR deposit on the skin sections decreased in a non-linear fashion with firing range. More specifically there were significant differences in the amount of GSR deposited from shots fired at contact compared with shots fired from distances between 2.5 and 45 cm; and between shots fired from a distance of 20 cm or less, with shots fired at a distance of 30 cm or more. In addition, GSR particles were heavily concentrated in the wound tract only for contact and close range shots at 2.5 cm, while the particle distribution was more uniform between the wound tract and the skin surfaces for shots fired from distances greater than 2.5 cm. Consequently, for future scientific investigations of gunshot fatalities, once standards have been established for the weapon and ammunition type in question, image analysis quantification of GSR deposited in and around the gunshot wound may be capable of providing a reliable, statistical basis for estimating firing range.

  17. TRM4: Range performance model for electro-optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keßler, Stefan; Gal, Raanan; Wittenstein, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    TRM4 is a commonly used model for assessing device and range performance of electro-optical imagers. The latest version, TRM4.v2, has been released by Fraunhofer IOSB of Germany in June 2016. While its predecessor, TRM3, was developed for thermal imagers, assuming blackbody targets and backgrounds, TRM4 extends the TRM approach to assess three imager categories: imagers that exploit emitted radiation (TRM4 category Thermal), reflected radiation (TRM4 category Visible/NIR/SWIR), and both emitted and reflected radiation (TRM4 category General). Performance assessment in TRM3 and TRM4 is based on the perception of standard four-bar test patterns, whether distorted by under-sampling or not. Spatial and sampling characteristics are taken into account by the Average Modulation at Optimum Phase (AMOP), which replaces the system MTF used in previous models. The Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived (MTDP) figure of merit was introduced in TRM3 for assessing the range performance of thermal imagers. In TRM4, this concept is generalized to the MDSP (Minimum Difference Signal Perceived), which can be applied to all imager categories. In this paper, we outline and discuss the TRM approach and pinpoint differences between TRM4 and TRM3. In addition, an overview of the TRM4 software and its functionality is given. Features newly introduced in TRM4, such as atmospheric turbulence, irradiation sources, and libraries are addressed. We conclude with an outlook on future work and the new module for intensified CCD cameras that is currently under development

  18. Subinteger Range-Bin Alignment Method for ISAR Imaging of Noncooperative Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pérez-Martínez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR is a coherent radar technique capable of generating images of noncooperative targets. ISAR may have better performance in adverse meteorological conditions than traditional imaging sensors. Unfortunately, ISAR images are usually blurred because of the relative motion between radar and target. To improve the quality of ISAR products, motion compensation is necessary. In this context, range-bin alignment is the first step for translational motion compensation. In this paper, we propose a subinteger range-bin alignment method based on envelope correlation and reference profiles. The technique, which makes use of a carefully designed optimization stage, is robust against noise, clutter, target scintillation, and error accumulation. It provides us with very fine translational motion compensation. Comparisons with state-of-the-art range-bin alignment methods are included and advantages of the proposal are highlighted. Simulated and live data from a high-resolution linear-frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar are included to perform the pertinent comparisons.

  19. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  20. 3D FACE RECOGNITION FROM RANGE IMAGES BASED ON CURVATURE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suranjan Ganguly

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel approach for three-dimensional face recognition by extracting the curvature maps from range images. There are four types of curvature maps: Gaussian, Mean, Maximum and Minimum curvature maps. These curvature maps are used as a feature for 3D face recognition purpose. The dimension of these feature vectors is reduced using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD technique. Now from calculated three components of SVD, the non-negative values of ‘S’ part of SVD is ranked and used as feature vector. In this proposed method, two pair-wise curvature computations are done. One is Mean, and Maximum curvature pair and another is Gaussian and Mean curvature pair. These are used to compare the result for better recognition rate. This automated 3D face recognition system is focused in different directions like, frontal pose with expression and illumination variation, frontal face along with registered face, only registered face and registered face from different pose orientation across X, Y and Z axes. 3D face images used for this research work are taken from FRAV3D database. The pose variation of 3D facial image is being registered to frontal pose by applying one to all registration technique then curvature mapping is applied on registered face images along with remaining frontal face images. For the classification and recognition purpose five layer feed-forward back propagation neural network classifiers is used, and the corresponding result is discussed in section 4.

  1. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (Pcine and 2D breath-held cine (Pcine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Tube Voltage (100 vs. 120 kVp on Radiation Dose and Image Quality using Prospective Gating 320 Row Multi-detector Computed Tomography Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atif N Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The objective of the following study is to evaluate the effect of reducing tube voltage from 120 to 100 kVp using prospective gating 320 row multi-detector computed tomography angiography on image quality and reduction in radiation dose. Materials and Methods : A total of 78 sequential patients were scanned with prospective electrocardiogram gating. A total of 45 patients (Group 1 with mean body mass index (BMI 29 ± 2 and heart rate (HR 57 ± 7 beats per minute (BPM were scanned at 120 kVp. 33 patients (Group 2 with mean BMI 23 ± 3 and HR 58 ± 6 bpm were scanned at 100 kVp. Effective dose was calculated using dose length product and factor (k = 0.014. Quantitative assessment of image quality was calculated by measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR and contrast to noise ratio (CNR in the left ventricle and left main coronary artery. Two experienced cardiac radiologists using a three-point ordinal scale assessed subjectively image quality. Results: In Group 1, the median radiation dose was 5.31 mSv (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.86-6.09 and for Group 2 (P = 0.009 the mean radiation dose was 3.71 mSv (95% CI: 2.76-4.87, representing 30% decrease in radiation dose. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for age, gender, HR, BMI, tube current and scan length, an absolute median reduction of 2.21 mSv (1.13-3.29 mSv was noted in patients scanned with 100 kVp (P < 0.0001. The quantitative image quality (SNR and CNR was not statistically significant between the groups. Subjective image quality was rated as good or excellent in 99% of coronary segments for both groups (P value was considered as non-significant. Conclusion: Our study suggests that radiation dose may be lowered from 120 to 100 kVp with preservation of image quality in patient′s whose BMI is ≤27.

  3. Self-gated 4D multiphase, steady-state imaging with contrast enhancement (MUSIC) using rotating cartesian K-space (ROCK): Validation in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Eric; Gao, Yu; Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Finn, J Paul; Hu, Peng

    2017-08-01

    To develop and validate a cardiac-respiratory self-gating strategy for the recently proposed multiphase steady-state imaging with contrast enhancement (MUSIC) technique. The proposed SG strategy uses the ROtating Cartesian K-space (ROCK) sampling, which allows for retrospective k-space binning based on motion surrogates derived from k-space center line. The k-space bins are reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. Ten pediatric patients underwent cardiac MRI for clinical reasons. The original MUSIC and 2D-CINE images were acquired as a part of the clinical protocol, followed by the ROCK-MUSIC acquisition, all under steady-state intravascular distribution of ferumoxytol. Subjective scores and image sharpness were used to compare the images of ROCK-MUSIC and original MUSIC. All scans were completed successfully without complications. The ROCK-MUSIC acquisition took 5 ± 1 min, compared to 8 ± 2 min for the original MUSIC. Image scores of ROCK-MUSIC were significantly better than original MUSIC at the ventricular outflow tracts (3.9 ± 0.3 vs. 3.3 ± 0.6, P ROCK-MUSIC in the other anatomic locations. ROCK-MUSIC provided images of equal or superior image quality compared to original MUSIC, and this was achievable with 40% savings in scan time and without the need for physiologic signal. Magn Reson Med 78:472-483, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Fluorescence imaging of viscous materials in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murr, Patrik J., E-mail: patrik.murr@tum.de; Rauscher, Markus S.; Tremmel, Anton; Schardt, Michael; Koch, Alexander W. [Institute for Measurement Systems and Sensor Technology, Technische Universität München, Theresienstraße 90, 80333 München (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents an approach of an innovative measurement principle for the quality control of viscous materials during a manufacturing process based on fluorescence imaging. The main contribution to the state of the art provided by this measurement system is that three equal fluorescence images of a static or moving viscous object are available in different optical paths. The independent images are obtained by two beam splitters which are connected in series. Based on these images, it is possible to evaluate each image separately. In our case, three optical bandpass filters with different center wavelengths of 405 nm, 420 nm, and 440 nm were used to filter the separate fluorescence images. The developed system is useable for the detection of impurities in the micrometer range. Further, incorrect mixing ratios of particular components and wrong single components in the viscous materials can be detected with the setup. Moreover, it is possible to realize static and dynamic measurements. In this case the maximum speed of the objects was 0.2 m/s for the dynamic measurements. Advantages of this measurement setup are the universality due to the use of optical standard components, the small dimension and the opportunity to integrate it easily into ongoing processes. In addition, the measurement system works on a non-contact basis. Thus, the expense for maintenance is at a very low level compared to currently available measurement setups for the investigated application. Furthermore, the setup provides for the first time a simultaneous analysis of more than one component and the detection of impurities concerning their nature and size in a manufacturing process.

  5. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  6. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  7. PROCESSING OF UAV BASED RANGE IMAGING DATA TO GENERATE DETAILED ELEVATION MODELS OF COMPLEX NATURAL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Kohoutek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are more and more used in civil areas like geomatics. Autonomous navigated platforms have a great flexibility in flying and manoeuvring in complex environments to collect remote sensing data. In contrast to standard technologies such as aerial manned platforms (airplanes and helicopters UAVs are able to fly closer to the object and in small-scale areas of high-risk situations such as landslides, volcano and earthquake areas and floodplains. Thus, UAVs are sometimes the only practical alternative in areas where access is difficult and where no manned aircraft is available or even no flight permission is given. Furthermore, compared to terrestrial platforms, UAVs are not limited to specific view directions and could overcome occlusions from trees, houses and terrain structures. Equipped with image sensors and/or laser scanners they are able to provide elevation models, rectified images, textured 3D-models and maps. In this paper we will describe a UAV platform, which can carry a range imaging (RIM camera including power supply and data storage for the detailed mapping and monitoring of complex structures, such as alpine riverbed areas. The UAV platform NEO from Swiss UAV was equipped with the RIM camera CamCube 2.0 by PMD Technologies GmbH to capture the surface structures. Its navigation system includes an autopilot. To validate the UAV-trajectory a 360° prism was installed and tracked by a total station. Within the paper a workflow for the processing of UAV-RIM data is proposed, which is based on the processing of differential GNSS data in combination with the acquired range images. Subsequently, the obtained results for the trajectory are compared and verified with a track of a UAV (Falcon 8, Ascending Technologies carried out with a total station simultaneously to the GNSS data acquisition. The results showed that the UAV's position using differential GNSS could be determined in the centimetre to the decimetre

  8. On the simulation and mitigation of anisoplanatic optical turbulence for long range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Russell C.; LeMaster, Daniel A.

    2017-05-01

    We describe a numerical wave propagation method for simulating long range imaging of an extended scene under anisoplanatic conditions. Our approach computes an array of point spread functions (PSFs) for a 2D grid on the object plane. The PSFs are then used in a spatially varying weighted sum operation, with an ideal image, to produce a simulated image with realistic optical turbulence degradation. To validate the simulation we compare simulated outputs with the theoretical anisoplanatic tilt correlation and differential tilt variance. This is in addition to comparing the long- and short-exposure PSFs, and isoplanatic angle. Our validation analysis shows an excellent match between the simulation statistics and the theoretical predictions. The simulation tool is also used here to quantitatively evaluate a recently proposed block- matching and Wiener filtering (BMWF) method for turbulence mitigation. In this method block-matching registration algorithm is used to provide geometric correction for each of the individual input frames. The registered frames are then averaged and processed with a Wiener filter for restoration. A novel aspect of the proposed BMWF method is that the PSF model used for restoration takes into account the level of geometric correction achieved during image registration. This way, the Wiener filter is able fully exploit the reduced blurring achieved by registration. The BMWF method is relatively simple computationally, and yet, has excellent performance in comparison to state-of-the-art benchmark methods.

  9. Prognostic significance of stress myocardial ECG-gated perfusion imaging in asymptomatic patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease on initiation of haemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Mitsuru; Kondo, Chisato; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Babazono, Tetsuya [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Diabetes Centre, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Takatomo [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) frequently develop cardiac events within several years of the initiation of haemodialysis. The present study assesses the prognostic significance of stress myocardial ECG-gated perfusion imaging (MPI) in patients with diabetic CKD requiring haemodialysis. Fifty-five asymptomatic patients with diabetic stage V CKD and no history of heart disease scheduled to start haemodialysis were enrolled in this study (56{+-}11 years old; 49 with type 2 diabetes mellitus). All patients underwent {sup 201}Tl stress ECG-gated MPI 1 month before or after the initiation of haemodialysis to assess myocardial involvement. We evaluated SPECT images using 17-segment defect scores graded on a 5-point scale, summed stress score (SSS) and summed difference scores (SDS). The patients were followed up for at least 2 years (42{+-}15 months) to determine coronary intervention (CI) and heart failure (HF) as soft events and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and all causes of deaths as hard events. The frequencies of myocardial ischaemia, resting perfusion defects, low ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) dilatation were 24,20,29 and 49%, respectively. Ten events (18%) developed during the follow-up period including four CI, one HF, one AMI and four sudden deaths. Multivariate Cox analysis selected SDS (p=0.0011) and haemoglobin A{sub 1c} (HbA{sub 1c}) (p=0.0076) as independent prognostic indicators for all events. Myocardial ischaemia, in addition to glycaemic control, is a strong prognostic marker for asymptomatic patients with diabetic CKD who are scheduled to start haemodialysis. Stress MPI is highly recommended for the management and therapeutic stratification of such patients. (orig.)

  10. Automatic grading of appearance retention of carpets using intensity and range images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela Vargas, Sergio Alejandro; Ortiz-Jaramillo, Benhur; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Rooms, Filip; De Meulemeester, Simon; de Keyser, Robain; Van Langenhove, Lieva; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Textiles are mainly used for decoration and protection. In both cases, their original appearance and its retention are important factors for customers. Therefore, evaluation of appearance parameters are critical for quality assurance purposes, during and after manufacturing, to determine the lifetime and/or beauty of textile products. In particular, appearance retention of textile products is commonly certified with grades, which are currently assigned by human experts. However, manufacturers would prefer a more objective system. We present an objective system for grading appearance retention, particularly, for textile floor coverings. Changes in appearance are quantified by using linear regression models on texture features extracted from intensity and range images. Range images are obtained by our own laser scanner, reconstructing the carpet surface using two methods that have been previously presented. We extract texture features using a variant of the local binary pattern technique based on detecting those patterns whose frequencies are related to the appearance retention grades. We test models for eight types of carpets. Results show that the proposed approach describes the degree of wear with a precision within the range allowed to human inspectors by international standards. The methodology followed in this experiment has been designed to be general for evaluating global deviation of texture in other types of textiles, as well as other surface materials.

  11. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  12. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  13. 4D micro-CT using fast prospective gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaolian; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-CT is currently used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. But, there is also significant interest in using this technology to obtain functional information. We report here a new sampling strategy for 4D micro-CT for functional cardiac and pulmonary imaging. Rapid scanning of free-breathing mice is achieved with fast prospective gating (FPG) implemented on a field programmable gate array. The method entails on-the-fly computation of delays from the R peaks of the ECG signals or the peaks of the respiratory signals for the triggering pulses. Projection images are acquired for all cardiac or respiratory phases at each angle before rotating to the next angle. FPG can deliver the faster scan time of retrospective gating (RG) with the regular angular distribution of conventional prospective gating for cardiac or respiratory gating. Simultaneous cardio-respiratory gating is also possible with FPG in a hybrid retrospective/prospective approach. We have performed phantom experiments to validate the new sampling protocol and compared the results from FPG and RG in cardiac imaging of a mouse. Additionally, we have evaluated the utility of incorporating respiratory information in 4D cardiac micro-CT studies with FPG. A dual-source micro-CT system was used for image acquisition with pulsed x-ray exposures (80 kVp, 100 mA, 10 ms). The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent containing 123 mg I ml-1 delivered via a tail vein catheter in a dose of 0.01 ml g-1 body weight. The phantom experiment demonstrates that FPG can distinguish the successive phases of phantom motion with minimal motion blur, and the animal study demonstrates that respiratory FPG can distinguish inspiration and expiration. 4D cardiac micro-CT imaging with FPG provides image quality superior to RG at an isotropic voxel size of 88 µm and 10 ms temporal resolution. The acquisition time for either sampling approach is less than 5 min. The

  14. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  15. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  16. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of high-speed, time-gated microchannel-plate-based x-ray detectors: saturation effects in dc and pulsed modes and detector dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschwitz, Craig A; Wu, Ming; Moy, Ken; Rochau, Greg

    2008-10-01

    We present here results of continued efforts to understand the performance of microchannel plate (MCP)-based, high-speed, gated, x-ray detectors. This work involves the continued improvement of a Monte Carlo simulation code to describe MCP performance coupled with experimental efforts to better characterize such detectors. Our goal is a quantitative description of MCP saturation behavior in both static and pulsed modes. A new model of charge buildup on the walls of the MCP channels is briefly described. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a short-pulse, high-intensity ultraviolet laser, and good agreement is found. These results indicate that a weak saturation can change the exponent of gain with voltage and that a strong saturation leads to a gain plateau. These results also demonstrate that the dynamic range of a MCP in pulsed mode has a value of between 10(2) and 10(3).

  18. A Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Partial Fixed-Point Imaging System Using a Field- Programmable Gate Array−Application-Specific Integrated Circuit Hybrid Heterogeneous Parallel Acceleration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of satellite load technology and very large scale integrated (VLSI circuit technology, onboard real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR imaging systems have become a solution for allowing rapid response to disasters. A key goal of the onboard SAR imaging system design is to achieve high real-time processing performance with severe size, weight, and power consumption constraints. In this paper, we analyse the computational burden of the commonly used chirp scaling (CS SAR imaging algorithm. To reduce the system hardware cost, we propose a partial fixed-point processing scheme. The fast Fourier transform (FFT, which is the most computation-sensitive operation in the CS algorithm, is processed with fixed-point, while other operations are processed with single precision floating-point. With the proposed fixed-point processing error propagation model, the fixed-point processing word length is determined. The fidelity and accuracy relative to conventional ground-based software processors is verified by evaluating both the point target imaging quality and the actual scene imaging quality. As a proof of concept, a field- programmable gate array−application-specific integrated circuit (FPGA-ASIC hybrid heterogeneous parallel accelerating architecture is designed and realized. The customized fixed-point FFT is implemented using the 130 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS technology as a co-processor of the Xilinx xc6vlx760t FPGA. A single processing board requires 12 s and consumes 21 W to focus a 50-km swath width, 5-m resolution stripmap SAR raw data with a granularity of 16,384 × 16,384.

  19. A Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Partial Fixed-Point Imaging System Using a Field- Programmable Gate Array-Application-Specific Integrated Circuit Hybrid Heterogeneous Parallel Acceleration Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Li, Bingyi; Chen, Liang; Wei, Chunpeng; Xie, Yizhuang; Chen, He; Yu, Wenyue

    2017-06-24

    With the development of satellite load technology and very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit technology, onboard real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging systems have become a solution for allowing rapid response to disasters. A key goal of the onboard SAR imaging system design is to achieve high real-time processing performance with severe size, weight, and power consumption constraints. In this paper, we analyse the computational burden of the commonly used chirp scaling (CS) SAR imaging algorithm. To reduce the system hardware cost, we propose a partial fixed-point processing scheme. The fast Fourier transform (FFT), which is the most computation-sensitive operation in the CS algorithm, is processed with fixed-point, while other operations are processed with single precision floating-point. With the proposed fixed-point processing error propagation model, the fixed-point processing word length is determined. The fidelity and accuracy relative to conventional ground-based software processors is verified by evaluating both the point target imaging quality and the actual scene imaging quality. As a proof of concept, a field- programmable gate array-application-specific integrated circuit (FPGA-ASIC) hybrid heterogeneous parallel accelerating architecture is designed and realized. The customized fixed-point FFT is implemented using the 130 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology as a co-processor of the Xilinx xc6vlx760t FPGA. A single processing board requires 12 s and consumes 21 W to focus a 50-km swath width, 5-m resolution stripmap SAR raw data with a granularity of 16,384 × 16,384.

  20. A low-power high dynamic range front-end ASIC for imaging calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bagliesi, M G; Marrocchesi, P S; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Paoletti, R; Pilo, F; Scribano, A; Turini, N; Valle, G D

    2002-01-01

    High granularity calorimeters with shower imaging capabilities require dedicated front-end electronics. The ICON 4CH and VA4 PMT chip-set is suitable for very high dynamic range systems with strict noise requirements. The ICON 4CH is a 4 channel input, 12 channel output ASIC designed for use in a multi-anode photomultiplier system with very large dynamic range and low-noise requirements. Each of the four input signals to the ASIC is split equally into three branches by a current conveyor. Each of the three branches is scaled differently: 1:1, 1:8 and 1:80. The signal is read out by a 12 channel low noise/low power high dynamic range charge sensitive preamplifier-shaper circuit (VA4-PMT chip), with simultaneous sample- and-hold, multiplexed analog read-out, calibration facilities. Tests performed in our lab with a PMT are reported in terms of linearity, dynamic range and cross-talk of the system. (5 refs).

  1. Application of lidar techniques to time-of-flight range imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Refael; Streeter, Lee; Cree, Michael J; Dorrington, Adrian A

    2015-11-20

    Amplitude-modulated continuous wave (AMCW) time-of-flight (ToF) range imaging cameras measure distance by illuminating the scene with amplitude-modulated light and measuring the phase difference between the transmitted and reflected modulation envelope. This method of optical range measurement suffers from errors caused by multiple propagation paths, motion, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation. In this paper a ToF camera is modified to operate in modes analogous to continuous wave (CW) and stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) lidar. In CW operation the velocity of objects can be measured. CW measurement of velocity was linear with true velocity (R2=0.9969). Qualitative analysis of a complex scene confirms that range measured by SFCW is resilient to errors caused by multiple propagation paths, phase wrapping, and nonideal amplitude modulation which plague AMCW operation. In viewing a complicated scene through a translucent sheet, quantitative comparison of AMCW with SFCW demonstrated a reduction in the median error from -1.3  m to -0.06  m with interquartile range of error reduced from 4.0 m to 0.18 m.

  2. Gated SPECT evaluation of left ventricular function using a CZT camera and a fast low-dose clinical protocol: comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Masci, Pier Giorgio; Marras, Gavino; Gimelli, Alessia; Genovesi, Dario; Lombardi, Massimo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); Rustamova, Yasmine K. [Azerbaijan Medical University, Department of internal medicine Central Customs Hospital, Baku (Azerbaijan); Marzullo, Paolo [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica del CNR, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    CZT technology allows ultrafast low-dose myocardial scintigraphy but its accuracy in assessing left ventricular function is still to be defined. The study group comprised 55 patients (23 women, mean age 63 {+-} 9 years) referred for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The patients were studied at rest using a CZT camera (Discovery NM530c; GE Healthcare) and a low-dose {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin clinical protocol (mean dose 264 {+-} 38 MBq). Gated SPECT imaging was performed as a 6-min list-mode acquisition, 15 min after radiotracer injection. Images were reformatted (8-frame to 16-frame) using Lister software on a Xeleris workstation (GE Healthcare) and then reconstructed with a dedicated iterative algorithm. Analysis was performed using Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS) software. Within 2 weeks patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI, 1.5-T unit CVi; GE Healthcare) using a 30-frame acquisition protocol and dedicated software for analysis (MASS 6.1; Medis). The ventricular volumes obtained with 8-frame QGS showed excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (end-diastolic volume (EDV), r = 0.90; end-systolic volume (ESV), r = 0.94; p < 0.001). However, QGS significantly underestimated the ventricular volumes (mean differences: EDV, -39.5 {+-} 29 mL; ESV, -15.4 {+-} 22 mL; p < 0.001). Similarly, the ventricular volumes obtained with 16-frame QGS showed an excellent correlations with the cMRI volumes (EDV, r = 0.92; ESV, r = 0.95; p < 0.001) but with significant underestimations (mean differences: EDV, -33.2 {+-} 26 mL; ESV, -17.9 {+-} 20 mL; p < 0.001). Despite significantly lower values (47.9 {+-} 16 % vs. 51.2 {+-} 15 %, p < 0.008), 8-frame QGS mean ejection fraction (EF) was closely correlated with the cMRI values (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). The mean EF with 16-frame QGS showed the best correlation with the cMRI values (r = 0.91, p < 0.001) and was similar to the mean cMRI value (49.6 {+-} 16 %, p not significant). Regional analysis showed a good

  3. Surface wave effects on long range IR imaging in the marine surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, M. J.; Kunz, G. J.; van Eijk, A. M. J.

    2005-08-01

    The quality of long range infrared (IR) imaging depends on the effects of atmospheric refraction and other pathintegrated effects (e.g., transmission losses, scintillation and blurring), which are strongly related to the prevailing meteorological conditions. EOSTAR is a PC based computer program to quantify these strong nonlinear effects in the marine atmospheric surface layer and to present a spectrally resolved target image influenced by atmospheric effects using ray tracing techniques for the individual camera pixels. Presently, the propagation is predicted with bulk atmospheric models and the sea surface is idealized by steady regular periodic Stokes' waves. Dynamical wind-waves interactions are not taken into account in this approach, although they may strongly modify the refractive index in the near-surface layer. Nonetheless, the inclusion of the sea surface in the ray tracer module already has a great impact on the near-surface grazing rays and thus influences the images especially in situations of super refraction and mirage. This work aims at improving the description of the sea surface in EOSTAR taking into account the non-uniformity of spatially resolved wind-generated waves and swell. A new surface module is developed to model surface wind-waves and swell in EOSTAR on the basis of meteorological observations and spectral wave modeling. Effects due to these new surfaces will be analyzed and presented.

  4. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  5. Realization of High Dynamic Range Imaging in the GLORIA Network and Its Effect on Astronomical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Vítek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science project GLORIA (GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array is a first free- and open-access network of robotic telescopes in the world. It provides a web-based environment where users can do research in astronomy by observing with robotic telescopes and/or by analyzing data that other users have acquired with GLORIA or from other free-access databases. Network of 17 telescopes allows users to control selected telescopes in real time or schedule any more demanding observation. This paper deals with new opportunity that GLORIA project provides to teachers and students of various levels of education. At the moment, there are prepared educational materials related to events like Sun eclipse (measuring local atmosphere changes, Aurora Borealis (calculation of Northern Lights height, or transit of Venus (measurement of the Earth-Sun distance. Student should be able to learn principles of CCD imaging, spectral analysis, basic calibration like dark frames subtraction, or advanced methods of noise suppression. Every user of the network can design his own experiment. We propose advanced experiment aimed at obtaining astronomical image data with high dynamic range. We also introduce methods of objective image quality evaluation in order to discover how HDR methods are affecting astronomical measurements.

  6. Monitoring glacier variations in the Urubamba and Vilcabamba Mountain Ranges, Peru, using "Landsat 5" images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Wilson; Cerna, Marcos; Ordoñez, Julio; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Huggel, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The Urubamba and Vilcabamba mountain ranges are two geological structures belonging to the Andes in the southern part of Peru, which is located in the tropical region. These mountain ranges are especially located within the transition area between the Amazon region (altitudes close to 1'000 m a.s.l.) and the Andes. These mountains, with a maximum height of 6'280 m a.s.l. (Salkantay Snow Peak in the Vilcabamba range), are characterized by glaciers mainly higher than 5000 m a.s.l. Here we present a study on the evolution of the ice cover based on "Landsat 5" images from 1991 and 2011 is presented in this paper. These data are freely available from the USGS in a georeferenced format and cover a time span of more than 25 years. The glacier mapping is based on the Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI). In 1991 the Vilcabamba mountain range had 221 km2 of glacier cover, being reduced to 116.4 km2 in 2011, which represents a loss of 48%. In the Urubamba mountain range, the total glacier area was 64.9 km2 in 1991 and 29.4 km2 in 2011, representing a loss of 54.7%. It means that the glacier area was halved during the past two decades although precipitation patterns show an increase in recent years (the wet season lasts from September to April with precipitation peaks in February and March). Glacier changes in these two tropical mountain ranges also impact from an economic point of view due to small local farming common in this region (use of water from the melting glacier). Furthermore, potential glacier related hazards can pose a threat to people and infrastructure in the valleys below these glaciers, where the access routes to Machu Picchu Inca City, Peru's main tourist destination, are located too.

  7. Assessment of cerebellar pulsation in dogs with and without Chiari-like malformation and syringomyelia using cardiac-gated cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C J; Watts, V; Bunck, A C; Van Ham, L M; Volk, H A

    2013-10-01

    Canine Chiari-like malformation (CM) is characterised by herniation of part of the cerebellum through the foramen magnum. In humans with Chiari type I malformation (CM-I), abnormal pulsation of the cerebellum during the cardiac cycle has been documented and is pivotal to theories for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia (SM). In this retrospective study, cardiac-gated cine balanced fast field echo (bFEE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess pulsation of the brain in dogs and to objectively measure the degree of cerebellar pulsation with the neck in a flexed position. Overall, 17 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS) with CM, including eight with SM and nine without SM, were compared with six small breed control dogs. Linear regions of interest were generated for the length of cerebellar herniation from each phase of the cardiac cycle and the degree of cerebellar pulsation was subsequently calculated. Age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion were also compared. CKCS with CM and SM had significantly greater pulsation of the cerebellum than control dogs (P=0.003) and CKCS with CM only (P=0.031). There was no significant difference in age, bodyweight and angle of neck flexion between the three groups. Cardiac-gated cine bFEE MRI permitted the dynamic visualisation of cerebellar pulsation in dogs. These findings support the current theories regarding the pathogenesis of SM secondary to CM and further highlight the similarities between canine CM and human CM-I. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of transient ischemic dilation (TID) ratio in gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using regadenoson, a new agent for pharmacologic stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J S; Ruisi, M; Giedd, K N; Rachko, M

    2012-08-01

    Abnormal values of the transient ischemic dilation (TID) ratio are associated with severe and extensive coronary artery disease (CAD). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between TID, determined from stress and rest ventricular volumes during regadenoson gated single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) dual isotope studies, and the extent of CAD found during coronary angiography. 195 patients who underwent dual isotope MPI with regadenoson and cardiac angiography between March 2009 and February 2010 were analyzed. TID was calculated using commercially available software, Emory Cardiac Toolbox. Mean TID values were compared across disease types. A threshold for abnormal TID was determined by adding two standard deviations (SDs) to the mean TID of the "non-obstructive CAD" subgroup. In the 195-patient group analyzed, the mean TID ratio for non-obstructive CAD (n = 104) was found to be 1.09 with a SD of 0.15. In a subgroup of patients whose angiogram was within 3 months of MPI (n = 155), the mean TIDs for non-obstructive disease (n = 81), single-vessel disease (n = 35), and multi-vessel disease (n = 39) were 1.09, 1.15, and 1.19 with SDs of 0.16, 0.19, and 0.26, respectively. Those with an abnormal TID had a crude and adjusted odds ratio of 3.4 for multi-vessel disease which was statistically significant. History of diabetes was not found to be a significant confounder, effect modifier, or mediator of the relationship between the TID and the vessel disease. The mean TID ratio in patients with multi-vessel disease was 1.19. The threshold for an abnormal TID was 1.39 with specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 15% for determining multi-vessel CAD status. We conclude that the level of TID in gated SPECT MPI using regadenoson is associated with the degree of CAD on angiography.

  9. Wide-Field Imaging Using Nitrogen Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Dirk Robert (Inventor); Trusheim, Matthew Edwin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen vacancies in bulk diamonds and nanodiamonds can be used to sense temperature, pressure, electromagnetic fields, and pH. Unfortunately, conventional sensing techniques use gated detection and confocal imaging, limiting the measurement sensitivity and precluding wide-field imaging. Conversely, the present sensing techniques do not require gated detection or confocal imaging and can therefore be used to image temperature, pressure, electromagnetic fields, and pH over wide fields of view. In some cases, wide-field imaging supports spatial localization of the NVs to precisions at or below the diffraction limit. Moreover, the measurement range can extend over extremely wide dynamic range at very high sensitivity.

  10. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  11. Multibit CkNOT quantum gates via Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isenhower, L.; Saffman, Mark; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Long range Rydberg blockade interactions have the potential for efficient implementation of quantum gates between multiple atoms. Here we present and analyze a protocol for implementation of a k-atom controlled NOT (CkNOT) neutral atom gate. This gate can be implemented using sequential or simult......Long range Rydberg blockade interactions have the potential for efficient implementation of quantum gates between multiple atoms. Here we present and analyze a protocol for implementation of a k-atom controlled NOT (CkNOT) neutral atom gate. This gate can be implemented using sequential...

  12. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level: In situ mapping of redox-gated tunneling resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, O; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    on the redox potential. Maximum resonance appears around the equilibrium redox potential of azurin with an on/off current ratio of approximate to 9. Simulation analyses, based on a two-step interfacial ET model for the scanning tunneling microscopy redox process, were performed and provide quantitative......A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  13. Assessment of the evaluation of liver T1 mapping imaging applying virtual ECG gating on a modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seung-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Suk-Jun; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-10-01

    A T1 mapping calculation error may occur in a physicochemical environment with large relaxivity. We evaluated through a simulated electrocardiogram (ECG) the administration of a contrast with high relaxivity and its effect on the heart rate by using a modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) pulse sequence. The agarose 2% phantom of high relaxivity environment was developed by diluting gadoxetic acid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 contrast media. The gold standard T1 determination was based on coronal single section imaging with a 2D inversion-recovery turbo spin echo sequence (2D-IRTSE) in a 3T MR unit. Using the identical 3T MR scanner, we acquired T1 mapping for the MOLLI pulse sequence with various virtual heart rates. T1 mapping data of the two different pulse sequences ( i.e., 2D-IRTSE and MOLLI) were measured to investigate the accuracy and the specificity. An in vivo study was conducted in the same manner as the phantom experiments for liver T1 mapping imaging in three healthy volunteers. The MOLLI pulse sequence showed an error rate of less than 10% at a contrast agent concentration of 0.4 mmol/L, and significant error, compared with the reference value, was observed at 0.6 mmol/L or higher. The percentage error of the T1 value did not correlated with the RR ( i.e., the time between heart beats) change that was observed (P =.270). Based on the in-vivo liver test, T1 mapping imaging of an abdominal organ as the liver can be successfully achieved using the applied virtual ECG gating on the MOLLI sequence.

  14. Real-Time 3D Image Guidance Using a Standard LINAC: Measured Motion, Accuracy, and Precision of the First Prospective Clinical Trial of Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring-Guided Gating for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keall, Paul J; Ng, Jin Aun; Juneja, Prabhjot

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a new real-time 3-dimensional image guidance method. Unlike previous real-time image guidance methods, KIM uses a standard linear accelerator without any additional equipment needed. The first prospective clinical trial of KIM is underway...... for prostate cancer radiation therapy. In this paper we report on the measured motion accuracy and precision using real-time KIM-guided gating. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Imaging and motion information from the first 200 fractions from 6 patient prostate cancer radiation therapy volumetric modulated arc therapy...... treatments were analyzed. A 3-mm/5-second action threshold was used to trigger a gating event where the beam is paused and the couch position adjusted to realign the prostate to the treatment isocenter. To quantify the in vivo accuracy and precision, KIM was compared with simultaneously acquired k...

  15. Self-gated fat-suppressed cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, R Reeve; Santos, Juan M; Overall, William R; McConnell, Michael V; Hu, Bob S; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2015-05-01

    To develop a self-gated alternating repetition time balanced steady-state free precession (ATR-SSFP) pulse sequence for fat-suppressed cardiac cine imaging. Cardiac gating is computed retrospectively using acquired magnetic resonance self-gating data, enabling cine imaging without the need for electrocardiogram (ECG) gating. Modification of the slice-select rephasing gradients of an ATR-SSFP sequence enables the acquisition of a one-dimensional self-gating readout during the unused short repetition time (TR). Self-gating readouts are acquired during every TR of segmented, breath-held cardiac scans. A template-matching algorithm is designed to compute cardiac trigger points from the self-gating signals, and these trigger points are used for retrospective cine reconstruction. The proposed approach is compared with ECG-gated ATR-SSFP and balanced steady-state free precession in 10 volunteers and five patients. The difference of ECG and self-gating trigger times has a variability of 13 ± 11 ms (mean ± SD). Qualitative reviewer scoring and ranking indicate no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between self-gated and ECG-gated ATR-SSFP images. Quantitative blood-myocardial border sharpness is not significantly different among self-gated ATR-SSFP ( 0.61±0.15 mm -1), ECG-gated ATR-SSFP ( 0.61±0.15 mm -1), or conventional ECG-gated balanced steady-state free precession cine MRI ( 0.59±0.15 mm -1). The proposed self-gated ATR-SSFP sequence enables fat-suppressed cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T without the need for ECG gating and without decreasing the imaging efficiency of ATR-SSFP. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A gold nanocluster-based fluorescent probe for simultaneous pH and temperature sensing and its application to cellular imaging and logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Tse; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar; Tseng, Wei-Bin; Hiseh, Ming-Mu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-01

    Metal nanocluster-based nanomaterials for the simultaneous determination of temperature and pH variations in micro-environments are still a challenge. In this study, we develop a dual-emission fluorescent probe consisting of bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) as temperature- and pH-responsive fluorescence signals. Under single wavelength excitation the FITC/BSA-AuNCs exhibited well-separated dual emission bands at 525 and 670 nm. When FITC was used as a reference fluorophore, FITC/BSA-AuNCs showed a good linear response over the temperature range 1-71 °C and offered temperature-independent spectral shifts, temperature accuracy, activation energy, and reusability. The possible mechanism for high temperature-induced fluorescence quenching of FITC/BSA-AuNCs could be attributed to a weakening of the Au-S bond, thereby lowering the charge transfer from BSA to AuNCs. Additionally, the pH- and temperature-responsive properties of FITC/BSA-AuNCs allow simultaneous temperature sensing from 21 to 41 °C (at intervals of 5 °C) and pH from 6.0 to 8.0 (at intervals of 0.5 pH unit), facilitating the construction of two-input AND logic gates. Three-input AND logic gates were also designed using temperature, pH, and trypsin as inputs. The practicality of using FITC/BSA-AuNCs to determine the temperature and pH changes in HeLa cells is also validated.Metal nanocluster-based nanomaterials for the simultaneous determination of temperature and pH variations in micro-environments are still a challenge. In this study, we develop a dual-emission fluorescent probe consisting of bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) as temperature- and pH-responsive fluorescence signals. Under single wavelength excitation the FITC/BSA-AuNCs exhibited well-separated dual emission bands at 525 and 670 nm. When FITC was used as a reference fluorophore, FITC/BSA-AuNCs showed a

  17. Initial Comparison of the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) with Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushio, Tomoo; Driscoll, Kevin; Heckman, Stan; Boccippio, Dennis; Koshak, William; Christian, Hugh

    1999-01-01

    The mapping of the lightning optical pulses detected by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) is compared with the radiation sources by Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) for three thunderstorms observed during and overpasses on 15 August 1998. The comparison involves 122 flashes including 42 ground and 80 cloud flashes. For ground flash, the LIS recorded the subsequent strokes and changes inside the cloud. For cloud flashes, LIS recorded those with higher sources in altitude and larger number of sources. The discrepancies between the LIS and LDAR flash locations are about 4.3 km for cloud flashes and 12.2 km for ground flashes. The reason for these differences remain a mystery.

  18. Design and fabrication of the New Horizons Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, S. J.; Azad, F.; Boldt, J. D.; Cheng, A.; Cooper, K. A.; Darlington, E. H.; Grey, M. P.; Hayes, J. R.; Hogue, P.; Kosakowski, K. E.; Magee, T.; Morgan, M. F.; Rossano, E.; Sampath, D.; Schlemm, C.; Weaver, H. A.

    2005-09-01

    The LOng-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) is an instrument that was designed, fabricated, and qualified for the New Horizons mission to the outermost planet Pluto, its giant satellite Charon, and the Kuiper Belt, which is the vast belt of icy bodies extending roughly from Neptune's orbit out to 50 astronomical units (AU). New Horizons is being prepared for launch in January 2006 as the inaugural mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. This paper provides an overview of the efforts to produce LORRI. LORRI is a narrow angle (field of view=0.29°), high resolution (instantaneous field of view = 4.94 μrad), Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a 20.8 cm diameter primary mirror, a focal length of 263 cm, and a three lens field-flattening assembly. A 1024 x 1024 pixel (optically active region), back-thinned, backside-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) detector (model CCD 47-20 from E2V Technologies) is located at the telescope focal plane and is operated in standard frame-transfer mode. LORRI does not have any color filters; it provides panchromatic imaging over a wide bandpass that extends approximately from 350 nm to 850 nm. A unique aspect of LORRI is the extreme thermal environment, as the instrument is situated inside a near room temperature spacecraft, while pointing primarily at cold space. This environment forced the use of a silicon carbide optical system, which is designed to maintain focus over the operating temperature range without a focus adjustment mechanism. Another challenging aspect of the design is that the spacecraft will be thruster stabilized (no reaction wheels), which places stringent limits on the available exposure time and the optical throughput needed to accomplish the high-resolution observations required. LORRI was designed and fabricated by a combined effort of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and SSG Precision Optronics Incorporated (SSG).

  19. The effective etch process proximity correction methodology for improving on chip CD variation in 20 nm node DRAM gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Geun; Kim, Sang-wook; Shim, Seong-Bo; Suh, Sung-Soo; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an effective methodology for etch PPC (Process Proximity Correction) of 20 nm node DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory) gate transistor. As devices shrinks, OCV(On chip CD Variation) control become more important to meet the performance goal for high speed in DRAM. The main factors which influence OCV are mask, photo, etch PPE (Process proximity effect) in DRAM gate. Model based etch PPC is required to properly correct Etch PPE as device density increases. To improve OCV in DRAM gate, we applied new type of etch loading kernel. It is called Vkernel which accounts for directional weight from the point of interest. And we optimized the etch PPC convergence by optimizing the etch PPC iteration. Because of density difference between spider mask and real gate mask, the skew difference occurs between them. We tested the effect of long range density using same real gate pattern clip by varying mask open image size from 0.5 ~ 10 mm. The ADI CD difference was on average in the order on 2 nm for varying mask open image size. But the ACI CD difference (the average of CD range by varying open image size) was very noticeable (about 15 nm). This result shows that etch skew affected by long range density by mm unit size. Due to asymmetrical pattern in real gate mask, spider mask which have symmetrical patterns is necessarily used to make PPC model. The etch skew of real pattern clip in spider mask was not also the same for the real pattern in real gate mask. To reduce this skew difference between spider mask and real mask, we applied open field mask correction term and long range density effects correlation equation to PPC modeling. There was noticeable improvement in the accuracy of PPC model. By applying these improvement items, OCV of 20 nm node DRAM gate is shown to improve up to 67%.

  20. Low-complexity Compression of High Dynamic Range Infrared Images with JPEG compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    data size, then we include the raw residual image instead. If the residual image contains only zero values or the quality factor for it is 0 then we do not include the residual image into the header. Experimental results show that compared with JPEG-XT Part 6 with ’global Reinhard’ tone-mapping....... Then we compress each image by a JPEG baseline encoder and include the residual image bit stream into the application part of JPEG header of the base image. As a result, the base image can be reconstructed by JPEG baseline decoder. If the JPEG bit stream size of the residual image is higher than the raw...

  1. Terbium-based time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer imaging for evaluating protein-protein interactions on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Stina; Singh, Manish Kumar; Wegner, K David; Regairaz, Marie; Dautry, François; Treussart, François; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2015-03-21

    Fluorescence imaging of cells and subcellular compartments is an essential tool to investigate biological processes and to evaluate the development and progression of diseases. In particular, protein-protein interactions can be monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two proximal fluorophores that are attached to specific recognition biomolecules such as antibodies. We investigated the membrane expression of E- and N-cadherins in three different cell lines used as model systems to study epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a possible detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs). EMT is a key process in cancer metastasis, during which epithelial markers (such as E-cadherin) are down-regulated in the primary tumour whereas mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin) are up-regulated, leading to enhanced cell motility, intravasation, and appearance of CTCs. Various FRET donor-acceptor pairs and protein recognition strategies were utilized, in which Lumi4-Tb terbium complexes (Tb) and different organic dyes were conjugated to several distinct E- and N-cadherin-specific antibodies. Pulsed excitation of Tb at low repetition rates (100 Hz) and time-gated (TG) imaging of both the Tb-donor and the dye-acceptor photoluminescence (PL) allowed efficient detection of the EMT markers as well as FRET in the case of sufficient donor-acceptor proximity. Efficient FRET was observed only between two E-cadherin-specific antibodies and further experiments indicated that these antibodies recognized the same E-cadherin molecule, suggesting a limited accessibility of cadherins when they are clustered at adherens junctions. The investigated Tb-to-dye FRET systems provided reduced photobleaching compared to the AlexaFluor 488-568 donor-acceptor pair. Our results demonstrate the applicability and advantages of Tb-based TG FRET for efficient and stable imaging of antibody-antibody interactions on different cell lines. They also reveal the limitations of

  2. Quantitative assessment of changes in carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional ultrasonography and non-gated magnetic resonance plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mao; Ohba, Hideki; Mori, Kiyofumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Katsura, Noriyuki; Ohura, Kazumasa; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Cilostazol, an antiplatelet agent, is reported to induce the regression of atherosclerotic changes. However, its effects on carotid plaques are unknown. Hence, we quantitatively investigated the changes that occur within carotid plaques during cilostazol administration using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasonography (US) and non-gated magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging. We prospectively examined 16 consecutive patients with carotid stenosis. 3D-US and T1-weighted MR plaque imaging were performed at baseline and 6 months after initiating cilostazol therapy (200 mg/day). We measured the volume and grayscale median (GSM) of the plaques from 3D-US data. We also calculated the contrast ratio (CR) of the carotid plaque against the adjacent muscle and areas of the intraplaque components: fibrous tissue, lipid, and hemorrhage components. The plaque volume on US decreased significantly (median at baseline and 6 months, 0.23 and 0.21 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = 0.03). In the group exhibiting a plaque volume reduction of more than 10%, GSM on US increased significantly (24.8 and 71.5, respectively; p = 0.04) and CR on MRI decreased significantly (1.13 and 1.04, respectively; p = 0.02). In this group, in addition, the percent area of the fibrous component on MRI increased significantly (68.6% and 79.4%, respectively; p = 0.02), while those of the lipid and hemorrhagic components decreased (24.9% and 20.5%, respectively; p = 0.12) (1.0% and 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.04). There were no substantial changes in intraplaque characteristics in either US or MRI in the other group. 3D-US and MR plaque imaging can quantitatively detect changes in the size and composition of carotid plaques during cilostazol therapy. (orig.)

  3. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Del Pozo

    Full Text Available Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

  4. Study for online range monitoring with the interaction vertex imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Ch; Karakaya, Y.; Reithinger, V.; Rescigno, R.; Baudot, J.; Constanzo, J.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Rinaldi, I.; Rousseau, M.; Testa, E.; Vanstalle, M.; Ray, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ion beam therapy enables a highly accurate dose conformation delivery to the tumor due to the finite range of charged ions in matter (i.e. Bragg peak (BP)). Consequently, the dose profile is very sensitive to patients anatomical changes as well as minor mispositioning, and so it requires improved dose control techniques. Proton interaction vertex imaging (IVI) could offer an online range control in carbon ion therapy. In this paper, a statistical method was used to study the sensitivity of the IVI technique on experimental data obtained from the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center. The vertices of secondary protons were reconstructed with pixelized silicon detectors. The statistical study used the χ2 test of the reconstructed vertex distributions for a given displacement of the BP position as a function of the impinging carbon ions. Different phantom configurations were used with or without bone equivalent tissue and air inserts. The inflection points in the fall-off region of the longitudinal vertex distribution were computed using different methods, while the relation with the BP position was established. In the present setup, the resolution of the BP position was about 4–5 mm in the homogeneous phantom under clinical conditions (106 incident carbon ions). Our results show that the IVI method could therefore monitor the BP position with a promising resolution in clinical conditions.

  5. Discrimination between Sedimentary Rocks from Close-Range Visible and Very-Near-Infrared Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo, Susana; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Kees Blom, Jan; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of different geological formations. The spectral data was recorded by a Tetracam Mini-MCA-6 camera mounted on a field-based platform covering six bands in the spectral range of 0.530-0.801 µm. Twelve sedimentary formations were selected in the Rhône-Alpes region (France) to analyse the discrimination potential of this camera for rock types and close-range mapping applications. After proper corrections and data processing, a supervised classification of the multispectral data was performed trying to distinguish four classes: limestones, marlstones, vegetation and shadows. After a maximum-likelihood classification, results confirmed that this camera can be efficiently exploited to map limestone-marlstone alternations in geological formations with this mineral composition.

  6. Time-gated energy-selected cold neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, T E; Claytor, T N; Farnum, E H; Greene, G L; Morris, C

    1999-01-01

    A technique is under development at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) for producing neutron radiography using only a narrow energy range of cold neutrons. The technique, referred to as time-gated energy-selected (TGES) neutron radiography, employs the pulsed neutron source at the Lujan Center with time of flight to obtain a neutron pulse having an energy distribution that is a function of the arrival time at the imager. The radiograph is formed on a short persistence scintillator and a gated, intensified, cooled CCD camera is employed to record the images, which are produced at the specific neutron energy range determined by the camera gate. The technique has been used to achieve a degree of material discrimination in radiographic images. For some materials, such as beryllium and carbon, at energies above the Bragg cutoff the neutron scattering cross section is relatively high while at energies below the Bragg cutoff the scattering cross ...

  7. 49 CFR 234.255 - Gate arm and gate mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gate arm and gate mechanism. 234.255 Section 234... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.255 Gate arm and gate mechanism. (a) Each gate arm and gate mechanism shall be inspected at least once each month. (b) Gate arm movement shall be...

  8. Effect of hybrid iterative reconstruction technique on quantitative and qualitative image analysis at 256-slice prospective gating cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Weigold, Wm Guy; Weissman, Gaby; Taylor, Allen J

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of hybrid iterative reconstruction on qualitative and quantitative parameters at 256-slice cardiac CT. Prospective cardiac CT images from 20 patients were analysed. Paired image sets were created using 3 reconstructions, i.e. filtered back projection (FBP) and moderate- and high-level iterative reconstructions. Quantitative parameters including CT-attenuation, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined in both proximal- and distal coronary segments. Image quality was graded on a 4-point scale. Coronary CT attenuation values were similar for FBP, moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction at 293 ± 74-, 290 ± 75-, and 283 ± 78 Hounsfield units (HU), respectively. CNR was significantly higher with moderate- and high-level iterative reconstructions (10.9 ± 3.5 and 18.4 ± 6.2, respectively) than FBP (8.2 ± 2.5) as was the visual grading of proximal vessels. Visualisation of distal vessels was better with high-level iterative reconstruction than FBP. The mean number of assessable segments among 289 segments was 245, 260, and 267 for FBP, moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction, respectively; the difference between FBP and high-level iterative reconstruction was significant. Interobserver agreement was significantly higher for moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction than FBP. Cardiac CT using hybrid iterative reconstruction yields higher CNR and better image quality than FBP. • Cardiac CT helps clinicians to assess patients with coronary artery disease • Hybrid iterative reconstruction provides improved cardiac CT image quality • Hybrid iterative reconstruction improves the number of assessable coronary segments • Hybrid iterative reconstruction improves interobserver agreement on cardiac CT.

  9. NETWORK DESIGN IN CLOSE-RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY WITH SHORT BASELINE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The avaibility of automated software for image-based 3D modelling has changed the way people acquire images for photogrammetric applications. Short baseline images are required to match image points with SIFT-like algorithms, obtaining more images than those necessary for “old fashioned” photogrammetric projects based on manual measurements. This paper describes some considerations on network design for short baseline image sequences, especially on precision and reliability of bundle adjustment. Simulated results reveal that the large number of 3D points used for image orientation has very limited impact on network precision.

  10. Network Design in Close-Range Photogrammetry with Short Baseline Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, L.

    2017-08-01

    The avaibility of automated software for image-based 3D modelling has changed the way people acquire images for photogrammetric applications. Short baseline images are required to match image points with SIFT-like algorithms, obtaining more images than those necessary for "old fashioned" photogrammetric projects based on manual measurements. This paper describes some considerations on network design for short baseline image sequences, especially on precision and reliability of bundle adjustment. Simulated results reveal that the large number of 3D points used for image orientation has very limited impact on network precision.

  11. The relationship between ischemia-induced left ventricular dysfunction, coronary flow reserve, and coronary steal on regadenoson stress-gated 82Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tosh, Andrew; Votaw, John R.; Reichek, Nathaniel; Palestro, Christopher J.; Nichols, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gated rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies are acquired both at rest and during pharmacologic stress. Stress-induced ischemic left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) can produce a significant decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from rest to stress. We determined the prevalence on PET of stress LVD with reduced ejection fraction (EF) and its association with absolute global and regional coronary flow reserve (CFR), and with relative perfusion defect summed difference score (SDS). Methods and Results We studied 205 patients with known or suspected coronary disease (120 M, 75 F, age 69 ± 13 years) who had clinically indicated rest/regadenoson stress 82Rb PET/CT studies. Data were acquired in dynamic gated list mode. Global and 17-segment regional CFR values were computed from first-pass flow data using a 2-compartment model and factor analysis applied to auto-generated time-activity curves. Rest and stress LVEF and SDS were quantified from gated equilibrium myocardial perfusion tomograms using Emory Cardiac Toolbox software. LVD was defined as a change in LVEF of ≤−5% from rest to stress. A subgroup of 109 patients also had coronary angiography. Stress LVD developed in 32 patients (16%), with mean EF change of −10 ± 5%, vs +6 ± 7% for patients without LVD (P < .0001). EF was similar at rest in patients with and without stress LVD (57 ± 18% vs 56 ± 16%, P = .63), but lower during stress for patients with LVD (47 ± 20% vs 61 ± 16%, P = .0001). CFR was significantly lower in patients with LVD (1.61 ± 0.67 vs 2.21 ± 1.03, Wilcoxon P = .002), and correlated significantly with change in EF (r = 0.35, P < .0001), but not with SDS (r = −0.13, P = .07). The single variable most strongly associated with high risk of CAD (i.e., left main stenosis ≥50%, LAD % stenosis ≥70%, and/or 3-vessel disease) was stress EF (χ2 = 17.3, P < .0001). There was a higher prevalence of patients with territorial CFR

  12. Time-gated cell imaging using long lifetime near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for autofluorescence rejection.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouccara, Sophie; Fragola, Alexandra; Giovanelli, Emerson; Sitbon, Gary; Lequeux, Nicolas; Pons, Thomas; Loriette, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Fluorescence imaging is a promising technique for the detection of individual cell migration. Its sensitivity is, however, limited by a high tissue autofluorescence and a poor visible light penetration depth. In order to solve this problem, the fluorescence signal peak wavelength should lie in an absorption and diffusion free region and should be distinguishable, either spectrally or temporally, from the autofluorescence background. We present, here, the synthesis and ...

  13. Cloud cover detection combining high dynamic range sky images and ceilometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, R.; Cazorla, A.; Toledano, C.; Olmo, F. J.; Cachorro, V. E.; de Frutos, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for cloud detection based on high dynamic range images from a sky camera and ceilometer measurements. The algorithm is also able to detect the obstruction of the sun. This algorithm, called CPC (Camera Plus Ceilometer), is based on the assumption that under cloud-free conditions the sky field must show symmetry. The symmetry criteria are applied depending on ceilometer measurements of the cloud base height. CPC algorithm is applied in two Spanish locations (Granada and Valladolid). The performance of CPC retrieving the sun conditions (obstructed or unobstructed) is analyzed in detail using as reference pyranometer measurements at Granada. CPC retrievals are in agreement with those derived from the reference pyranometer in 85% of the cases (it seems that this agreement does not depend on aerosol size or optical depth). The agreement percentage goes down to only 48% when another algorithm, based on Red-Blue Ratio (RBR), is applied to the sky camera images. The retrieved cloud cover at Granada and Valladolid is compared with that registered by trained meteorological observers. CPC cloud cover is in agreement with the reference showing a slight overestimation and a mean absolute error around 1 okta. A major advantage of the CPC algorithm with respect to the RBR method is that the determined cloud cover is independent of aerosol properties. The RBR algorithm overestimates cloud cover for coarse aerosols and high loads. Cloud cover obtained only from ceilometer shows similar results than CPC algorithm; but the horizontal distribution cannot be obtained. In addition, it has been observed that under quick and strong changes on cloud cover ceilometers retrieve a cloud cover fitting worse with the real cloud cover.

  14. Registration of partially overlapping surfaces for range image based augmented reality on mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, T.; Franz, A. M.; Seitel, A.; Marz, K.; Bartha, L.; Fangerau, M.; Mersmann, S.; Groch, A.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2012-02-01

    Visualization of anatomical data for disease diagnosis, surgical planning, or orientation during interventional therapy is an integral part of modern health care. However, as anatomical information is typically shown on monitors provided by a radiological work station, the physician has to mentally transfer internal structures shown on the screen to the patient. To address this issue, we recently presented a new approach to on-patient visualization of 3D medical images, which combines the concept of augmented reality (AR) with an intuitive interaction scheme. Our method requires mounting a range imaging device, such as a Time-of-Flight (ToF) camera, to a portable display (e.g. a tablet PC). During the visualization process, the pose of the camera and thus the viewing direction of the user is continuously determined with a surface matching algorithm. By moving the device along the body of the patient, the physician is given the impression of looking directly into the human body. In this paper, we present and evaluate a new method for camera pose estimation based on an anisotropic trimmed variant of the well-known iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. According to in-silico and in-vivo experiments performed with computed tomography (CT) and ToF data of human faces, knees and abdomens, our new method is better suited for surface registration with ToF data than the established trimmed variant of the ICP, reducing the target registration error (TRE) by more than 60%. The TRE obtained (approx. 4-5 mm) is promising for AR visualization, but clinical applications require maximization of robustness and run-time.

  15. The significance of post-stress decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction in patients undergoing regadenoson stress gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Javier; Golzar, Yasmeen; Fughhi, Ibtihaj; Olusanya, Adebayo; Doukky, Rami

    2017-02-08

    The significance of post-stress decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with regadenoson stress gated SPECT (GSPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has not been studied. Consecutive patients who underwent rest/regadenoson stress GSPECT-MPI followed by coronary angiography within 6 months were analyzed. Change in LVEF by GSPECT-MPI was calculated as stress LVEF minus rest LVEF; a significant decrease was tested at 5% and 10% thresholds. In a diagnostic cohort of 793 subjects, LVEF change was not predictive of severe/extensive coronary artery disease (area under the curve, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.44-0.57; P = 0.946). There was no significant difference in the rates of severe/extensive coronary artery disease in patients with or without a decrease in LVEF, irrespective of MPI findings. In an outcome cohort of the 929 subjects followed for 30 ± 16 months, post-regadenoson stress decrease in LVEF was not associated with increased risk of the composite endpoint of cardiac death or myocardial infarction or in the risk of coronary revascularization. In patients selected to undergo coronary angiography following regadenoson stress GSPECT-MPI, a decrease in LVEF after regadenoson stress is not predictive of severe/extensive CAD or adverse clinical outcomes, irrespective of MPI findings.

  16. Wide beam reconstruction "quarter-time" gated myocardial perfusion SPECT functional imaging: a comparison to "full-time" ordered subset expectation maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePuey, E Gordon; Bommireddipalli, Srinivas; Clark, John; Thompson, Linda; Srour, Yossi

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported that compared to iterative reconstruction with ordered subset expectation maximum (OSEM), wide beam reconstruction (WBR), which incorporates resolution recovery and controls noise during reconstruction without applying a post-processing filter, allows half-time SPECT acquisition with preserved diagnostic quality. We now postulate that with further Poisson noise treatment, quarter-time acquisition is possible. The half-time WBR algorithm was optimized for quarter-time acquisition based upon anthropomorphic cardiac phantom data and a pilot group of 48 patients (pts). Then using the modified algorithm, 209 pts (91 men, 118 women, mean chest circumference = 40 in) were imaged at rest (R) and stress (S) (9/32 mCi (99m)Tc-sestamibi) full-time with OSEM, and again quarter-time with the modified WBR algorithm. The 180 degrees , 64-stop, full-time single-day rest (R) (25 second-per-stop, sps) and 8-frame per cardiac cycle post-stress (S) (20 sps) gated SPECT, and then quarter-time R (6 sps) and post-S (4 sps) gated SPECT were acquired. Blinded observers graded scan quality (1 = poor to 5 = excellent) based on myocardial uniformity, endocardial/epicardial edge definition, and background noise. Perfusion defects were scored using a 17-segment model. Using three commercially available software methods, end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated. For the 209 prospective pts, mean image quality for R full-time OSEM and quarter-time WBR were similar (3.5 +/- 0.9 vs 3.6 +/- 0.7, p NS). For S, quarter-time WBR quality was superior to full-time OSEM (4.3 +/- 0.7 vs 3.9 +/- 0.7) (P = 1.78 x 10(-17)). In 35 pts with chest circumferences >44 inches a longer, 10 sps WBR acquisition improved resting image quality. Of 48 pts with abnormal scans (SSSs > 2 by OSEM) mean summed stress scores, summed rest scores, and summed difference scores were not significantly different with quarter-time WBR

  17. Transient Ischemic Dilation Ratio in Regadenoson, Single Isotope Gated Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manolo; Dias, Andre; Koshkelashvili, Nikoloz; Codolosa, Jose N; Jalife-Bucay, Mauricio; Rodriguez-Ziccardi, Mary; Amanullah, Aman M

    2017-01-01

    Single isotope 99mTc single-photon emission computed tomography-myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) is the most commonly used protocol for nuclear stress testing. Transient ischemic dilation of the left ventricle (TID) has been considered a specific marker of severe coronary artery disease (CAD). Recent publications have questioned the clinical utility of TID, specifically with regadenoson as a stressor and 4DM-SPECT software for TID analysis. These findings have not been demonstrated using other imaging packages. The goal of our study was to establish the TID threshold in the identification of Multi-vessel CAD using Quantitative Perfusion SPECT (QPS) software. Included in this study are 190 patients that had undergone regadenoson-stress, same day, single-isotope 99mTc MPI and had a coronary angiography within a designated 3-month period. QPS (Cedars-Sinai, LA, CA) automated image analysis software was used to calculate TID ratios which were compared across different CAD categories. Coronary angiograms were reviewed to identify both obstructive and nonobstructive CAD. The mean TID for patients with nonobstructive CAD ( n = 91) was 1.02 ± 0.11, and the threshold for TID was 1.24. A receiver operating characteristic curve showed that TID had a poor discriminatory capacity to identify MVD (area under the curve 0.58) with a sensitivity of 3% and a specificity of 97%. In our study with regadenoson MPI in a predominantly African-American population, TID was found to be a poor predictor of MVD using QPS software. The reason is unclear but possibly related to the significant decline in the prevalence of severe CAD in the area where our study took place.

  18. Illumination Effect of Laser Light in Foggy Objects Using an Active Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Active imaging techniques usually provide improved image information when compared to passive imaging techniques. Active vision is a direct visualization technique using an artificial illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique is one of active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The Range-gated imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security application, especially in the visualization of darken night or foggy environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is currently more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of the compact system configuration. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated range imaging based on range-gated imaging. Laser light having a short pulse width is usually used for the range-gated imaging system. In this paper, an illumination effect of laser light in foggy objects is studied using a range-gated imaging system. The used imaging system consists of an ultra-short pulse (0.35 ns) laser light and a gated imaging sensor. The experiment is carried out to monitor objects in a box filled by fog. In this paper, the effects by fog particles in range-gated imaging technique are studied. Edge blurring and range distortion are the generated by fog particles.

  19. Chitosan-Gated Magnetic-Responsive Nanocarrier for Dual-Modal Optical Imaging, Switchable Drug Release, and Synergistic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Mu, Qingxin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Revia, Richard [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Wang, Kui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Zhou, Xuezhe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Pauzauskie, Peter J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA; Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhou, Shuiqin [Department of Chemistry, The College of Staten Island, City University of New York, Staten Island NY 10314 USA; Zhang, Miqin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98195 USA

    2017-01-25

    In this study, we present a multifunctional yet structurally simple nanocarrier that has a high drug loading capacity, releases drug in response to onset of an AC magnetic field, and can serve as a long-term imaging contrast agent and effectively kills cancer cells by synergistic action. This nanocarrier (HMMC-NC) has a spherical shell structure with a center cavity of 80 nm in diameter. The shell is comprised of two layers: an inner layer of magnetite that exhibits superparamagnetism and an outer layer of mesoporous carbon embedded with carbon dots that exhibit photoluminescence property. Thus in addition to being a drug carrier, HMMC-NC is also a contrast agent for bioimaging. The switchable drug release is enabled by the chitosan molecules attached on the nanocarrier as the switching material which turns on or off the drug release in response to the application or withdrawal of an AC magnetic field.

  20. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramirez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramon; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J.; Paramo, Maria [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Cardiac Imaging Unit, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)], e-mail: bastarrika@unav.es

    2012-06-15

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 {+-} 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 {+-} 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 {+-} 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 {+-} 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols.

  1. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J.; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  2. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  3. Statistical Epistasis and Functional Brain Imaging Support a Role of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Angela; Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Spalek, Klara; Rasch, Björn; de Quervain, Dominique; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Despite the current progress in high-throughput, dense genome scans, a major portion of complex traits' heritability still remains unexplained, a phenomenon commonly termed “missing heritability.” The negligence of analytical approaches accounting for gene-gene interaction effects, such as statistical epistasis, is probably central to this phenomenon. Here we performed a comprehensive two-way SNP interaction analysis of human episodic memory, which is a heritable complex trait, and focused on 120 genes known to show differential, memory-related expression patterns in rat hippocampus. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was also used to capture genotype-dependent differences in memory-related brain activity. A significant, episodic memory-related interaction between two markers located in potassium channel genes (KCNB2 and KCNH5) was observed (Pnominal combined = 0.000001). The epistatic interaction was robust, as it was significant in a screening (Pnominal = 0.0000012) and in a replication sample (Pnominal = 0.01). Finally, we found genotype-dependent activity differences in the parahippocampal gyrus (Pnominal = 0.001) supporting the behavioral genetics finding. Our results demonstrate the importance of analytical approaches that go beyond single marker statistics of complex traits. PMID:22216252

  4. Gate crashing arbuscular mycorrhizas: in vivo imaging shows the extensive colonization of both symbionts by Trichoderma atroviride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lace, Beatrice; Genre, Andrea; Woo, Sheridan; Faccio, Antonella; Lorito, Matteo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi include strains of Trichoderma species that are used in biocontrol, and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, that enhance plant nutrition and stress resistance. The concurrent interaction of plants with these two groups of fungi affects crop performance but has only been occasionally studied so far. Using in vivo imaging of green fluorescent protein-tagged lines, we investigated the cellular interactions occurring between Trichoderma atroviride PKI1, Medicago truncatula and two Gigaspora species under in vitro culture conditions. Trichoderma atroviride did not activate symbiotic-like responses in the plant cells, such as nuclear calcium spiking or cytoplasmic aggregations at hyphal contact sites. Furthermore, T. atroviride parasitized G. gigantea and G. margarita hyphae through localized wall breaking and degradation - although this was not associated with significant chitin lysis nor the upregulation of two major chitinase genes. Trichoderma atroviride colonized broad areas of the root epidermis, in association with localized cell death. The infection of both symbionts was also observed when T. atroviride was applied to a pre-established AM symbiosis. We conclude that - although this triple interaction is known to improve plant growth in agricultural environments - in vitro culture demonstrate a particularly aggressive mycoparasitic and plant-colonizing behaviour of a biocontrol strain of Trichoderma. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Statistical epistasis and functional brain imaging support a role of voltage-gated potassium channels in human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Angela; Vogler, Christian; Gschwind, Leo; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Spalek, Klara; Rasch, Björn; de Quervain, Dominique; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Despite the current progress in high-throughput, dense genome scans, a major portion of complex traits' heritability still remains unexplained, a phenomenon commonly termed "missing heritability." The negligence of analytical approaches accounting for gene-gene interaction effects, such as statistical epistasis, is probably central to this phenomenon. Here we performed a comprehensive two-way SNP interaction analysis of human episodic memory, which is a heritable complex trait, and focused on 120 genes known to show differential, memory-related expression patterns in rat hippocampus. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was also used to capture genotype-dependent differences in memory-related brain activity. A significant, episodic memory-related interaction between two markers located in potassium channel genes (KCNB2 and KCNH5) was observed (P(nominal combined)=0.000001). The epistatic interaction was robust, as it was significant in a screening (P(nominal)=0.0000012) and in a replication sample (P(nominal)=0.01). Finally, we found genotype-dependent activity differences in the parahippocampal gyrus (P(nominal)=0.001) supporting the behavioral genetics finding. Our results demonstrate the importance of analytical approaches that go beyond single marker statistics of complex traits. © 2011 Heck et al.

  6. Statistical epistasis and functional brain imaging support a role of voltage-gated potassium channels in human memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Heck

    Full Text Available Despite the current progress in high-throughput, dense genome scans, a major portion of complex traits' heritability still remains unexplained, a phenomenon commonly termed "missing heritability." The negligence of analytical approaches accounting for gene-gene interaction effects, such as statistical epistasis, is probably central to this phenomenon. Here we performed a comprehensive two-way SNP interaction analysis of human episodic memory, which is a heritable complex trait, and focused on 120 genes known to show differential, memory-related expression patterns in rat hippocampus. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was also used to capture genotype-dependent differences in memory-related brain activity. A significant, episodic memory-related interaction between two markers located in potassium channel genes (KCNB2 and KCNH5 was observed (P(nominal combined=0.000001. The epistatic interaction was robust, as it was significant in a screening (P(nominal=0.0000012 and in a replication sample (P(nominal=0.01. Finally, we found genotype-dependent activity differences in the parahippocampal gyrus (P(nominal=0.001 supporting the behavioral genetics finding. Our results demonstrate the importance of analytical approaches that go beyond single marker statistics of complex traits.

  7. Non-gated fetal MRI of umbilical blood flow in an acardiac twin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Nobuhiko [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wada, Toru [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Kashima, Kyoko; Okada, Yoshiyuki [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Unno, Nobuya [Nagano Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Medicine, Nagano (Japan); Kitagawa, Michihiro [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Prenatal Medicine and Maternal Care, Tokyo (Japan); Chiba, Toshio [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Strategic Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Currently, the standard method of diagnosis of twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence is ultrasound imaging. The use of MRI for flow visualization may be a useful adjunct to US imaging for assessing the presence of retrograde blood flow in the acardiac fetus and/or umbilical artery. The technical challenge in fetal MRI flow imaging, however, is that fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring required for flow imaging is currently unavailable in the MRI scanner. A non-gated MRI flow imaging technique that requires no ECG monitoring was developed using the t-test to detect blood flow in 20 slices of phase-contrast MRI images randomly scanned at the same location over multiple cardiac cycles. A feasibility study was performed in a 24-week acardiac twin that showed no umbilical flow sonographically. Non-gated MRI flow images clearly indicated the presence of blood flow in the umbilical artery to the acardiac twin; however, there was no blood flow beyond the abdomen. This study leads us to conjecture that non-gated MRI flow imaging is sensitive in detecting low-range blood flow velocity and can be an adjunct to Doppler US imaging. (orig.)

  8. Multiple Constraints Based Robust Matching of Poor-Texture Close-Range Images for Monitoring a Simulated Landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are one of the most destructive geo-hazards that can bring about great threats to both human lives and infrastructures. Landslide monitoring has been always a research hotspot. In particular, landslide simulation experimentation is an effective tool in landslide research to obtain critical parameters that help understand the mechanism and evaluate the triggering and controlling factors of slope failure. Compared with other traditional geotechnical monitoring approaches, the close-range photogrammetry technique shows potential in tracking and recording the 3D surface deformation and failure processes. In such cases, image matching usually plays a critical role in stereo image processing for the 3D geometric reconstruction. However, the complex imaging conditions such as rainfall, mass movement, illumination, and ponding will reduce the texture quality of the stereo images, bringing about difficulties in the image matching process and resulting in very sparse matches. To address this problem, this paper presents a multiple-constraints based robust image matching approach for poor-texture close-range images particularly useful in monitoring a simulated landslide. The Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT algorithm was first applied to the stereo images for generation of scale-invariate feature points, followed by a two-step matching process: feature-based image matching and area-based image matching. In the first feature-based matching step, the triangulation process was performed based on the SIFT matches filtered by the Fundamental Matrix (FM and a robust checking procedure, to serve as the basic constraints for feature-based iterated matching of all the non-matched SIFT-derived feature points inside each triangle. In the following area-based image-matching step, the corresponding points of the non-matched features in each triangle of the master image were predicted in the homologous triangle of the searching image by using geometric

  9. GATE Monte Carlo simulations for variations of an integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging system based on the Biograph mMR model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklan, B.; Jakoby, B. W.; Watson, C. C.; Braun, H.; Ritt, P.; Quick, H. H.

    2015-06-01

    A simulation toolkit, GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission), was used to develop an accurate Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of a fully integrated 3T PET/MR hybrid imaging system (Siemens Biograph mMR). The PET/MR components of the Biograph mMR were simulated in order to allow a detailed study of variations of the system design on the PET performance, which are not easy to access and measure on a real PET/MR system. The 3T static magnetic field of the MR system was taken into account in all Monte Carlo simulations. The validation of the MC model was carried out against actual measurements performed on the PET/MR system by following the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) NU 2-2007 standard. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements included spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and count rate capability. The validated system model was then used for two different applications. The first application focused on investigating the effect of an extension of the PET field-of-view on the PET performance of the PET/MR system. The second application deals with simulating a modified system timing resolution and coincidence time window of the PET detector electronics in order to simulate time-of-flight (TOF) PET detection. A dedicated phantom was modeled to investigate the impact of TOF on overall PET image quality. Simulation results showed that the overall divergence between simulated and measured data was found to be less than 10%. Varying the detector geometry showed that the system sensitivity and noise equivalent count rate of the PET/MR system increased progressively with an increasing number of axial detector block rings, as to be expected. TOF-based PET reconstructions of the modeled phantom showed an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and image contrast to the conventional non-TOF PET reconstructions. In conclusion, the validated MC simulation model of an integrated PET/MR system with an overall

  10. GATE Monte Carlo simulations for variations of an integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging system based on the Biograph mMR model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklan, B; Jakoby, B W; Watson, C C; Braun, H; Ritt, P; Quick, H H

    2015-06-21

    A simulation toolkit, GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission), was used to develop an accurate Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of a fully integrated 3T PET/MR hybrid imaging system (Siemens Biograph mMR). The PET/MR components of the Biograph mMR were simulated in order to allow a detailed study of variations of the system design on the PET performance, which are not easy to access and measure on a real PET/MR system. The 3T static magnetic field of the MR system was taken into account in all Monte Carlo simulations. The validation of the MC model was carried out against actual measurements performed on the PET/MR system by following the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) NU 2-2007 standard. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements included spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and count rate capability. The validated system model was then used for two different applications. The first application focused on investigating the effect of an extension of the PET field-of-view on the PET performance of the PET/MR system. The second application deals with simulating a modified system timing resolution and coincidence time window of the PET detector electronics in order to simulate time-of-flight (TOF) PET detection. A dedicated phantom was modeled to investigate the impact of TOF on overall PET image quality. Simulation results showed that the overall divergence between simulated and measured data was found to be less than 10%. Varying the detector geometry showed that the system sensitivity and noise equivalent count rate of the PET/MR system increased progressively with an increasing number of axial detector block rings, as to be expected. TOF-based PET reconstructions of the modeled phantom showed an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and image contrast to the conventional non-TOF PET reconstructions. In conclusion, the validated MC simulation model of an integrated PET/MR system with an overall

  11. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J; Baeuerle, T; Semmler, W; Bartling, S H [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, S [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg University (Germany); Grasruck, M [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Kiessling, F [Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Gupta, R [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de

    2010-04-07

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  12. Digital Microfluidic Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Tao; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Microfluidic computing is an emerging application for microfluidics technology. We propose microfluidic logic gates based on digital microfluidics. Using the principle of electrowetting-on-dielectric, AND, OR, NOT and XOR gates are implemented through basic droplet-handling operations such as transporting, merging and splitting. The same input-output interpretation enables the cascading of gates to create nontrivial computing systems. We present a potential application for microfluidic logic gates by implementing microfluidic logic operations for on-chip HIV test.

  13. Measuring FMD in the brachial artery: how important is QRS gating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J; Gutterman, David D; Phillips, Shane A; Jurva, Jason W; Arthur, Emily I L; Das, Emon; Widlansky, Michael E

    2010-10-01

    Recommendations for the measurement of brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) typically suggest images be obtained at identical times in the cardiac cycle, usually end diastole (QRS complex onset). This recommendation presumes that inter-individual differences in arterial compliance are minimized. However, published evidence is conflicting. Furthermore, ECG gating is not available on many ultrasound systems; it requires an expensive software upgrade or increased image processing time. We tested whether analysis of images acquired with QRS gating or with the more simplified method of image averaging would yield similar results. We analyzed FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) in 29 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in 31 older adults and 12 young adults without diabetes, yielding a range of brachial artery distensibility. FMD and NMD were measured using recommended QRS-gated brachial artery diameter measurements and, alternatively, the average brachial diameters over the entire R-R interval. We found strong agreement between both methods for FMD and NMD (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.88-0.99). Measuring FMD and NMD using average diameter measurements significantly reduced post-image-processing time (658.9 ± 71.6 vs. 1,024.1 ± 167.6 s for QRS-gated analysis, P FMD and NMD measurements based on average diameter measurements can be performed without reducing accuracy. This finding may allow for simplification of FMD measurement and aid in the development of FMD as a potentially useful clinical tool.

  14. Evaluation of regional work from ECG-gated SPECT images through solution of equations of continuity for fluids-mechanical cardiac work calculated using thin wall model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hisatoshi

    2012-03-01

    Regional contraction work (RCW) of left ventricle (LV) was evaluated from cardiac perfusion images of ECG-gated single photon emission computed tomography (ECG-SPECT). The mechanical work was computed as a product of force and displaced distance. Force was determined from Laplace's law under a rectangle pressure. Deformation of wireframe representing LV was calculated from equations of continuity for two-dimensional fluids. Experiments were performed with homemade life-sized cardiac models. Total contraction work (TCW) and stroke work (SW) were 524.0 ± 166.1 mJ/beat and 709.8 ± 169.5 mJ/beat, respectively, in normal subjects (n = 23). Moderate correlation was seen between TCW and SW (y = -43.4 + 0.779 x, r = 0.815). The regional contraction amplitude (RCA), synchronous contraction index and RCW were 35.4 ± 3.5%, 95.4 ± 3.1% and 5.58 ± 0.97 mJ cm(-2)/beat in normal subjects, whereas those in patients with decreased ejection raction (EF) ≤ 30% (n = 6) were 19.6 ± 7.7%, 64.4 ± 32.2% and 2.58 ± 0.82 mJ cm(-2)/beat (p < 0.0001, Student's t-test). There was a poor correlation between RCW and RCA (y = 1.648 ± 0.116 x, r = 0.501) in normal subjects, suggesting that it might not be suitable to use RCA as an alternative to evaluate RCW.

  15. The Impact of Optimal Respiratory Gating and Image Noise on Evaluation of Intratumor Heterogeneity on 18F-FDG PET Imaging of Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, W.; Tixier, F.; van der Vos, Charlotte Sophie; Vriens, D.; Le Rest, C.C.; Bussink, J.; Oyen, W.J.; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Visvikis, D.; Visser, E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intratumor heterogeneity using parameters of texture on PET images is essential for precise characterization of cancer lesions. In this study, we investigated the influence of respiratory motion and varying noise levels on quantification of textural parameters in patients

  16. The impact of optimal respiratory gating and image noise on evaluation of intra-tumor heterogeneity in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography imaging of lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, W.; Tixier, F.; Vos, C.S. van der; Vriens, D.; Rest, C.C. Le; Bussink, J.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Geus-Oei, L.-F. de; Visvikis, D.; Visser, E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of measurement accuracy of intra-tumor heterogeneity using texture features in positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential to characterize cancer lesions with high precision. In this study, we investigated the influence of respiratory motion and varying noise levels on

  17. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  18. Gating of InAs/GaSb quantum wells using a silicon monoxide gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.; Gallagher, B. L.; Behet, M.; De Boeck, J.

    1998-07-01

    We report on a technique we have recently developed to fabricate very high quality gates and gated structures on InAs/AlxGa1-xSb quantum wells. The low thermal budget process leads to highly stable gates with extremely low leakage currents. Both electron and hole concentrations can be changed over a wide range by the application of modest gate voltages. We obtain a dn/dV value of 5×1011cm2/V for electrons and 1.6×1012cm2/V for holes at 1.2 K.

  19. Prediction of object detection, recognition, and identification [DRI] ranges at color scene images based on quantifying human color contrast perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Levin, Ilia; Yaron, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to predict, for specified color imaging system and for objects with known characteristics, their detection, recognition, identification (DRI) ranges in a colored dynamic scene, based on quantifying the human color contrast perception. The method refers to the well established L*a*b*, 3D color space. The nonlinear relations of this space are intended to mimic the nonlinear response of the human eye. The metrics of L*a*b* color space is such that the Euclidian distance between any two colors in this space is approximately proportional to the color contrast as perceived by the human eye/brain. The result of this metrics leads to the outcome that color contrast of any two points is always greater (or equal) than their equivalent grey scale contrast. This meets our sense that looking on a colored image, contrast is superior to the gray scale contrast of the same image. Yet, color loss by scattering at very long ranges should be considered as well. The color contrast derived from the distance between the colored object pixels and to the nearby colored background pixels, as derived from the L*a*b* color space metrics, is expressed in terms of gray scale contrast. This contrast replaces the original standard gray scale contrast component of that image. As expected, the resulted DRI ranges are, in most cases, larger than those predicted by the standard gray scale image. Upon further elaboration and validation of this method, it may be combined with the next versions of the well accepted TRM codes for DRI predictions. Consistent prediction of DRI ranges implies a careful evaluation of the object and background color contrast reduction along the range. Clearly, additional processing for reconstructing the objects and background true colors and hence the color contrast along the range, will further increase the DRI ranges.

  20. SIM Grid Star Observations: Astrometry With a New High Dynamic Range Imaging Device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, L

    2000-01-01

    ... (developed by the Institut fur Mikroelek-tronik Stuttgart, IMS, Germany) are presented. To test the HDRC4 imager at the telescope, a cooled camera had to be constructed by modifying a camera designed by IMS...

  1. Waveguide piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer array for short-range pulse-echo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y.; Tang, H.; Wang, Q.; Fung, S.; Tsai, J. M.; Daneman, M.; Boser, B. E.; Horsley, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an 8 × 24 element, 100 μm-pitch, 20 MHz ultrasound imager based on a piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (PMUT) array having integrated acoustic waveguides. The 70 μm diameter, 220 μm long waveguides function both to direct acoustic waves and to confine acoustic energy, and also to provide mechanical protection for the PMUT array used for surface-imaging applications such as an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor. The imager consists of a PMUT array bonded with a CMOS ASIC using wafer-level conductive eutectic bonding. This construction allows each PMUT in the array to have a dedicated front-end receive amplifier, which together with on-chip analog multiplexing enables individual pixel read-out with high signal-to-noise ratio through minimized parasitic capacitance between the PMUT and the front-end amplifier. Finite element method simulations demonstrate that the waveguides preserve the pressure amplitude of acoustic pulses over distances of 600 μm. Moreover, the waveguide design demonstrated here enables pixel-by-pixel readout of the ultrasound image due to improved directivity of the PMUT by directing acoustic waves and creating a pressure field with greater spatial uniformity at the end of the waveguide. Pulse-echo imaging experiments conducted using a one-dimensional steel grating demonstrate the array's ability to form a two-dimensional image of a target.

  2. Octave-spanning hyperspectral coherent diffractive imaging in the extreme ultraviolet range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yijian; Zhang, Chunmei; Marceau, Claude; Naumov, A Yu; Corkum, P B; Villeneuve, D M

    2015-11-02

    Soft x-ray microscopy is a powerful imaging technique that provides sub-micron spatial resolution, as well as chemical specificity using core-level near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Near the carbon K-edge (280-300 eV) biological samples exhibit high contrast, and the detailed spectrum contains information about the local chemical environment of the atoms. Most soft x-ray imaging takes place on dedicated beamlines at synchrotron facilities or at x-ray free electron laser facilities. Tabletop femtosecond laser systems are now able to produce coherent radiation at the carbon K-edge and beyond through the process of high harmonic generation (HHG). The broad bandwidth of HHG is seemingly a limitation to imaging, since x-ray optical elements such as Fresnel zone plates require monochromatic sources. Counter-intuitively, the broad bandwidth of HHG sources can be beneficial as it permits chemically-specific hyperspectral imaging. We apply two separate techniques - Fourier transform spectroscopy, and lensless holographic imaging - to obtain images of an object simultaneously at multiple wavelengths using an octave-spanning high harmonic source with photon energies up to 30 eV. We use an interferometric delay reference to correct for nanometer-scale fluctuations between the two HHG sources.

  3. Test of the Practicality and Feasibility of EDoF-Empowered Image Sensors for Long-Range Biometrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hsun Hsieh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For many practical applications of image sensors, how to extend the depth-of-field (DoF is an important research topic; if successfully implemented, it could be beneficial in various applications, from photography to biometrics. In this work, we want to examine the feasibility and practicability of a well-known “extended DoF” (EDoF technique, or “wavefront coding,” by building real-time long-range iris recognition and performing large-scale iris recognition. The key to the success of long-range iris recognition includes long DoF and image quality invariance toward various object distance, which is strict and harsh enough to test the practicality and feasibility of EDoF-empowered image sensors. Besides image sensor modification, we also explored the possibility of varying enrollment/testing pairs. With 512 iris images from 32 Asian people as the database, 400-mm focal length and F/6.3 optics over 3 m working distance, our results prove that a sophisticated coding design scheme plus homogeneous enrollment/testing setups can effectively overcome the blurring caused by phase modulation and omit Wiener-based restoration. In our experiments, which are based on 3328 iris images in total, the EDoF factor can achieve a result 3.71 times better than the original system without a loss of recognition accuracy.

  4. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra K.; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patricia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C.; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately,

  5. The Effect of a Pre-Lens Aperture on the Temperature Range and Image Uniformity of Microbolometer Infrared Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Parris, Larkin S. [Wichita State University; Lindal, John M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the temperature range extension of long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras by placing an aperture in front of the lens. An aperture smaller than the lens will reduce the radiance to the sensor, allowing the camera to image targets much hotter than typically allowable. These higher temperatures were accurately determined after developing a correction factor which was applied to the built-in temperature calibration. The relationship between aperture diameter and temperature range is linear. The effect of pre-lens apertures on the image uniformity is a form of anti-vignetting, meaning the corners appear brighter (hotter) than the rest of the image. An example of using this technique to measure temperatures of high melting point polymers during 3D printing provide valuable information of the time required for the weld-line temperature to fall below the glass transition temperature.

  6. Super-resolution depth information from a short-wave infrared laser gated-viewing system by using correlated double sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhler, Benjamin; Lutzmann, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Primarily, a laser gated-viewing (GV) system provides range-gated 2D images without any range resolution within the range gate. By combining two GV images with slightly different gate positions, 3D information within a part of the range gate can be obtained. The depth resolution is higher (super-resolution) than the minimal gate shift step size in a tomographic sequence of the scene. For a state-of-the-art system with a typical frame rate of 20 Hz, the time difference between the two required GV images is 50 ms which may be too long in a dynamic scenario with moving objects. Therefore, we have applied this approach to the reset and signal level images of a new short-wave infrared (SWIR) GV camera whose read-out integrated circuit supports correlated double sampling (CDS) actually intended for the reduction of kTC noise (reset noise). These images are extracted from only one single laser pulse with a marginal time difference in between. The SWIR GV camera consists of 640 x 512 avalanche photodiodes based on mercury cadmium telluride with a pixel pitch of 15 μm. A Q-switched, flash lamp pumped solid-state laser with 1.57 μm wavelength (OPO), 52 mJ pulse energy after beam shaping, 7 ns pulse length and 20 Hz pulse repetition frequency is used for flash illumination. In this paper, the experimental set-up is described and the operating principle of CDS is explained. The method of deriving super-resolution depth information from a GV system by using CDS is introduced and optimized. Further, the range accuracy is estimated from measured image data.

  7. Discrimination between sedimentary rocks from close-range visible and very-near-infrared images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozo, Susana Del; Lindenbergh, R.C.; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Blom, J.C.; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the mineral composition of rocks results in a change of their spectral response capable of being studied by imaging spectroscopy. This paper proposes the use of a low-cost handy sensor, a calibrated visible-very near infrared (VIS-VNIR) multispectral camera for the recognition of

  8. Deletion of cytosolic gating ring decreases gate and voltage sensor coupling in BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guohui; Geng, Yanyan; Jin, Yakang; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Magleby, Karl L; Salkoff, Lawrence; Cui, Jianmin

    2017-03-06

    Large conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + channels (BK channels) gate open in response to both membrane voltage and intracellular Ca 2+ The channel is formed by a central pore-gate domain (PGD), which spans the membrane, plus transmembrane voltage sensors and a cytoplasmic gating ring that acts as a Ca 2+ sensor. How these voltage and Ca 2+ sensors influence the common activation gate, and interact with each other, is unclear. A previous study showed that a BK channel core lacking the entire cytoplasmic gating ring (Core-MT) was devoid of Ca 2+ activation but retained voltage sensitivity (Budelli et al. 2013. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1313433110). In this study, we measure voltage sensor activation and pore opening in this Core-MT channel over a wide range of voltages. We record gating currents and find that voltage sensor activation in this truncated channel is similar to WT but that the coupling between voltage sensor activation and gating of the pore is reduced. These results suggest that the gating ring, in addition to being the Ca 2+ sensor, enhances the effective coupling between voltage sensors and the PGD. We also find that removal of the gating ring alters modulation of the channels by the BK channel's β1 and β2 subunits. © 2017 Zhang et al.

  9. Feasibility of a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm for tumor segmentation in retrospectively gated PET images: phantom and clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Montserrat; Fechter, Tobias; Nemer, Ursula; Nanko, Norbert; Mix, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer, Andrea

    2015-12-21

    PET/CT plays an important role in radiotherapy planning for lung tumors. Several segmentation algorithms have been proposed for PET tumor segmentation. However, most of them do not take into account respiratory motion and are not well validated. The aim of this work was to evaluate a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm (COA) for PET tumor segmentation adapted to retrospectively gated (4D) images. The evaluation involved a wide set of 4D-PET/CT acquisitions of dynamic experimental phantoms and lung cancer patients. In addition, segmentation accuracy of 4D-COA was compared with four other state-of-the-art algorithms. In phantom evaluation, the physical properties of the objects defined the gold standard. In clinical evaluation, the ground truth was estimated by the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) consensus of three manual PET contours by experts. Algorithm evaluation with phantoms resulted in: (i) no statistically significant diameter differences for different targets and movements (Δφ = 0.3 ± 1.6 mm); (ii) reproducibility for heterogeneous and irregular targets independent of user initial interaction and (iii) good segmentation agreement for irregular targets compared to manual CT delineation in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC = 0.66 ± 0.04), Positive Predictive Value (PPV  = 0.81 ± 0.06) and Sensitivity (Sen. = 0.49 ± 0.05). In clinical evaluation, the segmented volume was in reasonable agreement with the consensus volume (difference in volume (%Vol) = 40 ± 30, DSC = 0.71 ± 0.07 and PPV = 0.90 ± 0.13). High accuracy in target tracking position (ΔME) was obtained for experimental and clinical data (ΔME(exp) = 0 ± 3 mm; ΔME(clin) 0.3 ± 1.4 mm). In the comparison with other lung segmentation methods, 4D-COA has shown the highest volume accuracy in both experimental and clinical data. In conclusion, the accuracy in volume delineation, position tracking and its robustness on highly irregular target movements

  10. Feasibility of a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm for tumor segmentation in retrospectively gated PET images: phantom and clinical validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles, Montserrat; Fechter, Tobias; Nemer, Ursula; Nanko, Norbert; Mix, Michael; Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    PET/CT plays an important role in radiotherapy planning for lung tumors. Several segmentation algorithms have been proposed for PET tumor segmentation. However, most of them do not take into account respiratory motion and are not well validated. The aim of this work was to evaluate a semi-automated contrast-oriented algorithm (COA) for PET tumor segmentation adapted to retrospectively gated (4D) images. The evaluation involved a wide set of 4D-PET/CT acquisitions of dynamic experimental phantoms and lung cancer patients. In addition, segmentation accuracy of 4D-COA was compared with four other state-of-the-art algorithms. In phantom evaluation, the physical properties of the objects defined the gold standard. In clinical evaluation, the ground truth was estimated by the STAPLE (Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation) consensus of three manual PET contours by experts. Algorithm evaluation with phantoms resulted in: (i) no statistically significant diameter differences for different targets and movements (Δ φ =0.3+/- 1.6 mm); (ii) reproducibility for heterogeneous and irregular targets independent of user initial interaction and (iii) good segmentation agreement for irregular targets compared to manual CT delineation in terms of Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC  =  0.66+/- 0.04 ), Positive Predictive Value (PPV  =  0.81+/- 0.06 ) and Sensitivity (Sen.  =  0.49+/- 0.05 ). In clinical evaluation, the segmented volume was in reasonable agreement with the consensus volume (difference in volume (%Vol)  =  40+/- 30 , DSC  =  0.71+/- 0.07 and PPV  =  0.90+/- 0.13 ). High accuracy in target tracking position (Δ ME) was obtained for experimental and clinical data (Δ ME{{}\\text{exp}}=0+/- 3 mm; Δ ME{{}\\text{clin}}=0.3+/- 1.4 mm). In the comparison with other lung segmentation methods, 4D-COA has shown the highest volume accuracy in both experimental and clinical data. In conclusion, the accuracy in volume

  11. Processor for Real-Time Atmospheric Compensation in Long-Range Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Range surveillance is a critical component of space exploration because of its implications on safety, cost, and overall mission timeline. However, launch delays,...

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  13. Measuring Pulse Rate Variability using Long-Range, Non-Contact Imaging Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-20

    Photoplethysmography (PPG), first pioneered in the 1930’s, is a low cost , noninvasive method of detecting changes in blood volume using variations in...glasses, piercings, and use of skin or beauty products were recorded but not otherwise used for analysis or screening purposes. C. Experimental Design...and Lei Wang. A review of non-contact, low- cost physiological information measurement based on photoplethysmographic imaging. Annu. Int. Conf. IEEE

  14. Optical Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Fresne, E. R.; Dowler, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Logic gates for light signals constructed from combinations of prisms, polarizing plates, and quarterwave plates. Optical logic gate performs elementary logic operation on light signals received along two optical fibers. Whether gate performs OR function or exclusive-OR function depends on orientation of analyzer. Nonbinary truth tables also obtained by rotating polarizer or analyzer to other positions or inserting other quarter-wave plates.

  15. A contest of sensors in close range 3D imaging: performance evaluation with a new metric test object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hess

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An independent means of 3D image quality assessment is introduced, addressing non-professional users of sensors and freeware, which is largely characterized as closed-sourced and by the absence of quality metrics for processing steps, such as alignment. A performance evaluation of commercially available, state-of-the-art close range 3D imaging technologies is demonstrated with the help of a newly developed Portable Metric Test Artefact. The use of this test object provides quality control by a quantitative assessment of 3D imaging sensors. It will enable users to give precise specifications which spatial resolution and geometry recording they expect as outcome from their 3D digitizing process. This will lead to the creation of high-quality 3D digital surrogates and 3D digital assets. The paper is presented in the form of a competition of teams, and a possible winner will emerge.

  16. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  17. A Fast Component-Tree Algorithm for High Dynamic-Range Images and Second Generation Connectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    2011-01-01

    Component trees are important data structures for computation of connected attribute filters. Though some of the available algorithms are suitable for high-dynamic range, and in particular floating point data, none are suitable for computation of component trees for so-called second-generation, and

  18. GATE V6: a major enhancement of the GATE simulation platform enabling modelling of CT and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, S; Becheva, E [DSV/I2BM/SHFJ, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France); Benoit, D; Rehfeld, N; Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC-UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Carlier, T [INSERM U892-Cancer Research Center, University of Nantes, Nantes (France); Cassol, F; Morel, C [Centre de physique des particules de Marseille, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universite de la Mediterranee, Aix-Marseille II, 163, avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Descourt, P; Visvikis, D [INSERM, U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Brest (France); Frisson, T; Grevillot, L; Guigues, L; Sarrut, D; Zahra, N [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U630, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard (France); Maigne, L; Perrot, Y [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, 24 Avenue des Landais, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Schaart, D R [Delft University of Technology, Radiation Detection and Medical Imaging, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Pietrzyk, U, E-mail: buvat@imnc.in2p3.fr [Reseach Center Juelich, Institute of Neurosciences and Medicine and Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    GATE (Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography) is a Monte Carlo simulation platform developed by the OpenGATE collaboration since 2001 and first publicly released in 2004. Dedicated to the modelling of planar scintigraphy, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions, this platform is widely used to assist PET and SPECT research. A recent extension of this platform, released by the OpenGATE collaboration as GATE V6, now also enables modelling of x-ray computed tomography and radiation therapy experiments. This paper presents an overview of the main additions and improvements implemented in GATE since the publication of the initial GATE paper (Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61). This includes new models available in GATE to simulate optical and hadronic processes, novelties in modelling tracer, organ or detector motion, new options for speeding up GATE simulations, examples illustrating the use of GATE V6 in radiotherapy applications and CT simulations, and preliminary results regarding the validation of GATE V6 for radiation therapy applications. Upon completion of extensive validation studies, GATE is expected to become a valuable tool for simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging.

  19. A Very Low Dark Current Temperature-Resistant, Wide Dynamic Range, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-07-01

    A very low dark current (VLDC) temperature-resistant approach which best suits a wide dynamic range (WDR) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a lateral over-flow integration capacitor (LOFIC) has been developed. By implementing a low electric field photodiode without a trade-off of full well-capacity, reduced plasma damage, re-crystallization, and termination of silicon-silicon dioxide interface states in the front end of line and back end of line (FEOL and BEOL) in a 0.18 µm, two polycrystalline silicon, three metal (2P3M) process, the dark current is reduced to 11 e-/s/pixel (0.35 e-/s/µm2: pixel area normalized) at 60 °C, which is the lowest value ever reported. For further robustness at low and high temperatures, 1/3-in., 5.6-µm pitch, 800×600 pixel sensor chips with low noise readout circuits designed for a signal and noise hold circuit and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) have also been deposited with an inorganic cap layer on a micro-lens and covered with a metal hermetically sealed package assembly. Image sensing performance results in 2.4 e-rms temporal noise and 100 dB dynamic range (DR) with 237 ke- full well-capacity. The operating temperature range is extended from -40 to 85 °C while retaining good image quality.

  20. A comparison of optical architectures for constrained long-range imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S. Craig; Goodman, Timothy D.; Sparks, Andrew W.; Wheeler, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Long-range airborne full-motion-video systems require large apertures to maximize multiple aspects of system performance, including spatial resolution and sensitivity. As systems push to larger apertures for increased resolution and standoff range, both mounting constraints and atmospheric effects limit their effectiveness. This paper considers two questions: first, under what atmospheric and spectral conditions does it make sense to have a larger aperture; second, what types of optical systems can best exploit movement-constrained mounting? We briefly explore high-level atmospheric considerations in determining sensor aperture size for various spectral bands, following with a comparison of the swept-volume-to-aperture ratio of Ritchey-Chrétien and three-mirror-anastigmat optical systems.

  1. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  2. Design and control of multi-actuated atomic force microscope for large-range and high-speed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani Bozchalooi, I.; Careaga Houck, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); AlGhamdi, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Dammam, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Youcef-Toumi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents the design and control of a high-speed and large-range atomic force microscopy (AFM). A multi-actuation scheme is proposed where several nano-positioners cooperate to achieve the range and speed requirements. A simple data-based control design methodology is presented to effectively operate the AFM scanner components. The proposed controllers compensate for the coupled dynamics and divide the positioning responsibilities between the scanner components. As a result, the multi-actuated scanner behavior is equivalent to that of a single X–Y–Z positioner with large range and high speed. The scanner of the designed AFM is composed of five nano-positioners, features 6 μm out-of-plane and 120 μm lateral ranges and is capable of high-speed operation. The presented AFM has a modular design with laser spot size of 3.5 μm suitable for small cantilever, an optical view of the sample and probe, a conveniently large waterproof sample stage and a 20 MHz data throughput for high resolution image acquisition at high imaging speeds. This AFM is used to visualize etching of calcite in a solution of sulfuric acid. Layer-by-layer dissolution and pit formation along the crystalline lines in a low pH environment is observed in real time. - Highlights: • High-speed AFM imaging is extended to large lateral and vertical scan ranges. • A general multi-actuation approach to atomic force microscopy is presented. • A high-speed AFM is designed and implemented based on the proposed method. • Multi-actuator control is designed auxiliary to a PID unit to maintain flexibility. • Influence of calcite crystal structure on dissolution is visualized in video form.

  3. Gates Speaks to Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan

    1997-01-01

    In an interview, Microsoft CEO Bill Gates answers questions about the Gates Library Foundation; Libraries Online; tax-support for libraries; comparisons to Andrew Carnegie; charges of "buying" the library market; Internet filters, policies, and government censorship; the future of the World Wide Web and the role of librarians in its…

  4. Tilt-pair analysis of images from a range of different specimens in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard; Chen, Shaoxia; Chen, James Z; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Passmore, Lori A; Ciccarelli, Luciano; Rubinstein, John L; Crowther, R Anthony; Stewart, Phoebe L; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2011-11-11

    The comparison of a pair of electron microscope images recorded at different specimen tilt angles provides a powerful approach for evaluating the quality of images, image-processing procedures, or three-dimensional structures. Here, we analyze tilt-pair images recorded from a range of specimens with different symmetries and molecular masses and show how the analysis can produce valuable information not easily obtained otherwise. We show that the accuracy of orientation determination of individual single particles depends on molecular mass, as expected theoretically since the information in each particle image increases with molecular mass. The angular uncertainty is less than 1° for particles of high molecular mass (~50 MDa), several degrees for particles in the range 1-5 MDa, and tens of degrees for particles below 1 MDa. Orientational uncertainty may be the major contributor to the effective temperature factor (B-factor) describing contrast loss and therefore the maximum resolution of a structure determination. We also made two unexpected observations. Single particles that are known to be flexible showed a wider spread in orientation accuracy, and the orientations of the largest particles examined changed by several degrees during typical low-dose exposures. Smaller particles presumably also reorient during the exposure; hence, specimen movement is a second major factor that limits resolution. Tilt pairs thus enable assessment of orientation accuracy, map quality, specimen motion, and conformational heterogeneity. A convincing tilt-pair parameter plot, where 60% of the particles show a single cluster around the expected tilt axis and tilt angle, provides confidence in a structure determined using electron cryomicroscopy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Step-and-shoot prospectively ECG-gated versus retrospectively ECG-gated with tube current modulation coronary CT angiography using the 128-slice MDCT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dong Wook (Dept. of Family Medicine, Medial Research Institute, Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, School of Medicine, Gyeongsangnam-do, (Korea, Republic of)); Choo, Ki Seok; Baik, Seung Kug; Kim, Yong Woo; Jeon, Ung Bae (Dept. of Radiology, Medial Research Institute, Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, School of Medicine, Gyeongsangnam-do, (Korea, Republic of)), email: kschoo0618@naver.com; Kim, Jeong Soo (Dept. of Cardiology, Medial Research Institute, Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, School of Medicine, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of)); Lim, Soo Jin (Dept. of Cardiology, Kim Hae Joongang Hospital, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-02-15

    Background: Little is known regarding image quality and the required radiation dose for step-and-shoot and retrospective coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) with tube current modulation (TCM) in 128-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiography. Purpose: To compare image quality and radiation dose in patients who underwent 128-slice MDCT by the step-and- shoot method with those in patients who underwent 128-slice MDCT with retrospective CCTA with TCM. Material and Methods: CCTA obtained with 128-slice MDCT was retrospectively evaluated in 160 patients. Two independent reviewers separately scored the subjective image quality of the coronary artery segments (1, excellent; 4, poor) for step-and-shoot (68, mean heart rate [HR]: 59.3+-6.8) and retrospective CCTA with TCM (77, mean HR: 59.1+-9.8). Interobserver variability was calculated. Effective radiation doses of both scan techniques were calculated with dose-length product. Results: There was good agreement for quality scores of coronary artery segment images between the independent reviewers (k=0.72). The number of coronary artery segments that could not be evaluated was 2.85% (27 of 947) in the step-and-shoot and 1.87% (20 of 1071) in retrospective CCTA with TCM. Image quality scores were not significantly different (P>.05). Mean patient radiation dose was 63% lower for step-and-shoot (1.94+-0.70 mSv) than for retrospective CCTA with TCM (4.51+-1.18 mSv) (P<0.0001). For patients who underwent step-and-shoot or retrospective CCTA with TCM, an average HR of 63.5 beats per minute was identified as the threshold for the prediction of non-diagnostic image quality for both protocols. There were no significant differences in the image quality of both methods between obese (body mass index [BMI>=25) and non-obese patients (BMI<25), but radiation doses were higher in the obesity group than in the non-obesity group for both methods. Conclusion: Both step-and-shoot and retrospective CCTA with TCM using 128

  6. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-01-01

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrial automation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passive range finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive range finders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive range finders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chiefly consist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. The implementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjust the exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance of triangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From the experimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active range finder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within the measurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests on applications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotive field were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders are well-suited for distance measurements in this field. PMID:27879789

  7. Validation of a simultaneous PET/MR system model for PET simulation using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnier, Florian; Fayad, Hadi; Bert, Julien [LaTIM UMR 1101, Brest (France); Schmidt, Holger [University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen (Germany); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Simultaneous PET/MR acquisition shows promise in a range of applications. Simulation using GATE is an essential tool that allows obtaining the ground truth for such acquisitions and therefore helping in the development and the validation of innovative processing methods such as PET image reconstruction, attenuation correction and motion correction. The purpose of this work is to validate the GATE simulation of the Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MR system. A model of the Siemens Biograph mMR was developed. This model includes the geometry and spatial positioning of the crystals inside the scanner and the characteristics of the detection process. The accuracy of the model was tested by comparing, on a real physical phantom study, GATE simulated results to reconstructed PET images using measured results obtained from a Siemens Biograph mMR system. The same parameters such as the acquisition time and phantom position inside the scanner were fixed for our simulations. List-mode outputs were recovered in both cases and reconstructed using the OPL-EM algorithm. Several parameters were used to compare the two reconstructed images such as profile comparison, signal-to-noise ratio and activity contrast analysis. Finally patient acquired MR images were segmented and used for the simulation of corresponding PET images. The simulated and acquired sets of reconstructed phantom images showed close emission values in regions of interest with relative differences lower than 5%. The scatter fraction was within a <3% agreement. Close matching of profiles and contrast indices were obtained between simulated and corresponding acquired PET images. Our results indicate that the GATE developed Biograph mMR model is accurate in comparison to the real scanner performance and can be used for evaluating innovative processing methods for applications in clinical PET/MR protocols.

  8. Proposed NRC portable target case for short-range triangulation-based 3D imaging systems characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Benjamin; MacKinnon, David; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    2011-03-01

    The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is currently evaluating and designing artifacts and methods to completely characterize 3-D imaging systems. We have gathered a set of artifacts to form a low-cost portable case and provide a clearly-defined set of procedures for generating characteristic values using these artifacts. In its current version, this case is specifically designed for the characterization of short-range (standoff distance of 1 centimeter to 3 meters) triangulation-based 3-D imaging systems. The case is known as the "NRC Portable Target Case for Short-Range Triangulation-based 3-D Imaging Systems" (NRC-PTC). The artifacts in the case have been carefully chosen for their geometric, thermal, and optical properties. A set of characterization procedures are provided with these artifacts based on procedures either already in use or are based on knowledge acquired from various tests carried out by the NRC. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T), a well-known terminology in the industrial field, was used to define the set of tests. The following parameters of a system are characterized: dimensional properties, form properties, orientation properties, localization properties, profile properties, repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility. A number of tests were performed in a special dimensional metrology laboratory to validate the capability of the NRC-PTC. The NRC-PTC will soon be subjected to reproducibility testing using an intercomparison evaluation to validate its use in different laboratories.

  9. Flash trajectory imaging of target 3D motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan; Fan, Songtao; He, Jun; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-03-01

    We present a flash trajectory imaging technique which can directly obtain target trajectory and realize non-contact measurement of motion parameters by range-gated imaging and time delay integration. Range-gated imaging gives the range of targets and realizes silhouette detection which can directly extract targets from complex background and decrease the complexity of moving target image processing. Time delay integration increases information of one single frame of image so that one can directly gain the moving trajectory. In this paper, we have studied the algorithm about flash trajectory imaging and performed initial experiments which successfully obtained the trajectory of a falling badminton. Our research demonstrates that flash trajectory imaging is an effective approach to imaging target trajectory and can give motion parameters of moving targets.

  10. Lightness perception in high dynamic range images: local and remote luminance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Sarah R; Radonjic, Ana; Gilchrist, Alan L; Brainard, David H

    2012-02-08

    We measured the perceived lightness of target patches embedded in high dynamic range checkerboards. We independently varied the luminance of checks immediately surrounding the test and those remote from it. The data establish context transfer functions (CTFs) that characterize perceptual matches across checkerboard contexts. Several features of the CTFs are broadly consistent with previous research: Matched luminance decreases when overall context luminance decreases; matched luminance increases when overall context luminance increases; manipulating context locations near the target has a greater effect than manipulating locations far from the target patch. The measured CTFs are not well described, however, by changes with context in multiplicative gain alone or by changes in both multiplicative and subtractive adaptation parameters. We were able to fit the data with a three-parameter model of adaptation. This allowed us to characterize the CTFs by specifying the luminances that appeared white, black, and gray (white point, black point, and gray point, respectively). The white and black points depended additively on the local and remote contrasts, but accounting for the gray point required an interaction term. Analysis of this effect suggests that the target patch itself must be included in a description of the visual context.

  11. A Dynamic Range Enhanced Readout Technique with a Two-Step TDC for High Speed Linear CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a dynamic range (DR enhanced readout technique with a two-step time-to-digital converter (TDC for high speed linear CMOS image sensors. A multi-capacitor and self-regulated capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA structure is employed to extend the dynamic range. The gain of the CTIA is auto adjusted by switching different capacitors to the integration node asynchronously according to the output voltage. A column-parallel ADC based on a two-step TDC is utilized to improve the conversion rate. The conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase. An error calibration scheme is also proposed to correct quantization errors caused by propagation delay skew within −Tclk~+Tclk. A linear CMOS image sensor pixel array is designed in the 0.13 μm CMOS process to verify this DR-enhanced high speed readout technique. The post simulation results indicate that the dynamic range of readout circuit is 99.02 dB and the ADC achieves 60.22 dB SNDR and 9.71 bit ENOB at a conversion rate of 2 MS/s after calibration, with 14.04 dB and 2.4 bit improvement, compared with SNDR and ENOB of that without calibration.

  12. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators.

  13. Towards a comprehensive eye model for zebrafish retinal imaging using full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Weber, Anke; Cimalla, Peter; Köttig, Felix; Brand, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2014-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the zebrafish is a prominent animal model for studying degeneration and regeneration processes, e.g. of photoreceptor cells in the retina. By means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), these studies can be conducted over weeks using the same individual and hence reducing the variability of the results. To allow an improvement of zebrafish retinal OCT imaging by suitable optics, we developed a zebrafish eye model using geometrical data obtained by in vivo dispersion encoded full range OCT as well as a dispersion comprising gradient index (GRIN) lens model based on refractive index data found in the literature. Using non-sequential ray tracing, the focal length of the spherical GRIN lens (diameter of 0.96 mm) was determined to be 1.22 mm at 800 nm wavelength giving a Matheissen's ratio (ratio of focal length to radius of the lens) of 2.54, which fits well into the range between 2.19 and 2.82, found for various fish lenses. Additionally, a mean refractive index of 1.64 at 800 nm could be retrieved for the lens to yield the same focal position as found for the GRIN condition. With the aid of the zebrafish eye model, the optics of the OCT scanner head were adjusted to provide high-resolution retinal images with a field of view of 30° x 30°. The introduced model therefore provides the basis for improved retinal imaging with OCT and can be further used to study the image formation within the zebrafish eye.

  14. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  15. Flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method for the modal content characterization in a broad range of wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muliar, Olena; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Michieletto, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    as the phase distribution are extracted by the alternative method of 2D FT filtering. Being exceptionally tunable the flexible C2 method gives an ability to adapt the system’s parameters in a desired manner satisfying even measurements of very specific fiber designs opening up new possibilities for advanced......We demonstrate a flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method in the time domain by application of a tunable and highly flexible light source. An advantage of the flexible C2method is shown by characterization of the step-index fiber (SMF28) over a broad range of wavelengths from 870nm to 1090nm...

  16. Wide-field color imaging of scatter-based tissue contrast using both high spatial frequency illumination and cross-polarization gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mackenzie L; McClatchy, David M; Gunn, Jason R; Elliott, Jonathan T; Paulsen, Keith D; Kanick, Stephen C; Pogue, Brian W

    2017-08-11

    This study characterizes the scatter-specific tissue contrast that can be obtained by high spatial frequency (HSF) domain imaging and cross-polarization (CP) imaging, using a standard color imaging system, and how combining them may be beneficial. Both HSF and CP approaches are known to modulate the sensitivity of epi-illumination reflectance images between diffuse multiply scattered and superficially backscattered photons, providing enhanced contrast from microstructure and composition than what is achieved by standard wide-field imaging. Measurements in tissue-simulating optical phantoms show that CP imaging returns localized assessments of both scattering and absorption effects, while HSF has uniquely specific sensitivity to scatter-only contrast, with a strong suppression of visible contrast from blood. The combination of CP and HSF imaging provided an expanded sensitivity to scatter compared with CP imaging, while rejecting specular reflections detected by HSF imaging. ex vivo imaging of an atlas of dissected rodent organs/tissues demonstrated the scatter-based contrast achieved with HSF, CP and HSF-CP imaging, with the white light spectral signal returned by each approach translated to a color image for intuitive encoding of scatter-based contrast within images of tissue. The results suggest that visible CP-HSF imaging could have the potential to aid diagnostic imaging of lesions in skin or mucosal tissues and organs, where just CP is currently the standard practice imaging modality. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A laboratory-based Laue X-ray diffraction system for enhanced imaging range and surface grain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, William; Stock, Chris; Huxley, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    Although CCD X-ray detectors can be faster to use, their large-area versions can be much more expensive than similarly sized photographic plate detectors. When indexing X-ray diffraction patterns, large-area detectors can prove very advantageous as they provide more spots, which makes fitting an orientation easier. On the other hand, when looking for single crystals in a polycrystalline sample, the speed of CCD detectors is more useful. A new setup is described here which overcomes some of the limitations of limited-range CCD detectors to make them more useful for indexing, whilst at the same time making it much quicker to find single crystals within a larger polycrystalline structure. This was done by combining a CCD detector with a six-axis goniometer, allowing the compilation of images from different angles into a wide-angled image. Automated scans along the sample were coupled with image processing techniques to produce grain maps, which can then be used to provide a strategy to extract single crystals from a polycrystal.

  18. Short range shooting distance estimation using variable pressure SEM images of the surroundings of bullet holes in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Ruth; Frank, Paulo Ricardo Ost; Vasconcellos, M A Z

    2017-03-01

    Modifications of cotton and polyester textiles due to shots fired at short range were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Different mechanisms of fiber rupture as a function of fiber type and shooting distance were detected, namely fusing, melting, scorching, and mechanical breakage. To estimate the firing distance, the approximately exponential decay of GSR coverage as a function of radial distance from the entrance hole was determined from image analysis, instead of relying on chemical analysis with EDX, which is problematic in the VP-SEM. A set of backscattered electron images, with sufficient magnification to discriminate micrometer wide GSR particles, was acquired at different radial distances from the entrance hole. The atomic number contrast between the GSR particles and the organic fibers allowed to find a robust procedure to segment the micrographs into binary images, in which the white pixel count was attributed to GSR coverage. The decrease of the white pixel count followed an exponential decay, and it was found that the reciprocal of the decay constant, obtained from the least-square fitting of the coverage data, showed a linear dependence on the shooting distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Concept Scientific Instruments, ZA de Courtaboeuf, 2 rue de la Terre de Feu, 91940 Les Ulis (France); Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Chrétien, Pascal; Schneegans, Olivier; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.houze@geeps.centralesupelec.fr [Laboratoire de Génie électrique et électronique de Paris (GeePs), UMR 8507 CNRS-CentraleSupélec, Paris-Sud and UPMC Universities, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delprat, Sophie [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); UPMC, Université Paris 06, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Bouzehouane, Karim; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS-Thales UMR 137, 1 avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Tatay, Sergio [Molecular Science Institute, University of Valencia, 46980 Paterna (Spain); Geffroy, Bernard [Lab. Physique des Interfaces et Couches minces (PICM), UMR 7647 CNRS-École polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lab. d' Innovation en Chimie des Surfaces et Nanosciences (LICSEN), NIMBE UMR 3685 CNRS-CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2016-06-13

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  20. Reversible gates and circuits descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracki, Krzystof

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents basic methods of reversible circuit description. To design reversible circuit a set of gates has to be chosen. Most popular libraries are composed of three types of gates so called CNT gates (Control, NOT and Toffoli). The gate indexing method presented in this paper is based on the CNT gates set. It introduces a uniform indexing of the gates used during synthesis process of reversible circuits. The paper is organized as follows. Section 1 recalls basic concepts of reversible logic. In Section 2 and 3 a graphical representation of the reversible gates and circuits is described. Section 4 describes proposed uniform NCT gates indexing. The presented gate indexing method provides gate numbering scheme independent of lines number of the designed circuit. The solution for a circuit consisting of smaller number of lines is a subset of solution for a larger circuit.

  1. Advanced insulated gate bipolar transistor gate drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, James Evans [Monongahela, PA; West, Shawn Michael [West Mifflin, PA; Fabean, Robert J [Donora, PA

    2009-08-04

    A gate drive for an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) includes a control and protection module coupled to a collector terminal of the IGBT, an optical communications module coupled to the control and protection module, a power supply module coupled to the control and protection module and an output power stage module with inputs coupled to the power supply module and the control and protection module, and outputs coupled to a gate terminal and an emitter terminal of the IGBT. The optical communications module is configured to send control signals to the control and protection module. The power supply module is configured to distribute inputted power to the control and protection module. The control and protection module outputs on/off, soft turn-off and/or soft turn-on signals to the output power stage module, which, in turn, supplies a current based on the signal(s) from the control and protection module for charging or discharging an input capacitance of the IGBT.

  2. IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM BASED ON INTEGRATED RANGE AND INTENSITY IMAGES FOR TRAFFIC SIGNS LOCALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahbazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in positioning techniques have made it possible to develop Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS for detection and 3D localization of various objects from a moving platform. On the other hand, automatic traffic sign recognition from an equipped mobile platform has recently been a challenging issue for both intelligent transportation and municipal database collection. However, there are several inevitable problems coherent to all the recognition methods completely relying on passive chromatic or grayscale images. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of an operational MMS. Being distinct from the others, the developed MMS comprises one range camera based on Photonic Mixer Device (PMD technology and one standard 2D digital camera. The system benefits from certain algorithms to detect, recognize and localize the traffic signs by fusing the shape, color and object information from both range and intensity images. As the calibrating stage, a self-calibration method based on integrated bundle adjustment via joint setup with the digital camera is applied in this study for PMD camera calibration. As the result, an improvement of 83 % in RMS of range error and 72 % in RMS of coordinates residuals for PMD camera, over that achieved with basic calibration is realized in independent accuracy assessments. Furthermore, conventional photogrammetric techniques based on controlled network adjustment are utilized for platform calibration. Likewise, the well-known Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF is applied to integrate the navigation sensors, namely GPS and INS. The overall acquisition system along with the proposed techniques leads to 90 % true positive recognition and the average of 12 centimetres 3D positioning accuracy.

  3. IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM BASED ON INTEGRATED RANGE AND INTENSITY IMAGES FOR TRAFFIC SIGNS LOCALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahbazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in positioning techniques have made it possible to develop Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS for detection and 3D localization of various objects from a moving platform. On the other hand, automatic traffic sign recognition from an equipped mobile platform has recently been a challenging issue for both intelligent transportation and municipal database collection. However, there are several inevitable problems coherent to all the recognition methods completely relying on passive chromatic or grayscale images. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of an operational MMS. Being distinct from the others, the developed MMS comprises one range camera based on Photonic Mixer Device (PMD technology and one standard 2D digital camera. The system benefits from certain algorithms to detect, recognize and localize the traffic signs by fusing the shape, color and object information from both range and intensity images. As the calibrating stage, a self-calibration method based on integrated bundle adjustment via joint setup with the digital camera is applied in this study for PMD camera calibration. As the result, an improvement of 83% in RMS of range error and 72% in RMS of coordinates residuals for PMD camera, over that achieved with basic calibration is realized in independent accuracy assessments. Furthermore, conventional photogrammetric techniques based on controlled network adjustment are utilized for platform calibration. Likewise, the well-known Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF is applied to integrate the navigation sensors, namely GPS and INS. The overall acquisition system along with the proposed techniques leads to 90% true positive recognition and the average of 12 centimetres 3D positioning accuracy.

  4. A technique for respiratory-gated radiotherapy treatment verification with an EPID in cine mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Neicu, Toni; Rietzel, Eike; Chen, George T. Y.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2005-08-01

    Respiratory gating based on external surrogates is performed in many clinics. We have developed a new technique for treatment verification using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in cine mode for gated 3D conformal therapy. Implanted radiopaque fiducial markers inside or near the target are required for this technique. The markers are contoured on the planning CT set, enabling us to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for each treatment beam. During the treatment, a sequence of EPID images can be acquired without disrupting the treatment. Implanted markers are visualized in the images and their positions in the beam's eye view are calculated off-line and compared to the reference position by matching the field apertures in corresponding EPID and DRR images. The precision of the patient set-up, the placement of the beam-gating window, as well as the residual tumour motion can be assessed for each treatment fraction. This technique has been demonstrated with a case study patient, who had three markers implanted in his liver. For this patient, the intra-fractional variation of all marker positions in the gating window had a 95% range of 4.8 mm in the SI direction (the primary axis of motion). This was about the same (5 mm) as the residual motion considered in the planning process. The inter-fractional variation of the daily mean positions of the markers, which indicates the uncertainty in the set-up procedure, was within +8.3 mm/-4.5 mm (95% range) in the SI direction for this case.

  5. Investigation of Range Profiles from a Simplified Ship on Rough Sea Surface and Its Multipath Imaging Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The range profiles of a two-dimension (2 D perfect electric conductor (PEC ship on a wind-driven rough sea surface are derived by performing an inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT on the wide band backscattered field. The rough sea surface is assuming to be a PEC surface. The back scattered field is computed based on EM numerical simulation when the frequencies are sampled between 100 MHz and 700 MHz. Considering the strong coupling interactions between the ship and sea, the complicated multipath effect to the range profile characteristics is fully analyzed based on the multipath imaging mechanisms. The coupling mechanisms could be explained by means of ray theory prediction and numerical extraction of the coupling currents. The comparison of the range profile locations between ray theory prediction and surface current simulation is implemented and analyzed in this paper. Finally, the influence of different sea states on the radar target signatures has been examined and discussed.

  6. TU-FG-BRB-09: Thermoacoustic Range Verification with Perfect Co-Registered Overlay of Bragg Peak onto Ultrasound Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patch, S; Kireeff Covo, M; Jackson, A; Qadadha, Y; Campbell, K; Albright, R; Bloemhard, P; Donoghue, A; Siero, C; Gimpel, T; Small, S; Ninemire, B; Johnson, M; Phair, L [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The potential of particle therapy has not yet been fully realized due to inaccuracies in range verification. The purpose of this work was to correlate the Bragg peak location with target structure, by overlaying thermoacoustic localization of the Bragg peak onto an ultrasound image. Methods: Pulsed delivery of 50 MeV protons was accomplished by a fast chopper installed between the ion source and the inflector of the 88″ cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. 2 Gy were delivered in 2 µs by a beam with peak current of 2 µA. Thermoacoustic emissions were detected by a cardiac array and Verasonics V1 ultrasound system, which also generated a grayscale ultrasound image. 1024 thermoacoustic pulses were averaged before filtering and one-way beamforming focused signal onto the Bragg peak location with perfect co-registration to the ultrasound images. Data was collected in a room temperature water bath and gelatin phantom with a cavity designed to mimic the intestine, in which gas pockets can displace the Bragg peak. Experiments were performed with the cavity both empty and filled with olive oil. Results: In the waterbath overlays of the Bragg peak agreed with Monte Carlo simulations to within 800±170 µm. Agreement within 1.3 ± 0.2 mm was achieved in the gelatin phantom, although relative stopping powers were estimated only to first order from CT scans. Protoacoustic signals were detected after travel from the Bragg peak through 29 mm and 65 mm of phantom material when the cavity was empty and full of olive oil, respectively. Conclusion: Protoacoustic range verification is feasible with a commercial clinical ultrasound array, but at doses exceeding the clinical realm. Further optimization of both transducer array and injection line chopper is required to enable range verification within a 2 Gy dose limit, which would enable online adaptive treatment. This work was supported in part by a UWM Intramural Instrumentation Grant and by the Director, Office

  7. Widely Tunable Terahertz Phase Modulation with Gate-Controlled Graphene Metasurfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqi Miao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As the basis of a diverse set of photonic applications, such as hologram imaging, polarization, and wave front manipulation, the local phase control of electromagnetic waves is fundamental in photonic research. However, currently available bulky, passive, range-limited phase modulators pose an obstacle in photonic applications. Here, we propose a new mechanism to achieve a wide phase modulation range, with graphene used as a tunable loss to drive an underdamped to overdamped resonator transition. Based on this mechanism, we present widely tunable phase modulation in the terahertz regime, realized in gate-tuned ultrathin reflective graphene metasurfaces. A one-port resonator model, supported by full-wave simulations, explains the underlying physics of the discovered extreme phase modulation and indicates general strategies for designing tunable photonic devices. As an example, we demonstrate a gate-tunable terahertz (THz polarization modulator with a graphene metasurface. Our findings establish the possibility for photonic applications based on active phase manipulation.

  8. First-order convex feasibility algorithms for iterative image reconstruction in limited angular-range X-ray CT

    CERN Document Server

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms in Computed Tomography (CT) are based on algorithms for solving a particular optimization problem. Design of the IIR algorithm, therefore, is aided by knowledge of the solution to the optimization problem on which it is based. Often times, however, it is impractical to achieve accurate solution to the optimization of interest, which complicates design of IIR algorithms. This issue is particularly acute for CT with a limited angular-range scan, which leads to poorly conditioned system matrices and difficult to solve optimization problems. In this article, we develop IIR algorithms which solve a certain type of optimization called convex feasibility. The convex feasibility approach can provide alternatives to unconstrained optimization approaches and at the same time allow for efficient algorithms for their solution -- thereby facilitating the IIR algorithm design process. An accelerated version of the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is adapted to various convex fea...

  9. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Gabriel C.; Woo, Bryana L.; Sanchez, Andres L.; Knapp, Haley

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.

  10. Nonlocal Means Denoising of Self-Gated and k-Space Sorted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Block-Matching and 3-Dimensional Filtering: Implications for Pancreatic Tumor Registration and Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jun [Department of Computer Science, Xidian University, Xi' An (China); McKenzie, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Fan, Zhaoyang [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Tuli, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Deng, Zixin; Pang, Jianing [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Fraass, Benedick [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, Debiao [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Yang, Guang [Department of Computer Science, Xidian University, Xi' An (China); Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gou, Shuiping [Department of Computer Science, Xidian University, Xi' An (China); Yang, Wensha, E-mail: wensha.yang@cshs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To denoise self-gated k-space sorted 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (SG-KS-4D-MRI) by applying a nonlocal means denoising filter, block-matching and 3-dimensional filtering (BM3D), to test its impact on the accuracy of 4D image deformable registration and automated tumor segmentation for pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with pancreatic cancer and abdominal SG-KS-4D-MRI were included in the study. Block-matching and 3D filtering was adapted to search in the axial slices/frames adjacent to the reference image patch in the spatial and temporal domains. The patches with high similarity to the reference patch were used to collectively denoise the 4D-MRI image. The pancreas tumor was manually contoured on the first end-of-exhalation phase for both the raw and the denoised 4D-MRI. B-spline deformable registration was applied to the subsequent phases for contour propagation. The consistency of tumor volume defined by the standard deviation of gross tumor volumes from 10 breathing phases (σ-GTV), tumor motion trajectories in 3 cardinal motion planes, 4D-MRI imaging noise, and image contrast-to-noise ratio were compared between the raw and denoised groups. Results: Block-matching and 3D filtering visually and quantitatively reduced image noise by 52% and improved image contrast-to-noise ratio by 56%, without compromising soft tissue edge definitions. Automatic tumor segmentation is statistically more consistent on the denoised 4D-MRI (σ-GTV = 0.6 cm{sup 3}) than on the raw 4D-MRI (σ-GTV = 0.8 cm{sup 3}). Tumor end-of-exhalation location is also more reproducible on the denoised 4D-MRI than on the raw 4D-MRI in all 3 cardinal motion planes. Conclusions: Block-matching and 3D filtering can significantly reduce random image noise while maintaining structural features in the SG-KS-4D-MRI datasets. In this study of pancreatic tumor segmentation, automatic segmentation of GTV in the registered image sets is shown to be

  11. Wide range instantaneous temperature measurements of convective fluid flows by using a schlieren system based in color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, A.; Moreno-Hernández, D.; Monzón-Hernández, D.; León-Rodríguez, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the schlieren method, the deflection of light by the presence of an inhomogeneous medium is proportional to the gradient of its refractive index. Such deflection, in a schlieren system, is represented by light intensity variations on the observation plane. Then, for a digital camera, the intensity level registered by each pixel depends mainly on the variation of the medium refractive index and the status of the digital camera settings. Therefore, in this study, we regulate the intensity value of each pixel by controlling the camera settings such as exposure time, gamma and gain values in order to calibrate the image obtained to the actual temperature values of a particular medium. In our approach, we use a color digital camera. The images obtained with a color digital camera can be separated on three different color-channels. Each channel corresponds to red, green, and blue color, moreover, each one has its own sensitivity. The differences in sensitivity allow us to obtain a range of temperature values for each color channel. Thus, high, medium and low sensitivity correspond to green, blue, and red color channel respectively. Therefore, by adding up the temperature contribution of each color channel we obtain a wide range of temperature values. Hence, the basic idea in our approach to measure temperature, using a schlieren system, is to relate the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the system. Our approach was applied to the measurement of instantaneous temperature fields of the air convection caused by a heated rectangular metal plate and a candle flame. We found that for the metal plate temperature measurements only the green and blue color-channels were required to sense the entire phenomena. On the other hand, for the candle case, the three color-channels were needed to obtain a complete measurement of temperature. In our study, the candle temperature was took as

  12. Calibration of imaging plate detectors to mono-energetic protons in the range 1-200 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabhi, N.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Ducret, J.-E.; Jakubowska, K.; Lantuejoul-Thfoin, I.; Nauraye, C.; Patriarca, A.; Saïd, A.; Semsoum, A.; Serani, L.; Thomas, B.; Vauzour, B.

    2017-11-01

    Responses of Fuji Imaging Plates (IPs) to proton have been measured in the range 1-200 MeV. Mono-energetic protons were produced with the 15 MV ALTO-Tandem accelerator of the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Orsay, France) and, at higher energies, with the 200-MeV isochronous cyclotron of the Institut Curie—Centre de Protonthérapie d'Orsay (Orsay, France). The experimental setups are described and the measured photo-stimulated luminescence responses for MS, SR, and TR IPs are presented and compared to existing data. For the interpretation of the results, a sensitivity model based on the Monte Carlo GEANT4 code has been developed. It enables the calculation of the response functions in a large energy range, from 0.1 to 200 MeV. Finally, we show that our model reproduces accurately the response of more complex detectors, i.e., stack of high-Z filters and IPs, which could be of great interest for diagnostics of Petawatt laser accelerated particles.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to stopping-power-ratio estimation using dual-energy CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Lee, H. C.; Duan, X.; Shen, C.; Zhou, L.; Jia, X.; Yang, M.

    2017-09-01

    The dual-energy CT-based (DECT) approach holds promise in reducing the overall uncertainty in proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimation as compared to the conventional stoichiometric calibration approach. The objective of this study was to analyze the factors contributing to uncertainty in SPR estimation using the DECT-based approach and to derive a comprehensive estimate of the range uncertainty associated with SPR estimation in treatment planning. Two state-of-the-art DECT-based methods were selected and implemented on a Siemens SOMATOM Force DECT scanner. The uncertainties were first divided into five independent categories. The uncertainty associated with each category was estimated for lung, soft and bone tissues separately. A single composite uncertainty estimate was eventually determined for three tumor sites (lung, prostate and head-and-neck) by weighting the relative proportion of each tissue group for that specific site. The uncertainties associated with the two selected DECT methods were found to be similar, therefore the following results applied to both methods. The overall uncertainty (1σ) in SPR estimation with the DECT-based approach was estimated to be 3.8%, 1.2% and 2.0% for lung, soft and bone tissues, respectively. The dominant factor contributing to uncertainty in the DECT approach was the imaging uncertainties, followed by the DECT modeling uncertainties. Our study showed that the DECT approach can reduce the overall range uncertainty to approximately 2.2% (2σ) in clinical scenarios, in contrast to the previously reported 1%.

  14. Preliminary study of a new gamma imager for on-line proton range monitoring during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennati, P.; Dasu, A.; Colarieti-Tosti, M.; Lönn, G.; Larsson, D.; Fabbri, A.; Galasso, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-05-01

    We designed and tested new concept imaging devices, based on a thin scintillating crystal, aimed at the online monitoring of the range of protons in tissue during proton radiotherapy. The proposed crystal can guarantee better spatial resolution and lower sensitivity with respect to a thicker one, at the cost of a coarser energy resolution. Two different samples of thin crystals were coupled to a position sensitive photo multiplier tube read out by 64 independent channels electronics. The detector was equipped with a knife-edge Lead collimator that defined a reasonable field of view of about 10 cm in the target. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design of the experimental setup and assess the accuracy of the results. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Skandion Clinic, the recently opened proton beam facility in Uppsala, Sweden. PMMA and water phantoms studies were performed with a first prototype based on a round 6.0 mm thick Cry019 crystal and with a second detector based on a thinner 5 × 5 cm2, 2.0 mm thick LFS crystal. Phantoms were irradiated with mono-energetic proton beams whose energy was in the range between 110 and 160 MeV. According with the simulations and the experimental data, the detector based on LFS crystal seems able to identify the peak of prompt-gamma radiation and its results are in fair agreement with the expected shift of the proton range as a function of energy. The count rate remains one of the most critical limitations of our system, which was able to cope with only about 20% of the clinical dose rate. Nevertheless, we are confident that our study might provide the basis for developing a new full-functional system.

  15. Allosteric gating mechanism underlies the flexible gating of KCNQ1 potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Jeremiah D.; Barro-Soria, Rene; Robey, Seth; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2012-01-01

    KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) is a unique member of the superfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels in that it displays a remarkable range of gating behaviors tuned by coassembly with different β subunits of the KCNE family of proteins. To better understand the basis for the biophysical diversity of KCNQ1 channels, we here investigate the basis of KCNQ1 gating in the absence of β subunits using voltage-clamp fluorometry (VCF). In our previous study, we found the kinetics and voltage dependence of voltage-sensor movements are very similar to those of the channel gate, as if multiple voltage-sensor movements are not required to precede gate opening. Here, we have tested two different hypotheses to explain KCNQ1 gating: (i) KCNQ1 voltage sensors undergo a single concerted movement that leads to channel opening, or (ii) individual voltage-sensor movements lead to channel opening before all voltage sensors have moved. Here, we find that KCNQ1 voltage sensors move relatively independently, but that the channel can conduct before all voltage sensors have activated. We explore a KCNQ1 point mutation that causes some channels to transition to the open state even in the absence of voltage-sensor movement. To interpret these results, we adopt an allosteric gating scheme wherein KCNQ1 is able to transition to the open state after zero to four voltage-sensor movements. This model allows for widely varying gating behavior, depending on the relative strength of the opening transition, and suggests how KCNQ1 could be controlled by coassembly with different KCNE family members. PMID:22509038

  16. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  17. Imaging X-ray detector front-end with high dynamic range: IDeF-X HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevin, O.; Lemaire, O.; Lugiez, F.; Michalowska, A.; Baron, P.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.

    2012-12-01

    Presented circuit, IDeF-X HD (Imaging Detector Front-end) is a member of the IDeF-X ASICs family for space applications. It has been optimized for a half millimeter pitch CdTe or CdZnTe pixelated detector arranged in 16×16 array. It is aimed to operate in the hard X-ray range from few keV up to 250 keV or more. The ASIC has been realized in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS process. The IDeF-X HD is a 32 channel analog front-end with self-triggering capability. The architecture of the analog channel includes a chain of charge sensitive amplifier with continuous reset system and non-stationary noise suppressor, adjustable gain stage, pole-zero cancellation stage, adjustable shaping time low pass filter, baseline holder and peak detector with discriminator. The power consumption of the IDeF-X HD is 800 μW per channel. With the in-channel variable gain stage the nominal 250 keV dynamic range of the ASIC can be extended up to 1 MeV anticipating future applications using thick sensors. Measuring the noise performance without a detector at the input with minimized leakage current (programmable) at the input, we achieved ENC of 33 electrons rms at 10.7 μs peak time. Measurements with CdTe detector show good energy resolution FWHM of 1.1 keV at 60 keV and 4.3 keV at 662 keV with detection threshold below 4 keV. In addition, an absolute temperature sensor has been integrated with resolution of 1.5 °C.

  18. A semi-automatic image-based close range 3D modeling pipeline using a multi-camera configuration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rau, Jiann-Yeou; Yeh, Po-Chia

    2012-01-01

    .... This study proposes an image-based 3D modeling pipeline which takes advantage of a multi-camera configuration and multi-image matching technique that does not require any markers on or around the object...

  19. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sez-Jade Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs.

  20. Time-resolved imaging of prompt-gamma rays for proton range verification using a knife-edge slit camera based on digital photon counters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Clementel, E.; Crespo, P.; Henrotin, S.; Huizenga, J.; Janssens, G.; Parodi, K.; Prieels, D.; Roellinghoff, F.; Smeets, J.; Stichelbaut, F.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton range monitoring may facilitate online adaptive proton therapy and improve treatment outcomes. Imaging of proton-induced prompt gamma (PG) rays using a knife-edge slit collimator is currently under investigation as a potential tool for real-time proton range monitoring. A major challenge in

  1. Fusion of range-based data and image-based datasets for efficient documentation of cultural heritage objects and sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, J. L.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays it is possible to measure accurately dense point clouds either with aerial/terrestrial laser scanning systems or with imagebased solutions (namely based on photogrammetric computer vision algorithms such as structure-from-motion (SfM)), from which highly detailed 3D models can be achieved. Besides, direct tools in the form of simple devices such as rulers, compass and plumblines are usually required in simple metric surveys, as well as high-end surveying and geodetic instruments such as robotized imagebased total stations and GNSS (probably to a lesser degree but still required) to set the archaeological/architectural recording project in a global reference frame. With all this gamut of image-based and range-based sensors and datasets (in the form of coordinates, point clouds or 3D models), in different coordinate systems (most of the times local for each device), lack of uniform scale, orientation and levelling, the fusion of data tends to be cumbersome. This paper presents an efficient way to fuse and merge different datasets in the form of point clouds/3D models and geodetic/UTM coordinates. The new developed 3DVEM - Register GEO software is able to handle datasets coming from both direct and indirect methods in order to provide unified and precise deliverables.

  2. Ultrahigh polarimetric image contrast enhancement for skin cancer diagnosis using InN plasmonic nanoparticles in the terahertz range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Michael; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Mueller matrix imaging sensitivity, to delicate water content changes in tissue associated with early stages of skin cancer, is demonstrated by numerical modeling to be enhanced by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects at the terahertz (THz) range when InN nanoparticles (NPs) coated with Parylene-C are introduced into the skin. A skin tissue model tailored for THz wavelengths is established for a Monte Carlo simulation of polarized light propagation and scattering, and a comparative study based on simulated Mueller matrices is presented considering different NPs’ parameters and insertion into the skin methods. The insertion of NPs presenting LSPR in the THz is demonstrated to enable the application of polarization-based sample characterization techniques adopted from the scattering dominated visible wavelengths domain for the, otherwise, relatively low scattering THz domain, where such approach is irrelevant without the NPs. Through these Mueller polarimetry techniques, the detection of water content variations in the tissue is made possible and with high sensitivity. This study yields a limit of detection down to 0.0018% for relative changes in the water content based on linear degree of polarization--an improvement of an order of magnitude relative to the limit of detection without NPs calculated in a previous ellipsometric study.

  3. Organic Analysis in the Miller Range 090657 CR2 Chondrite: Part 3 C and N Isotopic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Elsila, J. E.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Cao, T.

    2016-01-01

    Primitive carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of organic material, ranging from soluble discrete molecules to insoluble nanoglobules of macro-molecular carbon. The relationship between the soluble organic molecules, macromolecular organic material, and host minerals are poorly understood. Large H, C and N isotopic anomalies suggest some organic components formed in low-T interstellar or outer Solar System environments. The highest isotope anomalies occur in m-scale inclusions in the most primitive materials, such as cometary dust and the least altered carbonaceous chondrites. Often, the hosts of these isotopically anomalous 'hotspots' are discrete organic nanoglobules that probably formed in the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk or cold molecular cloud. Molecular and isotopic studies of meteoritic organic matter are aimed at identifying the chemical properties and formation processes of interstellar organic materials and the subsequent chemical evolutionary pathways in various Solar System environments. The combination of soluble and insoluble analyses with in situ and bulk studies provides powerful constraints on the origin and evolution of organic matter in the Solar System. Using macroscale extraction and analysis techniques as well as microscale in situ observations we have been studying both insoluble and soluble organic material in primitive astromaterial samples. Here, we present results of bulk C and N isotopic measurements and coordinated in situ C and N isotopic imaging and mineralogical and textural studies of carbonaceous materials in a Cr2 carbonaceous chondrite. In accompanying abstracts we discuss the morphology and distribution of carbonaceous components and soluble organic species of this meteorite.

  4. Three-dimensional anterior segment imaging in patients with type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis with switchable full depth range swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Cortés, Dennis E.; Werner, John S.; Mannis, Mark J.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-08-01

    A high-speed (100 kHz A-scans/s) complex conjugate resolved 1 μm swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system using coherence revival of the light source is suitable for dense three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of the anterior segment. The short acquisition time helps to minimize the influence of motion artifacts. The extended depth range of the SS-OCT system allows topographic analysis of clinically relevant images of the entire depth of the anterior segment of the eye. Patients with the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) require evaluation of the full anterior segment depth. Current commercially available OCT systems are not suitable for this application due to limited acquisition speed, resolution, and axial imaging range. Moreover, most commonly used research grade and some clinical OCT systems implement a commercially available SS (Axsun) that offers only 3.7 mm imaging range (in air) in its standard configuration. We describe implementation of a common swept laser with built-in k-clock to allow phase stable imaging in both low range and high range, 3.7 and 11.5 mm in air, respectively, without the need to build an external MZI k-clock. As a result, 3-D morphology of the KPro position with respect to the surrounding tissue could be investigated in vivo both at high resolution and with large depth range to achieve noninvasive and precise evaluation of success of the surgical procedure.

  5. Spherical Panoramas, and non Metric Images for Long Range Survey, the San Barnaba Spire, Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cingolani

    2011-12-01

    consist basically in the difficulty given by its height above the street level, about 100 meters. Long focal lenses have to be used to get a suitable resolution and accuracy. We wanted to repeat now the survey using a different photogrammetric technique from the old one, that was DLT algorithm for non-metric images. The new technique is the Spherical Photogrammetry. Multi-image Spherical Photogrammetry makes use as sensor of a pseudo-image that is the spherical panorama, composed by the images taken from the same station point. For details of Spherical Photogrammetry see (Fangi, 2,3,4,9. A particular procedure appropriate for the orientation of very narrow field of view lenses panorama has been already set up and used for the orientation and plotting of the three minarets of the Great Mosque of Omayyad’s in Damascus, Syria. Their heights range from 60 to 80 meters above the courtyard pavement of the mosque. The technique consists in taking different focal lengths panorama from the same station point (Fangi, New Castle, 2010, one with WA wide angle and another one with NA Narrow Angle, adding to the stability of WA panorama the resolution of NA panorama. The same approach has been used in the Sagrada Familia, for the survey of San Barnaba’s spire. In 1990 the A. made a survey of the same spire. But in comparison to the years 90, there is one difficulty more: now the rear of the spire is not visible because of the construction of the roof of the church, while it was visible in 1990. The solution has been then to use the original images taken in the years 90 for the rear of the spire and the spherical panoramas for the rest, i.e. the part toward the façade, using the original control points. Then we had to make a combined adjustment of non metric images using DLT approach and spherical photogrammetry algorithms. The restitution has been indeed carried out using both type of imagery, spherical panorama and non metric images. The results are satisfactory in the sense that

  6. High permittivity gate dielectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    "The book comprehensively covers all the current and the emerging areas of the physics and the technology of high permittivity gate dielectric materials, including, topics such as MOSFET basics and characteristics, hafnium-based gate dielectric materials, Hf-based gate dielectric processing, metal gate electrodes, flat-band and threshold voltage tuning, channel mobility, high-k gate stack degradation and reliability, lanthanide-based high-k gate stack materials, ternary hafnia and lanthania based high-k gate stack films, crystalline high-k oxides, high mobility substrates, and parameter extraction. Each chapter begins with the basics necessary for understanding the topic, followed by a comprehensive review of the literature, and ultimately graduating to the current status of the technology and our scientific understanding and the future prospects."

  7. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M; Leahy, Martin J

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO₂) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO₂ estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO₂ maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  8. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET: Effects of adenosine and dipyridamole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2017-12-01

    Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac stress 82RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4.7) min-1, P respiratory gating compared to dipyridamole (47% vs 71%, P = .12). As a result, imaging quality was superior in the dipyridamole group compared to adenosine. If respiratory gating is considered for use in cardiac PET, a dipyridamole stress protocol is recommended as it, compared to adenosine, causes a more uniform respiration and results in a higher frequency of successful respiratory gating and thereby superior imaging quality.

  9. Automatically gated image-guided breath-hold IMRT is a fast, precise, and dosimetrically robust treatment for lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeonova-Chergou, Anna; Jahnke, Anika; Siebenlist, Kerstin; Stieler, Florian; Mai, Sabine; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Jahnke, Lennart [University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    High-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer is challenging. Tumors may move by up to 2 cm in craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions as a function of breathing cycle. Tumor displacement increases with treatment time, which consequentially increases the treatment uncertainty. This study analyzed whether automatically gated cone-beam-CT (CBCT)-controlled intensity modulated fast deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in flattening filter free (FFF) technique and normofractionated lung DIBH intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments delivered with a flattening filter can be applied with sufficient accuracy within a clinically acceptable timeslot. Plans of 34 patients with lung tumors were analyzed. Of these patients, 17 received computer-controlled fast DIBH SBRT with a dose of 60 Gy (5 fractions of 12 Gy or 12 fractions of 5 Gy) in an FFF VMAT technique (FFF-SBRT) every other day and 17 received conventional VMAT with a flattening filter (conv-VMAT) and 2-Gy daily fractional doses (cumulative dose 50-70 Gy). FFF-SBRT plans required more monitor units (MU) than conv-VMAT plans (2956.6 ± 885.3 MU for 12 Gy/fraction and 1148.7 ± 289.2 MU for 5 Gy/fraction vs. 608.4 ± 157.5 MU for 2 Gy/fraction). Total treatment and net beam-on times were shorter for FFF-SBRT plans than conv-VMAT plans (268.0 ± 74.4 s vs. 330.2 ± 93.6 s and 85.8 ± 25.3 s vs. 117.2 ± 29.6 s, respectively). Total slot time was 13.0 min for FFF-SBRT and 14.0 min for conv-VMAT. All modalities could be delivered accurately despite multiple beam-on/-off cycles and were robust against multiple interruptions. Automatically gated CBCT-controlled fast DIBH SBRT in VMAT FFF technique and normofractionated lung DIBH VMAT can be applied with a low number of breath-holds in a short timeslot, with excellent dosimetric accuracy. In clinical routine, these approaches combine optimally reduced lung tissue irradiation with maximal

  10. Extension of a data-driven gating technique to 3D, whole body PET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Paul J.; O'Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.

    2011-07-01

    Respiratory gating can be used to separate a PET acquisition into a series of near motion-free bins. This is typically done using additional gating hardware; however, software-based methods can derive the respiratory signal from the acquired data itself. The aim of this work was to extend a data-driven respiratory gating method to acquire gated, 3D, whole body PET images of clinical patients. The existing method, previously demonstrated with 2D, single bed-position data, uses a spectral analysis to find regions in raw PET data which are subject to respiratory motion. The change in counts over time within these regions is then used to estimate the respiratory signal of the patient. In this work, the gating method was adapted to only accept lines of response from a reduced set of axial angles, and the respiratory frequency derived from the lung bed position was used to help identify the respiratory frequency in all other bed positions. As the respiratory signal does not identify the direction of motion, a registration-based technique was developed to align the direction for all bed positions. Data from 11 clinical FDG PET patients were acquired, and an optical respiratory monitor was used to provide a hardware-based signal for comparison. All data were gated using both the data-driven and hardware methods, and reconstructed. The centre of mass of manually defined regions on gated images was calculated, and the overall displacement was defined as the change in the centre of mass between the first and last gates. The mean displacement was 10.3 mm for the data-driven gated images and 9.1 mm for the hardware gated images. No significant difference was found between the two gating methods when comparing the displacement values. The adapted data-driven gating method was demonstrated to successfully produce respiratory gated, 3D, whole body, clinical PET acquisitions.

  11. Analyses of Short Channel Effects of Single-Gate and Double-Gate Graphene Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjatollah Sarvari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short channel effects of single-gate and double-gate graphene nanoribbon field effect transistors (GNRFETs are studied based on the atomistic pz orbital model for the Hamiltonian of graphene nanoribbon using the nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism. A tight-binding Hamiltonian with an atomistic pz orbital basis set is used to describe the atomistic details in the channel of the GNRFETs. We have investigated the vital short channel effect parameters such as Ion and Ioff, the threshold voltage, the subthreshold swing, and the drain induced barrier lowering versus the channel length and oxide thickness of the GNRFETs in detail. The gate capacitance and the transconductance of both devices are also computed in order to calculate the intrinsic cut-off frequency and switching delay of GNRFETs. Furthermore, the effects of doping of the channel on the threshold voltage and the frequency response of the double-gate GNRFET are discussed. We have shown that the single-gate GNRFET suffers more from short channel effects if compared with those of the double-gate structure; however, both devices have nearly the same cut-off frequency in the range of terahertz. This work provides a collection of data comparing different features of short channel effects of the single gate with those of the double gate GNRFETs. The results give a very good insight into the devices and are very useful for their digital applications.

  12. Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of Ecg-gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging by a two-hour protocol: The Myofast study;Faisabilite et precision diagnostique d'un protocole de scintigraphie myocardique synchronisee a l'ECG en deux heures: l'etude Myofast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunet, V.; Costo, S.; Sabatier, R.; Grollier, G.; Bouvard, G.; Agostini, D. [CHU Cote-de-Nacre, Service de medecine nucleaire, 14 - Caen (France)

    2010-04-15

    Aim of the study: To assess the feasibility of early stress and rest myocardial perfusion and function study using a fast {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin gated-SPECT protocol in patients with known coronary artery disease. Materials and methods: Forty-three patients (pts) (37 M, 6 F, mean age 63.8 +- 9.8 years) underwent a {sup 99m}Tc-Tetrofosmin gated-SPECT (Axis Picker-Philips) myocardial study and a coronary angiography (C.A.) within 3 months. Images were acquired (LEHR, eight bins, 40 sec per image) after injection of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (200 to 380 MBq) early (15 min) post-stress (36 dipyridamole, two dobutamine and five ergo-metric stress), and at rest after {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin reinjection (600 to 1150 MBq), in a total time not exceeding 2 hours. Processing was performed with Q.G.S. software using the 17-segment model. Pathological study was defined as a summed difference score (SDS) greater than or equal to 4 4, a fixed defect with summed rest score greater than or equal to 4 and/or L.V. dysfunction defined as myocardial stunning (variation between stress and rest L.V.E.F. greater than or equal to 4 5%), stress L.V.E.F. less than or equal to 45% or rest L.V.E.F. less than or equal to 40%. Results were compared with C.A., and stenosis greater than or equal to 4 50% was considered as significant. Results: For 100% the quality of SPECT imaging was good or excellent. For six patients gating was impossible because of arrhythmia. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 95%, 50%, and 91%, respectively. The concordance between gated SPECT and C.A. was moderate (kappa = 0.45, S.E. = 0.15). Interestingly, early-gated acquisition permitted to underline left ventricular dysfunction in 11 cases (30%), of whom eight had poly vascular disease. Stunning was detected in six of 37 cases (16%), of whom six had poly vascular disease. Conclusion: A one-day two-hour {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin gated-SPECT protocol to assess left ventricular perfusion and function is

  13. A prospective gating method to acquire a diverse set of free-breathing CT images for model-based 4DCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D; Ruan, D; Thomas, D H; Dou, T H; Lewis, J H; Santhanam, A; Lee, P; Low, D A

    2018-02-15

    Breathing motion modeling requires observation of tissues at sufficiently distinct respiratory states for proper 4D characterization. This work proposes a method to improve sampling of the breathing cycle with limited imaging dose. We designed and tested a prospective free-breathing acquisition protocol with a simulation using datasets from five patients imaged with a model-based 4DCT technique. Each dataset contained 25 free-breathing fast helical CT scans with simultaneous breathing surrogate measurements. Tissue displacements were measured using deformable image registration. A correspondence model related tissue displacement to the surrogate. Model residual was computed by comparing predicted displacements to image registration results. To determine a stopping criteria for the prospective protocol, i.e. when the breathing cycle had been sufficiently sampled, subsets of N scans where 5  ⩽  N  ⩽  9 were used to fit reduced models for each patient. A previously published metric was employed to describe the phase coverage, or 'spread', of the respiratory trajectories of each subset. Minimum phase coverage necessary to achieve mean model residual within 0.5 mm of the full 25-scan model was determined and used as the stopping criteria. Using the patient breathing traces, a prospective acquisition protocol was simulated. In all patients, phase coverage greater than the threshold necessary for model accuracy within 0.5 mm of the 25 scan model was achieved in six or fewer scans. The prospectively selected respiratory trajectories ranked in the (97.5  ±  4.2)th percentile among subsets of the originally sampled scans on average. Simulation results suggest that the proposed prospective method provides an effective means to sample the breathing cycle with limited free-breathing scans. One application of the method is to reduce the imaging dose of a previously published model-based 4DCT protocol to 25% of its original value while achieving

  14. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: 4D-MRI with 3D Radial Sampling and Self-Gating-Based K-Space Sorting: Image Quality Improvement by Slab-Selective Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Fan, Z [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yang, W [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Bi, X [Siemens Healthcare, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hakimian, B [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles CA (United States); Li, D [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A recent 4D MRI technique based on 3D radial sampling and self-gating-based K-space sorting has shown promising results in characterizing respiratory motion. However due to continuous acquisition and potentially drastic k-space undersampling resultant images could suffer from low blood-to-tissue contrast and streaking artifacts. In this study 3D radial sampling with slab-selective excitation (SS) was proposed in attempt to enhance blood-to-tissue contrast by exploiting the in-flow effect and to suppress the excess signal from the peripheral structures particularly in the superior-inferior direction. The feasibility of improving image quality by using this approach was investigated through a comparison with the previously developed non-selective excitation (NS) approach. Methods: Two excitation approaches SS and NS were compared in 5 cancer patients (1 lung 1 liver 2 pancreas and 1 esophagus) at 3Tesla. Image artifact was assessed in all patients on a 4-point scale (0: poor; 3: excellent). Signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) of the blood vessel (aorta) at the center of field-of-view and its nearby tissue were measured in 3 of the 5 patients (1 liver 2 pancreas) and blood-to-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were then determined. Results: Compared with NS the image quality of SS was visually improved with overall higher signal in all patients (2.6±0.55 vs. 3.4±0.55). SS showed an approximately 2-fold increase of SNR in the blood (aorta: 16.39±1.95 vs. 32.19±7.93) and slight increase in the surrounding tissue (liver/pancreas: 16.91±1.82 vs. 22.31±3.03). As a result the blood-totissue CNR was dramatically higher in the SS method (1.20±1.20 vs. 9.87±6.67). Conclusion: The proposed 3D radial sampling with slabselective excitation allows for reduced image artifact and improved blood SNR and blood-to-tissue CNR. The success of this technique could potentially benefit patients with cancerous tumors that have invaded the surrounding blood vessels where radiation

  15. Signal restoration method for restraining the range walk error of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode lidar in acquiring a merged three-dimensional image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Yang, Chenghua; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan

    2017-04-10

    The fluctuation in the number of signal photoelectrons will cause a range walk error in a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) lidar, which significantly depends on the target intensity. For a nanosecond-pulsed laser, the range walk error of traditional time-of-flight will cause deterioration. A new signal restoration method, based on the Poisson probability response model and the center-of-mass algorithm, is proposed to restrain the range walk error. We obtain a high-precision depth and intensity merged 3D image using this method. The range accuracy is 0.6 cm, and the intensity error is less than 3%.

  16. Comparative assessment of rest and post-stress left ventricular volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction on gated myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and echocardiography in patients with transient ischaemic dilation on adenosine MPI: myocardial stunning or subendocardial hypoperfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Louise; Ng, Austin; Ha, Leo; Russo, Robert; Mansberg, Robert; Zhao, Wei; Chow, S Vincent; Kritharides, Leonard

    2012-08-01

    Transient ischaemic dilation (TID) on myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an important finding, conveying a high risk of subsequent cardiac events. However, the mechanism leading to TID on MPI is not well elucidated. This study aimed to determine if TID is due to true LV cavity dilation and ventricular stunning, or is due to relative subendocardial hypoperfusion. 31 patients undergoing single-day Tc-99m adenosine sestamibi MPI were recruited. All had routine ECG-gated single-day rest-stress adenosine MPI, with transthoracic echocardiograms (echo) acquired concurrently at rest, and both immediately, and 2 hours, post-stress. Echocardiography was performed using a Vivid-7 (GE). LV volumes and LVEF were quantified blinded to MPI results, using biplane Simpson method on echo, and quantitatively (including TID) with QGS(®), on MPI. Patients were divided into quartiles for TID, with the top quartile considered TID positive [TID+ 9/31 (TID ratio 1.3 ± 0.09)], and TID negative [TID- 22/31 (TID ratio 1.01 ± 0.04)]. There was good correlation between resting echo and MPI physical measurements (LVEDV r(2) = 0.79, LVESV r(2) = 0.9, and LVEF r(2) = 0.75). On MPI, a significant drop in LVEF was observed between rest and early stress in the TID+ group (56.6% vs 46.5%, P subendocardial hypoperfusion and impaired coronary flow reserve.

  17. Signal-to-noise characterization of time-gated intensifiers used for wide-field time-domain FLIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinty, J; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Talbot, C B; Dunsby, C; Neil, M A A; French, P M W [Photonics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Kellett, P A; Hares, J D, E-mail: james.mcginty@imperial.ac.u [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Isis Building, Howbery Park, Wallingford, OX10 8BA (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-07

    Time-gated imaging using gated optical intensifiers provides a means to realize high speed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the study of fast events and for high throughput imaging. We present a signal-to-noise characterization of CCD-coupled micro-channel plate gated intensifiers used with this technique and determine the optimal acquisition parameters (intensifier gain voltage, CCD integration time and frame averaging) for measuring mono-exponential fluorescence lifetimes in the shortest image acquisition time for a given signal flux. We explore the use of unequal CCD integration times for different gate delays and show that this can improve the lifetime accuracy for a given total acquisition time.

  18. Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A. T.; Noh, J. H.; Pudasaini, P. R.; Wolf, B.; Balke, N.; Herklotz, A.; Sharma, Y.; Haglund, A. V.; Dai, S.; Mandrus, D.; Rack, P. D.; Ward, T. Z.

    2017-04-01

    Ionic liquid electrolytes are gaining widespread application as a gate dielectric used to control ion transport in functional materials. This letter systematically examines the important influence that device geometry in standard "side gate" 3-terminal geometries plays in device performance of a well-known oxygen ion conductor. We show that the most influential component of device design is the ratio between the area of the gate electrode and the active channel, while the spacing between these components and their individual shapes has a negligible contribution. These findings provide much needed guidance in device design intended for ionotronic gating with ionic liquids.

  19. 100-nm gate lithography for double-gate transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperova, Azalia A.; Zhang, Ying; Babich, Inna V.; Treichler, John; Yoon, Jung H.; Guarini, Kathryn; Solomon, Paul M.

    2001-09-01

    The double gate field effect transistor (FET) is an exploratory device that promises certain performance advantages compared to traditional CMOS FETs. It can be scaled down further than the traditional devices because of the greater electrostatic control by the gates on the channel (about twice as short a channel length for the same gate oxide thickness), has steeper sub-threshold slope and about double the current for the same width. This paper presents lithographic results for double gate FET's developed at IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center. The device is built on bonded wafers with top and bottom gates self-aligned to each other. The channel is sandwiched between the top and bottom polysilicon gates and the gate length is defined using DUV lithography. An alternating phase shift mask was used to pattern gates with critical dimensions of 75 nm, 100 nm and 125 nm in photoresist. 50 nm gates in photoresist have also been patterned by 20% over-exposure of nominal 100 nm lines. No trim mask was needed because of a specific way the device was laid out. UV110 photoresist from Shipley on AR-3 antireflective layer were used. Process windows, developed and etched patterns are presented.

  20. Tuning terahertz transitions in a double-gated quantum ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, T. P.; Saroka, V. A.; Portnoi, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical functionality of a semiconducting quantum ring manipulated by two electrostatic lateral gates used to induce a double quantum well along the ring. The well parameters and corresponding interlevel spacings, which lie in the THz range, are highly sensitive to the gate voltages. Our analysis shows that selection rules for interlevel dipole transitions, caused by linearly polarized excitations, depend on the polarization vector angle with respect to the gates. In striking difference from the conventional symmetric double well potential, the ring geometry permits polarization-dependent transitions between the ground and second excited states, allowing the use of this structure in a three-level lasing scheme.

  1. Determination of mean ionization potential using magnetic resonance imaging for the reduction of proton beam range uncertainties: theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhyadhom, Atchar

    2017-11-01

    The accurate determination of mean ionization potential (I m) has the potential to reduce range uncertainty based margins and therefore allow for more focal treatments in proton radiotherapy. Many methods have been proposed to reduce uncertainty in I m and stopping power ratios (SPR), each with varying degrees of accuracy and issues. In this work, we present a simple parameterized model to determine I m in human biological tissue, allowing for the computation of patient-specific I m at the voxel level using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The model requires the measurement of three parameters by MRI, with only two parameters, mass percent water content and mass percent hydrogen content in organic molecules, required for the special case of soft tissues. The accuracy of this I m determination method was evaluated in available ‘standard’ (ICRU Report #44, (ICRU 1989 Tissue Substitutes in Radiation Dosimetry and Measurement (Bethesda, MD: International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements))) human tissues. The sensitivity of this I m determination method to in vivo perturbations was also tested by calculating the effect of 10% variations in the experimentally measurable parameters on I m and SPR. For the human tissues modeled in this work, a high level of accuracy with low susceptibility to perturbations in measurement error was achieved in the prediction of I m. Root-mean-square errors in I m were within 0.77% and 1.8% for both soft and bony tissues, and were 0.09% and 0.2% for the SPR of soft and bony tissues, respectively, assuming knowledge of electron density. Proof of principle MR measurements and model-based computations of I m and SPR were taken in phantom for a series of hydrogenous solutions and compared against expected I m and SPR calculations from known elemental composition. MR determined I m and SPR values in a known composition solution were determined to within 5% and 0.52%, respectively. We present a novel model to accurately

  2. Underwater laser imaging system (UWLIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Practical limitations with underwater imaging systems area reached when the noise in the back scattered radiation generated in the water between the imaging system and the target obscures the spatial contrast and resolution necessary for target discovery and identification. The advent of high power lasers operating in the blue-green portion of the visible spectrum (oceanic transmission window) has led to improved experimental illumination systems for underwater imaging. Range-gated and synchronously scanned devices take advantage of the unique temporal and spatial coherence properties of laser radiation, respectively, to overcome the deleterious effects of common volume back scatter.

  3. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  4. Long-range and depth-selective imaging of macroscopic targets using low-coherence and wide-field interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungsoo; Kang, Sungsam; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-03-01

    With the advancement of 3D display technology, 3D imaging of macroscopic objects has drawn much attention as they provide the contents to display. The most widely used imaging methods include a depth camera, which measures time of flight for the depth discrimination, and various structured illumination techniques. However, these existing methods have poor depth resolution, which makes imaging complicated structures a difficult task. In order to resolve this issue, we propose an imaging system based upon low-coherence interferometry and off-axis digital holographic imaging. By using light source with coherence length of 200 micro, we achieved the depth resolution of 100 micro. In order to map the macroscopic objects with this high axial resolution, we installed a pair of prisms in the reference beam path for the long-range scanning of the optical path length. Specifically, one prism was fixed in position, and the other prism was mounted on a translation stage and translated in parallel to the first prism. Due to the multiple internal reflections between the two prisms, the overall path length was elongated by a factor of 50. In this way, we could cover a depth range more than 1 meter. In addition, we employed multiple speckle illuminations and incoherent averaging of the acquired holographic images for reducing the specular reflections from the target surface. Using this newly developed system, we performed imaging targets with multiple different layers and demonstrated imaging targets hidden behind the scattering layers. The method was also applied to imaging targets located around the corner.

  5. Development and simulation of soft morphological operators for a field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Andrew J.; Harvey, Paul K.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Wu, Q. Henry

    2013-04-01

    In image processing applications, soft mathematical morphology (MM) can be employed for both binary and grayscale systems and is derived from set theory. Soft MM techniques have improved behavior over standard morphological operations in noisy environments, as they can preserve small details within an image. This makes them suitable for use in image processing applications on portable field programmable gate arrays for tasks such as robotics and security. We explain how the systems were developed using Altera's DSP Builder in order to provide optimized code for the many different devices currently on the market. Also included is how the circuits can be inserted and combined with previously developed work in order to increase their functionality. The testing procedures involved loading different images into these systems and analyzing the outputs against MATLAB-generated validation images. A set of soft morphological operations are described, which can then be applied to various tasks and easily modified in size via altering the line buffer settings inside the system to accommodate a range of image attributes ranging from image sizes such as 320×240 pixels for basic webcam imagery up to high quality 4000×4000 pixel images for military applications.

  6. Image Acquisition of Robust Vision Systems to Monitor Blurred Objects in Hazy Smoking Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yongjin; Park, Seungkyu; Baik, Sunghoon; Kim, Donglyul; Nam, Sungmo; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Image information in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important data for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, robust vision system for structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments, such as the places of a fire and detonation, is essential in remote monitoring. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog, dust. The vision system based on wavefront correction can be applied to blurred imaging environments and the range-gated imaging system can be applied to both of blurred imaging and darken light environments. Wavefront control is a widely used technique to improve the performance of optical systems by actively correcting wavefront distortions, such as atmospheric turbulence, thermally-induced distortions, and laser or laser device aberrations, which can reduce the peak intensity and smear an acquired image. The principal applications of wavefront control are for improving the image quality in optical imaging systems such as infrared astronomical telescopes, in imaging and tracking rapidly moving space objects, and in compensating for laser beam distortion through the atmosphere. A conventional wavefront correction system consists of a wavefront sensor, a deformable mirror and a control computer. The control computer measures the wavefront distortions using a wavefront sensor and corrects it using a deformable mirror in a closed-loop. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra

  7. Update History of This Database - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us Open TG-GATEs Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2015/10/01 URLs of the da...nload License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive ... .../02/25 Open TG-GATEs( http://toxico.nibio.go.jp/ ) is released. About This Database Database Description Dow

  8. Hysteresis free negative total gate capacitance in junctionless transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish; Kranti, Abhinav

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we report on the hysteresis free impact ionization induced off-to-on transition while preserving sub-60 mV/decade Subthreshold swing (S-swing) using asymmetric mode operation in double gate silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) junctionless (JL) transistor. It is shown that sub-60 mV/decade steep switching due to impact ionization implies a negative value of the total gate capacitance. The performance of asymmetric gate JL transistor is compared with symmetric gate operation of JL device, and the condition for hysteresis free current transition with a sub-60 mV/decade switching is analyzed through the product of current density (J) and electric field (E). It is shown that asymmetric gate operation limits the degree of impact ionization inherent in the semiconductor film to levels sufficient for negative total gate capacitance but lower than that required for the occurrence of hysteresis. The work highlights new viewpoints related to the suppression of hysteresis associated with steep switching JL transistors while maintaining S-swing within the range 6-15 mV/decade leading to the negative value of total gate capacitance.

  9. Gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and coronary calcium score for evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and a normal or nondiagnostic electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peix, Amalia; Batista, Elida; Cabrera, Lázaro O; Rodríguez, Lydia; Padrón, Kenia; Saínz, Benito; Mendoza, Vladimir; Carrillo, Regla; Fernández, Yoel; Mena, Erick; Dondi, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    To assess the ability of rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in emergency department patients, as well as to investigate whether there exists a concordance between MPI and coronary calcium. Fifty-five patients with chest pain and a normal or nondiagnostic ECG were included. Clinical follow-up was carried out within 1 year. Sixteen patients (29%) showed an abnormal rest MPI, and in 11 (20%) the MPI was equivocal. There was a weak concordance between MPI and coronary arteries calcium score (CACS) (κ: 0.25). Coronary angiogram driven by a positive MPI was performed in 12 patients (23%), resulting in percutaneous coronary intervention in nine cases (75%). A positive MPI (abnormal or equivocal results) was associated with the occurrence of events in the follow-up (χ(2)=19.961, Ppatient presenting to the emergency department with acute chest pain and a normal or nondiagnostic ECG, with a positive MPI, the relative risk of having events during the first year was 7.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.8-19.2), Ppatients were free of events. Patients presenting with acute chest pain and a low-to-intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease with a normal rest MPI have a very low probability of cardiac events during the first year. Coronary calcium score was not helpful in risk-stratifying these patients. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  10. Reconfigurable Skyrmion Logic Gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shijiang; Song, Min; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yue; Hong, Jeongmin; Yang, Xiaofei; Zou, Xuecheng; Xu, Nuo; You, Long

    2018-02-14

    Magnetic skyrmion, a nanosized spin texture with topological property, has become an area of significant interest due to the scientific insight that it can provide and also its potential impact on applications such as ultra-low-energy and ultra-high-density logic gates. In the quest for the reconfiguration of single logic device and the implementation of the complete logic functions, a novel reconfigurable skyrmion logic (RSL) is proposed and verified by micromagnetic simulations. Logic functions including AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR, XOR, and XNOR are implemented in the ferromagnetic (FM) nanotrack by virtue of various effects including spin orbit torque, skyrmion Hall effect, skyrmion-edge repulsions, and skyrmion-skyrmion collision. Different logic functions can be selected in an RSL by applying voltage to specific region(s) of the device, changing the local anisotropy energy of FM film. Material properties and geometrical scaling studies suggest RSL gates fit for energy-efficient computing as well as provide the guidelines for the design and optimization of this new logic family.

  11. Cascaded logic gates in nanophotonic plasmon networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Zhuoxian; Tian, Xiaorui; Käll, Mikael; Xu, Hongxing

    2011-01-01

    ... integrated logic units and cascade devices have not been reported. Here we demonstrate that a plasmonic binary NOR gate, a 'universal logic gate', can be realized through cascaded OR and NOT gates in four-terminal plasmonic nanowire networks...

  12. Development of a low-energy x-ray camera for the imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation for range estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koki; Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-06-01

    Imaging of secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation is a possible method for measurement of the proton beam distribution in phantom. However, it is not clear that the method is used for range estimation of protons. For this purpose, we developed a low-energy x-ray camera and conducted imaging of the bremsstrahlung x-ray produced during irradiation of proton beams. We used a 20 mm  ×  20 mm  ×  1 mm finely grooved GAGG scintillator that was optically coupled to a one-inch square high quantum efficiency (HQE)-type position-sensitive photomultiplier tube to form an imaging detector. The imaging detector was encased in a 2 cm-thick tungsten container, and a pinhole collimator was attached to its camera head. After performance of the camera was evaluated, secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray imaging was conducted during irradiation of the proton beams for three different proton energies, and the results were compared with Monte Carlo simulation as well as calculated value. The system spatial resolution and sensitivity of the developed x-ray camera with 1.5 mm-diameter pinhole collimator were estimated to be 32 mm FWHM and 5.2  ×  10-7 for ~35 keV x-ray photons at 100 cm from the collimator surface, respectively. We could image the proton beam tracks by measuring the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray during irradiation of the proton beams, and the ranges for different proton energies could be estimated from the images. The measured ranges from the images were well matched with the Monte Carlo simulation, and slightly smaller than the calculated values. We confirmed that the imaging of the secondary electron bremsstrahlung x-ray emitted during proton irradiation with the developed x-ray camera has the potential to be a new tool for proton range estimations.

  13. Works close to gate B

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    In connection to the TRAM project, drainage works will be carried out close to gate B until the end of next week. In order to avoid access problems, if arriving by car, please use gates A and E. Department of General Infrastructure Services (GS) GS-SE Group

  14. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  15. Logic gates with ion transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebel, H.

    2017-09-01

    Electronic logic gates are the basic building blocks of every computing and micro controlling system. Logic gates are made of switches, such as diodes and transistors. Ion-selective, ionic switches may emulate electronic switches [1-8]. If we ever want to create artificial bio-chemical circuitry, then we need to move a step further towards ion-logic circuitry. Here we demonstrate ion XOR and OR gates with electrochemical cells, and specifically, with two wet-cell batteries. In parallel to vacuum tubes, the batteries were modified to include a third, permeable and conductive mid electrode (the gate), which was placed between the anode and cathode in order to affect the ion flow through it. The key is to control the cell output with a much smaller biasing power, as demonstrated here. A successful demonstration points to self-powered ion logic gates.

  16. Logic Gates with Ion Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Grebel, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Electronic logic gates are the basic building blocks of every computing and micro controlling system. Logic gates are made of switches, such as diodes and transistors. Ion-selective, ionic switches may emulate electronic switches [1-8]. If we ever want to create artificial bio-chemical circuitry, then we need to move a step further towards ion-logic circuitry. Here we demonstrate ion XOR and OR gates with electrochemical cells, and specifically, with two wet-cell batteries. In parallel to vacuum tubes, the batteries were modified to include a third, permeable and conductive mid electrode (the gate), which was placed between the anode and cathode in order to affect the ion flow through it. The key is to control the cell output with a much smaller biasing power, as demonstrated here. A successful demonstration points to self-powered ion logic gates.

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth Range of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth Range GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  18. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufi, M; Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F [Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, K [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Hirose, T; Umezu, Y [Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Y [Saga Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localized on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed

  19. Multifunctional Logic Gate Controlled by Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuit has been designed to function as a NAND gate at a temperature between 0 and 80 deg C and as a NOR gate at temperatures from 120 to 200 C. In the intermediate temperature range of 80 to 120 C, this circuit is expected to perform a function intermediate between NAND and NOR with degraded noise margin. The process of designing the circuit and the planned fabrication and testing of the circuit are parts of demonstration of polymorphic electronics a technological discipline that emphasizes designing the same circuit to perform different analog and/or digital functions under different conditions. In this case, the different conditions are different temperatures.

  20. Multifunctional Logic Gate Controlled by Supply Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Zebulum, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuit functions as a NAND gate at a power-supply potential (V(sub dd)) of 3.3 V and as NOR gate for V(sub dd) = 1.8 V. In the intermediate V(sub dd) range of 1.8 to 3.3 V, this circuit performs a function intermediate between NAND and NOR with degraded noise margin. Like the circuit of the immediately preceding article, this circuit serves as a demonstration of the evolutionary approach to design of polymorphic electronics -- a technological discipline that emphasizes evolution of the design of a circuit to perform different analog and/or digital functions under different conditions. In this instance, the different conditions are different values of V(sub dd).