WorldWideScience

Sample records for range field number

  1. Quantum algorithms for number fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, D.; Maier, H. [Universitaet Ulm, Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Helmholtzstrasse 18, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2006-08-23

    This is a survey of recent results on quantum algorithms for the computation of invariants of number fields, namely the class number and the regulator. Most known classical algorithms for the computation of these values are of subexponential complexity and depend on the truth of a still unproven hypothesis of analytic number theory. We use an important number theoretic concept, Minkowski's Geometry of Numbers, to visualize these invariants, and describe the quantum algorithms developed by Hallgren, Schmidt and Vollmer which compute these invariants using a polynomial number of steps. Computational techniques in number fields, which are necessary to justify the classical part of these quantum algorithms, are the focus of the research of our project group, and are explained in detail. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Lenstra theorem in number fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0 ≤ r n1/3, (r, s) = 1. Then n has at most 11 positive divisors which are congruent to r modulo s. This result has been applied to solve many problems. Recently, Luca and Togbe [2] and. Subburam [4] applied this result on a conjecture of Mohanty and Ramasamy [3]. Let K be any number field, OK its ring of integers ...

  3. The development of the number field sieve

    CERN Document Server

    Lenstra, Hendrik

    1993-01-01

    The number field sieve is an algorithm for finding the prime factors of large integers. It depends on algebraic number theory. Proposed by John Pollard in 1988, the method was used in 1990 to factor the ninth Fermat number, a 155-digit integer. The algorithm is most suited to numbers of a special form, but there is a promising variant that applies in general. This volume contains six research papers that describe the operation of the number field sieve, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Pollard's original manuscript is included. In addition, there is an annotated bibliography of directly related literature.

  4. An implementation of the number field sieve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.M. de Jong; J.A.J. Metz; M. Elkenbracht-Huizing; O. Diekmann (Odo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe Number Field Sieve (NFS) is the asymptotically fastest known factoring algorithm for large integers. This article describes an implementation of the NFS, including the choice of two quadratic polynomials, both classical and lattice sieving, the block Lanczos method and a new square

  5. Foundations of analysis over surreal number fields

    CERN Document Server

    Alling, NL

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, a tower of surreal number fields is defined, each being a real-closed field having a canonical formal power series structure and many other higher order properties. Formal versions of such theorems as the Implicit Function Theorem hold over such fields. The Main Theorem states that every formal power series in a finite number of variables over a surreal field has a positive radius of hyper-convergence within which it may be evaluated. Analytic functions of several surreal and surcomplex variables can then be defined and studied. Some first results in the one variable case are derived. A primer on Conway''s field of surreal numbers is also given. Throughout the manuscript, great efforts have been made to make the volume fairly self-contained. Much exposition is given. Many references are cited. While experts may want to turn quickly to new results, students should be able to find the explanation of many elementary points of interest. On the other hand, many new results are given, and much mathe...

  6. An implementation of the number field sieve

    OpenAIRE

    Elkenbracht-Huizing, Marije

    1996-01-01

    The Number Field Sieve (NFS) is the asymptotically fastest known factoring algorithm for large integers. This article describes an implementation of the NFS, including the choice of two quadratic polynomials, both classical sieving and a special form of lattice sieving (line sieving), the block Lanczos method and a new square root algorithm. Finally some data on factorizations obtained with this implementation are listed, including the record factorization of $12^{151}-1$.

  7. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments.

  8. Active stabilization of error field penetration via control field and bifurcation of its stable frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S.; Shiraishi, J.; Takechi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Isayama, A.; Hayashi, N.; Ide, S.

    2017-11-01

    An active stabilization effect of a rotating control field against an error field penetration is numerically studied. We have developed a resistive magnetohydrodynamic code ‘AEOLUS-IT’, which can simulate plasma responses to rotating/static external magnetic field. Adopting non-uniform flux coordinates system, the AEOLUS-IT simulation can employ high magnetic Reynolds number condition relevant to present tokamaks. By AEOLUS-IT, we successfully clarified the stabilization mechanism of the control field against the error field penetration. Physical processes of a plasma rotation drive via the control field are demonstrated by the nonlinear simulation, which reveals that the rotation amplitude at a resonant surface is not a monotonic function of the control field frequency, but has an extremum. Consequently, two ‘bifurcated’ frequency ranges of the control field are found for the stabilization of the error field penetration.

  9. Capturing range of a near-field optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Mohammad Asif; Padhy, Punnag; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2017-10-01

    A study on the spatial characteristics of a near-field optical trap is presented. For analysis, a plasmonic near-field trap consisting of a C-shaped engraving is considered. Numerical simulations are performed to calculate the optical force exerted on a spherical nanoparticle by the trap. A Brownian dynamics model is used to simulate a large number of independent trajectories of a nanoparticle submerged in the optical force field. Statistical analysis is performed on the trajectory data to calculate the trapping probability at different points in space. The points with equal trapping probabilities are enclosed in a surface to visualize the influence domain of the trap. The metric capturing range is defined and calculated from the spatial extent of such surfaces. The possible applications of the defined metric are discussed. Some design examples from the literature are also analyzed and are found to be consistent with the proposed analysis.

  10. home range and reproduction of rodents in maynugus irrigation field

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    observations were outside irrigated fields. Population dynamics of small mammals in irrigated fields is unique due to the continuous supply of food. Hence this investigation was carried out in agricultural fields at Maynugus, in northern Ethiopia, to understand the home range and reproductive patterns of rodents, and to.

  11. Number theory arising from finite fields analytic and probabilistic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Knopfmacher, John

    2001-01-01

    ""Number Theory Arising from Finite Fields: Analytic and Probabilistic Theory"" offers a discussion of the advances and developments in the field of number theory arising from finite fields. It emphasizes mean-value theorems of multiplicative functions, the theory of additive formulations, and the normal distribution of values from additive functions. The work explores calculations from classical stages to emerging discoveries in alternative abstract prime number theorems.

  12. Prime valued polynomials and class numbers of quadratic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Mollin

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available It is the purpose of this paper to give a survey of the relationship between the class number one problem for real quadratic fields and prime-producing quadratic polynomials; culminating in an overview of the recent solution to the class number one problem for real quadratic fields of Richaud-Degert type. We conclude with new conjectures, questions and directions.

  13. Prime valued polynomials and class numbers of quadratic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Mollin, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to give a survey of the relationship between the class number one problem for real quadratic fields and prime-producing quadratic polynomials; culminating in an overview of the recent solution to the class number one problem for real quadratic fields of Richaud-Degert type. We conclude with new conjectures, questions and directions.

  14. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects Nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutteridge, S

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. Thes...

  15. Number-Phase Uncertainty Relations for Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanas, Ryszard

    1996-01-01

    The Hermitian phase formalism of Pegg and Barnett allows for direct calculations of the phase variance and, consequently, the number-phase uncertainty product. This gives us a unique opportunity, inaccessible before, to study the number-phase uncertainty relations for optical fields in a direct way within a consistent quantum formalism. A few examples of fields generated in nonlinear optical processes are studied from the point of view of their number-phase uncertainty relations.

  16. Environment Assessment for Grand Bay Range, Bemiss Field, and Moody Explosive Ordnance Disposal Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    longleaf pine (Pinus palustris), and slash pine (Moody AFB 2007a). The Grand Bay Range impact area and Bemiss Field are managed to provide a Bahia ...Bemiss Field or immigration has occurred in this area. No confirmed sightings of indigo snakes have occurred since 1996, despite intensive monitoring

  17. Numerical Upscaling of Transport Through Obstructed Regions Over a Broad Range of Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Mattis, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    While historically flow and transport in porous media has focused on low Reynolds number and Peclet number regimes there are a variety of examples relevant to environmental fluid dynamics where higher Reynolds number flows are important. A common example might include flow and transport through wetlands where plants act as the solid phase of an effective porous medium. In particular, heterogeneity in the flow field due to presence of the solid phases gives rise to complex transport and mixing behaviors that cannot be upscaled at pre-asymptotic times using conventional approaches. We numerically simulate pore-scale flow and transport through obstructed domains over a range of Reynolds numbers from 15 to 280 and then upscale transport. We upscale using a correlated continuous time random walk (correlated CTRW) model, originally introduced in [1]. We then assess the correlated CTRW's ability to predict observables for both asymptotic and pre-asymptotic time scales and compare our results to those of a classical CTRW to determine when velocity correlations must be accounted for. REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Lagrangian statistical model for transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, Physical Review Letters 101 (2008) 090601.

  18. Divisibility of class numbers of imaginary quadratic function fields by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (mod 4) can be achieved if one can first settle the function field analogue of Gauss's genus theory. For basic function field related concepts, we refer the reader to [23]. We will denote by. F× q the multiplicative group of non-zero elements in Fq. For an integer U, we let π(U) count the number of irreducible monic polynomials ...

  19. Factorization of RSA-140 using the number field sieve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Cavallar; B. Dodson; A.K. Lenstra (Arjen); P.C. Leyland; W.M. Lioen (Walter); P.L. Montgomery; B. Murphy; H.J.J. te Riele (Herman); P. Zimmermann

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOn February 2, 1999, we completed the factorization of the 140--digit number RSA--140 with the help of the Number Field Sieve factoring method (NFS). This is a new general factoring record. The previous record was established on April 10, 1996 by the factorization of the 130--digit

  20. Inertial range spectrum of field-aligned whistler turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dwivedi, Navin Kumar; Singh, Shobhana

    2017-01-01

    An analytical model to study the whistler turbulence spectrum and inertial range spectral scalings related with the electric and magnetic field spectra in a weakly non-collisional magnetized plasma is developed. In the present model, the dispersion relation of whistler wave propagating along...

  1. The middle range of the number line orients attention to the left side of visual space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Silvanto, Juha; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Battelli, Lorella

    2009-05-01

    Mental representation of numbers is believed to be spatial in nature, with small numbers occupying the left and large numbers the right side of a putative mental number line. Consistent with this, presentation of numbers from the low and high ends of the mental number line induces covert shifts of spatial attention to the left and right side of visual space, respectively. However, the effect of the presentation of the middle range (containing numbers below and above the midpoint) of the number line on visual perception has so far not been studied. Here we show in two experiments, using a line bisection task and a simple target detection task, that processing of middle-range numbers affects allocation of visuospatial attention in a similar way as processing of small numbers, with attention shifted to the left side of space. We suggest that this pattern of results arises due to "anchoring" heuristics that participants use in number processing.

  2. Evolution of Decision Support Systems Research Field in Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SUDUC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific production in a certain field shows, in great extent, the research interests in that field. Decision Support Systems are a particular class of information systems which are gaining more popularity in various domains. In order to identify the evolution in time of the publications number, authors, subjects, publications in the Decision Support Systems (DSS field, and therefore the scientific world interest for this field, in November 2010 there have been organized a series of queries on three major international scientific databases: ScienceDirect, IEEE Xplore Digital Library and ACM Digital Library. The results presented in this paper shows that, even the decision support systems research field started in 1960s, the interests for this type of systems grew exponentially with each year in the last decades.

  3. Effect of Brinkman number and magnetic field on laminar convection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Brinkman number and magnetic field on laminar convection in a vertical plate channel with uniform and asymmetric temperatures has been studied. The dimensionless form of momentum and energy balanced equations has been solved using one term perturbation series solution. The solution of the ...

  4. Long-range interactions in lattice field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1981-06-01

    Lattice quantum field theories containing fermions can be formulated in a chirally invariant way provided long-range interactions are introduced. It is established that in weak-coupling perturbation theory such a lattice theory is renormalizable when the corresponding continuum theory is, and that the continuum theory is indeed recovered in the perturbative continuum limit. In the strong-coupling limit of these theories one is led to study an effective Hamiltonian describing a Heisenberg antiferromagnet with long-range interactions. Block-spin renormalization group methods are used to find a critical rate of falloff of the interactions, approximately as inverse distance squared, which separates a nearest-neighbor-antiferromagnetic phase from a phase displaying identifiable long-range effects. A duality-type symmetry is present in some block-spin calculations.

  5. Do magnetic fields enhance turbulence at low magnetic Reynolds number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothérat, Alban; Klein, Rico

    2017-06-01

    Imposing a magnetic field on a turbulent flow of electrically conducting fluid incurs the Joule effect. A current paradigm is that the corresponding dissipation increases with the intensity of the magnetic field and as a result turbulent fluctuations are all the more damped as the magnetic field is strong. While this idea finds apparent support in the phenomenology of decaying turbulence, measurements of turbulence in duct flows and other, more complex configurations have produced seemingly contradicting results. The root of the controversy is that magnetic fields promote sufficient scale-dependent anisotropy to profoundly reorganize the structure of turbulence, so their net effect cannot be understood in terms of the additional dissipation only. Here we show that when turbulence is forced in a magnetic field that acts on turbulence itself rather than on the mechanisms that generate it, the field promotes large, nearly two-dimensional structures capturing sufficient energy to offset the loss due to Joule dissipation, with the net effect of increasing the intensity of turbulent fluctuations. This change of paradigm potentially carries important consequences for systems as diverse as the liquid cores of planets, accretion disks, and a wide range of metallurgical and nuclear engineering applications.

  6. Effective field theory for long-range properties of bottomonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Gastão

    2017-03-01

    In this communication we present selected results from a recent study [N. Brambilla, G. Krein, J. Tarrús Castellà and A. Vairo, Phys. Rev. D 93, 054002 (2016)] of long-range properties of bottomonium. An analytical expression for the chromopolarizability of 1S bottomonium states is derived within the framework of potential nonrelativistic QCD (pNRQCD). Next, after integrating out the ultrasoft scale associated with the binding energy of bottomonium, the QCD trace anomaly is used to obtain the two-pion production amplitude for the chromopolarizability operator and the result is matched to a chiral effective field theory having bottomonium states and pions as degrees of freedom. We present results for the leading chiral logarithm correction to the mass of the 1S bottomonium and the van der Waals potential between two bottomonium states.

  7. Predicting transition ranges to fully turbulent viscous boundary layers in low Prandtl number convection flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Janet D.; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-12-01

    We discuss two aspects of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations in a unique setting: a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio of one. First, we present a comprehensive comparison of statistical quantities such as energy dissipation rates and boundary layer thickness scales. Data are used from three simulation run series at Prandtl numbers Pr that cover two orders of magnitude. In contrast to most previous studies in RBC the focus of the present work is on convective turbulence at very low Prandtl numbers including Pr=0.021 for liquid mercury or gallium and Pr=0.005 for liquid sodium. In this parameter range of RBC, inertial effects cause a dominating turbulent momentum transport that is in line with highly intermittent fluid turbulence both in the bulk and in the boundary layers and thus should be able to trigger a transition to the fully turbulent boundary layers of the ultimate regime of convection for higher Rayleigh number. Second, we predict the ranges of Rayleigh numbers for which the viscous boundary layer will transition to turbulence and the flow as a whole will cross over into the ultimate regime. These transition ranges are obtained by extrapolation from our simulation data. The extrapolation methods are based on the large-scale properties of the velocity profile. Two of the three methods predict similar ranges for the transition to ultimate convection when their uncertainties are taken into account. All three extrapolation methods indicate that the range of critical Rayleigh numbers Rac is shifted to smaller magnitudes as the Prandtl number becomes smaller.

  8. Impacts of visitor number on Kangaroos housed in free-range exhibits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwen, Sally L; Hemsworth, Paul H; Butler, Kym L; Fanson, Kerry V; Magrath, Michael J L

    2015-01-01

    Free range exhibits are becoming increasingly popular in zoos as a means to enhance interaction between visitors and animals. However very little research exists on the impacts of visitors on animal behaviour and stress in free range exhibits. We investigated the effects of visitor number on the behaviour and stress physiology of Kangaroo Island (KI) Kangaroos, Macropus fuliginosus fuliginosus, and Red Kangaroos, Macropus rufus, housed in two free range exhibits in Australian zoos. Behavioural observations were conducted on individual kangaroos at each site using instantaneous scan sampling to record activity (e.g., vigilance, foraging, resting) and distance from the visitor pathway. Individually identifiable faecal samples were collected at the end of each study day and analysed for faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentration. When visitor number increased, both KI Kangaroos and Red Kangaroos increased the time spent engaged in visitor-directed vigilance and KI Kangaroos also increased the time spent engaged in locomotion and decreased the time spent resting. There was no effect of visitor number on the distance kangaroos positioned themselves from the visitor pathway or FGM concentration in either species. While there are limitations in interpreting these results in terms of fear of visitors, there was no evidence of adverse effects animal welfare in these study groups based on avoidance behaviour or stress physiology under the range of visitor numbers that we studied. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  10. String amplitudes: from field theories to number theory

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In a variety of recent developments, scattering amplitudes hint at new symmetries of and unexpected connections between physical theories which are otherwise invisible in their conventional description via Feynman diagrams or Lagrangians. Yet, many of these hidden structures are conveniently accessible to string theory where gauge interactions and gravity arise as the low-energy excitations of open and closed strings. In this talk, I will give an intuitive picture of gravity as a double copy of gauge interactions and extend the web of relations to scalar field theories including chiral Lagrangians for Goldstone bosons. The string corrections to gauge and gravity amplitudes beyond their point-particle limit exhibit elegant mathematical structures and offer a convenient laboratory to explore modern number-theoretic concepts in a simple context. As a common theme with Feynman integrals, string amplitudes introduce a variety of periods and special functions including multiple zeta values and polylogarithms, orga...

  11. Testing strong-field gravity with tidal Love numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Franzin, Edgardo; Maselli, Andrea; Pani, Paolo; Raposo, Guilherme

    2017-04-01

    The tidal Love numbers (TLNs) encode the deformability of a self-gravitating object immersed in a tidal environment and depend significantly both on the object's internal structure and on the dynamics of the gravitational field. An intriguing result in classical general relativity is the vanishing of the TLNs of black holes. We extend this result in three ways, aiming at testing the nature of compact objects: (i) we compute the TLNs of exotic compact objects, including different families of boson stars, gravastars, wormholes, and other toy models for quantum corrections at the horizon scale. In the black-hole limit, we find a universal logarithmic dependence of the TLNs on the location of the surface. (ii) We compute the TLNs of black holes beyond vacuum general relativity, including Einstein-Maxwell, Brans-Dicke, and Chern-Simons gravity. (iii) We assess the ability of present and future gravitational-wave detectors to measure the TLNs of these objects, including the first analysis of TLNs with LISA. Both LIGO, ET, and LISA can impose interesting constraints on boson stars, while LISA is able to probe even extremely compact objects. We argue that the TLNs provide a smoking gun of new physics at the horizon scale and that future gravitational-wave measurements of the TLNs in a binary inspiral provide a novel way to test black holes and general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  12. Passive Localization of Mixed Far-Field and Near-Field Sources without Estimating the Number of Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs and near-field sources (NFSs without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Passive localization of mixed far-field and near-field sources without estimating the number of sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-02-06

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Dissipative Effects on Inertial-Range Statistics at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bewley, Gregory P.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2017-09-01

    Using the unique capabilities of the Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Göttingen, we report experimental measurements in classical grid turbulence that uncover oscillations of the velocity structure functions in the inertial range. This was made possible by measuring extremely long time series of up to 1 010 samples of the turbulent fluctuating velocity, which corresponds to O (107) integral length scales. The measurements were conducted in a well-controlled environment at a wide range of high Reynolds numbers from Rλ=110 up to Rλ=1600 , using both traditional hot-wire probes as well as the nanoscale thermal anemometry probe developed at Princeton University. An implication of the observed oscillations is that dissipation influences the inertial-range statistics of turbulent flows at scales significantly larger than predicted by current models and theories.

  15. The Ranges Of Subauroral Geomagnetic Field Elements | Rabiu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics ... On quiet condition, the range in j season dominates over d- and e- seasons in all elements. ... Generally, the seasonal range in the D component for all the years as well as in H and Z components - apart from the anomaly - maintain the order e>j>d of seasonal variation which is ...

  16. High dynamic range electric field sensor for electromagnetic pulse detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Che-Yun; Wang, Alan X; Lee, Beom Suk; Zhang, Xingyu; Chen, Ray T

    2011-01-01

    ...) polymer Y-fed directional coupler for electromagnetic wave detection. This electrode-less, all optical, wideband electrical field sensor is fabricated using standard processing for E-O polymer photonic devices...

  17. Botanical studies in the Arctic National Wildlife Range: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a botanical study in the Arctic National Wildlife Range during 1970. Cooperative studies on flora and fauna were done on selected sites. Sites include...

  18. Flowing of supersonic underexpanded micro-jets in the range of moderate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, S. G.; Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents new experimental results on the simulation of supersonic underexpanded micro-jets by macro-jet in the range of moderate Reynolds numbers of air outflow from the nozzle. A correlation is shown between the variations in the Pitot pressure in the model micro-jet with variations in the length of the supersonic core of real the micro-jets. The results of experiments on the effect of humidity on the pulsation of mass flow rate in a micro-jet are presented.

  19. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Gabriel C.; Woo, Bryana L.; Sanchez, Andres L.; Knapp, Haley

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.

  20. Demand for Higher Education, by Field. Policy Note. Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Over the period 2001-2011, the number of applications for university places increased by 17.8%, or just over 37,000. At the same time, the number of offers increased faster in percentage terms (20.5%), while absolute growth was slightly smaller at just under 35,000. As demand for higher education has grown, there has been a trend towards Science,…

  1. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  2. Lattice implementation of Abelian gauge theories with Chern-Simons number and an axion field arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Figueroa, Daniel G.

    Real time evolution of classical gauge fields is relevant for a number of applications in particle physics and cosmology, ranging from the early Universe to dynamics of quark-gluon plasma. We present a lattice formulation of the interaction between a $shift$-symmetric field and some $U(1)$ gauge sector, $a(x)\\tilde{F}_{\\mu\

  3. Divisibility of class numbers of imaginary quadratic function fields by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 1. Divisibility of Class Numbers of ... Banerjee1 Srinivas Kotyada2. Indian Statistical Institute, Stat-Math Unit, 203 Barrackpore Trunk Road, Kolkata 700 108, India; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600 113, India ...

  4. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  5. The multiple number field sieve with conjugation and generalized Joux-Lercier methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Pierrot (Cécile)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we propose two variants of the Number Field Sieve (NFS) to compute discrete logarithms in medium characteristic finite fields. We consider algorithms that combine two ideas, namely the Multiple variant of the Number Field Sieve (MNFS) taking advantage of a large number of

  6. On the Number of Rational Points on Prym Varieties over Finite Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubry, Yves; Haloui, Safia

    2016-01-01

    We give upper and lower bounds for the number of rational points on Prym varieties over finite fields. Moreover, we determine the exact maximum and minimum number of rational points on Prym varieties of dimension 2....

  7. Bear Lake Unit of the Tallahatchie NWR - Field Numbers for the Forestry Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map depicts the field and stand numbers of the entire refuge in 1998. Management treatments in other sources are based on these same numbers.

  8. Analysis of the exactness of mean-field theory in long-range interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Relationships between general long-range interacting classical systems on a lattice and the corresponding mean-field models (infinitely long-range interacting models) are investigated. We study systems in arbitrary dimension d for periodic boundary conditions and focus on the free energy for fixed value of the total magnetization. As a result, it is shown that the equilibrium free energy of the long-range interacting systems are exactly the same as that of the corresponding mean-field models (exactness of the mean-field theory). Moreover, the mean-field metastable states can be also preserved in general long-range interacting systems. It is found that in the case that the magnetization is conserved, the mean-field theory does not give correct property in some parameter region.

  9. Turbulence Intermittency Characteristics in the Reynolds Number Range 100 <= R_λ <= 1,000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gylfason, Armann; Ayyalasomayajula, Sathyanarayanana; Warhaft, Zellman

    2002-11-01

    Work by Tabeling and collaborators^1 show a transitional behavior in the flatness factor of the velocity derivative, K_partial u/ partial x, as a function of Taylor Reynolds number, R_λ ≡ u λ / ν. Their results show a peak in K_partial u/partial x at R_λ ˜ 700 followed by a decrease (to R_λ ˜ 1000) before returning to a gentle increase. Here we investigate K_partial u / partial x in decaying, active grid, turbulence. Our preliminary results show that K_partial u / partial x increases until R_λ ˜ 700 and then remains approximately flat to R_λ ˜ 1,200 (the extent of our measurements). Thus there is some similarity with the Tabeling et al. work, although our data does not exhibit the pronounced peak and trough that they observe. Reasons for the differences are investigated, including differences in flow geometry and the possibility that the Taylor scale Reynolds number does not map linearly from one flow to another. Other recent proposals^2 of Reynolds numbers based purely on the small scales are investigated. Transverse velocity statistics and velocity difference measurements are also presented. The work is supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] P. Tabeling et al. PRE, 53, 1613 (1996); Tabeling and Willaime, PRE, 65, 066301--1 (2002). [2] R.H. Hill. J. Fluid Mech., 463, 403 (2002).

  10. Plasmonic Antennas Nanocoupler for Telecom Range: Simulation, Fabrication and Near-Field Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We report simulation, fabrication and, for the first time, full amplitude-phase near-field optical characterization in telecom range of the compact and efficient plasmonic nanoantenna based couplers. Near-field data allowed characterizing the subwavelength slot waveguide’s propagation losses...

  11. Effective atomic numbers of polypyrrole via transmission method in the energy range 15.74-40.93 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icelli, Orhan [Department of Physics Education, Education Faculty of Erzincan, Erzincan University, Erzincan (Turkey)], E-mail: orhanicelli@gmail.com; Erzeneoglu, Salih; Saglam, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2008-03-15

    Effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) of polypyrrole have been determined for total photon interactions in the energy range 15.74-40.93 keV from the accurately measured total attenuation coefficients, for characteristic K and K X-rays of Zr, Mo, Ag, In, Sb, Ba and Pr. The results were compared with the theoretical atomic numbers obtained using the XCOM.

  12. Near field phased array DOA and range estimation of UHF RFID tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiting, J.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a near field localization system based on a phased array for UHF RFID tags. To estimate angle and range the system uses a two-dimensional MUSIC algorithm. A four channel phased array is used to experimentally verify the estimation of angle and range for an EPC gen2 tag. The

  13. Bounding the number of Fq-rational places in algebraic function fields using Weierstrass semigroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Hans Olav; Matsumoto, Ryutaroh

    2009-01-01

    We present a new bound on the number of Fq -rational places in an algebraic function field. It uses information about the generators of the Weierstrass semigroup related to a rational place. As we demonstrate, the bound has implications to the theory of towers of function fields....

  14. Near Field HF Antenna Pattern Measurement Method Using an Antenna Pattern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 3006 December 2015 Near-Field HF Antenna Pattern Measurement Method Using an Antenna Pattern Range Ani Siripuram Michael Daly...link budget. This report focuses on computing absolute gain for HF antennas measured on the APR. Recent research efforts by SSC Pacific’s Applied...Electromagnetics Branch (Code 52250) show that the APR extends to accurate measurement of normalized far-field radiation patterns of HF antennas. The

  15. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hockmann, K.; Tandy, S.; Lenz, M.; Reiser, R.; Conesa, H.; Keller, M.; Studer, B.; Schulin, R.

    2015-01-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions

  16. Simulation, Fabrication and Near-Field Characterization of Nanoantenna Couplers for Telecom Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Zenin, Vladimir A.; Malureanu, Radu

    2014-01-01

    We report a modified bow - tie antenna for light coupling to subwavelength plasmonic slot waveguide . Its effective area is 15 times larger than that of the bare waveguide terminatio n at the wavelength 1.55 μm . We demonstrate numerical simulation, fabrication and , for the first time, full ampl...... amplitude - phase near - field optical characterization of nanocoupler in telecom range ....

  17. Measurement of dragging of inertial frames and gravitomagnetic field using laser-ranged satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, I.; Lucchesi, D.; Vespe, F.; Mandiello, A.

    1996-05-01

    By analysing the observations of the orbits of the laser-ranged satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, using the program GEODYN, the authors have obtained the first direct measurement of the Lense-Thirring effect, or dragging of inertial frames and the first direct experimental evidence for the gravitomagnetic field. The accuracy of their measurement is of about 30%.

  18. High night temperatures during grain number determination reduce wheat and barley grain yield: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Guillermo A; Dreccer, M Fernanda; Miralles, Daniel J; Serrago, Román A

    2015-11-01

    Warm nights are a widespread predicted feature of climate change. This study investigated the impact of high night temperatures during the critical period for grain yield determination in wheat and barley crops under field conditions, assessing the effects on development, growth and partitioning crop-level processes driving grain number per unit area (GN). Experiments combined: (i) two contrasting radiation and temperature environments: late sowing in 2011 and early sowing in 2013, (ii) two well-adapted crops with similar phenology: bread wheat and two-row malting barley and (iii) two temperature regimes: ambient and high night temperatures. The night temperature increase (ca. 3.9 °C in both crops and growing seasons) was achieved using purpose-built heating chambers placed on the crop at 19:000 hours and removed at 7:00 hours every day from the third detectable stem node to 10 days post-flowering. Across growing seasons and crops, the average minimum temperature during the critical period ranged from 11.2 to 17.2 °C. Wheat and barley grain yield were similarly reduced under warm nights (ca. 7% °C(-1) ), due to GN reductions (ca. 6% °C(-1) ) linked to a lower number of spikes per m(2) . An accelerated development under high night temperatures led to a shorter critical period duration, reducing solar radiation capture with negative consequences for biomass production, GN and therefore, grain yield. The information generated could be used as a starting point to design management and/or breeding strategies to improve crop adaptation facing climate change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Three-dimensional near-field MIMO array imaging using range migration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Xiaodong; Yarovoy, Alexander G

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a 3-D near-field imaging algorithm that is formulated for 2-D wideband multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) imaging array topology. The proposed MIMO range migration technique performs the image reconstruction procedure in the frequency-wavenumber domain. The algorithm is able to completely compensate the curvature of the wavefront in the near-field through a specifically defined interpolation process and provides extremely high computational efficiency by the application of the fast Fourier transform. The implementation aspects of the algorithm and the sampling criteria of a MIMO aperture are discussed. The image reconstruction performance and computational efficiency of the algorithm are demonstrated both with numerical simulations and measurements using 2-D MIMO arrays. Real-time 3-D near-field imaging can be achieved with a real-aperture array by applying the proposed MIMO range migration techniques.

  20. Hubbard interaction in the arbitrary Chern number insulator: A mean-field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang, E-mail: wangyixiang@jiangnan.edu.cn [School of Science, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Cao, Jie [College of Science, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)

    2017-05-10

    The low-dimensional electron gas owing topological property has attracted many interests recently. In this work, we study the influence of the electron-electron interaction on the arbitrary Chern number insulator. Using the mean-field method, we approximately solve the Hubbard model in the half-filling case and obtain the phase diagrams in different parametric spaces. We further verify the results by calculating the entanglement spectrum, which contains C chiral modes and corresponds to a real space partitioning. - Highlights: • In this work, we made a mean-field study of the Hubbard interaction in the arbitrary Chern number insulator. • We point out that how the Zeeman splitting, the local magnetization and the Hubbard interaction are intimately related. • The mean-field phase diagrams are obtained in different parametric spaces. • The Chern number phase is demonstrated by calculating the entanglement spectrum.

  1. Parameter-free numerical method for modeling thermal convection in square cavities in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloviznin, V. M.; Korotkin, I. A.; Finogenov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Some numerical results for the two- and three-dimensional de Vahl Davis benchmark are presented. This benchmark describes thermal convection in a square (cubic) cavity with vertical heated walls in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers (104 to 1014), which covers both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. Turbulent f lows are usually described using a turbulence model with parameters that depend on the Rayleigh number and require adjustment. An alternative is Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) methods, but they demand extremely large computational grids. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in DNS methods with an incomplete resolution, which, in some cases, are able to provide acceptable results without resolving Kolmogorov scales. On the basis of this approach, the so-called parameter-free computational techniques have been developed. These methods cover a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and allow computing various integral properties of heat transport on relatively coarse computational grids. In this paper, a new numerical method based on the CABARET scheme is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. This technique does not involve a turbulence model or any tuning parameters and has a second-order approximation scheme in time and space on uniform and nonuniform grids with a minimal computational stencil. Testing the technique on the de Vahl Davis benchmark and a sequence of refined grids shows that the method yields integral heat f luxes with a high degree of accuracy for both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. For Rayleigh numbers up to 1014, a several percent accuracy is achieved on an extremely coarse grid consisting of 20 × 20 cells refined toward the boundary. No definite or comprehensive explanation of this computational phenomenon has been given. Cautious optimism is expressed regarding the perspectives of using the new method for thermal convection computations at low Prandtl numbers typical of liquid metals.

  2. Zero-range effective field theory for resonant wino dark matter. Part I. Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Johnson, Evan; Zhang, Hong

    2017-11-01

    The most dramatic "Sommerfeld enhancements" of neutral-wino-pair annihilation occur when the wino mass is near a critical value where there is a zero-energy S-wave resonance at the neutral-wino-pair threshold. Near such a critical mass, low-energy winos can be described by a zero-range effective field theory in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a contact interaction. The effective field theory is controlled by a renormalization-group fixed point at which the neutral and charged winos are degenerate in mass and their scattering length is infinite. The parameters of the zero-range effective field theory can be determined by matching wino-wino scattering amplitudes calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation for winos interacting through a potential due to the exchange of weak gauge bosons. If the wino mass is larger than the critical value, the resonance is a wino-pair bound state. The power of the zero-range effective field theory is illustrated by calculating the rate for formation of the bound state in the collision of two neutral winos through the emission of two soft photons.

  3. Multi-phase-field analysis of short-range forces between diffuse interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Spatschek, R.; Karma, A.

    2010-05-01

    We characterize both analytically and numerically short-range forces between spatially diffuse interfaces in multi-phase-field models of polycrystalline materials. During late-stage solidification, crystal-melt interfaces may attract or repel each other depending on the degree of misorientation between impinging grains, temperature, composition, and stress. To characterize this interaction, we map the multiphase-field equations for stationary interfaces to a multidimensional classical mechanical scattering problem. From the solution of this problem, we derive asymptotic forms for short-range forces between interfaces for distances larger than the interface thickness. The results show that forces are always attractive for traditional models where each phase-field represents the phase fraction of a given grain. Those predictions are validated by numerical computations of forces for all distances. Based on insights from the scattering problem, we propose a multi-phase-field formulation that can describe both attractive and repulsive forces in real systems. This model is then used to investigate the influence of solute addition and a uniaxial stress perpendicular to the interface. Solute addition leads to bistability of different interfacial equilibrium states, with the temperature range of bistability increasing with strength of partitioning. Stress in turn, is shown to be equivalent to a temperature change through a standard Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The implications of those results for understanding grain boundary premelting are discussed.

  4. Zero-Range Effective Field Theory for Resonant Wino Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evan; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The most dramatic ``Sommerfeld enhancements'' of neutral-wino-pair annihilation occur when the wino mass is tuned to near critical values where there is a zero-energy S-wave resonance at the neutral-wino-pair threshold. If the wino mass is larger than the critical value, the resonance is a wino-pair bound state. If the wino mass is near a critical value, low-energy winos can be described by a zero-range effective field theory in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a contact interaction. The parameters of the zero-range effective field theory can be determined by matching wino scattering amplitudes calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation for a nonrelativistic effective field theory in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a potential due to the exchange of weak gauge bosons. The power of the zero-range effective field theory is illustrated by calculating the rate for formation of the bound state in the collision of two neutral winos through the emission of two soft photons. Supported in part by DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER15715.

  5. Gauged B-L number and neutron-antineutron oscillation: long-range forces mediated by baryophotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea; Berezhiani, Zurab; Kamyshkov, Yuri

    2017-05-01

    Transformation of a neutron to an antineutron n → {\\tilde{n}} has not yet been experimentally observed. In principle, it can occur with free neutrons in the vacuum or with neutrons bound inside the nuclei. In a nuclear medium the neutron and the antineutron have different potentials and for that reason n-{\\tilde{n}} conversion in nuclei is heavily suppressed. This transformation can also be suppressed for free neutrons in the presence of an environmental vector field that distinguishes the neutron from the antineutron. We consider the case of a gauge field coupled to the B-L charge of the particles (B-L photon), and we show that discovery of n-{\\tilde{n}} oscillation in experiment will lead to few order of magnitudes stronger limits on its coupling constant than present limits from the tests of the equivalence principle. If n-{\\tilde{n}} oscillation will be discovered via nuclear instability, but not in free neutron oscillations at a corresponding level, this would indicate the presence of such environmental fifth forces. In the latter case the B-L potential can be measurable by varying the external magnetic field for achieving the resonance conditions for n-{\\tilde{n}} conversion. As for neutron-mirror neutron oscillation, such potentials should have no effect once the fifth forces are associated to a common quantum number (B-L)-(B'-L') shared by the ordinary and mirror particles.

  6. Impact of Article Page Count and Number of Authors on Citations in Disability Related Fields: A Systematic Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abubakar; Adam, Mastura; Ghafar, Norafida A; Muhammad, Murtala; Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2016-09-01

    Citation metrics and total publications in a field has become the gold standard for rating researchers and viability of a field. Hence, stimulating demand for citation has led to a search for useful strategies to improve performance metric index. Meanwhile, title, abstract and morphologic qualities of the articles attract researchers to scientific publications. Yet, there is relatively little understanding of the citation trend in disability related fields. We aimed to provide an insight into the factors associated with citation increase in this field. Additionally, we tried to know at what page number an article might appear attractive to disability researchers needs. Thus, our focus is placed on the article page count and the number of authors contributing to the fields per article. To this end, we evaluated the quantitative characteristics of top cited articles in the fields with a total citation (≥50) in the Web of Science (WoS) database. Using one-way independent ANOVA, data extracted spanning a period of 1980-2015 were analyzed, while the non-parametric data analysis uses Kruskal-Walis test. Articles with 11 to 20 pages attract more citations followed by those within the range of zero to 10. Articles with upward 21 pages are the least cited. Surprisingly, articles with more than two authors are significantly ( P <0.05) less cited and the citation decreases as the number of authors increased. Collaborative studies enjoy wider utilization and more citation, yet discounted merit of additional pages and limited collaborative research in disability field is revealed in this study.

  7. Mean-field theory of spin-glasses with finite coordination number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, I.; Sompolinsky, H.

    1987-01-01

    The mean-field theory of dilute spin-glasses is studied in the limit where the average coordination number is finite. The zero-temperature phase diagram is calculated and the relationship between the spin-glass phase and the percolation transition is discussed. The present formalism is applicable also to graph optimization problems.

  8. A relativistic mean-field study of magic numbers in light nuclei from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A relativistic mean-field study of magic numbers in light nuclei from neutron to proton drip-lines. T K JHA1, M S MEHTA2, S K PATRA3,*, B K RAJ4 and RAJ K GUPTA2. 1Department of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla 768 019, India. 2Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014, India.

  9. Non-axisymmetric Anisotropy of magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind dissipation range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Turner, A. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.; Muller, W.

    2011-12-01

    Anisotropy is a key topic for theoretical, numerical and observational studies of plasma turbulence in the solar wind. A fundamental assumption of many theoretical descriptions of turbulence, both in the inertial and dissipation range, is that of axisymmetry of the anisotropic fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Intriguingly, there is observational evidence that these fluctuations are ordered both with respect to the background field and flow directions. This level of non-axisymmetry is observed to increases as we move from the inertial range to the dissipation range. This is characterized by minimum variance analysis as well as in observations of the ratio of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) in the perpendicular directions, eBxeR : eBx(eBxeR), where eB is a unit vector in the direction of the average magnetic field and eR is a unit vector in the radial direction away from the sun. Here, we show that this observed non-axisymmetry may arise as a data sampling effect rather than as a result of the physical properties of the turbulent plasma. We first quantify the observed non-axisymmetry through the inertial and dissipation ranges via the PSD ratio in the perpendicular plane for in-situ measurements using the Cluster spacecraft in fast wind where both magnetic field instruments, FGM and STAFF, are operating in burst mode. This allows the small scales of the dissipation range to be investigated. We then show that a spacecraft 'fly through' of a simple analytical model for a field composed of a linear superposition of transverse waves, where Taylor's hypothesis is used and the only variable parameter is the power law index, is sufficient to give the observed non-axisymmetry. In particular, we find that the ratio of power in the perpendicular plane, eBxeR : eBx(eBxeR), depends on the exponent of the PSD. Thus we find that the enhanced non-axisymmetry seen in the dissipation range is a result of the steepening of the PSD slope.

  10. Zero-Field Skyrmions with a High Topological Number in Itinerant Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Ryo; Hayami, Satoru; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic Skyrmions are swirling spin textures with topologically protected noncoplanarity. Recently, Skyrmions with the topological number of unity have been extensively studied in both experiment and theory. We here show that a Skyrmion crystal with an unusually high topological number of two is stabilized in itinerant magnets at a zero magnetic field. The results are obtained for a minimal Kondo lattice model on a triangular lattice by an unrestricted large-scale numerical simulation and variational calculations. We find that the topological number can be switched by a magnetic field as 2 ↔1 ↔0 . The Skyrmion crystals are formed by the superpositions of three spin density waves induced by the Fermi surface effect, and hence, the size of Skyrmions can be controlled by the band structure and electron filling. We also discuss the charge and spin textures of itinerant electrons in the Skyrmion crystals which are directly obtained in our numerical simulations.

  11. Modal analysis of the range evolution of broadband wavefields in the North Pacific Ocean: low mode numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovydchenkov, Ilya A; Brown, Michael G; Duda, Timothy F; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Howe, Bruce M; Colosi, John A

    2012-06-01

    The results of mode-processing measurements of broadband acoustic wavefields made in the fall of 2004 as part of the Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation Experiment (LOAPEX) in the eastern North Pacific Ocean are reported here. Transient wavefields in the 50-90 Hz band that were recorded on a 1400-m long 40 element vertical array centered near the sound channel axis are analyzed. This array was designed to resolve low-order modes. The wavefields were excited by a ship-suspended source at seven ranges, between approximately 50 and 3200 km, from the receiving array. The range evolution of broadband modal arrival patterns corresponding to fixed mode numbers ("modal group arrivals") is analyzed with an emphasis on the second (variance) and third (skewness) moments. A theory of modal group time spreads is described, emphasizing complexities associated with energy scattering among low-order modes. The temporal structure of measured modal group arrivals is compared to theoretical predictions and numerical simulations. Theory, simulations, and observations generally agree. In cases where disagreement is observed, the reasons for the disagreement are discussed in terms of the underlying physical processes and data limitations.

  12. Binocular correspondence and the range of fusible horizontal disparities in the central visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Ashleigh L; Grove, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    Binocular disparities underlie precise stereoscopic depth perception but only over a finite range. At large disparities, objects appear diplopic, and depth perception is degraded. Measurements of the range of horizontal disparities for which single vision is experienced have previously been restricted to the horizontal plane of regard. We extended these mappings, in two experiments, to the upper and lower visual fields and eccentric meridians. In Experiment 1, we measured empirical corresponding points and fusional limits at identical elevations in the median plane for 20 participants. We observed a vertical shear in binocular correspondence consistent with a backward inclined empirical vertical horopter and the fusional range centered upon it. In Experiment 2, we mapped the vertical horopter and fusional limits for a second set of elevations in the median plane and at two additional eccentricities and found a similar pattern of results as in Experiment 1. For 23 of 25 participants in this study, we found that the relationship between measurements of the vertical horopter and fusional range is similar to the established relationship between Panum's fusional range and the horizontal horopter. Our data replicate previous findings that the vertical horopter is inclined top back. We are the first to illustrate that the fusional range of horizontal disparities is approximately centered upon the vertical horopter in the median plane and along eccentric meridians.

  13. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  14. Ex-situ field application of electrokinetics for remediation of shooting-range soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Young; Kim, Hyun-A; Lee, Woo-Chun; Kim, Soon-Oh; Lee, Jong-Un; Kwon, Young-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Electrokinetic process for remediation of a shooting-range site was evaluated in this study. By field operation for 100 days, the newly designed electrokinetic system was evaluated for process stability, performance, and efficiency. The field site of this study was an abandoned military shooting range located in the Civilian Control Line of South Korea. The target area, only, was heavily contaminated by Pb and Cu to a depth of 0.5 m. After dry-sieving of the field soil to separate particulate Pb, two cells in a hexagonal (two-dimensional) arrangement, including ten anodes outside the cell and two cathodes in the middle, were prepared. The pH of each electrolyte was adjusted by use of concentrated HNO(3), resulting in acid-enhanced electrokinetics. The monitoring results indicated that overall removal of heavy metals (Pb, Cu) was achieved, and that both heavy metals were removed from outside the cell. The average final efficiency of removal of Pb and Cu was 39.5 ± 35 and 63.8 ± 12%, respectively. Although the feasibility of this system was confirmed, for commercialization of the process confirmed drawbacks must be improved by further study.

  15. Lexicographical structuring: the number and types of fields, data distribution, searching and data presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Henning; Pedersen, Heidi Agerbo

    2015-01-01

    in an existing dictionary. This part of the lexicographical work is what we call structuring, which encompasses a number of various lexicographical decisions. One of these is choosing the fields that a database should contain. Typically, for some of these field types, it will be easy to distribute data......, but for other fields it will require long considerations as there are several distribution options with different outcomes of varying usefulness. A second type of lexicographical decision to be made by the lexicographer is the predefined searching, which involves in what order searches are to be made...... dictionaries. However, only by producing monofunctional dictionaries is it possible to avoid the type of information overload, which makes polyfunctional dictionaries close to useless on electronic devices such as tablets and smartphones. In the case of monofunctional dictionaries, lexicographical structuring...

  16. Long-range magnetic fields in the ground state of the Standard Model plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-09-14

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at nonzero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new equilibrium state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation could occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  17. Long-range magnetic fields in the ground state of the Standard Model plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    In thermal equilibrium the ground state of the plasma of Standard Model particles is determined by temperature and exactly conserved combinations of baryon and lepton numbers. We show that at non-zero values of the global charges a translation invariant and homogeneous state of the plasma becomes unstable and the system transits into a new state, containing a large-scale magnetic field. The origin of this effect is the parity-breaking character of weak interactions and chiral anomaly. This situation can occur in the early Universe and may play an important role in its subsequent evolution.

  18. A New Algorithm for Joint Range-DOA-Frequency Estimation of Near-Field Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Feng Chen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the joint estimation problem of ranges, DOAs, and frequencies of near-field narrowband sources and proposes a new computationally efficient algorithm, which employs a symmetric uniform linear array, uses eigenvalues together with the corresponding eigenvectors of two properly designed matrices to estimate signal parameters, and does not require searching for spectral peak or pairing among parameters. In addition, the proposed algorithm can be applied in arbitrary Gaussian noise environment since it is based on the fourth-order cumulants, which is verified by extensive computer simulations.

  19. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  20. NOTE - Minimum number of common bean plants per plot to assess field resistance to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    uliana Andrade Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the minimum number of plants per plot to assess the field resistance in common beanto white mold. Thirteen cultivars were inoculated with six isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and evaluated in a randomized blockdesign with three replications and plots consisting of 1-m rows with 15 plants. Plants were inoculated by the straw test as proposedby Petzoldt and Dickson (1996, to evaluate partial resistance in a greenhouse. Eight days after inoculation the disease severity wasevaluated on a 1-9 diagrammatic scale, where 1 = asymptomatic plants to 9 = plant death. To determine the minimum number ofplants per plot, the following methods were used: maximum curvature, segmented linear model, quadratic segmented model and therelative CV model. There were significant differences among cultivars and isolates and no significant cultivar - isolate interaction.It was observed that eight plants per plot is an adequate number to assess the reaction of common bean to white mold.

  1. Occupation numbers of spherical orbits in self-consistent beyond-mean-field methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Tomás R.; Poves, Alfredo; Nowacki, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to compute the number of particles occupying spherical single-particle (SSP) levels within the energy density functional (EDF) framework. These SSP levels are defined for each nucleus by performing self-consistent mean-field calculations. The nuclear many-body states, in which the occupation numbers are evaluated, are obtained with a symmetry conserving configuration mixing (SCCM) method based on the Gogny EDF. The method allows a closer comparison between EDF and shell model with configuration mixing in large valence spaces (SM-CI) results, and can serve as a guidance to define physically sound valence spaces for SM-CI calculations. As a first application of the method, we analyze the onset of deformation in neutron-rich N =40 isotones and the role of the SSP levels around this harmonic oscillator magic number, with particular emphasis in the structure of 64Cr.

  2. FGF signaling regulates the number of posterior taste papillae by controlling progenitor field size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille I Petersen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste is fundamental to our ability to ingest nutritious substances and to detect and avoid potentially toxic ones. Sensory taste buds are housed in papillae that develop from epithelial placodes. Three distinct types of gustatory papillae reside on the rodent tongue: small fungiform papillae are found in the anterior tongue, whereas the posterior tongue contains the larger foliate papillae and a single midline circumvallate papilla (CVP. Despite the great variation in the number of CVPs in mammals, its importance in taste function, and its status as the largest of the taste papillae, very little is known about the development of this structure. Here, we report that a balance between Sprouty (Spry genes and Fgf10, which respectively antagonize and activate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signaling, regulates the number of CVPs. Deletion of Spry2 alone resulted in duplication of the CVP as a result of an increase in the size of the placode progenitor field, and Spry1(-/-;Spry2(-/- embryos had multiple CVPs, demonstrating the redundancy of Sprouty genes in regulating the progenitor field size. By contrast, deletion of Fgf10 led to absence of the CVP, identifying FGF10 as the first inductive, mesenchyme-derived factor for taste papillae. Our results provide the first demonstration of the role of epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling in taste papilla development, indicate that regulation of the progenitor field size by FGF signaling is a critical determinant of papilla number, and suggest that the great variation in CVP number among mammalian species may be linked to levels of signaling by the FGF pathway.

  3. Genre Differences on Visual Perception of Color Range and Depth of Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ballesteros

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception is the result of the integration of various related factors of the observed object and its environment. In this study we evaluated the impact of tridimensional form on color perception and the angle from the horizontal plane of a set of similar objets on the depth of field perception between young men and women. A panel half magenta and half white placed at the end of a black box, folded either concaved or convexed to alter the chromatic effect perceived were used to determine tridimensional form on color perception. Four sets of identical sticks where the angle from the horizontal plane varied for each, were used to determine the effect of spatial distribution of depth of field perception. The parameters taking into account were age, genre, associated visual defects for each individual evaluated. Our results show that the tridimensional form alters color perception but the range of color perceived was larger for women whereas depending on the angle from the horizontal plane we found genre differences on the depth of field perception.

  4. A compact, short-pulse laser for near-field, range-gated imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a compact laser, which produces high power, wide-angle emission for a near-field, range-gated, imaging system. The optical pulses are produced by a 100 element laser diode array (LDA) which is pulsed with a GaAs, photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS). The LDA generates 100 ps long, gain-switched, optical pulses at 904 nm when it is driven with 3 ns, 400 A, electrical pulses from a high gain PCSS. Gain switching is facilitated with this many lasers by using a low impedance circuit to drive an array of lasers, which are connected electrically in series. The total optical energy produced per pulse is 10 microjoules corresponding to a total peak power of 100 kW. The entire laser system, including prime power (a nine volt battery), pulse charging, PCSS, and LDA, is the size of a small, hand-held flashlight. System lifetime, which is presently limited by the high gain PCSS, is an active area of research and development. Present limitations and potential improvements will be discussed. The complete range-gated imaging system is based on complementary technologies: high speed optical gating with intensified charge coupled devices (ICCD) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and high gain, PCSS-driven LDAs developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system is designed for use in highly scattering media such as turbid water or extremely dense fog or smoke. The short optical pulses from the laser and high speed gating of the ICCD are synchronized to eliminate the back-scattered light from outside the depth of the field of view (FOV) which may be as short as a few centimeters. A high speed photodiode can be used to trigger the intensifier gate and set the range-gated FOV precisely on the target. The ICCD and other aspects of the imaging system are discussed in a separate paper.

  5. Field System for Extended Range Continuous Monitoring of Near Surface CO2 Gas from Multiple Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J.; Amonette, J.

    2007-12-01

    A novel system was developed for continuous measurement of near surface carbon dioxide gas concentrations associated with the monitoring of carbon dioxide capture and storage in geologic formations. In the current configuration, the battery powered system allows for near surface CO2 gas collection (0-300,000 ppm) from seven (expandable) independently located steady state chambers. Each chamber has an associated pump and metering valve attached to a control manifold that either directs the flow to the analyzer (test chamber) or to exhaust (all others). The uniquely large concentration range in which the system is capable of operating is achieved by using an auto-control system that senses when the LiCor LI-7000 analyzer is approaching saturation and then dilutes the incoming sample using a metered flow of nitrogen gas from the reference gas supply. The dilution is carried out in stages and is capable of increasing or decreasing on the fly to keep the analyzer within range. By reading in the sample flow rate, the dilution gas flow rate, and the output flow it is possible to calculate a dilution scalar that acts as a multiplier for the LiCor analyzer concentration, allowing for immediate read and record of true sampler concentrations. This system was tested and validated during a week of continuous operation and field use, monitoring the seven chambers 24 hours/day with CO2 concentrations ranging from background to over 130,000 ppm.

  6. Earth gravity field modeling and relativistic measurements with laser-ranged satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucacco, Giuseppe; Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The importance of General Relativity (GR) for space geodesy — and for geodesy in general — is well known since several decades and it has been confirmed by a number of very significant results. For instance, GR plays a fundamental role for the following very notable techniques: Satellite-and-Lunar Laser Ranging (SLR/LLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS), and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Each of these techniques is intimately and closely related with both GR and geodesy, i.e. they are linked in a loop where benefits in one field provide positive improvements in the other ones. A common ingredient for a suitable and reliable use of each of these techniques is represented by the knowledge of the Earth's gravitational field, both in its static and temporal dependence. Spaceborne gravimetry, with the inclusion of accelerometers and gradiometers on board dedicated satellites, together with microwave links between satellites and GPS measurements, have allowed a huge improvement in the determination of the Earth's geopotential during the last 15 years. In the near future, further improvements are expected in this knowledge thanks to the inclusion of laser inter-satellite link and the possibility to compare frequency and atomic standards by a direct use of atomic clocks, both on the Earth's surface and in space. Such results will be also important for the possibility to further improve the GR tests and measurements in the field of the Earth with laser-ranged satellites in order to compare the predictions of Einstein's theory with those of other (proposed) relativistic theories for the interpretation of the gravitational interaction. Within the present paper we describe the state of the art of such measurements with geodetic satellites, as the two LAGEOS and LARES, and we discuss the effective impact of the systematic errors of gravitational origin on the measurement of

  7. National Geographic FieldScope: Tools for Engaging a Range of Audiences in Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    OConnor, S.; Takaki, E.

    2013-12-01

    NSF grant to bring this vision for FieldScope to life. The project is structured around key collaborations with 'conveners' of existing citizen science initiatives. These existing initiatives include Project BudBurst, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums FrogWatch USA, and the Alice Ferguson Fund's Trash Free Potomac Initiative. These groups are serving as testbed partners, building their citizen science projects with the FieldScope development tools and hosting their communities within the FieldScope infrastructure. Through outcomes research and evaluation, these testbeds will provide much-needed evidence about the value of citizen science for learning and the conditions that can maximize those outcomes. Presenters will share findings to date of the project, including a demonstration of the technology using examples from our convening partners from the NSF project, as well as other communities using FieldScope, ranging from citizen science initiatives in the Yukon River watershed aimed at engaging indigenous Alaskan populations to a wide-spread initiative across the Chesapeake Bay watershed designed for students and environmental education program participants.

  8. Time of flight and range of the motion of a projectile in a constant gravitational field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Karkantzakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the classical problem of the motion of a projectile in a constant gravitational field under the influenceof a retarding force proportional to the velocity. Specifically, we express the time of flight, the time of fall and the range ofthe motion as a function of the constant of resistance per unit mass of the projectile. We also prove that the time of fall isgreater than the time of rise with the exception of the case of zero constant of resistance where we have equality. Finally weprove a formula from which we can compute the constant of resistance per unit mass of the projectile from time of flight andrange of the motion when the acceleration due to gravity and the initial velocity of the projectile are known.

  9. Spatial consistency of neural firing regulates long-range local field potential synchronization: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki

    2015-02-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are thought to integrate neuronal processes within the range of a few millimeters of radius, which corresponds to the scale of multiple columns. In this study, the model of LFP in the visual cortex proposed by Mazzoni et al. (2008) was adapted to organize a network of two cortical areas, in which pyramidal neurons were divided into two sub-population modeling columns with spatially organized connections to neurons in other areas. Using the model enabled the relationship between neural firing and LFP to be evaluated, in addition to the LFP coherence between the two areas. Results showed that: (1) neurons in a particular sub-population generated the LFP in the area; (2) the spatial consistency of neural firing in the two areas was strongly correlated with LFP coherence; and (3) this consistency was capable of regulating LFP coherence in a lower frequency band, which was originally introduced to neurons in a particular sub-population. These results were derived from a winner-take-all operation in the columnar structure; thus, they are expected to be common in the cortex. It is suggested that the spatial consistency of neural firing is essential for regulating long-range LFP synchronization, which would facilitate neuronal integration processes over multiple cortical areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring Relativistic effects in the field of the Earth with Laser Ranged Satellites and the LARASE research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) research program is to obtain refined tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) by means of very precise measurements of the round-trip time among a number of ground stations of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) network and a set of geodetic satellites. These measurements are guaranteed by means of the powerful and precise Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technique. In particular, a big effort of LARASE is dedicated to improve the dynamical models of the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and LARES satellites, with the objective to obtain a more precise and accurate determination of their orbit. These activities contribute to reach a final error budget that should be robust and reliable in the evaluation of the main systematic errors sources that come to play a major role in masking the relativistic precession on the orbit of these laser-ranged satellites. These error sources may be of gravitational and non-gravitational origin. It is important to stress that a more accurate and precise orbit determination, based on more reliable dynamical models, represents a fundamental prerequisite in order to reach a sub-mm precision in the root-mean-square of the SLR range residuals and, consequently, to gather benefits in the fields of geophysics and space geodesy, such as stations coordinates knowledge, geocenter determination and the realization of the Earth's reference frame. The results reached over the last year will be presented in terms of the improvements achieved in the dynamical model, in the orbit determination and, finally, in the measurement of the relativistic precessions that act on the orbit of the satellites considered.

  11. Modelling of diesel spray flame under engine-like conditions using an accelerated eulerian stochastic fields method: A convergence study of the number of stochastic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Jangi, Mehdi; Bai, X.-S.

    combustion under engine-like conditions.The current work aims to further evaluate the performance of the ESF model in this application, with an emphasis on examining the convergence of the number of stochastic fields, nsf. Five test conditions, covering both the conventional diesel combustion and low......The use of transported Probability Density Function(PDF) methods allows a single model to compute the autoignition, premixed mode and diffusion flame of diesel combustion under engine-like conditions [1,2]. The Lagrangian particle based transported PDF models have been validated across a wide range...... generated similar results. The principal motivation for ESF compared to Lagrangian particle based PDF is the relative ease of implementation of the former into Eulerian computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes [5]. Several works have attempted to implement the ESF model for the simulations of diesel spray...

  12. Performance analysis of a full-field and full-range swept-source OCT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauter, J.; Boettcher, T.; Körner, K.; Gronle, M.; Osten, W.; Passilly, N.; Froehly, L.; Perrin, S.; Gorecki, C.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, optical coherence tomography (OCT) became gained importance in medical disciplines like ophthalmology, due to its noninvasive optical imaging technique with micrometer resolution and short measurement time. It enables e. g. the measurement and visualization of the depth structure of the retina. In other medical disciplines like dermatology, histopathological analysis is still the gold standard for skin cancer diagnosis. The EU-funded project VIAMOS (Vertically Integrated Array-type Mirau-based OCT System) proposes a new type of OCT system combined with micro-technologies to provide a hand-held, low-cost and miniaturized OCT system. The concept is a combination of full-field and full-range swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) detection in a multi-channel sensor based on a micro-optical Mirau-interferometer array, which is fabricated by means of wafer fabrication. This paper presents the study of an experimental proof-of-concept OCT system as a one-channel sensor with bulk optics. This sensor is a Linnik-interferometer type with similar optical parameters as the Mirau-interferometer array. A commercial wavelength tunable light source with a center wavelength at 845nm and 50nm spectral bandwidth is used with a camera for parallel OCT A-Scan detection. In addition, the reference microscope objective lens of the Linnik-interferometer is mounted on a piezo-actuated phase-shifter. Phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) techniques are applied for resolving the conjugate complex artifact and consequently contribute to an increase of image quality and depth range. A suppression ratio of the complex conjugate term of 36 dB is shown and a system sensitivity greater than 96 dB could be measured.

  13. Asymptotic approximation of laminar lubrication thermal field at low reduced peclet and Brinkman number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per; Roemer, Daniel Beck; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2014-01-01

    A conventional simplification of the thermal problem in fluid film lubrication analysis is performed by assuming that the main direction of heat flow is conduction through the film thickness, and thereby neglecting convection. However, in a significant amount of applications, convection is not ne......A conventional simplification of the thermal problem in fluid film lubrication analysis is performed by assuming that the main direction of heat flow is conduction through the film thickness, and thereby neglecting convection. However, in a significant amount of applications, convection...... is not negligible, whereby the majority of design engineers exclusively use numerical solvers. This paper presents a perturbation series expansion of the temperature field for small values of the Brinkman number. The derived perturbation solution and the more conventional analytical solution, where convection...

  14. An intercomparison of POLARIS measurement results from the DTU-ESA Facility and from the ESTEC Near-Field Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    This report documents an intercomparison of measurement results of the POLARIS antenna from measurement at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility in August 2011 and from measurement at the ESTEC Near-Field Range in the fall 2012. The comparison was carried out at the DTU-ESA Facil......This report documents an intercomparison of measurement results of the POLARIS antenna from measurement at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility in August 2011 and from measurement at the ESTEC Near-Field Range in the fall 2012. The comparison was carried out at the DTU...

  15. Acoustic and Seismic Fields of Hydraulic Jumps at Varying Froude Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Timothy J.; Lees, Jonathan M.; Mikesell, T. Dylan; Anderson, Jacob F.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.

    2017-10-01

    Mechanisms that produce seismic and acoustic wavefields near rivers are poorly understood because of a lack of observations relating temporally dependent river conditions to the near-river seismoacoustic fields. This controlled study at the Harry W. Morrison Dam (HWMD) on the Boise River, Idaho, explores how temporal variation in fluvial systems affects surrounding acoustic and seismic fields. Adjusting the configuration of the HWMD changed the river bathymetry and therefore the form of the standing wave below the dam. The HWMD was adjusted to generate four distinct wave regimes that were parameterized through their dimensionless Froude numbers (Fr) and observations of the ambient seismic and acoustic wavefields at the study site. To generate detectable and coherent signals, a standing wave must exceed a threshold Fr value of 1.7, where a nonbreaking undular jump turns into a breaking weak hydraulic jump. Hydrodynamic processes may partially control the spectral content of the seismic and acoustic energies. Furthermore, spectra related to reproducible wave conditions can be used to calibrate and verify fluvial seismic and acoustic models.

  16. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predicting Short-Range Order in Multicomponent Alloys from an Improved Mean-Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Johnson, Duane

    2007-03-01

    In alloys the atomic short-range order (SRO) indicates the nascent ordering to which the disordered alloy is tending at high temperatures. Direct first-principles prediction based upon KKR-CPA and mean-field thermodynamics have been successful in predicting system-specific SRO [1], if, at a minimum, corrections are included to satisfy the diffuse scattering sum rule in k-space. However, such models do not account for k-dependence of the corrections. Here, we present an analytic generalization to multicomponent alloys that includes ``cyclic diagrams'' [2,3] for composition, temperature, and k-dependent corrections to SRO. We first explore the improvement to SRO in model fcc ternary alloys via the generalized Ising model. We find that there is much better agreement to Monte Carlo simulations than with standard Bragg-Williams with(out) Onsager corrections. Then we implement this within the KKR-CPA linear-response theory of SRO.Work was supported by DOE (Award DEFG02-03ER46026 and NSF (DMR-0325939). [1] J.B. Staunton, D.D. Johnson, and F.J. Pinski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1259 (1990); Phys. Rev. B 50, 1450 (1994); ibid, 57, 15177 (1998). [2] R. Brout, Phys. Rev. 115, 824-835 (1959). [3] R.V. Chepulski, et al, Phys. Rev. 65, 064201-7 (2002).

  18. a Comparison of Close-Range Photogrammetry Using a Non-Professional Camerawith Field Surveying for Vplume Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Rastiveis, H.

    2017-09-01

    Rapid and accurate volume calculation is one of the most important requirements in many applications such as construction and mining industries. The accuracy of a calculated volume depends on the number of collected points on the object. Increasing the number of measured points undoubtedly requires higher cost and time. On the other hand, collecting surveying points might sometimes be difficult, dangerous or impossible. The aim of this study is to evaluate the close range photogrammetry (CRP) using a non-professional camera for DEM generation in comparison to the traditional field surveying technique (TST). For this purpose, a test area in Deralok hydropower planet site was considered and the process of DEM extraction in both methods was compared. The obtained results showed that although the CRP method in contrast with TST method was more time consuming, however, this method was able to successfully measure negative slops and berms and, consequently, calculated more accurate volume. Moreover, the relative error of 0.2% was reported.

  19. Approximate expressions for lightning electromagnetic fields at near and far ranges: Influence of return-stroke speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yazhou; Wang, Xiaojia; Rakov, Vladimir A.

    2015-04-01

    The waveforms of lightning return-stroke electromagnetic fields on ground are studied using the transmission line model. Approximate expressions to calculate lightning electromagnetic fields at near and far ranges are presented. It is found that the waveforms of lightning electric and magnetic fields in the time domain at both near and far ranges can be expressed approximately as the channel-base current waveform multiplied by a factor which is a function of the return-stroke speed v and the horizontal distance r between the return-stroke channel and the observation point on ground. The ranges at which the approximate expressions are valid are determined. The ranges of validity increase with increasing the return-stroke speed, and the near and far field approximate expressions converge to the exact formula as the return-stroke speed approaches the speed of light.

  20. Extended Closed-form Expressions for the Robust Symmetrical Number System Dynamic Range and an Efficient Algorithm for its Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    ending position, Stop Case of M̂ is Case 220. The value of m was plotted against the value of M̂ , and the data was curve fitted to a quadratic polynomial ...kth prime . It is well–known (and easily derivable by using the prime number theorem [17]) that PN# = exp[(1 + o(1))n log n]. Assume N ≥ 6. It is...Theory IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. XX, NO. XX, MONTH YEAR 1 Extended Closed-form Expressions for the Robust Symmetrical Number

  1. Measured electric field intensities near electric cloud discharges detected by the Kennedy Space Center's Lightning Detection and Ranging System, LDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    For a summer thunderstorm, for which simultaneous, airborne electric field measurements and Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System data was available, measurements were coordinated to present a picture of the electric field intensity near cloud electrical discharges detected by the LDAR System. Radar precipitation echos from NOAA's 10 cm weather radar and measured airborne electric field intensities were superimposed on LDAR PPI plots to present a coordinated data picture of thunderstorm activity.

  2. Group velocity effect on resonant, long-range wake-fields in slow wave structures

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    Synchronous wake-fields in a dispersive waveguide are derived in a general explicit form on the basis of a rigorous electro-dynamical approach using Fourier transformations. The fundamental role of group velocity in wake-field propagation, calculation of attenuation, amplitudes, form-factors and loss-factors is analyzed for single bunch radiation. Adiabatic tapering of the waveguide and bunch density variation is taken into account analytically for the time-domain fields. Effects of field 'compression/expansion' and group delays are demonstrated. The role of these effects is discussed for single bunch wake-fields, transient beam loading, BBU and HOMs. A novel waveguide structure with central rf coupling and both positive and negative velocities is proposed. It can be used effectively in both high-energy accelerators and single-section linacs.

  3. Exact simulation of Brown-Resnick random fields at a finite number of locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieker, Ton; Mikosch, Thomas Valentin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an exact simulation method for Brown-Resnick random fields, building on new representations for these stationary max-stable fields. The main idea is to apply suitable changes of measure....

  4. Range Detection of the Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Produced by Laptop's AC Adapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodić, Darko; Amelio, Alessia

    2017-02-01

    Human exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic field represents a risk to their health. This paper takes into consideration the level of an extremely low-frequency magnetic field between 30 and 300 Hz emitted by an AC laptop adapter. The experiment consists of testing 17 different AC adapters for laptops. During the testing, laptops are operated in a normal operating conditions as well as under heavy load. The magnetic field measurement is conducted in the area around the AC adapter. Obtained data is evaluated according to the critical level of the magnetic field proposed by safety standards. Furthermore, data is classified by a K-medians method in order to determine the critical levels of the magnetic field exposure in the nearby area of the AC adapter. Obtained classifications are evaluated according to safety standards, giving a critical analysis of magnetic field areas at risk. Due to emission of a very strong magnetic field in certain areas, a recommendation for safety use of the AC adapter is proposed.

  5. Magnetic field concentration with coaxial silicon nanocylinders in the optical spectral range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baryshnikova, Kseniia V.; Novitsky, Andrey; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2017-01-01

    Possibility of magnetic energy accumulation inside silicon nanoparticles atthe conditions of resonant optical responses is investigated theoretically. Themagnetic field distributions inside silicon nanocylinders with and withoutcoaxial through holes are calculated using full-wave numerical approach....... It isdemonstrated that such systems can be used for control and manipulation ofoptical magnetic fields providing their enhancement up to 26 times at thecondition of optical resonances. Obtained results can be used for realizationof nanoantennas and nanolasers, in which magnetic optical transitions playsignificant...

  6. Photon Number-Phase Uncertainty Relation in the Evolution of the Field in a Kerr-Like Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, An-Fu; Sun, Nian-Chun

    1996-01-01

    A model of a single-mode field, initially prepared in a coherent state, coupled to a two-level atom surrounded by a nonlinear Kerr-like medium contained inside a very good quality cavity is considered. We derive the photon number-phase uncertainty relation in the evolution of the field for a weak and strong nonlinear coupling respectively, within the Hermitian phase operator formalism of Pegg and Barnett, and discuss the effects of nonlinear coupling of the Kerr-like medium on photon number-phase uncertainty relation of the field.

  7. Estimation of Kubo number and correlation length of fluctuating magnetic fields and pressure in BOUT + + edge pedestal collapse simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Lee, W.-J.; Jhang, Hogun; Kaang, H. H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2017-10-01

    Stochastic magnetic fields are thought to be as one of the possible mechanisms for anomalous transport of density, momentum and heat across the magnetic field lines. Kubo number and Chirikov parameter are quantifications of the stochasticity, and previous studies show that perpendicular transport strongly depends on the magnetic Kubo number (MKN). If MKN is smaller than one, diffusion process will follow Rechester-Rosenbluth model; whereas if it is larger than one, percolation theory dominates the diffusion process. Thus, estimation of Kubo number plays an important role to understand diffusion process caused by stochastic magnetic fields. However, spatially localized experimental measurement of fluctuating magnetic fields in a tokamak is difficult, and we attempt to estimate MKNs using BOUT + + simulation data with pedestal collapse. In addition, we calculate correlation length of fluctuating pressures and Chirikov parameters to investigate variation correlation lengths in the simulation. We, then, discuss how one may experimentally estimate MKNs.

  8. Simulation of electron transport in GaAs/AlAs superlattices with a small number of periods for the THz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavelyev, D. G., E-mail: pavelev@rf.unn.ru, E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Vasilev, A. P., E-mail: vasiljev@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Submicron Heterostructures for Microelectronics, Research and Engineering Center (Russian Federation); Kozlov, V. A., E-mail: kozlov@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Koschurinov, Yu. I.; Obolenskaya, E. S.; Obolensky, S. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M., E-mail: vmust@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The electron transport in superlattices based on GaAs/AlAs heterostructures with a small number of periods (6 periods) is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. These superlattices are used in terahertz diodes for the frequency stabilization of quantum cascade lasers in the range up to 4.7 THz. The band structure of superlattices with different numbers of AlAs monolayers is considered and their current–voltage characteristics are calculated. The calculated current–voltage characteristics are compared with the experimental data. The possibility of the efficient application of these superlattices in the THz frequency range is established both theoretically and experimentally.

  9. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Open Field Scoring Record Number 229

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry, Jr; Boutin, Matthew; Fling, Rick; McClung, Christina; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. The scoring record was coordinated by Larry Overbay and by the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  10. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record Number 740

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Jr., Larry; Fling, Rick; McClug, Christina; Watts, Kimberly; Banta, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The objective in the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Program is to evaluate the detection and discrimination capabilities of a given technology under various field and soil conditions...

  11. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record Number 673 (Naval Research Laboratories)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. Scoring Records have been coordinate by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  12. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site, Open Field Scoring Record Number 657

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. Scoring Records have been coordinated by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  13. Is the Field of Numbers a Real Physical Field? On the Frequent Distribution and Masses of the Elementary Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequent distributions of the databases of the numerical values obtained by resolving algorithms, which describe physical and other processes, give a possibility for bonding the probability of that results the algorithms get. In the frequent distribution of the fractions of integers (rational numbers, local maxima which meet the ratios of masses of the elementary particles have been found.

  14. Is the Field of Numbers a Real Physical Field? On the Frequent Distribution and Masses of the Elementary Patricles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyakov A. V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Frequent distributions of the databases of the numerical values obtained by resolving algorithms, which describe physical and other processes, give a possibility for bonding the probability of that results the algorithms get. In the frequent distribution of the fractions of integers (rational numbers, local maxima which meet the ratios of masses of the elementary particles have been found.

  15. where σ is a dimensionless number in ppm, B is the field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    hydrophobic environment of the protons in TMS. The small .... the sort of fields experienced in zeolites but for protons the fields where B is important are too large to ... Strong zeolite. 0.019. 1. [43]. Valence electrons. 0.117. 6. [43]. SCF calculations of A were obtained for the protons CH3OH(*) and CH3NH2. (*) using the cc-.

  16. Remote Detection of Climate Change Indicators in the Mission Mountain Range: Tracking Ice Field Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifford, C. N.; Kenning, R.; Carlson, M.; Rock, B. N.

    2010-12-01

    This study compared Landsat images over a 22-year span from 1987-2009 to map the change in size of the McDonald snow and ice fields in the Mission Mountains on the Flathead Reservation. Our hypothesis was that a variation in snow and ice field size can be used as an indicator of climate change on a local level. This hypothesis proved true. Analyzing snow and ice field acreage from 8 Landsat images representing September dates from different years (1987, 1990, 1991, 1994, 2005, 2007, 2008, and 2009) created with MultiSpec and ArcMap, we then created a sum of acres for each year that yielded a slight downward trend in area of snow and ice fields. The study found an upward trend in the average temperature for the month of September over a 100-year span (1909- 2009) of approximately 2.0o F, from 55o F to more than 57o F. Calculations of snow and ice field area were made from a Normalized Difference Snow and Ice Index (NDSII) of the September months’ ice/snow cover, using Multispec, and attribute table measures of those areas in ArcMap. Years 1990 and 1991 showed 738 and 700 acres, respectively; in the current decade the largest acreage was in 2005 with 531 acres and the lowest was in 2007 at 232 acres. I conclude that using remote sensing methods prove a reliable source for analyzing land cover such as snow and ice. Cloud cover remains a constant issue in acquiring usable data due to interference from clouds. Graphing the analyzed data from the 8 Landsat scenes shows a slight downward trend (Formula y = -4.6802x + 515.84 R2 = 0.0494).

  17. Field report: Exploring the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range, Alaska, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin V. Strauss

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Alaska is a ‘suspect’ terrane that encompasses approximately 20% of Alaska, stretching from the southern Brooks Range all the way to the continental shelves of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Although the origin and subsequent travels of this large crustal fragment are debated among geologists, most researchers agree upon its composite nature and exotic origin. To constrain the early geological history of this terrane, we describe a recent expedition to the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range. This area has long been regarded as a key locality for understanding the structural evolution of the Mesozoic–Cenozoic Brooks Range orogen; however, our target was different: a unique sequence of volcanic and siliciclastic rocks (Apoon assemblage exposed beneath a profound pre-Mississippian unconformity, which we argue is of key importance to understanding the early Paleozoic tectonic history of northern Alaska and the greater Arctic.

  18. Experimental study on stabilizing range extension of diamagnetic levitation under modulated magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, T C S; Wong, P L; Liu, K P, E-mail: 50578230@student.cityu.edu.h, E-mail: meplwong@cityu.edu.h, E-mail: mekpliu@cityu.edu.h [Manufacturing Engineering and Engineering Management Department, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-01-01

    The real energy-free levitation exists with the help of diamagnetic material. Its ultra-high sensitivity to force is particularly attractive to micro/nano force sensing. A key parameter: Levitation Stabilizing Local Range, LR (allowable moving range of the floater) is critical to the load and self-rotating performance. Besides, larger LR reduces the energy loss due to the eddy current and has greater application potential. Recently, an idea of extending the LR by a modulating coil array has been validated using numerical simulation. This paper takes the next move to carry out an experimental study on the shape effect of stacked coil arrays with different currents on LR.

  19. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tomsk state Pedagogical University Tomsk 634041 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-27

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  20. Short-range dynamics and prediction of mesoscale flow patterns in the MISTRAL field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O.; Kaufmann, P.; Talkner, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In a limited area of about 50 km by 50 km with complex topography, wind measurements on a dense network were performed during the MISTRAL field experiment in 1991-1992. From these data the characteristic wind fields were identified by an automated classification method. The dynamics of the resulting twelve typical regional flow patterns is studied. It is discussed how transitions between the flow patterns take place and how well the transition probabilities can be described in the framework of a Markov model. Guided by this discussion, a variety of prediction models were tested which allow a short-term forecast of the flow pattern type. It is found that a prediction model which uses forecast information from the synoptic scale has the best forecast skill. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  1. Escape factors for thermionic cathodes in atomic gases in a wide electric field range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, M. S.; Naidis, G. V.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M.; Stojkovic, A.

    2006-07-01

    An approximate analytical expression is obtained for the escape factors for thermionically emitting cathodes in atomic gases that is uniformly valid at all values of the reduced electric field. This expression is used for evaluation of the escape factors in neon, helium and mercury. An independent evaluation is performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical results are in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations, both for reflecting and non-reflecting cathodes.

  2. Escape factors for thermionic cathodes in atomic gases in a wide electric field range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal); Naidis, G V [Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Petrovic, Z Lj [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Stojkovic, A [Institute of Physics, POB 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2006-07-21

    An approximate analytical expression is obtained for the escape factors for thermionically emitting cathodes in atomic gases that is uniformly valid at all values of the reduced electric field. This expression is used for evaluation of the escape factors in neon, helium and mercury. An independent evaluation is performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical results are in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations, both for reflecting and non-reflecting cathodes.

  3. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min/sup -1/ can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected.

  4. Former Spencer Artillery Range, Tennessee Classification Demonstration Open Field and Dynamic Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    capabilities of the production community by enhancing and streamlining UX -Analyze’s workflow and functionality; by offering training documents...Inc. UXA UX -Analyze List of Figures Figure 3-1: Spencer Range Open Area Metal Mapper ROC Curve ............................................... 5...easting and horizontal is less than 0.1 meter. Statistics calculations are part of the Geosoft UX -Analyze (UXA) process module for IVS and include, in

  5. Relation of short-range and long-range lithium ion dynamics in glass-ceramics: Insights from 7Li NMR field-cycling and field-gradient studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaks, Michael; Martin, Steve W.; Vogel, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We use various 7Li NMR methods to investigate lithium ion dynamics in 70Li 2S-30 P 2S5 glass and glass-ceramic obtained from this glass after heat treatment. We employ 7Li spin-lattice relaxometry, including field-cycling measurements, and line-shape analysis to investigate short-range ion jumps as well as 7Li field-gradient approaches to characterize long-range ion diffusion. The results show that ceramization substantially enhances the lithium ion mobility on all length scales. For the 70Li 2S-30 P 2S5 glass-ceramic, no evidence is found that bimodal dynamics result from different ion mobilities in glassy and crystalline regions of this sample. Rather, 7Li field-cycling relaxometry shows that dynamic susceptibilities in broad frequency and temperature ranges can be described by thermally activated jumps governed by a Gaussian distribution of activation energies g (Ea) with temperature-independent mean value Em=0.43 eV and standard deviation σ =0.07 eV . Moreover, use of this distribution allows us to rationalize 7Li line-shape results for the local ion jumps. In addition, this information about short-range ion dynamics further explains 7Li field-gradient results for long-range ion diffusion. In particular, we quantitatively show that, consistent with our experimental results, the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient D is not described by the mean activation energy Em of the local ion jumps, but by a significantly smaller apparent value whenever the distribution of correlation times G (logτ ) of the jump motion derives from an invariant distribution of activation energies and, hence, continuously broadens upon cooling. This effect occurs because the harmonic mean, which determines the results of diffusivity or also conductivity studies, continuously separates from the peak position of G (logτ ) when the width of this distribution increases.

  6. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  7. Searching for the Haplorrhine Heterotherm: Field and Laboratory Data of Free-Ranging Tarsiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Welman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The observation of heterothermy in a single suborder (Strepsirrhini only within the primates is puzzling. Given that the placental-mammal ancestor was likely a heterotherm, we explored the potential for heterothermy in a primate closely related to the Strepsirrhini. Based upon phylogeny, body size and habitat stability since the Late Eocene, we selected western tarsiers (Cephalopachus bancanus from the island of Borneo. Being the sister clade to Strepsirrhini and basal in Haplorrhini (monkeys and apes, we hypothesized that C. bancanus might have retained the heterothermic capacity observed in several small strepsirrhines. We measured resting metabolic rate, subcutaneous temperature, evaporative water loss and the percentage of heat dissipated through evaporation, at ambient temperatures between 22 and 35°C in fresh-caught wild animals (126.1 ± 2.4 g. We also measured core body temperatures in free-ranging animals. The thermoneutral zone was 25–30°C and the basal metabolic rate was 3.52 ± 0.06 W.kg−1 (0.65 ± 0.01 ml O2.g−1.h−1. There was no evidence of adaptive heterothermy in either the laboratory data or the free-ranging data. Instead, animals appeared to be cold sensitive (Tb ~ 31°C at the lowest temperatures. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent lack of heterothermy in tarsiers, and identify putative heterotherms within Platyrrhini. We also document our concern for the vulnerability of C. bancanus to future temperature increases associated with global warming.

  8. Human exposure to pulsed fields in the frequency range from 6 to 100 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Morimoto, Ryota; Heinonen, Juhani; Jokela, Kari; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-09-01

    Restrictions on human exposure to electromagnetic waves at frequencies higher than 3-10 GHz are defined in terms of the incident power density to prevent excessive temperature rise in superficial tissue. However, international standards and guidelines differ in their definitions of how the power density is interpreted for brief exposures. This study investigated how the temperature rise was affected by exposure duration at frequencies higher than 6 GHz. Far-field exposure of the human face to pulses shorter than 10 s at frequencies from 6 to 100 GHz was modelled using the finite-difference time-domain method. The bioheat transfer equation was used for thermal modelling. We investigated the effects of frequency, polarization, exposure duration, and depth below the skin surface on the temperature rise. The results indicated limitations in the current human exposure guidelines and showed that radiant exposure, i.e. energy absorption per unit area, can be used to limit temperature rise for pulsed exposure. The data are useful for the development of human exposure guidelines at frequencies higher than 6 GHz.

  9. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

  10. Cosmological baryon-number domain structure from symmetry breaking in grand unified field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big bang can lead more naturally to a baryon-symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon-asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  11. Cosmological baryon number domain structure from symmetry-breaking in grand unified field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big-bang can lead more naturally to a baryon symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  12. Control of Chiral Magnetism Through Electric Fields in Multiferroic Compounds above the Long-Range Multiferroic Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, J; Baum, M; Holbein, S; Finger, T; Cronert, T; Tölzer, C; Fröhlich, T; Biesenkamp, S; Schmalzl, K; Steffens, P; Lee, C H; Braden, M

    2017-10-27

    Polarized neutron scattering experiments reveal that type-II multiferroics allow for controlling the spin chirality by external electric fields even in the absence of long-range multiferroic order. In the two prototype compounds TbMnO_{3} and MnWO_{4}, chiral magnetism associated with soft overdamped electromagnons can be observed above the long-range multiferroic transition temperature T_{MF}, and it is possible to control it through an electric field. While MnWO_{4} exhibits chiral correlations only in a tiny temperature interval above T_{MF}, in TbMnO_{3} chiral magnetism can be observed over several kelvin up to the lock-in transition, which is well separated from T_{MF}.

  13. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (H c2 ) and critical temperature (T c ). The critical current (I c ) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new I c measurement system that can carry out accurate I c measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The I c measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) tapes I c determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  14. Listening for bats: the hearing range of the bushcricket Phaneroptera falcata for bat echolocation calls measured in the field.

    OpenAIRE

    Schul, J.; Matt, F; von Helversen, O

    2000-01-01

    The hearing range of the tettigoniid Phaneropterafalcata for the echolocation calls of freely flying mouseeared bats (Myotis myotis) was determined in the field. The hearing of the insect was monitored using hook electrode recordings from an auditory interneuron, which is as sensitive as the hearing organ for frequencies above 16 kHz. The flight path of the bat relative to the insect's position was tracked by recording the echolocation calls with two microphone arrays, and calculating the bat...

  15. A Comparison of Antenna Measurements in a Near-Field Range and a Newly Renovated Short-Tapered Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Research Laboratory’s (ARL) near-field range (NFR) and tapered anechoic chamber, which has been newly renovated with absorber material . ARL would like...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study was undertaken to quantify and compare electromagnetic device (i.e., antenna) measurements using the US Army...to know the performance levels with the NFR and the newly renovated, slightly different absorber layout configuration laid out and designed by the

  16. Study of high speed complex number algorithms. [for determining antenna for field radiation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of evaluating the radiation integral on the curved surface of a reflecting antenna is presented. A three dimensional Fourier transform approach is used to generate a two dimensional radiation cross-section along a planer cut at any angle phi through the far field pattern. Salient to the method is an algorithm for evaluating a subset of the total three dimensional discrete Fourier transform results. The subset elements are selectively evaluated to yield data along a geometric plane of constant. The algorithm is extremely efficient so that computation of the induced surface currents via the physical optics approximation dominates the computer time required to compute a radiation pattern. Application to paraboloid reflectors with off-focus feeds in presented, but the method is easily extended to offset antenna systems and reflectors of arbitrary shapes. Numerical results were computed for both gain and phase and are compared with other published work.

  17. Generalizations Of Two-dimensional Conformal Field Theory; Some Results On Jacobians And Intersection Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, W

    2000-01-01

    My dissertation consists of three different topics. In the first topic, I consider the generalizations of two dimensional genus zero or tree level conformal field theory to the setting of locally trivialized holomorphic vector bundles and principal GC -bundles over the Riemann sphere, where G is any connected and simply connected semi-simple Lie group G and GC is the complexification of G. With the sewing operations of bundles and the permutations of symmetric groups on the local trivializations, the moduli spaces of locally trivialized holomorphic vector bundles and principal GC -bundles over the Riemann sphere form analytic partial operads. First, we study the holomorphic operadic structure on the moduli spaces of locally trivialized holomorphic vector bundles and principal GC -bundles over the Riemann sphere and their relations with the loop groups, the group Dif f+(S 1) as well as the infinite dimensional Grassmannians. Secondly, we classify and construct explicitly all 1-dimensional modular functors over...

  18. Magnetic field amplification by small-scale dynamo action: dependence on turbulence models and Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-02-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus it is expected to depend crucially on the nature of the turbulence. In this paper, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(ℓ)proportional ℓ([symbol see text])V}, where ℓ and v(ℓ) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_{crit}, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is Rm(crit) (K) ≈ 110 and for Burgers turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/2) Rm(crit)(B) ≈ 2700. Furthermore, we derive that the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field for a general type of turbulence is Γ proportional Re((1-[symbol see text])/(1+[symbol see text])) in the limit of infinite magnetic Prandtl number. For decreasing magnetic Prandtl number (down to Pm >/~ 10), the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo decreases. The details of this drop depend on the WKB approximation, which becomes invalid for a magnetic Prandtl number of about unity.

  19. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  20. Designing an array for performing Near-field Acoustic Holography with a small number of p-u probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Comesaña, Daniel; Wen, Junjie; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2016-01-01

    , such approaches usually require that a large number of transducers is spatially distributed over the area of interest. This paper describes some practical considerations for the design and optimization of a compact sensor array for performing NAH with a small number of sound intensity p-u probes. Two sensor......Near-field acoustic holography (NAH) enables the reconstruction of an entire three-dimensional wave field using data acquired near the sources of sound. An array of sensors can be used in combination with NAH techniques for tackling both time-stationary and transient noise problems. However...... geometries based on hexagonal lattice and polar sampling are assessed and compared to a regular square grid via Monte Carlo simulations accounting for multiple source configurations. Results show that transducer placement plays an important role in the robustness and accuracy of the results, specially...

  1. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Yeow, John T.W., E-mail: jyeow@uwaterloo.ca [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10–200 keV and 1–20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  2. Comparison of Martian meteorites with earth composition: Study of effective atomic numbers in the energy range 1 keV-100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ün, Adem, E-mail: ademun25@yahoo.com; Han, İbrahim, E-mail: ibrahimhan25@hotmail.com [Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 04100 Ağrı (Turkey); Ün, Mümine, E-mail: mun@agri.edu.tr [Ağrı İbrahim Çeçen University, Vocational School, Department of Electricity and Energy, 04100 Ağrz (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Effective atomic (Z{sub eff}) and electron numbers (N{sub eff}) for 24 Martian meteorites have been determined in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV and also for sixteen significant energies of commonly used radioactive sources. The values of Z{sub eff} and N{sub eff} for all sample were obtained from the DirectZeff program. The obtained results for Martian meteorites have been compared with the results for Earth composition and similarities or differences also evaluated.

  3. Comment on 'Field ion microscopy characterized tips in noncontact atomic force microscopy: Quantification of long-range force interactions'

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, William; Grütter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A recent article by Falter et al. (Phys. Rev. B 87, 115412 (2013)) presents experimental results using field ion microscopy characterized tips in noncontact atomic force microscopy in order to characterize electrostatic and van der Waals long range forces. In the article, the tip radius was substantially underestimated at ~4.7 nm rather than ~8.1 nm due to subtleties in the application of the ring counting method. We point out where common errors in ring counting arise in order to benefit fut...

  4. Innovative Ideas for Developing Geophysics Field Schools in Classes with Small Numbers: Experience Gained from the AfricaArray/Wits Geophysics International Field School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Manzi, M. S.; Scheiber-Enslin, S. E.; Durrheim, R. J.; Nyblade, A.

    2016-12-01

    The geophysics program at Wits University has few students in its Honours program, making it difficult to run a fully-fledged field school. However, there is a dire need for field training both at Wits and throughout Africa. The solution is to expand the number of participants by taking additional students from Africa and the US. This has been sponsored by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and more recently UNESCO, and a variety of US NSF programs. More students make it efficient to acquire data using a variety of methods and provides for important networking and skills development. Expanding the number of participants means that more staff members are needed. In Africa, it is difficult to recruit corporate participants as volunteering for three weeks is simply too long to take off from work. Thus university academic staff must commit on an ongoing basis and this can lead to burnout. The timing of the field school is during prime research field time and the results are difficult to publish. The solution has been to use graduate students as instructors. This has turned out to be a valuable experience for graduate students; one or two graduate students are assigned to each method and they take on the responsibility of preparing lectures, equipment, software and computers. Thus the program has developed into a two tier training program, whereby Honours students participate as students with the objective of collecting data and writing a company style report and graduate students participate as instructors. Graduate students participate for one or two years and the payment is mitigated as they are required to work a number of hours for the department. This has led to the establishment of a vibrant network of young geophysicists throughout Africa and the US.

  5. Multi-Range Conditional Random Field for Classifying Railway Electrification System Objects Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewook Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Railways have been used as one of the most crucial means of transportation in public mobility and economic development. For safe railway operation, the electrification system in the railway infrastructure, which supplies electric power to trains, is an essential facility for stable train operation. Due to its important role, the electrification system needs to be rigorously and regularly inspected and managed. This paper presents a supervised learning method to classify Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS data into ten target classes representing overhead wires, movable brackets and poles, which are key objects in the electrification system. In general, the layout of the railway electrification system shows strong spatial regularity relations among object classes. The proposed classifier is developed based on Conditional Random Field (CRF, which characterizes not only labeling homogeneity at short range, but also the layout compatibility between different object classes at long range in the probabilistic graphical model. This multi-range CRF model consists of a unary term and three pairwise contextual terms. In order to gain computational efficiency, MLS point clouds are converted into a set of line segments to which the labeling process is applied. Support Vector Machine (SVM is used as a local classifier considering only node features for producing the unary potentials of the CRF model. As the short-range pairwise contextual term, the Potts model is applied to enforce a local smoothness in the short-range graph; while long-range pairwise potentials are designed to enhance the spatial regularities of both horizontal and vertical layouts among railway objects. We formulate two long-range pairwise potentials as the log posterior probability obtained by the naive Bayes classifier. The directional layout compatibilities are characterized in probability look-up tables, which represent the co-occurrence rate of spatial relations in the horizontal and vertical

  6. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos, E-mail: triantafillos.koukoulas@npl.co.uk; Piper, Ben [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  7. The influence of excitation number of photon-added coherent state field on the entanglement swapping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Pakniat, R.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we outline a scheme for the entanglement swapping procedure based on cavity quantum electrodynamics using the Jaynes-Cummings model consisting of the coherent and photon-added coherent states. In particular, utilizing the photon-added coherent states (|α,m〉≃â†m|α〉, where |α〉 is the Glauber coherent state) in the scheme, enables us to investigate the effect of m, i.e., the number of excitations corresponding to the photon-added coherent field on the entanglement swapping process. In the scheme, two two-level atoms A1 and A2 are initially entangled together, and distinctly two exploited cavity fields F1 and F2 are prepared in an entangled state (a combination of coherent and photon-added coherent states). Interacting the atom A2 with field F1 (via the Jaynes-Cummings model) and then making detection on them, transfers the entanglement from the two atoms A1, A2 and the two fields F1, F2 to the atom-field “A1-F2”, i.e., entanglement swapping occurs. In the continuation, we pay our attention to the evaluation of the fidelity of the swapped entangled state relative to a suitable maximally entangled state, success probability of the performed detections and linear entropy as the degree of entanglement of the swapped entangled state. It is demonstrated that, an increase in the number of excitations, m, leads to the increment of fidelity as well as the amount of entanglement. According to our numerical results, the maximum values of fidelity (linear entropy) 0.98 (0.46) is obtained for m = 9, however, the maximum value of success probability does not significantly change by increasing m.

  8. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  9. The effects of field-of-view and patient size on CT numbers from cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seet, Katrina Y. T.; Barghi, Arvand; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for patient alignment before treatment and is ideal for use in adaptive radiotherapy to account for tumor shrinkage, organ deformation and weight loss. However, CBCT images are prone to artifacts such as streaking and cupping effects, reducing image quality and CT number accuracy. Our goal was to determine the optimum combination of cone-beam imaging options to increase the accuracy of image CT numbers. Several phantoms with and without inserts of known relative electron densities were imaged using the Varian on-board imaging system. It was found that CT numbers are most influenced by the selection of field-of-view and are dependent on object size and filter type. Image acquisition in half-fan mode consistently produced more accurate CT numbers, regardless of phantom size. Values measured using full-fan mode can differ by up to 7% from planning CT values. No differences were found between CT numbers of all phantom images with low and standard dose modes.

  10. Measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with the extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometer at high-energy mixed fields

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00406842; Bay, Aurelio; Silari, Marco; Aroua, Abbas

    The use of spectrometry to provide information for neutron radiation protection has become an increasingly important activity over recent years. The need for spectral data arises because neither area survey instruments nor personal dosimeters give the correct dose equivalent results at all neutron energies. It is important therefore to know the spectra of the fields in which these devices are used. One of the systems most commonly employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry is the Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS). The extended- range BSS that was used for this work, consists of 7 spheres with an overall response to neutrons up to 2 GeV. A 3He detector is used as a thermal counter in the centre of each sphere. In the context of this thesis the BSS was calibrated in monoenergetic neutron fields at low and intermediate energies. It was also used for measurements in several high energy mixed fields. These measurements have led to the calculation of neutron yields and spectral fluences from unshielded targets....

  11. Shortcuts to Adiabaticity in the Infinite-Range Ising Model by Mean-Field Counter-Diabatic Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatomura, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The strategy of shortcuts to adiabaticity enables us to realize adiabatic dynamics in finite time. In the counter-diabatic driving approach, an auxiliary Hamiltonian which is called the counter-diabatic Hamiltonian is appended to an original Hamiltonian to cancel out diabatic transitions. The counter-diabatic Hamiltonian is constructed by using the eigenstates of the original Hamiltonian. Therefore, it is in general difficult to construct the counter-diabatic Hamiltonian for quantum many-body systems. Even if the counter-diabatic Hamiltonian for quantum many-body systems is obtained, it is generally non-local and even diverges at critical points. We construct an approximated counter-diabatic Hamiltonian for the infinite-range Ising model by making use of the mean-field approximation. An advantage of this method is that the mean-field counter-diabatic Hamiltonian is constructed by only local operators. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of this method through quantum annealing processes going the vicinity of the critical point. It is also confirmed that the mean-field counter-diabatic Hamiltonian is still well-defined in the limit to the critical point for a certain class of schedules. The present method can take higher order contributions into account and is consistent with the variational approach for local counter-diabatic driving.

  12. The CIRCORT database: Reference ranges and seasonal changes in diurnal salivary cortisol derived from a meta-dataset comprised of 15 field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert; Stalder, Tobias; Jarczok, Marc; Almeida, David M.; Badrick, Ellena; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Coe, Christopher L.; Dekker, Marieke C. J.; Donzella, Bonny; Fischer, Joachim E.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Kumari, Meena; Lederbogen, Florian; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Power, Christine; Rosmalen, Judith G.; Ryff, Carol D.; Subramanian, S V; Tiemeier, Henning; Watamura, Sarah E.; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal salivary cortisol profiles are valuable indicators of adrenocortical functioning in epidemiological research and clinical practice. However, normative reference values derived from a large number of participants and across a wide age range are still missing. To fill this gap, data were compiled from 15 independently conducted field studies with a total of 104,623 salivary cortisol samples obtained from 18,698 unselected individuals (mean age: 48.3 years, age range: 0.5 to 98.5 years, 39% females). Besides providing a descriptive analysis of the complete dataset, we also performed mixed-effects growth curve modeling of diurnal salivary cortisol (i.e., 1 to 16 hours after awakening). Cortisol decreased significantly across the day and was influenced by both, age and sex. Intriguingly, we also found a pronounced impact of sampling season with elevated diurnal cortisol in spring and decreased levels in autumn. However, the majority of variance was accounted for by between-participant and between-study variance components. Based on these analyses, reference ranges (LC/MS-MS calibrated) for cortisol concentrations in saliva were derived for different times across the day, with more specific reference ranges generated for males and females in different age categories. This integrative summary provides important reference values on salivary cortisol to aid basic scientists and clinicians in interpreting deviations from the normal diurnal cycle. PMID:27448524

  13. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  14. Calculation of Friction Coefficient and Analysis of Fluid Flow in a Stepped Micro-Channel for Wide Range of Knudsen Number Using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bakhshan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro scale gas flows has attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in the stepped micro-channel at a wide range of Knudsen number has been analyzed with using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT method. In the model, a modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow and to gain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. It includes the slip and transition regimes of flow. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, streamline and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel as below: C_f Re  = 3.113+2.915/(1 +2 Kn+ 0.641 exp⁡(3.203/(1 + 2 Kn

  15. Calculation of friction coefficient and analysis of fluid flow in a stepped micro-channel for wide range of Knudsen number using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshan, Younes; Omidvar, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Micro scale gas flows have attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in a stepped micro-channel has been conducted. Wide range of Knudsen number has been implemented using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method in this study. A modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow to obtain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, stream lines and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show, good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows, that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient value. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel flows as below;

  16. Grammatical number agreement processing using the visual half-field paradigm: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmer, Laura; Coulson, Seana; Kutas, Marta

    2014-02-01

    Despite indications in the split-brain and lesion literatures that the right hemisphere is capable of some syntactic analysis, few studies have investigated right hemisphere contributions to syntactic processing in people with intact brains. Here we used the visual half-field paradigm in healthy adults to examine each hemisphere's processing of correct and incorrect grammatical number agreement marked either lexically, e.g., antecedent/reflexive pronoun ("The grateful niece asked herself/*themselves…") or morphologically, e.g., subject/verb ("Industrial scientists develop/*develops…"). For reflexives, response times and accuracy of grammaticality decisions suggested similar processing regardless of visual field of presentation. In the subject/verb condition, we observed similar response times and accuracies for central and right visual field (RVF) presentations. For left visual field (LVF) presentation, response times were longer and accuracy rates were reduced relative to RVF presentation. An event-related brain potential (ERP) study using the same materials revealed similar ERP responses to the reflexive pronouns in the two visual fields, but very different ERP effects to the subject/verb violations. For lexically marked violations on reflexives, P600 was elicited by stimuli in both the LVF and RVF; for morphologically marked violations on verbs, P600 was elicited only by RVF stimuli. These data suggest that both hemispheres can process lexically marked pronoun agreement violations, and do so in a similar fashion. Morphologically marked subject/verb agreement errors, however, showed a distinct LH advantage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-dynamic-range microscope imaging based on exposure bracketing in full-field optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Montgomery, Paul C; Serio, Bruno; Twardowski, Patrice; Uhring, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    By applying the proposed high-dynamic-range (HDR) technique based on exposure bracketing, we demonstrate a meaningful reduction in the spatial noise in image frames acquired with a CCD camera so as to improve the fringe contrast in full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). This new signal processing method thus allows improved probing within transparent or semitransparent samples. The proposed method is demonstrated on 3 μm thick transparent polymer films of Mylar, which, due to their transparency, produce low contrast fringe patterns in white-light interference microscopy. High-resolution tomographic analysis is performed using the technique. After performing appropriate signal processing, resulting XZ sections are observed. Submicrometer-sized defects can be lost in the noise that is present in the CCD images. With the proposed method, we show that by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the images, submicrometer-sized defect structures can thus be detected.

  18. Emitting far-field multicolor patterns and characters through plastic diffractive micro-optics elements illuminated by common Gaussian lasers in the visible range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Hui; Liu, Kan; Luo, Jun; Xie, Changsheng; Ji, An; Zhang, Tianxu

    2011-04-01

    Far-field multicolor patterns and characters are emitted effectively in a relatively wide and deep spatial region by plastic diffractive micro-optics elements (DMOEs), which are illuminated directly by common Gaussian lasers in the visible range. Phase-only DMOEs are composed of a large number of fine step-shaped phase microstructures distributed sequentially over the plastic wafer selected. The initial DMOEs in silicon wafer are fabricated by an innovative technique with a combination of a single-mask ultraviolet photolithography and low-cost and rapid wet KOH etching. The fabricated silicon DMOEs are further converted into a nickel mask by the conventional electrochemical method, and they are finally transferred onto the surface of the plastic wafer through mature hot embossing. Morphological measurements show that the surface roughness of the plastic DMOEs is in the nanometer range, and the feature height of the phase steps in diffractive elements is in the submicrometer scale, which can be designed and adjusted flexibly according to requirements. The dimensions of the DMOEs can be changed from the order of millimeters to centimeters. A large number of pixel phase microstructures with a square microappearance employed to construct the phase-only DMOEs are created by the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm, according to the target patterns and characters and common Gaussian lasers manipulated by the DMOEs fabricated. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. [Comparisons of Microbial Numbers, Biomasses and Soil Enzyme Activities Between Paddy Field and Drvland Origins in Karst Cave Wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhen-jiang; Zeng, Hong-hu; Li, Qiang; Cheng, Ya-ping; Tang, Hua-feng; Li, Min; Huang, Bing-fu

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare microbial number, microbial biomass as well as soil enzyme activity between paddy field and dryland originated karst wetland ecosystems. The soil samples (0-20 cm) of uncultivated wetland, paddy field and dryland were collected in Huixian karst cave wetland, Guilin, China. Microbial numbers and biomass were detected using dilute plate incubation counting and chloroform fumigation-extraction, respectively. Microbial DNA was extracted according to the manufacturer's instructions of the kit. Microbial activity was examined using soil enzyme assays as well. The result showed that the bacteria number in paddy filed was (4.36 +/- 2.25) x 10(7) CFU x g(-1), which was significantly higher than those in wetland and dryland. Fungi numbers were (6.41 +/- 2.16) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in rice paddy and (6.52 +/- 1.55) x 10(4) CFU x g(-1) in wetland, which were higher than that in dryland. Actinomycetes number was (2.65 +/- 0.72) x 10(6) CFU x g(-1) in dryland, which was higher than that in wetland. Microbial DNA concentration in rice paddy was (11.92 +/- 3.69) microg x g(-1), which was higher than that in dryland. Invertase activity was (66.87 +/- 18.61) mg x (g x 24 h)(-1) in rice paddy and alkaline phosphatase activity was (2.07 +/- 0.99) mg x (g x 2 h)(-1) in wetland, both of which were higher than those in dryland. Statistical analysis showed there was a significant positive correlation of microbial DNA content, alkaline phosphatase activity and microbial carbon with soil pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen, alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen, soil moisture, exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+, as well as a significant positive correlation of intervase activity with the former three microbial factors. The above results indicated that microbial biomass and function responded much more sensitively to land-use change than microbial number in karst cave wetland system. Soil moisture, SOC and some factors induced by land-use change

  20. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. George C. Vradis; Dr. Hagen Schempf

    2003-04-01

    This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6-inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. This module, which incorporates technology developed by NASA, has already been designed, constructed and tested, having exceeded performance expectations. The full prototype system will be comprehensively tested in the laboratory followed by two field demonstrations in real applications in NGA member utilities' pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its third six-month period. The project has in general achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. The fabrication of the prototype is complete and is now been tested in the laboratory mainly focusing on the last system integration issues and on software development for the turning and launching routines. Testing of the prototype in the lab is expected to be completed by Summer 2003, to be followed by two field demonstrations in early Fall 2003.

  1. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASOLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George C. Vradis; Hagen Schempf

    2004-10-01

    This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate ''EXPLORER'', a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6-inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its sixth six-month period. The project has in general achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. The prototype robot completed its first field demonstration in June 2004 and is undergoing further extensive endurance testing and some minor modifications in order to prepare for the second and last field demonstration planned for October 2004.

  2. A TURBO-GENERATOR DESIGN SYNTHESIS BASED ON THE NUMERICAL-FIELD CALCULATIONS AT VARYING THE NUMBER OF STATOR SLOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Milykh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The work is dedicated to the presentation of the principle of construction and implementation of an automated synthesis system of the turbo-generator (TG electromagnetic system in the case of its modernization. This is done on the example of changing the number of the stator core slots. Methodology. The basis of the synthesis is a TG basic construction. Its structure includes the mathematical and physical-geometrical models, as well as the calculation model for the FEMM software environment, providing the numerical calculations of the magnetic fields and electromagnetic parameters of TG. The mathematical model links the changing and basic dimensions and parameters of the electromagnetic system, provided that the TG power parameters are ensured. The physical-geometrical model is the geometric mapping of the electromagnetic system with the specified physical properties of its elements. This model converts the TG electromagnetic system in a calculation model for the FEMM program. Results. Testing of the created synthesis system is carried out on the example of the 340 MW TG. The geometric, electromagnetic and power parameters of its basic construction and its new variants at the different numbers of the stator slots are compared. The harmonic analysis of the temporal function of the stator winding EMF is also made for the variants being compared. Originality. The mathematical model, relating the new and base parameters of TG at the changing of the number of the stator slots is created. A Lua script, providing the numerical-field calculations of the TG electromagnetic parameters in the FEMM software environment is worked out. Construction of the constructive and calculation models, the numerical-field calculations and delivery of results are performed by a computer automatically, that ensures high efficiency of the TG design process. Practical value. The considered version of the TG modernization on the example of changing the number of the

  3. Near-field for electrodynamics at sub-wavelength scales: generalizing to an arbitrary number of dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaohong; Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2012-06-21

    We extend the recently developed near-field (NF) method to include an arbitrary number of dielectrics. NF assumes that the dipoles and fields respond instantaneously to the density, without retardation. The central task in NF is the solution of the Poisson equation for every time step, which is here done by a conjugate gradient method which handles any dielectric distribution. The optical response of any metal-dielectric system can now be studied very efficiently in the near field region. The improved NF method is first applied to simple benchmark systems: a gold nanoparticle in vacuum and embedded in silica. The surface plasmons in these systems and their dependence on the dielectrics are reproduced in the new NF approach. As a further application, we study a silver nanoparticle-based structure for the optical detection of a "lipid" (i.e., dielectric) layer in water, where the layer is wrapping around part of the metallic nanostructure. We show the ~0.1-0.15 eV shift in the spectrum due to the presence of the layer, for both spherical and non-spherical (sphere+rod) systems with various polarizations.

  4. SIRAH: a structurally unbiased coarse-grained force field for proteins with aqueous solvation and long-range electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darré, Leonardo; Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Brandner, Astrid Febe; González, Humberto Carlos; Ferreira, Sebastián; Pantano, Sergio

    2015-02-10

    Modeling of macromolecular structures and interactions represents an important challenge for computational biology, involving different time and length scales. However, this task can be facilitated through the use of coarse-grained (CG) models, which reduce the number of degrees of freedom and allow efficient exploration of complex conformational spaces. This article presents a new CG protein model named SIRAH, developed to work with explicit solvent and to capture sequence, temperature, and ionic strength effects in a topologically unbiased manner. SIRAH is implemented in GROMACS, and interactions are calculated using a standard pairwise Hamiltonian for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We present a set of simulations that test the capability of SIRAH to produce a qualitatively correct solvation on different amino acids, hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions, and long-range electrostatic recognition leading to spontaneous association of unstructured peptides and stable structures of single polypeptides and protein-protein complexes.

  5. Partial discharges and breakdown in SF6 in the pressure range 25-150 kPa in non-uniform background fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Clemen, M.

    2014-01-01

    The partial discharge (PD) and electric breakdown mechanisms in SF6 at a plug contact in the pressure range 25-150 kPa were investigated at ambient temperature in a plug-plate arrangement. This parameter range has similar particle number densities as in the previous investigation of the dielectric recovery in a high-voltage circuit breaker (Seeger et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 395204), where optical access was limited and the relevant parameters of pressure and temperature could only be determined indirectly by computational fluid dynamic simulations. The present investigation did not have these limitations, since the pressure and temperature were well defined. Optical observation by an image intensified high speed camera in combination with a photo multiplier tube allowed an understanding of the various mechanisms for the PDs and breakdown to be gained. The breakdown fields and PD parameters could be well described by a simple leader model in the pressure range 75-150 kPa for negative polarity and above 25 kPa for positive polarity. Discrepancies with the model are observed below 75 kPa for negative polarity and at 25 kPa for positive polarity. This could be explained by a slow, repetitive heating mechanism which has not been reported so far.

  6. Combining very-long-range terrestrial laser scanner data and thermal imagery for analysis of active lava flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mike; Pinkerton, Harry; Applegarth, Jane

    2010-05-01

    In order to increase our understanding of the processes involved in the evolution of lava flow fields, detailed and frequent assessments of the activity and the topographic change involved are required. Although topographic data of sufficient accuracy and resolution can be acquired by airborne lidar, the cost and logistics generally prohibit repeats at the daily (or more frequent) intervals necessary to assess flow processes. More frequent surveys can be carried out using ground-based terrestrial laser scanners (TLSs) but on volcanic terrain such instruments generally have ranges of only several hundreds of metres, with long range variants extending to ~1100 m. Here, we report preliminary results from the use of a new, ground-based Riegl LPM-321 instrument with a quoted maximum range of 6000 m. The LPM-321 was deployed at Mount Etna, Sicily during July 2009. At this time, active lava flows from the waning 2008-9 eruption were restricted to the upper region of a lava delta that had accumulated over the course of the eruption. Relatively small (a few hundreds of metres in length) and short lived (of order a few days) flows were being effused from a region of tumuli at the head of the delta. The instrument was used from three locations, Schiena dell' Àsino, the head of the Valle del Bove and Pizzi Deneri. From Schiena dell' Àsino, most of the 2008-9 lava flows could be observed, but, due to low reflectivities and viewing distances of ~4500 m, the active regions of the flows were out of range. The longest return was acquired from a range of 3978 m, but successful returns at this range were sparse; for dense topographic data, data were best acquired over distances of less than ~3500 m. The active flows were successfully imaged from the head of the Valle del Bove (9 and 12 July, 2009) and Pizzi Deneri (6 July, 2009). Despite low effusion rates (~1 m3s-1), topographic change associated with the emplacement and inflation of new flows and the inflation of a tumulus was

  7. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George C. Vradis, Hagen Schempf

    2004-04-01

    This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6-inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fifth six-month period. The project has in general achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. The prototype robot is undergoing extensive endurance testing in order to prepare for the field demonstrations planned for June 2004.

  8. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen Schempf

    2003-10-01

    This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate ''EXPLORER'', a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6- inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fourth six-month period. The project has in general achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. The fabrication of the prototype is complete and is now been tested in the laboratory mainly focusing on endurance testing and testing of launching procedures. Testing of the prototype in the lab is expected to be completed by Fall 2003, to be followed by two field demonstrations in Winter 2003-2004.

  9. Quaternary volcanism in the Colorado Plateau-Basin and Range transition zone: Zuni-Bandera and nearby volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascadden, Tracey Elaine

    Early (ca. 700 ka) voluminous tholeiites in the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field (ZBVF) were followed by smaller volume alkalic, transitional and tholeiitic basalts, intermittently erupted from ca. 200 ka through 3 ka. In some cases, lavas of different chemical characteristics were erupted from the same vent, or from contemporaneous clusters of vents. El Calderon cinder cone erupted magmas derived from two different sources. Early alkalic eruptions, derived from a depleted (asthenospheric) source, were followed by more voluminous tholeiitic flows derived from an enriched (lithospheric) source. The tholeiite flow erupted at ca. 80 ka during a high-amplitude excursion (possibly an aborted reversal) of the geomagnetic field, as indicated by a paleomagnetic direction with declination = 271sp° , inclination = -17sp° (N = 10, alphasb{95}=4.4sp° ,\\ kappa = 124). This tholeiite has higher Ksb2O, TiOsb2, MgO, Co, Nb, Sr, Zr and LREE contents than other ZBVF tholeiites. The Candelaria Cluster comprises four volcanoes, within a four kmsp2 area, that erupted alkalic and transitional lavas from an asthenospheric source and tholeiitic lavas from a lithospheric source. Lavas from all four vents record moderate-amplitude paleomagnetic secular variation (declination = 32sp° , inclination = 56sp° , N = 17, alphasb{95}=2.8sp° ,\\ kappa = 189) indicating eruption within a very short time span, conceivably less than 100 years. The ZBVF is located within the Basin and Range/Rio Grande rift - Colorado Plateau transition zone, where extension has thinned the crust and lithosphere with respect to the Colorado Plateau but not as much as in the more highly-extended Basin and Range. Contemporaneous eruption of magmas from different mantle sources is consistent with a model in which transition zone alkalic magmas are generated at the boundary between upwelling depleted asthenosphere and residual enriched lithosphere, and tholeiitic magmas are derived from the lithosphere. The lack of

  10. Characterization of long-range functional connectivity in epileptic networks by neuronal spike-triggered local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopour, Beth A.; Staba, Richard J.; Stern, John M.; Fried, Itzhak; Ringach, Dario L.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Quantifying the relationship between microelectrode-recorded multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) in distinct brain regions can provide detailed information on the extent of functional connectivity in spatially widespread networks. These methods are common in studies of cognition using non-human animal models, but are rare in humans. Here we applied a neuronal spike-triggered impulse response to electrophysiological recordings from the human epileptic brain for the first time, and we evaluate functional connectivity in relation to brain areas supporting the generation of seizures. Approach. Broadband interictal electrophysiological data were recorded from microwires adapted to clinical depth electrodes that were implanted bilaterally using stereotactic techniques in six presurgical patients with medically refractory epilepsy. MUA and LFPs were isolated in each microwire, and we calculated the impulse response between the MUA on one microwire and the LFPs on a second microwire for all possible MUA/LFP pairs. Results were compared to clinical seizure localization, including sites of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges. Main results. We detected significant interictal long-range functional connections in each subject, in some cases across hemispheres. Results were consistent between two independent datasets, and the timing and location of significant impulse responses reflected anatomical connectivity. However, within individual subjects, the spatial distribution of impulse responses was unique. In two subjects with clear seizure localization and successful surgery, the epileptogenic zone was associated with significant impulse responses. Significance. The results suggest that the spike-triggered impulse response can provide valuable information about the neuronal networks that contribute to seizures using only interictal data. This technique will enable testing of specific hypotheses regarding functional connectivity

  11. Global field synchronization in gamma range of the sleep EEG tracks sleep depth: Artifact introduced by a rectangular analysis window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusterholz, Thomas; Achermann, Peter; Dürr, Roland; Koenig, Thomas; Tarokh, Leila

    2017-06-01

    Investigating functional connectivity between brain networks has become an area of interest in neuroscience. Several methods for investigating connectivity have recently been developed, however, these techniques need to be applied with care. We demonstrate that global field synchronization (GFS), a global measure of phase alignment in the EEG as a function of frequency, must be applied considering signal processing principles in order to yield valid results. Multichannel EEG (27 derivations) was analyzed for GFS based on the complex spectrum derived by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). We examined the effect of window functions on GFS, in particular of non-rectangular windows. Applying a rectangular window when calculating the FFT revealed high GFS values for high frequencies (>15Hz) that were highly correlated (r=0.9) with spectral power in the lower frequency range (0.75-4.5Hz) and tracked the depth of sleep. This turned out to be spurious synchronization. With a non-rectangular window (Tukey or Hanning window) these high frequency synchronization vanished. Both, GFS and power density spectra significantly differed for rectangular and non-rectangular windows. Previous papers using GFS typically did not specify the applied window and may have used a rectangular window function. However, the demonstrated impact of the window function raises the question of the validity of some previous findings at higher frequencies. We demonstrated that it is crucial to apply an appropriate window function for determining synchronization measures based on a spectral approach to avoid spurious synchronization in the beta/gamma range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fault-related dolomitization in the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain): reactive transport simulations and field data constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rivas, E.; Martin-Martin, J. D.; Corbella, M.; Teixell, A.

    2009-04-01

    The relationships between hydrothermal fluid circulation and fracturing that lead to mineral dissolution and/or precipitation in carbonate rocks have direct impacts on the evolution and final distribution of hydrocarbon reservoir permeability. Understanding the coupling between these processes is important for predicting permeability and improving hydrocarbon recovery. We present a case study of dolomitization processes in Cretaceous limestone from the Orpesa Ranges (Iberian Chain, E Spain). Extending over part of the Maestrat Cretaceous Basin, the Orpesa area is deformed by extensional faults. These faults accommodated thick sequences of shallow marine limestone, mainly during Aptian times. The syn-rift carbonates are partially dolomitized due to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids along normal faults and bedding. Both Aptian and later Neogene extensional faults must have served as conduits for the circulation of fluids. MVT deposits of Paleocene age are well documented in the Maestrat basin and may also be related to dolomitization. Samples of host rocks and vein fillings have been collected along strike and analyzed in different fault sections to characterize fluid and rock composition, track flow pathways and map the relationships of fluid flow with respect to the main normal faults in the area. Using field and geochemical data from the Orpesa Ranges carbonates, we have developed reactive-transport models to study the influence of different parameters in the dolomitization of carbonates related to the circulation and mixing of hydrothermal fluids at the outcrop scale. We present results from models that were run with constant and non-constant permeability. The main parameters analyzed include: initial porosity and permeability of layers and fractures, composition of fluids, groundwater and brines flux, composition of layers, reactive surface of minerals, differences in vertical and horizontal permeability, and presence or absence of stratigraphic

  13. Characterization of long-range functional connectivity in epileptic networks by neuronal spike-triggered local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopour, Beth A; Staba, Richard J; Stern, John M; Fried, Itzhak; Ringach, Dario L

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the relationship between microelectrode-recorded multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFPs) in distinct brain regions can provide detailed information on the extent of functional connectivity in spatially widespread networks. These methods are common in studies of cognition using non-human animal models, but are rare in humans. Here we applied a neuronal spike-triggered impulse response to electrophysiological recordings from the human epileptic brain for the first time, and we evaluate functional connectivity in relation to brain areas supporting the generation of seizures. Broadband interictal electrophysiological data were recorded from microwires adapted to clinical depth electrodes that were implanted bilaterally using stereotactic techniques in six presurgical patients with medically refractory epilepsy. MUA and LFPs were isolated in each microwire, and we calculated the impulse response between the MUA on one microwire and the LFPs on a second microwire for all possible MUA/LFP pairs. Results were compared to clinical seizure localization, including sites of seizure onset and interictal epileptiform discharges. We detected significant interictal long-range functional connections in each subject, in some cases across hemispheres. Results were consistent between two independent datasets, and the timing and location of significant impulse responses reflected anatomical connectivity. However, within individual subjects, the spatial distribution of impulse responses was unique. In two subjects with clear seizure localization and successful surgery, the epileptogenic zone was associated with significant impulse responses. The results suggest that the spike-triggered impulse response can provide valuable information about the neuronal networks that contribute to seizures using only interictal data. This technique will enable testing of specific hypotheses regarding functional connectivity in epilepsy and the relationship between

  14. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. George C. Vradis; Dr. Hagen Schempf

    2002-10-01

    This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6- inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. This module, which incorporates technology developed by NASA, has already been designed, constructed and tested, having exceeded performance expectations. The full prototype system will be comprehensively tested in the laboratory followed by two field demonstrations in real applications in NYGAS member utilities' pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the New York Gas Group (NYGAS; a trade association of the publicly owned gas utilities in New York State), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this current phase of the project is $499,023 out of a total of $780,735 (not including NASA's contribution). The

  15. The Influence of Electron Temperature and Magnetic Field Strength on Cosmic-Ray Injection in High Mach Number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2002-05-01

    Electron preacceleration from thermal to mildly relativistic energies in high Mach number shocks (the injection problem) is an outstanding issue in understanding synchrotron radiation from supernova remnants. At high Alfvénic Mach numbers, collisionless perpendicular shocks reflect a fraction of the upstream ions. This gives rise to two-stream instabilities, which in turn can accelerate ions. However, in astrophysical plasmas, the value of β-the ratio of kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure-is not well known. We have used a particle in cell simulation code to investigate the influence of β on the shock structure and on the electron acceleration (assuming thermodynamic equilibrium in the undisturbed plasma, β=βi=βe). Previous simulations at low values of β showed that the phase space distributions of electrons and ions became highly structured: characteristic holes appear in the electron phase space, and the shock dynamics exhibit reformation processes. However, we find that all these features disappear at higher β due to the high initial thermal velocity of the electrons. It follows that the electron cosmic-ray injection mechanism depends strongly on β, that is, on the electron temperature normalized to the magnetic field upstream.

  16. Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: acute response to a wide range of peak overpressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C; Chandra, Namas

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10-20 kHz) than in other two groups (7-8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work.

  17. Isokinetic trunk strength and lumbosacral range of motion in elite female field hockey players reporting low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenety, A; Kumar, S

    1992-01-01

    This study was funded, in part, by a Small Faculties Grant from the University of Alberta. Physical therapists have reported an increased incidence of low back pain (LBP) in female field hockey (FH) players, commonly accompanied by decreased trunk range of motion (ROM) and strength. The purpose of this study was to compare lumbosacral sagittal ROM and isokinetic trunk strength in three groups of women: 1) FH athletes with a history of chronic LBP, 2) pain-free FH athletes, and 3) an age-matched, healthy nonathletic control group. Photographs (35 mm) of subjects wearing spinal motion markers were used to determine the limits of lumbosacral saggital ROM in standing. Eccentric and concentric isokinetic trunk flexion and extension torques were measured in sitting through 60 degrees of trunk movement using a Kin-Com dynamometer set at 60 degrees /sec. The ANOVA showed that the pain group had 12 degrees and 18 degrees less extension (p pain-free and control groups, respectively. Only peak (p pain group than in the nonathletic control group. These results suggest that physical therapists should perform preseason screening of trunk strength and lumbosacral ROM. In-season trunk extension stretching and strengthening is needed in the training regimes of these athletes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(3):129-135.

  18. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Edwin

    1998-01-01

    Careful organization and clear, detailed proofs characterize this methodical, self-contained exposition of basic results of classical algebraic number theory from a relatively modem point of view. This volume presents most of the number-theoretic prerequisites for a study of either class field theory (as formulated by Artin and Tate) or the contemporary treatment of analytical questions (as found, for example, in Tate's thesis).Although concerned exclusively with algebraic number fields, this treatment features axiomatic formulations with a considerable range of applications. Modem abstract te

  19. Concentrating colloids with electric field gradients. II. Phase transitions and crystal buckling of long-ranged repulsive charged spheres in an electric bottle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, M.E.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the usefulness of electric field gradients for the manipulation of the particle concentration in suspensions of charged colloids, which have long-ranged repulsive interactions. In particular, we studied the compression obtained by ``negative'' dielectrophoresis, which drives the

  20. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-01-01

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrial automation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passive range finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive range finders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive range finders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chiefly consist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. The implementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjust the exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance of triangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From the experimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active range finder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within the measurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests on applications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotive field were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders are well-suited for distance measurements in this field. PMID:27879789

  1. Algebraic Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watase Yasushige

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides definitions and examples upon an integral element of unital commutative rings. An algebraic number is also treated as consequence of a concept of “integral”. Definitions for an integral closure, an algebraic integer and a transcendental numbers [14], [1], [10] and [7] are included as well. As an application of an algebraic number, this article includes a formal proof of a ring extension of rational number field ℚ induced by substitution of an algebraic number to the polynomial ring of ℚ[x] turns to be a field.

  2. ITS1 Copy Number Varies among Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis Strains: Implications for qPCR Estimates of Infection Intensity from Field-Collected Amphibian Skin Swabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Ana V.; Rodriguez, David; da Silva Leite, Domingos; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Mendoza Almeralla, Cinthya; Burrowes, Patricia A.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies of the amphibian-killing fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, [Bd]) identified three highly divergent genetic lineages, only one of which has a global distribution. Bd strains within these linages show variable genomic content due to differential loss of heterozygosity and recombination. The current quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) protocol to detect the fungus from amphibian skin swabs targets the intergenic transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region using a TaqMan fluorescent probe specific to Bd. We investigated the consequences of genomic differences in the quantification of ITS1 from eight distinct Bd strains, including representatives from North America, South America, the Caribbean, and Australia. To test for potential differences in amplification, we compared qPCR standards made from Bd zoospore counts for each strain, and showed that they differ significantly in amplification rates. To test potential mechanisms leading to strain differences in qPCR reaction parameters (slope and y-intercept), we: a) compared standard curves from the same strains made from extracted Bd genomic DNA in equimolar solutions, b) quantified the number of ITS1 copies per zoospore using a standard curve made from PCR-amplicons of the ITS1 region, and c) cloned and sequenced PCR-amplified ITS1 regions from these same strains to verify the presence of the probe site in all haplotypes. We found high strain variability in ITS1 copy number, ranging from 10 to 144 copies per single zoospore. Our results indicate that genome size might explain strain differences in ITS1 copy number, but not ITS1 sequence variation because the probe-binding site and primers were conserved across all haplotypes. For standards constructed from uncharacterized Bd strains, we recommend the use of single ITS1 PCR-amplicons as the absolute standard in conjunction with current quantitative assays to inform on copy number variation and provide universal estimates of pathogen zoospore loads

  3. Albedo factors of some elements in the atomic number range 26≤Z≤79 for 59.54keV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Uzunoğlu, Zeynep; Demir, Celalettin

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the albedo factors for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Mo, Ag, Dy, Yb, and Au. Albedo factors were investigated experimentally for 59.54keV photon energy by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182eV at 5.9keV. Albedo number (AN), albedo energy (AE), and albedo dose (AD) were plotted as a function of atomic number of the target. It was observed that albedo factors decreased with increasing atomic number. In addition, there was a good third-order polynomial relationship between the albedo factors and atomic number. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Theory and implementation of a very high throughput true random number generator in field programmable gate array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonggang; Hui, Cong; Liu, Chong; Xu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The contribution of this paper is proposing a new entropy extraction mechanism based on sampling phase jitter in ring oscillators to make a high throughput true random number generator in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) practical. Starting from experimental observation and analysis of the entropy source in FPGA, a multi-phase sampling method is exploited to harvest the clock jitter with a maximum entropy and fast sampling speed. This parametrized design is implemented in a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, where the carry chains in the FPGA are explored to realize the precise phase shifting. The generator circuit is simple and resource-saving, so that multiple generation channels can run in parallel to scale the output throughput for specific applications. The prototype integrates 64 circuit units in the FPGA to provide a total output throughput of 7.68 Gbps, which meets the requirement of current high-speed quantum key distribution systems. The randomness evaluation, as well as its robustness to ambient temperature, confirms that the new method in a purely digital fashion can provide high-speed high-quality random bit sequences for a variety of embedded applications.

  5. Ionisation potential theorem in the presence of the electric field: Assessment of range-separated functional in the reproduction of orbital and excitation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borpuzari, Manash Protim; Boruah, Abhijit; Kar, Rahul

    2016-04-28

    Recently, the range-separated density functionals have been reported to reproduce gas phase orbital and excitation energies with good accuracy. In this article, we have revisited the ionisation potential theorem in the presence of external electric field. Numerical results on six linear molecules are presented and the performance of the range-separated density functionals in reproducing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies, LUMO energies, HOMO-LUMO gaps in the presence of the external electric field is assessed. In addition, valence and Rydberg excitation energies in the presence of the external electric field are presented. It is found that the range-separated density functionals reproduce orbital and excitation energies accurately in the presence of the electric field. Moreover, we have performed fractional occupation calculation using cubic spline equation and tried to explain the performance of the functional.

  6. Study of the number of pairs created by an electric field; Estudio del numero de pares creados por un campo electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haro, J. [Dpt. Matematica Aplicada I, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Spain (Spain)]. e-mail: Jaime.Haro@upc.es

    2004-07-01

    In this work we study the number of produced pairs in an electric field using the semiclassical approach. We see that the stochastic process N (t) ''net number of produced pairs at time t'', is an stochastic Poisson process with expected value ({alpha}{epsilon}(t)) / (64 mc{sup 2}), where {alpha} is the fine structure constant and {epsilon} (t) is the energy of the electric field at time t. (Author)

  7. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. George C. Vradis; Dr. Hagen Schempf

    2002-05-01

    retrieving the robot but through the use of auxiliaries, to be developed in a follow-on phase, that will allow insertion of additional antennas and battery recharge plugs into the pipe under live conditions through inexpensive keyhole sized excavations. The proposed system significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the New York Gas Group (NYGAS; a trade association of the publicly owned gas utilities in New York State), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this project is $499,023 out of a total of $780,735 (not including NASA's contribution). The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during the first six months since funding from DOE commenced. The project has achieved its goals for this period as outlined in the report. Currently the fabrication of the prototype is in progress and it should be completed by late-summer 2002. Testing of the prototype in the lab is expected to be completed by November 2002, to be followed by two field demonstrations in early 2003.

  8. Lévy flight and Brownian search patterns of a free-ranging predator reflect different prey field characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David W; Humphries, Nicolas E; Bradford, Russell W; Bruce, Barry D

    2012-03-01

    1. Search processes play an important role in physical, chemical and biological systems. In animal foraging, the search strategy predators should use to search optimally for prey is an enduring question. Some models demonstrate that when prey is sparsely distributed, an optimal search pattern is a specialised random walk known as a Lévy flight, whereas when prey is abundant, simple Brownian motion is sufficiently efficient. These predictions form part of what has been termed the Lévy flight foraging hypothesis (LFF) which states that as Lévy flights optimise random searches, movements approximated by optimal Lévy flights may have naturally evolved in organisms to enhance encounters with targets (e.g. prey) when knowledge of their locations is incomplete. 2. Whether free-ranging predators exhibit the movement patterns predicted in the LFF hypothesis in response to known prey types and distributions, however, has not been determined. We tested this using vertical and horizontal movement data from electronic tagging of an apex predator, the great white shark Carcharodon carcharias, across widely differing habitats reflecting different prey types. 3. Individual white sharks exhibited movement patterns that predicted well the prey types expected under the LFF hypothesis. Shark movements were best approximated by Brownian motion when hunting near abundant, predictable sources of prey (e.g. seal colonies, fish aggregations), whereas movements approximating truncated Lévy flights were present when searching for sparsely distributed or potentially difficult-to-detect prey in oceanic or shelf environments, respectively. 4. That movement patterns approximated by truncated Lévy flights and Brownian behaviour were present in the predicted prey fields indicates search strategies adopted by white sharks appear to be the most efficient ones for encountering prey in the habitats where such patterns are observed. This suggests that C. carcharias appears capable of exhibiting

  9. Field Testing and Performance Evaluation of the Long-Range Acoustic Real-Time Sensor for Polar Areas (LARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    animals ) in an array configuration. A few passive acoustic monitoring systems use a surface buoy to overcome some of these disadvantages but cannot be...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Field Testing and Performance Evaluation of the Long...cover expenses for field testing and performance evaluation. This new ONR award will allow us to conduct initial short-term deployments of LARA of the

  10. Criterion 1: Conservation of biological diversity - Indicator 8: The number of forest dependent species that occupy a small portion of their former range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis H. Flather; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Michael S. Knowles; Jason McNees

    2003-01-01

    This indicator measures the portion of a species' historical distribution that is currently occupied as a surrogate measure of genetic diversity. Based on data for 1,642 terrestrial animals associated with forests, most species (88 percent) were found to fully occupy their historic range - at least as measured by coarse state-level occurrence patterns. Of the 193...

  11. Accumulation-mode aerosol number concentrations in the Arctic during the ARCTAS aircraft campaign: Long-range transport of polluted and clean air from the Asian continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Kondo, Y.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.; Sahu, L. K.; Koike, M.; Zhao, Y.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Sessions, W. R.; Diskin, G.; Anderson, B. E.; Blake, D. R.; Wisthaler, A.; Cubison, M. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-10-01

    We evaluate the impact of transport from midlatitudes on aerosol number concentrations in the accumulation mode (light-scattering particles (LSP) with diameters >180 nm) in the Arctic during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. We focus on transport from the Asian continent. We find marked contrasts in the number concentration (NLSP), transport efficiency (TEN_LSP, the fraction transported from sources to the Arctic), size distribution, and the chemical composition of aerosols between air parcels from anthropogenic sources in East Asia (Asian AN) and biomass burning sources in Russia and Kazakhstan (Russian BB). Asian AN air had lower NLSP and TEN_LSP (25 cm-3 and 18% in spring and 6.2 cm-3 and 3.0% in summer) than Russian BB air (280 cm-3 and 97% in spring and 36 cm-3 and 7.6% in summer) due to more efficient wet scavenging during transport from East Asia. Russian BB in this spring is the most important source of accumulation-mode aerosols over the Arctic, and BB emissions are found to be the primary source of aerosols within all the data in spring during ARCTAS. On the other hand, the contribution of Asian AN transport had a negligible effect on the accumulation-mode aerosol number concentration in the Arctic during ARCTAS. Compared with background air, NLSP was 2.3-4.7 times greater for Russian BB air but 2.4-2.6 times less for Asian AN air in both spring and summer. This result shows that the transport of Asian AN air decreases aerosol number concentrations in the Arctic, despite the large emissions of aerosols in East Asia. The very low aerosol number concentrations in Asian AN air were caused by wet removal during vertical transport in association with warm conveyor belts (WCBs). Therefore, this cleansing effect will be prominent for air transported via WCBs from other midlatitude regions and seasons. The inflow of clean midlatitude air can potentially have an important impact on

  12. Recency of Faulting and Neotechtonic Framework in the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field and Other Geothermal Fields of the Basin and Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Wesnousky; S. John Caskey; John W. Bell

    2003-02-20

    We studied the role that earthquake faults play in redistributing stresses within in the earths crust near geothermal fields. The geographic foci of our study were the sites of geothermal plants in Dixie Valley, Beowawe, and Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada. Our initial results show that the past history of earthquakes has redistributed stresses at these 3 sites in a manner to open and maintain fluid pathways critical for geothermal development. The approach developed here during our pilot study provides an inexpensive approach to (1) better define the best locations to site geothermal wells within known geothermal fields and (2) to define the location of yet discovered geothermal fields which are not manifest at the surface by active geothermal springs. More specifically, our investigation shows that induced stress concentrations at the endpoints of normal fault ruptures appear to promote favorable conditions for hydrothermal activity in two ways. We conclude that an understanding of the spatial distribution of active faults and the past history of earthquakes on those faults be incorporated as a standard tool in geothermal exploration and in the siting of future boreholes in existing geothermal fields.

  13. Development of Environmental Guidelines for Multipurpose Range Complexes. Volume 2. Description of Field Tests, Sediment Yields, and Option Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Dead 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 70 to 73 Total 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0S...... i~mean 0. 0. 0, 0. kid ¢ 0:.O 0: .00 D 0.0 0. 0.0 , 75 to 80...brown thrashers, catbirds, yellowthroats, kingbirds, rosebreasted grosbeaks, warbling vireos, chickadees, robins, indigo buntings, cardinals, and field...16 7 30 22 CHIPPING SPARROW 25 0 FIELD SPARROW 20 5 12 3 8 0CARDINAL 15 8 16 7 18 9 . ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK 22 19 18 5 27 20 INDIGO BUNTIN6 17 9 19 8

  14. Neurone bioelectric activity under magnetic fields of variable frequency in the range of 0.1-80 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Bruzón, R. N.; Azanza, María. J.; Calvo, Ana C.; del Moral, A.

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular recordings from single unit molluscan neurones under exposure to ELF-MF (1 mT, 0.1-80 Hz), show that neurone frequency activity, f, decreases with the applied magnetic field frequency, fM, a phenomenon which indicates a frequency-window effect for the neurone membrane response. The HMHW of the window amounts between 2-10 Hz. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  15. Neurone bioelectric activity under magnetic fields of variable frequency in the range of 0.1-80 Hz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Bruzon, R.N.; Azanza, M.J. E-mail: mjazanza@posta.unizar.es; Calvo, Ana C.; Moral, A. del

    2004-05-01

    Intracellular recordings from single unit molluscan neurones under exposure to ELF-MF (1 mT, 0.1-80 Hz), show that neurone frequency activity, f, decreases with the applied magnetic field frequency, f{sub M}, a phenomenon which indicates a frequency-window effect for the neurone membrane response. The HMHW of the window amounts between 2-10 Hz. An explanation of this phenomenon is proposed.

  16. Resonance oscillations of non-reciprocal long-range van der Waals forces between atoms in electromagnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sherkunov, Yury

    2017-01-01

    We study theoretically the van der Waals interaction between two atoms out of equilibrium with isotropic electromagnetic field. We demonstrate that at large interatomic separations, the van der Waals forces are resonant, spatially oscillating and non-reciprocal due to resonance absorption and emission of virtual photons. We suggest that these forces can be used to manipulate and control centre-of-mass and relative motion of atomic pairs.

  17. Assessing five field sampling methods to monitor Yellowstone National Park's northern ungulate winter range: the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a new sampling protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela G. Sikkink; Roy Renkin; Geneva Chong; Art Sikkink

    2013-01-01

    The five field sampling methods tested for this study differed in richness and Simpson's Index values calculated from the raw data. How much the methods differed, and which ones were most similar to each other, depended on which diversity measure and which type of data were used for comparisons. When the number of species (richness) was used as a measure of...

  18. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  19. Update on ESTCP Project ER-0918: Field Sampling and Sample Processing for Metals on DoD Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    recovery of antimony is evident with conventional analysis; new digestion process needed 22 ...applicable to both metals and energetics Experimental Design –Task 1 ● Multi-increment versus grab samples ● Number of increments per decision unit...for digestate preparation 4 Experimental Design –Task 1 5 Single DU Grab Sample FP MI Sample Berm Sample Type 5 10 20 30 50 100 50 50 Pb < 400

  20. Assateague Island sediment core radiochemistry data from March-April 2014, USGS Field Activity Number 2014-301-FA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The influence of tropical and extratropical cyclones on coastal wetlands and marshes is highly variable in both space and time and depends on a number of climatic,...

  1. Assessment of charge-transfer excitations with time-dependent, range-separated density functional theory based on long-range MP2 and multiconfigurational self- consistent field wave functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Knecht, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Charge transfer excitations can be described within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT), not only by means of the Coulomb Attenuated Method (CAM) but also with a combination of wave function theory and TD-DFT based on range separation. The latter approach enables a rigorous formulat......Charge transfer excitations can be described within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT), not only by means of the Coulomb Attenuated Method (CAM) but also with a combination of wave function theory and TD-DFT based on range separation. The latter approach enables a rigorous...... formulation of multi-determinantal TD-DFT schemes where excitation classes, which are absent in conventional TD-DFT spectra (like for example double excitations), can be addressed. This paper investigates the combination of both the long-range Multi-Configuration Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) and Second Order...... Polarization Propagator Approximation (SOPPA) ansätze with a short-range DFT (srDFT) description. We find that the combinations of SOPPA or MCSCF with TD-DFT yield better results than could be expected from the pure wave function schemes. For the Time-Dependent MCSCF short-range DFT ansatz (TD...

  2. A hidden Markov random field-based Bayesian method for the detection of long-range chromosomal interactions in Hi-C data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Guosheng; Jin, Fulai; Chen, Mengjie; Furey, Terrence S; Sullivan, Patrick F; Qin, Zhaohui; Hu, Ming; Li, Yun

    2016-03-01

    Advances in chromosome conformation capture and next-generation sequencing technologies are enabling genome-wide investigation of dynamic chromatin interactions. For example, Hi-C experiments generate genome-wide contact frequencies between pairs of loci by sequencing DNA segments ligated from loci in close spatial proximity. One essential task in such studies is peak calling, that is, detecting non-random interactions between loci from the two-dimensional contact frequency matrix. Successful fulfillment of this task has many important implications including identifying long-range interactions that assist interpreting a sizable fraction of the results from genome-wide association studies. The task - distinguishing biologically meaningful chromatin interactions from massive numbers of random interactions - poses great challenges both statistically and computationally. Model-based methods to address this challenge are still lacking. In particular, no statistical model exists that takes the underlying dependency structure into consideration. In this paper, we propose a hidden Markov random field (HMRF) based Bayesian method to rigorously model interaction probabilities in the two-dimensional space based on the contact frequency matrix. By borrowing information from neighboring loci pairs, our method demonstrates superior reproducibility and statistical power in both simulation studies and real data analysis. The Source codes can be downloaded at: http://www.unc.edu/∼yunmli/HMRFBayesHiC CONTACT: ming.hu@nyumc.org or yunli@med.unc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Designing an array for performing Near-field Acoustic Holography with a small number of p-u probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Comesaña, Daniel; Wen, Junjie; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2016-01-01

    Near-field acoustic holography (NAH) enables the reconstruction of an entire three-dimensional wave field using data acquired near the sources of sound. An array of sensors can be used in combination with NAH techniques for tackling both time-stationary and transient noise problems. However...... geometries based on hexagonal lattice and polar sampling are assessed and compared to a regular square grid via Monte Carlo simulations accounting for multiple source configurations. Results show that transducer placement plays an important role in the robustness and accuracy of the results, specially...

  4. Determination of effective atomic numbers from mass attenuation coefficients of tissue-equivalent materials in the energy range 60 keV-1.33 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noorfatin Aida B.; Zukhi, J.; Kabir, N. A.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a cost-effective tissue-equivalent material for phantom fabrication. Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) were calculated based on mass attenuation coefficient values. The linear and mass attenuation coefficients of two samples of paraffin wax and NaCl compositions were measured using Si detector for NaI (Tl) detector of 1.5” resources. Radioactive source was placed in front of detector and the sample was placed between the source and the photomultiplier tube (PMT) of the detector. The real time was set for 6000 seconds. The photopeak, full width at half maximum (FWHM) and net area of photopeak were measured using Meastro software. The attenuation coefficient values obtained from this study were used to calculate Zeff and Neff of paraffin wax and NaCl compositions. The measured results were compared with the theoretical values from XCOM and ICRU Report 44. The relative percentage difference of mass attenuation coefficients between experimental and human tissue for both paraffin wax and NaCl mixture are below 5%, whereas the relative percentage difference of Zeff and Neff are above 5%. The measured values of Zeff and Neff of paraffin wax and NaCl help us to establish the optimal mixtures to fabricate a cost-effective tissue-equivalent material.

  5. The CIRCORT database : Reference ranges and seasonal changes in diurnal salivary cortisol derived from a meta-dataset comprised of 15 field studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Robert; Stalder, Tobias; Jarczok, Marc; Almeida, David M.; Badrick, Ellena; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Coe, Christopher L.; Dekker, Marieke C. J.; Donzella, Bonny; Fischer, Joachim E.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Kumari, Meena; Lederbogen, Florian; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Power, Christine; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Ryff, Carol D.; Subramanian, S. V.; Tiemeier, Henning; Watamura, Sarah E.; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal salivary cortisol profiles are valuable indicators of adrenocortical functioning in epidemiological research and clinical practice. However, normative reference values derived from a large number of participants and across a wide age range are still missing. To fill this gap, data were

  6. The CIRCORT database: Reference ranges and seasonal changes in diurnal salivary cortisol derived from a meta-dataset comprised of 15 field studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, R. (Robert); T. Stalder (Tobias); M.N. Jarczok; Almeida, D.M. (David M.); E. Badrick (Ellena); M. Bartels (Meike); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); Coe, C.L. (Christopher L.); Dekker, M.C.J. (Marieke C.J.); Donzella, B. (Bonny); J.E. Fischer (Joachim); Gunnar, M.R. (Megan R.); M. Kumari (Meena); Lederbogen, F. (Florian); C. Power (Christopher); Ryff, C.D. (Carol D.); Subramanian, S.V.; H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); Watamura, S.E. (Sarah E.); C. Kirschbaum (Clemens)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDiurnal salivary cortisol profiles are valuable indicators of adrenocortical functioning in epidemiological research and clinical practice. However, normative reference values derived from a large number of participants and across a wide age range are still missing. To fill this gap,

  7. Crop and field boundary influences on the activity of a wide range of beneficial invertebrate groups on a split conventional/organic farm in northern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, M D; Leifert, C

    2011-04-01

    Activity of 12 beneficial invertebrate groups was assessed in 2005 and 2006 on a farm in northern England split into conventional and organic management halves, using pitfall and pan traps set in both crops and field boundaries. Management, crop and boundary structure influences on invertebrate activity were assessed, as was the relationship between crop and boundary type. Classification of crop and boundary assemblages produced three and two groups, respectively, in both years. Organic arable crops had well-defined assemblages in both years; and, while grass and grass/clover fields were separated from conventional arable fields in 2005, there was mixing in 2006. One boundary group, in both years, was dominated by conventional arable fields with tall herbaceous boundary vegetation. The other group had more organic arable and grassy fields with shorter boundary vegetation. Redundancy analyses showed that a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, Syrphidae, Ichneumonidae, Braconidae, Proctotrupoidea, Lycosidae) were more active in organic arable fields with more Staphylinidae in conventional arable crops and no obvious trend with Carabidae, Hemiptera, Neuroptera and Linyphiidae. Activity of some groups, especially Coccinellidae, Syrphidae and parasitic wasps, was strongly related to weed cover. Staphylinidae were most active in tall herbaceous boundaries by conventional arable crops with more of a number of groups (Cantharidae, Coccinellidae, parasitic wasps) in short herbaceous boundaries by organic arable crops. Organic management produced most differences in aerially-dispersed invertebrates, and management had a profound effect on activity in field boundaries. Possible management prescriptions to increase invertebrate activity include changing sowing times, weed cover manipulation and field boundary and margin management.

  8. THE USE OF CHEMICALS IN THE FIELD OF FARM ANIMAL HEALTH (NUTRITION, ENTOMOLOGY, PATHOLOGY). AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS TECHNOLOGY, NUMBER 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF STATE STUDIES, THIS MODULE IS ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN PREPARING POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONS. THE SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE OF THIS MODULE IS TO PREPARE TECHNICIANS IN THE FIELD OF THE USE OF CHEMICALS FOR ANIMAL HEALTH. SECTIONS INCLUDE -- (1)…

  9. Homosexuality in Specific Fields: The Arts, the Military, the Ministry, Prisons, Sports, Teaching and Transsexuals. A Selected Bibliography. Number 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alan V., Comp.

    This bibliography represents the third in a series of three dealing with employment of homosexuals, to be published by the Ontario Ministry of Labour Library. All asterisked titles deal with the employment problems of and discrimination against homosexuals. This bibliography is concerned with homosexuality in the specific fields of the arts, the…

  10. Temperature range extension of an organically crosslinked polymer system and its successful field application for water and gas shutoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, Julio; Eoff, Larry; Dalrymple, Dwyann [Halliburton, Rio de Janeiro. RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Excessive water production from hydrocarbon reservoirs is one of the most serious problems in the oil industry. Water production greatly affects the economic life of producing wells and brings along secondary problems such as sand production, corrosion, and tubular scale. Remediation techniques for controlling water production, generally referred to as conformance control, include the use of polymer systems to reduce or plug permeability to water. This paper presents the laboratory evaluation of an organically crosslinked polymer (OCP) system used as a sealant for water control problems in hydrocarbon wells. Originally, the OCP system had a limited working temperature range (140 deg to 260 deg F). Recently, an alternative base polymer (for low temperatures) and a retarder (for high temperatures) have been introduced to expand the temperature range of applicability of the OCP system from 70 deg F to 350 deg F without compromising its effectiveness or thermal stability. More than 400 jobs have been performed with the OCP system around the world to address conformance problems such as water coning/cresting, high-permeability streaks, gravel pack isolation, fracture shutoff, and casing leak repairs. This paper presents an overview of case histories that used the OCP system in various regions of the world for a wide variety of applications. (author)

  11. Plant responses to extreme climatic events: a field test of resilience capacity at the southern range edge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier Herrero

    Full Text Available The expected and already observed increment in frequency of extreme climatic events may result in severe vegetation shifts. However, stabilizing mechanisms promoting community resilience can buffer the lasting impact of extreme events. The present work analyzes the resilience of a Mediterranean mountain ecosystem after an extreme drought in 2005, examining shoot-growth and needle-length resistance and resilience of dominant tree and shrub species (Pinus sylvestris vs Juniperus communis, and P. nigra vs J. oxycedrus in two contrasting altitudinal ranges. Recorded high vegetative-resilience values indicate great tolerance to extreme droughts for the dominant species of pine-juniper woodlands. Observed tolerance could act as a stabilizing mechanism in rear range edges, such as the Mediterranean basin, where extreme events are predicted to be more detrimental and recurrent. However, resistance and resilience components vary across species, sites, and ontogenetic states: adult Pinus showed higher growth resistance than did adult Juniperus; saplings displayed higher recovery rates than did conspecific adults; and P. nigra saplings displayed higher resilience than did P. sylvestris saplings where the two species coexist. P. nigra and J. oxycedrus saplings at high and low elevations, respectively, were the most resilient at all the locations studied. Under recurrent extreme droughts, these species-specific differences in resistance and resilience could promote changes in vegetation structure and composition, even in areas with high tolerance to dry conditions.

  12. Line-field swept source optical coherence tomography system for evaluating microstructure of objects in near-infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurov, Igor; Margaryants, Nikita; Pimenov, Aleksei

    2017-06-01

    Peculiarities of optical design for optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with illumination by a swept-source in the spectral range 1.26-1.36 μm are considered. In the OCT system, an object is illuminated by light intensity distribution in the form of line providing high power efficiency of the light source when evaluating micro structure of objects. A linearray photo detector with the frame acquisition rate of a few tens of kilohertz is utilized that allows obtaining B-scans without mechanical lateral scanning. The illumination power density at each point of investigated object is much less with respect to conventional "flying spot" methods that is important when studying biological objects not resistant to intensive light. Results of experimental investigations utilizing the Linnik micro interferometer optical scheme are given. Experimental tomograms of different objects are presented.

  13. Numerical simulation of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow between conducting cylinders in an axial magnetic field at low magnetic Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xueyuan; Kolesnikov, Yuri B.; Krasnov, Dmitry; Li, Benwen

    2018-01-01

    The effect of an axial homogeneous magnetic field on the turbulence in the Taylor-Couette flow confined between two infinitely long conducting cylinders is studied by the direct numerical simulation using a periodic boundary condition in the axial direction. The inner cylinder is rotating, and the outer one is fixed. We consider the case when the magnetic Reynolds number Rem ≪ 1, i.e., the influence of the induced magnetic field on the flow is negligible that is typical for industry and laboratory study of liquid metals. Relevance of the present study is based on the similarity of flow characteristics at moderate and high magnetic field for the cases with periodic and end-wall conditions at the large flow aspect ratio, as proven in the earlier studies. Two sets of Reynolds numbers 4000 and 8000 with several Hartmann numbers varying from 0 to 120 are employed. The results show that the mean radial induced electrical current, resulting from the interaction of axial magnetic field with the mean flow, leads to the transformation of the mean flow and the modification of the turbulent structure. The effect of turbulence suppression is dominating at a strong magnetic field, but before reaching the complete laminarization, we capture the appearance of the hairpin-like structures in the flow.

  14. Aeroacoustics of compressible subsonic jets : Direct Numerical Simulation of a low Reynolds number subsonic jet and the associated sound field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Jet noise is an extensively studied phenomenon since the deployment of the first civil jet aircraft more than 50 years ago. Jet noise makes up a considerable portion of the total noise of jet aircraft, and the expansion of the numbers of airplanes and airports has only been possible by keeping the

  15. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  16. Electronic spectrum in the visible frequency range of UF/sub 4/ molecules isolated in solid neon, and its interpretation in the crystal-field approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A.A.; Golubev, Y.M.

    1987-09-01

    The matrix isolation method is used to obtain the spectra of molecules in solid neon in the 1000--400-nm range. All the recorded bands are referred to transitions within the 5f /sup 2/ configuration of U/sup 4 +/ ion in the field of four fluorine ions. The interpretation assumes the case of a weak crystal field in which the terms of U/sup 4 +/ ion with different J are not mixed up. It is concluded that the UF/sub 3/ molecule has the structure of either a tetrahedron or a slightly distorted tetrahedron.

  17. Digital image processing for quantification through full flow field tracing (FFFT) in narrow geometries at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, M. J.; Batur, C.; Karavelakis, G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper introduces a computer based image processing technique to the field of nonintrusive velocity measurements in fluid mechanics. The method is presented with two alternatives: the first is involving intense interaction between the operator and the computer system; the second is a first generation artificial intelligence based system, where a set of initially imputed rules replaces the operator. The methods are applied to flow in narrow gaps.

  18. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

  19. Field evidence of colonisation by Holm Oak, at the northern margin of its distribution range, during the Anthropocene period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzon, Sylvain; Urli, Morgane; Samalens, Jean-Charles; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Lischke, Heike; Sin, Fabrice; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Porté, Annabel J

    2013-01-01

    A major unknown in the context of current climate change is the extent to which populations of slowly migrating species, such as trees, will track shifting climates. Niche modelling generally predicts substantial northward shifts of suitable habitats. There is therefore an urgent need for field-based forest observations to corroborate these extensive model simulations. We used forest inventory data providing presence/absence information from just over a century (1880-2010) for a Mediterranean species (Quercus ilex) in forests located at the northern edge of its distribution. The main goals of the study were (i) to investigate whether this species has actually spread into new areas during the Anthropocene period and (ii) to provide a direct estimation of tree migration rate. We show that Q. ilex has colonised substantial new areas over the last century. However, the maximum rate of colonisation by this species (22 to 57 m/year) was much slower than predicted by the models and necessary to follow changes in habitat suitability since 1880. Our results suggest that the rates of tree dispersion and establishment may also be too low to track shifts in bioclimatic envelopes in the future. The inclusion of contemporary, rather than historical, migration rates into models should improve our understanding of the response of species to climate change.

  20. Field Evidence of Colonisation by Holm Oak, at the Northern Margin of Its Distribution Range, during the Anthropocene Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzon, Sylvain; Urli, Morgane; Samalens, Jean-Charles; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Lischke, Heike; Sin, Fabrice; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Porté, Annabel J.

    2013-01-01

    A major unknown in the context of current climate change is the extent to which populations of slowly migrating species, such as trees, will track shifting climates. Niche modelling generally predicts substantial northward shifts of suitable habitats. There is therefore an urgent need for field-based forest observations to corroborate these extensive model simulations. We used forest inventory data providing presence/absence information from just over a century (1880–2010) for a Mediterranean species (Quercus ilex) in forests located at the northern edge of its distribution. The main goals of the study were (i) to investigate whether this species has actually spread into new areas during the Anthropocene period and (ii) to provide a direct estimation of tree migration rate. We show that Q. ilex has colonised substantial new areas over the last century. However, the maximum rate of colonisation by this species (22 to 57 m/year) was much slower than predicted by the models and necessary to follow changes in habitat suitability since 1880. Our results suggest that the rates of tree dispersion and establishment may also be too low to track shifts in bioclimatic envelopes in the future. The inclusion of contemporary, rather than historical, migration rates into models should improve our understanding of the response of species to climate change. PMID:24260391

  1. Configuration mixing of mean-field wave functions projected on angular momentum and particle number: Application to sup 2 sup 4 Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Valor, A; Bonche, P

    2000-01-01

    We present in this paper the general framework of a method which permits to restore the rotational and particle number symmetries of wave functions obtained in Skyrme HF + BCS calculations. This restoration is nothing but a projection of mean-field intrinsic wave functions onto good particle number and good angular momentum. The method allows us also to mix projected wave functions. Such a configuration mixing is discussed for sets of HF + BCS intrinsic states generated in constrained calculations with suitable collective variables. This procedure gives collective states which are eigenstates of the particle number and the angular momentum operators and between which transition probabilities are calculated. An application to sup 2 sup 4 Mg is presented, with mean-field wave functions generated by axial quadrupole constraints. Theoretical spectra and transition probabilities are compared to the experiment.

  2. Geospatial compilation of results from field sample collection in support of mineral resource investigations, Western Alaska Range, Alaska, July 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Benzel, William M.

    2015-07-16

    This Data Series summarizes results from July 2013 sampling in the western Alaska Range near Mount Estelle, Alaska. The fieldwork combined in situ and camp-based spectral measurements of talus/soil and rock samples. Five rock and 48 soil samples were submitted for quantitative geochemi­cal analysis (for 55 major and trace elements), and the 48 soils samples were also analyzed by x-ray diffraction to establish mineralogy and geochemistry. The results and sample photo­graphs are presented in a geodatabase that accompanies this report. The spectral, mineralogical, and geochemical charac­terization of these samples and the sites that they represent can be used to validate existing remote-sensing datasets (for example, ASTER) and future hyperspectral studies. Empiri­cal evidence of jarosite (as identified by x-ray diffraction and spectral analysis) corresponding with gold concentrations in excess of 50 parts per billion in soil samples suggests that surficial mapping of jarosite in regional surveys may be use­ful for targeting areas of prospective gold occurrences in this sampling area.

  3. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 83, quarter ending June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Summaries of 41 research projects on enhanced recovery are presented under the following sections: (1) chemical flooding; (2) gas displacement; (3) thermal recovery; (4) geoscience technology; (5) resource assessment technology; and (6) reservoir classes. Each presentation gives the title of the project, contract number, research facility, contract date, expected completion data, amount of the award, principal investigator, and DOE program manager, and describes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress.

  4. The Field Radiated by a Ring Quasi-Array of an Infinite Number of Tangential or Radial Dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H. L.

    1953-01-01

    A homogeneous ring array of axial dipoles will radiate a vertically polarized field that concentrates to an increasing degree around the horizontal plane with increasing increment of the current phase per revolution. There is reason to believe that by using a corresponding antenna system with tan...... of the antenna systems treated here converges towards infinity, too, i.e. supergain occurs. Based on the theory of supergain an approximate expression has been derived for the minimum value of the radius of the antenna system, which it is possible to use in practice....

  5. Site exploration for rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member, Belted Range Tuff, U12g Tunnel Complex, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langkopf, B.S.; Eshom, E.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes site exploration work completed in support of planned rock-mechanics field tests in the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Ruff at Nevada Test Site`s, G-Tunnel. As part of this work, the Rock Mechanics Drift (RMD) and the Rock Mass Property Alcove (RMPA) were mined and three coreholes drilled. The results of mapping and corehole logging are displayed, described, and analyzed.

  6. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  7. A mean field study of quantum transitions in a spin-1/2 XY chain with a transverse long-range interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, H. S.; de Lima, J. P.; Costa, N. C.; Lyra, M. L.; Gonçalves, L. L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the anisotropic one-dimensional XY model (s = 1/2 ) with uniform long-range interaction between the transverse components of the spins. The solution of the model was obtained by using the Jordan-Wigner transformation, and by treating the four fermion term within the mean field approximation. The proposed approximation reproduces the known exact results for two limiting cases of the model, namely, the isotropic model with long-range interaction and the anisotropic model without long-range interaction. Explicit expressions are obtained for the Helmholtz free energy, the induced magnetization and the isothermal susceptibility at arbitrary temperatures. Special attention is given to the study of quantum critical behaviour at T = 0 , by determining the phase diagram for the quantum phase transitions, and it is shown that the system presents a critical behaviour analogous to the one presented by isotropic model with long-range interaction. The spontaneous magnetization is also determined, at T = 0 , and we show that our results obtained by mean field approximation are in good agreement with those obtained by exact diagonalization of a finite chain; a comparison is also made with already known results.

  8. Low field induced large magnetocaloric effect in Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93 : influence of short range magnetic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R

    2017-10-31

    In this work, we report successful synthesis of a new intermetallic compound Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93 that forms in single phase only in defect crystal structure. The compound does not show any long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The material exhibits large magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM ~ 13.7 J/kg K) and adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad ~ 4.4 K) at 2.2 K for a field change of 20 kOe which can be realized by permanent magnets, thus being very beneficial for application purpose. In the absence of long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K, metastable nature of the low temperature spin dynamics and short range magnetic correlations are considered to be responsible for such large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) over a wide temperature region. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. Low-field induced large magnetocaloric effect in Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93: influence of short-range magnetic correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we report the successful synthesis of a new intermetallic compound Tm2 Ni0.93 Si2.93 that forms in single phase only in defect crystal structure. The compound does not show any long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The material exhibits a large magnetic entropy change (-Δ S_M∼13.7 J kg-1 K–1) and adiabatic temperature change (Δ T_ad∼4.4 K) at 2.2 K for a field change of 20 kOe which can be realized by permanent magnets, thus being very beneficial for application purpose. In the absence of long-range magnetic ordering down to 2 K, the metastable nature of low-temperature spin dynamics and short-range magnetic correlations are considered to be responsible for such a large magnetocaloric effect over a wide temperature region.

  10. Field-trip guide to mafic volcanism of the Cascade Range in Central Oregon—A volcanic, tectonic, hydrologic, and geomorphic journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligne, Natalia I.; Mckay, Daniele; Conrey, Richard M.; Grant, Gordon E.; Johnson, Emily R.; O'Connor, Jim; Sweeney, Kristin

    2017-08-16

    The Cascade Range in central Oregon has been shaped by tectonics, volcanism, and hydrology, as well as geomorphic forces that include glaciations. As a result of the rich interplay between these forces, mafic volcanism here can have surprising manifestations, which include relatively large tephra footprints and extensive lava flows, as well as water shortages, transportation and agricultural disruption, and forest fires. Although the focus of this multidisciplinary field trip will be on mafic volcanism, we will also look at the hydrology, geomorphology, and ecology of the area, and we will examine how these elements both influence and are influenced by mafic volcanism. We will see mafic volcanic rocks at the Sand Mountain volcanic field and in the Santiam Pass area, at McKenzie Pass, and in the southern Bend region. In addition, this field trip will occur during a total solar eclipse, the first one visible in the United States in more than 25 years (and the first seen in the conterminous United States in more than 37 years).The Cascade Range is the result of subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate underneath the North American plate. This north-south-trending volcanic mountain range is immediately downwind of the Pacific Ocean, a huge source of moisture. As moisture is blown eastward from the Pacific on prevailing winds, it encounters the Cascade Range in Oregon, and the resulting orographic lift and corresponding rain shadow is one of the strongest precipitation gradients in the conterminous United States. We will see how the products of the volcanoes in the central Oregon Cascades have had a profound influence on groundwater flow and, thus, on the distribution of Pacific moisture. We will also see the influence that mafic volcanism has had on landscape evolution, vegetation development, and general hydrology.

  11. Assessment of CT numbers in limited and medium field-of-view scans taken using Accuitomo 170 and Veraviewepocs 3De cone-beam computed tomography scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Matheus L. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Tosoni, Guilherme M. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Surgery, Araraquara Dental School, Sao Paulo State University, Araraquara (Brazil); Lindsey, David H.; Mendoza, Kristopher; Tetradis, Sotirios; Mallya, Sanjay M. [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the influence of anatomic location on the relationship between computed tomography (CT) number and X-ray attenuation in limited and medium field-of-view (FOV) scans. Tubes containing solutions with different concentrations of K2HPO4 were placed in the tooth sockets of a human head phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired, and CT numbers of the K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} solutions were measured. The relationship between CT number and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration was examined by linear regression analyses. Then, the variation in CT number according to anatomic location was examined. The relationship between K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} concentration and CT number was strongly linear. The slopes of the linear regressions for the limited FOVs were almost 2-fold lower than those for the medium FOVs. The absolute CT number differed between imaging protocols and anatomic locations. There is a strong linear relationship between X-ray attenuation and CT number. The specific imaging protocol and anatomic location of the object strongly influence this relationship.

  12. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to EFisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and calibrated, is important for guaranteeing the robustness of the measured spectra and estimating their overall uncertainties.

  13. Extending the frequency range of free-field reciprocity calibration of measurement microphones to frequencies up to 150 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Torras Rosell, Antoni; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as the measurement of noise emitted by ultrasound cleaning...... machines and failure detection in aeronautic structures require that the sensitivity of the microphone is known at frequencies up to 150 kHz. Another area of particular interest is the investigation of the perception mechanisms of ultrasound. In any of these applications, it is of fundamental importance...... to establish a well-defined traceability chain to support the measurement results. In order to extend the frequency range of free-field calibration the measurement system and measurement methods must undergo a series of changes and adaptations including the type of excitation signal, techniques for eliminating...

  14. Enhancing the critical current of a superconducting film in a wide range of magnetic fields with a conformal array of nanoscale holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. L.; Latimer, M. L.; Xiao, Z. L.; Divan, R.; Ocola, L. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2013-06-01

    The maximum current (critical current) a type-II superconductor can transmit without energy loss is limited by the motion of the quantized magnetic flux penetrating into a superconductor. Introducing nanoscale holes into a superconducting film has been long pursued as a promising way to increase the critical current. So far the critical current enhancement was found to be mostly limited to low magnetic fields. Here we experimentally investigate the critical currents of superconducting films with a conformal array of nanoscale holes that have nonuniform density while preserving the local ordering. We find that the conformal array of nanoscale holes provides a more significant critical current enhancement at high magnetic fields. The better performance can be attributed to its arching effect that not only gives rise to the gradient in hole density for pinning vortices with a wide range of densities but also prevents vortex channeling occurring in samples with a regular lattice of holes.

  15. Biological effect of dose distortion by fiducial markers in spot-scanning proton therapy with a limited number of fields: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Sutherland, Kenneth; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, 3-1-1 Saiwai-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan); Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In accurate proton spot-scanning therapy, continuous target tracking by fluoroscopic x ray during irradiation is beneficial not only for respiratory moving tumors of lung and liver but also for relatively stationary tumors of prostate. Implanted gold markers have been used with great effect for positioning the target volume by a fluoroscopy, especially for the cases of liver and prostate with the targets surrounded by water-equivalent tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that gold markers can cause a significant underdose in proton therapy. This paper focuses on prostate cancer and explores the possibility that multiple-field irradiation improves the underdose effect by markers on tumor-control probability (TCP). Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the dose distortion effect. A spherical gold marker was placed at several characteristic points in a water phantom. The markers were with two different diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm, both visible on fluoroscopy. Three beam arrangements of single-field uniform dose (SFUD) were examined: one lateral field, two opposite lateral fields, and three fields (two opposite lateral fields + anterior field). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was set to 1.1 and a dose of 74 Gy (RBE) was delivered to the target of a typical prostate size in 37 fractions. The ratios of TCP to that without the marker (TCP{sub r}) were compared with the parameters of the marker sizes, number of fields, and marker positions. To take into account the dependence of biological parameters in TCP model, {alpha}/{beta} values of 1.5, 3, and 10 Gy (RBE) were considered. Results: It was found that the marker of 1.5 mm diameter does not affect the TCPs with all {alpha}/{beta} values when two or more fields are used. On the other hand, if the marker diameter is 2 mm, more than two irradiation fields are required to suppress the decrease in TCP from TCP{sub r} by less than 3%. This is especially true when multiple

  16. Three-Dimensional Interaction of a Large Number of Dense DEP Particles on a Plane Perpendicular to an AC Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dielectrophoresis (DEP particles in an electric field has been observed in many experiments, known as the “particle chains phenomenon”. However, the study in 3D models (spherical particles is rarely reported due to its complexity and significant computational cost. In this paper, we employed the iterative dipole moment (IDM method to study the 3D interaction of a large number of dense DEP particles randomly distributed on a plane perpendicular to a uniform alternating current (AC electric field in a bounded or unbounded space. The numerical results indicated that the particles cannot move out of the initial plane. The similar particles (either all positive or all negative DEP particles always repelled each other, and did not form a chain. The dissimilar particles (a mixture of positive and negative DEP particles always attracted each other, and formed particle chains consisting of alternately arranged positive and negative DEP particles. The particle chain patterns can be randomly multitudinous depending on the initial particle distribution, the electric properties of particles/fluid, the particle sizes and the number of particles. It is also found that the particle chain patterns can be effectively manipulated via tuning the frequency of the AC field and an almost uniform distribution of particles in a bounded plane chip can be achieved when all of the particles are similar, which may have potential applications in the particle manipulation of microfluidics.

  17. Antimony (Sb) and lead (Pb) in contaminated shooting range soils: Sb and Pb mobility and immobilization by iron based sorbents, a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Grasshorn Gebhardt, Karl-Alexander; Amstaetter, Katja; Bue, Helga Lassen; Herzel, Hannes; Mariussen, Espen; Rossebø Almås, Åsgeir; Cornelissen, Gerard; Breedveld, Gijs D; Rasmussen, Grete; Mulder, Jan

    2016-04-15

    Small-arm shooting ranges often receive a significant input of lead (Pb), copper (Cu) and antimony (Sb) from ammunition. The goal of the present study was to investigate the mobility, distribution and speciation of Pb and Sb pollution under field conditions in both untreated and sorbent-amended shooting range soil. Elevated Sb (19-349μgL(-1)) and Pb (7-1495μgPbL(-1)) concentrations in the porewater of untreated soil over the four-year test period indicated a long-term Sb and Pb source to the adjacent environment in the absence of remedial measures. Mixing ferric oxyhydroxide powder (CFH-12) (2%) together with limestone (1%) into the soil resulted in an average decrease of Sb and Pb porewater concentrations of 66% and 97%, respectively. A similar reduction was achieved by adding 2% zerovalent iron (Fe°) to the soil. The remediation effect was stable over the four-year experimental period indicating no remobilization. Water- and 1M NH4NO3-extractable levels of Sb and Pb in field soil samples indicated significant immobilization by both treatments (89-90% for Sb and 89-99% for Pb). Results from sequential extraction analysis indicate fixation of Sb and Pb in less accessible fractions like amorphous iron oxides or even more crystalline and residual mineral phases, respectively. This work shows that amendment with Fe-based sorbents can be an effective method to reduce the mobility of metals both in cationic and anionic form in polluted shooting range soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Equivalence between fractional exclusion statistics and self-consistent mean-field theory in interacting-particle systems in any number of dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, D V; Nemnes, G A; Gulminelli, F

    2013-10-01

    We describe a mean field interacting particle system in any number of dimensions and in a generic external potential as an ideal gas with fractional exclusion statistics (FES). We define the FES quasiparticle energies, we calculate the FES parameters of the system and we deduce the equations for the equilibrium particle populations. The FES gas is "ideal," in the sense that the quasiparticle energies do not depend on the other quasiparticle levels' populations and the sum of the quasiparticle energies is equal to the total energy of the system. We prove that the FES formalism is equivalent to the semiclassical or Thomas Fermi limit of the self-consistent mean-field theory and the FES quasiparticle populations may be calculated from the Landau quasiparticle populations by making the correspondence between the FES and the Landau quasiparticle energies. The FES provides a natural semiclassical ideal gas description of the interacting particle gas.

  19. Influence of End Plates on Lift and Flow Field of a Canard-type Control Surface at a Mach Number of 2.00

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, George A

    1953-01-01

    The influence of triangular-shaped end plates on the lift and the flow field of a canard-type control surface mounted on a symmetrical fuselage was investigated in the Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel at a Mach number of 2.00, body angle of attack of 2 degrees, and control-surface deflection angles of 3 degrees, 6 degrees, 8 degrees, and 10 degrees. The investigation demonstrated that the addition of end plates to a canard-type control surface increased its lift and rearranged the single vortex into a two-vortex system. Perforating the end plates reduced these effects and resulted in a decrease in lift and a change in the flow-field characteristics.

  20. The potential of audiomagnetotellurics in the study of geothermal fields: A case study from the northern segment of the La Candelaria Range, northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelona, Hernan; Favetto, Alicia; Peri, Veronica Gisel; Pomposiello, Cristina; Ungarelli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Despite its reduced penetration depth, audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) studies can be used to determine a broad range of features related to little studied geothermal fields. This technique requires a stepwise interpretation of results taking into consideration diverse information (e.g. topographic, hydrological, geological and/or structural data) to constrain the characteristics of the study area. In this work, an AMT study was performed at the hot springs in the northern segment of the La Candelaria Range in order to characterize the area at depth. Geometric aspects of the shallow subsurface were determined based on the dimensional and distortion analysis of the impedance tensors. Also, the correlation between structural features and regional strikes allowed us to define two geoelectric domains, useful to determine the controls on fluid circulation. The subsurface resistivity distribution was determined through 1D and 2D models. The patterns of the 1D models were compared with the morpho-structure of the range. Shallow and deep conductive zones were defined and a possible shallow geothermal system scheme proposed. A strong correlation was found between the AMT results and the geological framework of the region, showing the relevance of using AMT in geothermal areas during the early stages of subsurface prospecting.

  1. Characterization of winemaking yeast by cell number-size distribution analysis through flow field-flow fractionation with multi-wavelength turbidimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2004-10-29

    Yeasts are widely used in several areas of food industry, e.g. baking, beer brewing, and wine production. Interest in new analytical methods for quality control and characterization of yeast cells is thus increasing. The biophysical properties of yeast cells, among which cell size, are related to yeast cell capabilities to produce primary and secondary metabolites during the fermentation process. Biophysical properties of winemaking yeast strains can be screened by field-flow fractionation (FFF). In this work we present the use of flow FFF (FlFFF) with turbidimetric multi-wavelength detection for the number-size distribution analysis of different commercial winemaking yeast varieties. The use of a diode-array detector allows to apply to dispersed samples like yeast cells the recently developed method for number-size (or mass-size) analysis in flow-assisted separation techniques. Results for six commercial winemaking yeast strains are compared with data obtained by a standard method for cell sizing (Coulter counter). The method here proposed gives, at short analysis time, accurate information on the number of cells of a given size, and information on the total number of cells.

  2. Short-chain fatty acid level and field cancerization show opposing associations with enteroendocrine cell number and neuropilin expression in patients with colorectal adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staton Carolyn A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested that the VEGF receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP-1 is expressed in a singly dispersed subpopulation of cells in the normal colonic epithelium, but that expression becomes dysregulated during colorectal carcinogenesis, with higher levels in tumour suggestive of a poor prognosis. We noted that the spatial distribution and morphology if NRP-1 expressing cells resembles that of enteroendocrine cells (EEC which are altered in response to disease state including cancer and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. We have shown that NRP-1 is down-regulated by butyrate in colon cancer cell lines in vitro and we hypothesized that butyrate produced in the lumen would have an analogous effect on the colon mucosa in vivo. Therefore we sought to investigate whether NRP-1 is expressed in EEC and how NRP-1 and EEC respond to butyrate and other short-chain fatty acids (SCFA - principally acetate and propionate. Additionally we sought to assess whether there is a field effect around adenomas. Methodology Biopsies were collected at the mid-sigmoid, at the adenoma and at the contralateral wall (field of 28 subjects during endoscopy. Samples were fixed for IHC and stained for either NRP-1 or for chromogranin A (CgA, a marker of EEC. Stool sampling was undertaken to assess individuals' butyrate, acetate and propionate levels. Result NRP-1 expression was inversely related to SCFA concentration at the colon landmark (mid-sigmoid, but expression was lower and not related to SCFA concentration at the field. Likewise CgA+ cell number was also inversely related to SCFA at the landmark, but was lower and unresponsive at the field. Crypt cellularity was unaltered by field effect. A colocalisation analysis showed only a small subset of NRP-1 localised with CgA. Adenomas showed extensive, weaker staining for NRP-1 which contrastingly correlated positively with butyrate level. Field effects cause this relationship to be lost. Adenoma tissue

  3. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Frazer

    2014-01-01

    The technical difficulties of algebraic number theory often make this subject appear difficult to beginners. This undergraduate textbook provides a welcome solution to these problems as it provides an approachable and thorough introduction to the topic. Algebraic Number Theory takes the reader from unique factorisation in the integers through to the modern-day number field sieve. The first few chapters consider the importance of arithmetic in fields larger than the rational numbers. Whilst some results generalise well, the unique factorisation of the integers in these more general number fields often fail. Algebraic number theory aims to overcome this problem. Most examples are taken from quadratic fields, for which calculations are easy to perform. The middle section considers more general theory and results for number fields, and the book concludes with some topics which are more likely to be suitable for advanced students, namely, the analytic class number formula and the number field sieve. This is the fi...

  4. Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for some elements in the atomic number range 28≤Z≤39 at 16.896 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yılmaz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The K shell intensity ratios (Kβ/Kα have been experimentally determined for some elements in the atomic number range 28 ≤ Z ≤ 39 by using secondary excitation method. K X-rays emitted by samples have been counted by a Si (Li detector with 160 eV resolutions at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with the theoretical and experimental values. In general, the values obtained are in good agreement with the calculated values.

  5. Measurements of the Atmospheric Electric Field through a Triangular Array and the Long-range Saharan Dust Electrification in Southern Portugal

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, H G; Pereira, S; Barbosa, S M; Nicoll, K; Pereira, M Collares; Harrison, R G

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric electric field (AEF) measurements were carried out in three different sites forming a triangular array in Southern Portugal. The campaign was performed during the summer characterized by Saharan dust outbreaks; the 16th-17th July 2014 desert dust event is considered here. Evidence of long-range dust electrification is attributed to the air-Earth electrical current creating a positive space-charge inside of the dust layer. An increase of ~23 V/m is observed in AEF on the day of the dust event corresponding to space-charges of ~20-2 pCm-3 (charge layer thicknesses ~10-100 m). A reduction of AEF is observed after the dust event.

  6. An Integrated Rock Typing Approach for Unraveling the Reservoir Heterogeneity of Tight Sands in the Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin, Western Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkhchi, Rahim Kadkhodaie; Rezaee, Reza; Harami, Reza Moussavi

    2014-01-01

    between pore system properties and depositional and diagenetic characteristics in each sand type, reservoir rock types were extracted. The identified reservoir rock types are in fact a reflection of internal reservoir heterogeneity related to pore system properties. All reservoir rock types......Tight gas sands in Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin show large heterogeneity in reservoir characteristics and production behavior related to depositional and diagenetic features. Diagenetic events (compaction and cementation) have severely affected the pore system. In order to investigate...... the petrophysical characteristics, reservoir sandstone facies were correlated with core porosity and permeability and their equivalent well log responses to describe hydraulic flow units and electrofacies, respectively. Thus, very tight, tight, and sub-tight sands were differentiated. To reveal the relationship...

  7. The effect of the number of consecutive night shifts on diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV): a systematic review of field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Garde, Anne Helene; Kristiansen, Jesper; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge from field studies on how many consecutive night shifts are required for adaptation of diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and heart rate variability (HRV) to night work. A systematic search of the databases PubMed and Web of Science resulted in 18 studies selected for review. Cortisol was measured in five studies, melatonin in 11 studies and HRV in four studies. Diurnal rhythms were assessed by use of several different measures based on three to eight samples per day for cortisol and melatonin and 24-h recordings for HRV. Most of the studies in the review were small studies with less than 30 participants, and most studies evaluated diurnal rhythms after only two consecutive night shifts whereas only six studies used seven or more consecutive night shifts. The majority of studies found that adaptation to night work had not occurred after two consecutive night shifts, whereas a small number found evidence for full adaptation after seven consecutive night shifts based on diurnal rhythms in cortisol and melatonin. There are methodological differences in the field studies analyzing diurnal rhythms and large diversity in the occupational fields studied. Nevertheless, we conclude that diurnal rhythms in cortisol, melatonin and HRV are not adapted to night work after 1-3 consecutive night shifts. Studies are needed to establish how many consecutive night shifts are needed for full adaptation of diurnal rhythms to night work.

  8. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Streich, Sean P; Abbott, Rachel C; Osorio, Jorge E; Miller, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  9. Apparent field safety of a raccoon poxvirus-vectored plague vaccine in free-ranging prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Streich, Sean P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Miller, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) suffer high rates of mortality from plague. An oral sylvatic plague vaccine using the raccoon poxvirus vector (designated RCN-F1/V307) has been developed for prairie dogs. This vaccine is incorporated into palatable bait along with rhodamine B as a biomarker. We conducted trials in August and September 2012 to demonstrate uptake and apparent safety of the RCN-F1/V307 vaccine in two prairie dog species under field conditions. Free-ranging prairie dogs and other associated small rodents readily consumed vaccine-laden baits during field trials with no apparent adverse effects; most sampled prairie dogs (90%) and associated small rodents (78%) had consumed baits. Visual counts of prairie dogs and their burrows revealed no evidence of prairie dog decline after vaccine exposure. No vaccine-related morbidity, mortality, or gross or microscopic lesions were observed. Poxviruses were not isolated from any animal sampled prior to bait distribution or on sites that received placebo baits. We isolated RCN-F1/V307 from 17 prairie dogs and two deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) captured on sites where vaccine-laden baits were distributed. Based on these findings, studies examining the utility and effectiveness of oral vaccination to prevent plague-induced mortality in prairie dogs and associated species are underway.

  10. THE ABUNDANCE OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN THE REDSHIFT RANGE 8.5-12: NEW RESULTS FROM THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD CAMPAIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Koekemoer, Anton [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R., E-mail: rse@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    We present the results of the deepest search to date for star-forming galaxies beyond a redshift z {approx_equal} 8.5 utilizing a new sequence of near-infrared Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) images of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). This 'UDF12' campaign completed in 2012 September doubles the earlier exposures with WFC3/IR in this field and quadruples the exposure in the key F105W filter used to locate such distant galaxies. Combined with additional imaging in the F140W filter, the fidelity of high-redshift candidates is greatly improved. Using spectral energy distribution fitting techniques on objects selected from a deep multi-band near-infrared stack, we find seven promising z > 8.5 candidates. As none of the previously claimed UDF candidates with 8.5 < z < 10 are confirmed by our deeper multi-band imaging, our campaign has transformed the measured abundance of galaxies in this redshift range. Although we recover the candidate UDFj-39546284 (previously proposed at z = 10.3), it is undetected in the newly added F140W image, implying that it lies at z = 11.9 or is an intense emission line galaxy at z {approx_equal} 2.4. Although no physically plausible model can explain the required line intensity given the lack of Ly{alpha} or broadband UV signal, without an infrared spectrum we cannot rule out an exotic interloper. Regardless, our robust z {approx_equal} 8.5-10 sample demonstrates a luminosity density that continues the smooth decline observed over 6 < z < 8. Such continuity has important implications for models of cosmic reionization and future searches for z >10 galaxies with James Webb Space Telescope.

  11. Effects of Electromagnetic Field Over a Human Body, Sar Simulation with and Without Nanotextile in the Frequency Range 0.9-1.8GHZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomovski, Boyan; Gräbner, Frank; Hungsberg, Axel; Kallmeyer, Christian; Linsel, Mario

    2011-11-01

    Within only the last decade, usage of mobile phones and many other electronic devices with high speed wireless RF connection is rapidly increasing. Modern life requires reliable, quick and high-quality information connections, which explains the widely spreading craze for electronic mobile devices of various types. The vast technological advances we are witnessing in electronics, electro-optics, and computer science have profoundly affected our everyday lives. Meanwhile, safety concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic (EM) radiation have been raised, in particular at a low level of exposure which we everyday experience. A variety of waves and signals have to be considered such as different sine waves, digital signals used in radio, television, mobile phone systems and other information transfer systems. The field around us has become rather complicated and the "air space is getting more and more dense with RF. The establishing of safety recommendations, law norms and rules augmented by adequate measurements is very important and requires quite an expertise. But as many scientific researches suggest, what we are currently witnessing is very likely to generate a great public danger and a bad influence over the human body. There are many health organisations warning the public for possible development of cancer, mental and physical disorders etc [7, 8]. These suggestions are quite serious and should not be neglected by the official bodies and the test laboratories. In the following work, the effects of electromagnetic field over a virtual model of a human head have been simulated in the frequency range from 900 MHz to 1800 MHz (commonly created in the real life by mobile GSM system) with the help of the program MEFiSTo 2D Classic [1]. The created virtual models using the 2D simulation & computation software proved that the use of new high tech nanotextile materials for shielding layers around the human body can reduce the effects of EM fields

  12. Horizontal/vertical differences in range and upper/lower visual field differences in the midpoints of sensory fusion limits of oriented lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Philip M; Ono, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    O'Shea and Crassini (1982, Perception & Psychophysics 32 195-196) demonstrated that fusion persists for vertical lines with an orientation disparity of 8 degrees, but diplopia is experienced in simultaneously presented horizontal lines with the same disparity. They concluded that the neural fusion process fuses larger horizontal disparities than vertical disparities. Kertesz criticised their demonstration because it did not quantify the possible motor component associated with fusing their counter-rotated images. Krekling and Blika argued that the demonstrated anisotropy is due to a disparity bias in the visual system, owing to the temporalward tilt of corresponding vertical meridians. We addressed these criticisms with a novel stimulus and presentation protocol, that rendered compensatory cyclovergence eye movements unlikely and explored a wide range of orientation disparities. We confirmed O'Shea and Crassini's vertical/horizontal anisotropy in orientation fusion limits. In addition, our measurements of vertical lines showed that the distributions of fused responses as a function of orientation disparity in the upper and lower visual fields were shifted relative to each other. Therefore, the distributions of fusible orientation disparities are wider for vertical lines than horizontal lines and are relatively shifted as predicted if the fusional range is centred around the vertical horopter.

  13. Osmotic dehydration of some agro-food tissue pre-treated by pulsed electric field: Impact of impeller’s Reynolds number on mass transfer and color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissues of apple, carrot and banana were pre-treated by pulsed electric field (PEF and subsequently osmotically dehydrated in an agitated flask at ambient temperature using a 65% sucrose solution as osmotic medium. The effect of stirring intensity was investigated through water loss (WL and solid gain (SG. Changes in product color were also considered to analyze the impact of the treatment. The impeller’s Reynolds number was used to quantify the agitation. The Reynolds number remained inferior to 300 thus displaying laminar flow regime. Water loss (WL and solid gain (SG increase with the increase of Reynolds number. Mass transfer in osmotic dehydration of all three test particles has been studied on the basis of a two-exponential kinetic model. Then, mass transfer coefficients were related to the agitation intensity. This paper shows that the proposed empirical model is able to describe mass transfer phenomena in osmotic dehydration of these tissues. It is also shown that a higher agitation intensity improves both the kinetics of water loss and solid gain.

  14. AcconPred: Predicting Solvent Accessibility and Contact Number Simultaneously by a Multitask Learning Framework under the Conditional Neural Fields Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhu Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. The solvent accessibility of protein residues is one of the driving forces of protein folding, while the contact number of protein residues limits the possibilities of protein conformations. The de novo prediction of these properties from protein sequence is important for the study of protein structure and function. Although these two properties are certainly related with each other, it is challenging to exploit this dependency for the prediction. Method. We present a method AcconPred for predicting solvent accessibility and contact number simultaneously, which is based on a shared weight multitask learning framework under the CNF (conditional neural fields model. The multitask learning framework on a collection of related tasks provides more accurate prediction than the framework trained only on a single task. The CNF method not only models the complex relationship between the input features and the predicted labels, but also exploits the interdependency among adjacent labels. Results. Trained on 5729 monomeric soluble globular protein datasets, AcconPred could reach 0.68 three-state accuracy for solvent accessibility and 0.75 correlation for contact number. Tested on the 105 CASP11 domain datasets for solvent accessibility, AcconPred could reach 0.64 accuracy, which outperforms existing methods.

  15. AcconPred: Predicting Solvent Accessibility and Contact Number Simultaneously by a Multitask Learning Framework under the Conditional Neural Fields Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The solvent accessibility of protein residues is one of the driving forces of protein folding, while the contact number of protein residues limits the possibilities of protein conformations. The de novo prediction of these properties from protein sequence is important for the study of protein structure and function. Although these two properties are certainly related with each other, it is challenging to exploit this dependency for the prediction. We present a method AcconPred for predicting solvent accessibility and contact number simultaneously, which is based on a shared weight multitask learning framework under the CNF (conditional neural fields) model. The multitask learning framework on a collection of related tasks provides more accurate prediction than the framework trained only on a single task. The CNF method not only models the complex relationship between the input features and the predicted labels, but also exploits the interdependency among adjacent labels. Trained on 5729 monomeric soluble globular protein datasets, AcconPred could reach 0.68 three-state accuracy for solvent accessibility and 0.75 correlation for contact number. Tested on the 105 CASP11 domain datasets for solvent accessibility, AcconPred could reach 0.64 accuracy, which outperforms existing methods.

  16. Backscatter dose effects for high atomic number materials being irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field: A Monte Carlo study for the MRI linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Bilal; Sarfehnia, Arman; Kim, Anthony; Wronski, Matt; Sahgal, Arjun; Keller, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    To quantify and explain the backscatter dose effects for clinically relevant high atomic number materials being irradiated in the presence of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field. Interface effects were investigated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. We used gpumcd (v5.1) and geant4 (v10.1) for this purpose. gpumcd is a commercial software written for the Elekta AB, MRI linac. Dose was scored using gpumcd in cubic voxels of side 1 and 0.5 mm, in two different virtual phantoms of dimensions 20 × 20 × 20 cm and 5 × 5 × 13.3 cm, respectively. A photon beam was generated from a point 143.5 cm away from the isocenter with energy distribution sampled from a histogram representing the true Elekta, MRI linac photon spectrum. A slab of variable thickness and position containing either bone, aluminum, titanium, stainless steel, or one of the two different dental filling materials was inserted as an inhomogeneity in the 20 × 20 × 20 cm phantom. The 5 × 5 × 13.3 cm phantom was used as a clinical test case in order to explain the dose perturbation effects for a head and neck cancer patient. The back scatter dose factor (BSDF) was defined as the ratio of the doses at a given depth with and without the presence of the inhomogeneity. Backscattered electron fluence was calculated at the inhomogeneity interface using geant4. A 1.5 T magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the direction of the beam in both phantoms, identical to the geometry in the Elekta MRI linac. With the application of a 1.5 T magnetic field, all the BSDF's were reduced by 12%-47%, compared to the no magnetic field case. The corresponding backscattered electron fluence at the interface was also reduced by 45%-64%. The reduction in the BSDF at the interface, due to the application of the magnetic field, is manifested in a different manner for each material. In the case of bone, the dose drops at the interface contrary to the expected increase when no magnetic field is applied. In the case of

  17. Crystal fields, disorder, and antiferromagnetic short-range order in (Yb{sub 0.24}Sn{sub 0.76})Ru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimczuk, T; Wang, C H; Lawrence, J M; Xu, Q; Durakiewicz, T; Ronning, F; Llobet, A; Trouw, F; Kurita, N; Tokiwa, Y; Lee, Han-oh; Booth, C H; Gardner, J S; Bauer, E D; Joyce, J J; Zandbergen, H W; Movshovich, R; Cava, R J; Thompson, J D

    2011-07-18

    We report extensive measurements on a new compound (Yb{sub 0.24}Sn{sub 0.76})Ru that crystallizes in the cubic CsCl structure. Valence band photoemission and L{sub 3} x-ray absorption show no divalent component in the 4f configuration of Yb. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) indicates that the eight-fold degenerate J-multiplet of Yb{sup 3+} is split by the crystalline electric field (CEF) into a Γ{sub 7} doublet ground state and a Γ{sub 8} quartet at an excitation energy 20 meV. The magnetic susceptibility can be fit very well by this CEF scheme under the assumption that a Γ{sub 6} excited state resides at 32 meV; however, the Γ{sub 8}/Γ{sub 6} transition expected at 12 meV was not observed in the INS. The resistivity follows a Bloch-Grüneisen law shunted by a parallel resistor, as is typical of systems subject to phonon scattering with no apparent magnetic scattering. All of these properties can be understood as representing simple local moment behavior of the trivalent Yb ion. At 1 K, there is a peak in specific heat that is too broad to represent a magnetic phase transition, consistent with absence of magnetic reflections in neutron diffraction. On the other hand, this peak also is too narrow to represent the Kondo effect in the Γ{sub 7} ground state doublet. On the basis of the field-dependence of the specific heat, we argue that antiferromagnetic shortrange order (possibly co-existing with Kondo physics) occurs at low temperatures. The long-range magnetic order is suppressed because the Yb site occupancy is below the percolation threshold for this disordered compound.

  18. Evaluation of a peat moss plus soybean oil (PMSO) technology for reducing explosive residue transport to groundwater at military training ranges under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Mark E; Schaefer, Charles E; Steffan, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    An evaluation of peat moss plus crude soybean oil (PMSO) for mitigation of explosive contamination of soil at military facilities was performed using large soil lysimeters under field conditions. Actual range soils were used, and two PMSO preparations with different ratios of peat moss:soybean oil (1:1, PO1; 1:2, PO2) were compared to a control lysimeter that received no PMSO. PMSO was applied as a 10 cm layer on top of the soil, and Composition B detonation residues from a 55-mm mortar round were applied at the surface of each of the lysimeters. Dissolution of the residues occurred during natural precipitation events over the course of 18 months. Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) emanating from the Composition B residues were significantly reduced by the PO2 PMSO material compared to the untreated control. Soil pore water RDX concentrations and RDX fluxes were reduced over 100-fold compared to the control plots at comparable depths. Residual RDX in the soil profile was also significantly lower in the PMSO treated plots. PO1 PMSO resulted in lower reductions in RDX transport than the PO2 PMSO. The transport of the RDX breakdown product hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) was also greatly reduced by the PMSO materials. Results were in general agreement with a previously developed fate and transport model describing PMSO effectiveness. These results demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the inexpensive and environmentally benign PMSO technology for reducing the subsurface loading of explosives at training ranges and other military facilities.

  19. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  20. Changes in numbers and size of synaptic vesicles of cortical neurons induced by exposure to 835 MHz radiofrequency-electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Da-Hyeon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Huh, Yang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) exposure on neuronal functions of mice. Particularly, we focused on RF-EMF effects on synaptic vesicles (SVs), which store neurotransmitters at axon terminals or synaptic boutons. C57 BL/6 mice were exposed to 835 MHz RF-EMF (4.0 W/kg SAR, for 5 h daily) and alterations in SVs at presynaptic terminals in the cerebral cortex were determined. Ultrastructure of randomly selected cortical neurons was observed using typical electron microscopy and bio-high voltage electron microscopy (Bio-HVEM) methods, which enable the estimation of the numbers and size of SVs. The density of the SVs (number /10 μm2 or 40 μm3) was significantly decreased in the presynaptic boutons of cortical neurons after RF-EMF exposure. Furthermore, qPCR and immunoblotting analyses revealed that the expression of synapsins I/II (Syns I/II) genes and proteins were significantly decreased in the cortical neurons of RF-EMF exposed mice. The present study suggested that alteration of SVs and Syn levels may result in alterations of neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex following RF-EMF exposure. PMID:29045446

  1. p-adic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Grešak, Rozalija

    2015-01-01

    The field of real numbers is usually constructed using Dedekind cuts. In these thesis we focus on the construction of the field of real numbers using metric completion of rational numbers using Cauchy sequences. In a similar manner we construct the field of p-adic numbers, describe some of their basic and topological properties. We follow by a construction of complex p-adic numbers and we compare them with the ordinary complex numbers. We conclude the thesis by giving a motivation for the int...

  2. Assessment of a CFD model for short-range plume dispersion: Applications to the Fusion Field Trial 2007 (FFT-07) diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Ngae, Pierre; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the short-range plume dispersion under different atmospheric conditions can provide essential information for the development of source reconstruction methodologies that allows to retrieve the location and intensity of an unknown hazardous pollutant source. This process required a comprehensive assessment of the atmospheric dispersion models with tracer diffusion experiments in various stability conditions. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE is performed with the observations from available seven trials of single releases conducted in the Fusion Field Trail 2007 (FFT-07) tracer experiment. The CFD simulations are performed for each trial and it was observed that the CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE provides good agreement of the predicted concentrations with the observations in both stable and convective atmospheric conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the simulated results is performed by computing the statistical performance measures for the dispersion model evaluation. The CFD model predicts 65.4% of the overall concentration points within a factor of two to the observations. It was observed that the CFD model is predicting better in convective stability conditions in comparison to the trials conducted in stable stability. In convective conditions, 74.6% points were predicted within a factor of two to the observations which are higher than 59.3% concentration points predicted within a factor of two in the trials in stable atmospheric conditions.

  3. A natural orbital analysis of the long range behavior of chemical bonding and van der Waals interaction in singlet H2: the issue of zero natural orbital occupation numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, X W; Mentel, Ł M; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2013-04-28

    This paper gives a natural orbital (NO) based analysis of the van der Waals interaction in (singlet) H2 at long distance. The van der Waals interaction, even if not leading to a distinct van der Waals well, affects the shape of the interaction potential in the van der Waals distance range of 5-9 bohrs and can be clearly distinguished from chemical bonding effects. In the NO basis the van der Waals interaction can be quantitatively covered with, apart from the ground state configurations (1σ(g))(2) and (1σ(u))(2), just the 4 configurations (2σ(g))(2) and (2σ(u))(2), and (1π(u))(2) and (1π(g))(2). The physics of the dispersion interaction requires and explains the peculiar relatively large positive CI coefficients of the doubly excited electron configurations (2σ(u))(2) and (1π(g))(2) (the occupancy amplitudes of the 2σ(u) and 1π(gx, y) NOs) in the distance range 5-9 bohrs, which have been observed before by Cioslowski and Pernal [Chem. Phys. Lett. 430, 188 (2006)]. We show that such positive occupancy amplitudes do not necessarily lead to the existence of zero occupation numbers at some H-H distances.

  4. Characteristics of Ambient Black Carbon Mass and Size-Resolved Particle Number Concentrations during Corn Straw Open-Field Burning Episode Observations at a Rural Site in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsiang Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Information on the effect of open-field burning of agricultural residues on ambient black carbon (BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations is scarce. In this study, to understand the effect of such open-field burning on short-term air quality, real-time variations of the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations were monitored before and during a corn straw open-field burning episode at a rural site. Correlations between the BC mass and size-resolved particle number concentrations during the episode were investigated. Moreover, the particle number size distribution and absorption Ångström exponent were determined for obtaining the characteristics of aerosol emissions from the corn straw open-field burning. The results can be used to address public health concerns and as a reference for managing similar episodes of open-field burning of agricultural residues.

  5. Semantic category-based decoding of human brain activity using a Gabor-based model by estimating intracranial field potential range in temporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromy, Fateme Zareayan; Daliri, Mohammed Reza

    2017-01-01

    Predicting and decoding the recorded neural activity for visual stimuli is the topic of many studies. This prediction can be made by comparing the model's responses to different stimuli with the available recorded brain signal. The neural activities can be decoded then by finding the stimulus which has generated the nearest model's response to the recorded signal. In this study, a model is proposed which can estimate the response of human brain to images from different conceptual categories by inserting the visual stimuli as the model input after filtering by Gabor wavelets. This helped us to find each image's low level visual features. Afterward, the extracted image features were applied to the input of a curve fitting neural network. As the output, the range of intracranial field potential was estimated. This was performed separately for each pixel of the image. To evaluate the model's accuracy, two factors were used, namely the Pearson correlation and Normalized root mean square error. The results show that the proposed model can accurately estimate the brain's response to conceptual categories To decode the brain' activity based on the observed semantic category in each test observations by using of the model, we calculated the distance between the recorded signal and the model responses to all stimuli from different categories and assigned the category of the nearest model response to brain's response in that trial. To this end, a K-nearest neighbors classifier based on Euclidean distance was used. This leaded to a classification accuracy which was significantly higher than chance level. So, the proposed model can be used to decode the activity of the brain in response to the visual stimuli.

  6. Introduction to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzana, Anthony; Garth, David

    2007-01-01

    One of the oldest branches of mathematics, number theory is a vast field devoted to studying the properties of whole numbers. Offering a flexible format for a one- or two-semester course, Introduction to Number Theory uses worked examples, numerous exercises, and two popular software packages to describe a diverse array of number theory topics.

  7. A Valid Matérn Class of Cross-Covariance Functions for Multivariate Random Fields With Any Number of Components

    KAUST Repository

    Apanasovich, Tatiyana V.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce a valid parametric family of cross-covariance functions for multivariate spatial random fields where each component has a covariance function from a well-celebrated Matérn class. Unlike previous attempts, our model indeed allows for various smoothnesses and rates of correlation decay for any number of vector components.We present the conditions on the parameter space that result in valid models with varying degrees of complexity. We discuss practical implementations, including reparameterizations to reflect the conditions on the parameter space and an iterative algorithm to increase the computational efficiency. We perform various Monte Carlo simulation experiments to explore the performances of our approach in terms of estimation and cokriging. The application of the proposed multivariate Matérnmodel is illustrated on two meteorological datasets: temperature/pressure over the Pacific Northwest (bivariate) and wind/temperature/pressure in Oklahoma (trivariate). In the latter case, our flexible trivariate Matérn model is valid and yields better predictive scores compared with a parsimonious model with common scale parameters. © 2012 American Statistical Association.

  8. Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Justin H Dingle; Eric C Apel; Teresa L Campos; Alan J Hills; Rebecca S Hornbrook; Denise D Montzka; John B Nowak; Joseph R Roscioli

    2016-01-01

      Summertime aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range and Denver metropolitan area as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ...

  9. Symmetry energy of cold nucleonic matter within a relativistic mean field model encapsulating effects of high-momentum nucleons induced by short-range correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations (SRC) from the tensor components and/or the repulsive core of nuclear forces lead to a high- (low-)momentum tail (depletion) in the single-nucleon momentum distribution above (below) the nucleon Fermi surface in cold nucleonic matter. Significant progress was made recently in constraining the isospin-dependent parameters characterizing the SRC-modified single-nucleon momentum distribution in neutron-rich nucleonic matter using both experimental data and microscopic model calculations. Using the constrained single-nucleon momentum distribution in a nonlinear relativistic mean field (RMF) model, we study the equation of state (EOS) of asymmetric nucleonic matter (ANM), especially the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ ) . First, as a test of the model, the average nucleon kinetic energy extracted recently from electron-nucleus scattering experiments using a neutron-proton dominance model is well reproduced by the RMF model incorporating effects of the SRC-induced high-momentum nucleons, while it is significantly under predicted by the RMF model using a step function for the single-nucleon momentum distribution as in free Fermi gas (FFG) models. Second, consistent with earlier findings within nonrelativistic models, the kinetic symmetry energy of quasinucleons is found to be Esymkin(ρ0) =-16.94 ±13.66 MeV which is dramatically different from the prediction of Esymkin(ρ0) ≈12.5 MeV by FFG models at nuclear matter saturation density ρ0=0.16 fm-3 . Third, comparing the RMF calculations with and without the high-momentum nucleons using two sets of model parameters both reproducing identically all empirical constraints on the EOS of symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the symmetry energy of ANM at ρ0, the SRC-modified single-nucleon momentum distribution is found to make the Esym(ρ ) more concave around ρ0 by softening it significantly at both subsaturation and suprasaturation

  10. Increasing age reduces expression of long term depression and dynamic range of transmission plasticity in CA1 field of the rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Kamal, A.; Biessels, G.J.; Urban, I.J.

    1997-01-01

    Long-term depression, depotentiation and long-term potentiation of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the CA1 field of the hippocampus were studied in slices from two-, 12-, 24- and 36-week-old rats. Long-term potentiation was induced by stimulating afferent fibres for 1 s at 100 Hz.

  11. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    through using mathematical names for the numbers such as one-ten-one for 11 and five-ten-six for 56. The project combines the renaming of numbers with supporting the teaching with the new number names. Our hypothesis is that Danish children have more difficulties learning and working with numbers, because...

  12. The Abundance of Star-forming Galaxies in the Redshift Range 8.5-12: New Results from the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Richard S.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Ono, Yoshiaki; Schenker, Matthew A.; Koekemoer, Anton; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Ouchi, Masami; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the deepest search to date for star-forming galaxies beyond a redshift z ~= 8.5 utilizing a new sequence of near-infrared Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3/IR) images of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF). This "UDF12" campaign completed in 2012 September doubles the earlier exposures with WFC3/IR in this field and quadruples the exposure in the key F105W filter used to locate such distant galaxies. Combined with additional imaging in the F140W filter, the fidelity of high-redshift candidates is greatly improved. Using spectral energy distribution fitting techniques on objects selected from a deep multi-band near-infrared stack, we find seven promising z > 8.5 candidates. As none of the previously claimed UDF candidates with 8.5 10 galaxies with James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Proth Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzweller Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce Proth numbers and prove two theorems on such numbers being prime [3]. We also give revised versions of Pocklington’s theorem and of the Legendre symbol. Finally, we prove Pepin’s theorem and that the fifth Fermat number is not prime.

  14. Establishing conditions for simulating hydrophobic solutes in electric fields by molecular dynamics Effects of the long-range van der Waals treatment on the apparent particle mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milicevic, Zoran; Marrink, Siewert J.; Smith, Ana-Suncana; Smith, David M.

    Despite considerable effort over the last decade, the interactions between solutes and solvents in the presence of electric fields have not yet been fully understood. A very useful manner in which to study these systems is through the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. However, a

  15. Fibonacci numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    2011-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers date back to an 800-year-old problem concerning the number of offspring born in a single year to a pair of rabbits. This book offers the solution and explores the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in number theory, continued fractions, and geometry. A discussion of the ""golden section"" rectangle, in which the lengths of the sides can be expressed as a ration of two successive Fibonacci numbers, draws upon attempts by ancient and medieval thinkers to base aesthetic and philosophical principles on the beauty of these figures. Recreational readers as well as students and teacher

  16. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Field on Positron Range and Spatial Resolution in an Integrated Whole-Body Time-Of-Flight PET/MRI System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Savic, Dragana; Yang, Jaewon; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho

    2014-11-01

    Simultaneous imaging systems combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been actively investigated. A PET/MR imaging system (GE Healthcare) comprised of a time-of-flight (TOF) PET system utilizing silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and 3-tesla (3T) MRI was recently installed at our institution. The small-ring (60 cm diameter) TOF PET subsystem of this PET/MRI system can generate images with higher spatial resolution compared with conventional PET systems. We have examined theoretically and experimentally the effect of uniform magnetic fields on the spatial resolution for high-energy positron emitters. Positron emitters including 18F, 124I, and 68Ga were simulated in water using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit in the presence of a uniform magnetic field (0, 3, and 7 Tesla). The positron annihilation position was tracked to determine the 3D spatial distribution of the 511-keV gammy ray emission. The full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) of the positron point spread function (PSF) was determined. Experimentally, 18F and 68Ga line source phantoms in air and water were imaged with an investigational PET/MRI system and a PET/CT system to investigate the effect of magnetic field on the spatial resolution of PET. The full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the line spread function (LSF) from the line source was determined as the system spatial resolution. Simulations and experimental results show that the in-plane spatial resolution was slightly improved at field strength as low as 3 Tesla, especially when resolving signal from high-energy positron emitters in the air-tissue boundary.

  18. Enhancing the Critical Current of a Superconducting Film in a Wide Range of Magnetic Fields with a Conformal Array of Nanoscale Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Latimer, M. L.; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Divan, R.; Ocola, L. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2013-01-01

    The maximum current (critical current) a type-II superconductor can transmit without energy loss is limited by the motion of the quantized magnetic flux penetrating into a superconductor. Introducing nanoscale holes into a superconducting film has been long pursued as a promising way to increase the critical current. So far the critical current enhancement was found to be mostly limited to low magnetic fields. Here we experimentally investigate the critical currents of superconducting films w...

  19. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  20. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Atsushi; Ueno, Takehiro; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Katsura, Makoto; Ikeya, Motoji

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400 mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu2+) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  1. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Atsushi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: atani@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueno, Takehiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamanaka, Chihiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Katsura, Makoto [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu{sup 2+}) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  2. Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Justin H.; Vu, Kennedy; Bahreini, Roya; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; Flocke, Frank; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Reeves, Mike; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoff; Walega, James; Weibring, Petter; Weinheimer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Summertime aerosol optical extinction (βext) was measured in the Colorado Front Range and Denver metropolitan area as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) campaign during July-August 2014. An Aerodyne cavity attenuated phase shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex) was deployed to measure βext (at average relative humidity of 20 ± 7 %) of submicron aerosols at λ = 632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret βext behavior in various categories of air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios relative to CO (Δβext / ΔCO) were higher in aged urban air masses compared to fresh air masses by ˜ 50 %. The resulting increase in Δβext / ΔCO for highly aged air masses was accompanied by formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In addition, the impacts of aerosol composition on βext in air masses under the influence of urban, natural oil and gas operations (O&G), and agriculture and livestock operations were evaluated. Estimated non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values for different air mass types ranged from 1.51 to 2.27 m2 g-1, with the minimum and maximum values observed in urban and agriculture-influenced air masses, respectively. The mass distribution for organic, nitrate, and sulfate aerosols presented distinct profiles in different air mass types. During 11-12 August, regional influence of a biomass burning event was observed, increasing the background βext and estimated MEE values in the Front Range.

  3. Aerosol optical extinction during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ 2014 summertime field campaign, Colorado, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Dingle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Summertime aerosol optical extinction (βext was measured in the Colorado Front Range and Denver metropolitan area as part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ campaign during July–August 2014. An Aerodyne cavity attenuated phase shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS-PMex was deployed to measure βext (at average relative humidity of 20 ± 7 % of submicron aerosols at λ = 632 nm at 1 Hz. Data from a suite of gas-phase instrumentation were used to interpret βext behavior in various categories of air masses and sources. Extinction enhancement ratios relative to CO (Δβext ∕ ΔCO were higher in aged urban air masses compared to fresh air masses by  ∼  50 %. The resulting increase in Δβext ∕ ΔCO for highly aged air masses was accompanied by formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs. In addition, the impacts of aerosol composition on βext in air masses under the influence of urban, natural oil and gas operations (O&G, and agriculture and livestock operations were evaluated. Estimated non-refractory mass extinction efficiency (MEE values for different air mass types ranged from 1.51 to 2.27 m2 g−1, with the minimum and maximum values observed in urban and agriculture-influenced air masses, respectively. The mass distribution for organic, nitrate, and sulfate aerosols presented distinct profiles in different air mass types. During 11–12 August, regional influence of a biomass burning event was observed, increasing the background βext and estimated MEE values in the Front Range.

  4. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redfield, Alfred G., E-mail: redfield@brandeis.edu [Brandeis University, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753-768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  5. Numerical study at moderate Reynolds number of peristaltic flow of micropolar fluid through a porous-saturated channel in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Bilal; Javed, Tariq; Ali, N.

    2018-01-01

    This paper analyzes the MHD flow of micropolar fluid induced by peristaltic waves passing through the porous saturated channel at large Reynolds number. The flow model is formulated in the absence of assumptions of lubrication theory which yields the governing equations into a non-linear set of coupled partial differential equations which allows studying the peristaltic mechanism at non-zero Reynolds and wave numbers. The influence of other involved parameters on velocity, stream function and microrotation are discussed through graphs plotted by using Galerkin's finite element method. Besides that, the phenomena of pumping and trapping are also analyzed in the later part of the paper. To ensure the accuracy of the developed code, obtained results are compared with the results available in the literature and found in excellent agreement. It is found that the peristalsis mixing can be enhanced by increasing Hartmann number while it reduces by increasing permeability of the porous medium.

  6. Field Demonstration and Validation of TREECS(trademark) and CTS for the Risk Assessment of Contaminants on Department of Defense (DoD) Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Range Constituent Database with TREECS™ ATC U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center bgs below ground surface BMP(s) Best Management Practice(s) C crop ...potential replacements for TNT and RDX, respectively. There is also uncertainty regarding their properties associated with fate processes. As a result, the...the USLE included: a regional rain- fall factor of 135; a land slope of 0.2 and LS factor of 8.35; a crop manage- ment factor of 0.1; a soil

  7. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  8. A magnetosensitive thin-film silicon Hall-type field-effect transistor with operating temperature range expanded up to 350°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. V.; Malykh, A. A.; Mordkovich, V. N.; Pavlyuk, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a magnetosensitive device consisting of a combination of a thin-film Si transistor with built-in conducting channel (fabricated by the silicon-on-insulator technology) and a Hall-type sensor (HS). The transistor has a double-gate field control system of the metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal type and operates in the regime of carrier accumulation in the channel at partial depletion of adjacent regions of the Si film. It is established that the device can operate at temperatures up to about 350°C, which is 160-180°C higher than the maximum operating temperature of HSs based on bulk Si crystals and comparable with HSs based on wide-bandgap semiconductors.

  9. Nice numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, John

    2016-01-01

    In this intriguing book, John Barnes takes us on a journey through aspects of numbers much as he took us on a geometrical journey in Gems of Geometry. Similarly originating from a series of lectures for adult students at Reading and Oxford University, this book touches a variety of amusing and fascinating topics regarding numbers and their uses both ancient and modern. The author intrigues and challenges his audience with both fundamental number topics such as prime numbers and cryptography, and themes of daily needs and pleasures such as counting one's assets, keeping track of time, and enjoying music. Puzzles and exercises at the end of each lecture offer additional inspiration, and numerous illustrations accompany the reader. Furthermore, a number of appendices provides in-depth insights into diverse topics such as Pascal’s triangle, the Rubik cube, Mersenne’s curious keyboards, and many others. A theme running through is the thought of what is our favourite number. Written in an engaging and witty sty...

  10. Variations in particulate matter over Indo-Gangetic Plains and Indo-Himalayan Range during four field campaigns in winter monsoon and summer monsoon: Role of pollution pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Abdelmaksoud, A. S.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Alghamdi, Mansour ِA.; Banerjee, Tirthankar; Bhat, Mudasir Ahmad; Chatterjee, A.; Choudhuri, Anil K.; Das, Trupti; Dhir, Amit; Dhyani, Pitamber Prasad; Gadi, Ranu; Ghosh, Sanjay; Kumar, Kireet; Khan, A. H.; Khoder, M.; Maharaj Kumari, K.; Kuniyal, Jagdish Chandra; Kumar, Manish; Lakhani, Anita; Mahapatra, Parth Sarathi; Naja, Manish; Pal, Dharam; Pal, S.; Rafiq, Mahammad; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad; Rashid, Irfan; Saikia, Prasenjit; Shenoy, D. M.; Sridhar, Vijay; Verma, Nidhi; Vyas, B. M.; Saxena, Mohit; Sharma, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Mandal, T. K.

    2017-04-01

    Both in-situ and space-borne observations reveal an extremely high loading of particulates over the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), all year around. With a burgeoning population and combustion sources (fossil fuels (FFs) and biofuels (BFs)) in close proximity to each other, the IGP is widely regarded as a hotspot for anthropogenic aerosol emission in South Asia. The deteriorating air quality over this region, particularly during winters, is a cause of major concern, since the pollutants undergo long range transport from their source regions to the Indo-Himalayan Range (IHR), Bay of Bengal (BoB) and other remote areas, polluting their pristine atmospheric conditions. Seasonal reversal in winds over the Indian mainland leads to an outflow of continental pollutants into the BoB during winters and a net advection of desert dust aerosols into the IGP from southwest Asia (SW-Asia), northwest India (NW-India) and northern Africa (N-Africa) during summers. Through the course of this study, four observational campaigns were conducted for sampling the ambient PM2.5 and PM10 during winter and summer seasons of 2014-2015, at multiple locations (18 sites) in the IGP, IHR, and semi-arid/arid sites towards their south and west, in order to accurately determine the inter-seasonal and inter-annual changes in the aerosol loading at the sites. We have also utilized data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra satellite for estimating the columnar Aerosol Optical Depth at 550 nm (AOD550) and data from EOS Terra and Aqua satellites for discovering openly burning fires in the vicinity of sampling sites. Determination of the major source regions and key transport pathways during both seasons have also been attempted, using back-trajectory cluster analyses, as well as receptor models such as PSCF and CWT.

  11. Long-range and depth-selective imaging of macroscopic targets using low-coherence and wide-field interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungsoo; Kang, Sungsam; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-03-01

    With the advancement of 3D display technology, 3D imaging of macroscopic objects has drawn much attention as they provide the contents to display. The most widely used imaging methods include a depth camera, which measures time of flight for the depth discrimination, and various structured illumination techniques. However, these existing methods have poor depth resolution, which makes imaging complicated structures a difficult task. In order to resolve this issue, we propose an imaging system based upon low-coherence interferometry and off-axis digital holographic imaging. By using light source with coherence length of 200 micro, we achieved the depth resolution of 100 micro. In order to map the macroscopic objects with this high axial resolution, we installed a pair of prisms in the reference beam path for the long-range scanning of the optical path length. Specifically, one prism was fixed in position, and the other prism was mounted on a translation stage and translated in parallel to the first prism. Due to the multiple internal reflections between the two prisms, the overall path length was elongated by a factor of 50. In this way, we could cover a depth range more than 1 meter. In addition, we employed multiple speckle illuminations and incoherent averaging of the acquired holographic images for reducing the specular reflections from the target surface. Using this newly developed system, we performed imaging targets with multiple different layers and demonstrated imaging targets hidden behind the scattering layers. The method was also applied to imaging targets located around the corner.

  12. Algebraic theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Algebraic number theory introduces students not only to new algebraic notions but also to related concepts: groups, rings, fields, ideals, quotient rings and quotient fields, homomorphisms and isomorphisms, modules, and vector spaces. Author Pierre Samuel notes that students benefit from their studies of algebraic number theory by encountering many concepts fundamental to other branches of mathematics - algebraic geometry, in particular.This book assumes a knowledge of basic algebra but supplements its teachings with brief, clear explanations of integrality, algebraic extensions of fields, Gal

  13. REVIEW OF IRRATIONAL NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafnani Hafnani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Study of the set properties is simple and rarely investigated at the Department of Mathematics. This paper examines some set properties on the irrational numbers. The study is about the properties applying to the real numbers which are a complete ordered field. However, the results of this study show that those properties do not imply to the irrational numbers, but the ordered property. The prove of the irrational numberby some examples is demonstrated in this study.

  14. The theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Pollard, Harry

    1998-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basics of algebraic number theory, this concise, well-written volume examines Gaussian primes; polynomials over a field; algebraic number fields; and algebraic integers and integral bases. After establishing a firm introductory foundation, the text explores the uses of arithmetic in algebraic number fields; the fundamental theorem of ideal theory and its consequences; ideal classes and class numbers; and the Fermat conjecture. 1975 edition. References. List of Symbols. Index.

  15. The theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Pollard, Harry

    1975-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basics of algebraic number theory, this concise, well-written volume examines Gaussian primes; polynomials over a field; algebraic number fields; and algebraic integers and integral bases. After establishing a firm introductory foundation, the text explores the uses of arithmetic in algebraic number fields; the fundamental theorem of ideal theory and its consequences; ideal classes and class numbers; and the Fermat conjecture. 1975 edition. References. List of Symbols. Index.

  16. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  17. Fundamentals of number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    1996-01-01

    This excellent textbook introduces the basics of number theory, incorporating the language of abstract algebra. A knowledge of such algebraic concepts as group, ring, field, and domain is not assumed, however; all terms are defined and examples are given - making the book self-contained in this respect.The author begins with an introductory chapter on number theory and its early history. Subsequent chapters deal with unique factorization and the GCD, quadratic residues, number-theoretic functions and the distribution of primes, sums of squares, quadratic equations and quadratic fields, diopha

  18. Comparison of rearing performances and intermuscular bone number in the mirror and nude genotypes of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. in a controlled field test in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Edithe Andria-Mananjara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nude carps, a genotype of common carp which are devoid of scales, have been banned from farmed populations of carp in Europe due to both the lethal effect of the N (nude gene when in homozygous state, and to the negative pleiotropic effects on growth and survival (especially in harsh conditions of this same gene in the heterozygous state, which produces the nude phenotype. In Madagascar, where climatic variations are less extreme than in Eastern Europe, the nude phenotype is valued both by farmers and consumers, for its good growth and supposed low number of intermuscular bones. We performed an on-farm experiment using a “common garden” design to control environmental variation, in order to compare the growth and survival, as well as the number of intermuscular bones of nude carp to two other common scale cover phenotypes of the same species, the mirror and scaly carps. We found that survival of nude carps was lower or equal to that of mirror carps at all stages of the farming process, while growth performance was lower than that of mirror carps in some ponds only. Globally, the biomass production per fish stocked was always lower in nude carp compared to mirror carp. The number of intermuscular bones was the same in nude, mirror and scaly carps. We conclude that as in Europe, it would be valuable to farm mirror rather than nude carps, as the supposed benefits of the latter are not supported by our experiment in typical Malagasy farming conditions.

  19. Effects of 2.45-GHz Electromagnetic Fields with a Wide Range of SARs on Micronucleus Formation in CHO-K1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koyama

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable discussion about the influence of high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HFEMF on the human body. In particular, HFEMF used for mobile phones may be of great concern for human health. In order to investigate the properties of HFEMF, we have examined the effects of 2.45-GHz EMF on micronucleus (MN formation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells. MN formation is induced by chromosomal breakage or inhibition of spindles during cell division and leads to cell damage. We also examined the influence of heat on MN formation, since HFEMF exposure causes a rise in temperature. CHO-K1 cells were exposed to HFEMF for 2 h at average specific absorption rates (SARs of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 W/kg, and the effects on these cells were compared with those in sham-exposed control cells. The cells were also treated with bleomycin alone as a positive control or with combined treatment of HFEMF exposure and bleomycin. Heat treatment was performed at temperatures of 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, and 42°C.The MN frequency in cells exposed to HFEMF at a SAR of lower than 50 W/kg did not differ from the sham-exposed controls, while those at SARs of 100 and 200 W/kg were significantly higher when compared with the sham-exposed controls. There was no apparent combined effect of HFEMF exposure and bleomycin treatment. On heat treatment at temperatures from 38–42°C, the MN frequency increased in a temperature-dependent manner. We also showed that an increase in SAR causes a rise in temperature and this may be connected to the increase in MN formation generated by exposure to HFEMF.

  20. Funny Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M. Porter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The struggle over cure rate measures in nineteenth-century asylums provides an exemplary instance of how, when used for official assessments of institutions, these numbers become sites of contestation. The evasion of goals and corruption of measures tends to make these numbers “funny” in the sense of becoming dis-honest, while the mismatch between boring, technical appearances and cunning backstage manipulations supplies dark humor. The dangers are evident in recent efforts to decentralize the functions of governments and corporations using incen-tives based on quantified targets.

  1. Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Sarıoğlu, Celal; Soulé, Christophe; Zeytin, Ayberk

    2017-01-01

    This lecture notes volume presents significant contributions from the “Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory” Summer School, held at Galatasaray University, Istanbul, June 2-13, 2014. It addresses subjects ranging from Arakelov geometry and Iwasawa theory to classical projective geometry, birational geometry and equivariant cohomology. Its main aim is to introduce these contemporary research topics to graduate students who plan to specialize in the area of algebraic geometry and/or number theory. All contributions combine main concepts and techniques with motivating examples and illustrative problems for the covered subjects. Naturally, the book will also be of interest to researchers working in algebraic geometry, number theory and related fields.

  2. Combined use of medium mass resolution and desolvation introduction system for accurate plutonium determination in the femtogram range by inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointurier, Fabien, E-mail: fabien.pointurier@cea.fr; Pottin, Anne-Claire; Hemet, Philippe; Hubert, Amelie

    2011-03-15

    Formation of a polyatomic species made of an atom of a heavy element like lead, mercury or iridium, and atoms abundant in plasma (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen) when using an inductively coupled plasma-sector-field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS) may lead to false detection of femtograms (fg) of plutonium or bias in the measured concentrations. Mathematical corrections, based on the measurement of heavy element concentrations in the sample solutions and determination of the extents of formation of the polyatomic interferences, are efficient but time-consuming and degrade detection limits. We describe and discuss a new method based on the combination of, on the one hand, medium mass resolution (MR) of the ICP-SFMS to separate plutonium isotopes physically from interfering polyatomic species, and, on the other, use of a desolvation introduction system (DIS) to enhance sensitivity, thus partly compensating for the loss of transmission due to use of a higher resolution. Plutonium peaks are perfectly separated from the major interfering species (PbO{sub 2}, HgAr, and IrO{sub 3}) with a mass resolution of {approx} 4000. The resulting nine-fold transmission loss is partly compensated by a five-fold increase in sensitivity obtained with the DIS and a lower background. The instrumental detection limits for plutonium isotopes, calculated for measurements of pure synthetic solutions, of the new method (known as MR-DIS method) and of the one currently used in the laboratory (LR method), based on a low mass resolution equal to 360, a microconcentric nebulizer and two in-line cooled spray chambers, are roughly equivalent, at around 0.2 fg ml{sup -1}. Regarding the measurement of real-life samples, the results obtained with both methods agree and the corresponding analytical detection limits for plutonium isotopes {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu and {sup 241}Pu are of a few fg.ml{sup -1} of sample solution, slightly lower with the MR-DIS method than with the current LR method

  3. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How many points are there on a line? Which is more in number- points on a line or lines in a plane? These are some natural questions that have occurred to us sometime or the other. It is interesting to note the difference between the two questions. Do we have to know how many points and lines there are to answer.

  4. Triangular Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Left: Anuradha S Garge completed her PhD from. Pune University in 2008 under the supervision of Prof. S A Katre. Her research interests include K-theory and number theory. Besides mathematics, she is interested in (singing) indian classical music and yoga. Right: Shailesh Shirali is. Director of Sahyadri School.

  5. Birth of puppies of predetermined sex after artificial insemination with a low number of sex-sorted, frozen-thawed spermatozoa in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yun-Fang; Chen, Fang-Liang; Tang, Shu-Sheng; Mao, Ai-Guo; Li, Li-Guang; Cheng, Lu-Guang; Chen, Chao; Li, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Bin; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Yue-Jun; Li, Jing; Wan, Jiu-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fertility and sex ratios after artificial insemination in dogs under field conditions. Semen was cryopreserved as unsorted (control) or was separated into X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm using a cell sorter. Sixty female dogs were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa of 100 × 106 unsorted (a dose in practice) and 4 × 106 sorted (X and Y group, respectively). A total of 20 dogs became pregnant and 126 puppies were born from the three groups. The percentage of parturition was similar for the X (5/20; 25.0%) and Y (4/20; 20.0%) group (P > 0.05), but lower than controls (11/20; 55.0%) (P technology potentially applicable for elite breeding units. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    , linolenic, arachidonic, and arachidic acids), nucleotide bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, and thymine), and carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and starch). The Z(PEA, eff) and Z(PI, eff) values have been found to change with energy and composition of the biological molecules. The energy......Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic...... dependence of the mass attenuation coefficient, Z(PEA, eff), and the mass energy-absorption coefficient, Z(PI, eff), is shown graphically and in tabular form. Significant differences of 17%-38% between Z(PI, eff) and Z(PEA, eff) occur in the energy region 5-100 keV. The reasons for these differences...

  7. Applied number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This textbook effectively builds a bridge from basic number theory to recent advances in applied number theory. It presents the first unified account of the four major areas of application where number theory plays a fundamental role, namely cryptography, coding theory, quasi-Monte Carlo methods, and pseudorandom number generation, allowing the authors to delineate the manifold links and interrelations between these areas.  Number theory, which Carl-Friedrich Gauss famously dubbed the queen of mathematics, has always been considered a very beautiful field of mathematics, producing lovely results and elegant proofs. While only very few real-life applications were known in the past, today number theory can be found in everyday life: in supermarket bar code scanners, in our cars’ GPS systems, in online banking, etc.  Starting with a brief introductory course on number theory in Chapter 1, which makes the book more accessible for undergraduates, the authors describe the four main application areas in Chapters...

  8. Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of Staphylococcus aureus: comparison with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa-typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo M Schouls

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is required to study the routes and rates of transmission of this pathogen. Currently available typing techniques are either resource-intensive or have limited discriminatory ability. Multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA may provide an alternative high throughput molecular typing tool with high epidemiological resolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new MLVA scheme for S. aureus was validated using 1681 S. aureus isolates collected from Dutch patients and 100 isolates from pigs. MLVA using 8 tandem repeat loci was performed in 2 multiplex PCRs and the fluorescently labeled PCR products were accurately sized on an automated DNA sequencer. The assessed number of repeats was used to create MLVA profiles consisting of strings of 8 integers that were used for categorical clustering. MLVA yielded 511 types that clustered into 11 distinct MLVA complexes which appeared to coincide with MLST clonal complexes. MLVA was at least as discriminatory as PFGE and twice as discriminatory as spa-sequence typing. There was considerable congruence between MLVA, spa-sequence typing and PFGE, at the MLVA complex level with group separation values of 95.1% and 89.2%. MLVA could not discriminate between pig-related MRSA strains isolated from humans and pigs, corroborating the high degree of relationship. MLVA was also superior in the grouping of MRSA isolates previously assigned to temporal-spatial clusters with indistinguishable SpaTypes, demonstrating its enhanced epidemiological usefulness. CONCLUSIONS: The MLVA described in this study is a high throughput, relatively low cost genotyping method for S. aureus that yields discrete and unambiguous data that can be used to assign biological meaningful genotypes and complexes and can be used for interlaboratory comparisons in network accessible databases. Results suggest that MLVA offsets the disadvantages of

  9. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 syste...

  10. Gene copy number gain of EGFR is a poor prognostic biomarker in gastric cancer: evaluation of 855 patients with bright-field dual in situ hybridization (DISH) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Eiji; Kuwata, Takeshi; Nagatsuma, Akiko Kawano; Nishida, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Aizawa, Masaki; Nitta, Hiroaki; Nagino, Masato; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    EGFR overexpression is a prognostic biomarker and is expected to be a predictive biomarker for anti-EGFR therapies in gastric cancer. However, few studies have reported the clinical impact of EGFR gene copy number (GCN) and its correlation with EGFR overexpression. We used dual in situ hybridization (DISH) to detect EGFR GCN and chromosome 7 centromere (CEN7) in a set of tissue microarrays representing 855 patients with gastric cancer. These data were compared with those of immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of EGFR expression to evaluate prognostic value. EGFR GCN gain (≥ 2.5 EGFR signals per cell) was detected in 194 patients (22.7%) and indicated poor prognosis. Among 194 patients, EGFR amplification (EGFR/CEN7 ≥ 2.0) was observed in 29 patients (14.9%), which was almost identical to the IHC 3+ subgroup and worst prognostic subgroup. Patients with EGFR GCN gain but not amplification, including those exhibiting polysomy, also exhibited poorer prognosis than GCN non-gain patients and were distributed between IHC 0/1+ and 2+ subgroups. GCN gain was frequently observed in patients with more advanced disease, but served as an independent prognostic factor regardless of the pathological stage. EGFR GCN gain is a more accurate prognostic biomarker than EGFR overexpression in patients with gastric cancer.

  11. Reticle level compensation for long range effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Thiago; Browning, Clyde; Thornton, Martin J.; Vannufel, Cyril; Schiavone, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Proximity Effects in electron beam lithography impact feature dimensions, pattern fidelity and uniformity. Electron scattering effects are commonly addressed using a mathematical model representing the radial exposure intensity distribution induced by a point electron source, commonly named Point Spread Function (PSF). PSF models are usually employed for correcting "short-range" and "long-range" backscattering effects up to 10μm to 15μm. It is well known that there are also some process related phenomena impacting pattern uniformity that have a wider range (fogging, chemical mechanical polishing -CMP- effects, etc.) which impacts up to a few millimeters or more. There are a number of commercial strategies for mitigating such long range effects based on data density. However, those traditional ones are usually performed within a single chip on a reticle field and ignore the presence of adjacent fields, neglecting their influence. Full field reticles can contain several different designs or arrayed chips in a multitude of layout placements. Reticle level jobdeck placing each design at specific sites, independent of each other can be used to account for the density of each pattern that has a relative impact on its neighbors, even if they are several millimeters away from offending data. Therefore, full field density analysis accounting for scribe frames and all neighboring patterns is required for reaching fidelity control requirements such as critical dimension (CD) and line end shortening (LES) on the full plate. This paper describes a technique to compensate long range effects going across chip boundaries to the full reticle exposure field. The extreme long range effects are also represented with a model that is calibrated according to the characteristics of the user's process. Data correction can be based on dose and geometry modulation. Uniform pattern dimensional control matching the user's specific process long range variability can be achieved with the

  12. Electric field induced short range to long range structural ordering and its influence on the Eu{sup +3} photoluminescence in the lead-free ferroelectric Na{sub 1/2}Bi{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaskar, Abhijeet; Rao, Badari Narayana; Ranjan, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, Bangalore 560012 (India); Thomas, Tiju, E-mail: tijuthomas@iitm.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-28

    Eu{sup +3} was incorporated into the lattice of a lead-free ferroelectric Na{sub 1/2}Bi{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} (NBT) as per the nominal formula Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5−x}Eu{sub x}TiO{sub 3}. This system was investigated with regard to the Eu{sup +3} photoluminescence (PL) and structural behaviour as a function of composition and electric field. Electric field was found to irreversibly change the features in the PL spectra and also in the x-ray diffraction patterns below the critical composition x = 0.025. Detailed analysis revealed that below the critical composition, electric field irreversibly suppresses the structural heterogeneity inherent of the host matrix NBT and brings about a long range ferroelectric state with rhombohedral (R3c) distortion. It is shown that the structural disorder on the nano-scale opens a new channel for radiative transition which manifests as a new emission line branching off from the main {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 0} line along with a concomitant change in the relative intensity of the other crystal field induced Stark lines with different J values. The study suggests that Eu{sup +3} luminescence can be used to probe the relative degree of field induced structural ordering in relaxor ferroelectrics and also in high performance piezoelectric alloys where electric field couples very strongly with the lattice and structural degrees of freedom.

  13. Long Range Effect of The M7.8 April 2015 Nepal Earth Quake on the Deep Groudwater Outflow in a Thousand-Mile-Away Geothermal Field in Southern China's Guangdong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Yu, S.; Xu, F.; Wang, X.; Yan, K.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Deep ground waters sustain high temperature and pressure and are susceptible to impact from an earthquake. How an earthquake would have been associated with long-range effect on geological environment of deep groundwater is a question of interest to the scientific community and general public. The massive Richter 8.1 Nepal Earthquake (on April 25, 2015) provided a rare opportunity to test the response of deep groundwater systems. Deep ground waters at elevated temperature would naturally flow to ground surface along preferential flow path such as a deep fault, forming geothermal water flows. Geothermal water flows are susceptible to stress variation and can reflect the physical conditions of supercritical hot water kilometers deep down inside the crust. This paper introduces the monitoring work on the outflow in Xijiang Geothermal Field of Xinyi City, Guangdong Province in southern China. The geothermal field is one of typical geothermal fields with deep faults in Guangdong. The geothermal spring has characteristic daily variation of up to 72% in flow rate, which results from being associated with a north-south run deep fault susceptible to earthquake event. We use year-long monitoring data to illustrate how the Nepal earthquake would have affected the flows at the field site over 2.5 thousand kilometers away. The irregularity of flow is judged by deviation from otherwise good correlation of geothermal spring flow with solid earth tidal waves. This work could potentially provide the basis for further study of deep groundwater systems and insight to earthquake prediction.

  14. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  15. Beurling generalized numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, Harold G; Cheung, Man Ping

    2016-01-01

    "Generalized numbers" is a multiplicative structure introduced by A. Beurling to study how independent prime number theory is from the additivity of the natural numbers. The results and techniques of this theory apply to other systems having the character of prime numbers and integers; for example, it is used in the study of the prime number theorem (PNT) for ideals of algebraic number fields. Using both analytic and elementary methods, this book presents many old and new theorems, including several of the authors' results, and many examples of extremal behavior of g-number systems. Also, the authors give detailed accounts of the L^2 PNT theorem of J. P. Kahane and of the example created with H. L. Montgomery, showing that additive structure is needed for proving the Riemann hypothesis. Other interesting topics discussed are propositions "equivalent" to the PNT, the role of multiplicative convolution and Chebyshev's prime number formula for g-numbers, and how Beurling theory provides an interpretation of the ...

  16. Evaluating the change in fingerprint directional patterns under variation of rotation and number of regions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dorasamy, K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Directional Patterns, which are formed by grouping regions of orientation fields falling within a specific range, vary under rotation and the number of regions. For fingerprint classification schemes, this can result in missclassification due...

  17. Logarithmic scaling in the near-dissipation range of turbulence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) can successfully replace the power law Sp ∼ rζp in the near-dissipation range. Figures 1 and 2 show the longitudinal second-order structure function of the velocity field calculated using the data obtained in a wind tunnel at Rλ = 206 and 487, respectively. Here Rλ is the so-called Taylor microscale Reynolds number.

  18. From objects to diagrams for ranges of functors

    CERN Document Server

    Gillibert, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    This work introduces tools from the field of category theory that make it possible to tackle a number of representation problems that have remained unsolvable to date (e.g. the determination of the range of a given functor). The basic idea is: if a functor lifts many objects, then it also lifts many (poset-indexed) diagrams.

  19. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  20. Advanced number theory with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mollin, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Algebraic Number Theory and Quadratic Fields Algebraic Number Fields The Gaussian Field Euclidean Quadratic Fields Applications of Unique Factorization Ideals The Arithmetic of Ideals in Quadratic Fields Dedekind Domains Application to Factoring Binary Quadratic Forms Basics Composition and the Form Class Group Applications via Ambiguity Genus Representation Equivalence Modulo p Diophantine Approximation Algebraic and Transcendental Numbers Transcendence Minkowski's Convex Body Theorem Arithmetic Functions The Euler-Maclaurin Summation Formula Average Orders The Riemann zeta-functionIntroduction to p-Adic AnalysisSolving Modulo pn Introduction to Valuations Non-Archimedean vs. Archimedean Valuations Representation of p-Adic NumbersDirichlet: Characters, Density, and Primes in Progression Dirichlet Characters Dirichlet's L-Function and Theorem Dirichlet DensityApplications to Diophantine Equations Lucas-Lehmer Theory Generalized Ramanujan-Nagell Equations Bachet's Equation The Fermat Equation Catalan and the A...

  1. A comparison between electric field strengths similarly generated and measured in the open air, in a shielded enclosure and in a large aircraft hangar, over frequency range 10 to 110 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, M.; Harrison, F.

    1980-02-01

    Field strength measurements over 10 to 110 MHz were made using a tracking generator counter, a spectrum analyzer, and a biconal antenna. The dimensions of the shielded enclosure were 6.1 x 3.66 x 3.0 m, and the concrete floored, metal hangar 80 x 40 x 10 m. It was found that in each polarization the hangar performance deviated much less from that in the open air than did the shielded enclosure performance. The latter shows deviations with modulus as great as 38 dB (certical pol) and 26 dB (horizontal pol). For any electric field strength measured in the shielded enclosure (in 10 kHz bandwidth in the range 10 to 110 MHz) the probability that the result would be at least 6 dB different from that similary obtained in the open air was 38% or 43.5% according to polarization and that when similarly measured in the hangar the corresponding probabilities were 0% and 1%. Hangar results were shown to lie much closer to the open air results than do the shielded enclosure results. This is further demonstrated by the rms deviations of the shielded enclosure and hangar readings from those of the open air.

  2. Distribution theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chung-Chun

    2008-01-01

    The book timely surveys new research results and related developments in Diophantine approximation, a division of number theory which deals with the approximation of real numbers by rational numbers. The book is appended with a list of challenging open problems and a comprehensive list of references. From the contents: Field extensions Algebraic numbers Algebraic geometry Height functions The abc-conjecture Roth''s theorem Subspace theorems Vojta''s conjectures L-functions.

  3. Elementary number theory with programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lewinter, Marty

    2015-01-01

    A successful presentation of the fundamental concepts of number theory and computer programming Bridging an existing gap between mathematics and programming, Elementary Number Theory with Programming provides a unique introduction to elementary number theory with fundamental coverage of computer programming. Written by highly-qualified experts in the fields of computer science and mathematics, the book features accessible coverage for readers with various levels of experience and explores number theory in the context of programming without relying on advanced prerequisite knowledge and con

  4. Combining image analysis, genome wide association studies and different field trials to reveal stable genetic regions related to panicle architecture and the number of spikelets per panicle in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Camila Rebolledo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Number of spikelets per panicle (NSP is a key trait to increase yield potential in rice (O. sativa. The architecture of the rice inflorescence which is mainly determined by the length and number of primary (PBL and PBN and secondary (SBL and SBN branches can influence NSP. Although several genes controlling panicle architecture and NSP in rice have been identified, there is little evidence of (i the genetic control of panicle architecture and NSP in different environments and (ii the presence of stable genetic associations with panicle architecture across environments. This study combines image phenotyping of 225 accessions belonging to a genetic diversity array of indica rice grown under irrigated field condition in two different environments and Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS based on the genotyping of the diversity panel, providing 83,374 SNPs.Accessions sown under direct seeding in one environement had reduced Panicle Length (PL, NSP, PBN, PBL, SBN and SBL compared to those established under transplanting in the second environment. Across environments, NSP was significantly and positively correlated with PBN, SBN and PBL. However, the length of branches (PBL and SBL was not significantly correlated with variables related to number of branches (PBN and SBN , suggesting independent genetic control.Twenty- three GWAS sites were detected with P-values ≤ 1.0E-04 and 27 GWAS sites with p ≤ 5.9E-04. We found 17 GWAS sites related to NSP, 10 for PBN and 11 for SBN, 7 for PBL and 11 for SBL. This study revealed new regions related to NSP, but only three associations were related to both branching number (PBN and SBN and NSP. Two GWAS sites associated with SBL and SBN were stable across contrasting environments and were not related to genes previously reported.The new regions reported in this study can help improving NSP in rice for both direct seeded and transplanted conditions. The integrated approach of high-throughput phenotyping, multi

  5. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Draft topical report for Task {number_sign}7.2 entitled ``Field scale test`` (January 10, 1996--December 31, 1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athmer, C.; Ho, S.V.; Hughes, B.M. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, and pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task {number_sign}7.2 summarizes the Field Scale Test conducted by Monsanto Company, DuPont, and General Electric.

  6. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  7. Prediction of the critical reduced electric field strength for carbon dioxide and its mixtures with copper vapor from Boltzmann analysis for a gas temperature range of 300 K to 4000 K at 0.4 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingwen; Guo, Xiaoxue; Zhao, Hu; Jia, Shenli; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2015-04-01

    The influence of copper vapor mixed in hot CO2 on dielectric breakdown properties of gas mixture at a fixed pressure of 0.4 MPa for a temperature range of 300 K-4000 K is numerically analyzed. First, the equilibrium composition of hot CO2 with different copper fractions is calculated using a method based on mass action law. The next stage is devoted to computing the electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) by solving the two-term Boltzmann equation. The reduced ionization coefficient, the reduced attachment coefficient, and the reduced effective ionization coefficient are then obtained based on the EEDF. Finally, the critical reduced electric field (E/N)cr is obtained. The results indicate that an increasing mole fraction of copper markedly reduces (E/N)cr of the CO2-Cu gas mixtures because of copper's low ionization potential and large ionization cross section. Additionally, the generation of O2 from the thermal dissociation of CO2 contributes to the increase of (E/N)cr of CO2-Cu hot gas mixtures from about 2000 K to 3500 K.

  8. On Fibonacci Numbers Which Are Elliptic Korselt Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-17

    On Fibonacci numbers which are elliptic Korselt numbers Florian Luca School of Mathematics University of the Witwatersrand P. O. Box Wits 2050, South...is a CM elliptic curve with CM field Q( √ −d), then the set of n for which the nth Fibonacci number Fn satisfies an elliptic Korselt criterion for Q...Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that

  9. Zero Prandtl-number rotating magnetoconvection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Manojit; Pal, Pinaki

    2017-12-01

    We investigate instabilities and chaos near the onset of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of electrically conducting fluids with free-slip, perfectly electrically and thermally conducting boundary conditions in the presence of uniform rotation about the vertical axis and horizontal external magnetic field by considering zero Prandtl-number limit (Pr → 0). Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) and low-dimensional modeling of the system are done for the investigation. Values of the Chandrasekhar number (Q) and the Taylor number (Ta) are varied in the range 0 field (Q field (Q ≥ 2) for one set of initial conditions. On the other hand, the quasiperiodic route to chaos at the onset is observed for another set of initial conditions. However, the rotation rate (value of Ta) also plays an important role in determining the nature of convection at the onset. Analysis of the system simultaneously with DNSs and low-dimensional modeling helps us to clearly identify different flow regimes concentrated near the onset of convection and understand their origins. The periodic or chaotic convection at the onset is found to be connected with rich bifurcation structures involving subcritical pitchfork, imperfect pitchfork, supercritical Hopf, imperfect homoclinic gluing, and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations.

  10. Observer variability in estimating numbers: An experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Census estimates of bird populations provide an essential framework for a host of research and management questions. However, with some exceptions, the reliability of numerical estimates and the factors influencing them have received insufficient attention. Independent of the problems associated with habitat type, weather conditions, cryptic coloration, ete., estimates may vary widely due only to intrinsic differences in observers? abilities to estimate numbers. Lessons learned in the field of perceptual psychology may be usefully applied to 'real world' problems in field ornithology. Based largely on dot discrimination tests in the laboratory, it was found that numerical abundance, density of objects, spatial configuration, color, background, and other variables influence individual accuracy in estimating numbers. The primary purpose of the present experiment was to assess the effects of observer, prior experience, and numerical range on accuracy in estimating numbers of waterfowl from black-and-white photographs. By using photographs of animals rather than black dots, I felt the results could be applied more meaningfully to field situations. Further, reinforcement was provided throughout some experiments to examine the influence of training on accuracy.

  11. Irrigated Acreage Within the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah Field Verification Global Position System (GPS) Waypoints

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Delineated irrigated acreage in 2005 was field verified from September 26 to 29 and November 1 to 3 , 2005. Fields were visited to confirm that irrigation had...

  12. Topics in number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    2002-01-01

    Classic two-part work now available in a single volume assumes no prior theoretical knowledge on reader's part and develops the subject fully. Volume I is a suitable first course text for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. Volume II requires a much higher level of mathematical maturity, including a working knowledge of the theory of analytic functions. Contents range from chapters on binary quadratic forms to the Thue-Siegel-Roth Theorem and the Prime Number Theorem. Includes numerous problems and hints for their solutions. 1956 edition. Supplementary Reading. List of Symb

  13. Diferencias de género en percepción visual de rango de color y profundidad Genre Differences on Visual Perception of Color Range and Depth of Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinosa Paola

    2003-12-01

    tridimensional form on color perception. Four sets of identical sticks where the angle from the horizontal plane varied for each, were used to determine the effect of spatial distribution of depth of field perception. The parameters taking into account were age, genre, associated visual defects for each individual evaluated. Our results show that the tridimensional form alters color perception but the range of color perceived was larger for women whereas depending on the angle from the horizontal plane we found genre differences on the depth of field perception.

  14. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  15. 7th International Conference on Elementary and Analytic Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Steuding, Jörn; Steuding, Rasa

    2016-01-01

    This book collects more than thirty contributions in memory of Wolfgang Schwarz, most of which were presented at the seventh International Conference on Elementary and Analytic Number Theory (ELAZ), held July 2014 in Hildesheim, Germany. Ranging from the theory of arithmetical functions to diophantine problems, to analytic aspects of zeta-functions, the various research and survey articles cover the broad interests of the well-known number theorist and cherished colleague Wolfgang Schwarz (1934-2013), who contributed over one hundred articles on number theory, its history and related fields. Readers interested in elementary or analytic number theory and related fields will certainly find many fascinating topical results among the contributions from both respected mathematicians and up-and-coming young researchers. In addition, some biographical articles highlight the life and mathematical works of Wolfgang Schwarz.

  16. From natural numbers to quaternions

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    This textbook offers an invitation to modern algebra through number systems of increasing complexity, beginning with the natural numbers and culminating with Hamilton's quaternions. Along the way, the authors carefully develop the necessary concepts and methods from abstract algebra: monoids, groups, rings, fields, and skew fields. Each chapter ends with an appendix discussing related topics from algebra and number theory, including recent developments reflecting the relevance of the material to current research. The present volume is intended for undergraduate courses in abstract algebra or elementary number theory. The inclusion of exercises with solutions also makes it suitable for self-study and accessible to anyone with an interest in modern algebra and number theory.

  17. Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns in Discrimination of Sporadic and Outbreak-Related Strains of Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skurnik Mikael

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We assessed the potential of multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for discriminating 104 sporadic and outbreak-related Yersinia enterocolitica (YE bio/serotype 3-4/O:3 and 2/O:9 isolates. MLVA using six VNTR markers was performed in two separate multiplex PCRs, and the fluorescently labeled PCR products were accurately sized on an automated DNA sequencer. Results MLVA discriminated 82 sporadic YE 3-4/O:3 and 2/O:9 strains into 77 types, whereas PFGE with the restriction enzyme NotI discriminated the strains into 23 different PFGE pulsotypes. The discriminatory index for a sporadic strain was 0.862 for PFGE and 0.999 for MLVA. MLVA confirmed that a foodborne outbreak in the city of Kotka, Finland in 2003 had been caused by a multiresistant YE 4/O:3 strain that was distinctly different from those of epidemiologically unrelated strains with an identical PFGE pulsotype. The multiresistance of Y. enterocolitica strains (19% of the sporadic strains correlated significantly (p = 0.002 with travel abroad. All of the multiresistant Y. enterocolitica strains belonged to four PFGE pulsotypes that did not contain any susceptible strains. Resistance to nalidixic acid was related to changes in codons 83 or 87 that stemmed from mutations in the gyrA gene. The conjugation experiments demonstrated that resistance to CHL, STR, and SUL was carried by a conjugative plasmid. Conclusions MLVA using six loci had better discriminatory power than PFGE with the NotI enzyme. MLVA was also a less labor-intensive method than PFGE and the results were easier to analyze. The conjugation experiments demonstrated that a resistance plasmid can easily be transferred between Y. enterocolitica strains. Antimicrobial multiresistance of Y. enterocolitica strains was significantly associated with travel abroad.

  18. Classical theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Ribenboim, Paulo

    2001-01-01

    Gauss created the theory of binary quadratic forms in "Disquisitiones Arithmeticae" and Kummer invented ideals and the theory of cyclotomic fields in his attempt to prove Fermat's Last Theorem These were the starting points for the theory of algebraic numbers, developed in the classical papers of Dedekind, Dirichlet, Eisenstein, Hermite and many others This theory, enriched with more recent contributions, is of basic importance in the study of diophantine equations and arithmetic algebraic geometry, including methods in cryptography This book has a clear and thorough exposition of the classical theory of algebraic numbers, and contains a large number of exercises as well as worked out numerical examples The Introduction is a recapitulation of results about principal ideal domains, unique factorization domains and commutative fields Part One is devoted to residue classes and quadratic residues In Part Two one finds the study of algebraic integers, ideals, units, class numbers, the theory of decomposition, iner...

  19. Log for Joint SEPM-Colorado Scientific Society field trip, September 20-21, 1986: late Paleozoic sedimentation and Laramide tectonics of the Sangre de Cristo Range, from Westcliffe to Crestone, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, David A.

    2001-01-01

    This trip will cross the northern Sangre de Cristo Range, from Westcliffe to Crestone, Colorado, by way of the Hermit Pass Road and the Rito Alto pack trail (Fig. 1 below; road and trail shown on Fig. 2). The traverse is designed to give the geologist a sample of the structure and stratigraphy of this part of the range. Emphasis will be on the relationship between the horst of the Sangre de Cristo Range and adjacent down-dropped valleys, on the Laramide thrusted structure of the range, and on the stratigraphy and depositional environments of Pennsylvanian and Permian sedimentary rocks in the range.The northern Sangre de Cristo Range is composed mostly of Early and Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks and Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks (see geologic map, Fig. 2). Proterozoic rocks, mostly gneiss and quartz monzonite, are overlain on the west side of the range by about 100 m of early Paleozoic quartzite, dolomite, limestone, and shale. Early Paleozoic rocks are in turn unconformably overlain by Pennsylvanian and Permian clastic rocks. Southeast of the range, in Huerfano Park, Paleozoic rocks are overlain by Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of the Raton basin.

  20. Large dynamic range optical metrology with radial shearing interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dahai; Qi, Xiaoping; Cao, Yiping; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Qionghua

    2009-05-01

    Optical metrology for elements with large dynamic range is very important, especially in aspheric components testing field. Cyclic radial shearing interferometer(CRSI) with a small radial shearing ratio of the expanded wavefront's radii to the contracted version's radii can obtain a small magnitude optical path difference(OPD) because the expanded wavefront and its contracted version nearly have the same shape and magnitude, especially for an optical component to be tested with rotationally symmetric surface. The number of fringe pattern can be decreased dramatically and recorded by CCD. This paper demonstrates the feasibility that CRSI could be used to measure an aspheric surface with large dynamic range and large aperture.

  1. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  2. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  3. Children, everyday numbers and school numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Maria Ignatius Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Relationship made by school children between “daily” numbers, or rather, numbers deployed outside the school, and numbers worked out in school under various circumstances, or rather, orally and in writing, is investigated. Analysis has been undertaken with ten six-year-old children by means of a clinical and critical method. Research results show that children interact with the environment and recognized the figures, name them, conjecture on their written mode and give coherent meaning to the figures. Analysis also demonstrates that children use numbers outside the school. They understand and exemplify the number’s different meanings in an out-class context. Since the children do not give a weighty meaning to “school” numbers, pedagogical activity with numbers fails to put into practice the recommendations of the official policy.

  4. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  5. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  6. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  7. Radio pill antenna range test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, W. F.; Kane, R. J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to investigate the potential of a proposed 'radio pill' beacon transmitter, a range test experiment was devised and carried out in the VHF frequency range. Calculations and previous work indicated that optimum sensitivity and, thus, distance would be obtained in this frequency range provided body radio-frequency (RF) absorption was not too great. A ferrite-core loop antenna is compatible with a pill geometry and has better radiation efficiency than an air core loop. The ferrite core may be a hollow cylinder with the electronics and batteries placed inside. However, this range test was only concerned with experimentally developing test range data on the ferrite core antenna itself. A one turn strap loop was placed around a 9.5 mm diameter by 18.3 mm long stack of ferrite cores. This was coupled to a 50 Omega transmission line by 76 mm of twisted pair line and a capacitive matching section. This assembly was excited by a signal generator at output levels of -10 to +10 dBm. Signals were received on a VHF receiver and tape recorder coupled to a 14 element, circularly polarized Yagi antenna at a height of 2.5 m. Field strength measurements taken at ranges of 440, 1100, and 1714 m. Maximum field strengths referenced to 0 dBm transmitter level were -107 to -110 dB at 440 m, -124 to -127 dBm at 1100 m, and -116 to -119 dBm at 1714 m when the antenna cylinder was horizontal. Field strengths with a vertical antenna were about 6 dB below these values. The latter transmit site was elevated and had a clear line-of-site path to the receiving site. The performance of this test antenna was better than that expected from method-of-moment field calculations. When this performance data is scaled to a narrow bandwidth receiving system, ground level receiving ranges of a few to 10 km can be expected. Clear line-of-sight ranges where either or both the transmitter and receiver are elevated could vary from several km to 100 km.

  8. Number words and number symbols a cultural history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Menninger, Karl

    1992-01-01

    Classic study discusses number sequence and language and explores written numerals and computations in many cultures. "The historian of mathematics will find much to interest him here both in the contents and viewpoint, while the casual reader is likely to be intrigued by the author's superior narrative ability.

  9. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  10. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  11. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  12. New data structures for orthogonal range searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2000-01-01

    We present new general techniques for static orthogonal range searching problems in two and higher dimensions. For the general range reporting problem in R3, we achieve query time O(log n+k) using space O(n log1+ε n), where n denotes the number of stored points and k the number of points to be re...

  13. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  14. Reynolds number and geometry effects in laminar axisymmetric isothermal counterflows

    KAUST Repository

    Scribano, Gianfranco

    2016-12-29

    The counterflow configuration is a canonical stagnation flow, featuring two opposed impinging round jets and a mixing layer across the stagnation plane. Although counterflows are used extensively in the study of reactive mixtures and other applications where mixing of two streams is required, quantitative data on the scaling properties of the flow field are lacking. The aim of this work is to characterize the velocity and mixing fields in isothermal counterflows over a wide range of conditions. The study features both experimental data from particle image velocimetry and results from detailed axisymmetric simulations. The scaling laws for the nondimensional velocity and mixture fraction are obtained as a function of an appropriate Reynolds number and the ratio of the separation distance of the nozzles to their diameter. In the range of flow configurations investigated, the nondimensional fields are found to depend primarily on the separation ratio and, to a lesser extent, the Reynolds number. The marked dependence of the velocity field with respect to the separation ratio is linked to a high pressure region at the stagnation point. On the other hand, Reynolds number effects highlight the role played by the wall boundary layer on the interior of the nozzles, which becomes less important as the separation ratio decreases. The normalized strain rate and scalar dissipation rate at the stagnation plane are found to attain limiting values only for high values of the Reynolds number. These asymptotic values depend markedly on the separation ratio and differ significantly from the values produced by analytical models. The scaling of the mixing field does not show a limiting behavior as the separation ratio decreases to the smallest practical value considered.

  15. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Midya, Bikashkali; Evrard, Jérémie; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Ramirez Suarez, Oscar Leonardo; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Thir...

  16. Tropical Real Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Markwig, Hannah; Rau, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we define tropical analogues of real Hurwitz numbers, i.e. numbers of covers of surfaces with compatible involutions satisfying prescribed ramification properties. We prove a correspondence theorem stating the equality of the tropical numbers with their real counterparts. We apply this theorem to the case of double Hurwitz numbers (which generalizes our result from arXiv:1409.8095).

  17. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  18. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  19. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  20. Species Diversity and Temporal Variation of the Orchid-Bee Fauna (Hymenoptera, Apidae) in a Conservation Gradient of a Rocky Field Area in the Espinhaço Range, State of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, M A; Moura, F R; Lourenço, A P

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the orchid-bee community in a conservation gradient of the high-altitude rocky fields in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Sampling was performed at two sites with different anthropic influences: a disturbed area (DA), with exotic plant species, and a preserved area (PA). From September 2009 through February 2011, males of euglossine bees were sampled using aromatic bait-traps. We collected a total of 819 specimens belonging to 11 species and three genera: Euglossa Latreille, Eulaema Lepeletier, and Eufriesea Cockerell. Despite the proximity of DA and PA (about 1.2 km), differences in orchid-bee abundance and richness were observed. Higher abundance was observed in the PA (n = 485) compared with the DA (n = 334). Eight species were common to both sites, and only the DA showed exclusive species. The DA showed higher diversity and higher estimated species richness. Euglossa leucotricha Rebêlo & Moure was the most abundant species at both sites followed by Euglossa melanotricha Moure. Higher abundance and richness were found in the warm rainy season. This study contributes to the knowledge of the orchid-bee fauna in the rocky fields and suggests that the greater resource availability in the DA was responsible for the higher orchid-bee diversity.

  1. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  2. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  3. Women In Numbers - Europe workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Bucur, Alina; Feigon, Brooke; Schneps, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Covering topics in graph theory, L-functions, p-adic geometry, Galois representations, elliptic fibrations, genus 3 curves and bad reduction, harmonic analysis, symplectic groups and mould combinatorics, this volume presents a collection of papers covering a wide swath of number theory emerging from the third iteration of the international Women in Numbers conference, “Women in Numbers - Europe” (WINE), held on October 14–18, 2013 at the CIRM-Luminy mathematical conference center in France. While containing contributions covering a wide range of cutting-edge topics in number theory, the volume emphasizes those concrete approaches that make it possible for graduate students and postdocs to begin work immediately on research problems even in highly complex subjects.

  4. Safety-in-numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune; Bjørnskau, Torkel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •26 studies of the safety-in-numbers effect are reviewed. •The existence of a safety-in-numbers effect is confirmed. •Results are consistent. •Causes of the safety-in-numbers effect are incompletely known.......Highlights •26 studies of the safety-in-numbers effect are reviewed. •The existence of a safety-in-numbers effect is confirmed. •Results are consistent. •Causes of the safety-in-numbers effect are incompletely known....

  5. A Comparative Survey of Lotka and Pao’s Laws Conformity with the Number of Researchers and Their Articles in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Fields in Web of Science (1986-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Osareh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine the validity of Lotka and Pao’s laws with authorship distribution of "Computer Science" and "Artificial Intelligence" fields using Web of Science (WoS during 1986 to 2009 and comparing the results of examinations. This study was done by using the methods of citation analysis which are scientometrics techniques. The research sample includes all articles in computer science and artificial intelligence fields indexed in the databases accessible via Web of Science during 1986-2009; that were stored in 500 records files and added to "ISI.exe" software for analysis to be performed. Then, the required output of this software was saved in Excel. There were 19150 articles in the computer science field (by 45713 authors and 958 articles in artificial intelligence field (by 2487 authors. Then for final counting and analyzing, the data converted to “Excel” spreadsheet software. Lotka and Pao’s laws were tested using both Lotka’s formula: (for Lotka’s Law; also for testing Pao’s law the values of the exponent n and the constant c are computed and Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit tests were applied. The results suggested that author productivity distribution predicted in “Lotka's generalized inverse square law” was not applicable to computer science and artificial intelligence; but Pao’s law was applicable to these subject areas. Survey both literature and original examining of Lotka and Pao’s Laws witnessed some aspects should be considered. The main elements involved in fitting in a bibliometrics method have been identified: using Lotka or Pao’s law, subject area, period of time, measurement of authors, and a criterion for assessing goodness-of-fit.

  6. Geoscience Field Education: A Recent Resurgence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Mogk, David W.

    2009-10-01

    Field education traditionally has been an integral component of undergraduate geoscience curricula. Students have learned the fundamentals of field techniques during core geology courses and have honed their field credentials during class-specific field trips, semester-long field courses, and capstone summer field camps. In many geoscience departments, field camp remains a graduation requirement, and more than 100 field camps currently are offered by U.S. universities and colleges (see http://geology.com/field-camp.shtml). During the past several decades, however, many geoscience departments have moved away from traditional geologic fieldwork and toward a broader theoretical and laboratory-intensive focus that encompasses a range of subdisciplines. Trends that have influenced these shifts include (1) the decline in the late twentieth century of the petroleum and mining industries, which have consistently championed the values of fieldwork; (2) a decrease in the number of professional jobs that incorporate field mapping; (3) a decline in the number of geoscience majors nationwide [American Geological Institute (AGI), 2009]; and (4) barriers to fieldwork, including time requirements, cost, liability, and decreasing access to field sites.

  7. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We now apply the theory of the Thue equation to obtain an effective bound on m. Indeed, by Lemma 3.2, we can write m2 = ba3 and m2 − 4 = cd3 with b, c cubefree. By the above, both b, c are bounded since they are cubefree and all their prime factors are less than e63727. Now we have a finite number of. Thue equations:.

  8. Making decisions from numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, E.

    1987-03-01

    Regulatory agencies require numbers to provide health protection. The manner in which these numbers are derived from animal experiments and human epidemiology is considered together with the limitations and inadequacies of these numbers. Some recent examples of risk assessment in Canada are given including asbestos, drinking water, and indoor air quality. The value of these numbers in providing a measure of the hazard in a wider perspective is stressed, although they can never be the sole determinant of public policy.

  9. Survey on fusible numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Junyan

    2012-01-01

    We point out that the recursive formula that appears in Erickson's presentation "Fusible Numbers" is incorrect, and pose an alternate conjecture about the structure of fusible numbers. Although we are unable to solve the conjecture, we succeed in establishing some basic properties of fusible numbers. We suggest some possible approaches to the conjecture, and list further problems in the final chapter.

  10. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  11. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Kohji

    2002-01-01

    The book includes several survey articles on prime numbers, divisor problems, and Diophantine equations, as well as research papers on various aspects of analytic number theory such as additive problems, Diophantine approximations and the theory of zeta and L-function Audience Researchers and graduate students interested in recent development of number theory

  12. Efeito da amplitude de movimento no número máximo de repetições no exercício supino livre Efectos de la amplitud de movimiento em el número máximo de repeticiones em el ejercicio de supino libre Effect of range of motion in the maximum number of repetitions in the bench press exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Vitor Lima

    2012-12-01

    about increases in strength using different ranges of motion (ROM. The aim of this study was to compare the maximum number of repetitions (MNR in bench press with two different ROM. Fourteen subjects performed familiarization and one repetition maximum (1 RM tests in sessions 1 and 2. MNR in four sets at 50% of 1 RM, one-minute rest with partial (ROMP and complete ROM (ROMC were performed in the third and fourth sessions. The ROMP used half of the bar vertical displacement compared to ROMC. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the experimental conditions, followed by post hoc Scheffe. There was a significant decrease of the MNR among sets, except from third to fourth sets in both ROM. MNR in all sets was higher in ROMP than ROMC. The reduction of ROM allow to perform higher number of repetitions.

  13. Graspable objects shape number processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia eRanzini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of numerical cognition represents an interesting case for action-based theories of cognition, since number is a special kind of abstract concept. Several studies have shown that within the parietal lobes adjacent neural regions code numerical magnitude and grasping-related information. This anatomical proximity between brain areas involved in number and sensorimotor processes may account for interactions between numerical magnitude and action. In particular, recent studies has demonstrated a causal role of action perception on numerical magnitude processing. If objects are represented in terms of actions (affordances, the causal role of action on number processing should extend to the case of objects affordances. This study investigates the relationship between numbers and objects affordances in two experiments, without (Experiment 1 or with (Experiment 2 a motor action execution (i.e., participants were asked to hold an object in their hands during the task. The task consisted in repeating aloud the odd or even digit within a pair depending on the type of the preceding or following object. Order of presentation (object-number vs. number-object, object type (graspable vs. ungraspable, object size (small vs. large, and Numerical magnitude (small vs. large were manipulated for each experiment. Experiment 1 showed a facilitation – in terms of quicker responses - for graspable over ungraspable objects preceded by numbers, and an effect of numerical magnitude after the presentation of graspable objects. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the action execution enhanced overall the sensitivity to numerical magnitude, however interfering with the effects of objects affordances on number processing. Overall, these findings demonstrate that numbers and graspable objects communicate with each other, supporting the view that abstract concepts may be grounded in motor experience.

  14. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  15. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  16. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  17. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  18. Study of interaction of ELF-ULF range (0.1-200 Hz) electromagnetic waves with the earth's crust and the ionosphere in the field of industrial power transmission lines (FENICS experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhamaletdinov, A. A.; Shevtsov, A. N.; Velikhov, E. P.; Skorokhodov, A. A.; Kolesnikov, V. E.; Korotkova, T. G.; Ryazantsev, P. A.; Efimov, B. V.; Kolobov, V. V.; Barannik, M. B.; Prokopchuk, P. I.; Selivanov, V. N.; Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Kopytenko, E. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Petrishchev, M. S.; Sergushin, P. A.; Tereshchenko, P. E.; Samsonov, B. V.; Birulya, M. A.; Smirnov, M. Yu.; Korja, T.; Yampolski, Yu. M.; Koloskov, A. V.; Baru, N. A.; Poljakov, S. V.; Shchennikov, A. V.; Druzhin, G. I.; Jozwiak, W.; Reda, J.; Shchors, Yu. G.

    2015-12-01

    This article is devoted to describing the theory, technique, and first experimental results of a control source electromagnetic (CSEM) study of the Earth's crust and ionosphere with the use of two mutually orthogonal industrial transmission lines 109 and 120 km in length in the frame of FENICS (Fennoscandian Electrical Conductivity from Natural and Induction Control Source Soundings) experiment. The main part of the measurements is executed on the territory of the Fennoscandian shield at distances from the first hundreds kilometers up to 856 km from the source with the purpose of the deep electromagnetic sounding of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. According to the results of these studies clarifying the parameters of "normal" (standard) geoelectric section of the lithosphere to a depth of 60-70 km, the anisotropy parameters are evaluated and a geothermal and rheological interpretation in conjunction with the analysis of the seismic data is executed. Furthermore, to study the propagation of ELF-LLF waves (0.1-200 Hz) in an "Earth-Ionosphere" waveguide, the measurements are carried out apart from Fennoscandian shield at distances up to 5600 km from the source (in Ukraine, Spitsbergen, Poland, Kamchatka, and other areas). According to the results of these studies, the experimental estimates of the influence of the ionosphere and of the displacement currents on the propagation of ELF-ULF waves in the upper half-space at the different azimuths generation of the primary field are obtained.

  19. Colored Range Searching in Linear Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Roberto; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2014-01-01

    In colored range searching, we are given a set of n colored points in d ≥ 2 dimensions to store, and want to support orthogonal range queries taking colors into account. In the colored range counting problem, a query must report the number of distinct colors found in the query range, while...... an answer to the colored range reporting problem must report the distinct colors in the query range. We give the first linear space data structure for both problems in two dimensions (d = 2) with o(n) worst case query time. We also give the first data structure obtaining almost-linear space usage and o...

  20. Dimensionless numbers in additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, T.; Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of many process variables and alloy properties on the structure and properties of additively manufactured parts are examined using four dimensionless numbers. The structure and properties of components made from 316 Stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and Inconel 718 powders for various dimensionless heat inputs, Peclet numbers, Marangoni numbers, and Fourier numbers are studied. Temperature fields, cooling rates, solidification parameters, lack of fusion defects, and thermal strains are examined using a well-tested three-dimensional transient heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results show that lack of fusion defects in the fabricated parts can be minimized by strengthening interlayer bonding using high values of dimensionless heat input. The formation of harmful intermetallics such as laves phases in Inconel 718 can be suppressed using low heat input that results in a small molten pool, a steep temperature gradient, and a fast cooling rate. Improved interlayer bonding can be achieved at high Marangoni numbers, which results in vigorous circulation of liquid metal, larger pool dimensions, and greater depth of penetration. A high Fourier number ensures rapid cooling, low thermal distortion, and a high ratio of temperature gradient to the solidification growth rate with a greater tendency of plane front solidification.

  1. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  2. Unification and local baryon number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileviez Pérez, Pavel; Ohmer, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the possibility to find an ultraviolet completion of the simple extensions of the Standard Model where baryon number is a local symmetry. In the context of such theories one can understand the spontaneous breaking of baryon number at the low scale and the proton stability. We find a simple theory based on SU(4)C ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ SU(3)R where baryon number is embedded in a non-Abelian gauge symmetry. We discuss the main features of the theory and the possible implications for experiments. This theory predicts stable colored and/or fractional electric charged fields which can give rise to very exotic signatures at the Large Hadron Collider experiments such as CMS and ATLAS. We further discuss the embedding in a gauge theory based on SU(4)C ⊗ SU(4)L ⊗ SU(4)R which could define the way to achieve the unification of the gauge interactions at the low scale.

  3. Fluctuation dynamo and turbulent induction at small Prandtl number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2010-10-01

    We study the Lagrangian mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo at zero Prandtl number and infinite magnetic Reynolds number, in the Kazantsev-Kraichnan model of white-noise advection. With a rough velocity field corresponding to a turbulent inertial range, flux freezing holds only in a stochastic sense. We show that field lines arriving to the same point which were initially separated by many resistive lengths are important to the dynamo. Magnetic vectors of the seed field that point parallel to the initial separation vector arrive anticorrelated and produce an "antidynamo" effect. We also study the problem of "magnetic induction" of a spatially uniform seed field. We find no essential distinction between this process and fluctuation dynamo, both producing the same growth rates and small-scale magnetic correlations. In the regime of very rough velocity fields where fluctuation dynamo fails, we obtain the induced magnetic energy spectra. We use these results to evaluate theories proposed for magnetic spectra in laboratory experiments of turbulent induction.

  4. Algebra and Number Theory An Integrated Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Martyn; Subbotin, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Explore the main algebraic structures and number systems that play a central role across the field of mathematics Algebra and number theory are two powerful branches of modern mathematics at the forefront of current mathematical research, and each plays an increasingly significant role in different branches of mathematics, from geometry and topology to computing and communications. Based on the authors' extensive experience within the field, Algebra and Number Theory has an innovative approach that integrates three disciplines-linear algebra, abstract algebra, and number theory-into one compr

  5. The simple complex numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A new simple geometrical interpretation of complex numbers is presented. It differs from their usual interpretation as points in the complex plane. From the new point of view the complex numbers are rather operations on vectors than points. Moreover, in this approach the real, imaginary and complex numbers have similar interpretation. They are simply some operations on vectors. The presented interpretation is simpler, more natural, and better adjusted to possible applications in geometry and ...

  6. Numbers, sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Hirst, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Number and geometry are the foundations upon which mathematics has been built over some 3000 years. This book is concerned with the logical foundations of number systems from integers to complex numbers. The author has chosen to develop the ideas by illustrating the techniques used throughout mathematics rather than using a self-contained logical treatise. The idea of proof has been emphasised, as has the illustration of concepts from a graphical, numerical and algebraic point of view. Having laid the foundations of the number system, the author has then turned to the analysis of infinite proc

  7. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the "law of small numbers" using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in th...

  8. The adventure of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Godefroy, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Numbers are fascinating. The fascination begins in childhood, when we first learn to count. It continues as we learn arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and so on. Eventually, we learn that numbers not only help us to measure the world, but also to understand it and, to some extent, to control it. In The Adventure of Numbers, Gilles Godefroy follows the thread of our expanding understanding of numbers to lead us through the history of mathematics. His goal is to share the joy of discovering and understanding this great adventure of the mind. The development of mathematics has been punctuated by a n

  9. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus Bjørn; Suetens, Sigrid; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We investigate the “law of small numbers” using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto...... numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in the way predicted by the law of small numbers as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular...

  10. Intuitive numbers guide decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Peters

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring reaction times to number comparisons is thought to reveal a processing stage in elementary numerical cognition linked to internal, imprecise representations of number magnitudes. These intuitive representations of the mental number line have been demonstrated across species and human development but have been little explored in decision making. This paper develops and tests hypotheses about the influence of such evolutionarily ancient, intuitive numbers on human decisions. We demonstrate that individuals with more precise mental-number-line representations are higher in numeracy (number skills consistent with previous research with children. Individuals with more precise representations (compared to those with less precise representations also were more likely to choose larger, later amounts over smaller, immediate amounts, particularly with a larger proportional difference between the two monetary outcomes. In addition, they were more likely to choose an option with a larger proportional but smaller absolute difference compared to those with less precise representations. These results are consistent with intuitive number representations underlying: a perceived differences between numbers, b the extent to which proportional differences are weighed in decisions, and, ultimately, c the valuation of decision options. Human decision processes involving numbers important to health and financial matters may be rooted in elementary, biological processes shared with other species.

  11. Truthful approximations to range voting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsika, Aris; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    We consider the fundamental mechanism design problem of approximate social welfare maximization under general cardinal preferences on a finite number of alternatives and without money. The well-known range voting scheme can be thought of as a non-truthful mechanism for exact social welfare......-unilateral has an approximation ratio between 0.610 and 0.611, the best ordinal mechanism has an approximation ratio between 0.616 and 0.641, while the best mixed-unilateral mechanism has an approximation ratio bigger than 0.660. In particular, the best mixed-unilateral non-ordinal (i.e., cardinal) mechanism...

  12. Certain number-theoretic episodes in algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Sivaramakrishnan, R

    2006-01-01

    Many basic ideas of algebra and number theory intertwine, making it ideal to explore both at the same time. Certain Number-Theoretic Episodes in Algebra focuses on some important aspects of interconnections between number theory and commutative algebra. Using a pedagogical approach, the author presents the conceptual foundations of commutative algebra arising from number theory. Self-contained, the book examines situations where explicit algebraic analogues of theorems of number theory are available. Coverage is divided into four parts, beginning with elements of number theory and algebra such as theorems of Euler, Fermat, and Lagrange, Euclidean domains, and finite groups. In the second part, the book details ordered fields, fields with valuation, and other algebraic structures. This is followed by a review of fundamentals of algebraic number theory in the third part. The final part explores links with ring theory, finite dimensional algebras, and the Goldbach problem.

  13. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  14. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  15. Littlewood and Number Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    doctoral thesis, R Balasubramanian [8] improved this further and showed that one can take θ = 1/3. 4. Littlewood's Problem on Diophantine Ap- proximation. For any real number x, let ||x|| denote the distance of x to the nearest integer. For any pair of real numbers α, β, Littlewood conjectured that lim inf n→∞ n||nα||||nβ|| = 0.

  16. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 28-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetens, Sigrid; Galbo-Jørgensen, Claus B.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the ‘law of small numbers’ using a data set on lotto gambling that allows us to measure players’ reactions to draws. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week, we find that those who do change react on average as predicted by the law of small numbers...

  18. The Congruent Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Mathematics, especially number theory, one of- .... pear on the list. Continuing in this way ·would exhaust one's computing resources, not to mention one's patience! Also, this procedure is of no avail if n is not a congruent number. ..... If p and q are odd primes, then the Legendre symbol (p/q) is 1 if P is a quadratic residue.

  19. Avogadro's Number Ferromagnetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Avogadro's number, usually denoted by N[subscript A], plays a fundamental role in both physics and chemistry. It defines the extremely useful concept of the mole, which is the base unit of the amount of matter in the international system of units. The fundamental character of this number can also be illustrated by its appearance in the definitions…

  20. Number 1, January

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dual equations for SU(2) gauge fields and Charap's equations for chiral invariant model of pion dynamics and a comparative discussion among the three . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......................... Susanto Chakraborty and Pranab Krishna Chanda. 535 ...

  1. Sound propagation from a semi-open shooting range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Berg, F. van den

    2011-01-01

    Semi-open shooting ranges, in contrast to a fully open shooting range, are often used in the densely populated area of the Netherlands. The Ministry of Defense operates a number of these ranges. In these shooting ranges above the line of fire a number of screens are situated for safety precautions

  2. Compressed Data Structures for Range Searching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vind, Søren Juhl

    2015-01-01

    matrices and web graphs. Our contribution is twofold. First, we show how to compress geometric repetitions that may appear in standard range searching data structures (such as K-D trees, Quad trees, Range trees, R-trees, Priority R-trees, and K-D-B trees), and how to implement subsequent range queries......We study the orthogonal range searching problem on points that have a significant number of geometric repetitions, that is, subsets of points that are identical under translation. Such repetitions occur in scenarios such as image compression, GIS applications and in compactly representing sparse...... that supports range searching....

  3. Advanced number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Harvey

    1980-01-01

    ""A very stimulating book ... in a class by itself."" - American Mathematical MonthlyAdvanced students, mathematicians and number theorists will welcome this stimulating treatment of advanced number theory, which approaches the complex topic of algebraic number theory from a historical standpoint, taking pains to show the reader how concepts, definitions and theories have evolved during the last two centuries. Moreover, the book abounds with numerical examples and more concrete, specific theorems than are found in most contemporary treatments of the subject.The book is divided into three parts

  4. Elementary theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Sierpinski, Waclaw

    1988-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of this work, considerable progress has been made in many of the questions examined. This edition has been updated and enlarged, and the bibliography has been revised.The variety of topics covered here includes divisibility, diophantine equations, prime numbers (especially Mersenne and Fermat primes), the basic arithmetic functions, congruences, the quadratic reciprocity law, expansion of real numbers into decimal fractions, decomposition of integers into sums of powers, some other problems of the additive theory of numbers and the theory of Gaussian

  5. Elementary number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dudley, Underwood

    2008-01-01

    Ideal for a first course in number theory, this lively, engaging text requires only a familiarity with elementary algebra and the properties of real numbers. Author Underwood Dudley, who has written a series of popular mathematics books, maintains that the best way to learn mathematics is by solving problems. In keeping with this philosophy, the text includes nearly 1,000 exercises and problems-some computational and some classical, many original, and some with complete solutions. The opening chapters offer sound explanations of the basics of elementary number theory and develop the fundamenta

  6. The emergence of number

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, John N

    1987-01-01

    This book presents detailed studies of the development of three kinds of number. In the first part the development of the natural numbers from Stone-Age times right up to the present day is examined not only from the point of view of pure history but also taking into account archaeological, anthropological and linguistic evidence. The dramatic change caused by the introduction of logical theories of number in the 19th century is also treated and this part ends with a non-technical account of the very latest developments in the area of Gödel's theorem. The second part is concerned with the deve

  7. Numbers and computers

    CERN Document Server

    Kneusel, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    This is a book about numbers and how those numbers are represented in and operated on by computers. It is crucial that developers understand this area because the numerical operations allowed by computers, and the limitations of those operations, especially in the area of floating point math, affect virtually everything people try to do with computers. This book aims to fill this gap by exploring, in sufficient but not overwhelming detail, just what it is that computers do with numbers. Divided into two parts, the first deals with standard representations of integers and floating point numb

  8. Supersymmetric Displaced Number States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy R. Zypman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce, generate and study a family of supersymmetric displaced number states (SDNS that can be considered generalized coherent states of the supersymmetric harmonic oscillator. The family is created from the seminal supersymmetric boson-fermion entangling annihilation operator introduced by Aragone and Zypman and later expanded by Kornbluth and Zypman. Using the momentum representation, the states are obtained analytically in compact form as displaced supersymmetric number states. We study their position-momentum uncertainties, and their bunchiness by classifying them according to their Mandel Q-parameter in phase space. We were also able to find closed form analytical representations in the space and number basis.

  9. Brief history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The world around us is saturated with numbers. They are a fundamental pillar of our modern society, and accepted and used with hardly a second thought. But how did this state of affairs come to be? In this book, Leo Corry tells the story behind the idea of number from the early days of the Pythagoreans, up until the turn of the twentieth century. He presents an overview of how numbers were handled and conceived in classical Greek mathematics, in the mathematics of Islam, in European mathematics of the middle ages and the Renaissance, during the scientific revolution, all the way through to the

  10. Graph pegging numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Helleloid, Geir; Khalid, Madeeha; Moulton, David Petrie; Wood, Philip Matchett

    2008-01-01

    In graph pegging, we view each vertex of a graph as a hole into which a peg can be placed, with checker-like ``pegging moves'' allowed. Motivated by well-studied questions in graph pebbling, we introduce two pegging quantities. The pegging number (respectively, the optimal pegging number) of a graph is the minimum number of pegs such that for every (respectively, some) distribution of that many pegs on the graph, any vertex can be reached by a sequence of pegging moves. We prove several basic...

  11. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  12. Number Theory, Analysis and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfeld, Dorian; Jones, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Serge Lang was an iconic figure in mathematics, both for his own important work and for the indelible impact he left on the field of mathematics, on his students, and on his colleagues. Over the course of his career, Lang traversed a tremendous amount of mathematical ground. As he moved from subject to subject, he found analogies that led to important questions in such areas as number theory, arithmetic geometry, and the theory of negatively curved spaces. Lang's conjectures will keep many mathematicians occupied far into the future. In the spirit of Lang's vast contribution to mathematics, th

  13. Really big numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2014-01-01

    In the American Mathematical Society's first-ever book for kids (and kids at heart), mathematician and author Richard Evan Schwartz leads math lovers of all ages on an innovative and strikingly illustrated journey through the infinite number system. By means of engaging, imaginative visuals and endearing narration, Schwartz manages the monumental task of presenting the complex concept of Big Numbers in fresh and relatable ways. The book begins with small, easily observable numbers before building up to truly gigantic ones, like a nonillion, a tredecillion, a googol, and even ones too huge for names! Any person, regardless of age, can benefit from reading this book. Readers will find themselves returning to its pages for a very long time, perpetually learning from and growing with the narrative as their knowledge deepens. Really Big Numbers is a wonderful enrichment for any math education program and is enthusiastically recommended to every teacher, parent and grandparent, student, child, or other individual i...

  14. Quantum random number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  15. Solar Indices - Sunspot Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  16. Drawing a random number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard; Sørensen, Majken Vildrik

    2006-01-01

    highly uniform multidimensional draws, which are highly relevant for todays traffic models. This paper shows among others combined shuffling and scrambling seems needless, that scrambling gives the lowest correlation and that there are detectable differences between random numbers, dependent...

  17. Bernoulli-Carlitz and Cauchy-Carlitz numbers with Stirling-Carlitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Hajime; Komatsu, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the Cauchy-Carlitz number was defined as the counterpart of the Bernoulli-Carlitz number. Both numbers can be expressed explicitly in terms of so-called Stirling-Carlitz numbers. In this paper, we study the second analogue of Stirling-Carlitz numbers and give some general formulae, including Bernoulli and Cauchy numbers in formal power series with complex coefficients, and Bernoulli-Carlitz and Cauchy-Carlitz numbers in function fields. We also give some applications of Hasse-Teichm...

  18. Platinum sensors versus KTY and NTC in low temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienand, K. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite GmbH, Kleinostheim (Germany); Gerwen, P. van [Heraeus Sensor-Nite N.V., Leuven (Netherlands); Reinwald, H.J. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite Int., Freiberg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    On the automotive electronics market, negative temperature coefficient sensors (NTC) and silicon spreading resistance sensors (KTY) have increasingly been used above all in the temperature range between -40 and +150 C. The latest demands of the automotive industry show that these tight temperature limits will no longer meet the requirements in the future. Moreover, the automotive industry is more frequently expanding the temperature measuring range to between -55 C and 180 C, for example in engine oil. This trend can also be seen in the commercial vehicle field, for example with retarders which also heat the oil to a great extent. Due to these increasingly more demanding conditions, platinum (Pt) sensors are being used more and more, as they have a number of advantages compared with NTCs or KTYs. The pros and cons of using these three sensor types are explained in more detail in the following. (orig.)

  19. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries...... in optimal O(k) time. The structure uses O(n) words of space and can be constructed in O(n logn) time. The data structure can be extended to solve the online version of the problem, where the elements in A[i..j] are reported one-by-one in sorted order, in O(1) worst-case time per element. The problem...... is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  20. Politics of aviation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  1. Report number codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  2. Number 1, July

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Generalized Grüneisen parameters and low temperature limit of lattice ther- mal expansion of cadmium and zirconium . .... Present status of lattice QCD at nonzero T and µ ........... Rajiv V Gavai. 885. Nucleus–nucleus ... dence on relative magnitude of probe and coherent field Rabi frequencies in three-level Λ system .

  3. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  4. New magic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Kruecken, R

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear shell model is a benchmark for the description of the structure of atomic nuclei. The magic numbers associated with closed shells have long been assumed to be valid across the whole nuclear chart. Investigations in recent years of nuclei far away from nuclear stability at facilities for radioactive ion beams have revealed that the magic numbers may change locally in those exotic nuclei leading to the disappearance of classic shell gaps and the appearance of new magic numbers. These changes in shell structure also have important implications for the synthesis of heavy elements in stars and stellar explosions. In this review a brief overview of the basics of the nuclear shell model will be given together with a summary of recent theoretical and experimental activities investigating these changes in the nuclear shell structure.

  5. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  6. Geometry of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Peter M

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains a fairly complete picture of the geometry of numbers, including relations to other branches of mathematics such as analytic number theory, diophantine approximation, coding and numerical analysis. It deals with convex or non-convex bodies and lattices in euclidean space, etc.This second edition was prepared jointly by P.M. Gruber and the author of the first edition. The authors have retained the existing text (with minor corrections) while adding to each chapter supplementary sections on the more recent developments. While this method may have drawbacks, it has the definit

  7. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    The area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service  

  8. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    he area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service

  9. Earthquake number forecasts testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Yan Y.

    2017-10-01

    We study the distributions of earthquake numbers in two global earthquake catalogues: Global Centroid-Moment Tensor and Preliminary Determinations of Epicenters. The properties of these distributions are especially required to develop the number test for our forecasts of future seismic activity rate, tested by the Collaboratory for Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP). A common assumption, as used in the CSEP tests, is that the numbers are described by the Poisson distribution. It is clear, however, that the Poisson assumption for the earthquake number distribution is incorrect, especially for the catalogues with a lower magnitude threshold. In contrast to the one-parameter Poisson distribution so widely used to describe earthquake occurrences, the negative-binomial distribution (NBD) has two parameters. The second parameter can be used to characterize the clustering or overdispersion of a process. We also introduce and study a more complex three-parameter beta negative-binomial distribution. We investigate the dependence of parameters for both Poisson and NBD distributions on the catalogue magnitude threshold and on temporal subdivision of catalogue duration. First, we study whether the Poisson law can be statistically rejected for various catalogue subdivisions. We find that for most cases of interest, the Poisson distribution can be shown to be rejected statistically at a high significance level in favour of the NBD. Thereafter, we investigate whether these distributions fit the observed distributions of seismicity. For this purpose, we study upper statistical moments of earthquake numbers (skewness and kurtosis) and compare them to the theoretical values for both distributions. Empirical values for the skewness and the kurtosis increase for the smaller magnitude threshold and increase with even greater intensity for small temporal subdivision of catalogues. The Poisson distribution for large rate values approaches the Gaussian law, therefore its skewness

  10. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Iwaniec, Henryk

    2004-01-01

    Analytic Number Theory distinguishes itself by the variety of tools it uses to establish results, many of which belong to the mainstream of arithmetic. One of the main attractions of analytic number theory is the vast diversity of concepts and methods it includes. The main goal of the book is to show the scope of the theory, both in classical and modern directions, and to exhibit its wealth and prospects, its beautiful theorems and powerful techniques. The book is written with graduate students in mind, and the authors tried to balance between clarity, completeness, and generality. The exercis

  11. Individual differences in BEV drivers' range stress during first encounter of a critical range situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Thomas; Rauh, Nadine; Krems, Josef F

    2016-11-01

    It is commonly held that range anxiety, in the form of experienced range stress, constitutes a usage barrier, particularly during the early period of battery electric vehicle (BEV) usage. To better understand factors that play a role in range stress during this critical period of adaptation to limited-range mobility, we examined individual differences in experienced range stress in the context of a critical range situation. In a field experiment, 74 participants drove a BEV on a 94-km round trip, which was tailored to lead to a critical range situation (i.e., small available range safety buffer). Higher route familiarity, trust in the range estimation system, system knowledge, subjective range competence, and internal control beliefs in dealing with technology were clearly related to lower experienced range stress; emotional stability (i.e., low neuroticism) was partly related to lower range stress. These results can inform strategies aimed at reducing range stress during early BEV usage, as well as contribute to a better understanding of factors that drive user experience in low-resource systems, which is a key topic in the field of green ergonomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Categories of Large Numbers in Line Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, David; Charlesworth, Arthur; Ottmar, Erin

    2017-01-01

    How do people stretch their understanding of magnitude from the experiential range to the very large quantities and ranges important in science, geopolitics, and mathematics? This paper empirically evaluates how and whether people make use of numerical categories when estimating relative magnitudes of numbers across many orders of magnitude. We…

  13. Safety in glomerular numbers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    A low nephron number is, according to Brenner's hyperfiltration hypothesis, associated with hypertension, glomerular damage and proteinuria, and starts a vicious cycle that ends in renal failure over the long term. Nephron endowment is set during foetal life, and there is no formation of nephrons

  14. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the "law of small numbers" using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto

  15. The magic of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Eric Temple

    1991-01-01

    From one of the foremost interpreters for lay readers of the history and meaning of mathematics: a stimulating account of the origins of mathematical thought and the development of numerical theory. It probes the work of Pythagoras, Galileo, Berkeley, Einstein, and others, exploring how ""number magic"" has influenced religion, philosophy, science, and mathematics

  16. Paint by Numbers Revived!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Nic

    2012-01-01

    Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

  17. Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis. Biman Nath. Article-in-a-Box Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 7-7. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/08/0007-0007. Author Affiliations.

  18. Littlewood and Number Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 9. Littlewood and Number Theory. M Ram Murty. General Article Volume 18 Issue 9 September 2013 pp 789-798. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/09/0789-0798. Keywords.

  19. Context and Number Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin W.

    1979-01-01

    A replication study was conducted to determine whether conservation-of-number performance would be improved by questioning the subject only after the transformation is performed, rather than before and after the transformation, as is done in the standard conservation test. Subjects were preschoolers, aged 0-4 to 5-7. (Author/MP)

  20. Surveys in Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alladi, Krishnaswami

    2008-01-01

    Contains chapters on number theory and related topics. This title covers topics that focus on multipartitions, congruences and identities, the formulas of Koshliakov and Guinand in Ramanujan's "Lost Notebook", alternating sign matrices and the Weyl character formulas, theta functions in complex analysis, and elliptic functions

  1. Volume 9 Number 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Volume 9 Number 2 May 2010 PP. 131 – 136 ... The study assessed the effectiveness of Songhai-Delta fish culture training programme. A structured ..... The high adoption of these technologies might be due to the fact that these farmers are fish farmers and would like to adopt improved technologies that would meet their ...

  2. Introducing Complex Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgian, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    One of the difficulties in any teaching of mathematics is to bridge the divide between the abstract and the intuitive. Throughout school one encounters increasingly abstract notions, which are more and more difficult to relate to everyday experiences. This article examines a familiar approach to thinking about negative numbers, that is an…

  3. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JX) over Q, and Q is a subfield of Q( .JX). This process can easily be generalised. For in- stance, let p be a prime and ( = e27ri/p. Let Q(() be the set of complex numbers of the form XO+Xl( +X2(2+ .. '+Xp_2(p-2 with Xi rational. Note that 1 + ( + (2 ...

  4. Volume 9 Number 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    for egg-laying industry in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria utilizing Cobb-Douglas production function based on .... machinery, equipment, implements, cost of machine hire, transportation, interest, charges on loan. X2 = Farm size measured by total number of birds housed. л1*, л2* ... using the computer software frontier version.

  5. Physical Constraints of Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mueckenheim, W.

    2005-01-01

    All sciences need and many arts apply mathematics whereas mathematics seems to be independent of all of them, but only based upon logic. This conservative concept, however, needs to be revised because, contrary to Platonic idealism (frequently called "realism" by mathematicians), mathematical ideas, notions, and, in particular, numbers are not at all independent of physical laws and prerequisites.

  6. Volume 9 Number 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) contents in cassava products. Studies on .... Parameters. Mean ± S.D. Range minimum maximum. Minimum - Maximum. pH. Dissolved oxygen (mg/l). Temperature (oC). Nitrite (mg/l). Ammonia (mg/l) ... Table 3: Proximate Composition mineral content and cyanide levels of the experimental diets.

  7. Compact ranges in antenna and RCS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audone, B.

    1989-09-01

    With the increased complexity and extended frequency range of operation model measurements and far field test ranges are no longer suitable to satisfy the demand of accurate testing. Moreover plane wave test conditions are required for Radar Cross Section (RCS) measurements which represent a key point in stealth technology. Compact ranges represent the best test facilities available presently since they allow for indoor measurements under far field conditions in real time without any calculation effort. Several types of compact ranges are described and compared discussing their relevant advantages with regard to RCS and antenna measurements. In parallel to measuring systems sophisticated computer models were developed with such a high level of accuracy that it is questionable whether experiments give better results than theory. Tests performed on simple structures show the correlation between experimental results and theoretical ones derived on the basis of GTD computer codes.

  8. Spectra of turbulently advected scalars that have small Schmidt number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Reginald J.

    2017-09-01

    Exact statistical equations are derived for turbulent advection of a passive scalar having diffusivity much larger than the kinematic viscosity, i.e., small Schmidt number. The equations contain all terms needed for precise direct numerical simulation (DNS) quantification. In the appropriate limit, the equations reduce to the classical theory for which the scalar spectrum is proportional to the energy spectrum multiplied by k-4, which, in turn, results in the inertial-diffusive range power law, k-17 /3. The classical theory was derived for the case of isotropic velocity and scalar fields. The exact equations are simplified for less restrictive cases: (1) locally isotropic scalar fluctuations at dissipation scales with no restriction on symmetry of the velocity field, (2) isotropic velocity field with averaging over all wave-vector directions with no restriction on the symmetry of the scalar, motivated by that average being used for DNS, and (3) isotropic velocity field with axisymmetric scalar fluctuations, motivated by the mean-scalar-gradient-source case. The equations are applied to recently published DNSs of passive scalars for the cases of a freely decaying scalar and a mean-scalar-gradient source. New terms in the exact equations are estimated for those cases and are found to be significant; those terms cause the deviations from the classical theory found by the DNS studies. A new formula for the mean-scalar-gradient case explains the variation of the scalar spectra for the DNS of the smallest Schmidt-number cases. Expansion in Legendre polynomials reveals the effect of axisymmetry. Inertial-diffusive-range formulas for both the zero- and second-order Legendre contributions are given. Exact statistical equations reveal what must be quantified using DNS to determine what causes deviations from asymptotic relationships.

  9. Turbulent pipe flow at extreme Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, M; Vallikivi, M; Bailey, S C C; Smits, A J

    2012-03-02

    Both the inherent intractability and complex beauty of turbulence reside in its large range of physical and temporal scales. This range of scales is captured by the Reynolds number, which in nature and in many engineering applications can be as large as 10(5)-10(6). Here, we report turbulence measurements over an unprecedented range of Reynolds numbers using a unique combination of a high-pressure air facility and a new nanoscale anemometry probe. The results reveal previously unknown universal scaling behavior for the turbulent velocity fluctuations, which is remarkably similar to the well-known scaling behavior of the mean velocity distribution.

  10. Numbers and sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruffino

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the intuition behind Frege's and Russell's definitions of numbers as sets, as well as Benacerraf's criticism of it. I argue that Benacerraf's argument is not as strong as some philosophers tend to think. Moreover, I examine an alternative to the Fregean-Russellian definition of numbers proposed by Maddy, and point out some problems faced by it.Neste artigo discuto a intuição subjacente à definição de n∨meros como conjuntos proposta por Frege e Russell, assim como a crítica de Benacerraf a esta definição. Eu tento mostrar que o argumento de Benacerraf não é tão forte como alguns filósofos o tomaram. Adicionalmente, examino uma alternativa à definição de Frege e Russell proposta por Maddy, e indico algumas dificuldades encontrada pela mesma.

  11. From Natural Numbers to Numbers and Curves in Nature - I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to Kronecker, a famous European mathematician, only natural numbers, i.e., positive integers like 1, 2, 3, ... are given by God or belong to the nature. All other numbers like negative numbers, fractional numbers, irrational numbers, tran- scendental numbers, complex numbers, etc., are a creation of the.

  12. Averaged number of visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, N; Lunedei, E; Vaienti, S

    2007-09-01

    We introduce a new indicator for dynamical systems, namely the averaged number of visits, to estimate the frequency of visits in small regions when a map is iterated up to the inverse of the measure of this region. We compute this quantity analytically and numerically for various systems and we show that it depends on the ergodic properties of the systems and on their topological properties, such as the presence of periodic points.

  13. Low Reynolds Number Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    of the blade . The Darrieus VAWT has more complex aerodynamics. This type of wind turbine produces power as a result of the tangential thrust as... Wind turbine blades also require high aerodynamic efficiency and all-weather capabilities. The need for efficient low Reynolds number airfoils which...application. The design of this type of propeller is similar to the design of low solidity wind turbine blades and will be discussed in the next

  14. High-Range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes development of a conceptual design for a High-range Scalar Helium Magnetometer (HSHM) for the field range +/-16 Gauss. The HSHM...

  15. Number Needed To… $ave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, Graeme M; Verma, Jennifer Y; Demmons, Jillian; Mittmann, Nicole

    2015-02-06

    The 'Number Needed to Treat' (NNT) is a useful measure for estimating the number of patients that would need to receive a therapeutic intervention to avoid one of the adverse events that the treatment is designed to prevent. We explored the possibility of an adaption of NNT to estimate the 'Number Needed to $ave' (NN$) as a new, conceptual systems metric to estimate potential cost-savings to the health system from implementation of a treatment, or in this case, a program. We used the outcomes of the INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM to calculate that 26 patients would need to complete the program to avoid healthcare expenditures of $100,000, based on hospital bed days avoided. The NN$ does not translate into 'cost savings' per se, but redirection of resource expenditures for other purposes. We propose that the NN$ metric, if further developed, could help to inform system-level resource allocation decisions in a manner similar to the way that the NNT metric helps to inform individual-level treatment decisions.

  16. An invitation to algebraic number theory and class field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruíz Duarte, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    This informal document was motivated by a question here at my university by a bachelor student. I will try to expose something that personally I think is impressive. The aim is to do it in such a way that is understandable with a basic knowledge of algebra. \\\\We will examine without any rigor the

  17. Flow field characteristics of an ornithopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Allen, James

    2007-11-01

    This paper details phase locked PIV measurements from a model Ornithopther flying in a wind tunnel at representative flight conditions. Testing over a range of Strouhal numbers, 0.1-0.3, shows that the unsteady wake is composed of coherent vortical structures that resemble vortex rings. A single ring is formed in the wake of each wing during one wing beat. Momentum balance from velocity field measurements are used to estimate the lift and drag of the ornithopter.

  18. Neocortical glial cell numbers in human brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelvig, D.P.; Pakkenberg, H.; Stark, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Stereological cell counting was applied to post-mortem neocortices of human brains from 31 normal individuals, age 18-93 years, 18 females (average age 65 years, range 18-93) and 13 males (average age 57 years, range 19-87). The cells were differentiated in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia...... while the total astrocyte number is constant through life; finally males have a 28% higher number of neocortical glial cells and a 19% higher neocortical neuron number than females. The overall total number of neocortical neurons and glial cells was 49.3 billion in females and 65.2 billion in males......, a difference of 24% with a high biological variance. These numbers can serve as reference values in quantitative studies of the human neocortex. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  19. The number system

    CERN Document Server

    Thurston, H A

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of mathematics has undergone extensive changes in approach, with a shift in emphasis from rote memorization to acquiring an understanding of the logical foundations and methodology of problem solving. This book offers guidance in that direction, exploring arithmetic's underlying concepts and their logical development.This volume's great merit lies in its wealth of explanatory material, designed to promote an informal and intuitive understanding of the rigorous logical approach to the number system. The first part explains and comments on axioms and definitions, making their subseq

  20. The Brothel Phone Number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsby, Trine Mygind

    2017-01-01

    -infrastructure in its own right, providing an entry point into the wider infrastructure of transnational pimping. The pimps’ embodied certainty of how to operate successfully in their neighbourhood in Romania is produced in resonance with the local, urban materiality. This interplay generates body techniques, which...... in turn cultivate and maximize uncertainty about themselves in others. When making the move to go abroad into unknown terrains, accessing the infrastructure generated by the phone number can provide certainty and consolidate one’s position within criminal networks abroad. However, at the same time...

  1. Rock glaciers in the Suntar‑Khayata Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Lytkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote map‑making technique and results of field investigations made possible for the first time to reveal a great number of rock glaciers within the area of the Suntar‑Khayata Range (North‑East Asia. A total of 540 formations were identified. Among them, 47 rock glaciers were classified as corrie (cirque tongue‑shaped formations and 493 ones – as niche lobe‑shaped (single‑ and multi‑lobe rock glaciers. Occurrence of such formations is 8.4/100 km2, that is the largest in the North‑East Asia. The rock glaciers in this region are found within a range of true altitudes from 1297 up to 2402 m asl. The majority of active features, however, are confined to the interval between 1500 and 1900 m asl. Rock glaciers occur in the altitudinal range of 1297 to 2402 m asl. The majority of active features, however, are confined to the interval between 1500 and 1900 m asl, and the main part of active formations is located within the range of 1500‑2500 m. The frequency analysis of true altitudes of the rock‑glacier occurrence indicates that their formation can be caused by the hypsometry of the region relation to morphoclimatic zonality.

  2. Nurturing a growing field: Computers & Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariethoz, Gregoire; Pebesma, Edzer

    2017-10-01

    Computational issues are becoming increasingly critical for virtually all fields of geoscience. This includes the development of improved algorithms and models, strategies for implementing high-performance computing, or the management and visualization of the large datasets provided by an ever-growing number of environmental sensors. Such issues are central to scientific fields as diverse as geological modeling, Earth observation, geophysics or climatology, to name just a few. Related computational advances, across a range of geoscience disciplines, are the core focus of Computers & Geosciences, which is thus a truly multidisciplinary journal.

  3. Visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam. This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  4. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, Matt, E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  5. Plurality and number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Lackner, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Singularis is the marking of the noun if it refers to an entity only. Often languages distinguish between singularis and non-singularis. The term used for these two forms are singular and plural. While singular is generally the unmarked form, plural is usually marked. Depending on the morphosynta......Singularis is the marking of the noun if it refers to an entity only. Often languages distinguish between singularis and non-singularis. The term used for these two forms are singular and plural. While singular is generally the unmarked form, plural is usually marked. Depending...... on the morphosyntactic properties of the language under investigation, plural can be expressed on various lexical items such as nouns [Lexicon – Section 3.1], verbs [Lexicon – Section 3.2], adjectives [Lexicon – Section 3.4], number words [Lexicon – Section 3.10.1], quantifiers [Lexicon – Section 3.10.2] or classifier...

  6. Hypergeometric Euler numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Takao; Zhu, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    For a nonnegative integer $N$, define hypergeometric Euler numbers $E_{N,n}$ by $$ \\frac{1}{{}_1 F_2(1;N+1,(2 N+1)/2;t^2/4)}=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty E_{N,n}\\frac{t^n}{n!}\\,, $$ where ${}_1 F_2(a;b,c;z)$ is the hypergeometric function defined by $$ {}_1 F_2(a;b,c;z)=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty\\frac{(a)^{(n)}}{(b)^{(n)}(c)^{(n)}}\\frac{z^n}{n!}\\,. $$ Here, $(x)^{(n)}$ is the rising factorial, defined by $(x)^{(n)}=x(x+1)\\cdots(x+n-1)$ ($n\\ge 1$) with $(x)^{(0)}=1$. When $N=0$, then $E_n=E_{0,n}$ are classical E...

  7. On Fibonacci Numbers Which Are Elliptic Carmichael

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-27

    On Fibonacci numbers which are elliptic Carmichael Florian Luca School of Mathematics University of the Witwatersrand P. O. Box Wits 2050, South...CM elliptic curve with CM field different from Q( √ −1), then the set of n for which the nth Fibonacci number Fn is elliptic Carmichael for E is of...Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law

  8. THE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES COMPARISON BETWEEN ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL RICE FIELDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamesiri, P; Thaimuangphol, W

    2015-01-01

    Rice fields are temporary wetlands prone to contamination from agricultural chemicals which affect their ecotoxicology and benthic community composition. The diversity of benthic fauna in both organic and conventional rice fields in Kalasin Province, Thailand was investigated. Benthos samples were collected by grab sampling from 20 stations in organic and conventional rice fields during one successive crop in August 2014. The number of benthic organisms found at each sampling station ranged from 16-518 and 24-137 individuals for organic and conventional rice fields, respectively. The benthic fauna in organic rice fields were dominated by crustaceans 41%, insects 31%, annelids 26%, and gastropods 2%. The conventional rice fields benthic fauna was composed of insects 51%, annelids 41%, and gastropods 8%. The abundance and composition of the benthic fauna demonstrated that organic rice farming practices are beneficial to sustaining the biodiversity in rice field ecosystems.

  9. Effects of excitation around jet preferred mode Strouhal number in high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely reported in the literature that the jet preferred mode Strouhal number varies over a large range of 0.2-0.6, depending upon the facility where the measurement is made as well as the measurement techniques and the location in the jet plume where the measurement is taken. This study investigates this wide variation and potential explanations for it. Active flow control is used to show that the jet is receptive to excitation over a large range of Strouhal numbers and azimuthal modes. The wide variation in the preferred mode Strouhal number is shown to be tightly linked to the evolution, spacing, and scale of the coherent flow structures, which dominate the jet shear layer's development. The low-end of the range is determined by the minimum Strouhal number at which structures begin to interact with one another in the jet plume. Below this range, structures have no significant effect on the plume's statistical properties. For Strouhal numbers at the high-end of the range, the development of coherent flow structures shifts upstream toward the nozzle exit and the structures disintegrate earlier in the jet plume. The earlier development and disintegration prevent these structures from strongly impacting the entire flowfield. The results imply that upstream perturbations in the flow present in various facilities could be responsible for the variations in the measured jet preferred mode Strouhal number. Experimental results from schlieren imaging and near- and far-field microphone measurements are used to investigate the preferred mode Strouhal number across this range.

  10. Optimal Static Range Reporting in One Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2001-01-01

    a query interval, we present an optimal data structure with linear space cost and with query time linear in the number of integers reported. This result holds in the unit cost RAM model with word size w and a standard instruction set. We also present a linear space data structure for approximate range...

  11. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania).......The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania)....

  12. Numbers at work a cultural perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Taschner , Rudolf

    2007-01-01

    Drawing primarily from historical examples, this book explains the tremendous role that numbers and, in particular, mathematics play in all aspects of our civilization and culture. The lively style and illustrative examples will engage the reader who wants to understand the many ways in which mathematics enables science, technology, art, music, politics, and rational foundations of human thought. Each chapter focuses on the influence of mathematics in a specific field and on a specific historical figure, such as ""Pythagoras: Numbers and Symbol""; ""Bach: Numbers and Music""; ""Descartes: Numb

  13. Accelerating Seismic Computations Using Customized Number Representations on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohuan Fu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry has an increasingly large demand for high-performance computation over huge volume of data. Compared to common processors, field-programable gate arrays (FPGAs can boost the computation performance with a streaming computation architecture and the support for application-specific number representation. With hardware support for reconfigurable number format and bit width, reduced precision can greatly decrease the area cost and I/O bandwidth of the design, thus multiplying the performance with concurrent processing cores on an FPGA. In this paper, we present a tool to determine the minimum number precision that still provides acceptable accuracy for seismic applications. By using the minimized number format, we implement core algorithms in seismic applications (the FK step in forward continued-based migration and 3D convolution in reverse time migration on FPGA and show speedups ranging from 5 to 7 by including the transfer time to and from the processors. Provided sufficient bandwidth between CPU and FPGA, we show that a further increase to 48X speedup is possible.

  14. Accelerating Seismic Computations Using Customized Number Representations on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clapp RobertG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry has an increasingly large demand for high-performance computation over huge volume of data. Compared to common processors, field-programable gate arrays (FPGAs can boost the computation performance with a streaming computation architecture and the support for application-specific number representation. With hardware support for reconfigurable number format and bit width, reduced precision can greatly decrease the area cost and I/O bandwidth of the design, thus multiplying the performance with concurrent processing cores on an FPGA. In this paper, we present a tool to determine the minimum number precision that still provides acceptable accuracy for seismic applications. By using the minimized number format, we implement core algorithms in seismic applications (the FK step in forward continued-based migration and 3D convolution in reverse time migration on FPGA and show speedups ranging from 5 to 7 by including the transfer time to and from the processors. Provided sufficient bandwidth between CPU and FPGA, we show that a further increase to 48X speedup is possible.

  15. Lepton family number violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herczeg, P.

    1999-03-01

    At present there is evidence from neutrino oscillation searches that the neutrinos are in fact massive particles and that they mix. If confirmed, this would imply that the conservation of LFN is not exact. Lepton family number violation (LFNV) has been searched for with impressive sensitivities in many processes involving charged leptons. The present experimental limits on some of them (those which the author shall consider here) are shown in Table 1. These stringent limits are not inconsistent with the neutrino oscillation results since, given the experimental bounds on the masses of the known neutrinos and the neutrino mass squared differences required by the oscillation results, the effects of LFNV from neutrino mixing would be too small to be seen elsewhere (see Section 2). The purpose of experiments searching for LFNV involving the charged leptons is to probe the existence of other sources of LFNV. Such sources are present in many extensions of the SM. In this lecture the author shall discuss some of the possibilities, focusing on processes that require muon beams. Other LFNV processes, such as the decays of the kaons and of the {tau}, provide complementary information. In the next Section he shall consider some sources of LFNV that do not require an extension of the gauge group of the SM (the added leptons or Higgs bosons may of course originate from models with extended gauge groups). In Section 3 he discusses LFNV in left-right symmetric models. In Section 4 he considers LFNV in supersymmetric models, first in R-parity conserving supersymmetric grand unified models, and then in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. The last section is a brief summary of the author`s conclusions.

  16. Quantum Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczek, Frank

    1998-01-01

    I discuss the general principles underlying quantum field theory, and attempt to identify its most profound consequences. The deepest of these consequences result from the infinite number of degrees of freedom invoked to implement locality. I mention a few of its most striking successes, both achieved and prospective. Possible limitations of quantum field theory are viewed in the light of its history.

  17. The structure of low Mach number, low beta, quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynn, III; Koval, Andriy; Szabo, Adam; Stevens, Michael; Kasper, Justin; Cattell, Cynthia; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    A study of the structure of 145 low Mach number (M magnetic field, most (87%) propagate >=30° from the shock normal vector, and most ( 79%) propagate at least 20° from the coplanarity plane. The peak-to-peak wave amplitudes are large with a range of maximum values of 0.2-13 nT with an average of 3 nT. When we normalize the wave amplitudes to the upstream averaged magnetic field and the shock ramp amplitude, we find average values of 50% and 80%, respectively.

  18. Unitarity corrections to short-range order long-range rapidity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Capella, A

    1978-01-01

    Although the effective hadronic forces have short range in rapidity space, one nevertheless expects long-range dynamical correlations induced by unitarity constraints. This paper contains a thorough discussion of long-range rapidity correlations in high-multiplicity events. In particular, the authors analyze in detail the forward- backward multiplicity correlations, measured recently in the whole CERN ISR energy range. They find from these data that the normalized variance of the number n of exchanged cut Pomerons, ((n/(n)-1)/sup 2/) , is most probably in the range 0.32 to 0.36. They show that such a number is obtained from Reggeon theory in the eikonal approximation. The authors also predict a very specific violation of local compensation of charge in multiparticle events: The violation should appear in the fourth-order zone correlation function and is absent in the second-order correlation function, the only one measured until now. (48 refs).

  19. A conversational introduction to algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pollack, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Gauss famously referred to mathematics as the "queen of the sciences" and to number theory as the "queen of mathematics". This book is an introduction to algebraic number theory, meaning the study of arithmetic in finite extensions of the rational number field \\mathbb{Q}. Originating in the work of Gauss, the foundations of modern algebraic number theory are due to Dirichlet, Dedekind, Kronecker, Kummer, and others. This book lays out basic results, including the three "fundamental theorems": unique factorization of ideals, finiteness of the class number, and Dirichlet's unit theorem. While these theorems are by now quite classical, both the text and the exercises allude frequently to more recent developments. In addition to traversing the main highways, the book reveals some remarkable vistas by exploring scenic side roads. Several topics appear that are not present in the usual introductory texts. One example is the inclusion of an extensive discussion of the theory of elasticity, which provides a precise w...

  20. [REMENEN. Mental representation of natural whole numbers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risquez, F; Avram-Ghelman, D; Jaegerman, P

    1995-03-01

    Study was carried out to find the existence, form of presentation and commonalities and individual differences in the mental representation of natural whole numbers (REMENEN). The design used was an ex-post-factor exploratory and descriptive field study. A questionnaire was developed and administered to a sample of 153 senior students at the Universidad Católica Andres Bello (UCAB). The hypotheses were: a) that REMENEN exists in all individuals, b) that REMENEN are individual, c) that there are intergroup differences and intragroup similarities in REMENEN according to major field of study and sex. The existence of REMENEN in the great majority of individuals was demonstrated as well as their individuality in all subjects. There were no significant differences according to major or sex, and no significant intragroup similarities. The present study opens the field for a new line of research and allows a relationship between isolated statements regarding numbers made by Galton, Jung and some cognitive psychologists.

  1. Measurements of energy exchange between acoustic fields and non-uniform steady flow fields

    OpenAIRE

    Magiawala, K. R.; Culick, F. E. C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of interactions between acoustic waves and a non-uniform steady flow field. Data have been obtained for a resonance tube having a vent at the center in the lateral boundary, an average flow being introduced at the ends. Experiments have been done for both circular and slot vents, over ranges of both frequency and Mach number. According to the one-dimensional linear stability analysis, the interactions between the longitudinal a...

  2. Prandtl and Rayleigh number dependence of heat transport in high Rayleigh number thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulation for three-dimensional Rayleigh–Bénard convection in samples of aspect ratio and up to Rayleigh number are presented. The broad range of Prandtl numbers is considered. In contrast to some experiments, we do not see any increase in with increasing , neither due

  3. Predicting Long-Range Traversability from Short-Range Stereo-Derived Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmon, Michael; Tang, Benyang; Howard, Andrew; Brjaracharya, Max

    2010-01-01

    Based only on its appearance in imagery, this program uses close-range 3D terrain analysis to produce training data sufficient to estimate the traversability of terrain beyond 3D sensing range. This approach is called learning from stereo (LFS). In effect, the software transfers knowledge from middle distances, where 3D geometry provides training cues, into the far field where only appearance is available. This is a viable approach because the same obstacle classes, and sometimes the same obstacles, are typically present in the mid-field and the farfield. Learning thus extends the effective look-ahead distance of the sensors.

  4. Short-range correlations in quark and nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froemel, Frank

    2007-06-15

    In the first part of this thesis, the role of short-range correlations in quark matter is explored within the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Starting from a next-to-leading order expansion in the inverse number of the quark colors, a fully self-consistent model constructed that employs the close relations between spectral functions and self-energies. In contrast to the usual quasiparticle approximations, this approach allows the investigation of the collisional broadening of the quark spectral function. Numerical calculations at various chemical potentials and zero temperature show that the short-range correlations do not only induce a finite width of the spectral function but also have some influence on the structure of the chiral phase transition. In the second part of this thesis, the temperature and density dependence of the nucleon spectral function in symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The short-range correlations can be well described by a simple, self-consistent model on the one-particle-two-hole and two-particle-one-hole level (1p2h, 2p1h). The thermodynamically consistent description of the mean-field properties of the nucleons is ensured by incorporating a Skyrme-type potential. Calculations at temperatures and densities that can also be found in heavy-ion collisions or supernova explosions and the formation of neutron stars show that the correlations saturate at high temperatures and densities. (orig.)

  5. Distributed chaos and inertial ranges in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that appearance of inertial range of scales, adjacent to distributed chaos range, results in adiabatic invariance of an energy correlation integral for isotropic homogeneous turbulence and for buoyancy driven turbulence (with stable or unstable stratification, including Rayleigh-Taylor mixing zone). Power spectrum of velocity field for distributed chaos dominated by this adiabatic invariant has a stretched exponential form $\\propto \\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{3/5}$. Results of recent direct numerical simulations have been used in order to support these conclusions.

  6. Bearings Only Air-to-Air Ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-25

    TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessarv and identify WIock numberl FIELD GROUP’ SUB- GIR Air to Air RangingRange Estimationt Min..a simtr Passive...by uarget rnge sad direction or by observer motion in the statistical behavior of the 4.2 &Awo 0*l LA Sqvwnr. Rmng IoiamIin. Since it hu alredy bin...lengths, sad while they indicate irreularty in the estimation processt, they do nix explain its source. Figure 22, whMc as typical of whet can arise

  7. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Broiler Chickens 1: Factors Related to Flock Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peta S; Hemsworth, Paul H; Groves, Peter J; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-07-20

    Little is known about the ranging behaviour of chickens. Understanding ranging behaviour is required to improve management and shed and range design to ensure optimal ranging opportunities. Using Radio Frequency Identification technology, we tracked 300 individual broiler chickens in each of four mixed sex ROSS 308 flocks on one commercial farm across two seasons. Ranging behaviour was tracked from the first day of range access (21 days of age) until 35 days of age in winter and 44 days of age in summer. Range use was higher than previously reported from scan sampling studies. More chickens accessed the range in summer (81%) than winter (32%; p < 0.05). On average, daily frequency and duration of range use was greater in summer flocks (4.4 ± 0.1 visits for a total of 26.3 ± 0.8 min/day) than winter flocks (3.2 ± 0.2 visits for a total of 7.9 ± 1.0 min/day). Seasonal differences were only marginally explained by weather conditions and may reflect the reduction in range exposure between seasons (number of days, hours per day, and time of day). Specific times of the day (p < 0.01) and pop-holes were favoured (p < 0.05). We provide evidence of relationships between ranging and external factors that may explain ranging preferences.

  8. The whole truth about whole numbers an elementary introduction to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    The Whole Truth About Whole Numbers is an introduction to the field of Number Theory for students in non-math and non-science majors who have studied at least two years of high school algebra. Rather than giving brief introductions to a wide variety of topics, this book provides an in-depth introduction to the field of Number Theory. The topics covered are many of those included in an introductory Number Theory course for mathematics majors, but the presentation is carefully tailored to meet the needs of elementary education, liberal arts, and other non-mathematical majors. The text covers logic and proofs, as well as major concepts in Number Theory, and contains an abundance of worked examples and exercises to both clearly illustrate concepts and evaluate the students’ mastery of the material.

  9. Topics from the theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Grosswald, Emil

    1984-01-01

    Many of the important and creative developments in modern mathematics resulted from attempts to solve questions that originate in number theory. The publication of Emil Grosswald’s classic text presents an illuminating introduction to number theory. Combining the historical developments with the analytical approach, Topics from the Theory of Numbers offers the reader a diverse range of subjects to investigate, including: * divisibility * congruences * the Riemann zeta function * Diophantine equations and Fermat’s conjecture * the theory of partitions Comprehensive in nature, Topics from the Theory of Numbers is an ideal text for advanced undergraduates and graduate students alike. "In my opinion it is excellent. It is carefully written and represents clearly a work of a scholar who loves and understands his subject. One can only wish more authors would take such pains and would be as good and honest expositors as Grosswald." — Marc Kac "This book is designed for use in a first course in number theory at...

  10. Exhaled air analysis using wideband wave number tuning range infrared laser photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistenev, Yury V; Borisov, Alexey V; Kuzmin, Dmitry A; Penkova, Olga V; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y; Karapuzikov, Alexey A

    2017-01-01

    The infrared laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and the pattern-recognition-based approach for noninvasive express diagnostics of pulmonary diseases on the basis of absorption spectra analysis of the patient’s exhaled air are presented. The study involved lung cancer patients ( N = 9 ), patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( N = 12 ), and a control group of healthy, nonsmoking volunteers ( N = 11 ). The analysis of the measured absorption spectra was based at first on reduction of the dimension of the feature space using principal component analysis; thereafter, the dichotomous classification was carried out using the support vector machine. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method (GC–MS) was used as the reference. The estimated mean value of the sensitivity of exhaled air sample analysis by the LPAS in dichotomous classification was not less than 90% and specificity was not less than 69%; the analogous results of analysis by GC–MS were 68% and 60%, respectively. Also, the approach to differential diagnostics based on the set of SVM classifiers usage is presented.

  11. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay GORBACHUK; Mikhail LARIONOV; Aleksey FIRSOV; Nikolay SHATIL

    2014-01-01

    Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors) make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resis...

  12. Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Capacitive proximity sensor on robot arm detects nearby object via capacitive effect of object on frequency of oscillator. Sensing element part of oscillator circuit operating at about 20 kHz. Total capacitance between sensing element and ground constitutes tuning capacitance of oscillator. Sensor circuit includes shield driven by replica of alternating voltage applied to sensing element. Driven shield concentrates sensing electrostatic field in exterior region to enhance sensitivity to object. Sensitivity and dynamic range has corresponding 12-to-1 improvement.

  13. On the ranges of discrete exponentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Caragiu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Let a>1 be a fixed integer. We prove that there is no first-order formula ϕ(X in one free variable X, written in the language of rings, such that for any prime p with gcd(a,p=1 the set of all elements in the finite prime field Fp satisfying ϕ coincides with the range of the discrete exponential function t↦at(modp.

  14. On the ranges of discrete exponentials

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Caragiu; Mihai Caragiu

    2004-01-01

    Let a>1 be a fixed integer. We prove that there is no first-order formula ϕ(X) in one free variable X, written in the language of rings, such that for any prime p with gcd(a,p)=1 the set of all elements in the finite prime field Fp satisfying ϕ coincides with the range of the discrete exponential function t↦at(modp).

  15. Phase Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Toshiyuki

    The term phase field has recently become known across many fields of materials science. The meaning of phase field is the spatial and temporal order parameter field defined in a continuum-diffused interface model. By using the phase field order parameters, many types of complex microstructure changes observed in materials science are described effectively. This methodology has been referred to as the phase field method, phase field simulation, phase field modeling, phase field approach, etc. In this chapter, the basic concept and theoretical background for the phase field approach is explained in Sects. 21.1 and 21.2. The overview of recent applications of the phase field method is demonstrated in Sects. 21.3 to 21.6.

  16. Algebraic extensions of fields

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Paul J

    1991-01-01

    ""...clear, unsophisticated and direct..."" - MathThis textbook is intended to prepare graduate students for the further study of fields, especially algebraic number theory and class field theory. It presumes some familiarity with topology and a solid background in abstract algebra. Chapter 1 contains the basic results concerning algebraic extensions. In addition to separable and inseparable extensions and normal extensions, there are sections on finite fields, algebraically closed fields, primitive elements, and norms and traces. Chapter 2 is devoted to Galois theory. Besides the fundamenta

  17. Cordial Languages and Cordial Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baskar BABUJEE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cordial labeling in graphs motivated us to introduce cordial words, cordial languages and cordial numbers. We interpret the notion of cordial labeling in Automata and thereby study the corresponding languages. In this paper we develop a new sequence of numbers called the cordial numbers in number theory using the labeling techniques in graph theory on automata theory.

  18. Engineering Biosensors with Dual Programmable Dynamic Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benmei; Zhang, Juntao; Ou, Xiaowen; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2018-01-10

    Although extensively used in all fields of chemistry, molecular recognition still suffers from a significant limitation: host-guest binding displays a fixed, hyperbolic dose-response curve, which limits its usefulness in many applications. Here we take advantage of the high programmability of DNA chemistry and propose a universal strategy to engineer biorecognition-based sensors with dual programmable dynamic ranges. Using DNA aptamers as our model recognition element and electrochemistry as our readout signal, we first designed a dual signaling "signal-on" and "signal-off" adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sensor composed of a ferrocene-labeled ATP aptamer in complex to a complementary, electrode-bound, methylene-blue labeled DNA. Using this simple "dimeric" sensor, we show that we can easily (1) tune the dynamic range of this dual-signaling sensor through base mutations on the electrode-bound DNA, (2) extend the dynamic range of this sensor by 2 orders of magnitude by using a combination of electrode-bound strands with varying affinity for the aptamers, (3) create an ultrasensitive dual signaling sensor by employing a sequestration strategy in which a nonsignaling, high affinity "depletant" DNA aptamer is added to the sensor surface, and (4) engineer a sensor that simultaneously provides extended and ultrasensitive readouts. These strategies, applicable to a wide range of biosensors and chemical systems, should broaden the application of molecular recognition in various fields of chemistry.

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NUMBER NAMES AND NUMBER CONCEPTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2016-01-01

    the regularity or irregularity of number naming affects children’s formation of number concepts and arithmetic performance. We investigate this issue by reviewing relevant literature and undertaking a design research project addressing the specific irregularities of the Danish number names. In this project......, a second, regular set of number names is introduced in primary school. The study’s findings suggest that the regularity of number names influences the development of number concepts and creates a positive impact on the understanding of the base-10 system....

  20. Cosmic numbers the numbers that define our universe

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, James D

    2011-01-01

    Our fascination with numbers begins when we are children and continues throughout our lives. We start counting our fingers and toes and end up balancing checkbooks and calculating risk. So powerful is the appeal of numbers that many people ascribe to them a mystical significance. Other numbers go beyond the supernatural, working to explain our universe and how it behaves. In Cosmic Numbers , mathematics professor James D. Stein traces the discovery, evolution, and interrelationships of the numbers that define our world. Everyone knows about the speed of light and absolute zero, but numbers lik