WorldWideScience

Sample records for range facility types

  1. First lasings at IR-and FIR range using hybrid type undulator (FEL facility 4) and Halbach type undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takii, T.; Oshita, E.; Okuma, S.; Wakita, K.; Koga, A.; Tomimasu, T.; Ohasi, K.

    1997-01-01

    First lasing at 18μm was achieved by using a 2.7-m long hybrid type undulator (undulator 4) for far-infrared FELs and a 6.72-m long optical cavity installed at the 33-MeV beam line of the downstream of the FEL facility 1 (FEL-1). We are challenged at two-color FEL oscillation in mid-infrared range using the undulator 1 (λ u=3.4mm) and in far-infrared range using the undulator 4 (λ u=9mm). At first, a 30-MeV, 60-A beam passed through the undulator 1 without lasing is transported using a QFQDBQFQDBQFQDQF system and is used for lasing at the undulator 4. However, six pairs of steering coils had to be attached on the beam duct to reduce the deviation of the electron beam trajectory due to the vertical field distribution induced by the built-in electromagnets. The minimum gap of the undulator 4 was designed to be 35mm. However, the steering coils attached on the beam duct increased the gap up to 52mm. Therefore, the hybrid type undulator was replaced by a new Halbach type one (λ u=8mm, N=30) after the first lasing at 18μm on October 24, '96. The New FEL facility 4 was installed in the middle of December and first lasing at 18.6μm was achieved on December 26, within 10 hours operation. (author)

  2. THE WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE PULSED REACTOR FACILITY, MAY 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Robert L.; Boor, R. A.; Cole, W. M.; Elder, G. E.

    1963-05-15

    A brief statement of the mission of the White Sands Missile Range Nuclear Effects Laboratory is given. The new Nuclear Effects Laboratory Facility is described. This facility consists of two buildings-a laboratory and a reactor building. The White Sands Missile Range bare critical assembly, designated as the MoLLY-G, is described. The MoLLY-G, an unreflected, unmoderated right circular cylinder of uranium-molybdenum alloy designed for pulsed operation, will have a maximum burst capability of approximately 2 x 10/sup 17/ fissions with a burst width of 50 microseconds. The reactor construction and operating procedures are described. As designed, the MoLLY-G will provide an intense source of pulsed neutron and gamma radiation for a great variety of experimental and test arrangements. (auth)

  3. Logic model needs for diverse facility types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares the characteristics of fault trees (where initiators are developed within the fault tree) vs. event trees (where the nodes are developed by fault trees). This comparison requires some additional discussion on the subtlety of initiators. Difficulties when analyzing various reactor-type and processing facilities are discussed to illustrate the particular characteristics of each type of logic. The intent is to allow probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) analysts to be open-quotes bi-logical,close quotes or equally comfortable with event-tree or fault-tree logic, knowing when to apply each

  4. Lining facility for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimano, Kunio.

    1991-01-01

    In a lining facility for protecting structural material concretes for concrete buildings in an FBR type power plant, sodium-resistant and heat-resistant first and second coating layers are lined at the surface of concretes, and steam releasing materials are disposed between the first and the second coating layers for releasing water contents evaporated from the concretes to the outside. With such a constitution, since there is no structures for welding steel plates to each other as in the prior art, the fabrication is made easy. Further, since cracks of coating materials can be suppressed, reactor safety is improved. (T.M.)

  5. Long range planning of radiotherapy facilities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, T.J.B.M.; Terpstra, S.

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this paper is long range planning or policy development for healthcare in the Netherlands. Especially the co-ordinating function of planning will be discussed. In healthcare different actors or stakeholders are involved. Each of these actors may have their own interests, expectations,

  6. Energy efficiency in California laboratory-type facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, E.; Bell, G.; Sartor, D. [and others

    1996-07-31

    The central aim of this project is to provide knowledge and tools for increasing the energy efficiency and performance of new and existing laboratory-type facilities in California. We approach the task along three avenues: (1) identification of current energy use and savings potential, (2) development of a {ital Design guide for energy- Efficient Research Laboratories}, and (3) development of a research agenda for focused technology development and improving out understanding of the market. Laboratory-type facilities use a considerable amount of energy resources. They are also important to the local and state economy, and energy costs are a factor in the overall competitiveness of industries utilizing laboratory-type facilities. Although the potential for energy savings is considerable, improving energy efficiency in laboratory-type facilities is no easy task, and there are many formidable barriers to improving energy efficiency in these specialized facilities. Insufficient motivation for individual stake holders to invest in improving energy efficiency using existing technologies as well as conducting related R&D is indicative of the ``public goods`` nature of the opportunity to achieve energy savings in this sector. Due to demanding environmental control requirements and specialized processes, laboratory-type facilities epitomize the important intersection between energy demands in the buildings sector and the industrial sector. Moreover, given the high importance and value of the activities conducted in laboratory-type facilities, they represent one of the most powerful contexts in which energy efficiency improvements stand to yield abundant non-energy benefits if properly applied.

  7. Intelligent type sodium level gauge and its graduation calibration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong; Wang Xuan; Li Xinying; Sun Huiqing; Zhu Jie

    1998-04-01

    The component construction and their performances of the intelligent type sodium level gauge newly-developed and its graduation calibration facility are presented. They can be operated in the temperature limit 100∼550 degree C. Its graduation characteristic calibration test is described. The temperature effect is analyzed. The graduation characteristic equation using the medium temperature as the parameter is given. The calibration errors are analyzed. The measurement system using this sodium level gauge is presented. The tests show that the intelligent type sodium level gauge possesses good linearity. The accurate sodium level measurement data can be obtained by means of its on-line compensation function of the temperature effect. Moreover, it possesses the self-inspection, the electric shutoff protection, the setting of full-scale, the thermocouple breaking alarm, the two upper limits and two lower limits alarms, the standard analog output signal and the digital output signal. Therefore, it is applicable particularly to the instrument, control and protection systems of LMFBR. The basic error of this intelligent type sodium level gauge is +-1.9% of measuring range

  8. Temporal Variability of Upper-level Winds at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind profiles to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments incorporate wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the upper-level winds over the time period between the assessment and launch can be mitigated by a statistical analysis of wind change over time periods of interest using historical data from the launch range. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the Eastern Range, Western Range and Wallops Flight Facility were developed for use in upper-level wind assessments. Database development procedures as well as statistical analysis of temporal wind variability at each launch range will be presented.

  9. Physics and detector simulation facility Type O workstation specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartrand, G.; Cormell, L.R.; Hahn, R.; Jacobson, D.; Johnstad, H.; Leibold, P.; Marquez, M.; Ramsey, B.; Roberts, L.; Scipioni, B.; Yost, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    This document specifies the requirements for the front-end network of workstations of a distributed computing facility. This facility will be needed to perform the physics and detector simulations for the design of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors, and other computations in support of physics and detector needs. A detailed description of the computer simulation facility is given in the overall system specification document. This document provides revised subsystem specifications for the network of monitor-less Type 0 workstations. The requirements specified in this document supersede the requirements given. In Section 2 a brief functional description of the facility and its use are provided. The list of detailed specifications (vendor requirements) is given in Section 3 and the qualifying requirements (benchmarks) are described in Section 4

  10. 75 FR 68334 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Training Range and Garrison Support Facilities Construction and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... decision sites ranges and support facilities in locations that reflect the proper balance of initiatives for the protection of the environment, mission needs, and Soldier and Family quality of life..., Directorate of Public Works, Prevention and Compliance Branch, Environmental Division, 1550 Frank Cochran...

  11. Retuning Rieske-type Oxygenases to Expand Substrate Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Mahmood; Viger, Jean-François; Kumar, Pravindra; Barriault, Diane; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Sylvestre, Michel (INRS); (Purdue)

    2012-09-17

    Rieske-type oxygenases are promising biocatalysts for the destruction of persistent pollutants or for the synthesis of fine chemicals. In this work, we explored pathways through which Rieske-type oxygenases evolve to expand their substrate range. BphAE{sub p4}, a variant biphenyl dioxygenase generated from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 BphAE{sub LB400} by the double substitution T335A/F336M, and BphAE{sub RR41}, obtained by changing Asn{sup 338}, Ile{sup 341}, and Leu{sup 409} of BphAE{sub p4} to Gln{sup 338}, Val{sup 341}, and Phe{sup 409}, metabolize dibenzofuran two and three times faster than BphAE{sub LB400}, respectively. Steady-state kinetic measurements of single- and multiple-substitution mutants of BphAE{sub LB400} showed that the single T335A and the double N338Q/L409F substitutions contribute significantly to enhanced catalytic activity toward dibenzofuran. Analysis of crystal structures showed that the T335A substitution relieves constraints on a segment lining the catalytic cavity, allowing a significant displacement in response to dibenzofuran binding. The combined N338Q/L409F substitutions alter substrate-induced conformational changes of protein groups involved in subunit assembly and in the chemical steps of the reaction. This suggests a responsive induced fit mechanism that retunes the alignment of protein atoms involved in the chemical steps of the reaction. These enzymes can thus expand their substrate range through mutations that alter the constraints or plasticity of the catalytic cavity to accommodate new substrates or that alter the induced fit mechanism required to achieve proper alignment of reaction-critical atoms or groups.

  12. Identification of Human Intrusion Types into Radwaste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budi Setiawan

    2007-01-01

    Human intrusion has long been recognized as a potentially important post-closure safety issue for rad waste disposal facility. It is due to the difficulties in predicting future human activities. For the preliminary study of human intrusion, identification of human intrusion types need to be recognized and investigated also the approaching of problem solving must be known to predict the prevention act and accepted risk. (author)

  13. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  14. A study on hazard types occurring in hydrogen facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Chul; Jae, Moo Sung; Eon, Yang Joon

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen has ideal characteristics as an energy carrier. Hydrogen can be used as a clean fuel in a variety of energy end-use sectors including the conversion to electricity. After combustion, it produces only water. Therefore, the concept of hydrogen energy system has attracted much interest worldwide. But hydrogen has a defect that the explosion risk is high to an inflammable gas of a colorless, tasteless and odorless. Therefore, to use the hydrogen to the source of energy, hydrogen accident sequences and causes analysis must be needed. For this, hazard types occurring in hydrogen facilities have been considered through the case of domestic and foreign hydrogen accident in this study and hazard types to be considered are ignition, leaks, hydrogen dispersion, fire an explosion, storage vessel failure, vent and exhaust system, purging, condensation of air, hydrogen embrittlement, physiological hazard, and collisions during transportation

  15. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  16. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-01-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b)

  17. The Abbott School Construction Program: Report on the NJ Department of Education Proposed Regulations on Long-Range Facilities Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponessa, Joan

    2004-01-01

    This report on Long Range Facilities Plans (LRFPs) analyzes regulations proposed by the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) to implement the Educational Facilities Construction and Financing Act. (EFCFA). EFCFA, which authorizes and governs New Jersey's public school construction program, was enacted in July 2000 to implement the State…

  18. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  19. Properties of Wide-dose-range GafChromic Films for Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2007-01-01

    GafChromic films have been used at SPring-8 to detect the intensively irradiated parts and protect them from damage by being covered with shield or moved. To extend the usable dose range more widely, a new type of sensitive film EBT was investigated for the introduction. Calibration curves were obtained irradiated with 60Co γ rays and compared with those of other GafChromic films. For the application, these films were set in the white x-ray hutch and the dose distribution was measured. Ratio of doses given by EBT and XT-R indicated the degree of the photon spectrum hardness, which depended on the positions. As a result, dose range from 50 mGy to 300 kGy became available for dose distribution measurements, and a set of films having different energy responses was found to give information of photon spectra

  20. Facile synthesis of birnessite-type manganese oxide nanoparticles as supercapacitor electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihu; Luo, Yao; Tan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yashan; Liu, Fan; Qiu, Guohong

    2016-11-15

    Manganese oxides are environmentally benign supercapacitor electrode materials and, in particular, birnessite-type structure shows very promising electrochemical performance. In this work, nanostructured birnessite was facilely prepared by adding dropwise NH2OH·HCl to KMnO4 solution under ambient temperature and pressure. In order to fully exploit the potential of birnessite-type manganese oxide electrode materials, the effects of specific surface area, pore size, content of K(+), and manganese average oxidation state (Mn AOS) on their electrochemical performance were studied. The results showed that with the increase of NH2OH·HCl, the Mn AOS decreased and the corresponding pore sizes and specific surface area of birnessite increased. The synthesized nanostructured birnessite showed the highest specific capacitance of 245Fg(-1) at a current density of 0.1Ag(-1) within a potential range of 0-0.9V, and excellent cycle stability with a capacitance retention rate of 92% after 3000 cycles at a current density of 1.0Ag(-1). The present work implies that specific capacitance is mainly affected by specific surface area and pore volume, and provides a new method for the facile preparation of birnessite-type manganese oxide with excellent capacitive performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Results of 15 years experiments in the PMK-2 integral-type facility for VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabados, L.; Ezsoel, G.; Perneczky, L. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary)

    2001-07-01

    Due to the specific features of the VVER-440/213-type reactors the transient behaviour of such a reactor system is different from the usual PWR system behaviour. To provide an experimental database for the transient behaviour of VVER systems the PMK integral-type facility, the scaled down model of the Paks NPP was designed and constructed in the early 1980's. Since the start-up of the facility 48 experiments have been performed. It was confirmed through the experiments that the facility is a suitable tool for the computer code validation experiments and to the identification of basic thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring during plant accidents. High international interest was shown by the four Standard Problem Exercises of the IAEA and by the projects financed by the EU-PHARE. A wide range of small- and medium-size LOCA sequences have been studied to know the performance and effectiveness of ECC systems and to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic safety of the core. Extensive studies have been performed to investigate the one- and two-phase natural circulation, the effect of disturbances coming from the secondary circuit and to validate the effectiveness of accident management measures like bleed and feed. The VVER-specific case, the opening of the SG collector cover was also extensively investigated. Examples given in the report show a few results of experiments and the results of calculation analyses performed for validation purposes of codes like RELAP5, ATHLET and CATHARE. There are some other white spots in Cross Reference Matrices for VVER reactors and, therefore, further experiments are planned to perform tests primarily in further support of accident management measures at low power states of plants to facilitate the improved safety management of VVER-440-type reactors. (authors)

  2. Results of 15 years experiments in the PMK-2 integral-type facility for VVERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabados, L.; Ezsoel, G.; Perneczky, L.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the specific features of the VVER-440/213-type reactors the transient behaviour of such a reactor system is different from the usual PWR system behaviour. To provide an experimental database for the transient behaviour of VVER systems the PMK integral-type facility, the scaled down model of the Paks NPP was designed and constructed in the early 1980's. Since the start-up of the facility 48 experiments have been performed. It was confirmed through the experiments that the facility is a suitable tool for the computer code validation experiments and to the identification of basic thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring during plant accidents. High international interest was shown by the four Standard Problem Exercises of the IAEA and by the projects financed by the EU-PHARE. A wide range of small- and medium-size LOCA sequences have been studied to know the performance and effectiveness of ECC systems and to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic safety of the core. Extensive studies have been performed to investigate the one- and two-phase natural circulation, the effect of disturbances coming from the secondary circuit and to validate the effectiveness of accident management measures like bleed and feed. The VVER-specific case, the opening of the SG collector cover was also extensively investigated. Examples given in the report show a few results of experiments and the results of calculation analyses performed for validation purposes of codes like RELAP5, ATHLET and CATHARE. There are some other white spots in Cross Reference Matrices for VVER reactors and, therefore, further experiments are planned to perform tests primarily in further support of accident management measures at low power states of plants to facilitate the improved safety management of VVER-440-type reactors. (authors)

  3. Facility for the measurement of proton polarization in the range 50-70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M; Sakaguchi, H; Sakamoto, H; Ogawa, H; Cynshi, O; Kobayashi, S [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kato, S [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Lab. of Nuclear Studies; Matsuoka, N; Hatanaka, K; Noro, T [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1983-07-01

    A proton polarimetry facility based on silicon analyzers combined with high-purity germanium detectors is described. The scattering efficiency is 1.5 x 10/sup -5/ at 60 MeV with an effective analyzing power of 0.71 and the energy resolution is about 300 keV fwhm. The facility has succeeded in measuring the depolarization in p-/sup 13/C elastic scattering separated clearly from inelastic events. In order to use a silicon detector as an analyzer target, measurements of cross sections and analyzing powers have been performed at proton energies of 65, 60, 55, 50 and 45 MeV.

  4. 78 FR 76060 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone. AGENCY: U.S... Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The U.S. Navy conducts weapon systems testing and other military... Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The proposed rule was published in the July 1, 2013 issue of the Federal...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and...), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Location. The following area is established as a safety zone during launch operations at PMRF, Kauai, Hawaii: The waters bounded by the following coordinates: (22°01...

  6. Space Technology Demonstrations Using Low Cost, Short-Schedule Airborne and Range Facilities at the Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Kelly, John; Jones, Dan; Lee, James

    2013-01-01

    There is a national effort to expedite advanced space technologies on new space systems for both government and commercial applications. In order to lower risk, these technologies should be demonstrated in a relevant environment before being installed in new space systems. This presentation introduces several low cost, short schedule space technology demonstrations using airborne and range facilities available at the Dryden Flight Research Center.

  7. Demonstration test of underground cavern-type disposal facilities, fiscal 2010 status - 59180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Terada, Kenji; Oda, Nobuaki; Yada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    A test to demonstrate practical construction technology for underground cavern-type disposal facilities is currently underway. Cavern-type disposal facilities are a radioactive waste repository excavated to a depth of 50 to 100 m below ground and constructed with an engineered barrier system (EBS) that is a combination of low-permeable bentonite material and low-diffusive cementitious material. The disposed materials are low-level radioactive waste with relatively high radioactivity, mainly generated from power reactor decommissioning, and certain transuranic wastes that are mainly generated from spent fuel reprocessing. The project started in fiscal 2005*, and since fiscal 2007 a full-scale mock-up of a disposal facility has been constructed in an actual sub-surface environment. The main objective of the demonstration test is to establish construction procedures and methods which ensure the required quality of an EBS on-site. Certain component parts of the facility had been constructed in an underground cavern by fiscal 2010, and tests so far have demonstrated both the practicability of the construction and the achievement of the required quality. This paper covers the project outline and the test results obtained by the construction of certain EBS components. The following results were obtained from the construction test of EBS in the test cavern: 1) The dry density of bentonite buffer at the lower layer constructed by vibratory compaction shows that 95% of core samples have densities within the target range. 2) The specified mix for the low-diffusion layer has uniform density and crack-control properties, and meets the requirements for diffusion performance. 3) The specified mix of the concrete pit has sufficient passing ability through congested reinforcement and meets the requirements of strength performance. 4) The dry density of the bentonite buffer at the lateral layer constructed by the spraying method shows that 65% of the core samples are within the

  8. Comparison of Range of Motion After Total Knee Prosthesis According to Different Type of Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firat Seyfettinoglu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness and range of motion of different type of knee prosthesis. Material and Method: This study includes 180 of 225 patients (139 F, 41 M, average age: 65, range of age: 51-82 between April 2005 and September 2007 with the diagnosis of gonarthrosis. All patients underwent to primary total knee arthroplasty. Primary osteoartrhritis is the reason of gonarthrosis. The patients with secondary osteoartrhritis were excluded from the study. All the patients were operated by the same surgical team and rehabilitated after surgery. Patella didnt change any patient. PCL was protected in some of the patients and cut some of patients. Totally seven type prosthesis in 16 subgroup were applied to the patients. All measurement were done by the same surgeon. Average follow up period was 31 months (24-49 months. Results: Patients without subgrouping were tested according to the range of motion before and after surgery to the type of the prosthesis trademark. Range of motion was decreased with the usage of Rotaglide and LCS® type of prosthesis. Range of motion didnt change with the usage of Maxim and Kinemax type. The range of motion increased in the other trademark of prosthesis. Flexion angle was increased statistically significant with nexgen® and scorpio® prosthesis (p

  9. MLRS - A lunar/artificial satellite laser ranging facility at the McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experience from lunar and satellite laser ranging experiments carried out at McDonald Observatory has been used to design the McDonald Laser Ranging Station (MLRS). The MLRS is a dual-purpose installation designed to obtain observations from the LAGEOS satellite and lunar targets. The instruments used at the station include a telescope assembly 0.76 meters in diameter; a Q-switched doubled neodymium YAG laser with a pulse rate of three nanoseconds; and a GaAs photodetector with Fabry-Perot interferometric filter. A functional diagram of the system is provided. The operating parameters of the instruments are summarized in a table.

  10. Investigation on proper materials of a liner system for trench type disposal facilities of radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Arikawa, Masanobu; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency will settle on near surface disposal facilities with and without engineered barriers for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. Both of them are so called 'concrete pit type' and 'trench type', respectively. The technical standard of constructing and operating a disposal facility based on 'Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors' have been regulated partly by referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. This means that the concrete pit type and the trench type disposal facility resemble an isolated type for specified industrial wastes and a non leachate controlled type final disposal site for stable industrial wastes, respectively. On the other, We plan to design a disposal facility with a liner system corresponding to a leachate controlled type final disposal site on a crucial assumption that radioactive wastes other than stable industrial wastes to be disposed into the trench type disposal facility is generated. By current nuclear related regulations in Japan, There are no technical standard of constructing the disposal facility with the liner system referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. We investigate the function of the liner system in order to design a proper liner system for the trench type disposal facility. In this report, We investigated liner materials currently in use by actual leachate controlled type final disposal sites in Japan. Thereby important items such as tensile strength, durability from a view point of selecting proper liner materials were studied. The items were classified into three categories according to importance. We ranked proper liner materials for the trench type disposal facility by evaluating the important items per material. As a result, high density polyethylene(HDPE) of high elasticity type polymetric sheet was selected

  11. Aqueous Boric acid injection facility of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi; Iwami, Masao.

    1996-01-01

    If a rupture should be caused in a secondary system of a PWR type reactor, pressure of a primary coolant recycling system is lowered, and a back flow check valve is opened in response to the lowering of the pressure. Then, low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion of a pressurized tank is flown into the primary coolant recycling system based on the pressure difference, and the aqueous boric acid reaches the reactor core together with coolants to suppress reactivity. If the injection is continued, high temperature aqueous boric acid in the upper portion boils under a reduced pressure, further urges the low temperature aqueous boric acid in the lower portion by the steam pressure and injects the same to the primary system. The aqueous boric acid stream from the pressurized tank flowing by self evaporation of the high temperature aqueous boric acid itself is rectified by a rectifying device to prevent occurrence of vortex flow, and the steam is injected in a state of uniform stream. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is lowered, a bypass valve is opened to introduce the high pressure fluid of primary system into the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. When the pressure in the pressurized tank is elevated to higher than the pressure of the primary system, a back flow check valve is opened, and high pressure aqueous boric acid is flown out of the pressurized tank to keep the pressure to a predetermined value. (N.H.)

  12. Facility type and primary care performance in sub-district health promotion hospitals in Northern Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithra Kitreerawutiwong

    Full Text Available Poor and middle-income Thai people rely heavily on primary care health services. These are staffed by a range of professionals. However, it is unknown whether the performance of primary care varies according to the staffing and organization of local service delivery units. Tambon (sub-district health promotion hospitals (THPHs were introduced in 2009 to upgrade the services offered by the previous health centres, but were faced with continuing shortages of doctors and nurses. The Ministry of Public Health (MoPH designated three categories of THPH, defined according to whether they were regularly staffed by a medical practitioner, a qualified nurse or non-clinical public health officers. This study aimed to compare the performance of primary care offered by the three different types of primary care facilities in one public health region of Northern Thailand (Public Health Region 2.A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 2013. Data were collected on accessibility, continuity, comprehensiveness, co-ordination and community orientation of care from 825 patients attending 23 primary care facilities. These were selected to include the three officially-designated types of Tambon (sub-district health promotion hospitals (THPHs led by medical, nursing or public health personnel. Survey scores were compared in unadjusted and adjusted analyses.THPHs staffed only by public health officers achieved the highest performance score (Mean = 85.14, SD. = 7.30, followed by THPHs staffed by qualified nurses (Mean = 82.86, SD. = 7.06. THPHs staffed by a doctor on rotation returned the lowest scores (Mean = 81.63, SD. = 7.22.Differences in overall scores resulted mainly from differences in reported accessibility, continuity, and comprehensiveness of care, rather than staff skill-mix per se. Policy on quality improvement should therefore focus on improving performance in these areas.

  13. The use of new facility by means internal balance with sting support for wide range Angle of Attack aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subagyo; Daryanto, Yanto; Risnawan, Novan

    2018-04-01

    The development of facilities for the testing of wide range angle of attack aircraft in the wind tunnel at subsonic regime has done and implemented. Development required to meet the test at an angle of attack from -20 ° to 40 °. Testing the wide range angle of attack aircraft with a wide variation of the angle of attack become important needs. This can be done simply by using the sting support-equipped by internal balance to measure the forces and moments component aerodynamics. The results of development and use on the wide range angle of attack aircraft testing are aerodynamics characteristics in the form of the coefficient three components forces and the three components of the moment. A series of test aircraft was successfully carried out and the results are shown in the form of graphs of characteristic of aerodynamics at wind speed 70 m/s.

  14. Environmental consequences of hydroelectric development: the role of facility size and type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleick, P.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of hydroelectric power throughout the world is receiving renewed attention as the economic, political, and environmental costs of conventional energy production rise. There is currently a perception that hydroelectricity has environmental and economic advantages over electricity produced by conventional energy technologies, but there is a paucity of information about the environmental impacts of hydroelectric facilities as a function of size and type. We characterize the environmental impacts of hydroelectric developments and quantify these impacts as a function of the size and type of project. Several unexpected conclusions arise from our analysis. For most hydroelectric facilities, size, as measured by installed capacity, is not necessarily a good indicator or the severity of environmental costs. For impacts such as land flooded and evaporative water lost, smaller facilities cause greater environmental disruptions per unit of energy produced than do larger facilities. (Author)

  15. Household Consumption of Food-Away-From-Home: Total Expenditure and by Type of Food Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Vicki A. McCracken; Jon A. Brandt

    1987-01-01

    Consistent with prior expectations based on household production theory, household income, time value, size and composition, and the environment in which production and consumption occurred were all important determinants of total household expenditures on food-away-from-home. However, the importance of these factors varied by type of food facility: conventional restaurants, fast-food facilities, and other commercial establishments. Decomposition of the tobit elasticities indicated the differ...

  16. RADON-type disposal facility safety case for the co-ordinated research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskov, A.; Batanjieva, B.; Kozak, M.W.; Torres-Vidal, C.

    2002-01-01

    The ISAM safety assessment methodology was applied to RADON-type facilities. The assessments conducted through the ISAM project were among the first conducted for these kinds of facilities. These assessments are anticipated to lead to significantly improved levels of safety in countries with such facilities. Experience gained though this RADON-type Safety Case was already used in Russia while developing national regulatory documents. (author)

  17. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  18. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  19. 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kauai Test Facility Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Li, Jun [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Minitrez, Alexandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avery, Penny [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); duMond, Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, William [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, III, Allen [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lantow, Tiffany [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Reuben [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Amy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Payne, Jennifer [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ricketson, Sherry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities managed and operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Field Office (SFO), in Albuquerque, New Mexico, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes data and the compliance status of the sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year 2013. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of TTR ER sites. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  20. Simulation of natural circulation on an integral type experimental facility, MASLWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Youngjong; Lim, Sungwon; Ha, Jaejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The OSU MASLWR test facility was reconfigured to eliminate a recurring grounding problem and improve facility reliability in anticipation of conducting an IAEA International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP). The purpose of ICSP is to provide experimental data on flow instability phenomena under natural circulation conditions and coupled containment/reactor vessel behavior in integral-type reactors, and to evaluate system code capabilities to predict natural circulation phenomena for integral type PWR, by simulating an integrated experiment. A natural circulation in the primary side during various core powers is analyzed using TASS/SMR code for the integral type experimental facility. The calculation results show higher steady state primary flow than experiment. If it matches the initial flow with experiment, it shows lower primary flow than experiment according to the increase of power. The code predictions may be improved by applying a Reynolds number dependent form loss coefficient to accurately account for unrecoverable pressure losses.

  1. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-05-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  2. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  3. Compact Range Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures electrical properties and characteristics of antenna systems and performs radar cross section (RCS) measurements of objects. These data are used...

  4. Three formulations of the multi-type capacitated facility location problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Andreas

    The "multi-type" or "modular" capacitated facility location problem is a discrete location model that addresses non-convex piecewise linear production costs as, for instance, staircase cost functions. The literature basically distinguishes three different ways to formulate non-convex piecewise...

  5. Cavity-Type BPMs For The TESLA Test Facility Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, H

    2003-01-01

    For measurements of the beam position at the undulator section of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY cavity-type beam position monitors were developed, installed and brought into operation. Besides of some theoretical aspects results of in-beam measurements at the TTF are presented and pros and cons of this monitor concept are discussed.

  6. 41 CFR 102-72.45 - What are the different types of delegations related to facility management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... different types of delegations related to facility management? The principal types of delegations involved... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the different types of delegations related to facility management? 102-72.45 Section 102-72.45 Public Contracts and...

  7. A model for plasma evolution in Filipov type plasma focus facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siahpoush, V.; Sobhanian, S.; Tafreshi, M. A.; Lamehi, M.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented in this paper for the evolution of plasma in Filipov type plasma focus facilities. With the help of this model, one can predict some of the main parameters of the produced plasma and obtain the optimized geometrical an physical properties (anode radius and length, gas pressure, capacitance, bank energy etc) for the primary design purposes. The results obtained by this model will be compared with the experimental data obtained from the 90 kJ plasma focus facility D ena

  8. Establishing blood gas ranges in healthy bovine neonates differentiated by age, sex, and breed type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillane, Patrick; Krump, Lea; Kennedy, Aideen; Sayers, Ríona G; Sayers, Gearóid P

    2018-04-01

    Calf mortality and morbidity commonly occurs within the first month of life postpartum. Standard health ranges are invaluable aids in diagnostic veterinary medicine to confirm normal or the degree and nature of abnormal parameters in (sub)clinically ill animals. Extensive research has indicated significant differences between the physiologies of neonate and adult cattle, particularly for blood parameters such as pH, base excess, anion gap, and bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ). The objective of this research was to determine the influence of age, sex, and breed type, in addition to environmental factors, on the normal blood gas profiles of neonatal calves, and thus develop a scientifically validated reference range accounting for any significant factors. The study was conducted on healthy neonatal calves (n = 288), and completed over a 2-yr period. Individual calf blood gas analysis was conducted for parameters of pH, base excess, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Cl - , glucose, total hemoglobin, HCO 3 - , pCO 2 , anion gap, strong ion difference, and hematocrit levels. Regression procedures examined the combined effect of year, farm, age, breed type, sex, and hours postfeeding on each variable. Significant effects were observed for age, sex, and breed type on several of the blood gas variables. Furthermore, year, farm, and hours postfeeding appeared to have less of an influence on neonatal bovine blood gas profiles. Consequently, specific ranges based on the neonate's age, sex, and breed type will allow for more detailed and accurate diagnosis of health and ill health in neonatal calves. The Authors. Published by FASS Inc. and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  9. A Facile Approach to Preparing Molecularly Imprinted Chitosan for Detecting 2,4,6-Tribromophenol with a Widely Linear Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The environmental pollution of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP has attracted attention. Based on an urgent need for the better provision of clean water, in situ determination of TBP is of great importance. Here, a facile and effective approach for detecting TBP is developed, based on coupling molecular imprinting technique with electrodeposition of chitosan (CS on the gold electrode. The TBP imprinting CS film was fabricated by using CS as functional material and TBP as template molecule. The experiments show that the morphologies and electrochemical properties of the imprinted film sensor was different from non-imprinted film electrode. The current of the imprinted film was linearly proportional to the TBP concentration, with a wide linear range of 1.0 × 10−7 mol•L−1 to 1.0 × 10−3 mol•L−1. By selecting drop-coating method as a reference for controlled trials with the same functional material, the results illustrated that the electrodeposition enjoyed a widely linear range advantage.

  10. Home range differences by habitat type of raccoon dogs Nyctereutes procyonoides (Carnivora: Canidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseog Jeong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available From July 2013 to November 2014, this research was conducted to secure baseline data to find long-term preventive measures against epidemics from the analysis of home range and movement characteristics of raccoon dogs, which are known as carriers of zoonosis. Researchers conducted a follow-up study with 12 raccoon dogs, each attached with a Global Positioning System mobile transmitter. Analysis of home range used the minimum convex polygon (MCP method and kernel density estimation (KDE with accumulating data of time-based locations. Except for three animals that showed unique behavior, the researchers analyzed nine animals and calculated their average home range. As a result, average home range was 0.48±0.35 km2 (MCP method, and KDE result analysis was verified as 0.65±0.66 km2 (95%, 0.31±0.35 km2 (75%, and 0.23±0.28 km2 (50%. Based on the MCP method, acted in range of minimum 0.07 km2 and maximum 1.08 km2, and the core habitat, KDE 50% level showed activity range in 0.02 km2 to 0.37 km2. Three individuals of unique behavior were classified into two types. Two individuals moved 10–20 km and settled at a place different from the existing habitat, and one individual kept moving without a regular sphere of influence. Generally, raccoon dogs are not considered to move if they secure their area of influence; animals in urban areas have a wider area of influence than those living in areas with a rich source of food such as forest and agricultural land.

  11. The progress and results of a demonstration test of a cavern-type disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Terada, Kenji; Oda, Nobuaki; Yada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    The cavern-type disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW) with relatively high radioactivity levels mainly generated from power reactor decommissioning and for part of transuranic (TRU) waste mainly from spent fuel reprocessing are designed to be constructed in a cavern 50 to 100 meters below ground, and to employ an engineered barrier system (EBS) of a combination of bentonite and cement materials in Japan. In order to advance the feasibility study for these disposal, a government-commissioned research project named Demonstration Test of Cavern-Type Disposal Facility started in fiscal 2005, and since fiscal 2007 a full-scale mock-up test facility has been constructed under actual subsurface environment. The main objective of the test is to establish construction methodology and procedures which ensure the required quality of the EBS on-site. By fiscal 2009 some parts of the facility have been constructed, and the test has demonstrated both practicability of the construction and achievement of the quality. They are respectively taken as low-permeability of less than 5x10 13 m/s and low-diffusivity of less than 1x10 -12 m 2 /s at the time of completion of construction. This paper covers the project outline and the test results obtained by the construction of some parts of a bentonite and cement materials. (author)

  12. Current status of the Demonstration Test of Underground Cavern-Type Disposal Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Terada, Kenji; Oda, Nobuaki; Yada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, the underground cavern-type disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW) with relatively high radioactivity, mainly generated from power reactor decommissioning, and for certain transuranic (TRU) waste, mainly from spent fuel reprocessing, are designed to be constructed in a cavern 50-100 m underground and to employ an engineered barrier system (EBS) made of bentonite and cement materials. To advance a disposal feasibility study, the Japanese government commissioned the Demonstration Test of Underground Cavern-Type Disposal Facilities in fiscal year (FY) 2005. Construction of a full-scale mock-up test facility in an actual subsurface environment started in FY 2007. The main test objective is to establish the construction methodology and procedures that ensure the required quality of the EBS on-site. A portion of the facility was constructed by 2010, and the test has demonstrated both the practicability of the construction and the achievement of quality standards: low permeability of less than 5x10 -13 m/s and low-diffusion of less than 1x10 -12 m 2 /s at the completion of construction. This paper covers the test results from the construction of certain parts using bentonite and cement materials. (author)

  13. Design Methodology of Process Layout considering Various Equipment Types for Large scale Pyro processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Lee, Hyo Jik

    2016-01-01

    At present, each item of process equipment required for integrated processing is being examined, based on experience acquired during the Pyropocess Integrated Inactive Demonstration Facility (PRIDE) project, and considering the requirements and desired performance enhancement of KAPF as a new facility beyond PRIDE. Essentially, KAPF will be required to handle hazardous materials such as spent nuclear fuel, which must be processed in an isolated and shielded area separate from the operator location. Moreover, an inert-gas atmosphere must be maintained, because of the radiation and deliquescence of the materials. KAPF must also achieve the goal of significantly increased yearly production beyond that of the previous facility; therefore, several parts of the production line must be automated. This article presents the method considered for the conceptual design of both the production line and the overall layout of the KAPF process equipment. This study has proposed a design methodology that can be utilized as a preliminary step for the design of a hot-cell-type, large-scale facility, in which the various types of processing equipment operated by the remote handling system are integrated. The proposed methodology applies to part of the overall design procedure and contains various weaknesses. However, if the designer is required to maximize the efficiency of the installed material-handling system while considering operation restrictions and maintenance conditions, this kind of design process can accommodate the essential components that must be employed simultaneously in a general hot-cell system

  14. Designing a range modulator wheel to spread-out the Bragg peak for a passive proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, S. Bijan; Romano, F.; Cirrone, Giuseppe A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Hadizadeh, M.H.; Mowlavi, A.A.; Raffaele, L.

    2016-01-01

    In proton beam therapy, a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to establish a uniform dose distribution in the target volume. In order to create a SOBP, several Bragg peaks of different ranges, corresponding to different entrance energies, with certain intensities (weights) should be combined each other. In a passive beam scattering system, the beam is usually extracted from a cyclotron at a constant energy throughout a treatment. Therefore, a SOBP is produced by a range modulator wheel, which is basically a rotating wheel with steps of variable thicknesses, or by using the ridge filters. In this study, we used the Geant4 toolkit to simulate a typical passive scattering beam line. In particular, the CATANA transport beam line of INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania has been reproduced in this work. Some initial properties of the entrance beam have been checked by benchmarking simulations with experimental data. A class dedicated to the simulation of the wheel modulators has been implemented. It has been designed in order to be easily modified for simulating any desired modulator wheel and, hence, any suitable beam modulation. By using some auxiliary range-shifters, a set of pristine Bragg peaks was obtained from the simulations. A mathematical algorithm was developed, using the simulated pristine dose profiles as its input, to calculate the weight of each pristine peak, reproduce the SOBP, and finally generate a flat dose distribution. Therefore, once the designed modulator has been realized, it has been tested at CATANA facility, comparing the experimental data with the simulation results.

  15. Designing a range modulator wheel to spread-out the Bragg peak for a passive proton therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, S. Bijan [Physics Department, University of Bojnord, Bojnord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Romano, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cirrone, Giuseppe A.P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Prague (Czech Republic); Cuttone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Hadizadeh, M.H. [Physics Department, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mowlavi, A.A. [Physics Department, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); ICTP, Associate Federation Scheme, Medical Physics Field, Trieste (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria “Policlinico – Vittorio Emanuele”, Catania (Italy)

    2016-01-11

    In proton beam therapy, a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used to establish a uniform dose distribution in the target volume. In order to create a SOBP, several Bragg peaks of different ranges, corresponding to different entrance energies, with certain intensities (weights) should be combined each other. In a passive beam scattering system, the beam is usually extracted from a cyclotron at a constant energy throughout a treatment. Therefore, a SOBP is produced by a range modulator wheel, which is basically a rotating wheel with steps of variable thicknesses, or by using the ridge filters. In this study, we used the Geant4 toolkit to simulate a typical passive scattering beam line. In particular, the CATANA transport beam line of INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania has been reproduced in this work. Some initial properties of the entrance beam have been checked by benchmarking simulations with experimental data. A class dedicated to the simulation of the wheel modulators has been implemented. It has been designed in order to be easily modified for simulating any desired modulator wheel and, hence, any suitable beam modulation. By using some auxiliary range-shifters, a set of pristine Bragg peaks was obtained from the simulations. A mathematical algorithm was developed, using the simulated pristine dose profiles as its input, to calculate the weight of each pristine peak, reproduce the SOBP, and finally generate a flat dose distribution. Therefore, once the designed modulator has been realized, it has been tested at CATANA facility, comparing the experimental data with the simulation results.

  16. Vulnerability Analysis for Physical Protection System at Hypothetical Facility of a Different Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Won-Moog; Kim, Jung-Soo; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Ho-Sik; Kwak, Sung-Ho; Jang, Sung-Soon

    2007-01-01

    Since the 9/11 event in the U.S.A, International terror possibilities has been increased for nuclear facilities including nuclear power plants(NPPs). It is necessary to evaluate the performance of an existing physical protection system(PPS) at nuclear facilities based on such malevolent acts. Detection, delay, and response elements are all important to PPS. They are used for the analysis and evaluation of a PPS and its effectiveness. Methods are available to analyze a PPS and evaluate its effectiveness. Sandia National Laboratory(SNL) in the U.S.A developed a System Analysis of Vulnerability to Intrusion (SAVI) computer code for evaluating the effectiveness of PPS against outsider threats. This study presents the vulnerability analysis of the PPS at hypothetical facility of a different type using SAVI code that the basic input parameters are from PPS of a different type. For analysis, first, the site-specific Adversary Sequence Diagrams(ASDs) of the PPS is designed. It helps to understand the functions of the existing PPS composed of physical areas and Protection Elements(PEs). Then, the most vulnerable path of an ASD as a measure of effectiveness is determined. The results in the analysis can compare with the most vulnerable paths at a different type

  17. Element patterns in albatrosses and petrels: Influence of trophic position, foraging range, and prey type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, O.R.J.; Phillips, R.A.; Shore, R.F.; McGill, R.A.R.; McDonald, R.A.; Bearhop, S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the concentrations of 22 essential and non-essential elements among a community of Procellariiformes (and their prey) to identify the extent to which trophic position and foraging range governed element accumulation. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) was used to characterise trophic (δ 15 N) and spatial patterns (δ 13 C) among species. Few consistent patterns were observed in element distributions among species and diet appeared to be highly influential in some instances. Arsenic levels in seabird red blood cells correlated with δ 15 N and δ 13 C, demonstrating the importance of trophic position and foraging range for arsenic distribution. Arsenic concentrations in prey varied significantly across taxa, and in the strength of association with δ 15 N values (trophic level). In most instances, element patterns in Procellariiformes showed the clearest separation among species, indicating that a combination of prey selection and other complex species-specific characteristics (e.g. moult patterns) were generally more important determining factors than trophic level per se. - Trophic position, foraging range, and prey type were found to influence element compositions and concentrations in Procellariiformes from South Georgia.

  18. Novel Cross-Type Network for Wide-Tuning-Range Reconfigurable Multiband Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Sen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a cross-type network design with a novel reconfigurable functionality to realize a tunable multiband antenna. By attaching a reconfigurable network at the feeding port of a broadband antenna, multi-input impedance adjustment enables the production of multimatching operating bands. Each band can be independently controlled by a single component with a considerably wide tuning range and high selectivity. The experiments in this study involved using an ultra-wideband (UWB antenna connected to the proposed cross-type network. The tunable antenna operates in a dual band of fL (1.39 to 2.34 GHz and fH (2.1 to 3.6 GHz with tunable frequency ratios of 168% and 132%, respectively. The average bandwidths at fL and fH are approximately 50 MHz and 148 MHz, respectively, implying narrowband operation. The measured radiation pattern revealed that the tunable antenna exhibits a nearly omnidirectional radiation pattern at both 1.8 and 3.5 GHz. The network circuit architecture can be extended to the multiband function type by adopting this matching approach. The amount of shunt matches determines the number of operation bands.

  19. Test facility of the VVER-440 condensation-type pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, H.; Arndt, S.

    2004-01-01

    Since the early nineties, GRS has supported regulatory authorities in Central and Eastern Europe in performing safety assessments of nuclear power plants. Especially studies of the condensation-type pressure suppression system of VVER-440/V-213-type plants have been important in this respect. Major steps in demonstrating complete functioning of the condensation-type pressure suppression system under accident conditions by experiments run in the Russian large scale test facility, BC V-213, have been completed in the past two years within the framework of various international experimental programs. The test results were used to validate specifically for power plants with VVER-400/V-213 reactors the COCOSYS GRS computer code, which is used in the safety assessments. The results of recalculations of the C02 EREC test, which simulates a break of a main steam pipe, demonstrate the present state of validation of COCOSYS for VVER condensation-type pressure suppression systems. (orig.) [de

  20. Strategies for energy benchmarking in cleanrooms and laboratory-type facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, Dale; Piette, Mary Ann; Tschudi, William; Fok, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Buildings with cleanrooms and laboratories are growing in terms of total floor area and energy intensity. This building type is common in institutions such as universities and in many industries such as microelectronics and biotechnology. These buildings, with high ventilation rates and special environmental considerations, consume from 4 to 100 times more energy per square foot than conventional commercial buildings. Owners and operators of such facilities know they are expensive to operate, but have little way of knowing if their facilities are efficient or inefficient. A simple comparison of energy consumption per square foot is of little value. A growing interest in benchmarking is also fueled by: A new U.S. Executive Order removing the exemption of federal laboratories from energy efficiency goals, setting a 25% savings target, and calling for baseline guidance to measure progress; A new U.S. EPA and U.S. DOE initiative, Laboratories for the 21st Century, establishing voluntary performance goals and criteria for recognition; and A new PG and E market transformation program to improve energy efficiency in high tech facilities, including a cleanroom energy use benchmarking project. This paper identifies the unique issues associated with benchmarking energy use in high-tech facilities. Specific options discussed include statistical comparisons, point-based rating systems, model-based techniques, and hierarchical end-use and performance-metrics evaluations

  1. Comparison and discussion of two types of threat (Hazard) categorization method for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Rongyao; Xu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Jiangang; Zhao, Bin

    2008-01-01

    The emergency threat categorization method suggested by international atomic energy agency (IAEA) and hazard categorization standard by the Department of Energy of United States (USDOE) for nuclear facilities are compared and discussed in this paper. The research shows the two types of categorization method for nuclear facility are similar, though each has its own speciality. The categorization method suggested by IAEA is quite completed and sound in scientific basis. The thresholds of radioactive material are connected with the quantity of dangerous source, and the latest radiobiological effect research results are taken in setting the thresholds. While the main purpose is put on emergency management, some of the categorization criteria do not fit for safety surveillance of nuclear facilities. The categorization method of DOE is advanced in its operability, and it fits for safety surveillance. The disadvantage is that the thresholds of radioactive material need to be updated because the parameters used in calculation is outdated, and also the threshold of category 3 is somewhat disputable for many reasons. We should take advantage of both methods and adjust the standards according to the application purpose while establishing the categorization standard of nuclear facilities in China. (author)

  2. Whole-body patterns of the range of joint motion in young adults: masculine type and feminine type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moromizato, Keiichi; Kimura, Ryosuke; Fukase, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Kyoko; Ishida, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the whole-body patterns of joint flexibility and their related biological and physical factors contributes not only to clinical assessments but also to the fields of human factors and ergonomics. In this study, ranges of motion (ROMs) at limb and trunk joints of young adults were analysed to understand covariation patterns of different joint motions and to identify factors associated with the variation in ROM. Seventy-eight healthy volunteers (42 males and 36 females) living on Okinawa Island, Japan, were recruited. Passive ROM was measured at multiple joints through the whole body (31 measurements) including the left and right side limbs and trunk. Comparisons between males and females, dominant and non-dominant sides, and antagonistic motions indicated that body structures influence ROMs. In principal component analysis (PCA) on the ROM data, the first principal component (PC1) represented the sex difference and a similar covariation pattern appeared in the analysis within each sex. Multiple regression analysis showed that this component was associated with sex, age, body fat %, iliospinale height, and leg extension strength. The present study identified that there is a spectrum of "masculine" and "feminine" types in the whole-body patterns of joint flexibility. This study also suggested that body proportion and composition, muscle mass and strength, and possibly skeletal structures partly explain such patterns. These results would be important to understand individual variation in susceptibility to joint injuries and diseases and in one's suitable and effective postures and motions.

  3. Temperature-sensitive host range mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koment, R.W.; Rapp, F.

    1975-01-01

    Herpesviruses are capable of several types of infection of a host cell. To investigate the early events which ultimately determine the nature of the virus-host cell interaction, a system was established utilizing temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2. Four mutants have been isolated which fail to induce cytopathic effects and do not replicate at 39 C in hamster embryo fibroblast cells. At least one mutant is virus DNA negative. Since intracellular complementation is detectable between pairs of mutants, a virus function is known to be temperature sensitive. However, all four mutants induce cytopathic effects and replicate to parental virus levels in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C. This suggests that a host cell function, lacking or nonfunctional in HEF cells but present in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C, is required for the replication of these mutants in hamster embryo fibroblast cells at 39 C. Therefore, we conclude that these mutants are both temperature sensitive and exhibit host range properties

  4. Application of Long-Range Surface Plasmon Resonance for ABO Blood Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanida Tangkawsakul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we demonstrate a long-range surface plasmon resonance (LR-SPR biosensor for the detection of whole cell by captured antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs as a model. The LR-SPR sensor chip consists of high-refractive index glass, a Cytop film layer, and a thin gold (Au film, which makes the evanescent field intensity and the penetration depth longer than conventional SPR. Therefore, the LR-SPR biosensor has improved capability for detecting large analytes, such as RBCs. The antibodies specific to blood group A and group B (Anti-A and Anti-B are covalently immobilized on a grafting self-assembled monolayer (SAM/Au surface on the biosensor. For blood typing, RBC samples can be detected by the LR-SPR biosensor through a change in the refractive index. We determined that the results of blood typing using the LR-SPR biosensor are consistent with the results obtained from the agglutination test. We obtained the lowest detection limits of 1.58 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-A and 3.83 × 105 cells/ml for RBC-B, indicating that the LR-SPR chip has a higher sensitivity than conventional SPR biosensors (3.3 × 108 cells/ml. The surface of the biosensor can be efficiently regenerated using 20 mM NaOH. In summary, as the LR-SPR technique is sensitive and has a simple experimental setup, it can easily be applied for ABO blood group typing.

  5. SCANDAL -- A facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50--130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, J.; Blomgren, J.; Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Dangtip, S.; Elmgren, K.; Johansson, C.; Olsson, N.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Rahm, J.; Oberstedt, A.; Tovesson, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Haddad, F.; Kerveno, M.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Stuttge, L.; Slypen, I.; Michel, R.; Neumann, S.; Herpers, U.

    2001-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50--130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has recently been installed at the 20--180 MeV neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for the (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  6. SCANDAL--a facility for elastic neutron scattering studies in the 50-130 MeV range

    CERN Document Server

    Klug, J; Atac, A; Bergenwall, B; Dangtip, S; Elmgren, K; Johansson, C; Olsson, N; Pomp, S; Prokofiev, A V; Rahm, J; Tippawan, U; Jonsson, O; Nilsson, L; Renberg, P U; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ringbom, A; Oberstedt, A; Tovesson, F; Blideanu, V; Le Brun, C; Lecolley, J F; Lecolley, F R; Louvel, M; Marie, N; Schweitzer, C; Varignon, C; Eudes, P; Haddad, F; Kerveno, M; Kirchner, T; Lebrun, C; Stuttgé, L; Slypen, I; Smirnov, A N; Michel, R; Neumann, S; Herpers, U

    2002-01-01

    A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy (SCANDAL), has recently been installed at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala. It is primarily intended for studies of elastic neutron scattering, but can be used for (n,p) and (n,d) reaction experiments as well. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated in measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 2 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail.

  7. Type B investigation report of curium-244 exposure at the ORNL TRU Facility, January 15, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.L.; Butler, H.M.; Duncan, D.T.; Oakes, T.W.

    1986-04-01

    This Type B Investigative Report provides an evaluation of relevant events and activities that led to, were a part of, or resulted from the release of curium-244 in the Building 7920 facility at ORNL in January 1986. Impacts have been evaluated with respect to employee exposures and the costs and loss of productivity resulting from increased bioassay analyses and activities of investigative committees. Management systems evaluated include (1) training of employees performing lab analyses, (2) adherence to procedures, and (3) response to unusual circumstances

  8. The Development of an Information System Master Plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    sites and support facilities are located on the islands of Niihau and Oahu. Figure 1 depicts the overall layout of PMRF. [Ref. 4: p. 2] In addition...the HIANG facility at Kokee: • a wideband microwave system serving Niihau Island remotely controls operation of the AN/APS-134 surveillance radar, and...provides relay of digitized radar data, control data and voice between the remotely operated, unmanned radar on Niihau Island and Barking Sands

  9. PMK-2 the Hungarian integral type test facility. Documentations, publications and archivations of experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, L.; Guba, A.; Ezsoel, G.; Toth, I.; Szabados, L.

    2002-01-01

    The PMK-2 experimental facility at the KFKI-AEKI, Budapest, is a full pressure, scaled down model of the primary and partly the secondary circuit of the Paks NPP, which is equipped with four VVER-440/213-type reactors. Since the start-up of the facility altogether 48 experiments have been performed for groups of transients as follows: one- and two-phase natural circulation, loss of coolant accidents, special plant transients and experiments in support of accident management procedures. The results have been used for the validation of thermal-hydraulic system codes for VVER applications. Following the experiments a detailed documentation and archiving activity - using an optimised data storage - was required to preserve the essential information and to assure these for a widely utilisation for the international nuclear community. In the publication list related to the facility and the experiments for the moment altogether 280 items - documents, articles in periodicals, papers in proceedings and research reports - in six languages were collected. The paper gives an overview on this activity including the participation in the EU CERTA-TN programme, where AEKI introduced representative databases of two PMK-2 tests in the STRESA Network.(author)

  10. 43 CFR 404.9 - What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? 404.9 Section 404.9 Public Lands... RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.9 What types of infrastructure and facilities may be included in an eligible rural water supply project? A rural water supply project may include, but is not...

  11. The effect of range and ammunition type on fracture patterns in porcine postcranial flat bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkouli, Kleio; Al Hakeem, Eyad; Bulut, Ozgur; Simmons, Tal

    2018-01-01

    Pig half-carcasses were shot in scapulae, ribs and mandibles with either 0.243 hunting rifle using high velocity expanding ammunition (N = 30) or AK47 using full metal jacketed (FMJ) ammunition (N = 12) from a range of either 5 or 20 m. Fracture patterns related to distance of fire and ammunition type were compared on de-fleshed, macerated, and reconstructed bones. For expanding ammunition, location of fracture on ribs affected the resulting pattern. Scapulae shot from 5 m presented a comminuted pattern different from those shot from 20 m. Mandibles shot from 20 m showed a characteristic radiating pattern at entrance with the opposite ramus un-fractured; those shot from 5 m exhibited fractures to both rami. Using decision tree analysis provided accuracies of 93.8% for scapulae and 87.5% for mandibles. For FMJ, no distance dependent fracture differences were apparent in any bone. Decision tree analysis facilitated the interpretation of fracture patterns caused by projectile trauma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Product/Process (P/P) Models For The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF): Model Ranges And Validation Ranges For Future Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-25

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.

  13. Developing Livestock Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melius, C; Robertson, A; Hullinger, P

    2006-10-24

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of livestock diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each livestock facility within the US. At the present time, the only national database of livestock facilities that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data.' The NASS data provides facility data at the county level for various livestock types (i.e., beef cows, milk cows, cattle on feed, other cattle, total hogs and pigs, sheep and lambs, milk goats, and angora goats). However, the number and sizes of facilities for the various livestock types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of livestock, and some livestock are of more than one type (e.g., 'other cattle' that are being fed for slaughter are also 'cattle on feed'). In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of animals or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D.'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or animals. At the same time, it must account for all the animals, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual livestock operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national livestock facility database with twenty-eight facility types. The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to estimate the data that is suppressed within the NASS database. The second step converts the NASS

  14. The SCANDAL facility - How to measure elastic neutron scattering in the 50-130 MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, Joakim

    2001-01-01

    The interest in neutrons of energies above 20 MeV is growing rapidly, since new applications are being developed or have been identified. Transmutation of nuclear waste and cancer therapy with neutron beams are two research fields that would benefit from new neutron scattering data at these energies. A facility for detection of scattered neutrons in the energy interval 50-130 MeV, SCANDAL (SCAttered Nucleon Detection AssembLy), has been developed and installed at the neutron beam facility of the The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. It can be used to study the (n,n), (n,p) and (n,d) reactions. This thesis describes the layout of the setup, the experimental procedure, and data analysis principles. The performance of the spectrometer is illustrated with measurements of the (n,p) and (n,n) reactions on 1 H and 12 C. In addition, the neutron beam facility is described in some detail

  15. Long-Ranged Oppositely Charged Interactions for Designing New Types of Colloidal Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Faik Demirörs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Getting control over the valency of colloids is not trivial and has been a long-desired goal for the colloidal domain. Typically, tuning the preferred number of neighbors for colloidal particles requires directional bonding, as in the case of patchy particles, which is difficult to realize experimentally. Here, we demonstrate a general method for creating the colloidal analogs of molecules and other new regular colloidal clusters without using patchiness or complex bonding schemes (e.g., DNA coating by using a combination of long-ranged attractive and repulsive interactions between oppositely charged particles that also enable regular clusters of particles not all in close contact. We show that, due to the interplay between their attractions and repulsions, oppositely charged particles dispersed in an intermediate dielectric constant (4<ϵ<10 provide a viable approach for the formation of binary colloidal clusters. Tuning the size ratio and interactions of the particles enables control of the type and shape of the resulting regular colloidal clusters. Finally, we present an example of clusters made up of negatively charged large and positively charged small satellite particles, for which the electrostatic properties and interactions can be changed with an electric field. It appears that for sufficiently strong fields the satellite particles can move over the surface of the host particles and polarize the clusters. For even stronger fields, the satellite particles can be completely pulled off, reversing the net charge on the cluster. With computer simulations, we investigate how charged particles distribute on an oppositely charged sphere to minimize their energy and compare the results with the solutions to the well-known Thomson problem. We also use the simulations to explore the dependence of such clusters on Debye screening length κ^{−1} and the ratio of charges on the particles, showing good agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Comparison of mass balance, energy consumption and cost of composting facilities for different types of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huijun; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Mass balance, energy consumption and cost are basic pieces of information necessary for selecting a waste management technology. In this study, composting facilities that treat different types of organic waste were studied by questionnaire survey and via a chemical analysis of material collected at the facilities. The mass balance was calculated on a dry weight basis because the moisture content of organic waste was very high. Even though the ratio of bulking material to total input varied in the range 0-65% on a dry basis, the carbon and ash content, carbon/nitrogen ratio, heavy metal content and inorganic nutrients in the compost were clearly influenced by the different characteristics of the input waste. The use of bulking material was not correlated with ash or elemental content in the compost. The operating costs were categorised into two groups. There was some economy of scale for wages and maintenance cost, but the costs for electricity and fuel were proportional to the amount of waste. Differences in operating costs can be explained by differences in the process characteristics.

  17. Restraint effect of water infiltration by soil cover types of LLW disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. M.; Lee, E. Y.; Lee, C. K.; Kim, C. L.

    2002-01-01

    Since soil cover for LLW disposal vault shows quite different restraint effect of water infiltration depending on its type, four different types of soil cover were studied and simulated using HELP code. Simulation result showed that Profile B1 is the most effective type in restraint of water infiltration to the disposal vault. Profile B1 is totally 6m thick and composed of silt, gravelly sand, pea gravel, sand and clayey soil mixed with bentonite 20%. Profile B1 also includes artificial layers, such as asphalt and geomembrane layers. This profile is designed conceptually by NETEC for the soil cover of the near surface disposal facility of the low-level radioactive waste. For comparison, 3 types of different profile were tested. One profile includes bentonite mixed layer only as water barrier layer, or one as same as profile B1 but without geomembrane layer or one without asphalt layer respectively. The simulation using HELP code showed that the water balance in profile B1 was effectively controlled

  18. A tip / tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.A.H.

    2011-01-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and

  19. Developing Poultry Facility Type Information from USDA Agricultural Census Data for Use in Epidemiological and Economic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melius, C

    2007-12-05

    The epidemiological and economic modeling of poultry diseases requires knowing the size, location, and operational type of each poultry type operation within the US. At the present time, the only national database of poultry operations that is available to the general public is the USDA's 2002 Agricultural Census data, published by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, herein referred to as the 'NASS data'. The NASS data provides census data at the county level on poultry operations for various operation types (i.e., layers, broilers, turkeys, ducks, geese). However, the number of farms and sizes of farms for the various types are not independent since some facilities have more than one type of operation. Furthermore, some data on the number of birds represents the number sold, which does not represent the number of birds present at any given time. In addition, any data tabulated by NASS that could identify numbers of birds or other data reported by an individual respondent is suppressed by NASS and coded with a 'D'. To be useful for epidemiological and economic modeling, the NASS data must be converted into a unique set of facility types (farms having similar operational characteristics). The unique set must not double count facilities or birds. At the same time, it must account for all the birds, including those for which the data has been suppressed. Therefore, several data processing steps are required to work back from the published NASS data to obtain a consistent database for individual poultry operations. This technical report documents data processing steps that were used to convert the NASS data into a national poultry facility database with twenty-six facility types (7 egg-laying, 6 broiler, 1 backyard, 3 turkey, and 9 others, representing ducks, geese, ostriches, emus, pigeons, pheasants, quail, game fowl breeders and 'other'). The process involves two major steps. The first step defines the rules used to

  20. Buffer Construction Methodology in Demonstration Test For Cavern Type Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshihiro, Akiyama; Takahiro, Nakajima; Katsuhide, Matsumura; Kenji, Terada; Takao, Tsuboya; Kazuhiro, Onuma; Tadafumi, Fujiwara

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies concerning a cavern type disposal facility have been carried out for disposal of low level radioactive waste mainly generated by power plant decommissioning in Japan. The disposal facility is composed of an engineered barrier system with concrete pit and bentonite buffer, and planed to be constructed in sub-surface 50 - 100 meters depth. Though the previous studies have mainly used laboratory and mock-up tests, we conducted a demonstration test in a full-size cavern. The main objectives of the test were to study the construction methodology and to confirm the quality of the engineered barrier system. The demonstration test was planned as the construction of full scale mock-up. It was focused on a buffer construction test to evaluate the construction methodology and quality control in this paper. Bentonite material was compacted to 1.6 Mg/m 3 in-site by large vibrating roller in this test. Through the construction of the buffer part, a 1.6 Mg/m 3 of the density was accomplished, and the data of workability and quality is collected. (authors)

  1. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  2. Evaluation on construction quality of pit filler material of cavern type radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takechi, Shin-ichi; Yokozeki, Kosuke; Shimbo, Hiroshi; Terada, Kenji; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Yada, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Yukikazu

    2014-01-01

    The pit filler material of the underground cavern-type radioactive waste disposal facility, which is poured directly around the radioactive waste packages where high temperature environment is assumed by their decay heat, is concerned to be adversely affected on the filling behavior and its hardened properties. There also are specific issues that required quality of construction must be achieved by unmanned construction with remote operation, because the pit filler construction shall be done under radiation environment. In this paper, the mix proportion of filler material is deliberated with filling experiments simulating high temperature environment, and also the effect of temperature on hardened properties are confirmed with high temperature curing test. Subsequently, the feasibility of unmanned construction method of filler material by pumping, and by movable bucket, are comparatively discussed through a real size demonstration. (author)

  3. 2 MeV, 60 kW dual-beam type electron accelerator irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsumoto, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Takao; Haruyama, Yasuyuki; Agematsu, Takashi; Mizuhashi, Kiyoshi; Sunaga, Hiromi; Washino, Masamitsu; Tamura, Naoyuki

    1984-02-01

    The specification of new irradiation facility which has been constructed from 1978 through 1981 as the replacement of 1st Accelerator of JAERI, TRCRE are described. The accelerator is the Cockcroft-Walton type and both vertical and horizontal accelerating tubes are arranged on a single high voltage generator. Transferring of the high voltage to the horizontal accelerating tube is performed with the high voltage changing system in the pressure vessel. The output ratings of the accelerator are 2 MV of acceleration voltage and 30 mA of beam current. By providing the dual beam system, two irradiation rooms, one for vertical and the other for horizontal beam, are independently operationable. Persons can enter the horizontal irradiation room for experimental setting even when the vertical irradiation room is in operation. The specification of the buildings, the exhaust air treatment system, the irradiation conveyor and the safety observation system are also described. (author)

  4. Thermo Physics Facilities Branch Brochure ARC Jet Complex Fact Sheets, Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility Fact Sheets, Ames Vertical Gun Range Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretter, E. F. (Editor); Kuhns, Jay (Editor); Nuez, Jay (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Arc Jet Complex has a rich heritage of over 40 years in Thermal Protection System (TPS) development for every NASA Space Transportation and Planetary program, including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Viking, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Mars Pathfinder,Stardust, NASP,X-33,X-34,SHARP-B1 and B2,X-37 and Mars Exploration Rovers. With this early TPS history came a long heritage in the development of the arc jet facilities. These are used to simulate the aerodynamic heating that occurs on the nose cap, wing leading edges and on other areas of the spacecraft requiring thermal protection. TPS samples have been run in the arc jets from a few minutes to over an hour,from one exposure to multiple exposures of the same sample, in order t o understand the TPS materials response to a hot gas flow environment (representative of real hyperthermal environments experienced in flight). The Ames Arc l e t Complex is a key enabler for customers involved in the three major areas of TPS development: selection, validation, and qualification. The arc jet data are critical for validating TPS thermal models, heat shield designs and repairs, and ultimately for flight qualification.

  5. 15 years of The Hungarian integral type test facility: horizontal SG related PMK-2 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perneczky, L.; Ezsoel, G.; Guba, A.; Szabados, L.

    2001-01-01

    The PMK-2 experimental facility at the KFKI-AEKI, Budapest, is a full pressure, scaled down model of the primary and partly the secondary circuit of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. This NPP is equipped with four VVER-440/213-type reactors. Such plants are slightly different from PWRs of usual design and have a number of special features as 6-loop primary circuit, horizontal steam generators, loop seal in hot and cold legs, setpoint pressure of passive safety injection tanks (SIT) higher than secondary pressure, etc. The PMK-2 was primarily designed for investigating operational and off-normal transient processes, as well as small-break loss of coolant accidents of Paks NPP. The volume and power scaling ratios are 1:2070. Due to the importance of gravitational forces in both single- and two-phase flow the elevation ratio is 1:1 except for the lower plenum and pressuriser. The six loops of the plant are modelled by a single active loop. Transients can be started from nominal operating conditions. The pressuriser (PRZ) is connected to the lower part of the hot leg as in the reference system. The core model consists of 19 electrically heated rods. The main circulating pump of the PMK-2 serves to produce the nominal operating conditions and to simulate the flow coast-down following pump trip. The horizontal design of the VVER-440 steam generator is modelled by horizontal heat transfer tubes between hot and cold vertical collectors in the primary side. The emergency core cooling systems including the SITs. High and low pressure injection systems of the Paks NPP are also modelled. The first design of the PMK-NVH facility only modelled the primary circuit of plant. This version was used until 1990. The PMK-2 facility is an upgraded version (first of all by addition of a controlled secondary heat removal system) extending the capability of the test loop to modelling transient processes evoked by initiating events in the secondary circuit or including accident sequences in

  6. Identification of the chemical inventory of different paint types applied in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabrina Tietze; Foreman, M.R.St.J.; Ekberg, CH.H.; Chalmers University of Technology, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Goeteborg; Dongen van, B.E.

    2013-01-01

    The floors, concrete walls and many of the metal surfaces in nuclear power plant containments are coated with zinc primers or paint films to preserve the metal surfaces and simplify decontamination in the containment after the occurrence of a severe nuclear incident or accident. A chemical examination of paint films from different nuclear installations out of operation, as well as current operating ones, reveals that different types of paints are used whose composition can vary significantly. Results obtained for one type of paint at a certain nuclear site are in most cases unlikely to be comparable with sites painted with another type of paint. During normal operation and particularly during nuclear accidents, the paints will degrade under the high temperature, steam and irradiation influence. As paint and its degradation products can act as sources and depots for volatile iodine compounds, the type and aging conditions of the paint films will have a significant impact on the source term of the volatile fission product iodine. Thus, great care should be taken when extrapolating any results obtained for the interaction of radioactive iodine with one paint product to a different paint product. The main focus of the study is a comparison of the chemical profile of paint films applied in Swedish nuclear power plants. Teknopox Aqua V A, an epoxy paint recently used at Ringhals 2, and an emulsion paint used in the scrubber buildings of Ringhals 1-4 are compared with a paint film from Barsebaeck nuclear power plant unit 1 that had been aged under real reactor conditions for 20 years. In addition, two paint films, an emulsion and a gloss paint, used in an international nuclear fuel reprocessing facility, are compared with the paints from the Swedish nuclear power plants. (author)

  7. Fluctuations in substitution type alloys and their analyses. Short-range order structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    This article is the fifth of the serial lecture, microstructures and fluctuations, in this magazine. The formula of X-ray diffuse scattering intensity was derived for binary alloys by introducing short-range order parameters. Diffuse scattering intensities for a single crystal Cu 3 Au were measured above critical temperature for ordering. The short-range parameters were obtained by a three-dimensional Fourier analysis. The long-range pair interaction between atoms was originated from the indirect screening interaction due to conduction electrons. A detailed study was made on short-range-order diffuse scattering from Cu 3 Au in the disordered state by electron diffraction. Fourfold splitting of the diffuse scattering was observed at 110 in the reciprocal lattice, and this result was attributed to the reflection of the form of the Fermi surface. The X-ray diffuse scattering intensity was measured at room temperature for disordered Cu-Pd alloys for the six composition of Pd. Twofold and fourfold splitting of diffuse scattering due to the short-range order (SRO) were observed at 100, 110 and equivalent positions respectively from alloys with more than 13.0at% Pd. The SRO parameters were determined from all the six alloys. For Cu-Pt alloys, the diffuse scattering originated from the correlation between Cu and Pt layers in direction was observed in addition to the one due to the reflection of the Fermi surface imaging. (author)

  8. Huff-type competitive facility location model with foresight in a discrete space

    OpenAIRE

    Milad Gorji Ashtiani; Ahmad Makui; Reza Ramezanian

    2011-01-01

    Consider a chain as leader that wants to open p new facilities in a linear market, like metro. In this market, there is a competitor, called follower. The leader and the follower have established some facilities in advance. When the leader opens p new facilities, its competitor, follower, reacts the leader’s action and opens r new facilities. The optimal locations for leader and follower are chosen among predefined potential locations. Demand is considered as demand points and is assumed inel...

  9. Image quality of mammography in Croatian nationwide screening program: Comparison between various types of facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnić, Zoran; Blašković, Darko; Klasić, Branimir; Ramač, Jelena Popić; Flegarić-Bradić, Mirjana; Štimac, Damir; Lubina, Ivan Zvonimir; Brnić, Vedran; Faj, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study was aimed to provide objective evidence about the mammographic image quality in Croatia, to compare it between different types of MG facilities and to identify the most common deficiencies and possible reasons as well as the steps needed to improve image quality. Materials and methods: A total of 420 mammographic examinations collected from 84 mammographic units participating in the Croatian nationwide breast cancer screening program were reviewed in terms of four image quality categories: identification of patient and examination, breast positioning and compression, exposure and contrast, and artifacts. Those were rated using image evaluating system based on American College of Radiology and European Commission proposals. The results were compared among different types of mammographic units, and common image quality deficiencies were identified. Results: Total image quality scores of 12.8, 16.1, 13.0 and 13.7 were found for general hospitals, university hospitals, private clinics and public healthcare centres, respectively. Average score for all mammographic units was 13.5 (out of 25 points). University hospitals were significantly better than all other mammography units in overall image quality, which was mostly contributed by better breast positioning practices. Private clinics showed the worst results in identification, exposure, contrast and artifacts. Conclusions: Serious deficiencies in identification and breast positioning, which might compromise breast cancer screening outcome, were detected in our material. They occur mainly due to subjective reasons and could be corrected through additional staff training and improvement of working discipline.

  10. Cherenkov-type diagnostics of fast electrons beams escaping from MCF facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L.; Malinowski, K.; Mirowski, R.; Rabinski, M.; Sadowski, M.J.; Zebrowski, J. [Institute for Nuclear Studies - IPJ, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents the feasibility study, the measuring system and the first experimental results of a new method developed for direct detection of high-energy (super-thermal, ripple-born and runaway) electrons generated in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) facilities. The technique in question is based on registration of the Cherenkov radiation, emitted by energetic electrons, moving through a transparent medium (radiator) with a velocity higher than the velocity of light in this material. The main aim of our studies was to develop a diagnostic technique applicable for measurements of fast electron beams within MCF devices. The IPJ team proposed Cherenkov-type probes because of their high spatial- and temporal-resolutions. The most important results of applications of the presented Cherenkov-type diagnostics have proved that the one- and four-channel versions of the detecting head are useful for studies of the fast (ripple-born and runaway) electrons in different MCF experiments. Experience collected during the described studies allows to introduce some changes in the radiator configuration and to modify the Cherenkov probe design. This document is composed of a paper followed by a poster

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Major Range and Test Facility Base (MRTFB) environmental Workshop (4th) Held in Alexandria, Virginia on 26-28 April 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Copy 0of 37 Copts$ | AD-A285 779 SIDA DOCUMENT D- 1537 I PROCEEDLNGS OF THE FOURTH ANNUAL MAJOR RANGE AND TEST FACILITY BASE (MRTFB...DEFENSE ANALYSES 񓜩 N. Beauregard Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1772 SIDA Log No. HU 94-45640 * III i DEFINITIONS IDA publishes the follewing...woodpecker. The RCW is a good indicator of ecosystem health in VIH -36 I I the longleaf pine ecosystem. This survey identified Eglin as having the fourth

  12. WWER type reactor primary loop imitation on large test loop facility in MARIA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldysh, A.; Strupchevski, A.; Kmetek, Eh.; Spasskov, V.P.; Shumskij, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    At present in Poland in cooperation with USSR a nuclear water loop test facility (WL) in 'MARIA' reactor in Sverke is under construction. The program objective is to investigate processes occuring in WWER reactor under emergency conditions, first of all after the break of the mainprimary loop circulation pipe-line. WL with the power of about 600 kW consists of three major parts: 1) an active loop, imitating the undamaged loops of the WWER reactor; 2) a passive loop assignedfor modelling the broken loop of the WWER reactor; 3) the emergency core cooling system imitating the corresponding full-scale system. The fuel rod bundle consists of 18 1 m long rods. They were fabricated according to the standard WWER fuel technology. In the report some general principles of WWERbehaviour imitation under emergency conditions are given. They are based on the operation experience obtained from 'SEMISCALE' and 'LOFT' test facilities in the USA. A description of separate modelling factors and criteria effects on the development of 'LOCA'-type accident is presented (the break cross-section to the primary loop volume ratio, the pressure differential between inlet and outlet reactor chambers, the pressure drop rate in the loop, the coolant flow rate throuh the core etc.). As an example a comparison of calculated flow rate variations for the WWER-1000 reactor and the model during the loss-of-coolant accident with the main pipe-line break at the core inlet is given. Calculations have been carried out with the use of TECH'-M code [ru

  13. Time profile of type 3 bursts in decameter and hectometer range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, T.; Naito, Y.; Ohki, K.

    1973-01-01

    The following new hypothesis is proposed. The decay time of plasma waves is much shorter than the time scale of type 3 bursts especially at low frequencies. Accordingly, the time variation of radio flux at a given frequency merely corresponds to the flux of fast electrons passing through the corresponding plasma layer.

  14. Ownership type and team climate in elderly care facilities: the moderating effect of stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Elovainio, Marko; Kouvonen, Anne; Noro, Anja; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Sinervo, Timo

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study examining the association between ownership type and perceived team climate among older people care staff. In addition, we examined whether work stress factors (time pressure, resident-related stress, role conflicts and role ambiguity) mediated or moderated the above mentioned association. There has been a trend towards contracting out in older people care facilities in Finland and the number of private for-profit firms has increased. Studies suggest that there may be differences in employee well-being and quality of care according to the ownership type of older people care. Cross-sectional survey data was collected during the autumn of 2007 from 1084 Finnish female older people care staff aged 18-69 years were used. Team Climate Inventory was used to measure team climate. Ownership type was divided into four categories: for-profit sheltered homes, not-for-profit sheltered homes, public sheltered homes and not-for-profit nursing homes. Analyses of covariance were used to examine the associations. Team climate dimensions participative safety, vision and support for innovation were higher in not-for-profit organizations (both sheltered homes and nursing homes) compared to for-profit sheltered homes and public sheltered homes. Stress factors did not account for these associations but acted as moderators in a way that in terms of task orientation and participative safety employees working in for-profit organizations seemed to be slightly more sensitive to work-related stress than others. Our results suggest that for-profit organizations and public organizations may have difficulties in maintaining their team climate. In consequence, these organizations should focus more effort on improving their team climate. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Host-range phylogenetic grouping of capripoxviruses. Genetic typing of CaPVs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, C.; Chadeyras, A.; Libeau, G.; Albina, E.; Fakhfakh, E.; Hammami, S.; Elexpeter Aba Adulugba; Diallo, A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of their close relationship, specific identification of the CaPVs genus inside the Poxviridae family relies mainly on molecular tools rather than on classical serology. We describe the suitability of the G protein-coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR), for host range phylogenetic grouping. The analysis of 26 CaPVs shows 3 tight genetic clusters consisting of goatpox virus (GPV), lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), and sheeppox virus (SPV). (author)

  16. 78 FR 39198 - Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... indicates that the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or... businesses and small governments). Unless information is obtained to the contrary during the public notice..., http://www.cnic.navy.mil/PMRF/ , and Facebook Web site, http://www.facebook.com/PacificMissileRange...

  17. A tip/tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.

    2011-09-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and performance testing of the FSM. The driving requirement for the FSM is its large stroke of +/-6.1 mrad, in combination with less than 1.5 μrad RMS absolute accuracy. The FSM design consists of a Zerodur mirror, bonded to a membrane spring and strut combination to allow only tip and tilt. Two spindle drives actuate the mirror, using a stiffness based transmission to increase resolution. Absolute accuracy is achieved with two differential inductive sensor pairs. A prototype of the FSM is realized to optimize the control configuration and measure its performance. Friction in the spindle drive is overcome by creating a local velocity control loop between the spindle drives and the shaft encoders. Accuracy is achieved by using a cascaded low bandwidth control loop with feedback from the inductive sensors. The pointing jitter and settling time of the FSM are measured with an autocollimator. The system performance meets the strict requirements, and is ready to be implemented in the first OTA.

  18. Quality of broiler meat of the free-range type submitted to diets containing alternative feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Faria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The work had the intention of investigating the effect of the use of alternative feeds as part replacers in diet-formulating, evaluating the characteristic physicochemical alterations and centesimal composition of the free-range chicken. In the experiment a total of 192 (one hundred and ninety-two birds of the Pescoço Pelado (Label Rouge strain arranged in a completely randomized design (CRD formed by 4 treatments (Treatment 1 (Control, Treatment 2 (10% of the inclusion of rice bran, Treatment 3 (10% of the inclusion of ground cassava leaf and Treatment 4 (10% of the inclusion of ground leucaena hay with 8 replicates per treatment were used. The results revealed greater values of b* (yellow, Saturation (C* and pH for broiler meat with inclusion of ground cassava leaf and leucaena, while for the other variables of physicochemical composition, no influences of the treatments were not found. For centesimal composition the treatments showed greater values of moisture in relation to the control treatment. For sex, only a difference for the content of b* and C* was found, with higher values for female. The use of the alternative feedstuffs has not revealed marked influences on the chemical composition and quality parameters of free-ranging chicken’s meat with the use of replacement up to 10% in the diets.

  19. Workers' exposure to bioaerosols from three different types of composting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Marchand, Geneviève; Veillette, Marc; M'Bareche, Hamza; Dubuis, Marie-Eve; Pépin, Carole; Cloutier, Yves; Bernard, Yves; Duchaine, Caroline

    2017-10-01

    Composting is a natural dynamic biological process used to valorise putrescible organic matter. The composting process can involve vigorous movements of waste material piles, which release high concentrations of bioaerosols into the surrounding environment. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the dispersal of airborne microorganisms emitted by composting plants (CP) as well as the potential occupational exposure of composting workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the workers exposure to bioaerosols during working activities in three different types of composting facilities (domestic, manure, carcass) using two different quantification methods (cultivation and qPCR) for bacteria and moulds concentrations. As expected, even if there are differences between all CP frameworks, independently of the type of the raw compost used, the production of bioaerosols increases significantly during handling activities. Important concentrations of mesophilic moulds and mesophilic bacteria were noted in the working areas with a respective maximal concentration of 2.3 × 10 5 CFU/m 3 and 1.6 × 10 5 CFU/m 3 . A. fumigatus and thermophilic Actinomycetes were also detected in all working areas for the 3 CP. This study emphases the risks for workers to being in contact with aerosolized pathogens such as Mycobacterium and Legionella and more specifically, L. pneumophila. The presence of high concentration of these bacteria in CP suggests a potential occupational health risk. This study may lead to recommendations for the creation of limits for occupational exposure. There is a need for identifying the standards exposure limits to bioaerosols in CP and efficient recommendation for a better protection of workers' health.

  20. The range of ambient air pollution by effluents arising by coal combustion in different types of furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konieczynski, J.; Pason, A.; Zelinski, J.

    1994-01-01

    The range of ambient air contamination caused by coal incineration in different furnace types was analysed. Application of the integrated emission coefficient enabled to determine domestic stoves as the main source of air pollutants in Gliwice. (Author). 7 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Echo signal from rough planar interfaces influence of roughness, angle, range and transducer type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pedersen, P.C.; Jacobsen, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The received electrical signal from a pulse-echo system insonifying a planar acoustical interface was measured for varying degrees of rms roughness (0-0.16 mm), angle of incidence (typically +/-7°) and range to the transducer. A planar and a focused 5 MHz transducer was used. When insonifying...... a smooth interface, the normalized spectrum of the received signals for a planar transducer exhibits an increasing number of nulls with increased angle of insonification, as predicted from numerical modeling while the dependence on insonification angle for the focused transducer was smaller and the null...... pattern was much less distinct. For the planar transducer and for the focused transducer with the interface located at the geometrical point of focus, the energy of the received signal as a function of incident angle was approximately Gaussian with maximum at 0°. For the smooth interface, the -3 dB width...

  2. Implementation of acoustic demultiplexing with membrane-type metasurface in low frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Peng; Hou, Zewei; Pei, Yongmao

    2017-04-01

    Wavelength division multiplexing technology, adopted to increase the information density, plays a significant role in optical communication. However, in acoustics, a similar function can be hardly implemented due to the weak dispersion in natural acoustic materials. Here, an acoustic demultiplexer, based on the concept of metasurfaces, is proposed for splitting acoustic waves and propagating along different trajectories in a low frequency range. An acoustic metasurface, containing multiple resonant units, is designed with various phase profiles for different frequencies. Originating from the highly dispersive properties, the resonant units are independent and merely work in the vicinity of their resonant frequencies. Therefore, by combing multiple resonant units appropriately, the phenomena of anomalous reflection, acoustic focusing, and acoustic wave bending can occur in different frequencies. The proposed acoustic demultiplexer has advantages on the subwavelength scale and the versatility in wave control, providing a strategy for separating acoustic waves with different Fourier components.

  3. Experiments in LEENA facility with modified wire type leak detector layout in large sodium pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, G.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.; Rajan, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • FBR large horizontal secondary pipeline were simulated and five sodium leak experiments were conducted by providing modified wire type leak detector layout at 550 °C. • Early detection of sodium leak is needed for minimizing the sodium leaked out and consequent damages. • PFBR leak detector layout on large horizontal pipelines can detect a leak rate of 200 g/h within 6 h. • By reducing the distance between leak point and detector to half, detection time was reduced to 1/6th and found that a leak rate of 200 g/h can be detected in one hour. • A relationship between leak rate and detection time was established based on experimental results. - Abstract: Sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (SFRs) are envisaged in the second phase of Indian nuclear power programme. Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in the SFRs due to its favourable nuclear properties and excellent heat transfer properties. Leaks in sodium systems have the potential of being exceptionally hazardous due to the reaction of liquid sodium with oxygen and water vapour in the air. When a sodium leak occurs, the sodium leak rate, the total quantity of sodium leaked and leak detector layout governs the detection time. Other factors to be considered are insulation material packing condition, distance between the leak point and detector, heater layout, pipe geometry, temperature etc. Potential regions of leakage in Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) sodium circuits are near welds, high stress areas and regions subjected to thermal striping. Early detection of leak is needed for minimizing the quantity of sodium leaked to outside and consequent damages. Three wire type leak detectors (WLDs positioned at 90°, 180° and 270°) working on conductivity principle are used for detecting sodium leak in the large horizontal secondary sodium pipelines of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). It was found from the upper boundary curve based on LEENA (LEak Experiments in NAtrium) facility experimental

  4. An analysis of carbon and radiocarbon profiles across a range ecosystems types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, K. A.; Gallo, A.; Hatten, J. A.; Swanston, C.; Strahm, B. D.; Sanclements, M.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon stocks have become recognized as increasingly important in the context of climate change and global C cycle modeling. As modelers seek to identify key parameters affecting the size and stability of belowground C stocks, attention has been drawn to the mineral matrix and the soil physiochemical factors influenced by it. Though clay content has often been utilized as a convenient and key explanatory variable for soil C dynamics, its utility has recently come under scrutiny as new paradigms of soil organic matter stabilization have been developed. We utilized soil cores from a range of National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) experimental plots to examine the influence of mineralogical parameters on soil C stocks and turnover and their relative importance in comparison to climatic variables. Results are presented for a total of 11 NEON sites, spanning Alfisols, Entisols, Mollisols and Spodosols. Soils were sampled by genetic horizon, density separated according to density fractionation: light fractions (particulate organics neither occluded within aggregates nor associated with mineral surfaces), occluded fractions (particulate organics occluded within aggregates), and heavy fractions (organics associated with mineral surfaces). Bulk soils and density fractions were measured for % C and radiocarbon abundance (as a measure of C stability). Carbon and radiocarbon abundances were examined among fractions and in the context of climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, elevation) and soil physiochemical variables (% clay and pH). No direct relationships between temperature and soil C or radiocarbon abundances were found. As a whole, soil radiocarbon abundance in density fractions decreased in the order of light>heavy>occluded, highlighting the importance of both surface sorption and aggregation to the preservation of organics. Radiocarbon concentrations of the heavy fraction (mineral adsorbed) were significantly, though weakly, correlated with pH (r

  5. Design Concept of a Seal-off Type 14 MeV Neutron Generator of 10''1''1n/s Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, S. R.; Oh, B. H. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The total neutron fluence during the life time is expected to be around 10MW·yr/m''2 which may cause a damage of -100 dpa in materials. To estimate the adaptability of candidate materials in a few years, a 14MeV neutron source with a flux level of 3 - 5 x 10''1''8 n/s·m''2, which is the goal of the IFMIF facility costing more than ¤1000M, is necessitated. The problem in making an intense neutron generator of beam target type is really not on the neutron production rate, but on the huge heat generated in the target, because the fusion power is only one of thousands of beam power exerted on the target. We have a plan to develop neutron generators step by step from a 10''8 n/s level. The final goal is establishing a 14MeV neutron irradiation facility at 10''1''4 intensity level.. Up to the 10''1''0 n/s level, there occurs basically no critical thermal problem, because beam power density is in the range of tens W/cm''2. The neutron generator designed in a sealed-off type because of tritium safety is mainly composed of an ion source, target, reaction chamber, and getter pump.. The major design concepts for the neutron generator with the neutron production rate of 10''1''1 n/s range were presented. The specifications of the ion source, target and getter have been determined for attaining the goal of the neutron generation rate.

  6. Incidence, types and characteristics of aggressive behaviour in treatment facilities for adults with mild intellectual disability and severe challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenneij, N.H.; Koot, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types

  7. Functional plant types drive plant interactions in a Mediterranean mountain range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr eMacek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shrubs have both positive (facilitation and negative (competition effects on understory plants, the net interaction effect being modulated by abiotic conditions. Overall shrubs influence to great extent the structure of plant communities where they have significant presence. Interactions in a plant community are quite diverse but little is known about their variability and effects at community level. Here we checked the effects of co-occurring shrub species from different functional groups on a focal understory species, determining mechanisms driving interaction outcome, and tested whether effects measured on the focal species were a proxy for effects measured at the community level. Growth, physiological, and reproductive traits of Euphorbia nicaeensis, our focal species, were recorded on individuals growing in association with four dominant shrub species and in adjacent open areas. We also recorded community composition and environmental conditions in each microhabitat.Shrubs provided environmental conditions for plant growth, which contrasted with open areas, including moister soil, greater N content, higher air temperatures, and lower radiation. Shrub-associated individuals showed lower reproductive effort and greater allocation to growth, while most physiological traits remained unaffected. Euphorbia individuals were bigger and had more leaf N under N-fixing than under non-fixing species. Soil moisture was also higher under N-fixing shrubs; therefore soil conditions in the understory may counter reduced light conditions.There was a significant effect of species identity and functional types in the outcome of plant interactions with consistent effects at individual and community levels. The contrasting allocation strategies to reproduction and growth in Euphorbia plants, either associated or not with shrubs, showed high phenotypic plasticity and evidence its ability to cope with contrasting environmental conditions.

  8. Internal friction measurement with a kilohertz range test facility of cold-worked and neutron-irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandchamp, Pierre-Andre

    1970-02-01

    The author studies properties of the Bordoni peak in 99,999 % gold. The following features are considered: - influence of type and rate of cold-work on relaxation strength. After traction cold-work, the height of the Bordoni peak is roughly proportional to the rate of plastic deformation, - relaxation features. The relaxation energies and attempt frequencies of the Bordoni peak are determined for poly - and single crystals. The broadening of experimental peaks is studied, - effect of dislocation pinning on the Bordoni peak. One shows that the experience leads to a relation: Q"-"1_m_a_x ∼ Λl"2 where Q"-"1_m_a_x is the height of the peak, Λ the dislocation density and l the mean loop length of dislocations which are implied in the phenomenon [fr

  9. Huff-type competitive facility location model with foresight in a discrete space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Gorji Ashtiani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider a chain as leader that wants to open p new facilities in a linear market, like metro. In this market, there is a competitor, called follower. The leader and the follower have established some facilities in advance. When the leader opens p new facilities, its competitor, follower, reacts the leader’s action and opens r new facilities. The optimal locations for leader and follower are chosen among predefined potential locations. Demand is considered as demand points and is assumed inelastic. Considering huff model, demand points are probabilistically absorbed by all facilities. The leader’s objective is maximization of its market share after opening follower’s new facilities. For solving leader problem, first the follower’s problem is solved for all leader’s potential locations and the best location for leader is obtained and then, a heuristic model is proposed for leader problem when the leader and the follower want to open one new facility. Computational results show that the proposed method is efficient for large scale problems.

  10. A Study on the Ion Beam Extraction using Duo-PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sok; Lee, Chan young; Lee, Jae Sang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC), we have started ion beam service in the new beam utilization building since March this year. For various ion beam irradiation services, we are developed implanters such as metal (150keV/1mA), gaseous (200keV/5mA) and high current ion beam facility (20keV/150mA). One of the new one is a vertical type ion beam facility without acceleration tube (60keV/20mA) which is easy to install the sample. After the installation is complete, it is where you are studying the optimal ion beam extraction process. Detailed experimental results will be presented. Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility without acceleration tube of 60keV 20mA class was installed. We successfully extracted 60keV 20mA using Duo- PiGatron Ion source for Vertical Type Ion Beam Facility. Use the BPM and Faraday-cup, is being studied the optimum conditions of ion beam extraction.

  11. Application of an experimental irradiation facility type K-120 for the radiation treatment of agricultural products in large quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, V.; Foeldiak, G.; Horvath, I.; Hargittai, P.; Bartfai, Cs.

    1979-01-01

    During experimental and pilot irradiation carried out by the 60 Co irradiation facility type K-120 of the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences an irradiation technology for the treatment of agricultural and food products of considerable density has been developed. Applying transport containers of commercial size the intermittent radiation treatment of great quantity products was made possible with homogeneous dose distribution. The radiation technical characteristics, the utilization coefficient and the capacity of the facility for every agricultural product were calculated. (author)

  12. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  13. Quality-control ranges for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth dilution of the Brachyspira hyodysenteriae type strain (ATCC 27164(T))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pringle, M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Bergsjø, B.

    2006-01-01

    There are no approved standards for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the fastidious spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. An interlaboratory study was performed to establish MIC quality control ranges for six antimicrobial agents for the type strain of B. hyodysenteriae using broth diluti....... The results showed that B. hyodysenteriae B78(T) ATCC 27164(T) is a suitable quality control strain. This is a first step toward standardization of methods regarding this anaerobe....

  14. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Blenski, T; Caillaud, T; Ducret, J E; Foelsner, W; Gilles, D; Gilleron, F; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Serres, F; Silvert, V; Soullie, G; Turck-Chieze, S; Villette, B

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  15. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B.; Thais, Frédéric; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M.; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S.

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ∼ 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at École Polytechnique (France) to measure the Δn = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  16. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Thais, Frederic; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons, Atomes et Molecules, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Busquet, M. [ARTEP Inc, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Ducret, J. E. [CELIA, UMR5107, CEA, CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, 33400 Talence (France); Foelsner, W. [Max Planck Instituet fuer Quantum Optik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S. [CEA, DSM, IRFU, Service d' astrophysique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-10-15

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  17. Range Hood Test Facility (IAQ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Indoor Environment Group has a unique laboratory, plus associated protocols and instrumentation systems designed to characterize the performance of residential...

  18. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  19. Safety analysis and lay-out aspects of shieldings against particle radiation at the example of spallation facilities in the megawatt range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanslik, R.

    2006-08-01

    This paper discusses the shielding of particle radiation from high current accelerators, spallation neutron sources and so called ADS-facilities (Accelerator Driven Systems). ADS-facilities are expected to gain importance in the future for transmutation of long-lived isotopes from fission reactors as well as for energy production. In this paper physical properties of the radiation as well as safety relevant requirements and corresponding shielding concepts are discussed. New concepts for the layout and design of such shielding are presented. Focal point of this work will be the fundamental difference between conventional fission reactor shielding and the safety relevant issues of shielding from high-energy radiation. Key point of this paper is the safety assessment of shielding issues of high current accelerators, spallation targets and ADS-blanket systems as well as neutron scattering instruments at spallation neutron sources. Safety relevant shielding requirements are presented and discussed. For the layout and design of the shielding for spallation sources computer base calculations methods are used. A discussion and comparison of the most important methods like semi-empirical, deterministic and stochastic codes are presented. Another key point within the presented paper is the discussion of shielding materials and their shielding efficiency concerning different types of radiation. The use of recycling material, as a cost efficient solution, is discussed. Based on the conducted analysis, flowcharts for a systematic layout and design of adequate shielding for targets and accelerators have been developed and are discussed in this paper. By use of these flowcharts layout and engineering design of future ADS-facilities can be performed. (orig.)

  20. The Inter Facility Testing of a Standard Oscillating Water Column (OWC) Type Wave Energy Converter (WEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg

    This report describes the behavior and preliminary performance of a simplified standard oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter (WEC). The same tests will be conducted at different scales at 6 different test facilities and the results obtained will be used for comparison. This project...

  1. Entanglement and quantum state geometry of a spin system with all-range Ising-type interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmak, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The evolution of an N spin-1/2 system with all-range Ising-type interaction is considered. For this system we study the entanglement of one spin with the rest spins. It is shown that the entanglement depends on the number of spins and the initial state. Also, the geometry of the manifold, which contains entangled states, is obtained. For this case we find the dependence of entanglement on the scalar curvature of the manifold and examine it for different numbers of spins in the system. Finally we show that the transverse magnetic field leads to a change in the manifold topology.

  2. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  3. Technical basis for the performance of radiological surveys in support of nuclear facility decommissioning/deactivation utilizing the Laser-Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, C.D.

    1997-06-01

    This document describes the implementation of the Laser-Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS) as it applies to performing radiological surveys on facility exterior and interior surfaces. The LARADS enables the system operator to document scanning measurements, stationary radiological measurements, and sample locations of surfaces, with the radiological readings and exact coordinates (<2 cm [0.8 in.] precision) automatically logged in real-time. After the survey is completed, the information is downloaded to a geographical information system, and the radiological information is overlaid on a digital picture of the survey area or may be generated as a computer- aided drafted drawing. The final product is a track map or contour of the survey area that clearly shows the area covered by the detector and the locations of elevated readings. The exact reproducibility of data facilitates locating hot spots for remediation and provides for objective review by regulators and verifiers

  4. Experimental facility of innovative types as the laboratory analog of research reactor experimental device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsenko, A.A.; Androsenko, P.A.; Zabud'ko, A.N.; Kremenetskij, A.K.; Nikolaev, A.N.; Trykov, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper analyses capability of creating laboratory analogs of complex experimental facilities at research reactors utilizing power radionuclide neutron sources fabricated in industrial conditions. Some experimental and calculational investigations of neutron-physical characteristics are presented, which have been attained at the RIZ research reactor laboratory analog. Experimental results are supplemented by calculational investigations, fulfilled by means of the BRAND three-dimensional computational complex and the ROZ-6 one-dimensional program. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Exploring trophic strategies of exotic caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda): Comparison between habitat types and native vs introduced distribution ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Macarena; Tierno de Figueroa, José Manuel; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Navarro-Barranco, Carlos; Lacerda, Mariana Baptista; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Masunari, Setuko

    2014-02-01

    The trophic ecology of non-native species is a key aspect to understand their invasion success and the community effects. Despite the important role of caprellid amphipods as trophic intermediates between primary producers and higher levels of marine food webs, there is very little information on their feeding habits. This is the first comprehensive study on the trophic strategies of two co-occurring introduced caprellids in the Spanish coasts: Caprella scaura and Paracaprella pusilla. The diet of 446 specimens of C. scaura and 230 of P. pusilla was analyzed to investigate whether there were differences in the feeding habits in relation to habitat characteristics (natural vs artificial hard substrata), type of host substrata (bryozoans and hydroids) and native vs introduced distribution ranges (Brazil vs Spain). Results revealed differences in diet preferences of the two species that have important implications for their trophic behaviour and showed a limited food overlap, which may favour their coexistence in introduced areas. In general terms, P. pusilla is a predator species, showing preference by crustacean prey in all of its life stages, while C. scaura feeds mainly on detritus. Although no sex-related diet shifts were observed in either of the species, evidence of ontogenetic variation in diet of C. scaura was found, with juveniles feeding on more amount of prey than adults. No diet differences were found between native and introduced populations within the same habitat type. However, P. pusilla exhibited a shift in its diet when different habitats were compared in the same distribution area, and C. scaura showed a flexible feeding behaviour between different host substrata in the same habitat type. This study shows that habitat characteristics at different scales can have greater influence on the feeding ecology of exotic species than different distribution ranges, and support the hypothesis that a switch between feeding strategies depending on habitat

  6. Population genetics and new insight into range of CAG repeats of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 in the Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Rui Gan

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, also called Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, is one of the most common SCAs worldwide and caused by a CAG repeat expansion located in ATXN3 gene. Based on the CAG repeat numbers, alleles of ATXN3 can be divided into normal alleles (ANs, intermediate alleles (AIs and expanded alleles (AEs. It was controversial whether the frequency of large normal alleles (large ANs is related to the prevalence of SCA3 or not. And there were huge chaos in the comprehension of the specific numbers of the range of CAG repeats which is fundamental for genetic analysis of SCA3. To illustrate these issues, we made a novel CAG repeat ladder to detect CAG repeats of ATXN3 in 1003 unrelated Chinese normal individuals and studied haplotypes defined by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs closed to ATXN3. We found that the number of CAG repeats ranged from 13 to 49, among them, 14 was the most common number. Positive skew, the highest frequency of large ANs and 4 AIs which had never been reported before were found. Also, AEs and large ANs shared the same haplotypes defined by the SNPs. Based on these data and other related studies, we presumed that de novo mutations of ATXN3 emerging from large ANs are at least one survival mechanisms of mutational ATXN3 and we can redefine the range of CAG repeats as: ANs≤44, 45 ≤AIs ≤49 and AEs≥50.

  7. Satellite monitoring of different vegetation types by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS in the red spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the satellite remote sensing of different types of vegetation and ocean colour is presented. In contrast to existing algorithms relying on the strong change of the reflectivity in the red and near infrared spectral region, our method analyses weak narrow-band (few nm reflectance structures (i.e. "fingerprint" structures of vegetation in the red spectral range. It is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS, which is usually applied for the analysis of atmospheric trace gas absorptions. Since the spectra of atmospheric absorption and vegetation reflectance are simultaneously included in the analysis, the effects of atmospheric absorptions are automatically corrected (in contrast to other algorithms. The inclusion of the vegetation spectra also significantly improves the results of the trace gas retrieval. The global maps of the results illustrate the seasonal cycles of different vegetation types. In addition to the vegetation distribution on land, they also show patterns of biological activity in the oceans. Our results indicate that improved sets of vegetation spectra might lead to more accurate and more specific identification of vegetation type in the future.

  8. Windthrow Dynamics in Boreal Ontario: A Simulation of the Vulnerability of Several Stand Types across a Range of Wind Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Anyomi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Boreal North America, management approaches inspired by the variability in natural disturbances are expected to produce more resilient forests. Wind storms are recurrent within Boreal Ontario. The objective of this study was to simulate wind damage for common Boreal forest types for regular as well as extreme wind speeds. The ForestGALES_BC windthrow prediction model was used for these simulations. Input tree-level data were derived from permanent sample plot (PSP data provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. PSPs were assigned to one of nine stand types: Balsam fir-, Jack pine-, Black spruce-, and hardwood-dominated stands, and, Jack pine-, spruce-, conifer-, hardwood-, and Red and White pine-mixed species stands. Morphological and biomechanical parameters for the major tree species were obtained from the literature. At 5 m/s, predicted windthrow ranged from 0 to 20%, with damage increasing to 2 to 90% for winds of 20 m/s and to 10 to 100% for winds of 40 m/s. Windthrow varied by forest stand type, with lower vulnerability within hardwoods. This is the first study to provide such broad simulations of windthrow vulnerability data for Boreal North America, and we believe this will benefit policy decisions regarding risk management and forest planning.

  9. Effect of free-range access, shelter type and weather conditions on free-range use and welfare of slow-growing broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadig, Lisanne M.; Rodenburg, Bas; Ampe, Bart; Reubens, Bert; Tuyttens, Frank A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Free-range access for broiler chickens can benefit animal welfare because the birds have access to a more natural environment and more opportunities to perform natural behaviours than in indoor systems. Also, they have more space and more environmental enrichment, which could lead to better leg

  10. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, H., E-mail: hsio@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Spectral range calculation inside the Research Irradiating Facility Army Technology Center using code MCNPX and comparison with the spectra of energy Caesium 137 raised in laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Cavaliere, Marcos Paulo; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Moreira Junior, Luis; Vital, Helio C.; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    Using the MCNPX code, the objective was to calculate by means of computer simulation spectroscopy range inside the irradiation chamber upper radiator gamma research irradiating facility Army Technology Center (CTEx). The calculations were performed in the spectral range usual 2 points for research purposes irradiating the energy spectra of gamma rays from the source of Cesium chloride 137. Sought the discretization of the spectrum in 100 channels at points of upper bound of 1cm higher and lower dose rates previously known. It was also conducted in the laboratory lifting the spectrum of Cesium-137 source using NaI scintillator detector and multichannel analyzer. With the source spectrum Cesium-137 contained in the literature and raised in the laboratory, both used as reference for comparison and analysis in terms of probability of emission maximum of 0.661 MeV The spectra were quite consistent in terms of the behavior of the energy distributions with scores. The position of maximum dose rate showed absorption detection almost maximum energy of 0.661 MeV photopeak In the spectrum of the position of minimum dosage rate, it was found that due to the removal of the source point of interest, some loss detection were caused by Compton scattering. (author)

  12. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  13. Safety assessment of a borehole type disposal facility using the ISAM methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blerk, J.J. van; Yucel, V.; Kozak, M.W.; Moore, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Improving Long-term of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Waste Disposal Facilities (ISAM), three example cases were developed. The aim was to test the ISAM safety assessment methodology using as realistic as possible data. One of the Test Cases, the Borehole Test Case (BTC), related to a proposed future disposal option for disused sealed radioactive sources. This paper uses the various steps of the ISAM safety assessment methodology to describe the work undertaken by ISAM participants in developing the BTC and provides some general conclusions that can be drawn from the findings of their work. (author)

  14. 2016 Annual Site Environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kaua'i Test Facility Hawai'i.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, Angela Maria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffith, Stacy R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology & Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under contract DE-NA0003525. The DOE/NNSA Sandia Field Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the SNL, Tonopah Test Range (SNL/TTR) in Nevada and the SNL, Kaua‘i Test Facility (SNL/KTF) in Hawai‘i. SNL personnel manage and conduct operations at SNL/TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and have operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering personnel perform most of the environmental programs activities at SNL/TTR. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for cleanup and management of SNL/TTR Environmental Restoration sites. SNL personnel operate SNL/KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring programs at SNL/TTR and SNL/KTF during calendar year 2016. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial and biological surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention, environmental restoration, oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. This ASER is prepared in accordance with and as required by DOE O 231.1B, Admin Change 1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.

  15. Design of transmission-type phase holograms for a compact radar-cross-section measurement range at 650 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noponen, Eero; Tamminen, Aleksi; Vaaja, Matti

    2007-07-10

    A design formalism is presented for transmission-type phase holograms for use in a submillimeter-wave compact radar-cross-section (RCS) measurement range. The design method is based on rigorous electromagnetic grating theory combined with conventional hologram synthesis. Hologram structures consisting of a curved groove pattern on a 320 mmx280 mm Teflon plate are designed to transform an incoming spherical wave at 650 GHz into an output wave generating a 100 mm diameter planar field region (quiet zone) at a distance of 1 m. The reconstructed quiet-zone field is evaluated by a numerical simulation method. The uniformity of the quiet-zone field is further improved by reoptimizing the goal field. Measurement results are given for a test hologram fabricated on Teflon.

  16. Defect formation energies and homogeneity ranges of rock salt-, pyrite-, chalcopyrite- and molybdenite-type compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, S. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, Berlin D-14109 (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Employing the generalisation of Van Vechten's cavity model, formation energies of neutral point defects in pyrites (FeS{sub 2}, RuS{sub 2}), chalcopyrites (II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-III-VI{sub 2}) as well as molybdenites (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) have been estimated. As input parameters the fundamental band gaps, work functions, electron affinities, surface energies, coordination numbers, covalent or ionic radii and unit cell parameters were used. The values calculated for tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated compounds agreed well with measured values. The data obtained can be used to calculate point defect concentrations and homogeneity ranges as a function of partial pressure and temperature. Introducing charged vacancies, the conductivity type can be predicted.

  17. Expanding the body mass range: associations between BMR and tissue morphology in wild type and mutant dwarf mice (David mice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carola W; Neubronner, Juliane; Rozman, Jan; Stumm, Gabi; Osanger, Andreas; Stoeger, Claudia; Augustin, Martin; Grosse, Johannes; Klingenspor, Martin; Heldmaier, Gerhard

    2007-02-01

    We sought to identify associations of basal metabolic rate (BMR) with morphological traits in laboratory mice. In order to expand the body mass (BM) range at the intra-strain level, and to minimize relevant genetic variation, we used male and female wild type mice (C3HeB/FeJ) and previously unpublished ENU-induced dwarf mutant littermates (David mice), covering a body mass range from 13.5 g through 32.3 g. BMR was measured at 30 degrees C, mice were killed by means of CO(2 )overdose, and body composition (fat mass and lean mass) was subsequently analyzed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), after which mice were dissected into 12 (males) and 10 (females) components, respectively. Across the 44 individuals, 43% of the variation in the basal rates of metabolism was associated with BM. The latter explained 47% to 98% of the variability in morphology of the different tissues. Our results demonstrate that sex is a major determinant of body composition and BMR in mice: when adjusted for BM, females contained many larger organs, more fat mass, and less lean mass compared to males. This could be associated with a higher mass adjusted BMR in females. Once the dominant effects of sex and BM on BMR and tissue mass were removed, and after accounting for multiple comparisons, no further significant association between individual variation in BMR and tissue mass emerged.

  18. Influenza virus sequence feature variant type analysis: evidence of a role for NS1 in influenza virus host range restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Jyothi M; Liu, Mengya; Squires, R Burke; Pickett, Brett E; Hale, Benjamin G; Air, Gillian M; Galloway, Summer E; Takimoto, Toru; Schmolke, Mirco; Hunt, Victoria; Klem, Edward; García-Sastre, Adolfo; McGee, Monnie; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2012-05-01

    Genetic drift of influenza virus genomic sequences occurs through the combined effects of sequence alterations introduced by a low-fidelity polymerase and the varying selective pressures experienced as the virus migrates through different host environments. While traditional phylogenetic analysis is useful in tracking the evolutionary heritage of these viruses, the specific genetic determinants that dictate important phenotypic characteristics are often difficult to discern within the complex genetic background arising through evolution. Here we describe a novel influenza virus sequence feature variant type (Flu-SFVT) approach, made available through the public Influenza Research Database resource (www.fludb.org), in which variant types (VTs) identified in defined influenza virus protein sequence features (SFs) are used for genotype-phenotype association studies. Since SFs have been defined for all influenza virus proteins based on known structural, functional, and immune epitope recognition properties, the Flu-SFVT approach allows the rapid identification of the molecular genetic determinants of important influenza virus characteristics and their connection to underlying biological functions. We demonstrate the use of the SFVT approach to obtain statistical evidence for effects of NS1 protein sequence variations in dictating influenza virus host range restriction.

  19. Development of one body α-γ type manipulator for hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. K.; Lee, S. B.; Lee, E. P.

    2004-01-01

    To handle the high level radioactive materials in a sealed type hot cell, our company has developed the one body alpha-gamma type manipulator and this is an improved model compared with the previously developed beta-gamma and separated alpha-gamma type manipulators. The successful development of one body alpha-gamma type manipulator means our company has a whole capacity to design and fabricate all kinds of manipulators using in hot cells. Until now most of the manipulators in Korea were imported from other countries. The development of Korean manipulators gives us the easier maintenance and lower price compared to the foreign products. It is also possible to export the Korean manipulators to overseas

  20. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  1. Radiation shielding at interim storage facility for CANDU-type nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateescu, S.; Radu, M. Pantazi D.; Stanciu, M.

    1997-01-01

    Technical measures in radiological protection are taken in the interim storage facility design to ensure that, during normal operation, exposures of workers and members of public to ionizing radiation are limited to levels lower than regulatory limits. The spent fuel storage design provides for radiation exposure to be as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA principles). The evaluation of radiation shields includes the most conservative provisions: - all locations which may contain spent fuel are full; - the spent fuel has reached the maximum burnup; - the post irradiation cooling period should be the minimum reasonable; - equipment for handling contains the maximum amount of spent fuel. Radiation shields should ensure that external radiation fields do not exceed limits accepted by the Regulatory Body Module. The evaluation has been performed with two computer codes, QAD-5K and MICROSHIELD-4. (authors)

  2. Automatic stair-climbing algorithm of the planetary wheel type mobile robot in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jong Min

    1995-01-01

    A mobile robot, named KAEROT, has been developed for inspection and maintenance operations in nuclear facilities. The main feature of locomotion system is the planetary wheel assembly with small wheels. This mechanism has been designed to be able to go over the stairs and obstacles with stability. This paper presents the inverse kinematic solution that is to be operated by remote control. The automatic stair climbing algorithm is also proposed. The proposed algorithms the moving paths of small wheels and calculates the angular velocity of 3 actuation wheels. The results of simulations and experiments are given for KAEROT performed on the irregular stairs in laboratory. It is shown that the proposed algorithm provides the lower inclination angle of the robot body and increases its stability during navigation. 14 figs., 16 refs. (Author)

  3. Automatic stair-climbing algorithm of the planetary wheel type mobile robot in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Seung Ho; Lee, Jong Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-01

    A mobile robot, named KAEROT, has been developed for inspection and maintenance operations in nuclear facilities. The main feature of locomotion system is the planetary wheel assembly with small wheels. This mechanism has been designed to be able to go over the stairs and obstacles with stability. This paper presents the inverse kinematic solution that is to be operated by remote control. The automatic stair climbing algorithm is also proposed. The proposed algorithms the moving paths of small wheels and calculates the angular velocity of 3 actuation wheels. The results of simulations and experiments are given for KAEROT performed on the irregular stairs in laboratory. It is shown that the proposed algorithm provides the lower inclination angle of the robot body and increases its stability during navigation. 14 figs., 16 refs. (Author).

  4. Geohydrology of the High Energy Laser System Test Facility site, White Sands Missile Range, Tularosa Basin, south-central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basabilvazo, G.T.; Nickerson, E.L.; Myers, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Yesum-HoHoman and Gypsum land (hummocky) soils at the High Energy Laser System Test Facility (HELSTF) represent wind deposits from recently desiccated lacustrine deposits and deposits from the ancestral Lake Otero. The upper 15-20 feet of the subsurface consists of varved gypsiferous clay and silt. Below these surfidai deposits the lithology consists of interbedded clay units, silty-clay units, and fine- to medium-grained quartz arenite units in continuous and discontinuous horizons. Clay horizons can cause perched water above the water table. Analyses of selected clay samples indicate that clay units are composed chiefly of kaolinire and mixed-layer illite/ smectite. The main aquifer is representative of a leaky-confined aquifer. Estimated aquifer properties are: transmissivity (T) = 780 feet squared per day, storage coefficient (S) = 3.1 x 10-3, and hydraulic conductivity (K) = 6.0 feet per day. Ground water flows south and southwest; the estimated hydraulic gradient is 5.3 feet per mile. Analyses of water samples indicate that ground water at the HELSTF site is brackish to slightly saline at the top of the main aquifer. Dissolved-solids concentration near the top of the main aquifer ranges from 5,940 to 11,800 milligrams per liter. Predominant ions are sodium and sulfate. At 815 feet below land surface, the largest dissolved-solids concentration measured is 111,000 milligrams per liter, which indicates increasing salinity with depth. Predominant ions are sodium and chloride.

  5. Commissioning dosimetry for the laboratory irradiation facility type PX-γ-30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, E.F.; Cuesta Fuente, G.I.; Chavez Ardanza, A.; Sainz Vidal, D.

    1997-01-01

    In the present paper at the laboratory irradiation type PX-y-30 was carried out the commissioning dosimetry, which belongs to Radiological Department of the CEADEN. It was determined the dose distribution as well as principal dosimetric parameters of the irradiation process. Besides, an irradiation position was found for the calibration or intercomparison of dosimetry systems

  6. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  7. Facile synthesis of cyclopentenone B1- and L1-type Phytoprostanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eGuy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoprostanes (PhytoPs represent non-enzymatic metabolites of α-linolenic acid (ALA, the essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA derived from plants. PhytoPs are present in the plant kingdom and represent endogenous mediators capable of protecting cells from oxidative stress damages in plants. Recently, it was found that such metabolites are present in cooking oil in high quantities, and also that B1-PhytoPs protect immature neurons from oxidant injury and promote differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors through PPAR-γ activation. We report a novel and facile synthesis of natural 2,3-substituted cyclopentenone PhytoPs, 16-B1-PhytoP and 9-L1-PhytoP. Our strategy is based on reductive alkylation at the 2-position of 1,3-cyclopentanedione using a recent protocol developed by Ramachary et al., and on a cross-coupling metathesis to access conjugate dienone system. In conclusion, this strategy permitted access to B1- and L1-PhytoPs in a relative short sequence process, and afford the possibility to easily develop analogs of PhytoPs.

  8. Production of exotic, short lived carbon isotopes in ISOL-type facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, Hanna; Köster, Ulli; Ammann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The beam intensities of short-lived carbon isotopes at Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facilities have been limited in the past for technical reasons. The production of radioactive ion beams of carbon isotopes is currently of high interest for fundamental nuclear physics research. To produce radioactive ions a target station consisting of a target in a container connected to an ion source via a transfer line is commonly used. The target is heated to vaporize the product for transport. Carbon in elementary form is a very reactive element and react strongly with hot metal surfaces. Due to the strong chemisorption interaction, in the target and ion source unit, the atoms undergo significant retention on their way from the target to the ion source. Due to this the short lived isotopes decays and are lost leading to low ion yields. A first approach to tackle these limitations consists of incorporating the carbon atoms into less reactive molecules and to use materials for the target housing and the transfer line ...

  9. Enhancement and creation of secondary channel habitat: Review of project performance across a range of project types and settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J.; Lind, P.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary channels provide critical off-channel habitat for key life stages of aquatic species. In many systems, interruption of natural processes via anthropogenic influences have reduced the quantity of secondary channel habitat and have impaired the processes that help form and maintain them. Creation and enhancement of secondary channels is therefore a key component of stream rehabilitation, particularly in the Pacific Northwest where the focus has been on enhancement of habitat for ESA-listed salmonids. Secondary channel enhancement varies widely in scope, scale, and approach depending on species requirements, hydrology/hydraulics, geomorphologic setting, sediment dynamics, and human constraints. This presentation will review case studies from numerous secondary channel projects constructed over the last 20 years by different entities and in different settings. Lessons learned will be discussed that help to understand project performance and inform future project design. A variety of secondary channel project types will be reviewed, including mainstem flow splits, year-round flow through, seasonally activated, backwater alcove, natural groundwater-fed, and engineered groundwater-fed (i.e. groundwater collection galleries). Projects will be discussed that span a range of project construction intensities, such as full excavation of side channels, select excavation to increase flow, or utilizing mainstem structures to activate channels. Different configurations for connecting to the main channel, and their relative performance, will also be presented. A variety of connection types will be discussed including stabilized channel entrance, free-formed entrance, using bar apex jams to split flows, using `bleeder' jams to limit secondary channel flow, and obstructing the main channel to divert flows into secondary channels. The performance and longevity of projects will be discussed, particularly with respect to the response to sediment mobilizing events. Lessons

  10. Scaled Facility Design Approach for Pool-Type Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Small Modular Reactor Utilizing Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangrok; Shin, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In low carbon era, nuclear energy is the most prominent energy source of electricity. For steady ecofriendly nuclear energy supply, Generation IV reactors which are future nuclear reactor require safety, sustainability, economics and non-proliferation as four criteria. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of these reactor type and Generation IV international forum (GIF) adapted three reference LFR systems which are a small and movable systems with long life without refueling, intermediate size and huge electricity generation system for power grid. NUTRECK (Nuclear Transmutation Energy Center of Korea) has been designed reactor called URANUS (Ubiquitous, Rugged, Accident-forgiving, Non-proliferating, and Ultra-lasting Sustainer) which is small modular reactor and using lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. To prove natural circulation capability of URANUS and analyze design based accidents, scaling mock-up experiment facility will be constructed. In this paper, simple specifications of URANUS will be presented. Then based on this feature, scaling law and scaled facility design results are presented. To validate safety feature and thermodynamics characteristic of URANUS, scaled mockup facility of URANUS is designed based on the scaling law. This mockup adapts two area scale factors, core and lower parts of mock-up are scaled for 3D flow experiment. Upper parts are scaled different size to reduce electricity power and LBE tonnage. This hybrid scaling method could distort some thermal-hydraulic parameters, however, key parameters for experiment will be matched for up-scaling. Detailed design of mock-up will be determined through iteration for design optimization.

  11. A nuclear desalination complex with a VK-300 boiling type reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetzov, Y.N.; Mishanina, Y.A.; Romenkov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    RDIPE has developed a detailed design of an enhanced safety nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) with a VK-300 boiling water reactor for combined heat and power generation. The thermal power of the reactor is 750 MW. The maximum electrical power in the condensation mode is 250 MWe. The maximum heat generation capacity of 400 Gcal/h is reached at 150 MWe. This report describes, in brief, the basic technical concepts for the VK-300 NSSS and the power unit, with an emphasis on enhanced safety and good economic performance. With relatively small power, good technical and economic performance of the VK-300 reactor that is a base for the desalination complex is attained through: reduced capital costs of the nuclear plant construction thanks to technical approaches ensuring maximum simplicity of the reactor design and the NSSS layout; a single-circuit power unit configuration (reactor-turbine) excluding expensive equipment with a lot of metal, less pipelines and valves; reduced construction costs of the basic buildings thanks to reduced construction volumes due to rational arrangement concepts; higher reliability of equipment and reduced maintenance and repair costs; longer reactor design service life of up to 60 years; selection of the best reactor and desalination equipment interface pattern. The report considers the potential application of the VK-300 reactor as a source of energy for distillation desalination units. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the desalination unit via an intermediate circuit. Comparison is made between variants of the reactor integration with desalination units of the following types: multi-stage flash (MSF technology); multi-effect distillation horizontal-tube film units of the DOU GTPA type (MED technology). The NDC capacity with the VK-300 reactor, in terms of distillate, will be more than 200,000 m 3 /day, with the simultaneous output of electric power from the turbine generator buses of around 150 MWe. The variants of the

  12. Facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe2O3 composite with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiangpeng; Li, Changqing; Cong, Jingkun; Liu, Ziwei; Zhang, Hanzhuo; Liang, Mei; Gao, Junkuo; Wang, Shunli; Yao, Juming

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a facile synthesis of nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe 2 O 3 composite (Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 ) by using Fe-melamine supramolecular framework as precursor. The chemical and optical properties of the nanocomposites are well-characterized. The Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light due to the efficient utilization of sunlight and the construction of Z-scheme electron transfer pathway. The results indicated that it could be a promising approach for the preparation of efficient g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposites photocatalysts by using metal-melamine supramolecular framework as precursors. - Graphical abstract: Nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe 2 O 3 composite (Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 ) was synthesized by using Fe-melamine supramolecular framework as precursor. The Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanorod-type graphitic carbon nitride/Fe 2 O 3 composite (Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 ) was synthesized. • Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 showed strong optical absorption in the visible-light region. • The Fe 2 O 3 -g-C 3 N 4 nanocomposite demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activities.

  13. Neutron production with mixture of deuterium and krypton in Sahand Filippov type plasma focus facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, M.A.; Sobhanian, S.; Rawat, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    This Letter reports the order of magnitude enhancement in neutron yield from Sahand plasma focus device with krypton seeded deuterium operation. The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10 9 neutrons per shot was achieved at 1.00 Torr deuterium with 3% krypton which is higher than the best average neutron yield of 3.18x10 8 neutrons per shot for pure deuterium operation. Estimation of average neutron energy showed that the maximum and minimum average energies are 2.98±0.6 MeV at 16 kV in 0.25 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr and 2.07±0.2 MeV at 18 kV operation in 0.5 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr, respectively. The anisotropy of neutron emission from Sahand DPF showed that the neutrons are produced mainly by beam-target mechanisms. -- Highlights: → The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10 9 neutrons per shot was achieved at mixture of deuterium and krypton. → In the krypton seeding of deuterium also anisotropy of neutron emission deuterium is found. → The krypton seeding of deuterium made the neutron emission more reliable over wider operating pressure ranges.

  14. Qualification testing facility for type A, B and C packages to be used for transport and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.; Nistor, V.; Vasile, A.; Cojocaru, V.

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the Economic Commission for Europe-Committee on inland transport (ADR- European Agreement-concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by road, 2007 Edition) the Safety and Security of the dangerous goods class No. 7 - Radioactive Materials during transport in all different modes - by road, by rail, by sea, by inland rivers or by air - have to be ensured at a very high level. The radioactive materials (RAM) packaging have to comply to all transport conditions, routine or in accident conditions, possibly to occur during transportation operations. It is well known that the safety in the transport of RAM is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required for the package. The quality of these packages - type A, B or C has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the Romanian nuclear regulation conditions provided by CNCAN Order no. 357/22.12.2005- N orms for a Safe Transport of Radioactive Material , the IAEA Vienna Recommendation (1, 2) stipulated in the Safety standard TS-R-1- Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, and other applicable international recommendations. The paper will describe the components of the designed testing facilities, and the qualification testing to be performed for all type A, B and C packages subjected to the testing Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM packages will comply with the national safe standards as well as with the IAEA applicable recommendation provided by the TS-R-1 safety standard. (authors)

  15. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.romagnoli@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Hanuskova, Miriam, E-mail: Miriam.hanuskova@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Fabbri, Elena, E-mail: Elena.fabbri@unimore.it [Dipartimento Ingegneria “Enzo Ferrari”, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: Alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m{sup 2}/g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information.

  16. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Romagnoli, Marcello; Hanuskova, Miriam; Fabbri, Elena; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m 2 /g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH) 2 and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information

  17. Evaluation of the Cable Types for Safety Requirements during Fire Conditions in Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-kattan, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    In Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), the fire in cables causes many dangerous events in electrical or mechanical operations causing a nuclear reactor melt down. Main Control Room (MCR) in nuclear power plants have therefore, special concern in the fire protection systems. The Nuclear International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has promoted the use of risk-informed and performance based methods for fire protection. These methods affirm the relevant needs to develop realistic methods to quantify the risk of fire to NPPs safety. The recent electrical cable testing has been carried out to provide empirical data on the failure modes and likelihood of fire-induced damage. In this thesis, will use fire modeling to develop fire probabilistic safety assessment to estimate the likelihood of fire induced cable damage given a specified fire profile. The objective of this work is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the most recent fire-induced circuit failure due to different cables type that used inside the NPPs by simulation using fire modeling. One of this work scope is to suggest a suitable cable insulation material especially in case of the thermal failure thresholds, for developing the electrical cable thermal fragility distributions and evaluate parameters that influence fire-induced circuit failure modes. The main control room is implementing using the CFAST (fire simulation package). The simulation results represent the full development fire temperature and heat flux as well as the output gases. The results can be used as the basic parameters of the cables comparison and then evaluation.The importance of these results are not only for evaluating the cables but one can efficiently use them to improve the whole NPPs safety levels. The gases results of the fire simulation inside the room are oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen chloride. These gases are being used lot achieving the healthy protection of NPPs. Finally, one can measure the healthy environment

  18. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  19. Evaluation on applicability of construction methods and construction quality of low-diffusion layer of cavern type radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takechi, Shin-ichi; Yokozeki, Kosuke; Terada, Kenji; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Yada, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Yukikazu

    2014-01-01

    A performance verification experiment of cavern type radioactive waste disposal facility with a real scale construction is being conducted to evaluate the applicability of proposed construction methods and construction quality of the facility. In this paper, we confirmed that the low-diffusion layer, which is one of the cementitious materials based members, could be filled with mortar from end to end of the member; cracks of low-diffusion layer would not affect the long-term safety evaluation of the facility. And also we figured out the relationship between the material strength and the accumulated temperature, relationship between diffusion coefficient and porosity of low-diffusion layer. (author)

  20. Fiscal 1997 survey report. Basic survey on trends of waste use type production facilities and waste fuel production facilities; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. Haikibutsu riyogata seizo shisetsu oyobi haikibutsu nenryo seizo shisetsu doko kiso chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This survey was made to obtain the basic data for future spread and promotion of No.6 type (waste use type production facilities) and No.7 type (waste fuel production facilities) which were added to the objects having been subsidized since fiscal 1997 under `the environmental harmony type energy community project.` In the former, the kiln in the cement industry and the blast furnace in the steel industry can be extremely large places to receive waste plastic since the facilities are distributed in every area and the treatment capacity is large. However, the effective collection, transportation and sorting of large quantity of waste plastic, especially the problem of removal of vinyl chloride, is a big bottleneck. As to the use of waste plastic using gasification technology, there are no actual results on the commercial basis. That is, however, appropriate for treatment of the waste difficult in treatment, and can be expected of the usage in the chemical industry. In the latter, in the facilities using industrial waste raw materials as fuel, solidification and liquefaction are both operated on a commercial basis. In relation to the solidification and use as fuel of general waste, the treatment of combustion ash is preventing the expansion of use of waste in the industrial field because of a large quantity of chlorine included in the products. 92 refs., 54 figs., 35 tabs.

  1. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  2. Average fast neutron flux in three energy ranges in the Quinta assembly irradiated by two types of beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strugalska-Gola Elzbieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was performed within the international project “Energy plus Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T - RAW for investigations of energy production and transmutation of radioactive waste of the nuclear power industry. 89Y (Yttrium 89 samples were located in the Quinta assembly in order to measure an average high neutron flux density in three different energy ranges using deuteron and proton beams from Dubna accelerators. Our analysis showed that the neutron density flux for the neutron energy range 20.8 - 32.7 MeV is higher than for the neutron energy range 11.5 - 20.8 MeV both for protons with an energy of 0.66 GeV and deuterons with an energy of 2 GeV, while for deuteron beams of 4 and 6 GeV we did not observe this.

  3. Cooling effects of artificial water facilities by using a moving type turbulence promoter; Kudo ranryu sokushintai ni yoru suireikyaku jikkenho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, K; Nomura, T; Nishimura, N; Iyota, H [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Artificial water facilities present an effective means to alleviate trying micrometeorological phenomena such as warming of the urban space. For the reproduction of such an alleviating means by use of a model in a wind tunnel, a moving disturbance promoter (moving spire) was developed so as to render disturbances in a wind tunnel current similar in scale to ones in the real atmosphere, and an air current cooling experiment was conducted using a model fountain. The effort was intended for a small-size wind tunnel without a space large enough for disturbance promoter installation, and a moving type spire was developed for promoting disturbance effectively. The new spire is driven by a driving unit consisting of a motor and cam and can change its angle relative to the main current by 140{degree} at a rotation cycle of 1.7Hz., and this changes the flow direction of the main current periodically. As compared with the generally used combination of a roughness block and stationery spire, this new spire produced a disturbance intensity two times greater and a disturbance scale three times larger. When the disturbance intensity and scale were increased, the cooling characteristics of the air current changed in response to changes in the state of flow. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Performance of a 100V Half-Bridge MOSFET Driver, Type MIC4103, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The operation of a high frequency, high voltage MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors) driver was investigated over a wide temperature regime that extended beyond its specified range. The Micrel MIC4103 is a 100V, non-inverting, dual driver that is designed to independently drive both high-side and low-side N-channel MOSFETs. It features fast propagation delay times and can drive 1000 pF load with 10ns rise times and 6 ns fall times [1]. The device consumes very little power, has supply under-voltage protection, and is rated for a -40 C to +125 C junction temperature range. The floating high-side driver of the chip can sustain boost voltages up to 100 V. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specification.

  5. Facile synthesis of pyrite-type binary nickel iron diselenides as efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Jing-Qi; Shang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liang, Fei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Dong, Bin, E-mail: dongbin@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Li, Xiao; Liu, Yan-Ru; Yan, Kai-Li [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Gao, Wen-Kun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Chai, Yong-Ming [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China); Liu, Chen-Guang, E-mail: cgliu@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum (East China), Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Binary pyrite-type Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC was prepared by a facile two-step process. • The effect of Ni/Fe (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}Se{sub 2} x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) on OER was investigated. • Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC (x = 0.5) possesses the better electrocatalytic activity for OER. • The enhanced activity may be attributed to binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} and CFC support. - Abstract: Pyrite-type binary nickel iron diselenides (Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}) supported on carbon fiber cloth (CFC) as electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been prepared by a facile two-step process. Firstly, binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5} hydroxide nanosheets have been electrodeposited on CFC. Secondly, a solvothermal selenization process has been used to convert Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}/CFC into Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC. XRD shows that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} on CFC has the typically octahedral crystalline. XPS proves the existence and valence of Ni, Fe and Se. SEM images show that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} has novel pyrite-type octahedral morphology with uniform size and good dispersion on the surface of CFC. SEM elemental mapping images confirm the good distribution of Ni, Fe, Se element on CFC. TEM and SAED provide the clear diffraction rings of octahedral Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}, which is consistent with the results of XRD. Furtherly, the effect of different ratio of Ni/Fe (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}Se{sub 2} x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) on OER performances has been systematically investigated. The electrochemical measurements results show that Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC (x = 0.5) possesses the better electrocatalytic activity with the lower overpotential, Tafel slope and long-term stability than other samples. The enhanced activity of Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2}/CFC may be attributed to the intrinsic activity of binary Ni{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}Se{sub 2} and faster electron

  6. A divergent [5+2] cascade approach to bicyclo[3.2.1]octanes: facile synthesis of ent-kaurene and cedrene-type skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chi; Bai, Zengbing; Hu, Jialei; Wang, Bingnan; Xie, Hujun; Yu, Lei; Ding, Hanfeng

    2017-07-25

    A solvent-dependent oxidative dearomatization-induced divergent [5+2] cascade approach to bicyclo[3.2.1]octanes was described. This novel protocol enables a facile synthesis of a series of diversely functionalized ent-kaurene and cedrene-type skeletons in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities.

  7. A comparative study of the Si diodes of N type applied to high-dose range dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascoalino, Kelly Cristina da Silva; Goncalves, Josemary Angelica Correa; Tobias, Carmen Cecilia Bueno

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the comparative studies of floating-zone (Fz) and magnetic Czochralski (MCz) n-type silicon diodes as gamma dosimeters. The devices were irradiated with gamma rays from 60 Co source, Gammacell 220, at Radiation Technology Center (CTR-IPEN/CNEN-SP) with the dose rate of 2 kGy/h. The results with total absorbed doses of approximately 1 MGy showed that the devices studied are tolerant to radiation damages and then can be used as an online dosimeter in high doses radiation processing. (author)

  8. Transparency of Semi-Insulating, n-Type, and p-Type Ammonothermal GaN Substrates in the Near-Infrared, Mid-Infrared, and THz Spectral Range

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Kucharski; Łukasz Janicki; Marcin Zajac; Monika Welna; Marcin Motyka; Czesław Skierbiszewski; Robert Kudrawiec

    2017-01-01

    GaN substrates grown by the ammonothermal method are analyzed by Fast Fourier Transformation Spectroscopy in order to study the impact of doping (both n- and p-type) on their transparency in the near-infrared, mid-infrared, and terahertz spectral range. It is shown that the introduction of dopants causes a decrease in transparency of GaN substrates in a broad spectral range which is attributed to absorption on free carriers (n-type samples) or dopant ionization (p-type samples). In the mid-in...

  9. Patients newly diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes mellitus but presenting with HbA1c within normal range: 19-year mortality and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veloso, A.G.; Siersma, V.; Heldgaard, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether long-term mortality or clinical outcomes differed between patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and presenting with HbA1c within or above normal range at time of diagnosis. METHODS: Data were from a population-based sample of 1136 individuals with newly dia...

  10. Cellular tropism, population dynamics, host range and taxonomic status of an aphid secondary symbiont, SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L type symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L type symbiont is a newly reported aphid secondary symbiont. Phylogenetic evidence from molecular markers indicates that SMLS belongs to the Rickettsiaceae and has a sibling relationship with Orientia tsutsugamushi. A comparative analysis of coxA nucleotide sequences further supports recognition of SMLS as a new genus in the Rickettsiaceae. In situ hybridization reveals that SMLS is housed in both sheath cells and secondary bacteriocytes and it is also detected in aphid hemolymph. The population dynamics of SMLS differ from those of Buchnera aphidicola and titer levels of SMLS increase in older aphids. A survey of 13 other aphids reveals that SMLS only occurs in wheat-associated species.

  11. Investigation of a type C/D botulism outbreak in free-range laying hens in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souillard, R; Le Maréchal, C; Ballan, V; Rouxel, S; Léon, D; Balaine, L; Poëzevara, T; Houard, E; Robineau, B; Robinault, C; Chemaly, M; Le Bouquin, S

    2017-04-01

    In 2014, a botulism outbreak in a flock of laying hens was investigated in France. In the flock of 5020 hens, clinical signs of botulism occurred at 46 weeks of age. A type C/D botulism outbreak was confirmed using the mouse lethality assay for detection of botulinum toxin in serum and a real-time PCR test to detect Clostridium botulinum in intestinal contents. The disease lasted one week with a mortality rate of 2.6% without recurrence. Botulism in laying hens has rarely been reported. Five monthly visits were made to the farm between December 2014 and May 2015 for a longitudinal study of the persistence of C. botulinum in the poultry house after the outbreak, and to assess egg contamination by C. botulinum. Several samples were collected on each visit: in the house (from the ventilation circuit, the egg circuit, water and feed, droppings) and the surrounding area. Thirty clean and 30 dirty eggs were also swabbed at each visit. In addition, 12 dirty and 12 clean eggs were collected to analyse eggshell and egg content. The samples were analysed using real-time PCR to detect type C/D C. botulinum. The bacterium was still detected in the house more than 5 months after the outbreak, mostly on the walls and in the egg circuit. Regarding egg contamination, the bacteria were detected only on the shell but not in the content of the eggs. Control measures should therefore be implemented throughout the egg production period to avoid dissemination of the bacteria, particularly during egg collection.

  12. Alkylated selenophene-based ladder-type monomers via a facile route for high performance thin-film transistor applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Zhuping

    2017-05-26

    We report the synthesis of two new selenophene containing ladder-type monomers, cyclopentadiselenophene (CDS) and indacenodiselenophene (IDSe), via a twofold and fourfold Pd catalyzed coupling with a 1,1-diborylmethane derivative. Co-polymers with benzothiadiazole (BT) were prepared in high yield by Suzuki polymerization to afford co-polymers which exhibited excellent solubility in a range of non-chlorinated solvents. The CDS co-polymer exhibited a band gap of just 1.18 eV, which is amongst the lowest reported for donor-acceptor polymers. Thin-film transistors were fabricated using environmentally benign, non-chlorinated solvents with the CDS and IDSe co-polymers exhibiting hole mobility up to 0.15 and 6.4 cm2 /Vs, respectively. This high performance was achieved without the undesirable peak in mobility often observed at low gate voltages due to parasitic contact resistance.

  13. Alkylated selenophene-based ladder-type monomers via a facile route for high performance thin-film transistor applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Zhuping; Han, Yang; Gann, Eliot; Hodsden, Thomas; Chesman, Anthony; McNeill, Christopher R.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Heeney, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We report the synthesis of two new selenophene containing ladder-type monomers, cyclopentadiselenophene (CDS) and indacenodiselenophene (IDSe), via a twofold and fourfold Pd catalyzed coupling with a 1,1-diborylmethane derivative. Co-polymers with benzothiadiazole (BT) were prepared in high yield by Suzuki polymerization to afford co-polymers which exhibited excellent solubility in a range of non-chlorinated solvents. The CDS co-polymer exhibited a band gap of just 1.18 eV, which is amongst the lowest reported for donor-acceptor polymers. Thin-film transistors were fabricated using environmentally benign, non-chlorinated solvents with the CDS and IDSe co-polymers exhibiting hole mobility up to 0.15 and 6.4 cm2 /Vs, respectively. This high performance was achieved without the undesirable peak in mobility often observed at low gate voltages due to parasitic contact resistance.

  14. Facile and tunable synthesis of hierarchical mesoporous silica materials ranging from flower structure with wrinkled edges to hollow structure with coarse surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Nanjing, E-mail: nanjing.hao@dartmouth.edu [Dartmouth College, Thayer School of Engineering (United States); Li, Laifeng; Tang, Fangqiong, E-mail: tangfq@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (China)

    2016-11-15

    Mesoporous silica materials have attracted great attention in many fields. However, facile and tunable synthesis of hierarchical mesoporous silica structures is still a big challenge, and thus the development of them still lags behind. Herein, well-defined mesoporous silica flower structure with wrinkled edges and mesoporous silica hollow structure with coarse surface were synthesized simply by using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and hexadecylamine as cotemplates in different water/ethanol solvent systems. The shape evolution from flower to hollow can be easily realized by tuning the volume ratio of water to ethanol, and the yields of both materials can reach gram scale. The formation mechanisms of mesoporous silica flower and hollow structures were also experimentally investigated and discussed. These novel hierarchical structures having unique physicochemical properties may bring many interesting insights into scientific research and technological application.

  15. Pore pressure measurement plan of near field rock used on three dimensional groundwater flow analysis in demonstration test of cavern type disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Kazuhiro; Terada, Kenji; Matsumura, Katsuhide; Koyama, Toshihiro; Yajima, Kazuaki

    2008-01-01

    Demonstration test of underground cavern type disposal facilities is planed though carrying out construction of full scale engineering barrier system which simulated in the underground space in full scale and under actual environment. This test consists of three part, these are construction test, performance test and measurement test. Behavior of near field rock mass is measured about hydrological behavior under and after construction to evaluate effect at test facility. To make plan of pore pressure measurement, three dimensional groundwater flow analysis has been carried out. Based on comparison of analysis before and after test, detail plan has been studied. (author)

  16. Optimizing battery sizes of plug-in hybrid and extended range electric vehicles for different user types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redelbach, Martin; Özdemir, Enver Doruk; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2014-01-01

    There are ambitious greenhouse gas emission (GHG) targets for the manufacturers of light duty vehicles. To reduce the GHG emissions, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and extended range electric vehicle (EREV) are promising powertrain technologies. However, the battery is still a very critical component due to the high production cost and heavy weight. This paper introduces a holistic approach for the optimization of the battery size of PHEVs and EREVs under German market conditions. The assessment focuses on the heterogeneity across drivers, by analyzing the impact of different driving profiles on the optimal battery setup from total cost of ownership (TCO) perspective. The results show that the battery size has a significant effect on the TCO. For an average German driver (15,000 km/a), battery capacities of 4 kWh (PHEV) and 6 kWh (EREV) would be cost optimal by 2020. However, these values vary strongly with the driving profile of the user. Moreover, the optimal battery size is also affected by external factors, e.g. electricity and fuel prices or battery production cost. Therefore, car manufacturers should develop a modular design for their batteries, which allows adapting the storage capacity to meet the individual customer requirements instead of “one size fits all”. - Highlights: • Optimization of the battery size of PHEVs and EREVs under German market conditions. • Focus on heterogeneity across drivers (e.g. mileage, trip distribution, speed). • Optimal battery size strongly depends on the driving profile and energy prices. • OEMs require a modular design for their batteries to meet individual requirements

  17. An Integrated Rock Typing Approach for Unraveling the Reservoir Heterogeneity of Tight Sands in the Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin, Western Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkhchi, Rahim Kadkhodaie; Rezaee, Reza; Harami, Reza Moussavi

    2014-01-01

    Tight gas sands in Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin show large heterogeneity in reservoir characteristics and production behavior related to depositional and diagenetic features. Diagenetic events (compaction and cementation) have severely affected the pore system. In order to investigate...... the petrophysical characteristics, reservoir sandstone facies were correlated with core porosity and permeability and their equivalent well log responses to describe hydraulic flow units and electrofacies, respectively. Thus, very tight, tight, and sub-tight sands were differentiated. To reveal the relationship...... between pore system properties and depositional and diagenetic characteristics in each sand type, reservoir rock types were extracted. The identified reservoir rock types are in fact a reflection of internal reservoir heterogeneity related to pore system properties. All reservoir rock types...

  18. Nephrotic range proteinuria as a strong risk factor for rapid renal function decline during pre-dialysis phase in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Yuichiro; Doi, Yohei; Osaki, Keisuke; Sugioka, Sayaka; Koshikawa, Masao; Sugawara, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Proteinuria is an established risk factor for progression of renal disease, including diabetic nephropathy. The predictive power of proteinuria, especially nephrotic range proteinuria, for progressive renal deterioration has been well demonstrated in diabetic patients with normal to relatively preserved renal function. However, little is known about the relationship between severity of proteinuria and renal outcome in pre-dialysis diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function. 125 incident dialysis patients with type 2 diabetes were identified. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the impact of nephrotic range proteinuria (urinary protein-creatinine ratio above 3.5 g/gCr) on renal function decline during the 3 months just prior to dialysis initiation. In total, 103 patients (82.4 %) had nephrotic range proteinuria. The median rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in this study population was 0.98 (interquartile range 0.51-1.46) ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Compared to patients without nephrotic range proteinuria, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed significantly faster renal function decline (0.46 [0.24-1.25] versus 1.07 [0.64-1.54] ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month; p = 0.007). After adjusting for gender, age, systolic blood pressure, serum albumin, calcium-phosphorus product, hemoglobin A1c, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker, patients with nephrotic range proteinuria showed a 3.89-fold (95 % CI 1.08-14.5) increased risk for rapid renal function decline defined as a decline in eGFR ≥0.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) per month. Nephrotic range proteinuria is the predominant renal risk factor in type 2 diabetic patients with severely impaired renal function receiving pre-dialysis care.

  19. Transparency of Semi-Insulating, n-Type, and p-Type Ammonothermal GaN Substrates in the Near-Infrared, Mid-Infrared, and THz Spectral Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kucharski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available GaN substrates grown by the ammonothermal method are analyzed by Fast Fourier Transformation Spectroscopy in order to study the impact of doping (both n- and p-type on their transparency in the near-infrared, mid-infrared, and terahertz spectral range. It is shown that the introduction of dopants causes a decrease in transparency of GaN substrates in a broad spectral range which is attributed to absorption on free carriers (n-type samples or dopant ionization (p-type samples. In the mid-infrared the transparency cut-off, which for a semi-insulating GaN is at ~7 µm due to an absorption on a second harmonic of optical phonons, shifts towards shorter wavelengths due to an absorption on free carriers up to ~1 µm at n ~ 1020 cm−3 doping level. Moreover, a semi-insulating GaN crystal shows good transparency in the 1–10 THz range, while for n-and p-type crystal, the transparency in this spectral region is significantly quenched below 1%. In addition, it is shown that in the visible spectral region n-type GaN substrates with a carrier concentration below 1018 cm−3 are highly transparent with the absorption coefficient below 3 cm−1 at 450 nm, a satisfactory condition for light emitting diodes and laser diodes operating in this spectral range.

  20. Effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range behaviour of slow-growing broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadig, L M; Rodenburg, T B; Ampe, B; Reubens, B; Tuyttens, F A M

    2017-06-01

    Free-range use by broiler chickens is often limited, whereas better use of the free-range area could benefit animal welfare. Use of free-range areas could be stimulated by more appropriate shelter or environmental enrichment (by decreasing birds' fearfulness). This study aimed to assess the effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range use. Three production rounds with 440 slow-growing broiler chickens (Sasso T451) were carried out. Birds were housed indoors in four groups (two with males, two with females) from days 0 to 25, during which two of the groups received environmental enrichment. At day 23 birds' fearfulness was assessed with a tonic immobility (TI) test (n=100). At day 25 all birds were moved (in mixed-sex groups) to mobile houses, and provided with free-range access from day 28 onwards. Each group could access a range consisting for 50% of grassland with 21 artificial shelters (ASs, wooden A-frames) and for 50% of short rotation coppice (SRC) with willow (dense vegetation). Free-range use was recorded by live observations at 0900, 1300 and 1700 h for 15 to 21 days between days 28 and 63. For each bird observed outside the shelter type (AS or SRC), distance from the house (0 to 2, 2 to 5, >5 m) and its behaviour (only rounds 2 and 3) were recorded. Weather conditions were recorded by four weather stations. On average, 27.1% of the birds were observed outside at any given moment of observation. Early environmental enrichment did not decrease fearfulness as measured by the TI test. It only had a minor effect on the percentage of birds outside (0.4% more birds outside). At all distances from the house, SRC was preferred over AS. In AS, areas closer to the house were preferred over farther ones, in SRC this was less pronounced. Free-range use increased with age and temperature and decreased with wind speed. In AS, rainfall and decreasing solar radiation were related to finding more birds outside, whereas the

  1. Creep-fatigue life prediction for different heats of Type 304 stainless steel by linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiya, P.S.

    1978-07-01

    The creep-fatigue life results for five different heats of Type 304 stainless steel at 593 0 C (1100 0 F), generated under push-pull conditions in the axial strain-control mode, are presented. The life predictions for the various heats based on the linear-damage rule, strain-range partitioning method, and damage-rate approach are discussed. The appropriate material properties required for computation of fatigue life are also included

  2. Insights Gained from the Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195’s Transcriptome Responding to a Wide Range of Respiration Rates and Substrate Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    fermented yeast , pure hydrogen, or endogenous biomass decay). When similarly respiring (~120 ?eeq PCE/(L-hr)) batch and PSS cultures were contrasted, the...REPORT Insights gained from the “Dehalococcoides ethenogenes” strain 195?s transcriptome responding to a wide range of respiration rates and substrate...types. 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Bacteria of the group “Dehalococcoides” display the ability to respire recalcitrant chlorinated

  3. Study protocol for the SMART2D adaptive implementation trial: a cluster randomised trial comparing facility-only care with integrated facility and community care to improve type 2 diabetes outcomes in Uganda, South Africa and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guwatudde, David; Absetz, Pilvikki; Delobelle, Peter; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Olmen Van, Josefien; Alvesson, Helle Molsted; Mayega, Roy William; Ekirapa Kiracho, Elizabeth; Kiguli, Juliet; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Sanders, David; Tomson, Göran; Puoane, Thandi; Peterson, Stefan; Daivadanam, Meena

    2018-03-17

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasingly contributing to the global burden of disease. Health systems in most parts of the world are struggling to diagnose and manage T2D, especially in low-income and middle-income countries, and among disadvantaged populations in high-income countries. The aim of this study is to determine the added benefit of community interventions onto health facility interventions, towards glycaemic control among persons with diabetes, and towards reduction in plasma glucose among persons with prediabetes. An adaptive implementation cluster randomised trial is being implemented in two rural districts in Uganda with three clusters per study arm, in an urban township in South Africa with one cluster per study arm, and in socially disadvantaged suburbs in Stockholm, Sweden with one cluster per study arm. Clusters are communities within the catchment areas of participating primary healthcare facilities. There are two study arms comprising a facility plus community interventions arm and a facility-only interventions arm. Uganda has a third arm comprising usual care. Intervention strategies focus on organisation of care, linkage between health facility and the community, and strengthening patient role in self-management, community mobilisation and a supportive environment. Among T2D participants, the primary outcome is controlled plasma glucose; whereas among prediabetes participants the primary outcome is reduction in plasma glucose. The study has received approval in Uganda from the Higher Degrees, Research and Ethics Committee of Makerere University School of Public Health and from the Uganda National Council for Science and Technology; in South Africa from the Biomedical Science Research Ethics Committee of the University of the Western Cape; and in Sweden from the Regional Ethical Board in Stockholm. Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and scientific meetings. ISRCTN11913581; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their

  4. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. The authors built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses their calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of the x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well

  5. Facilities and Techniques for X-Ray Diagnostic Calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV Energy Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J. L.; Wittmayer, F. J.

    1986-08-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  6. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-06-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well

  7. Theoretical interpretation for 2p − nd absorption spectra of iron, nickel, and copper in X-ray range measured at the LULI2000 facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poirier M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The 2p − nd absorption structures in medium Z elements present a valuable benchmark for atomic models since they exhibit a complex dependence on temperature and density. For these transitions lying in the X-ray range, one observes a competition between the spin-orbit splitting and the broadening associated to the excitation of complex structures. Detailed opacity codes based on the HULLAC or FAC suites agree with the statistical code SCO; but in iron computations predict higher peak absorption than measured. An addition procedure on opacities calculated with detailed codes is proposed and successfully tested.

  8. Effect of the product type, of the amount of applied sunscreen product and the level of protection in the UVB range on the level of protection achieved in the UVA range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couteau, C; Diarra, H; Coiffard, L

    2016-03-16

    Using a topical product is part of the overall strategy for skin cancer prevention. The level of protection attainable when using commercial products is indicated by the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) value, in use everywhere. This value reflects the level of protection primarily in the UVB range. However, UVA radiation also has deleterious effects on the skin, and it is essential to prevent it, which is why products must offer a wide spectrum of protection. Tests conducted in vivo, before any marketing, are done by applying the studied product at a rate of 2.0 mg cm(-2), while users, in practice, only use 1.0-1.5 mg cm(-2). We now know that this reduction in the amount of applied product greatly affects the SPF. To complete the state of knowledge in this area, we sought to evaluate the effect of a decrease in the amount of applied sunscreen product by studying sunscreen creams and oils on the level of protection attainable in the UVA range. We have shown that the PF-UVA is divided by a factor of 2.2, on average, when the amount of applied product is reduced by half, with differences depending on the product type under consideration (cream or oil) and depending on the SPF of the preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Scaling laws between population and facility densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jaegon; Son, Seung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Ik; Jeong, Hawoong; Kim, Beom Jun

    2009-08-25

    When a new facility like a grocery store, a school, or a fire station is planned, its location should ideally be determined by the necessities of people who live nearby. Empirically, it has been found that there exists a positive correlation between facility and population densities. In the present work, we investigate the ideal relation between the population and the facility densities within the framework of an economic mechanism governing microdynamics. In previous studies based on the global optimization of facility positions in minimizing the overall travel distance between people and facilities, it was shown that the density of facility D and that of population rho should follow a simple power law D approximately rho(2/3). In our empirical analysis, on the other hand, the power-law exponent alpha in D approximately rho(alpha) is not a fixed value but spreads in a broad range depending on facility types. To explain this discrepancy in alpha, we propose a model based on economic mechanisms that mimic the competitive balance between the profit of the facilities and the social opportunity cost for populations. Through our simple, microscopically driven model, we show that commercial facilities driven by the profit of the facilities have alpha = 1, whereas public facilities driven by the social opportunity cost have alpha = 2/3. We simulate this model to find the optimal positions of facilities on a real U.S. map and show that the results are consistent with the empirical data.

  10. A green and facile approach for synthesizing imine to develop optical biosensor for wide range detection of bilirubin in human biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellairaja, Sundaram; Shenbagavalli, Kathiravan; Ponmariappan, Sarkaraisamy; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy

    2017-05-15

    Bilirubin, a key biomarker for the jaundice and its clinical diagnosis needs a better analytical tool. A novel and simple fluorescent platform based on (2,2'-((1E,1'E)-((6-bromopyridine-2,3-diyl) bis(azanylylidene)) bis(methanylylidene diphenol) (BAMD) was designed. BAMD showed a remarkable fluorescent intensity with a very good quantum yield of 0.85 and lifetime of 870ps. Hence, it was applied for the determination of bilirubin using both colorimetric and fluorimetric techniques in physiological and basic pH. Under optimized experimental conditions, the probe detects bilirubin selectively in the presence of other interfering biomolecules and metal ions. The linear range of detection is 1pM-500µM at pH=7.4 and LOD is 2.8 and 3.3 pM at pH=7.4 and 9.0, respectively, which were reported so far. The probe detects the bilirubin through FRET mechanism. The practical application of the probe was successfully tested in the human blood and urine samples. Based on all above advantages, this simple idea can be applied to design a simple clinical diagnostic tool for jaundice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Facile Quantification and Identification Techniques for Reducing Gases over a Wide Concentration Range Using a MOS Sensor in Temperature-Cycled Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Schultealbert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dedicated methods for quantification and identification of reducing gases based on model-based temperature-cycled operation (TCO using a single commercial MOS gas sensor are presented. During high temperature phases the sensor surface is highly oxidized, yielding a significant sensitivity increase after switching to lower temperatures (differential surface reduction, DSR. For low concentrations, the slope of the logarithmic conductance during this low-temperature phase is evaluated and can directly be used for quantification. For higher concentrations, the time constant for reaching a stable conductance during the same low-temperature phase is evaluated. Both signals represent the reaction rate of the reducing gas on the strongly oxidized surface at this low temperature and provide a linear calibration curve, which is exceptional for MOS sensors. By determining these reaction rates on different low-temperature plateaus and applying pattern recognition, the resulting footprint can be used for identification of different gases. All methods are tested over a wide concentration range from 10 ppb to 100 ppm (4 orders of magnitude for four different reducing gases (CO, H2, ammonia and benzene using randomized gas exposures.

  12. Facile Quantification and Identification Techniques for Reducing Gases over a Wide Concentration Range Using a MOS Sensor in Temperature-Cycled Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultealbert, Caroline; Baur, Tobias; Schütze, Andreas; Sauerwald, Tilman

    2018-03-01

    Dedicated methods for quantification and identification of reducing gases based on model-based temperature-cycled operation (TCO) using a single commercial MOS gas sensor are presented. During high temperature phases the sensor surface is highly oxidized, yielding a significant sensitivity increase after switching to lower temperatures (differential surface reduction, DSR). For low concentrations, the slope of the logarithmic conductance during this low-temperature phase is evaluated and can directly be used for quantification. For higher concentrations, the time constant for reaching a stable conductance during the same low-temperature phase is evaluated. Both signals represent the reaction rate of the reducing gas on the strongly oxidized surface at this low temperature and provide a linear calibration curve, which is exceptional for MOS sensors. By determining these reaction rates on different low-temperature plateaus and applying pattern recognition, the resulting footprint can be used for identification of different gases. All methods are tested over a wide concentration range from 10 ppb to 100 ppm (4 orders of magnitude) for four different reducing gases (CO, H₂, ammonia and benzene) using randomized gas exposures.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes attending rural primary healthcare facilities in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Tony; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Murhekar, Manoj V; Jayaraman, Yuvaraj; Kolandaswamy, K; Rao, Sudha Ramachandra; David, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    India has a high burden of diabetic retinopathy ranging from 12.2% to 20.4% among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A T2DM management programme was initiated in the public sector in Tamil Nadu. We estimated the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and its associated risk factors. We did a cross-sectional survey among patients with T2DM attending two primary health centres for treatment and follow-up in Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu in January- March 2013. We did a questionnaire-based survey, and measured blood pressure and biochemical parameters (serum creatinine, plasma glucose, etc.) of the patients. We examined their eyes by direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and defined diabetic retinopathy using a modified classification by Klein et al. We calculated the proportion and 95% CI for the prevalence and adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy. Among the 270 patients, the mean (SD) age was 54.5 (10) years. The median duration of T2DM was 48 months. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 29.6%. Overall, 65.9% of patients had hypertension, 14.4% had nephropathy (eGFR 5 years (AOR 6.5, 95% CI 3.6-11.7), poor glycaemic control (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), and nephropathy (AOR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6). There was a high burden of undetected retinopathy and other comorbid conditions among patients with T2DM. Early detection of comorbid conditions and glycaemic control can be improved by training care-providers and educating patients.

  14. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  15. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  16. Isolation and RFLP Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii in Free-Range Chickens (Gallus domesticus) in Grenada, West Indies, Revealed Widespread and Dominance of Clonal Type III Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikweto, Alfred; Sharma, Ravindra N; Tiwari, Keshaw P; Verma, Shiv K; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Jiang, Tiantian; Su, Chunlei; Kwok, Oliver C; Dubey, Jitender P

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of the present cross-sectional study were to isolate and genotype Toxoplasma gondii in free-range chickens from Grenada, West Indies. Using the modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 39 (26.9%) of 145 free-range chickens with titers of 25 in 7 chickens, 50 in 6 chickens, 100 in 2 chickens, and 200 or higher in 24 chickens. The hearts of the 39 seropositive chickens were bioassayed in mice; viable T. gondii was isolated from 20 and further propagated in cell culture. Genotyping of T. gondii DNA extracted from cell-cultured tachyzoites using the 10 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico revealed 4 genotypes, including ToxoDB PCR-RFLP no. 2 (Type III), no. 7, no. 13, and no. 259 (new). These results indicated that T. gondii population genetics in free-range chickens seems to be moderately diverse with ToxoDB no. 2 (Type III) as the most frequent (15/20 = 75%) compared to other genotypes in Grenada.

  17. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  18. Facile fabrication of wire-type indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors applicable to ultrasensitive flexible sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong-Gyu; Tak, Young Jun; Kim, Hee Jun; Kim, Won-Gi; Yoo, Hyukjoon; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2018-04-03

    We fabricated wire-type indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a self-formed cracked template based on a lift-off process. The electrical characteristics of wire-type IGZO TFTs could be controlled by changing the width and density of IGZO wires through varying the coating conditions of template solution or multi-stacking additional layers. The fabricated wire-type devices were applied to sensors after functionalizing the surface. The wire-type pH sensor showed a sensitivity of 45.4 mV/pH, and this value was an improved sensitivity compared with that of the film-type device (27.6 mV/pH). Similarly, when the wire-type device was used as a glucose sensor, it showed more variation in electrical characteristics than the film-type device. The improved sensing properties resulted from the large surface area of the wire-type device compared with that of the film-type device. In addition, we fabricated wire-type IGZO TFTs on flexible substrates and confirmed that such structures were very resistant to mechanical stresses at a bending radius of 10 mm.

  19. Translocation, switching and gating: potential roles for ATP in long-range communication on DNA by Type III restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-04-01

    To cleave DNA, the Type III RM (restriction-modification) enzymes must communicate the relative orientation of two recognition sequences, which may be separated by many thousands of base pairs. This long-range interaction requires ATP hydrolysis by a helicase domain, and both active (DNA translocation) and passive (DNA sliding) modes of motion along DNA have been proposed. Potential roles for ATP binding and hydrolysis by the helicase domains are discussed, with a focus on bipartite ATPases that act as molecular switches.

  20. 2 μm wavelength range InP-based type-II quantum well photodiodes heterogeneously integrated on silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruijun; Sprengel, Stephan; Muneeb, Muhammad; Boehm, Gerhard; Baets, Roel; Amann, Markus-Christian; Roelkens, Gunther

    2015-10-05

    The heterogeneous integration of InP-based type-II quantum well photodiodes on silicon photonic integrated circuits for the 2 µm wavelength range is presented. A responsivity of 1.2 A/W at a wavelength of 2.32 µm and 0.6 A/W at 2.4 µm wavelength is demonstrated. The photodiodes have a dark current of 12 nA at -0.5 V at room temperature. The absorbing active region of the integrated photodiodes consists of six periods of a "W"-shaped quantum well, also allowing for laser integration on the same platform.

  1. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  2. A new AMS facility based on a Cockcroft-Walton type 1 MV tandetron at IFIN-HH Magurele, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.; Ghita, D. G.; Calinescu, C. I.; Petre, A.; Mosu, D. V.; Klein, M.

    2014-01-01

    A 1 MV AMS machine was recently installed in the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Bucharest Romania. It is the second AMS facility at IFIN-HH having the goal not only to continue but mainly to enlarge the research area of this highly sensitive analyzing method. The multi-element AMS was developed by HVEE to measure 14C, 10Be, and 26Al, and 129I. The results of an acceptance test are presented and demonstrate that this machine is capable of routine 14C age dating and of measurements of other radioisotopes in terms of accuracy and precision as well as a low background level.

  3. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  4. Severe fuel damage experiments performed in the QUENCH facility with 21-rod bundles of LWR-type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.; Hering, W.; Schanz, G.; Scholtyssek, W.; Steinbrueck, M.; Stuckert, J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the QUENCH experimental program at the Karlsruhe Research Center is to investigate core degradation and the hydrogen source term that results from quenching/flooding an uncovered core, to examine the physical/chemical behavior of overheated fuel elements under different flooding conditions, and to create a data base for model development and improvement of severe fuel damage (SFD) code systems. The large-scale 21-rod bundle experiments conducted in the QUENCH out-of-pile facility are supported by an extensive separate-effects test program, by modeling activities as well as application and improvement of SFD code systems. International cooperations exist with institutions mainly within the European Union but e.g. also with the Russian Academy of Science (IBRAE, Moscow) and the CSARP program of the USNRC. So far, eleven experiments have been performed, two of them with B 4 C absorber material. Experimental parameters were: the temperature at initiation of reflood, the degree of peroxidation, the quench medium, i.e. water or steam, and its injection rate, the influence of a B 4 C absorber rod, the effect of steam-starved conditions before quench, the influence of air oxidation before quench, and boil-off behavior of a water-filled bundle with subsequent quenching. The paper gives an overview of the QUENCH program with its organizational structure, describes the test facility and the test matrix with selected experimental results. (author)

  5. I. Do chronic pain patients' perceptions about their preinjury jobs determine their intent to return to the same type of job post-pain facility treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, D A; Rosomoff, H L; Cutler, R B; Steele-Rosomoff, R

    1995-12-01

    To demonstrate that chronic pain patients' (CPPs') perceptions about their preinjury jobs determine their intent to return to the same type of job post pain facility treatment. A total of 225 CPPs completed a series of rating scales and yes/no questions relating to their preinjury job perceptions and a question relating to intent to return to the same type of preinjury job post-pain facility treatment. The CPPs were broken down into subgroups (males, females, college males, noncollege males, college females, noncollege females), and within each subgroup those not intending to return to the same type of pre-injury job were compared to those intending to return on the preinjury job perception questions. In addition for the whole group, stepwise discriminant analysis was used to predict who planned to return to the preinjury job utilizing the job perceptions questions. Multidisciplinary Pain Center. Consecutive chronic pain patients. For the whole group, CPPs not intending to return were more likely to complain of job excessive physical demands, job satisfaction, and job dislike. Job perception complaints that were significantly different between the intending and not intending to return groups differed between the subgroups. For example, noncollege males not intending to return were more likely to complain of excessive physical demands only versus satisfaction and liking as significant items for college males who did not intend to return. Within the discriminant analysis, the combination of job satisfaction, excessive physical demands, employee conflicts, job liking, job dangerousness, supervisory conflicts, job stress, and age classified 73.46% of the CPPs correctly as to intent to return to the same type of preinjury job. There appears to be a relationship between preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the same type of job post pain treatment. However, subgroups of CPPs will differ by which job perceptions are important towards making that decision.

  6. Sensitivity to Nuclear Data and Neutron Source Type in Calculations of Transmutation Capabilities of the Energy Amplifier Demonstration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlfors, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    This text is a summary of two studies the author has performed within the field of 3-D Monte Carlo calculations of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for transmutation of nuclear waste. The simulations were carried out with the state-of-the-art computer code package EA-MC, developed by C. Rubbia and his group at CERN. The concept studied is ANSALDOs 80 MWth Energy Amplifier Demonstration Facility based on classical MOX-fuel technology and on molten Lead-Bismuth Eutectic cooling. A review of neutron cross section sensitivity in numerical calculations of an ADS and a comparative assessment relevant to the transmutation efficiency of plutonium and minor actinides in fusion/fission hybrids and ADS are presented

  7. Sensitivity to Nuclear Data and Neutron Source Type in Calculations of Transmutation Capabilities of the Energy Amplifier Demonstration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlfors, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    This text is a summary of two studies the author has performed within the field of 3-D Monte Carlo calculations of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for transmutation of nuclear waste. The simulations were carried out with the state-of-the-art computer code package EA-MC, developed by C. Rubbia and his group at CERN. The concept studied is ANSALDOs 80 MWth Energy Amplifier Demonstration Facility based on classical MOX-fuel technology and on molten Lead-Bismuth Eutectic cooling. A review of neutron cross section sensitivity in numerical calculations of an ADS and a comparative assessment relevant to the transmutation efficiency of plutonium and minor actinides in fusion/fission hybrids and ADS are presented.

  8. Safety analysis and lay-out aspects of shieldings against particle radiation at the example of spallation facilities in the megawatt range; Sicherheitstechnische Analyse und Auslegungsaspekte von Abschirmungen gegen Teilchenstrahlung am Beispiel von Spallationsanlagen im Megawatt Bereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanslik, R.

    2006-08-15

    This paper discusses the shielding of particle radiation from high current accelerators, spallation neutron sources and so called ADS-facilities (Accelerator Driven Systems). ADS-facilities are expected to gain importance in the future for transmutation of long-lived isotopes from fission reactors as well as for energy production. In this paper physical properties of the radiation as well as safety relevant requirements and corresponding shielding concepts are discussed. New concepts for the layout and design of such shielding are presented. Focal point of this work will be the fundamental difference between conventional fission reactor shielding and the safety relevant issues of shielding from high-energy radiation. Key point of this paper is the safety assessment of shielding issues of high current accelerators, spallation targets and ADS-blanket systems as well as neutron scattering instruments at spallation neutron sources. Safety relevant shielding requirements are presented and discussed. For the layout and design of the shielding for spallation sources computer base calculations methods are used. A discussion and comparison of the most important methods like semi-empirical, deterministic and stochastic codes are presented. Another key point within the presented paper is the discussion of shielding materials and their shielding efficiency concerning different types of radiation. The use of recycling material, as a cost efficient solution, is discussed. Based on the conducted analysis, flowcharts for a systematic layout and design of adequate shielding for targets and accelerators have been developed and are discussed in this paper. By use of these flowcharts layout and engineering design of future ADS-facilities can be performed. (orig.)

  9. Studies and testing in water and steam of valves and fittings, and nuclear components. The result of 25 years of testing using a comprehensive range of test facilities under service conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berail, J.F.; Bruneau, S.; Crouzet, D.; Haas, J.L.; Zbinden, M.

    1998-05-01

    Electricite de France operates 58 PWR nuclear power stations, for which the behaviour of valves and fittings is of major importance for safety, for the availability of the plants, and for maintenance costs. Since the early 70's, EDF has developed a comprehensive range of facilities to test valves and fittings in PWR service and accident conditions. It has carried out studies, tests, development work, experimental and numerical research in collaboration with external organisations and manufacturers, to improve the technologies of these equipment as well as maintenance tools and methods. In the present paper, the authors quantify the importance of valves and fittings studies for EDF, which has led to the drawing up of a catalogue of approved equipment. They describe the principle test facilities, and the structure of the EDF 'valves and fittings tests results' data base. They show the importance of twenty-five years of testing experience for both the evolution of equipment and for the increase in French nuclear plants availability. (author)

  10. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  11. First report of a multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type 11 causing sepsis in a free-ranging beaver (Castor fiber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Paola; Vogt, Debora; Origgi, Francesco C; Endimiani, Andrea; Peterson, Susanne; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type (ST) 11 is a hyper-epidemic nosocomial clone spreading worldwide among humans and also emerging in pets. In this report, we describe a clinical case of fatal sepsis due to this multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen in a Eurasian beaver. The isolate showed resistance to six different classes of antimicrobials including third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. This is the first report describing the detection of a MDR K. pneumoniae ST11 in a free-ranging animal. Our finding highlights the potential for environmental dissemination of hyper-epidemic clones of K. pneumoniae and possible spread in wildlife and cause epizootics. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Determination with a condenser type dosemeter of half value lager of X ray beams generated in the range from 50 to 70 kilovolt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Monzon, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The methodology of half value lager measurement based on ratio of unit output measured before and after an additional 4 mm thick aluminium filter has been installed is studied. The use of a condenser type dosemeter model FJ301G3 produced by Beijing Nuclear Instrument Factory for that purpose is studied too. The study is base on measurement of attenuation curves using high purity aluminium filter done with a dosemeter FJ301G3 and a standard ionization chamber model NE 2530/1 from Nuclear Enterprise respectively. The X ray quality generated had similar characteristic 50 high kerma dose rate series normalized by ISO. Expressions that allow estimate half value lager in aluminium with a maximum deviation of 0,25 mm is reported. The easy handling and low cost of dispositives employed are the main advantages of that methodology. According to voltage range in which study was done, the results have application in quality control of dental X ray units

  13. Facile synthesis of bismuth oxyhalide nanosheet films with distinct conduction type and photo-induced charge carrier behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huimin; He, Weiwei; Zhang, Beibei; Yao, Lei; Yang, Xiaokai; Zheng, Zhi

    2018-05-01

    A modified successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method was developed to fabricate 2D ordered BiOX (X = CI, Br, I) nanosheet array films on FTO substrates at room temperature. The formation of BiOX films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The semiconductor surface states determine the type of semiconductor. Although BiOCI, BiOBr and BiOI belong to the bismuth oxyhalide semiconductor family and possess similar crystal and electronic structures, they show different conductivity types due to their respective surface states. Mott-Schottky curve results demonstrate that the BiOCl and BiOI nanosheet arrays display n-type semiconductor properties, while the BiOBr films exhibit p-type semiconductor properties. Assisted by surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques, the photoinduced charge transfer dynamics on the surface/interface of the BiOX/FTO nanosheet films were systematically and comparatively investigated. As revealed by the results, both the separation and transfer dynamics of the photo-induced carrier are influenced by film thickness.

  14. Facile preparation of hierarchically porous diatomite/MFI-type zeolite composites and their performance of benzene adsorption: the effects of NaOH etching pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbin; Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Weiwei; Tao, Bo; Cheng, Hefa; Chen, Fanrong

    2015-03-21

    Hierarchically porous diatomite/MFI-type zeolite (Dt/Z) composites with excellent benzene adsorption performance were prepared. The hierarchical porosity was generated from the microporous zeolite coated at the surface of diatom frustules and from the macroporous diatomite support. A facile NaOH etching method was employed for the first time to treat the frustule support, followed by hydrothermal growth of MFI-type zeolite at the surface of frustules previously seeded with nanocrystalline silicalite-1 (Sil-1). NaOH etching enlarged the pores on diatom frustules and further increased the coated zeolite contents (W(z)). The central macropore size of the diatom frustules increased from approximately 200-500 nm to 400-1000 nm after NaOH etching. The W(z) could reach 61.2%, while the macroporosity of the composites was largely preserved due to more voids for zeolite coating being formed by NaOH etching. The Dt/Z composites exhibited higher benzene adsorption capacity per unit mass of zeolite and less mass transfer resistance than Sil-1, evaluated via a method of breakthrough curves. These results demonstrate that etching of a diatomite support is a facile but crucial process for the preparation of Dt/Z composites, enabling the resulting composites to become promising candidates for uses in volatile organic compounds emission control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spread of CTX-M-type ESßLs in isolates of E. coli from long-term care and rehabilitation facilities in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Nucleo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During the period March 2003 – May 2004 at the Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology “Redaelli” LTCRF in Milan, Italy, a total of 529 E. coli, obtained from inpatients of 3 different Long Term Care Rehabilitation Facilities (LTCRFs in Northern Italy, were processed and 77 ESßLs producers (14.5% were identified by Vitek System. The results were confirmed by double-disk synergy test with tazobactam (TZP. 61/77 isolates were characterized by higher levels of resistance to cefotaxime (CTX than to ceftazidime (CAZ. (ß-lactamase production was investigated by analytical isoelectric focusing (IEF coupled with a bioassay and showed multiple (ß-lactamase bands including one enzyme with pI 8.4 that, in a bioassay, was more active on CTX,ATM than on CAZ. The presence of (ß-lactamase genes was investigated by colony blot hybridization and by PCR amplification of blaTEM, blaSHV and blaCTX-M alleles. 43/61 isolates produced both TEM-1 and CTX-M-type enzymes, 14/61 expressed only CTX-M-type while in 4 cases were found blaCTX-M, blaTEM and blaSHV genes.The remainders (16/77, characterized by high levels of resistance to both CTX and CAZ, produced TEM-1 and SHV-5 enzymes (1/16 and TEM type ESßLs (15/16. Conjugation experiments, performed in liquid medium, confermed that the ESßLs determinants were transferable. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of genomic DNA, digested with NotI, were analysed and revealed clonal heterogeneity. Our work confirms the emergence of CTX-M-type enzymes and their spread in Northern Italy also in longterm care and rehabilitation facilities that may be an important reservoir of ES?L producing E. coli.

  16. Changes in feedwater organic matter concentrations based on intake type and pretreatment processes at SWRO facilities, Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2015-03-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), natural organic matter, and bacterial concentrations in feedwater are important factors that can lead to membrane biofouling in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) systems. Two methods for controlling these concentrations in the feedwater prior to pretreatment have been suggested; use of subsurface intake systems or placement of the intake at a greater depth in the sea. These proposed solutions were tested at two SWRO facilities located along the Red Sea of Saudi Arabia. A shallow well intake system was very effective in reducing the algae and bacterial concentrations and somewhat effective in reducing TEP concentrations. An intake placed at a depth of 9. m below the surface was found to have limited impact on improving water quality compared to a surface intake. The algae and bacteria concentration in the feedwater (deep) was lower compared to the surface seawater, but the overall TEP concentration was higher. Bacteria and TEP measurements made in the pretreatment process train in the plant and after the cartridge filters suggest that regrowth of bacteria is occurring within the cartridge filters.

  17. Changes in feedwater organic matter concentrations based on intake type and pretreatment processes at SWRO facilities, Red Sea, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah; Li, Sheng; Almashharawi, Samir; Winters, Harvey; Missimer, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), natural organic matter, and bacterial concentrations in feedwater are important factors that can lead to membrane biofouling in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) systems. Two methods for controlling these concentrations in the feedwater prior to pretreatment have been suggested; use of subsurface intake systems or placement of the intake at a greater depth in the sea. These proposed solutions were tested at two SWRO facilities located along the Red Sea of Saudi Arabia. A shallow well intake system was very effective in reducing the algae and bacterial concentrations and somewhat effective in reducing TEP concentrations. An intake placed at a depth of 9. m below the surface was found to have limited impact on improving water quality compared to a surface intake. The algae and bacteria concentration in the feedwater (deep) was lower compared to the surface seawater, but the overall TEP concentration was higher. Bacteria and TEP measurements made in the pretreatment process train in the plant and after the cartridge filters suggest that regrowth of bacteria is occurring within the cartridge filters.

  18. C7L family of poxvirus host range genes inhibits antiviral activities induced by type I interferons and interferon regulatory factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Xiang, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L(-)C7L(-)). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L(-)C7L(-) in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L(-)C7L(-) but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L(-)C7L(-) resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells.

  19. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  20. Retention of radionuclides by some types of flora in the aquatic system in the vicinity of a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csupka, S.

    1982-01-01

    In the years 1974 to 1981 the impacts were monitored of 90 Sr and 137 Cs discharged in liquid wastes from the Bohunice nuclear power plant on aquatic plants in the recipient. The highest values of the said monitored radionuclides were found in 1977 in Fontinalis antipyretica and Cladophora glomerata in the waste water discharge channel. The content of 137 Cs in plants is higher than the content of 90 Sr. The average values of concentration coefficients in the individual plants ranged from 750 to 3200 for 90 Sr and from 1600 to 3300 for 137 Cs. (author)

  1. Retention of radionuclides by some types of flora in the aquatic system in the vicinity of a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csupka, S. (Krajska Hygienicka Stanica, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-01-01

    In the years 1974 to 1981 the impacts were monitored of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs discharged in liquid wastes from the Bohunice nuclear power plant on aquatic plants in the recipient. The highest values of the said monitored radionuclides were found in 1977 in Fontinalis antipyretica and Cladophora glomerata in the waste water discharge channel. The content of /sup 137/Cs in plants is higher than the content of /sup 90/Sr. The average values of concentration coefficients in the individual plants ranged from 750 to 3200 for /sup 90/Sr and from 1600 to 3300 for /sup 137/Cs.

  2. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 18. Facility construction feasibility and costs by rock type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The results of a study that compared the general engineering feasibility and unit costs associated with sinking shafts and mining storage rooms in the four rock types (salt, granite, shale, basalt) are presented in this volume. The report includes a discussion of the general effects of rock characteristics on shaft and mine design, the application of these design considerations to the specific designs developed for the Draft GEIS, shaft and mine construction techniques, and the unit cost comparison. The repository designs upon which this comparison was based are presented in other volumes of this series

  3. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1–2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand breaks are introduced at random wherever two translocating enzymes form a so-called collision complex following long-range communication between a pair of target sites in inverted (head-to-head) repeat. Paradoxically, structural models for collision suggest that the nuclease domains are too far apart (>30 bp) to dimerise and produce a double-strand DNA break using just two strand-cleavage events. Here, we examined the organisation of different collision complexes and how these lead to nuclease activation. We mapped DNA cleavage when a translocating enzyme collides with a static enzyme bound to its site. By following communication between sites in both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations, we could show that motor activity leads to activation of the nuclease domains via distant interactions of the helicase or MTase-TRD. Direct nuclease dimerization is not required. To help explain the observed cleavage patterns, we also used exonuclease footprinting to demonstrate that individual Type ISP domains can swing off the DNA. This study lends further support to a model where DNA breaks are generated by multiple random nicks due to mobility of a collision complex with an overall DNA-binding footprint of ∼30 bp. PMID:26507855

  4. Somatic embryogenesis from seeds in a broad range of Vitis vinifera L. varieties: rescue of true-to-type virus-free plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Tània; Gammoudi, Najet; Peiró, Rosa; Olmos, Antonio; Gisbert, Carmina

    2017-11-29

    Somatic embryogenesis is the preferred method for cell to plant regeneration in Vitis vinifera L. However, low frequencies of plant embryo conversion are commonly found. In a previous work we obtained from cut-seeds of a grapevine infected with the Grapevine leafroll associated viruses 1 and 3 (GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3), high rates of direct regeneration, embryo plant conversion and sanitation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of this procedure for regeneration of other grapevine varieties which include some infected with one to three common grapevine viruses (GLRaV-3, Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)). As grapevine is highly heterozygous, it was necessary to select from among the virus-free plants those that regenerated from mother tissues around the embryo, (true-to-type). Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration were achieved in a first experiment, using cut-seeds from the 14 grapevine varieties Airén, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mencía, Merlot, Monastrell, Petit Verdot, Pinot Blanc (infected by GFLV and GFkV), Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Tempranillo (infected by GFLV), and Verdil. All regenerated plants were confirmed to be free of GFkV whereas at least 68% sanitation was obtained for GFLV. The SSR profiles of the virus-free plants showed, in both varieties, around 10% regeneration from mother tissue (the same genetic make-up as the mother plant). In a second experiment, this procedure was used to sanitize the varieties Cabernet Franc, Godello, Merlot and Valencí Blanc infected by GLRaV-3, GFkV and/or GFLV. Cut-seeds can be used as explants for embryogenesis induction and plant conversion in a broad range of grapevine varieties. The high regeneration rates obtained with this procedure facilitate the posterior selection of true-to-type virus-free plants. A sanitation rate of 100% was obtained for GFkV as this virus is not seed-transmitted. However, the presence of GLRaV-3 and GFLV in

  5. Application of SAFRAN Tool for the Knowledge Management at the Stage of Radioactive Waste Retrieval from Historical Radon-type Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetnik, A.; Murlis, D.

    2016-01-01

    Our task was to assess waste retrieval operations from a typical RADON-type historical waste storage facility during decommissioning. Challenges: “Historical radioactive waste” is generated without a complete traceable characterization programme or quality management system in place. Key characteristics of historical waste are: — may be conditioned, partially treated, or raw; — poor or no information/traceability; — cannot conclusively identify originating process/location; — waste streams may be mixed. Conclusions: • SAFRAN uses methodologies agreed upon at the international level, namely, by IAEA standards; • Several experts can work more effectively when performing the same safety assessment. SAFRAN makes it easier to exchange experience through sharing projects and data bases; • It is helpful for systematic and structured safety assessment as per safety standards; • It manages information and data in the same software environment. • SAFRAN can play a significant role in managing records and knowledge on radioactive waste, nuclear facility site, characteristics of geological environment and safety barriers. • It can provide reliable long-term storage and effective management of safety related records for the purposes of safety reassessments, review and supervision.

  6. Development of evaluation method for heat removal design of dry storage facilities. Pt. 4. Numerical analysis on vault storage system of cross flow type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kazuaki; Hattori, Yasuo; Koga, Tomonari; Wataru, Masumi

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the result of the heat removal test on vault storage system of cross flow type using the 1/5 scale model, an evaluation method for the heat removal design was established. It was composed of the numerical analysis for the convection phenomena of air flow inside the whole facility and that for the natural convection and the detailed turbulent mechanism near the surface of the storage tube. In the former analysis, air temperature distribution in the storage area obtained by the calculation gave good agreement within ±3degC with the test result. And fine turbulence models were introduced in the latter analysis to predict the separation flow in the boundary layer near the surface of the storage tube and the buoyant flow generated by the heat from the storage tube. Furthermore, the properties of removing the heat in a designed full-scale storage facility, such as flow pattern in the storage area, temperature and heat transfer rate of the storage tubes, were evaluated by using each of three methods, which were the established numerical analysis method, the experimental formula demonstrated in the heat removal test and the conventional evaluation method applied to the past heat removal design. As a result, the safety margin and issues included in the methods were grasped, and the measures to make a design more rational were proposed. (author)

  7. Method to estimate the effective temperatures of late-type giants using line-depth ratios in the wavelength range 0.97-1.32 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Fukue, Kei; Hamano, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Yasui, Chikako

    2018-02-01

    The effective temperature, one of the most fundamental atmospheric parameters of a star, can be estimated using various methods; here, we focus on a method using line-depth ratios (LDRs). This method combines low- and high-excitation lines and makes use of relations between LDRs of these line pairs and the effective temperature. It has an advantage, for example, of being minimally affected by interstellar reddening, which changes stellar colours. We report 81 relations between LDRs and effective temperature established with high-resolution, λ/Δλ ∼ 28 000, spectra of nine G- to M-type giants in the Y and J bands. Our analysis gives the first comprehensive set of LDR relations for this wavelength range. The combination of all these relations can be used to determine the effective temperatures of stars that have 3700 < Teff < 5400 K and -0.5 < [Fe/H] < +0.3 dex, to a precision of ±10 K in the best cases.

  8. Impact of type of the roof rocks on location and range of endogenous fires particular hazard zone by in goaf with caving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutak, Magdalena; Brodny, Jarosław

    2018-01-01

    Hazard of endogenous fires is one of the basic and common presented occupational safety hazards in coal mine in Poland and in the world. This hazard means possibility of coal self-ignition as the result of its self-heating process in mining heading or its surrounding. In underground coal-mining during ventilating of operating longwalls takes place migration of parts of airflow to goaf with caving. In a case when in these goaf a coal susceptible to self-ignition occurs, then the airflow through these goaf may influence on formation of favorable conditions for coal oxidation and subsequently to its self-heating and self-ignition. Endogenous fire formed in such conditions can pose a serious hazards for the crew and for continuity of operation of mining plant. From the practical point of view a very significant meaning has determination of the zone in the goaf with caving, in which necessary conditions for occurence of endogenous fire are fulfilled. In the real conditions determination of such a zone is practically impossible. The main aim of the analysis was to determine the impact of type of the roof rocks forming the goaf on the location and range of endogenous fires particular hazard zone by in these goaf. For determined mining-geological conditions, the critical value of velocity of airflow and oxygen concentration in goaf, conditioning initiation of coal oxidation process were determined.

  9. Operation of a New Half-Bridge Gate Driver for Enhancement - Mode GaN FETs, Type LM5113, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    A new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) gate driver designed to drive both the high-side and the low-side enhancement-mode GaN FETs, National Semiconductor's type LM5113, was evaluated for operation at temperatures beyond its recommended specified limits of -40 C to +125 C. The effects of limited thermal cycling under the extended test temperature, which ranged from -194 C to +150 C, on the operation of this chip as well as restart capability at the extreme cryogenic and hot temperatures were also investigated. The driver circuit was able to maintain good operation throughout the entire test regime between -194 C and +150 C without undergoing any major changes in its outputs signals and characteristics. The limited thermal cycling performed on the device also had no effect on its performance, and the driver chip was able to successfully restart at each of the extreme temperatures of -194 C and +150 C. The plastic packaging of this device was also not affected by either the short extreme temperature exposure or the limited thermal cycling. These preliminary results indicate that this new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) halfbridge eGaN FET driver integrated circuit has the potential for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature environments. Further testing is planned under long-term cycling to assess the reliability of these parts and to determine their suitability for extended use in the harsh environments of space.

  10. Thermal Response of Whipox-Type All-Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites during Reentry Simulation in the Dlr-Lbk Arc-Heated Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechnich, P.; Braue, W.; Schneider, H.; Koch, U.; Esser, B.; Gülhan, A.

    2005-02-01

    All-oxide ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) such as WHIPOXTM (wound highly porous oxide) exhibit excellent damage tolerance and thermal stability up to 1400°C. Due to their low density and thermal conductivity these new ceramic materials are considered promising candidates for thermal protection systems (TPS) of spacecrafts. The performance of WHIPOX-type CMCs was evaluated during reentry simulations in the L2K leg of the arc-heated LBK facility of DLR, Cologne. The application of reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) coatings provides significant CMC surface protection and decreased gas permeability, which are key issues for reentry applications. Since emittance and catalycity of the RBAO-coatings limit the performance of CMCs in a reentry environment, binary SiC/RBAO coatings providing higher emittance and/or lower catalycity proved to be a promising approach.

  11. Development of the radiation models of a BWR type reactor and it facility in the SUN-RAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron A, I.

    2005-01-01

    This work about generation models, transport in processes and radioactive contamination of areas of a BWR central, is an amplification to the project developed in the UNAM to have a support tool in subjects or electric generation courses. It is planned about the implementation of models of radiation generation in a BWR type reactor for complement the functions developed in the University Simulator of Nucleo electric- Boiling water reactor (SUN-RAH) which it has been implemented in Simulink of MatLab and it has a model for the dynamics of one nucleo electric central that presents the main characteristics of the reactor vessel, the recirculation system, steam lines, turbines, generator, condensers and feeding water, defined by the main processes that intervene in the generation of energy of these plants. By this way the radiation monitoring systems for area and process, operate simultaneously with the processes of energy generation, with that is possible to observe the changes that present with respect to the operation conditions of the plant, and likewise to appreciate the radiation transport process through the components of the reactor, steam lines and turbines, for different operation conditions and possible faults that they could be presented during the reactor operation. (Author)

  12. [Supply and demand of medical specialists in the health facilities of the Ministry of Health: national, regional and by type of specialty gaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Leslie; Pastor, Reyna; Moscoso, Betsy

    2011-06-01

    To characterize the supply, demand and the gap of medical specialists in facilities of the Ministry of Health of Peru (MINSA) at the national, regional and specialty type levels. Observational, descriptive study through which we calculated the supply of medical specialists using secondary sources of MINSA. The analysis of the demand for medical specialists was based on two methodologies: the need for specialists according to the guidelines of classification of the health facilities and according to the epidemiological and demographic profile. The arithmetic difference between the estimated demand and the supply was the procedure used to calculate the gap of medical specialists. The Ministry of Health has a total supply at the national level of 6,074 medical specialists of which 61.5% belong to the clinical specialties, 33.2% to the surgical specialties, 4.9% specialities related to aid to diagnosis and treatment and 0.4% to public health specialties. According to the categorization guideline there is a total demand of 11,176 medical specialists and according to the epidemiological and demographic profile of 11,738. The national estimated gaps found are similar in both methods, although they differ widely across regions and by type of specialty. At the regional level, the gaps are greater in Loreto, Piura, Puno and Madre de Dios when estimating the defficit in relation to the supply. Regarding the speciality, the gap is greater in the four basic specialties: gynecology and obstetrics, pediatrics, internal medicine and general surgery. There is a waid gap between supply and demand of medical specialists at the national and regional levels, as a whole representing approximately 45% of the current offer, regardless of the estimation method.

  13. Influence of Soap Characteristics and Food Service Facility Type on the Degree of Bacterial Contamination of Open, Refillable Bulk Soaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Donald W; Jensen, Dane; Gerba, Charles P; Shumaker, David; Arbogast, James W

    2018-02-01

    Concern has been raised regarding the public health risks from refillable bulk-soap dispensers because they provide an environment for potentially pathogenic bacteria to grow. This study surveyed the microbial quality of open refillable bulk soap in four different food establishment types in three states. Two hundred ninety-six samples of bulk soap were collected from food service establishments in Arizona, New Jersey, and Ohio. Samples were tested for total heterotrophic viable bacteria, Pseudomonas, coliforms and Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacteria were screened for antibiotic resistance. The pH, solids content, and water activity of all soap samples were measured. Samples were assayed for the presence of the common antibacterial agents triclosan and parachlorometaxylenol. More than 85% of the soap samples tested contained no detectable microorganisms, but when a sample contained any detectable microorganisms, it was most likely contaminated at a very high level (∼7 log CFU/mL). Microorganisms detected in contaminated soap included Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia liquefaciens, Shigella sonnei, Enterobacter gergoviae, Serratia odorifera, and Enterobacter cloacae. Twenty-three samples contained antibiotic-resistant organisms, some of which were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Every sample containing less than 4% solids had some detectable level of bacteria, whereas no samples with greater than 14% solids had detectable bacteria. This finding suggests the use of dilution and/or low-cost formulations as a cause of bacterial growth. There was a statistically significant difference ( P = 0.0035) between the fraction of bacteria-positive samples with no detected antimicrobial agent (17%) and those containing an antimicrobial agent (7%). Fast food operations and grocery stores were more likely to have detectable bacteria in bulk-soap samples compared with convenience stores ( P food service establishments.

  14. Latest developments on fibered MOPA in mJ range with hollow-core fiber beam delivery and fiber beam shaping used as seeder for large scale laser facilities (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleyze, Jean-François; Scol, Florent; Perrin, Arnaud; Gouriou, Pierre; Valentin, Constance; Bouwmans, Géraud; Hugonnot, Emmanuel

    2017-05-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is a French large scale laser facility dedicated to inertial fusion and plasma physics research. LMJ front-ends are based on fiber laser technology at nanojoule range [1]. Scaling the energy of those fiber seeders to the millijoule range is a way to upgrade LMJ's front ends architecture and could also be used as seeder for lasers for ELI project for example. However, required performances are so restrictive (optical-signal-to-noise ratio higher than 50 dB, temporally-shaped nanosecond pulses and spatial single-mode top-hat beam output) that such fiber systems are very tricky to build. High-energy fiber amplifiers In 2015, we have demonstrated, an all-fiber MOPA prototype able to produce a millijoule seeder, but unfortunately not 100% conform for all LMJ's performances. A major difficulty was to manage the frequency modulation used to avoid stimulated Brillouin scattering, to amplitude modulation (FM-AM) conversion, this limits the energy at 170µJ. For upgrading the energy to the millijoule range, it's necessary to use an amplifier with a larger core fiber. However, this fiber must still be flexible; polarization maintaining and exhibit a strictly single-mode behaviour. We are thus developing a new amplifier architecture based on an Yb-doped tapered fiber: its core diameter is from a narrow input to a wide output (MFD 8 to 26 µm). A S² measurement on a 2,5m long tapered fiber rolled-up on 22 cm diameter confirmed that this original geometry allows obtaining strictly single-mode behaviour. In a 1 kHz repetition rate regime, we already obtain 750 µJ pulses, and we are on the way to mJ, respecting LMJ performances. Beam delivery In LMJ architecture the distance between the nanojoule fiber seeder and the amplifier stages is about 16 m. Beam delivery is achieved with a standard PM fiber, such a solution is no longer achievable with hundreds of kilowatt peak powers. An efficient way to minimize nonlinear effects is to use hollow-core (HC

  15. Effects of shelter type, early environmental enrichment and weather conditions on free-range behaviour of slow-growing broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadig, L.M.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Ampe, B.; Reubens, B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Free-range use by broiler chickens is often limited, whereas better use of the free-range area could benefit animal welfare. Use of free-range areas could be stimulated by more appropriate shelter or environmental enrichment (by decreasing birds’ fearfulness). This study aimed to assess the

  16. Development of evaluation method for heat removal design of dry storage facilities. pt. 1. Heat removal test on vault storage system of cross flow type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Kazuaki; Koga, Tomonari; Wataru, Masumi; Hattori, Yasuo

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the result of heat removal test of passive cooling vault storage system of cross flow type using 1/5 scale model. Based on a prospect of steady increase in the amount of spent fuel, it is needed to establish large capacity dry storage technologies for spent fuel. Air flow patterns, distributions of air temperature and velocity were measured, by which heat removal characteristics of the system were made clear. Air flow patterns in the storage module depended on the ratio of the buoyant force to the inertial force; the former generated by the difference of air temperatures and the height of the storage module, the latter by the difference of air densities between the outlet of the storage module and ambience and the height of the chimney of the storage facility. A simple method to estimate air flow patterns in the storage module was suggested, where Ri(Richardson) number was applied to represent the ratio. Moreover, heat transfer coefficient from a model of storage tube to cooling air was evaluated, and it was concluded that the generalized expression of heat transfer coefficient for common heat exchangers could be applied to the vault storage system of cross flow type, in which dozens of storage tubes were placed in a storage module. (author)

  17. Is Office-Based Surgery Safe? Comparing Outcomes of 183,914 Aesthetic Surgical Procedures Across Different Types of Accredited Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Parikh, Rikesh; Nguyen, Lyly; Afshari, Ashkan; Shack, R Bruce; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-02-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in office-based surgery. However, due to wide variations in regulatory standards, the safety of office-based aesthetic surgery has been questioned. This study compares complication rates of cosmetic surgery performed at office-based surgical suites (OBSS) to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospitals. A prospective cohort of patients undergoing cosmetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the CosmetAssure database (Birmingham, AL). Patients were grouped by type of accredited facility where the surgery was performed: OBSS, ASC, or hospital. The primary outcome was the incidence of major complication(s) requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days postoperatively. Potential risk factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of procedure, and combined procedures were reviewed. Of the 129,007 patients (183,914 procedures) in the dataset, the majority underwent the procedure at ASCs (57.4%), followed by hospitals (26.7%) and OBSS (15.9%). Patients operated in OBSS were less likely to undergo combined procedures (30.3%) compared to ASCs (31.8%) and hospitals (35.3%, P procedures. Plastic surgeons should continue to triage their patients carefully based on other significant comorbidities that were not measured in this present study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  19. Factors associated with adherence to diabetes care recommendations among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a facility-based study in two urban diabetes clinics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyokunzire C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Catherine Kyokunzire,1 Nicholas Matovu2,3 1Department of Community Health and Behavioural Sciences, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 2Department of Community Health, Division of Noncommunicable Diseases, Ministry of Health – Uganda, Kampala, Uganda; 3Global Health Corps Fellowship Program 2017/2018, New York, NY, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of adherence and the factors associated with adherence to diabetes care recommendations among type 1 diabetic children and adolescents at two urban diabetes clinics in Kampala, Uganda.Research design and methods: A facility-based cross-sectional study was carried out among 200 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes at two major diabetes clinics in Kampala. Caretakers of the children and adolescents were interviewed using pretested questionnaires to provide information on sociodemographic characteristics, diabetes care, knowledge, attitudes, and adherence to diabetes care recommendations in type 1 diabetes. Prevalence rate ratios (PRRs at the 95% confidence interval (CI were used to establish the factors associated with adherence using modified Poisson regression, with robust standard errors. The data were analyzed by using STATA Version 13.0.Results: The overall prevalence of adherence to diabetes care recommendations was at 37%. However, evaluating adherence to specific treatment parameters showed that 52%, 76.5%, and 29.5% of the children and adolescents adhered to insulin, blood glucose monitoring, and dietary recommendations, respectively. In the final adjusted model, active diet monitoring (adjusted PRR [APRR]: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.01, 3.78, being under care of a sibling (APRR: 1.66; 95% CI: 1.61, 1.71, being under care of a married caretaker (APRR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.14 and a separated or divorced caretaker (APRR: 1.60; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.27, taking three or less tests of blood glucose per day (APRR: 0

  20. Underwater Ranging

    OpenAIRE

    S. P. Gaba

    1984-01-01

    The paper deals with underwater laser ranging system, its principle of operation and maximum depth capability. The sources of external noise and methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio are also discussed.

  1. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  2. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities

  3. Isolation and RFLP genotyping of toxoplasma gondii in free-range chicken(Gallus domesticus) in Grenada, West Indies, revealed widespread and dominance of clonal type III parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the present cross sectional study were to estimate the prevalence and to isolate and genotype Toxoplasma gondii in free range chickens from Grenada, West Indies. Using the modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 39 (26.9%) of 145 free-range chickens with ...

  4. Solid Waste Management Facilities with Permits by the Iowa DNR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — All types of facilities that handle solid waste, including: sanitary landfills, appliance demanufacturing facilities, transfer stations, land application sites,...

  5. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  6. Facility transition instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Bechtel Hanford, Inc. facility transition instruction was initiated in response to the need for a common, streamlined process for facility transitions and to capture the knowledge and experience that has accumulated over the last few years. The instruction serves as an educational resource and defines the process for transitioning facilities to long-term surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Generally, these facilities do not have identified operations missions and must be transitioned from operational status to a safe and stable configuration for long-term S and M. The instruction can be applied to a wide range of facilities--from process canyon complexes like the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility or B Plant, to stand-alone, lower hazard facilities like the 242B/BL facility. The facility transition process is implemented (under the direction of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office [RL] Assistant Manager-Environmental) by Bechtel Hanford, Inc. management, with input and interaction with the appropriate RL division and Hanford site contractors as noted in the instruction. The application of the steps identified herein and the early participation of all organizations involved are expected to provide a cost-effective, safe, and smooth transition from operational status to deactivation and S and M for a wide range of Hanford Site facilities

  7. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  8. Oral bacteria influenced by the functional status of the elderly people and the type and quality of facilities for the bedridden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, A; Watanabe, T; Yokoe, H; Hanada, N; Tanzawa, H

    2002-01-01

    To analyse the relationship between oral bacteria and the health and functional status of the elderly. The bacteria species in the oral cavity of the elderly were examined. It was found that the bedridden subjects staying at two hospitals for long-term (HOBR) showed significantly lower detection rates of commensal bacteria species and significantly higher detection rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and of coagulase(-) Staph. aureus than those living independently (the independent). In addition, the detection rate of Haemophilus parainfluenzae in NUBR was discovered to be higher than that found in the independent. In HOBR, the detection rate of Ps. aeruginosa was significantly higher among in-patients who required continual care than those in need of partial care, while the detection rate of MRSA was significantly higher among in-patients with low serum albumin than those with normal serum albumin. Oral bacteria examination analysis proved that the risks of infection of some pathogenic bacteria species were correlated with functional status, physical function and nutritional state. Our study suggests that the oral bacteria, especially pathogenic bacteria were influenced by the functional status of the elderly and the type and quality of the facilities for the bedridden, physical function and nutritional state.

  9. Epidemiology and Characteristics of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 (ST131) from Long-Term Care Facility Residents Colonized Intestinally with Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer H.; Garrigan, Charles; Johnston, Brian; Nachamkin, Irving; Clabots, Connie; Bilker, Warren B.; Santana, Evelyn; Tolomeo, Pam; Maslow, Joel; Myers, Janice; Carson, Lesley; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Johnson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate molecular and epidemiologic factors associated with Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) among long-term care facility (LTCF) residents who acquired gastrointestinal tract colonization with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (FQREC). Colonizing isolates from 37 residents who newly developed FQREC colonization at three LTCFs from 2006–2008 were evaluated. Twenty-nine (78%) of 37 total FQREC colonizing isolates were ST131. Most ST131 isolates had a distinctive combination of gyrA and parC replacement mutations. The ST131 and non-ST131 isolates differed significantly for the prevalence of many individual virulence factors but not for the proportion that qualified molecularly as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) or aggregate virulence factor scores. E. coli ST131 was highly prevalent among LTCF residents with FQREC colonization. Future studies should determine the risk factors for infection among ST131-colonized residents, and assess the potential for increased transmissibility of ST131 in the long-term care setting. PMID:27939288

  10. Evaluating the sensitivity of EQ-5D in a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in two tertiary health care facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwunife, Obinna Ikechukwu; Ezenduka, Charles C; Uzoma, Bede Emeka

    2016-01-12

    The EQ-5D instrument is arguably the most well-known and commonly used generic measure of health status internationally. Although the instrument has been employed in outcomes studies of diabetes mellitus in many countries, it has not yet been used in Nigeria. This study was carried out to assess the sensitivity of the EQ-5D instrument in a sample of Nigerian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A cross-sectional study was conducted using the EQ-5D instrument to assess the self-reported quality of life of patients with T2DM attending two tertiary healthcare facilities in south eastern Nigeria consenting patients completed the questionnaire while waiting to see a doctor. A priori hypotheses were examined using multiple regression analysis to model the relationship between the dependent variables (EQ VAS and EQ-5D Index) and hypothesized independent variables. A total of 226 patients with T2DM participated in the study. The average age of participants was 57 years (standard deviation 10 years) and 61.1% were male. The EQ VAS score and EQ-5D index averaged 66.19 (standard deviation 15.42) and 0.78 (standard deviation 0.21) respectively. Number of diabetic complications, number of co-morbidities, patient's age and being educated predicted EQ VAS score by -6.76, -6.15, -0.22, and 4.51 respectively. Also, number of diabetic complications, number of co-morbidities, patient's age and being educated predicted EQ-5D index by -0.12, -0.07, -0.003, and 0.06 respectively.. Our findings indicate that the EQ-5D could adequately capture the burden of type 2 diabetes and related complications among Nigerian patients.

  11. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  12. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  13. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  14. Powder Metallurgy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The facility is uniquely equipped as the only laboratory within DA to conduct PM processing of refractory metals and alloys as well as the processing of a wide range...

  15. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  16. Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities | Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research | NREL Facilities Power Electronics and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management experimentation facilities feature a wide range of four researchers in discussion around a piece of laboratory equipment. Power electronics researchers

  17. Introduction to natural disturbances and historic range of variation: type, frequency, severity, and post-disturbance structure in central hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Greenberg; Beverly S. Collins; Henry McNab; Douglas K. Miller; Gary R. Wein

    2015-01-01

    EXCERPT FROM: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range Variation 2015. Throughout the history of upland hardwood forests of the Central Hardwood Region, natural disturbances have been integral to shaping forest structure and composition, and essential in maintaining diverse biotic...

  18. Range and variability in gesture-based interactions with medical images : do non-stereo versus stereo visualizations elicit different types of gestures?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van M.H.P.H.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The current paper presents a study into the range and variability of natural gestures when interacting with medical images, using traditional non stereo and stereoscopic modes of presentation. The results have implications for the design of computer-vision algorithms developed to support natural

  19. Temperature dependence of the Schottky-barrier heights of n-type semiconductors in the temperature range of 7 to 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.P.; Lee, T.C.; Fung, S.; Beling, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    In this note we present the results of the temperature dependence of the SBH in Au/n-Si, Ag/n-GaAs, and Au/n-GaAs in the temperature range of 7 to 300 K from our internal photoemission measurements. (orig.)

  20. Least Limiting Water Range and Load Bearing Capacity of Soil under Types of Tractor-Trailers for Mechanical Harvesting of Green Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Higino Frederico Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The expansion of the sugarcane industry in Brazil has intensified the mechanization of agriculture and caused effects on the soil physical quality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the limiting water range and soil bearing capacity of a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico (Rhodic Hapludox under the influence of different tractor-trailers used in mechanical sugarcane harvesting. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with five replications. The treatments consisted of green sugarcane harvesting with: harvester without trailer (T1; harvester with two trailers with a capacity of 10 Mg each (T2; harvester with trailer with a capacity of 20 Mg (T3 and harvester and truck with trailer with a capacity of 20 Mg (10 Mg per compartment (T4. The least limiting water range and soil bearing capacity were evaluated. The transport equipment to remove the harvested sugarcane from the field (trailer at harvest decreased the least limiting water range, reducing the structural soil quality. The truck trailer caused the greatest impact on the soil physical properties studied. The soil load bearing capacity was unaffected by the treatments, since the pressure of the harvester (T1 exceeded the pre-consolidation pressure of the soil.

  1. Status and development potential of proven reactor types and fuel cycles, and their role in a medium-to-long range energy supply strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerkl, H.

    1982-01-01

    After a general review of the present world-wide energy situation (with particular reference to those of the Federal Republic of Germany and of Argentina) the possible contribution of nuclear energy in general, and of proven light water and heavy water reactor types in particular, to meeting the energy demand is discussed. The technical and economic development potential of those reactors is evaluated, both regarding plant components technology as well as fuel and fuel cycle improvement, with special emphasis on the Pressure Vessel Heavy Water Reactor type. The last section presents some results of nuclear reactor strategy calculations made for a scenario similar to that of Argentina over the period from 1970 through 2040 and involving the use of: A) heavy water reactors (HWR's) only, with and without plutonium recycling, and B) the use of HWR's plus fast breeder reactors. (M.E.L.) [es

  2. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    OpenAIRE

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1-2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand brea...

  3. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  4. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  5. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  6. Status of RIB facilities in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao

    1998-01-01

    Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities in Asia are presented. In China, in-flight separation type facilities are in operation at the Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou and the other at Tandem facility in China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. The storage-ring facility is proposed and approved in Lanzhou. In India, the Variable Energy Cyclotron Facility in Calcutta start to construct an ISOL-type facility. In Japan, in-flight separation type facilities are working at Research Center for Nuclear Physics in Osaka, and at RIKEN. Also a separator start its operation in medical facility in Chiba. In RIKEN, the construction of RI Beam Factory has been started. An ISOL-type facility is proposed in the Japan Hadron Facility in KEK. Table I summarize these facilities

  7. Alzheimer's-type neuropathology in the precuneus is not increased relative to other areas of neocortex across a range of cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter T; Abner, Erin L; Scheff, Stephen W; Schmitt, Frederick A; Kryscio, Richard J; Jicha, Gregory A; Smith, Charles D; Patel, Ela; Markesbery, William R

    2009-02-06

    We studied Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the precuneus and surrounding brain areas. Anatomically, the precuneus corresponds to the medial portion of human cerebral cortical Brodmann Area 7. This study utilized patients from the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center autopsy cohort. Data from 47 brains were used comprising patients of differing antemortem cognitive impairment severities, each with longitudinal clinical data and extensive neuropathological data. We assessed whether the precuneus and surrounding areas are differentially vulnerable to AD-type pathological lesions (diffuse amyloid plaques, neuritic amyloid plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles). Eleven areas of brain were evaluated for each case: amygdala, hippocampal CA1, subiculum, entorhinal cortex, frontal cortex, superior and middle temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, occipital cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, Brodmann Area 31, and the precuneus proper. Like other areas of neocortex, the precuneus demonstrated increased diffuse and neuritic amyloid plaques early in the evolution in AD, and increased neurofibrillary tangles late in AD. Correcting for the antemortem cognitive status of the patients, there was no evidence of an increase in the density of AD-type pathology in the precuneus or neighboring areas relative to other areas of cerebral neocortex. Our results are not consistent with the idea that the precuneus is involved in a special way with plaques or tangles relative to other areas of neocortex.

  8. Highly sensitive x-ray detectors in the low-energy range on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Muzykov, Peter G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Russell Terry, J. [Space Science and Applications Group (ISR-1), Intelligence and Space Research Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-30

    Schottky diodes on n-type 4H-SiC epitaxial layers have been fabricated for low-energy x-ray detection. The detectors were highly sensitive to soft x-rays and showed improved response compared to the commercial SiC UV photodiodes. Current-voltage characteristics at 475 K showed low leakage current revealing the possibility of high temperature operation. The high quality of the epi-layer was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and chemical etching. Thermally stimulated current measurements performed at 94-550 K revealed low density of deep levels which may cause charge trapping. No charge trapping on detectors' responsivity in the low x-ray energy was found.

  9. Functional genomic mRNA profiling of a large cancer data base demonstrates mesothelin overexpression in a broad range of tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, Laetitia E; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Bense, Rico D; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N

    2015-09-29

    The membrane bound glycoprotein mesothelin (MSLN) is a highly specific tumor marker, which is currently exploited as target for drugs. There are only limited data available on MSLN expression by human tumors. Therefore we determined overexpression of MSLN across different tumor types with Functional Genomic mRNA (FGM) profiling of a large cancer database. Results were compared with data in articles reporting immunohistochemical (IHC) MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling is a technique that allows prediction of biologically relevant overexpression of proteins from a robust data set of mRNA microarrays. This technique was used in a database comprising 19,746 tumors to identify for 41 tumor types the percentage of samples with an overexpression of MSLN compared to a normal background. A literature search was performed to compare the FGM profiling data with studies reporting IHC MSLN tumor expression. FGM profiling showed MSLN overexpression in gastrointestinal (12-36%) and gynecological tumors (20-66%), non-small cell lung cancer (21%) and synovial sarcomas (30%). The overexpression found in thyroid cancers (5%) and renal cell cancers (10%) was not yet reported with IHC analyses. We observed that MSLN amplification rate within esophageal cancer depends on the histotype (31% for adenocarcinomas versus 3% for squamous-cell carcinomas). Subset analysis in breast cancer showed MSLN amplification rates of 28% in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and 33% in basal-like breast cancer. Further subtype analysis of TNBCs showed the highest amplification rate (42%) in the basal-like 1 subtype and the lowest amplification rate (9%) in the luminal androgen receptor subtype.

  10. Facility planning and site development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisman, R.C.; Handmaker, H.

    1986-01-01

    Planning for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facility should provide for the efficient operation of current and future MRI devices and must also take into consideration a broad range of general planning principles. Control of budgeted facility costs and construction schedules is of increasing importance due to the magnitude of expense of MRI facility development as well as the need to protect institutional or entrepreneurial investment. In a competitive environment facility costs may be the determining factor in a project's success

  11. BeP2: a tetrahedral structure of type order-disorder which obeys a coordination rule for short-range order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Haridon, P.; David, J.; Lang, J.; Parthe, E.

    1976-01-01

    Single-crystal studies on BeP 2 indicate that this compound possesses an OD structure. The substructure has a tetragonal unit cell with: a = 3.546 A, c = 15.01 A, Z = 4, space group: I4 1 /amd. The final R factor has a value of 0.033. The atom sites in this substructure correspond to the sites of diamond if the latter is described with a tetragonal cell, where a = (2/sup 1/2//a/sub diamond/ and c = 3a/sub diamond/. A short-range order governs the occupation of these sites with Be and P atoms. Each Be has four tetrahedral P neighbors and every P has two Be and two P neighbors. Consideration of the maxima on the diffuse streaks between the sharp reflectins of the substructure leads to an intermediate unit cell with a = 7.09 A and c = 30.02 A. Coordination considerations allow a structure proposal to be formulated for this intermediate structure which is triclinic but pseudotetragonal. The true unit cell is also pseudotetragonal with a = 7.09 A and c = N . 15.01 A, where N is a large integer

  12. Polarization filtering in the visible wavelength range using surface plasmon resonance and a sunflower-type photonic quasi-crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bei; Wang, Anran; Liu, Exian; Tan, Wei; Xie, Jianlan; Ge, Rui; Liu, Jianjun

    2018-04-01

    A novel polarization filter based on a sunflower-type photonic quasi-crystal fiber (PQF) is proposed in this paper. We also discuss different methods to tune the filter wavelength. The proposed filter can efficiently produce polarized light with visible wavelengths by using the resonance between the second-order surface plasmon polariton mode and the core mode of the PQF. The filtered wavelength can be tuned between 0.55 µm and 0.68 µm by adjusting the thickness of the gold film. When the thickness of the gold film is 25.3 nm, the resonance loss in the y-polarized direction reaches 11707 dB m‑1 for a wavelength of 0.6326 µm, and the full width at half maximum is only 5 nm. Due to the flexible design and absence of both polarization coupling and polarization dispersion, this polarization filter can be used in devices that require narrow-band filtering.

  13. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  14. Dissolved Massive Metal-rich Globular Clusters Can Cause the Range of UV Upturn Strengths Found among Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2018-04-01

    I discuss a scenario in which the ultraviolet (UV) upturn of giant early-type galaxies (ETGs) is primarily due to helium-rich stellar populations that formed in massive metal-rich globular clusters (GCs), which subsequently dissolved in the strong tidal field in the central regions of the massive host galaxy. These massive GCs are assumed to show UV upturns similar to those observed recently in M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Data taken from the literature reveal a strong correlation between the strength of the UV upturn and the specific frequency of metal-rich GCs in ETGs. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization of GC mass functions, simulations of long-term dynamical evolution of GC systems show that the observed correlation between UV upturn strength and GC specific frequency can be explained by variations in the characteristic truncation mass {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} such that {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} increases with ETG luminosity in a way that is consistent with observed GC luminosity functions in ETGs. These findings suggest that the nature of the UV upturn in ETGs and the variation of its strength among ETGs are causally related to that of helium-rich populations in massive GCs, rather than intrinsic properties of field stars in massive galactic spheroids. With this in mind, I predict that future studies will find that [N/Fe] decreases with increasing galactocentric radius in massive ETGs, and that such gradients have the largest amplitudes in ETGs with the strongest UV upturns.

  15. Engineering Pyrite-Type Bimetallic Ni-Doped CoS2 Nanoneedle Arrays over a Wide Compositional Range for Enhanced Oxygen and Hydrogen Electrocatalysis with Flexible Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of cheap and efficient catalytic electrodes is of great importance, to promote the sluggish overall water-splitting systems associated with the large-scale application of clean and renewable energy technologies. In this work, we report the controlled synthesis of pyrite-type bimetallic Ni-doped CoS2 nanoneedle (NN arrays supported on stainless steel (SS (designated as NixCo1−xS2 NN/SS, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 and the related compositional influence on electrocatalytic efficiencies for the oxygen and hydrogen evolution reaction (OER/HER. Impressively, the Ni0.33Co0.67S2 NN/SS displays superior activity and faster kinetics for catalyzing OER (low overpotential of 286 mV at 50 mA cm−2; Tafel value of 55 mV dec−1 and HER (low overpotential of 350 mV at 30 mA cm−2; Tafel value of 76 mV dec−1 than those of counterparts with other Ni/Co ratios and also monometallic Ni- or Co-based sulfides, which is attributed to the optimized balance from the improved electron transfer capability, increased exposure of electrocatalytic active sites, and favorable dissipation of gaseous products over the nanoneedle surface. Furthermore, the conductive, flexible SS support and firmly attached in-situ integrated feature, result in the flexibility and remarkable long-term stability of as-prepared binder-free Ni0.33Co0.67S2 NN/SS electrode. These results demonstrate element-doping could be an efficient route at the atomic level to design new materials and further optimize the surface physicochemical properties for enhancing the overall electrochemical water splitting activity.

  16. Subglacial drainage effects on surface motion on a small surge type alpine glacier on the St. Elias range, Yukon Territory, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, C.; Schoof, C.; King, M. A.; Flowers, G. E.; Haber, E.

    2017-12-01

    Subglacial drainage is known to play an important role in glacier dynamics trough its influence on basal sliding. However, drainage is also one of the most poorly understood process in glacier flow due to the difficulties of observing, identifying and modeling the physics involved. In an effort to improve understanding of subglacial processes, we have monitored a small, approximately 100 m thick surge-type alpine glacier for nine years. Over 300 boreholes were instrumented with pressure transducers over a 0.5 km² in its upper ablation area, in addition to a weather station and a permanent GPS array consisting on 16 dual-frequency receivers within the study area. We study the influence of the subglacial drainage system on the glacier surface velocity. However, pressure variations in the drainage system during the melt season are dominated by diurnal oscillations.Therefore, GPS solutions have to be computed at sub-diurnal time intervals in order to explore the effects of transient diurnal pressure variations. Due to the small displacements of the surface of the glacier over those periods (4-10 cm/day), sub-diurnal solutions are dominated by errors, making it impossible to observe the diurnal variations in glacier motion. We have found that the main source of error is GPS multipath. This error source does largely cancel out when solutions are computed over 24 hour periods (or more precisely, over a sidereal day), but solution precisions decrease quickly when computed over shorter periods of time. Here we present an inverse problem approach to remove GPS multipath errors on glaciers, and use the reconstructed glacier motion to explore how the subglacial drainage morphology and effective pressure influence glacier dynamics at multiple time scales.

  17. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  18. Reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Murase, Michio; Yokomizo, Osamu.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a BWR type reactor facility capable of suppressing the amount of steams generated by the mutual effect of a failed reactor core and coolants upon occurrence of an imaginal accident, and not requiring spacial countermeasures for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel. Namely, a means for supplying cooling water at a temperature not lower by 30degC than the saturated temperature corresponding to the inner pressure of the containing vessel upon occurrence of an accident is disposed to a lower dry well below the pressure vessel. As a result, upon occurrence of such an accident that the reactor core should be melted and flown downward of the pressure vessel, when cooling water at a temperature not lower than the saturated temperature, for example, cooling water at 100degC or higher is supplied to the lower dry well, abrupt generation of steams by the mutual effect of the failed reactor core and cooling water is scarcely caused compared with a case of supplying cooling water at a temperature lower than the saturation temperature by 30degC or more. Accordingly, the amount of steams to be generated can be suppressed, and special countermeasure is no more necessary for enhancing the pressure resistance of the container vessel is no more necessary. (I.S.)

  19. Facile one-step template-free synthesis of uniform hollow microstructures of cryptomelane-type manganese oxide K-OMS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Hugo M; Carvajal, Yadira; Njagi, Eric; Ristau, Roger A; Suib, Steven L

    2010-08-17

    Hollow microstructures of cryptomelane-type manganese oxide were produced in a template-free one-step process based on the fine-tuning of the oxidation rate of manganese species during the synthesis. The tuning of the reaction rate brought about by a mixture of the oxidants oxone and potassium nitrate becomes apparent from the gradual physical changes taking place in the reaction medium at early times of the synthesis. The successful synthesis of the hollow uniform structures could be performed in the ranges 120-160 degrees C and 8.2-10.7 for temperature and mass ratio oxone/potassium nitrate, respectively. Independent of the conditions of the synthesis, all of the complex microstructures showed the same pattern for the array of very long nanofibers in which some of these elongated around the surface confining the cavity and the other fibers grew normal to the surface created by the previous arrangement. A mechanism based on the heterogeneous nucleation of the cryptomelane phase on the surface of an amorphous precursor and the growth of the nanoscale fibers by processes such as dissolution-crystallization and lateral attachment of primary nanocrystalline fibers is proposed to explain the formation of the hollow structures.

  20. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Water Pollution Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Water Pollution Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control Program. The sub-facility types related to Water Pollution...

  1. Range Process Simulation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  2. Factors affecting minority population proximity to hazardous facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, A.L. [Wheaton Coll., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Disproportionate exposure of minority groups to environmental hazards has been attributed to ``environmental racism`` by some authors, without systematic investigation of the factors underlying this exposure pattern. This study examines regional differences in the proximity of African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and non-Hispanic Whites to a broad range of facility types and explores the effects of urban and income factors. A statistically significant inverse relationship is found between the percentage of non-Hispanic Whites and virtually all facility categories in all regions. Except for Hispanics in the South, all such associations for minority groups show a direct relationship, though some are nonsignificant. The geographic concentration of facilities is more closely tied to urbanization than to economic factors. Controlling for both urban and economic factors, minority population concentration is still a significant explanatory variable for some facility types in some regions. This finding is most consistent for African-Americans.

  3. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  4. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  5. Maintenance, repair and operation (MRO) of shutdown facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, S.

    2006-01-01

    attributed to maintenance and repair of the facilities. At CRL the percentage of budget attributed to maintenance, repair and operation of a facility does not exceed 1.2% on average. The result of this under funding is typical of many other campus type facilities where the higher priority facilities will see MRO budget figures attributed to their facilities or systems in the 2% range to 3% for nuclear related facilities while non priority facilities or systems will have less than 1% allocated against them for MRO. Listed below in Figure 1 is a comparison of CRL Decommissioning Budgets over the past few years. (author)

  6. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Here is given the decree (2000-1065) of the 25. of October 2000 reporting the publication of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the CERN concerning the safety of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and the SPS (Proton Supersynchrotron) facilities, signed in Geneva on July 11, 2000. By this convention, the CERN undertakes to ensure the safety of the LHC and SPS facilities and those of the operations of the LEP decommissioning. The French legislation and regulations on basic nuclear facilities (concerning more particularly the protection against ionizing radiations, the protection of the environment and the safety of facilities) and those which could be decided later on apply to the LHC, SPS and auxiliary facilities. (O.M.)

  7. HNF - Helmholtz Nano Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Albrecht

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Helmholtz Nano Facility (HNF is a state-of-the-art cleanroom facility. The cleanroom has ~1100 m2 with cleanroom classes of DIN ISO 1-3. HNF operates according to VDI DIN 2083, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP and aquivalent to Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA standards. HNF is a user facility of Forschungszentrum Jülich and comprises a network of facilities, processes and systems for research, production and characterization of micro- and nanostructures. HNF meets the basic supply of micro- and nanostructures for nanoelectronics, fluidics. micromechanics, biology, neutron and energy science, etc.. The task of HNF is rapid progress in nanostructures and their technology, offering efficient access to infrastructure and equipment. HNF gives access to expertise and provides resources in production, synthesis, characterization and integration of structures, devices and circuits. HNF covers the range from basic research to application oriented research facilitating a broad variety of different materials and different sample sizes.

  8. 30 CFR 57.6161 - Auxiliary facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auxiliary facilities. 57.6161 Section 57.6161...-Underground Only § 57.6161 Auxiliary facilities. (a) Auxiliary facilities used to store explosive material near work places shall be wooden, box-type containers equipped with covers or doors, or facilities...

  9. Status of U.S. Plans for an Advanced ISOL Facility. A Brief Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1998-01-01

    A brief discussion is provided of the current status of plans to build an advanced ISOL radioactive ion beam facility in the US. Designs for this new facility, which was recommended as the next major construction project of the DOE Nuclear Physics Program Office, have been proposed by two US national laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The new facility will provide orders-of-magnitude higher radioactive beam currents than existing facilities of this type and will cost in the range of $250 million

  10. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  11. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  12. Nuclear fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Isaka, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the spent fuel storage capacity and reduce the installation cost in a nuclear fuel storage facility. Constitution: Fuels handled in the nuclear fuel storage device of the present invention include the following four types: (1) fresh fuels, (2) 100 % reactor core charged fuels, (3) spent fuels just after taking out and (4) fuels after a certain period (for example one half-year) from taking out of the reactor. Reactivity is high for the fuels (1), and some of fuels (2), while low in the fuels (3) (4), Source intensity is strong for the fuels (3) and some of the fuels (2), while it is low for the fuels (1) and (4). Taking notice of the fact that the reactivity, radioactive source intensity and generated after heat are different in the respective fuels, the size of the pool and the storage capacity are increased by the divided storage control. While on the other hand, since the division is made in one identical pool, the control method becomes important, and the working range is restricted by means of a template, interlock, etc., the operation mode of the handling machine is divided into four, etc. for preventing errors. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  14. The study of the container types used for transport and final disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postelnicu, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to select from a variety of package forms and capacities some containers which will be used for transport and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from decommissioning of nuclear facilities into the National Repository for Radioactive Waste - Baita, Bihor county. Taken into account the possibilities of railway and / or road transport and waste disposal in our country, detailed container classification was given in order to use them for radioactive waste transport and final disposal from decommissioning of IFIN-HH Research Reactor. (author)

  15. Omega: A 24-beam UV irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.C.; Beich, W.; Delettrez, J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on the characterization and performance of the 24-beam Omega laser facility under full third harmonic (351-nm) upconversion. This system provides for the first time a multibeam laser facility for the illumination of spherical targets with UV laser light in symmetric irradiation conditions with energies in the kilojoule range. This facility is capable of providing sufficient irradiation uniformity to test concepts of direct drive laser fusion with UV-driven ablation targets. The results of initial studies of ablatively driven DT-fueled glass microballoon targets will be described. The 24-beam Omega Nd:phosphate glass facility is capable of providing at 1054 nm output powers in excess of 10 TW in short ( 10 4 full system shots to date) irradiation facility with beam synchronism of approx. =3 psec, beam placement accuracy on target of 10 μm, and interbeam energy variance of approx. =2%. From measured target plane intensity distributions, overall illumination uniformity with tangentially focused beams is estimated to be approx. =5%. In 1984, a symmetric set of six beams was upconverted to 351-nm radiation using the polarization-mismatch scheme developed by Craxton. Monolithic cells of 20-cm clear aperture containing both frequency and doubler and tripler type II KDP crystals in index-matching propylene carbonate liquid were incorporated to output of six of the Omega beams with a full set of UV beam diagnostics

  16. Regionalised tertiary psychiatric residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Alain; Groden, David; Goldner, Elliot M; Gelinas, Daniel; Arnold, Leslie M

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitals remain the main venue for long-term mental health care and, despite widespread closures and downsizing, no country that built asylums in the last century has done away with them entirely--with the recent exception of Italy. Differentiated community-based residential alternatives have been developed over the past decades, with staffing levels that range from full-time professional, to daytime only, to part-time/on-call. This paper reviews the characteristics of community-based psychiatric residential care facilities as an alternative to long-term care in psychiatric hospitals. It describes five factors decision makers should consider: 1. number of residential places needed; 2. staffing levels; 3. physical setting; 4. programming; and 5. governance and financing. In Italy, facilities with full-time professional staff have been developed since the mid-1990s to accommodate the last cohorts of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals. In the United Kingdom, experiments with hostel wards since the 1980s have shown that home-like, small-scale facilities with intensive treatment and rehabilitation programming can be effective for the most difficult-to-place patients. More recently in Australia, Community Care Units (CCUs) have been applying this concept. In the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC), Tertiary Psychiatric Residential Facilities (TPRFs) have been developed as part of an effort to regionalise health and social services and downsize and ultimately close its only psychiatric hospital. This type of service must be further developed in addition to the need for forensic, acute-care and intermediate-level beds, as well as for community-based care such as assertive community treatment and intensive case management. All these types of services, together with long-term community-based residential care, constitute the elements of a balanced mental health care system. As part of a region's balanced mental health care plan, these Tertiary

  17. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  18. The CUTLASS database facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, P.; Rutter, P.

    1988-09-01

    The enhancement of the CUTLASS database management system to provide improved facilities for data handling is seen as a prerequisite to its effective use for future power station data processing and control applications. This particularly applies to the larger projects such as AGR data processing system refurbishments, and the data processing systems required for the new Coal Fired Reference Design stations. In anticipation of the need for improved data handling facilities in CUTLASS, the CEGB established a User Sub-Group in the early 1980's to define the database facilities required by users. Following the endorsement of the resulting specification and a detailed design study, the database facilities have been implemented as an integral part of the CUTLASS system. This paper provides an introduction to the range of CUTLASS Database facilities, and emphasises the role of Database as the central facility around which future Kit 1 and (particularly) Kit 6 CUTLASS based data processing and control systems will be designed and implemented. (author)

  19. An Outbreak of Streptococcus pyogenes in a Mental Health Facility: Advantage of Well-Timed Whole-Genome Sequencing Over emm Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, Sarah M; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Barkham, Timothy; Chua, Hong Choon; Mok, Yee Ming; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng; Su, Alex Hsin Chuan; Lee, Yen Ling; Chua, Ming Lai Ivan; Ng, Poh Yong; Soon, Wei Jia Wendy; Chu, Collins Wenhan; Tan, Siyun Lucinda; Meehan, Mary; Ang, Brenda Sze Peng; Leo, Yee Sin; Holden, Matthew T G; De, Partha; Hsu, Li Yang; Chen, Swaine L; de Sessions, Paola Florez; Marimuthu, Kalisvar

    2018-05-09

    OBJECTIVEWe report the utility of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) conducted in a clinically relevant time frame (ie, sufficient for guiding management decision), in managing a Streptococcus pyogenes outbreak, and present a comparison of its performance with emm typing.SETTINGA 2,000-bed tertiary-care psychiatric hospital.METHODSActive surveillance was conducted to identify new cases of S. pyogenes. WGS guided targeted epidemiological investigations, and infection control measures were implemented. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome phylogeny, emm typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. We compared the ability of WGS and emm typing to correctly identify person-to-person transmission and to guide the management of the outbreak.RESULTSThe study included 204 patients and 152 staff. We identified 35 patients and 2 staff members with S. pyogenes. WGS revealed polyclonal S. pyogenes infections with 3 genetically distinct phylogenetic clusters (C1-C3). Cluster C1 isolates were all emm type 4, sequence type 915 and had pairwise SNP differences of 0-5, which suggested recent person-to-person transmissions. Epidemiological investigation revealed that cluster C1 was mediated by dermal colonization and transmission of S. pyogenes in a male residential ward. Clusters C2 and C3 were genomically diverse, with pairwise SNP differences of 21-45 and 26-58, and emm 11 and mostly emm120, respectively. Clusters C2 and C3, which may have been considered person-to-person transmissions by emm typing, were shown by WGS to be unlikely by integrating pairwise SNP differences with epidemiology.CONCLUSIONSWGS had higher resolution than emm typing in identifying clusters with recent and ongoing person-to-person transmissions, which allowed implementation of targeted intervention to control the outbreak.Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;1-9.

  20. COSPAS-SARSAT Beacon Certification Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — EPG's COSPAS-SARSAT Beacon Certification Facility is one of five certification facilities in the world. Formal certifications are available for all beacon types and...

  1. A facile enhancement in battery-type of capacitive performance of spinel NiCo2O4 nanostructure via directly tuning thermal decomposition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Shu; Sun, Yujing; Dai, Haichao; Ni, Pengjuan; Lu, Wangdong; Wang, Yilin; Li, Zhen; Li, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    A facile, low cost and time-saving method to synthesize porous NiCo 2 O 4 nanoplatelet and nanorod structures is developed via a simple two-step route. A flakes assembled precursor containing Ni-Co hydroxides is firstly prepared via a facile, low-cost chemical bath coprecipitation process only using diluted ammonia solution as a precipitant to govern over the nucleation, growth, and agglomeration processes.Then, porous NiCo 2 O 4 nanoplatelet and nanorod structures are successfully obtained through pyrolyzing the above precursor. The influence of the calcination temperature is mainly studied on the pyrolysis reaction. The calcination temperature has statistically significant effects on the morphology and structure evolution, crystallinity, electronic conductivity and the electrochemical performances of the products. The optimized, nanoplatelet predominated NiCo 2 O 4 spinel, calcinated at 300 ∘C for 6 h (denoted as NC300), has excellent crystallinity and electric conductivity. It shows a superior-specific capacitance of 1362F g −1 at a current density of 1 A g −1 .When the current density increases to 16 A g −1 , the specific capacity still retains 964 F g −1 (70.8% capacity retention). Ragone plot indicates maximum energy density of our porous NC300 electrode is 75.67 W h kg −1 at a power density of 499.82 W kg −1 . Cycle-life tests show that the specific capacitance of NC300 is nearly stable between 300 and 1500 cycles, indicating its potential use in energy-storage field.The simplicity and practicability of the modified pyrolysis process may facilitate the successful commercial applications in electrochemical capacitors for nanostructured NiCo 2 O 4 spinel.

  2. Mineral facilities of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  3. Facile synthesis of Li2S-P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte with micron range particles for all-solid-state batteries via a low-temperature solution technique (LTST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunho; Lee, Sewook; Park, Jongyeop; Nichols, William T.; Shin, Dongwook

    2018-06-01

    A lithium ion conductive 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 glass-ceramics electrolyte is, for the first time, successfully synthesized via a new low-temperature solution technique (LTST) and compared to the conventional mechanical-milling technique. Both samples are composed of the highly lithium ion conductive thio-LISICON III analog phase. Due to the uniform dispersion of reactants in an organic liquid, the use of LTST produced significantly smaller and more uniform particle sizes (2.2 ± 1.68 μm) resulting in a 6.5 times higher specific surface area compared to the mechanically-milled sample. A pronounced enhancement of both the rate capability and cyclability is demonstrated for the LTST solid electrolyte sample due to the more intimate contact with the LiCoO2 active material. Furthermore, the LTST sample shows excellent electrochemical stability throughout the potential range of -1 to 5 V. These results suggest that the proposed technique using the optimized LTST process is promising for the preparation of 75Li2Sṡ25P2S5 solid electrolytes for use in advanced Li-ion batteries.

  4. An extended range neutron rem counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birattari, C.; Nuccetelli, C.; Pelliccioni, M.; Silari, M.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to assess the possibility of extending the sensitivity of a neutron rem counter of the Andersson-Braun type up to several hundred MeV. The validity of the model adopted has first been checked by comparing with experimental data the calculated response curve and the angular dependence of the sensitivity for a well known commercial rem counter. Next, a number of modifications to the configuration of the moderator-attenuator have been investigated. The response functions and angular distributions produced by two simple solutions yielding an instrument with a sensitivity extended up to 400 MeV are presented. The response of the original rem counter and of its two modified versions to nine test spectra has also been calculated. The resulting instrument is transportable rather than portable, but the availability of an extended range neutron survey meter would be of great advantage at medium and high energy particle accelerator facilities. (orig.)

  5. Structural concept of angle type of hot isolation valve and its test program at an out-of-pile test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Kazuhiko; Fujisaki, Katsuo; Shibata, Taijyu; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Koiso, Hiroshi

    1997-02-01

    The Japanese safety regulation generally requires to set an isolation valve at the penetration of the reactor containment vessel on the secondary helium piping system which connects a steam reforming hydrogen production system, located outside the reactor building, to an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in the HTTR reactor system. The hot secondary helium which is heated up to the high temperature of 905degC and at the high pressure of 4.1MPa is passing through the isolation valve. So far, such a hot isolation valve has not been industrialized. The present report presents a proposal of a structural design concept of an angle valve as a promising candidate of the hot isolation valve, and a proposal on a test program for demonstrating the technological feasibility of the concept at an out-of-pile test facility before installing at the HTTR. A closing time and a leak rate at a valve seat are the key design parameters for developing the design concept. To set a reasonable value to each parameter, safety requirements on the isolation valve were discussed at first. The target closing time and the acceptable design limit of leak rate at the valve seat for meeting the requirements were specified 30 seconds and 10 STP cm{sup 3}/s, respectively. A nickel-base superalloy Hastelloy XR is feasible as such a valve seat material as to withstand the internal/external pressure of 4.1MPa at the high temperature of 905degC, the severest loading conditions of the valve seat at the accident of secondary helium pipe rupture. Correlation of leak rate at the ambient temperature to that at an operating temperature (900degC) is one of key test subjects of test program at an out-of-pile test facility. Leak rate at the operating temperature is the real parameter to be checked but only the leak rate at the ambient temperature is measured at regulatory examination in service. A test method to develop such correlation was proposed. (author)

  6. Proposal of a neutron transmutation doping facility for n-type spherical silicon solar cell at high-temperature engineering test reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Honda, Yuki; Motoyama, Mizuki; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Ishii, Toshiaki; Ishitsuka, Etsuo

    2018-05-01

    The p-type spherical silicon solar cell is a candidate for future solar energy with low fabrication cost, however, its conversion efficiency is only about 10%. The conversion efficiency of a silicon solar cell can be increased by using n-type silicon semiconductor as a substrate. This study proposed a new method of neutron transmutation doping silicon (NTD-Si) for producing the n-type spherical solar cell, in which the Si-particles are irradiated directly instead of the cylinder Si-ingot as in the conventional NTD-Si. By using a 'screw', an identical resistivity could be achieved for the Si-particles without a complicated procedure as in the NTD with Si-ingot. Also, the reactivity and neutron flux swing could be kept to a minimum because of the continuous irradiation of the Si-particles. A high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), which is located in Japan, was used as a reference reactor in this study. Neutronic calculations showed that the HTTR has a capability to produce about 40t/EFPY of 10Ωcm resistivity Si-particles for fabrication of the n-type spherical solar cell. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    Good design is an important step towards ensuring operational as well as long term safety of low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. The IAEA has produced this report with the objective of outlining the most important technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities and to provide some examples of the design process in different countries. This guidance has been developed in light of experience gained from the design of existing near surface disposal facilities in a range of Member States. In particular the report provide information on design objective, design requirements, and design phases. The report focuses on: near surface disposal facilities accepting solidified LILW; disposal facilities on or just below the ground surface, where the final protective covering is of the order of a few metres thick; and disposal facilities several tens of metres below the ground surface (including rock cavern type facilities)

  8. The Toulouse pulsed magnet facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses' (LNCMP) is an international user facility providing access to pulsed magnetic fields up to and beyond 60 T. The laboratory disposes of 10 magnet stations equipped with long-pulse magnets operating in the 35-60 T range and a short-pulse system reaching magnetic fields in excess of 70 T. The experimental infrastructure includes various high and low-temperature systems ranging from ordinary flow-type cryostats to dilution refrigerators reaching 50 mK, as well as different types of high-pressure cells. Experimental techniques include magnetization, transport, luminescence, IR-spectroscopy and polarimetry. The LNCMP pursues an extensive in-house research program focussing on all technological and scientific aspects of pulsed magnetic fields. Recent technical developments include the implementation of 60 T rapid-cooling coils, an 80 T prototype, a pulsed dipole magnet for optical investigations of dilute matter and a transportable horizontal access magnet for small angle x-ray scattering experiments. Scientific activities cover a variety of domains, including correlated electron systems, magnetism, semiconductors and nanoscience

  9. Gamma-Ray Irradiation Effects on the Characteristics of New Material P Type 6H-SiC Ni-Schottky Diodes (Application For Nuclear Fuel Facilities)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-Sudjadi; T-Ohshima, N. Iwamoto; S-Hishiki; N-Iwamoto, K. Kawano

    2007-01-01

    Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on electrical characteristics of new material p type 6H-SiC Ni-Schottky diodes were investigated. Ni Schottky diodes fabricated on p type 6H-SiC epi-layer were irradiated with gamma-rays at RT. The electrical characteristics of the diodes were evaluated before and after irradiation. The value of the on-resistance does not change up to 1 MGy, and the value increases with increasing absorbed dose above 1 MGy. For n factor, no significant increase is observed below 500 kGy, however, the value increases above 500 kGy. Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) decreases with increasing absorbed dose. Leakage current tends to increase due to irradiation. (author)

  10. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  11. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  12. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  13. AERIAL DELIVERY DESIGN AND FABRICATION FACILITY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Skilled personnel are equipped to design and develop various prototype airdrop items. This facility has all classes of sewing machines, ranging from lightweight to...

  14. Waste isolation facility description: bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    The waste isolation facility is designed to receive and store three basic types of solidified wastes: high-level wastes, intermediate level high-gamma transuranic waste, and low-gamma transuranic wastes. The facility under consideration in this report is designed for bedded salt at a depth of approximately 1800 ft. The present design for the facility includes an area which would be used initially as a pilot facility to test the viability of the concept, and a larger facility which would constitute the final storage area. The total storage area in the pilot facility is planned to be 77 acres and in the fuel facility 1601 acres. Other areas for shaft operations and access would raise the overall size of the total facility to slightly less than 2,000 acres. The following subjects are discussed in detail: surface facilities, shaft design and characteristics, design and construction of the underground waste isolation facility, ventilation systems, and design requirements and criteria. (LK)

  15. Waste isolation facility description: bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    The waste isolation facility is designed to receive and store three basic types of solidified wastes: high-level wastes, intermediate level high-gamma transuranic waste, and low-gamma transuranic wastes. The facility under consideration in this report is designed for bedded salt at a depth of approximately 1800 ft. The present design for the facility includes an area which would be used initially as a pilot facility to test the viability of the concept, and a larger facility which would constitute the final storage area. The total storage area in the pilot facility is planned to be 77 acres and in the fuel facility 1601 acres. Other areas for shaft operations and access would raise the overall size of the total facility to slightly less than 2,000 acres. The following subjects are discussed in detail: surface facilities, shaft design and characteristics, design and construction of the underground waste isolation facility, ventilation systems, and design requirements and criteria

  16. On-field investigation and process modelling of end-of-life vehicles treatment in the context of Italian craft-type authorized treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzi, Lorenzo; Delogu, Massimo; Giorgetti, Alessandro; Pierini, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The present article analyses the current situation of End-of-Life-of-Vehicles (ELVs) management in Europe, with particular attention on Italian condition. Similarly to other European countries, metal recycling is the main activity of the whole system, but such situation is evolving due to the 2000/53/EC Directive, which sets out targets for Reuse, Recycling and Recovery of ELVs. Due to the relevance of the ELVs problem, in 2008 Italian Ministry of Environment subscribed a framework agreement with competent stakeholders as carmakers, dismantlers, shredders. The main result is an industrial plan to promote (amongst other objectives) technological progress for residual waste (Automotive Shredder Residue-ASR) treatment. According with Italian Trial 2006 analysis about ELVs, Reuse and Recycling rate is currently estimated to be about 81%. At the present time, dismantling plants constitute the first collection points for ELVs; for this reason, during 2009 an investigation has been done over a number of ten Authorized Treatment Facilities (ATFs) operating in Italy. The first step of the analysis was aimed to find out major practices and methods through observations of ATFs activities and interviews to operators. Furthermore, the depollution and dismantling treatments of about 70 different ELVs have been observed and timed in detail over a period of three months. The results included the identification of most relevant critical issues in ELVs treatment, such as distortions between scrapping activities and Directive's regulation, and the assessment of the time and of the resources needed to perform each operation. In the second step of the survey, a process simulation model has been built on the basis of such data. The model was aimed to include the real variability and all the uncertainties that are typical of dismantling activities; it is intended as a tool for process layout planning and for its management. Some control parameters have been introduced; these are able to

  17. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  18. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Evidence for large-magnitude, post-Eocene extension in the northern Shoshone Range, Nevada, and its implications for Carlin-type gold deposits in the lower plate of the Roberts Mountains allochthon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.; John, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The northern Shoshone and Toiyabe Ranges in north-central Nevada expose numerous areas of mineralized Paleozoic rock, including major Carlin-type gold deposits at Pipeline and Cortez. Paleozoic rocks in these areas were previously interpreted to have undergone negligible postmineralization extension and tilting, but here we present new data that suggest major post-Eocene extension along west-dipping normal faults. Tertiary rocks in the northern Shoshone Range crop out in two W-NW–trending belts that locally overlie and intrude highly deformed Lower Paleozoic rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. Tertiary exposures in the more extensive, northern belt were interpreted as subvertical breccia pipes (intrusions), but new field data indicate that these “pipes” consist of a 35.8 Ma densely welded dacitic ash flow tuff (informally named the tuff of Mount Lewis) interbedded with sandstones and coarse volcaniclastic deposits. Both tuff and sedimentary rocks strike N-S and dip 30° to 70° E; the steeply dipping compaction foliation in the tuffs was interpreted as subvertical flow foliation in breccia pipes. The southern belt along Mill Creek, previously mapped as undivided welded tuff, includes the tuff of Cove mine (34.4 Ma) and unit B of the Bates Mountain Tuff (30.6 Ma). These tuffs dip 30° to 50° east, suggesting that their west-dipping contacts with underlying Paleozoic rocks (previously mapped as depositional) are normal faults. Tertiary rocks in both belts were deposited on Paleozoic basement and none appear to be breccia pipes. We infer that their present east tilt is due to extension on west-dipping normal faults. Some of these faults may be the northern strands of middle Miocene (ca. 16 Ma) faults that cut and tilted the 34.0 Ma Caetano caldera ~40° east in the central Shoshone Range (

  20. Gamma irradiation facility: Evaluation of operational modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesanmi, C.A.; Ali, M.S.; Shonowo, O.A.; Akueche, E.C.; Sadare, O.O.; Mustapha, T.K.; Yusuf, U.; Inyanda, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The multipurpose Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at the Nuclear Technology Centre (NTC), Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHETSCO), Abuja, Nigeria is designed as a semi-commercial plant with facilities for research and development (R and D). The design takes into account the different needs of the various research applications which require a wide dose range, a variety of techniques, different product sizes, shapes, mass, volume, densities and types. Programmable doses are used for food irradiation (0.04 - 10 kGy), biological seed mutation breeding and sterile insect technique (STI) (0.01- 5 kGy) sterilization of medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products and packages (up to 25 kGy) and cross-linking of polymers (up to 100 kGy). The six different modes of operations (sample elevator, stationary, swiveling, 2-path inner lane and 2-path outer lane and 4-path line) were evaluated. The dose range, mass range and range of irradiation time practicable were established and advantages for radiation processing of food and industrial products were enumerated for the six modes of operations for the first time

  1. Integrated management of organic wastes for remediation of massive tailings storage facilities under semiarid mediterranean climate type: efficacy of organic pork residues as study case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; España, Helena; Gardeweg, Rosario; Bas, Fernando; Gandarillas, Mónica

    2016-04-01

    Remediation of large surface areas of massive mine wastes, such as tailings storage facilities (TSFs) is challenging, particularly when no topsoils have been stored for the mine closure stage. Worldwide, it has been demonstrated that the use of organic wastes as substrate amendments for remediation of hard rock mine wastes is a useful alternative to topsoils material. In the case of semi-arid climate conditions of north-central Chile, the copper mining industry has generated massive TSF (between 400 ha and 3,000 ha) which needs now to be properly closed according to recently established mine closure regulations. However, in most of the cases, there have been no topsoils savage that facilitate the initial stage of the site remediation. Industrial organic wastes (i.e. biosolids) are found in the area, but their availability is normally below the demand needed for remediation of TSFs and salt content is normally elevated, thus posing salinization risks to the substrate and negative plant growth. We focused on a large organic waste producing industry, the pork industry, whose growth has been restricted due to the limited possibilities for using pig slurries as amendments for croplands in north-central Chile and the strong odor generated, resulting in conflicts with local communities. Incorporation of pig slurries as amendments to post-operative TSFs has been scarcely evaluated at international level (i.e. Spain) and no evaluation at all exists for the solid organic fraction generated from pig slurry treatment plants (PSTP). In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of both pig slurries (PS) and the solid fraction of PSTP (SF-PSTP) as tailings amendment for creating good plant productivity on TSFs located under semi-arid Mediterranean climate conditions in north-central Chile. A short-term greenhouse study was developed. Copper mine tailings were mixed either with PS (0, 40, 80, and 120 m3 ha-1) or SF-PSTP (0, 25, 50 and 75 t ha-1), distributed in 3 L pots, and

  2. Physical Environment of the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    Macdonald, Davis, and Cox (1960), the island of Kauai and the adjacent island of Niihau are lava domes located at the top of one large marine volcanic...tidal current. 35 z Hnalei B. ~ IV* KAUAI 220 NIIHAU MnaP N Koeno P OAHU V, 0 10 20 -3.0 Scale in Nautical Miles Approx. * LEGEND ~-FLOOD CURRENT

  3. Respiratory and protective equipment at a large nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zippler, D.B.

    1975-12-01

    A variety of personal protective equipment is used in a large nuclear facility to protect employees against both nuclear and ordinary industrial materials. Equipment requirements are based on risk evaluation and may range from a minimum of shoe covers to whole body protection by air-supplied plastic suits. Types of equipment are listed and one-year costs are given. Criteria for evaluating and compartmentalizing risks are discussed. Air-supplied suits and hoods are discussed in detail

  4. Structural safety assessment of a tokamak-type fusion facility for a through crack to cause cooling water leakage and plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka

    2004-01-01

    A tokamak-type fusion machine has inherent safety associated with plasma shutdown. A small water leak can cause a plasma disruption although there is another possibility to terminate plasma without disruption. This plasma disruption will induce electromagnetic (EM) forces acting in the vacuum vessel (VV). From a radiological safety viewpoint, the VV is designed to form a physical barrier that encloses tritium and activated dust. If the VV can sustain an unstable fracture by EM forces from a through crack to cause the small leak, the structural safety will be assured and the inherent safety will be demonstrated. Therefore, a systematic approach to assure the structural safety is developed. A new analytical model to evaluate the through crack and leak rate of cooling water is proposed, with verification by experimental leak measurements. Based on the analysis, the critical crack length to terminate plasma is evaluated as about 2mm. On the other hand, the critical crack length for unstable fracture is obtained as about 400 mm. It is concluded that EM forces induced by the small leak to terminate plasma will not cause unstable fracture of the VV; thus the inherent safety is demonstrated. (author)

  5. Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition – a facile method for encapsulation of diverse cell types in silica matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Robert [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Materials Engineering Dept.; Rogelj, Snezna [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Biology Dept.; Harper, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Bioenergy and Biodefense Technologies Dept.; Tartis, Michaelann [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Materials and Chemical Engineering Dept.

    2014-12-12

    In nature, cells perform a variety of complex functions such as sensing, catalysis, and energy conversion which hold great potential for biotechnological device construction. However, cellular sensitivity to ex vivo environments necessitates development of bio–nano interfaces which allow integration of cells into devices and maintain their desired functionality. In order to develop such an interface, the use of a novel Sol-Generating Chemical Vapor into Liquid (SG-CViL) deposition process for whole cell encapsulation in silica was explored. In SG-CViL, the high vapor pressure of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) is utilized to deliver silica into an aqueous medium, creating a silica sol. Cells are then mixed with the resulting silica sol, facilitating encapsulation of cells in silica while minimizing cell contact with the cytotoxic products of silica generating reactions (i.e. methanol), and reduce exposure of cells to compressive stresses induced from silica condensation reactions. Using SG-CVIL, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) engineered with an inducible beta galactosidase system were encapsulated in silica solids and remained both viable and responsive 29 days post encapsulation. By tuning SG-CViL parameters, thin layer silica deposition on mammalian HeLa and U87 human cancer cells was also achieved. Thus, the ability to encapsulate various cell types in either a multi cell (S. cerevisiae) or a thin layer (HeLa and U87 cells) fashion shows the promise of SG-CViL as an encapsulation strategy for generating cell–silica constructs with diverse functions for incorporation into devices for sensing, bioelectronics, biocatalysis, and biofuel applications.

  6. Comparison of tritium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Huang Jinhua

    2002-01-01

    Detailed investigation and research on the source of tritium, tritium production facilities and their comparison are presented based on the basic information about tritium. The characteristics of three types of proposed tritium production facilities, i.e., fissile type, accelerator production tritium (APT) and fusion type, are presented. APT shows many advantages except its rather high cost; fusion reactors appear to offer improved safety and environmental impacts, in particular, tritium production based on the fusion-based neutron source costs much lower and directly helps the development of fusion energy source

  7. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  8. Short-range fundamental forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Baessler, S.; Buchner, M.; Fedorov, V.V.; Hoedl, S.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Pignol, G.; Protasov, K.V.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces; 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments

  9. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Systems management of facilities agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, A.

    1998-01-01

    The various types of facilities agreements, the historical obstacles to implementation of agreement management systems and the new opportunities emerging as industry is beginning to make an effort to overcome these obstacles, are reviewed. Barriers to computerized agreement management systems (lack of consistency, lack of standards, scarcity of appropriate computer software) are discussed. Characteristic features of a model facilities agreement management system and the forces driving the changing attitudes towards such systems (e.g. mergers) are also described

  11. The Generic Data Capture Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Edward B.; Barnes, William P.; Stallings, William H.

    1987-01-01

    The Generic Data Capture Facility, which can provide data capture support for a variety of different types of spacecraft while enabling operations costs to be carefully controlled, is discussed. The data capture functions, data protection, isolation of users from data acquisition problems, data reconstruction, and quality and accounting are addressed. The TDM and packet data formats utilized by the system are described, and the development of generic facilities is considered.

  12. Pumps for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The guide describes how the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls pumps and their motors at nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities. The scope of the control is determined by the Safety Class of the pump in question. The various phases of the control are: (1) review of construction plan, (2) control of manufacturing, and construction inspection, (3) commissioning inspection, and (4) control during operation. STUK controls Safety Class 1, 2 and 3 pumps at nuclear facilities as described in this guide. STUK inspects Class EYT (non-nuclear) pumps separately or in connection with the commissioning inspections of the systems. This guide gives the control procedure and related requirements primarily for centrifugal pumps. However, it is also applied to the control of piston pumps and other pump types not mentioned in this guide

  13. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  14. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  15. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  16. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  17. Efficacy and safety of aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting during the first cycle of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy in Korean patients with a broad range of tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Jang, Joung-Soon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Sung, Yong Lee; Cho, Chi-Heum; Lee, Myung-Ah; Kim, Do-Jin; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Lee, Kil Yeon; Sym, Sun Jin; Lim, Myong Choel; Jung, Hun; Cho, Eun Kim; Min, Kyung Wan

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a 3-day aprepitant regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) during the first cycle of non-anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide (AC)-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) based on government guidelines in Korean patients. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase IV trial (NCT01636947) enrolled adult South Korean patients with a broad range of tumor types who were scheduled to receive a single dose of ≥1 MEC agent. Patients were randomized to a 3-day regimen of aprepitant (aprepitant regimen) or placebo (control regimen) on top of ondansetron plus dexamethasone. The primary and key secondary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of subjects who achieved no vomiting and complete response (CR) during the overall phase. Of the 494 randomized subjects, 480 were included in the modified intent-to-treat population. Response rates for no vomiting and CR in the overall phase were numerically higher for the aprepitant regimen compared with the control regimen groups, but failed to reach statistical significance (no vomiting 77.2 vs 72.0%; p = 0.191; CR 73.4 vs 70.4%; p = 0.458). Both the aprepitant and control regimens were generally well tolerated. A 3-day aprepitant regimen was numerically better but not statistically superior to a control regimen with respect to the achievement of no vomiting or CR during the overall phase in a non-AC MEC Korean population based on government reimbursement guidelines. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01636947 ( https://clinicaltrials.Gov/ct2/show/NCT01636947 ).

  18. Respirator use and its impact on particulate matter exposure in aluminum manufacturing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth; Eisen, Ellen; Cullen, Mark R; Hammond, Katharine

    2018-05-31

    Objectives As part of a large epidemiologic study of particulate health effect, this study aimed to report respirator use among total particulate matter (TPM) samples collected in a major aluminum manufacturing company from 1966‒2013 and evaluate the impact of respirator-use adjustment on exposure estimation. Methods Descriptive analyses were performed to evaluate respirator use across facilities and by facility type and job. Protection factors were applied to TPM measurements for recorded respirator use. Estimated TPM exposure for each job ‒ before and after respirator-use adjustment ‒ were compared to assess the impact of adjustment on exposure estimation. Results Respirator use was noted for 37% of 12 402 full-shift personal TPM samples. Measured TPM concentration ranged from less than detectable to 8220 mg/m3, with arithmetic mean, median and standard deviation being 10.6, 0.87 and 130 mg/m 3 , respectively. Respirators were used more often in smelting facilities (52% of TPM measurements) than in fabricating (17%) or refinery facilities (28%) (Pfacilities were subject to respirator-use adjustment, whereas it was 20% and 70% in fabricating and refinery facilities, respectively. Applying protection factors to TPM measurements significantly reduced estimated job mean TPM exposures and changed exposure categories in these facilities, with larger impact in smelting than fabricating facilities. Conclusions Respirator use varied by time, facility and job. Adjusting respirator use resulted in differential impact in smelting and fabricating facilities, which will need to be incorporated into ongoing epidemiologic studies accordingly.

  19. Dry-type radioactive material storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Yasuharu; Matsuda, Masami; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Ganda, Takao.

    1996-01-01

    A plurality of container tubes containing a plurality of canisters therein are disposed in a canister storage chamber. High level radioactive materials are filled in the canisters in the form of glass solidification materials. The canister storage chamber is divided into two cooling channels by a horizontal partition wall. Each of the container tubes is suspended from a ceiling slab and pass through the horizontal partition wall. Namely, each of the container tubes vertically traverses the cooling channel formed between the ceiling slab and the partition wall and extends to the cooling channel formed between the partition wall and a floor slab. Cooling gases heated in the cooling channel below the partition wall are suppressed from rising to the cooling channel above the partition wall. Therefore, the container tubes are efficiently cooled even in a cooling channel above the partition wall to unify temperature distribution in the axial direction of the container tubes. (I.N.)

  20. Lining facility for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitori, Takashi.

    1992-01-01

    Liner blocks of a dual layer structure made of sodium resistant and heat resistant refractories are laid on the surfaces of the floor and the wall of a concrete building containing pipelines in which coolants are circulated. The gas permeability of materials on one side of the liner block in contact with the surface of the floor or the wall is made greater than that of materials on the other side. Cavities are formed in the central portion of the block for releasing water content evaporated from the surfaces of the floor and the wall to the outside. With such a constitution, since it is no more necessary to weld and join a great number of steel plates, such as steel liners, laying operation is facilitated and the amount of materials required is reduced. In addition, damages of the liner blocks due to pressure elevation can be presented. (T.M.)

  1. Facility of BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji

    1998-01-01

    A condensate filtering device for cleaning condensate flown from a low pressure turbine and a condensate desalting device are connected by way of a condensate pipeline. Control rod drives (CRD) are disposed to the lower portion of BWR. A CRD pump and one end of a CRD feedwater pipeline are connected in series to the upstream of CRD. The other end of the CRD feedwater pipeline is connected to a CRD water taking pipeline branched from the condensate pipeline. Water is taken to the CRD from downstream of the condensate filtering device and upstream of a connecting portion between a low pressure heater drain pipeline and the condensate pipeline. Flow of impurities leached out of the condensate desalting device to the reactor can be suppressed, and rising of temperature of CRD water by the low pressure heater drain water is prevented. In addition, flowing of dissolved oxygen to the CRD system can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  2. Facile and green synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors with sulfate-ion pillared layered hydroxides as a new type of precursor: controlled hydrothermal processing, phase evolution and photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a facile and green route for the synthesis of (La0.95Eu0.052O2S red phosphors of controllable morphologies, with the sulfate-type layered hydroxides of Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O (Ln = La and Eu as a new type of precursor. The technique takes advantage of the fact that the precursor has had the exact Ln:S molar ratio of the targeted phosphor, thus saving the hazardous sulfurization reagents indispensable to traditional synthesis. Controlled hydrothermal processing at 120 °C yielded phase-pure Ln2(OH4SO4centerdot2H2O crystallites in the form of either nanoplates or microprisms, which can both be converted into Ln2O2S phosphor via a Ln2O2SO4 intermediate upon annealing in flowing H2 at a minimum temperature of ~ 700 °C. The nanoplates collapse into relatively rounded Ln2O2S particles while the microprisms retain well their initial morphologies at 1 200 °C, thus yielding two types of red phosphors. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE studies found two distinct charge transfer (CT excitation bands of O2− → Eu3+ at ~ 270 nm and S2− → Eu3+ at ~ 340 nm for the Ln2O2S phosphors, with the latter being stronger and both significantly stronger than the intrinsic intra-f transitions of Eu3+. The two types of phosphors share high similarities in the positions of PLE/PL (photoluminescence bands and both show the strongest red emission at 627 nm (5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ under S2− → Eu3+ CT excitation at 340 nm. The PLE/PL intensities show clear dependence on particle morphology and calcination temperature, which were investigated in detail. Fluorescence decay analysis reveals that the 627 nm red emission has a lifetime of ~ 0.5 ms for both types of the phosphors.

  3. Active use of urban park facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Michael; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    groups of the facilities. Facilities that provide the opportunity for games and playing activities are more used for PA than facilities directed at individual training of strength and fitness. The opportunity for socializing and playing while being physically active seems important for many users...... was mentioned as a key factor when designing facilities. Our results provide important knowledge to architects, planners and policy makers when aiming at designing activity-promoting facilities in UGS. Future studies need to further investigate the use of facilities among specific target groups, particularly......Abstract Urban green spaces (UGS), and more specific a higher number of facilities in UGS, have been positively associated with physical activity (PA). However, more detailed studies of which facilities generate high levels of PA, for which type of users, are relevant as existing knowledge...

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  6. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  7. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  8. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  9. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  10. Efeito do bebedouro e da densidade no desempenho de frangos alojados em alta temperatura Effect of type of water facility and density on performance of broiler reared in hot-climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José H.V. Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do bebedouro pendular (BP e do bebedouro alternativo (BALT, e de diferentes densidades (10 e 14 aves m-2 sobre o desempenho de 240 frangos de corte de 12 a 18, 19 a 38 e de 39 a 46 dias de idade, realizou-se este experimento em condições de temperatura média de 27,6 ºC e umidade relativa de 70,4%, no qual foi utilizado um delineamento inteiramente casualizado em esquema fatorial 2 x 2 (dois bebedouros x duas densidades, resultando em quatro tratamentos constituídos de cinco repetições de 10 aves. O BALT foi desenvolvido com base no conceito de amplo espaço de calha circular e alta profundidade de lâmina de água (5 cm para permitir a imersão do bico e das faces da ave. Na alimentação das aves, foram utilizadas rações comerciais, cujo consumo (CR caiu, enquanto a conversão alimentar (CA melhorou, quando o BALT foi empregado de 12 a 18 dias. Não houve efeito do bebedouro sobre o CR, ganho de peso (GP e CA no período total. A D14 (14 aves m-2 afetou o GP e o CR de 19 a 38 e de 39 a 46 dias e também no período total, mas a CA não foi alterada. O BALT não afeta o desempenho de frangos de corte, podendo ser usado como opção de baixo custo ao BP. A análise econômica pelo índice de rentabilidade relativa mostrou que o BALT e a D14 oferecem 1 e 5,9% de retorno a mais que o BP e a D10, (10 aves m-2 respectivamente.The experiment was undertaken in conditions of average temperature of 27.6 ºC and relative humidity of 70.4%, with the objective to evaluate bell (BD and alternative (ALT water facility and stocking densities (SD of 10 and 14 broilers m-2 (SD10 and SD14, on performance of 240 broiler chickens of 12 to 18, 19 to 38 and 39 to 46 days of age, allotted in boxes in a completely randomized design in 2 x 2 factorial arrangement (two types of drinking facility and two stocking densities, resulting in four treatments, each one with five replications of ten birds. The ALT was developed based on

  11. ATLAS Facility Description Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Moon, Sang Ki; Park, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Yong

    2009-04-01

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS has the same two-loop features as the APR1400 and is designed according to the well-known scaling method suggested by Ishii and Kataoka to simulate the various test scenarios as realistically as possible. It is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating loop-type. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations in detail

  12. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  13. Tonopah Test Range - Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capabilities Test Operations Center Test Director Range Control Track Control Communications Tracking Radars Photos Header Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Tonopah Test Range Top TTR_TOC Tonopah is the testing range of choice for all national security missions. Tonopah Test Range (TTR) provides research and

  14. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  15. Research Facilities | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Facilities Research Facilities NREL's state-of-the-art wind research facilities at the Research Facilities Photo of five men in hard hards observing the end of a turbine blade while it's being tested. Structural Research Facilities A photo of two people silhouetted against a computer simulation of

  16. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented

  17. LLNL superconducting magnets test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R; Martovetsky, N; Moller, J; Zbasnik, J

    1999-09-16

    The FENIX facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was upgraded and refurbished in 1996-1998 for testing CICC superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility was used for superconducting high current, short sample tests for fusion programs in the late 1980s--early 1990s. The new facility includes a 4-m diameter vacuum vessel, two refrigerators, a 40 kA, 42 V computer controlled power supply, a new switchyard with a dump resistor, a new helium distribution valve box, several sets of power leads, data acquisition system and other auxiliary systems, which provide a lot of flexibility in testing of a wide variety of superconducting magnets in a wide range of parameters. The detailed parameters and capabilities of this test facility and its systems are described in the paper.

  18. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  19. Wallac automatic alarm dosimeter type RAD21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, P. H.; Iles, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    The Automatic Alarm Dosimeter type RAD 21 is a batterypowered personal dosemeter and exposure rate alarm monitor, designed to be worn on the body, covering an exposure range from 0.1 to 999.9 mR and has an audible alarm which can be pre-set over the range 1 mR h -1 to 250 mR h -1 . The instrument is designed to measure x- and γ radiation over the energy range 50 keV to 3 MeV. The facilities and controls, the radiation, electrical, environmental and mechanical characteristics, and the manual, have been evaluated. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear Station Facilities Improvement Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooks, R. W.; Lunardini, A. L.; Zaben, O.

    1991-01-01

    An effective facilities improvement program will include a plan for the temporary relocation of personnel during the construction of an adjoining service building addition. Since the smooth continuation of plant operation is of paramount importance, the phasing plan is established to minimize the disruptions in day-to-day station operation and administration. This plan should consider the final occupancy arrangements and the transition to the new structure; for example, computer hookup and phase-in should be considered. The nuclear industry is placing more emphasis on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. In order to do this, more emphasis is placed on operations and maintenance. This results in increased size of managerial, technical and maintenance staffs. This in turn requires improved office and service facilities. The facilities that require improvement may include training areas, rad waste processing and storage facilities, and maintenance facilities. This paper discusses an approach for developing an effective program to plan and implement these projects. These improvement projects can range in magnitude from modifying a simple system to building a new structure to allocating space for a future project. This paper addresses the planning required for the new structures with emphasis on site location, space allocation, and internal layout. Since facility planning has recently been completed by Sargent and Leyden at six U. S. nuclear stations, specific examples from some of those plants are presented. Site planning and the establishment of long-range goals are of the utmost importance when undertaking a facilities improvement program for a nuclear station. A plan that considers the total site usage will enhance the value of both the new and existing facilities. Proper planning at the beginning of the program can minimize costs and maximize the benefits of the program

  1. Optically-based Sensor System for Critical Nuclear Facilities Post-Event Seismic Structural Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petrone, Floriana [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buckle, Ian [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Wu, Suiwen [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coates, Jason [California State Univ., Chico, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has ownership and operational responsibility for a large enterprise of nuclear facilities that provide essential functions to DOE missions ranging from national security to discovery science and energy research. These facilities support a number of DOE programs and offices including the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Science, and Office of Environmental Management. With many unique and “one of a kind” functions, these facilities represent a tremendous national investment, and assuring their safety and integrity is fundamental to the success of a breadth of DOE programs. Many DOE critical facilities are located in regions with significant natural phenomenon hazards including major earthquakes and DOE has been a leader in developing standards for the seismic analysis of nuclear facilities. Attaining and sustaining excellence in nuclear facility design and management must be a core competency of the DOE. An important part of nuclear facility management is the ability to monitor facilities and rapidly assess the response and integrity of the facilities after any major upset event. Experience in the western U.S. has shown that understanding facility integrity after a major earthquake is a significant challenge which, lacking key data, can require extensive effort and significant time. In the work described in the attached report, a transformational approach to earthquake monitoring of facilities is described and demonstrated. An entirely new type of optically-based sensor that can directly and accurately measure the earthquake-induced deformations of a critical facility has been developed and tested. This report summarizes large-scale shake table testing of the sensor concept on a representative steel frame building structure, and provides quantitative data on the accuracy of the sensor measurements.

  2. Facility safeguards at an LEU fuel fabrication facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroi, H.; Osabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    A facility description of a Japanese LEU BWR-type fuel fabrication plant focusing on safeguards viewpoints is presented. Procedures and practices of MC and A plan, measurement program, inventory taking, and the report and record system are described. Procedures and practices of safeguards inspection are discussed and lessons learned from past experiences are reviewed

  3. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  4. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  5. Demonstration poloidal coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masahiko; Kawano, Katumi; Tada, Eisuke

    1989-01-01

    A new compact cryogenic cold compressor was developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with Isikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI) in order to produce the supercritical helium below 4.2 K for Demonstration Poloidal Coils (DPC) which are forced-flow cooled type superconducting pulse coils. This compressor is one of key components for DPC test facility. The cold compressor reduces pressure in liquid helium bath, which contains liquid helium of around 3,000 l, down to 0.5 atm efficiently. Consequently, supercritical helium down to 3.5 K is produced and supplied to the DPC coils. A centrifugal compressor with dynamic gas bearing is selected as a compressor mechanism to realize high adiabatic efficiency and large flow rate. In this performance tests, the compressor was operated for 220 h at saturated condition from 0.5 to 1.0 atm without any failure. High adiabatic efficiency (more than 60 %) is achieved with wide flow range (25-65 g/s) and the design value is fully satisfied. The compressor can rotate up to 80,000 rpm at maximum then the coil supply temperature of supercritical helium is 3.5 K. (author)

  6. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  7. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  8. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  9. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years

  11. Severe accident analysis and management in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golshan, Mina

    2013-01-01

    Within the UK regulatory regime, assessment of risks arising from licensee's activities are expected to cover both normal operations and fault conditions. In order to establish the safety case for fault conditions, fault analysis is expected to cover three forms of analysis: design basis analysis (DBA), probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accident analysis (SAA). DBA should provide a robust demonstration of the fault tolerance of the engineering design and the effectiveness of the safety measures on a conservative basis. PSA looks at a wider range of fault sequences (on a best estimate basis) including those excluded from the DBA. SAA considers significant but unlikely accidents and provides information on their progression and consequences, within the facility, on the site and off site. The assessment of severe accidents is not limited to nuclear power plants and is expected to be carried out for all plant states where the identified dose targets could be exceeded. This paper sets out the UK nuclear regulatory expectation on what constitutes a severe accident, irrespective of the type of facility, and describes characteristics of severe accidents focusing on nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Key rules in assessment of severe accidents as well as the relationship to other fault analysis techniques are discussed. The role of SAA in informing accident management strategies and offsite emergency plans is covered. The paper also presents generic examples of scenarios that could lead to severe accidents in a range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (authors)

  12. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  13. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Michael; Huber, Wolfgang; Pagès, Hervé; Aboyoun, Patrick; Carlson, Marc; Gentleman, Robert; Morgan, Martin T; Carey, Vincent J

    2013-01-01

    We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  14. UGCT: New X-ray radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masschaele, B.C.; Cnudde, V.; Dierick, M.; Jacobs, P.; Hoorebeke, L. van; Vlassenbroeck, J.

    2007-01-01

    The UGCT (University Gent Computer Tomography) facility, a cooperation between the Radiation Physics research group and the Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology research group is a new CT facility providing a large range of scanning possibilities. Formerly a Skyscan 1072 was used to perform X-ray micro-CT scans at the UGCT facility and although this is a very powerful instrument, there were needs for a higher resolution and more flexibility. Therefore, the UCGT facility started the construction of a multidisciplinary micro-CT scanner inside a shielded room with a maximum flexibility of the set-up. The X-ray tube of this high-resolution CT scanner is a state-of-the-art open-type device with dual head: one head for high power micro-CT and one for sub-micro- or also called nano-CT. An important advantage of this scanner is that different detectors can be used to optimize the scanning conditions of the objects under investigation. The entire set-up is built on a large optical table to obtain the highest possible stability. Due to the flexible set-up and the powerful CT reconstruction software 'Octopus', it is possible to obtain the highest quality and the best signal-to-noise of the reconstructed images for each type of sample

  15. UGCT: New X-ray radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masschaele, B.C. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.masschaele@ugent.be; Cnudde, V. [Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Dierick, M. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Jacobs, P. [Department of Geology and Soil Science, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Hoorebeke, L. van; Vlassenbroeck, J. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2007-09-21

    The UGCT (University Gent Computer Tomography) facility, a cooperation between the Radiation Physics research group and the Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology research group is a new CT facility providing a large range of scanning possibilities. Formerly a Skyscan 1072 was used to perform X-ray micro-CT scans at the UGCT facility and although this is a very powerful instrument, there were needs for a higher resolution and more flexibility. Therefore, the UCGT facility started the construction of a multidisciplinary micro-CT scanner inside a shielded room with a maximum flexibility of the set-up. The X-ray tube of this high-resolution CT scanner is a state-of-the-art open-type device with dual head: one head for high power micro-CT and one for sub-micro- or also called nano-CT. An important advantage of this scanner is that different detectors can be used to optimize the scanning conditions of the objects under investigation. The entire set-up is built on a large optical table to obtain the highest possible stability. Due to the flexible set-up and the powerful CT reconstruction software 'Octopus', it is possible to obtain the highest quality and the best signal-to-noise of the reconstructed images for each type of sample.

  16. Review of proposed kaon factory facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of proton accelerator facilities, popularly called ''Kaon Factories,'' have been proposed to extend the intensity frontier from about 1 GeV to higher energies in the range of 15 to 45 GeV. Seven proposed facilities - LAMPF II, TRIUMF II, SIN II, AGS II, KEK, MUNICH, and KYOTO - are reviewed with emphasis on capabilities of the experimental facilities. Costs and the choice of energy and current are also discussed. 7 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Safety of fuel cycle facilities. Topical issues paper no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranguelova, V.; Niehaus, F.; Delattre, D.

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities are in operation. These installations process, use, store and dispose of radioactive material and cover: mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication (including mixed oxide fuel), reactor, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste treatment and waste disposal facilities. For the purposes of this paper, reactors and waste disposal facilities are not considered. The term 'fuel cycle facilities' covers only the remainder of the installations listed above. The IAEA Secretariat maintains a database of fuel cycle facilities in its Member States. Known as the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS), it is available as an on-line service through the Internet. More than 500 such facilities have been reported under this system. The facilities are listed by facility type and operating status. Approximately one third of all of the facilities are located in developing States. About half of all facilities are reported to be operating, of which approximately 40% are operating in developing States. In addition, some 60 facilities are either in the design stage or under construction. Although the radioactive source term for most fuel cycle facilities is lower than the source term for reactors, which results in less severe consequences to the public from potential accidents at these fuel cycle installations, recent events at some fuel cycle facilities have given rise to public concern which has to be addressed adequately by national regulatory bodies and at the international level. Worldwide, operational experience feedback warrants improvements in the safety of these facilities. Some of the hazards are similar for reactor and non-reactor facilities. However, the differences between these installations give rise to specific safety concerns at fuel cycle facilities. In particular, these concerns include: criticality, radiation protection of workers, chemical hazards, fire and explosion hazards. It is recognized

  18. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-01-01

    trials, non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies, interrupted time series, and repeated measures studies that compared different payment methods for outpatient health facilities. We defined outpatient care facilities in this review as facilities that provide health services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation. We only included methods used to transfer funds from the purchaser of healthcare services to health facilities (including groups of individual professionals). These include global budgets, line-item budgets, capitation, fee-for-service (fixed and unconstrained), pay for performance, and mixed payment. The primary outcomes were service provision outcomes, patient outcomes, healthcare provider outcomes, costs for providers, and any adverse effects. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We conducted a structured synthesis. We first categorised the comparisons and outcomes and then described the effects of different types of payment methods on different categories of outcomes. We used a fixed-effect model for meta-analysis within a study if a study included more than one indicator in the same category of outcomes. We used a random-effects model for meta-analysis across studies. If the data for meta-analysis were not available in some studies, we calculated the median and interquartile range. We reported the risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the relative change for continuous outcomes. Main results We included 21 studies from Afghanistan, Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, and the United States of health facilities providing primary health care and mental health care. There were three kinds of payment comparisons. 1) Pay for performance (P4P) combined with some existing payment method (capitation or different kinds of input-based payment) compared to the existing payment method We

  19. Air pollution control system testing at the DOE offgas components test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.B.; Speed, D.; VanPelt, W.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    In 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. A key component of this technical support program includes the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a pilot-scale offgas system test bed. The primary goal for this test facility is to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the planned CIF Air Pollution Control System (APCS). To accomplish this task, the OCTF has been equipped with a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system equipment components and instrumentation. In addition, the OCTF design maximizes the flexibility of APCS operation and facility instrumentation and sampling capabilities permit accurate characterization of all process streams throughout the facility. This allows APCS equipment performance to be evaluated in an integrated system under a wide range of possible operating conditions. This paper summarizes the use of this DOE test facility to successfully demonstrate APCS operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. These types of facilities are needed to permit resolution of technical issues associated with design and operation of systems that treat and dispose combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste throughout and DOE complex

  20. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    high capacity transmission lines, solar arrays, and geothermal 4 | 2014 Sustainable Ranges Report February 2014 Chapter 1: Military Service... geothermal power and associated transmission infrastructure both on- and off-shore will require close attention to ensure the Marine Corps’ access...Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman; offshore wind development proposed south of Pearl Harbor, HI, NAWC China Lake, CA/Nevada Test

  1. NRC regulation of DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.; Edgar, G.; Silverman, D.; Murley, T.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are in for major changes if the DOE follows through on its intentions announced December 20, 1996. The DOE is seeking legislation to establish the NRC as the regulatory agency with jurisdiction over nuclear health, safety, and security at a wide range of DOE facilities. At this stage, it appears that as many as 200 (though not all) DOE facilities would be affected. On March 28, 1997, the NRC officially endorsed taking over the responsibility for regulatory oversight of DOE nuclear facilities as the DOE had proposed, contingent upon adequate funding, staffing resources, and a clear delineation of NRC authority. This article first contrasts the ways in which the NRC and the DOE carry out their basic regulatory functions. Next, it describes the NRC's current authority over DOE facilities and the status of the DOE's initiative to expand that authority. Then, it discusses the basic changes and impacts that can be expected in the regulation of DOE facilities. The article next describes key lessons learned from the recent transition of the GDPs from DOE oversight to NRC regulation and the major regulatory issues that arose in that transition. Finally, some general strategies are suggested for resolving issues likely to arise as the NRC assumes regulatory authority over DOE facilities

  2. Water Supply and Sanitation Facility Accessibility in Off-Campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water Supply and Sanitation Facility Accessibility in Off-Campus Houses ... on drinking water source, rate of illness, type and usage of sanitation facilities. ... wells, unprotected dug wells; while others during the wet season harvest rain water.

  3. Managing highly flexible facilities: an essential complementary asset at risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, Robert; Tierney, R.; Groen, Arend J.; Harms, Rainer; Luizink, M.; Hetherington, D.; Steward, H.; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Linton, Jonathan; Linton, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they require an expensive new type of fabrication facility. Multiple technology production facilities (MTPF) have

  4. LLL transient-electromagnetics-measurement facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deadrick, F.J.; Miller, E.K.; Hudson, H.G.

    1975-01-01

    The operation and hardware of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's transient-electromagnetics (EM)-measurement facility are described. The transient-EM range is useful for determining the time-domain transient responses of structures to incident EM pulses. To illustrate the accuracy and utility of the EM-measurement facility, actual experimental measurements are compared to numerically computed values

  5. Design Standards for School Art Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Art Education Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    "Design Standards for School Art Facilities" is an invaluable resource for any school or school district looking to build new facilities for the visual arts or renovate existing ones. Discover detailed information about spaces for the breadth of media used in the visual arts. Photographs illustrate all types of features including…

  6. Computer Profile of School Facilities Energy Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Felix E.

    This document outlines a computerized management tool designed to enable building managers to identify energy consumption as related to types and uses of school facilities for the purpose of evaluating and managing the operation, maintenance, modification, and planning of new facilities. Specifically, it is expected that the statistics generated…

  7. Explotation of irradiation facilities. Safety handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Franscisco; Melo Crespo, Jose Carlos

    1997-01-01

    At present in the world there are more of 160 gamma radiation facilities and more of 600 electron bean accelerators in operation, at least one in each member state of International Atomic Energy Agency. In this paper is elaborated a Manual with the security criteria to operation of these facility types

  8. 10 CFR 75.10 - Facility information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) The identification of the facility, stating its general character, purpose, nominal capacity (thermal... used for routine purposes; (2) A description of the general arrangement of the facility with reference... information must be submitted: (1) Regarding a modification of a type described in the license or certificate...

  9. Republic of Korea. Closure concept development for LILW disposal facility in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) of Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) is developing near surface disposal concepts for both a rock cavern type disposal facility, and a vault type facility; two types of facility are being considered to provide more options for LILW repository siting. The conceptual design for the vault type facility will be completed in 1999. As a part of conceptual design effort, a preliminary concept for the disposal facility closure has been identified

  10. Compressive laser ranging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Wm Randall; Barber, Zeb W; Renner, Christoffer

    2011-12-15

    Compressive sampling has been previously proposed as a technique for sampling radar returns and determining sparse range profiles with a reduced number of measurements compared to conventional techniques. By employing modulation on both transmission and reception, compressive sensing in ranging is extended to the direct measurement of range profiles without intermediate measurement of the return waveform. This compressive ranging approach enables the use of pseudorandom binary transmit waveforms and return modulation, along with low-bandwidth optical detectors to yield high-resolution ranging information. A proof-of-concept experiment is presented. With currently available compact, off-the-shelf electronics and photonics, such as high data rate binary pattern generators and high-bandwidth digital optical modulators, compressive laser ranging can readily achieve subcentimeter resolution in a compact, lightweight package.

  11. Communication grounding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gye Seong

    1998-06-01

    It is about communication grounding facility, which is made up twelve chapters. It includes general grounding with purpose, materials thermal insulating material, construction of grounding, super strength grounding method, grounding facility with grounding way and building of insulating, switched grounding with No. 1A and LCR, grounding facility of transmission line, wireless facility grounding, grounding facility in wireless base station, grounding of power facility, grounding low-tenton interior power wire, communication facility of railroad, install of arrester in apartment and house, install of arrester on introduction and earth conductivity and measurement with introduction and grounding resistance.

  12. NIST display colorimeter calibration facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven W.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    A facility has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to provide calibration services for color-measuring instruments to address the need for improving and certifying the measurement uncertainties of this type of instrument. While NIST has active programs in photometry, flat panel display metrology, and color and appearance measurements, these are the first services offered by NIST tailored to color-measuring instruments for displays. An overview of the facility, the calibration approach, and associated uncertainties are presented. Details of a new tunable colorimetric source and the development of new transfer standard instruments are discussed.

  13. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  14. Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ECHO provides integrated compliance and enforcement information for about 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide. Its features range from simple to advanced,...

  15. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years.

  16. AOV Facility Tool/Facility Safety Specifications -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Develop and maintain authorizing documents that are standards that facilities must follow. These standards are references of FAA regulations and are specific to the...

  17. Wide range neutron detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todt, W.H. Sr.

    1978-01-01

    A neutron detection system for reactor control is described which is operable over a wide range of neutron flux levels. The system includes a fission type ionization chamber neutron detector, means for gamma and alpha signal compensation, and means for operating the neutron detector in the pulse counting mode for low neutron flux levels, and in the direct current mode for high neutron flux levels

  18. Figure 5, Biofuel refinery facility locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This workbook contains the locations and types of current and anticipated biofuel feedstock processing facilities assumed under the simulated scenarios. This dataset...

  19. Mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by short- and long-range glycopeptide substrate recognition that varies among members of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revoredo, Leslie; Wang, Shengjun; Bennett, Eric Paul

    2016-01-01

    A large family of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) initiates and defines sites of mucin-type Ser/Thr-O-GalNAc glycosylation. Family members have been classified into peptide- and glycopeptide-preferring subfamilies, although both families possess variable activities agains...

  20. Astrophysics at nTOF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliente, G.; Colonna, N.; Maronne, S.; Terlizzi, R.; Abondanno, U.; Fujii, K.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Belloni, F.; Aerts, G.; Berthoumieux, E.; Andriamonje, S.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Alvarez, H.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Embid-Segura, M.; Guerrero, C.; Martinez, T.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Karamanis, D.; Audouin, L.; Dillman, I.; Heil, M.; Kappeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wissak, K.; Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M.T.; Baumann, P.; David, S.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Lukic, S.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Bisterzo, S.; Ferrant, L.; Gallino, R.; Calvino, F.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Calviani, M.; Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P.; Capote, R.; Mengoni, A.; Capote, R.; Lozano, M.; Quesada, J.; Carrapico, C.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Tavora, L.; Vaz, P.; Cennini, P.; Chiaveri, E.; Dahlfors, M.; Kadi, Y.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wendler, H.; Chepel, V.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Goncalves, I.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Neves, F.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Dominga-Pardo, C.; Tain, J.L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Lamboudis, C.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Furman, W.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Reifarth, R.; Igashira, M.; Koehler, P.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Plomen, A.; Rullhusen, P.; Rauscher, T.; Rubbia, C.; Ventura, A.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron time of flight (n T OF) facility at CERN is a neutron spallation source, its white neutron energy spectrum ranges from thermal to several GeV, covering the full energy range of interest for nuclear astrophysics, in particular for measurements of the neutron capture cross-section required in s-process nucleosynthesis. This contribution gives an overview on the astrophysical program made at n T OF facility, the results and the implications will be considered.

  1. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrick, T.E.; Coobs, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of certain DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 75 facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. This paper describes the scope of the ORNL program and outlines the decommissioning activities currently underway, including a brief description of the decontamination techniques being utilized. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  3. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  4. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  5. Autonomous Target Ranging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz

    2003-01-01

    of this telescope, a fast determination of the range to and the motion of the detected targets are important. This is needed in order to prepare the future observation strategy for each target, i.e. when is the closest approach where imaging will be optimal. In order to quickly obtain such a determination two...... ranging strategies are presented. One is an improved laser ranger with an effective range with non-cooperative targets of at least 10,000 km, demonstrated in ground tests. The accuracy of the laser ranging will be approximately 1 m. The laser ranger may furthermore be used for trajectory determination...... of nano-gravity probes, which will perform direct mass measurements of selected targets. The other is triangulation from two spacecraft. For this method it is important to distinguish between detection and tracking range, which will be different for Bering since different instruments are used...

  6. Soliton microcomb range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myoung-Gyun; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-based range measurement systems are important in many application areas, including autonomous vehicles, robotics, manufacturing, formation flying of satellites, and basic science. Coherent laser ranging systems using dual-frequency combs provide an unprecedented combination of long range, high precision, and fast update rate. We report dual-comb distance measurement using chip-based soliton microcombs. A single pump laser was used to generate dual-frequency combs within a single microresonator as counterpropagating solitons. We demonstrated time-of-flight measurement with 200-nanometer precision at an averaging time of 500 milliseconds within a range ambiguity of 16 millimeters. Measurements at distances up to 25 meters with much lower precision were also performed. Our chip-based source is an important step toward miniature dual-comb laser ranging systems that are suitable for photonic integration.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  8. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  9. The prevalence of hypertension in relation with the normal albuminuria range in type 2 diabetes mellitus within the South Korean population: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Koh-Eun; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Cho, Kyung-Hwan; Han, Kyung-Do; Park, Yong-Gyu; Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Yang-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    The coexistence of hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. In some studies, normal albuminuria has also been associated with cardiovascular disease and HTN. Therefore, we examined the relationships between albuminuria and the prevalence of HTN and its control rate in type 2 DM patients. We analyzed data from the 2011-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and 1188 subjects with type 2 DM were included in the study. We divided albuminuria into 3 albuminuria tertiles (T): T1: hypertension had more ACR T3 (odds ratio=2.018, 95% confidence interval=1.445-2.818) than subjects without HTN. Subjects with controlled HTN had less ACR T3 than subjects without controlled HTN (odds ratio=0.566, 95% confidence interval=0.384-0.836). When, we redivided albuminuria by Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction ranges. Annual review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.C.; Tharp, W.H.; Spiro, P.S.; Keng, K.; Angastiniotis, M.; Hachey, L.T.

    1988-01-01

    Prediction ranges equip the planner with one more tool for improved assessment of the outcome of a course of action. One of their major uses is in financial evaluations, where corporate policy requires the performance of uncertainty analysis for large projects. This report gives an overview of the uses of prediction ranges, with examples; and risks and uncertainties in growth, inflation, and interest and exchange rates. Prediction ranges and standard deviations of 80% and 50% probability are given for various economic indicators in Ontario, Canada, and the USA, as well as for foreign exchange rates and Ontario Hydro interest rates. An explanatory note on probability is also included. 23 tabs.

  11. The Australian National Proton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A.; Bishop, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Protons have been used in the treatment of cancer since 1954 and over 30,000 patients have been treated around the world. Their precise dose distribution allows the treatment of small tumours in critical locations such as the base of skull and orbit and is an alternative to stereotactic radiotherapy in other sites. With the development of hospital-based systems in the 1990's, common tumours such as prostate, breast and lung cancer can now also be treated using simple techniques. The therapeutic ratio is improved as the dose to the tumour can be increased while sparing normal tissues. The well defined high dose region and low integral dose compared with photon treatments is a particular advantage in children and other situations where long-term survival is expected and when used in combination with chemotherapy. In January 2002, the NSW Health Department initiated a Feasibility Study for an Australian National Proton Facility. This Study will address the complex medical, scientific, engineering, commercial and legal issues required to design and build a proton facility in Australia. The Facility will be mainly designed for patient treatment but will also provide facilities for biological, physical and engineering research. The proposed facility will have a combination of fixed and rotating beams with an energy range of 70-250 MeV. Such a centre will enable the conduct of randomised clinical trials and a comparison with other radiotherapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Cost-utility comparisons with other medical treatments will also be made and further facilities developed if the expected benefit is confirmed. When patients are not being treated, the beam will be available for commercial and research purposes. This presentation will summarize the progress of the Study and discuss the important issues that need to be resolved before the Facility is approved and constructed

  12. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Junker, L.; Karol, R.C.; Lobner, P.R.; Goldman, L.A.

    1981-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE Order 5480.1, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities. The guidance and criteria provided are directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. These general guidelines may have limited applicability to subsurface facilities such as waste repositories. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines

  13. Sodium Fire Demonstration Facility Design and Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Youngil; Kim, Jong-Man; Lee, Jewhan; Hong, Jonggan; Yeom, Sujin; Cho, Chungho; Jung, Min-Hwan; Gam, Da-Young; Jeong, Ji-Young

    2014-01-01

    Although sodium has good characteristics such as high heat transfer rate and stable nuclear property, it is difficult to manage because of high reactivity. Sodium is solid at the room temperature and it easily reacts with oxygen resulting in fire due to the reaction heat. Thus, sodium must be stored in a chemically stable place, i.e., an inert gas-sealed or oil filled vessel. When a sodium fire occurs, the Na 2 O of white fume is formed. It is mainly composed of Na 2 O 2 , NaOH, and Na 2 CO 3 , ranging from 0.1 to several tens of micrometers in size. It is known that the particle size increases by aggregation during floating in air. Thus, the protection method is important and should be considered in the design and operation of a sodium system. In this paper, sodium fire characteristics are described, and the demonstration utility of outbreak of sodium fire and its extinguishing is introduced. In this paper, sodium fire characteristics and a demonstration facility are described. The introduced sodium fire demonstration facility is the only training device used to observe a sodium fire and extinguish it domestically. Furthermore, the type of sodium fire will be diversified with the enhancement of the utility. It is expected that this utility will contribute to experience in the safe treatment of sodium by the handlers

  14. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  16. Antenna Pattern Range (APR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheAntenna Pattern Range (APR)features a non-metallic arch with a trolley to move the transmit antenna from the horizon to zenith. At the center of the ground plane,...

  17. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  18. EV range sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostafew, C. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation included a sensitivity analysis of electric vehicle components on overall efficiency. The presentation provided an overview of drive cycles and discussed the major contributors to range in terms of rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; motor efficiency; and vehicle mass. Drive cycles that were presented included: New York City Cycle (NYCC); urban dynamometer drive cycle; and US06. A summary of the findings were presented for each of the major contributors. Rolling resistance was found to have a balanced effect on each drive cycle and proportional to range. In terms of aerodynamic drive, there was a large effect on US06 range. A large effect was also found on NYCC range in terms of motor efficiency and vehicle mass. figs.

  19. Optical properties of infrared FELs from the FELI Facility II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, K.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E. [Free Electron Laser Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility II has succeeded in infrared FEL oscillation at 1.91 {mu} m using a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in February 27, 1995. The FELI Facility II is composed of a 3-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.8cm, N=78, Km a x=1.4, gap length {ge}20mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 1-5{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 40-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  20. Research reactor facilities, recent developments at Imperial College, London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, S.J.; Goddard, A.J.H.; O Connell, J.

    1998-01-01

    The 100 kW CONSORT pool-type reactor is now the only Research Reactor in the UK. Because of its strategic importance, Imperial College is continuing and accelerating a programme of refurbishment of the control system, and planning for a further fuel charge. These plans are described and the progress to date discussed. To this end, a description of the enhanced Safety Case being written is provided here and refueling plans discussed. The current range of facilities available is described, and future plans highlighted. (author)

  1. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes and large explosions. Therefore, the displacement due to earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters

  2. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  3. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  4. Water types and their relaxation behavior in partially rehydrated CaFe-mixed binary oxide obtained from CaFe-layered double hydroxide in the 155-298 K temperature range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugris, Valéria; Haspel, Henrik; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Sipiczki, Mónika; Sipos, Pál; Pálinkó, István

    2013-10-29

    Heat-treated CaFe-layered double hydroxide samples were equilibrated under conditions of various relative humidities (11%, 43% and 75%). Measurements by FT-IR and dielectric relaxation spectroscopies revealed that partial to full reconstruction of the layered structure took place. Water types taking part in the reconstruction process were identified via dielectric relaxation measurements either at 298 K or on the flash-cooled (to 155 K) samples. The dynamics of water molecules at the various positions was also studied by this method, allowing the flash-cooled samples to warm up to 298 K.

  5. Subsidence characterization and modeling for engineered facilities in Arizona, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Rucker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several engineered facilities located on deep alluvial basins in southern Arizona, including flood retention structures (FRS and a coal ash disposal facility, have been impacted by up to as much as 1.8 m of differential land subsidence and associated earth fissuring. Compressible basin alluvium depths are as deep as about 300 m, and historic groundwater level declines due to pumping range from 60 to more than 100 m at these facilities. Addressing earth fissure-inducing ground strain has required alluvium modulus characterization to support finite element modeling. The authors have developed Percolation Theory-based methodologies to use effective stress and generalized geo-material types to estimate alluvium modulus as a function of alluvium lithology, depth and groundwater level. Alluvial material modulus behavior may be characterized as high modulus gravel-dominated, low modulus sand-dominated, or very low modulus fines-dominated (silts and clays alluvium. Applied at specific aquifer stress points, such as significant pumping wells, this parameter characterization and quantification facilitates subsidence magnitude modeling at its' sources. Modeled subsidence is then propagated over time across the basin from the source(s using a time delay exponential decay function similar to the soil mechanics consolidation coefficient, only applied laterally. This approach has expanded subsidence modeling capabilities on scales of engineered facilities of less than 2 to more than 15 km.

  6. An Overview of the Antenna Measurement Facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Kevin M.; Anzic, Godfrey; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Zaman, Afroz J.

    2002-10-01

    For the past twenty years, the NASA Glenn Research Center (formerly Lewis Research Center) in Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and maintained facilities for the evaluation of antennas. This effort has been in support of the work being done at the center in the research and development of space communication systems. The wide variety of antennas that have been considered for these systems resulted in a need for several types of antenna ranges at the Glenn Research Center. Four ranges, which are part of the Microwave Systems Laboratory, are the responsibility of the staff of the Applied RF Technology Branch. A general description of these ranges is provided in this paper.

  7. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  8. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  9. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  10. Rocketball Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test facility offers the capability to emulate and measure guided missile radar cross-section without requiring flight tests of tactical missiles. This facility...

  11. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  12. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  13. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  14. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  15. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  16. Neighbourhood facilities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper these are referred to as ‘Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability’. Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability (NFS) are initiatives undertaken by individuals and communities to build local sustainable systems which not only improve...

  17. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  18. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  19. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  20. Facility design: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    The design of shielded chemical processing facilities for handling plutonium is discussed. The TRU facility is considered in particular; its features for minimizing the escape of process materials are listed. 20 figures

  1. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    and several natural special cases thereof. The rst special case is known as range median, which arises when k is xed to b(j 􀀀 i + 1)=2c. The second case, denoted prex selection, arises when i is xed to 0. Finally, we also consider the bounded rank prex selection problem and the xed rank range......Range selection is the problem of preprocessing an input array A of n unique integers, such that given a query (i; j; k), one can report the k'th smallest integer in the subarray A[i];A[i+1]; : : : ;A[j]. In this paper we consider static data structures in the word-RAM for range selection...... selection problem. In the former, data structures must support prex selection queries under the assumption that k for some value n given at construction time, while in the latter, data structures must support range selection queries where k is xed beforehand for all queries. We prove cell probe lower bounds...

  2. Range-Measuring Video Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard T.; Briscoe, Jeri M.; Corder, Eric L.; Broderick, David

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors of a proposed type would perform the functions of both electronic cameras and triangulation- type laser range finders. That is to say, these sensors would both (1) generate ordinary video or snapshot digital images and (2) measure the distances to selected spots in the images. These sensors would be well suited to use on robots that are required to measure distances to targets in their work spaces. In addition, these sensors could be used for all the purposes for which electronic cameras have been used heretofore. The simplest sensor of this type, illustrated schematically in the upper part of the figure, would include a laser, an electronic camera (either video or snapshot), a frame-grabber/image-capturing circuit, an image-data-storage memory circuit, and an image-data processor. There would be no moving parts. The laser would be positioned at a lateral distance d to one side of the camera and would be aimed parallel to the optical axis of the camera. When the range of a target in the field of view of the camera was required, the laser would be turned on and an image of the target would be stored and preprocessed to locate the angle (a) between the optical axis and the line of sight to the centroid of the laser spot.

  3. Establishment and Operation of User Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kye Ryung; Park, B. S.; Lim, Y. K.; Lee, S. K.; Jung, J. P.

    2005-08-01

    The final goal of this project is to establish the proton beam user facility which can offer the suitable proton beam for the user's demand. In the first phase we developed the key technologies that were required for the establishment of 20MeV and 100MeV proton user facilities. The user's demand survey was also achieved, and the test user facility was established on the results of the demand survey. Using the test facility, the users performed their pilot studies. Now, we have finished the conceptual design for 20MeV proton user facility. During the first phase we performed the user's demand survey and produced many materials related to the proton beam utilizations in domestic or abroad. The survey results were reflected on the establishment of the test user facility and the conceptual design of 20MeV/100MeV proton beam user facilities. We have developed the key technologies which concern to beam energy control, flux control, uniform irradiation, dose and uniformity measurement, proton energy measurement, SOBP(Spread-out Bragg Peak) system using a rotating range modulator, and carried out the conceptual design of 20MeV proton user facility. The test user facility has been constructed and operated for both verifying the developed key technologies and performing the user's preliminary experiments. 45MeV low flux user facility was constructed in 2003 and has performed a lot of irradiation experiments. The development of 1.8MeV test user facility was completed. Also the low energy user facility that KAERI kept was upgraded and used for many users. Therefore, we provided our users with various beams. On the other hand, the following activities were carried out, such as, inviting the oversea researchers, giving support to users to use the beam in domestic and abroad, discussing the beam utilization technologies by visiting the foreign user facilities, etc

  4. Nuclear power generation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Mitsuji.

    1996-01-01

    Main steams are introduced from a moisture separation device for removing moisture content of the main steams to a low pressure turbine passing through a cross-around pipe. A condensate desalter comprising a mixed floor-type desalting tower using granular ion exchange resins is disposed at the downstream of the main condensator by way of condensate pipelines, and a feedwater heater is disposed at the downstream. Structural members of the main condensator are formed by weather proof steels. Low alloy steels are used partially or entirely for the cross-around pipe, gas extraction pipelines, heat draining pipelines, inner structural members other than pipelines in the feedwater heater, and the body and the inner structural members of the moisture separator. Titanium or a titanium alloy is used for the pipelines in the main condensator. With such a constitution, BWR type reactor facilities, in which the concentration of cruds inflown to the condensate cleanup system is reduced to simplify the condensate cleanup device can be obtained. (I.N.)

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Moeller, M.P.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum three years. A variety of liquid wastes are generated in processing treatment, and disposal operations throughout the Hanford Site. The Tank Farms Project serves a major role in Hanford Site waste management activities as the temporary repository for these wastes. Stored wastes include hazardous components regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and as by-product material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. A total of 177 single- and double-shell tanks (SST and DST) have been constructed in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site. These facilities were constructed to various designs from 1943 to 1986. The Tank Farms Project is comprised of these tanks along with various transfer, receiving, and treatment facilities

  6. Long-range research plan: FY 1984-FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Information is presented concerning planned research activities related to LOCA and transients; LOFT; accident evaluation and mitigation; LMFBR and HTGR type reactors; facility operations and safeguards; waste management; siting and environment; and system and reliability analysis

  7. INEL D&D long-range plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland, R.J.; Kenoyer, D.J.; LaBuy, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This Long-Range Plan presents the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) Program planning status for facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan provides a general description of the D&D Program objectives, management criteria, and policy; discusses current activities; and documents the INEL D&D Program cost and schedule estimate projections for the next 15 years. Appendices are included that provide INEL D&D project historical information, a comprehensive descriptive summary of each current D&D surplus facility, and a summary database of all INEL contaminated facilities awaiting or undergoing the facility transition process.

  8. INEL D ampersand D long-range plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckland, R.J.; Kenoyer, D.J.; LaBuy, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This Long-Range Plan presents the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D ampersand D) Program planning status for facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The plan provides a general description of the D ampersand D Program objectives, management criteria, and policy; discusses current activities; and documents the INEL D ampersand D Program cost and schedule estimate projections for the next 15 years. Appendices are included that provide INEL D ampersand D project historical information, a comprehensive descriptive summary of each current D ampersand D surplus facility, and a summary database of all INEL contaminated facilities awaiting or undergoing the facility transition process

  9. Facility or Facilities? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viso, M.

    2018-04-01

    The management of the martian samples upon arrival on the Earth will require a lot of work to ensure a safe life detection and biohazard testing during the quarantine. This will induce a sharing of the load between several facilities.

  10. Overview of linac applications at future radioactive beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest worldwide in the research which could be done at a next generation, advanced radioactive beam facility. To generate high quality, intense beams of accelerated radionuclides via the open-quotes isotope separator on-lineclose quotes (ISOL) method requires two major accelerator components: a high power (100 kW) driver device to produce radionuclides in a production target/ion source complex, and a secondary beam accelerator to produce beams of radioactive ions up to energies on the order of 10 MeV per nucleon over a broad mass range. In reviewing the technological challenges of such a facility, several types of modem linear accelerators appear well suited. This paper reviews the properties of the linacs currently under construction and those proposed for future facilities for use either as the driver device or the radioactive beam post-accelerator. Other choices of accelerators, such as cyclotrons, for either the driver or secondary beam devices of a radioactive beam complex will also be compared. Issues to be addressed for the production accelerator include the choice of ion beam types to be used for cost-effective production of radionuclides. For the post-accelerator the choice of ion source technology is critical and dictates the charge-to-mass requirements at the injection stage

  11. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  12. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...

  13. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...

  14. Range-clustering queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamsen, M.; de Berg, M.T.; Buchin, K.A.; Mehr, M.; Mehrabi, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    In a geometric k -clustering problem the goal is to partition a set of points in R d into k subsets such that a certain cost function of the clustering is minimized. We present data structures for orthogonal range-clustering queries on a point set S : given a query box Q and an integer k>2 , compute

  15. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunning, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Collaborative studies are in progress in the U.K. between the U.K.A.E.A., the Generating Boards and other outside bodies, to identify the development issues and practical aspects of decommissioning redundant nuclear facilities. The various types of U.K.A.E.A. experimental reactors (D.F.R., W.A.G.R , S.G.H.W.R.) in support of the nuclear power development programme, together with the currently operating commercial 26 Magnox reactors in 11 stations, totalling some 5 GW will be retired before the end of the century and attention is focussed on these. The actual timing of withdrawal from service will be dictated by development programme requirements in the case of experimental reactors and by commercial and technical considerations in the case of electricity production reactors. Decommissioning studies have so far been confined to technical appraisals including the sequence logic of achieving specific objectives and are based on the generally accepted three stage progression. Stage 1, which is essentially a defuelling and coolant removal operation, is an interim phase. Stage 2 is a storage situation, the duration of which will be influenced by environmental pressures or economic factors including the re-use of existing sites. Stage 3, which implies removal of all active and non-active waste material and returning the site to general use, must be the ultimate objective. The engineering features and the radioactive inventory of the system must be assessed in detail to avoid personnel or environmental hazards during Stage 2. These factors will also influence decisions on the degree of Stage 2 decommissioning and its duration, bearing in mind that for Stage 3 activation may govern the waste disposal route and the associated radiation man-rem exposure during dismantling. Ideally, planning for decommissioning should be considered at the design stage of the facility. An objective of present studies is to identify features which would assist decommissioning of future systems

  16. Assessing School Facilities in Public Secondary Schools in Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated school facilitates in public secondary schools in Delta State, Nigeria. The purpose of the study was to find out the state of the facilities, the types of maintenance carried out on the facilities by school administrators, the factors encouraging school facilities depreciation and the roles of school ...

  17. 14 CFR 21.43 - Location of manufacturing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of manufacturing facilities. 21.43... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.43 Location of manufacturing facilities... location of the manufacturer's facilities places no undue burden on the FAA in administering applicable...

  18. A systems approach to nuclear facility monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argo, P.E.; Doak, J.E.; Howse, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Sensor technology for use in nuclear facility monitoring has reached an advanced stage of development. Research on where to place these sensors in a facility and how to combine their outputs in a meaningful fashion does not appear to be keeping pace. In this paper, the authors take a global view of the problem where sensor technology is viewed as only one piece of a large puzzle. Other pieces of this puzzle include the optimal location and type of sensors used in a specific facility, the rate at which sensors record information, and the risk associated with the materials/processes at a facility. If the data are analyzed off-site, how will they be transmitted? Is real-time analysis necessary? Is one monitoring only the facility itself, or might one also monitor the processing that occurs there (e.g., tank levels and concentrations)? How is one going to combine the outputs from the various sensors to give us an accurate picture of the state of the facility? This paper will not try to answer all these questions, but rather it will attempt to stimulate thought in this area by formulating a systems approach to the problem demonstrated by a prototype system and a system proposed for an actual facility. The focus will be on the data analysis aspect of the problem. Future work in this area should focus on recommendations and guidelines for a monitoring system based upon the type of facility and processing that occurs there

  19. Long-range current flow and percolation in Rabbits-type conductors and the relative importance of out-of-plane and in-plane mis orientations in determining J {sub c}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States)]. E-mail: goyala@ornl.gov; Rutter, N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States); University of Cambridge, Pembroke St., Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Cantoni, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States); Lee, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6116 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Calculations of long-range current flow using an advanced percolation model show that with the presently observed texture in RABiTS substrates, the dependence of J {sub c} on length as a function of width is greatly reduced. Furthermore, this dependence becomes almost negligible in applied fields. These results suggest that sub-division of a wide conductor into narrow filaments should be possible without loss in J {sub c}. The relative importance of the out-of-plane texture in affecting intergranular J {sub c} was also explored by fabricating RABiTS substrates with different out-of-plane textures but approximately the same in-plane texture. This was accomplished by using TiN as a seed layer for which significant sharpening of the out-of-plane texture is observed. Similar J {sub c} was found for samples with differing out-of-plane texture but almost the same in-plane texture. Finally, separation of the total misorientation in GB networks into in-plane and out-of-plane misorientations using manipulations in Rodrigues space shows that J {sub c} correlates best with in-plane texture.

  20. Enhancing Efficiency of Safeguards at Facilities that are Shutdown or Closed-Down, including those being Decommissioned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Colley, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards involves verification activities at a wide range of facilities in a variety of operational phases (e.g., under construction, start-up, operating, shutdown, closed-down, and decommissioned). Safeguards optimization for each different facility type and operational phase is essential for the effectiveness of safeguards implementation. The IAEA’s current guidance regarding safeguards for the different facility types in the various lifecycle phases is provided in its Design Information Examination (DIE) and Verification (DIV) procedure. 1 Greater efficiency in safeguarding facilities that are shut down or closed down, including those being decommissioned, could allow the IAEA to use a greater portion of its effort to conduct other verification activities. Consequently, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of International Nuclear Safeguards sponsored this study to evaluate whether there is an opportunity to optimize safeguards approaches for facilities that are shutdown or closed-down. The purpose of this paper is to examine existing safeguards approaches for shutdown and closed-down facilities, including facilities being decommissioned, and to seek to identify whether they may be optimized.

  1. Using GIFTS on the Cray-1 for the large coil test facility test: stand design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudry, T.V.; Gray, W.H.

    1981-06-01

    The GIFTS finite element program has been used extensively throughout the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand design analysis. Effective use has been made of GIFTS both as a preprocessor to other finite element programs and as a complete structural analysis package. The LCTF test stand design involved stress analysis ranging from simple textbook-type problems to very complicated three-dimensional structural problems. Two areas of the design analysis are discussed

  2. Agriculture products as source of radionuclides and some monitoring principles of agriculture near nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksakhin, R.M.; Korneev, N.A.; Panteleev, L.I.; Shukhovtsev, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    Migration of radionuclides into agriculture products in regions adjoining the nuclear facilities depends on a large number of factors. Among them is the complex of ecological conditions: meteorological factors, type of soils etc., as well as biological peculiarities of agriculture plants and animals. It is possible to control the radionuclide content administered to man's organism with agriculture products changing large branches of agriculture and varying within the range of seprate branches of industry, taking into account the most effective ways of radionuclide pathways

  3. Simulated physical inventory verification exercise at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, D.; Augustson, R.

    1985-01-01

    A physical inventory verification (PIV) was simulated at a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility. Safeguards inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducted the PIV exercise to test inspection procedures under ''realistic but relaxed'' conditions. Nondestructive assay instrumentation was used to verify the plutonium content of samples covering the range of material types from input powders to final fuel assemblies. This paper describes the activities included in the exercise and discusses the results obtained. 5 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  4. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.; Haffner, D.R.; Schneider, K.J.; Short, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational

  5. Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

    2002-12-01

    facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total

  6. Extended Range Intercept Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    1988). Desert bighorn ewes with lambs show a stronger response than do groups of only rams, only ewes, or mixed groups of adults (Miller and Smith...1985). While all startle events may affect desert bighorns, those occurring during the lambing period (February-April) would represent the highest...35807 U.S. Army Pueblo Depot Activity SDSTE-PU-EE Pueblo, CO 81001-5000 U.S. Army White Sands Missile Range STEWS -EL-N White Sands, NM 88002-5076

  7. ORANGE: RANGE OF BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Parle Milind; Chaturvedi Dev

    2012-01-01

    No wonder that oranges are one of the most popular fruits in the world. Orange (citrus sinensis) is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties throughout the world. From times immemorial, whole Orange plant including ripe and unripe fruits, juice, orange peels, leaves and flowers are used as a traditional medicine. Citrus sinensis belongs to the family Rutaceae. The fruit is a fleshy, indehiscent, berry that ranges widely in size from 4 cm to 12 cm. The major medicinal proper...

  8. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  9. Effective removal of a range of Ti/Ri plasmids using a pBBR1-type vector having a repABC operon and a lux reporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinji; Sakai, Ayako; Agustina, Vita; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2018-02-01

    Ti and Ri plasmids of pathogenic Agrobacterium strains are stably maintained by the function of a repABC operon and have been classified into four incompatibility groups, namely, incRh1, incRh2, incRh3, and incRh4. Removal of these plasmids from their bacterial cells is an important step in determining strain-specific virulence characteristics and to construct strains useful for transformation. Here, we developed two powerful tools to improve this process. We first established a reporter system to detect the presence and absence of Ti/Ri plasmids in cells by using an acetosyringone (AS)-inducible promoter of the Ti2 small RNA and luxAB from Vibrio harveyi. This system distinguished a Ti/Ri plasmid-free cell colony among plasmid-harboring cell colonies by causing the latter colonies to emit light in response to AS. We then constructed new "Ti/Ri eviction plasmids," each of which carries a repABC from one of four Ti/Ri plasmids that belonged to incRh1, incRh2, incRh3, and incRh4 groups in the suicidal plasmid pK18mobsacB and in a broad-host-range pBBR1 vector. Introduction of the new eviction plasmids into Agrobacterium cells harboring the corresponding Ti/Ri plasmids led to Ti/Ri plasmid-free cells in every incRh group. The Ti/Ri eviction was more effective by plasmids with the pBBR1 backbone than by those with the pK18mobsacB backbone. Furthermore, the highly stable cryptic plasmid pAtC58 in A. tumefaciens C58 was effectively evicted by the introduction of a pBBR1 vector containing the repABC of pAtC58. These results indicate that the set of pBBR1-repABC plasmids is a powerful tool for the removal of stable rhizobial plasmids.

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayer, J.E.; Clark, A.T.; Loysen, P.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Mishima, J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gregory, W.S.; Nichols, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  11. Nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The information brochure is a survey of installed nuclear facilities in Germany, presenting on one page each a picture of a nuclear power plant together with the main relevant data, or of other type of nuclear facilities belonging to the nuclear fuel cycle (such as fuel production plant, fuel production plant, fuel element storage facilities, and facilities for spent fuel and waste management). (UA) [de

  12. Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Critical Experiments Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been in existence for 45 years. In that period of time, thousands of measurements have been made on assemblies containing every fissionable material in various configurations that included bare metal and compounds of the nitrate, sulfate, fluoride, carbide, and oxide. Techniques developed or applied include Rossi-α, source-jerk, rod oscillator, and replacement measurements. Many of the original measurements of delay neutrons were performed at the site, and a replica of the Hiroshima weapon was operated at steady state to assist in evaluating the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons. Solid, liquid, and gas fissioning systems were run at critical. Operation of this original critical facility has demonstrated the margin of safety that can be obtained through remote operation. Eight accidental excursions have occurred on the site, ranging from 1.5 x 10 16 to 1.2 x 10 17 fissions, with no significant exposure to personnel or damage to the facility beyond the machines themselves -- and in only one case was the machine damaged beyond further use. The present status of the facility, operating procedures, and complement of machines will be described in the context of programmatic activity. New programs will focus on training, validation of criticality alarm systems, experimental safety assessment of process applications, and dosimetry. Special emphasis will be placed on the incorporation of experience from 45 years of operation into present procedures and programs. 3 refs

  13. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  14. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Goldhagen, P.

    1988-07-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generated a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the U.S. Department of Energy. As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the RRL are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. Facilities and services are provided to users, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. RARAF was located at BNL from 1967 until 1980, when it was dismantled and moved to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University, where it was then reassembled and put back into operation. Data obtained from experiment using RARAF have been of pragmatic value to radiation protection and to neutron therapy. At a more fundamental level, the research at RARAF has provided insight into the biological action of radiation and especially its relation to energy distribution in the cell. High-LET radiations are an agent of special importance because they can cause measurable cellular effects by single particles, eliminating some of the complexities of multievent action and more clearly disclosing basic features. This applies particularly to radiation carcinogenesis. Facilities are available at RARAF for exposing objects to different radiations having a wide range of linear energy transfers (LETs)

  15. Calibration Modeling Methodology to Optimize Performance for Low Range Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Raymond A.; Commo, Sean A.; Parker, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Calibration is a vital process in characterizing the performance of an instrument in an application environment and seeks to obtain acceptable accuracy over the entire design range. Often, project requirements specify a maximum total measurement uncertainty, expressed as a percent of full-scale. However in some applications, we seek to obtain enhanced performance at the low range, therefore expressing the accuracy as a percent of reading should be considered as a modeling strategy. For example, it is common to desire to use a force balance in multiple facilities or regimes, often well below its designed full-scale capacity. This paper presents a general statistical methodology for optimizing calibration mathematical models based on a percent of reading accuracy requirement, which has broad application in all types of transducer applications where low range performance is required. A case study illustrates the proposed methodology for the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System that employs seven strain-gage based pressure transducers mounted on the heatshield of the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  16. Type B Drum packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, W.S.

    1995-11-01

    The Type B Drum package is a container in which a single drum containing Type B quantities of radioactive material will be packaged for shipment. The Type B Drum containers are being developed to fill a void in the packaging and transportation capabilities of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as no double containment packaging for single drums of Type B radioactive material is currently available. Several multiple-drum containers and shielded casks presently exist. However, the size and weight of these containers present multiple operational challenges for single-drum shipments. The Type B Drum containers will offer one unshielded version and, if needed, two shielded versions, and will provide for the option of either single or double containment. The primary users of the Type B Drum container will be any organization with a need to ship single drums of Type B radioactive material. Those users include laboratories, waste retrieval facilities, emergency response teams, and small facilities

  17. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  18. Facilities inventory protection for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The fact that shut-down applications have been filed for nuclear power plants, suggests to have a scrutinizing look at the scopes of assessment and decision available to administrations and courts for the protection of facilities inventories relative to legal and constitutional requirements. The paper outlines the legal bases which need to be observed if purposeful calculation is to be ensured. Based on the different actual conditions and legal consequences, the author distinguishes between 1) the legal situation of facilities licenced already and 2) the legal situation of facilities under planning during the licencing stage. As indicated by the contents and restrictions of the pertinent provisions of the Atomic Energy Act and by the corresponding compensatory regulation, the object of the protection of facilities inventor in the legal position of the facility owner within the purview of the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensing proper. Art. 17 of the Atomic Energy Act indicates the legislators intent that, once issued, the licence will be the pivotal point for regulations aiming at protection and intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Facility certification program for coal miners pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, E.D.; Kelley, J.P.; Larson, V.L.; Herbert, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    Public Law 91-173, often referred to as the Black Lung Law, called for a chest radiograph of all active coal miners at stated intervals. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health was responsible for carrying out the provisions of the law. Among other requirements was a provision for certification of radiological facilities where radiological examinations would be provide. A test object to be radiographed by each such facility was designed and sent to those facilities applying for certification. To date, 284 facilities have applied for certification of which 215 have been approved. A record has been kept of the number of times any approved facility submitted radiographs before approval. A complete listing of the types of equipment used, personnel qualifications and other pertinent data will be reported

  20. Nonreactor nuclear facilities: Standards and criteria guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Scarlett, C.H.; Tanguay, G.E.; Lobner, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    This guide is a source document that identifies standards, codes, and guides that address the nuclear safety considerations pertinent to nuclear facilities as defined in DOE 5480.1A, Chapter V, ''Safety of Nuclear Facilities.'' The guidance and criteria provided is directed toward areas of safety usually addressed in a Safety Analysis Report. The areas of safety include, but are not limited to, siting, principal design criteria and safety system design guidelines, radiation protection, accident analysis, conduct of operations, and quality assurance. The guide is divided into two sections: general guidelines and appendices. Those guidelines that are broadly applicable to most nuclear facilities are presented in the general guidelines. Guidelines specific to the various types or categories of nuclear facilities are presented in the appendices. These facility-specific appendices provide guidelines and identify standards and criteria that should be considered in addition to, or in lieu of, the general guidelines. 25 figs., 62 tabs

  1. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  2. Long-range antigravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession. (orig.)

  3. Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.; Wang, J.; Fujiwara, O.

    2012-01-01

    For safety management at a magnetic confinement fusion-test facility, protection from not only ionising radiation, but also non-ionising radiation such as the leakage of static magnetic and electromagnetic fields is an important issue. Accordingly, the use of a commercially available personal RF monitor for multipoint area monitoring is proposed. In this study, the performance of both fast- and slow-type personal RF monitors was investigated by using a transverse electromagnetic cell system. The range of target frequencies was between 10 and 300 MHz, corresponding to the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a fusion device. The personal RF monitor was found to have good linearity, frequency dependence and isotropic response. However, the time constant for the electric field sensor of the slow-type monitor was much longer than that for the fast-type monitor. Considering the time-varying field at the facility, it is found that the fast-type monitor is suitable for multipoint monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion test facilities. (authors)

  4. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  5. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.J.; Sontag, S.

    1991-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plant is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the first annual report. It shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years. The UO 3 Plant is located in the south-central portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The plant consists of two primary processing buildings and several ancillary facilities. The purpose of the UO 3 Plant is to receive uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, concentrate it, convert the UNH to uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) powder by calcination and package it for offsite shipment. The UO 3 Plant has been placed in a standby mode. There are two liquid discharges, and three gaseous exhaust stacks, and seven building exhausters that are active during standby conditions

  6. Nuclear physics accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Physics program is a comprehensive program of interdependent experimental and theoretical investigation of atomic nuclei. Long range goals are an understanding of the interactions, properties, and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter at the most elementary level possible and an understanding of the fundamental forces of nature by using nuclei as a proving ground. Basic ingredients of the program are talented and imaginative scientists and a diversity of facilities to provide the variety of probes, instruments, and computational equipment needed for modern nuclear research. Approximately 80% of the total Federal support of basic nuclear research is provided through the Nuclear Physics program; almost all of the remaining 20% is provided by the National Science Foundation. Thus, the Department of Energy (DOE) has a unique responsibility for this important area of basic science and its role in high technology. Experimental and theoretical investigations are leading us to conclude that a new level of understanding of atomic nuclei is achievable. This optimism arises from evidence that: (1) the mesons, protons, and neutrons which are inside nuclei are themselves composed of quarks and gluons and (2) quantum chromodynamics can be developed into a theory which both describes correctly the interaction among quarks and gluons and is also an exact theory of the strong nuclear force. These concepts are important drivers of the Nuclear Physics program

  7. Data Analysis Facility (DAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Dryden's Data Analysis Facility (DAF) provides a variety of support services to the entire Dryden community. It provides state-of-the-art hardware and software systems, available to any Dryden engineer for pre- and post-flight data processing and analysis, plus supporting all archival and general computer use. The Flight Data Access System (FDAS) is one of the advanced computer systems in the DAF, providing for fast engineering unit conversion and archival processing of flight data delivered from the Western Aeronautical Test Range. Engineering unit conversion and archival formatting of flight data is performed by the DRACO program on a Sun 690MP and an E-5000 computer. Time history files produced by DRACO are then moved to a permanent magneto-optical archive, where they are network-accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Pertinent information about the individual flights is maintained in a relational (Sybase) database. The DAF also houses all general computer services, including; the Compute Server 1 and 2 (CS1 and CS2), the server for the World Wide Web, overall computer operations support, courier service, a CD-ROM Writer system, a Technical Support Center, the NASA Dryden Phone System (NDPS), and Hardware Maintenance.

  8. Large experimental facilities of the UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hills, P.R.

    1987-10-01

    This list of UKAEA capital equipment was first assembled for the Interdepartmental Committee on Large Experimental Facilities as a contribution to a directory of national installations with a replacement value of Pound 1M or more. It is now being circulated in report form within the Authority, to assist staff to demonstrate to customers the wide range of facilities the Authority has available to carry out contract work, and to help them identify where customers' work can best be placed. (author)

  9. 340 Facility compliance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, S.L.

    1993-10-01

    This study provides an environmental compliance evaluation of the RLWS and the RPS systems of the 340 Facility. The emphasis of the evaluation centers on compliance with WAC requirements for hazardous and mixed waste facilities, federal regulations, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) requirements pertinent to the operation of the 340 Facility. The 340 Facility is not covered under either an interim status Part A permit or a RCRA Part B permit. The detailed discussion of compliance deficiencies are summarized in Section 2.0. This includes items of significance that require action to ensure facility compliance with WAC, federal regulations, and WHC requirements. Outstanding issues exist for radioactive airborne effluent sampling and monitoring, radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, non-radioactive liquid effluent sampling and monitoring, less than 90 day waste storage tanks, and requirements for a permitted facility

  10. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  11. Payment methods for outpatient care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Beibei; He, Li; Meng, Qingyue; Jia, Liying

    2017-03-03

    -after studies, interrupted time series, and repeated measures studies that compared different payment methods for outpatient health facilities. We defined outpatient care facilities in this review as facilities that provide health services to individuals who do not require hospitalisation or institutionalisation. We only included methods used to transfer funds from the purchaser of healthcare services to health facilities (including groups of individual professionals). These include global budgets, line-item budgets, capitation, fee-for-service (fixed and unconstrained), pay for performance, and mixed payment. The primary outcomes were service provision outcomes, patient outcomes, healthcare provider outcomes, costs for providers, and any adverse effects. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We conducted a structured synthesis. We first categorised the comparisons and outcomes and then described the effects of different types of payment methods on different categories of outcomes. We used a fixed-effect model for meta-analysis within a study if a study included more than one indicator in the same category of outcomes. We used a random-effects model for meta-analysis across studies. If the data for meta-analysis were not available in some studies, we calculated the median and interquartile range. We reported the risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the relative change for continuous outcomes. We included 21 studies from Afghanistan, Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, the United Kingdom, and the United States of health facilities providing primary health care and mental health care. There were three kinds of payment comparisons. 1) Pay for performance (P4P) combined with some existing payment method (capitation or different kinds of input-based payment) compared to the existing payment methodWe included 18 studies in this comparison, however we did not include five studies in the effects

  12. Oxygen injection facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masamoto; Hirose, Yuki

    1998-01-01

    A compressor introduces air as a starting material and sends it to a dust removing device, a dehumidifying device and an adsorption/separation system disposed downstream. The facility of the present invention is disposed in the vicinity of an injection point and installed in a turbine building of a BWR type reactor having a pipeline of a feedwater system to be injected. The adsorbing/separation system comprises an adsorbing vessel and an automatic valve, and the adsorbing vessel is filled with an adsorbent for selectively adsorbing nitrogen. Zeolite is used as the adsorbent. Nitrogen in the air passing through the adsorbing vessel is adsorbed and removed under a pressurized condition, and a highly concentrated oxygen gas is formed. The direction of the steam of the adsorbed nitrogen is changed by an opening/closing switching operation of an automatic valve and released to the atmosphere (the pressure is released). Generated oxygen gas is stored under pressure in a tank, and injected to the pipeline of the feedwater system by an oxygen injection conduit by way of a flow rate control valve. In the adsorbing vessel, steps of adsorption, separation and storage under pressure are repeated successively. (I.N.)

  13. Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic confinement plasma device under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. The ATF is a type of stellerator, known as a ''torsatron'' which theoretically has the capability to operate at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 2 s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin, helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the Impurities Studies Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of electron cyclotron heating. The ATF is scheduled to start operation in late 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented, including details of the construction process envisioned. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Generalized plotting facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, R.D.; Gray, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    A command which causes the translation of any supported graphics file format to a format acceptable to any supported device was implemented on two linked DECsystem-10s. The processing of the command is divided into parsing and translating phases. In the parsing phase, information is extracted from the command and augmented by default data. The results of this phase are saved on disk, and the appropriate translating routine is invoked. Twenty-eight translating programs were implemented in this system. They support four different graphics file formats, including the DISSPLA and Calcomp formats, and seven different types of plotters, including Tektronix, Calcomp, and Versatec devices. Some of the plotters are devices linked to the DECsystem-10s, and some are driven by IBM System/360 computers linked via a communications network to the DECsystem-10s. The user of this facility can use any of the supported packages to create a file of graphics data, preview the file on an on-line scope, and, when satisfied, cause the same data to be plotted on a hard-copy device. All of the actions utilize a single simple command format. 2 figures.

  15. Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic plasma confinement device, under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. ATF is a type of stellarator known as a torsatron which theoretically has the capability at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 5-s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the ISX-B tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of neutral injection heating and 0.2 MW of electron cyclotron heating. ATF device is scheduled to start operation in the fall of 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented including details of the construction process envisioned

  16. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  17. Facility of aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G; Regnier, J

    1975-04-18

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator).

  18. The CEA JOSEFA test facility for sub-size conductors and joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decool, P.; Libeyre, P.; Van Houtte, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Zani, L.; Serries, J.P.; Cloez, H.; Bej, S.

    2003-01-01

    The JOSEFA (Joint Sub-size Experiment FAcility) experimental test facility, installed at CEA/Cadarache is devoted to perform tests at cryogenic temperature on sub-size superconducting conductor and joint samples under parallel or transverse magnetic field. This facility was built in 1993 to investigate the performances of joints of cable-in-conduit conductors at sub-size level and further upgraded in the framework of European tasks. The samples of hairpin type using sub-size ITER conductors are cooled by a circulation of supercritical helium in a temperature range from 5 to 15 K and tested at a maximum current up to 10 kA. Two different helium bath cooled magnets allow to apply DC or AC transverse magnetic field up to 3.5 T or longitudinal magnetic field up to 7.5 T. A sliding system with a 240 mm stroke on the sample cryostat allows to test separately in the same sample either the conductor or the joint performances. The paper reports on how, through the conductor and joint development tasks, the facility performances were successfully increased and tested. The ITER TFMC joints using Nb3Sn conductors were first developed on this facility. The last developments, performed on ITER PF NbTi conductors and joints proved this facility to be a versatile and useful tool for superconducting magnet developments and showed the interest of possible upgrading to finalize conductor design. (author)

  19. Particulate filtration in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The removal of particulate radioactive material from exhaust air or gases is an essential feature of virtually all nuclear facilities. Recent IAEA publications have covered the broad designs of off-gas and air cleaning systems for the range of nuclear power plants and other facilities. This report is a complementary guidebook that examines in detail the latest developments in the design, operation, maintenance and testing of fibrous air filters. The original draft of the report was prepared by three consultants, M.W. First, of the School of Public Health, Harvard University, United States of America, K.S. Robinson, from the UKAEA Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, and H.G. Dillmann, of the Kernforschungzentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM), at which the report was reviewed and much additional information contributed, was attended by 11 experts and was held in Vienna, from 30 May to 3 June 1988. 64 refs, 41 figs, 10 tabs

  20. Earthquake engineering for nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kuno, Michiya

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive compilation of earthquake- and tsunami-related technologies and knowledge for the design and construction of nuclear facilities. As such, it covers a wide range of fields including civil engineering, architecture, geotechnical engineering, mechanical engineering, and nuclear engineering, for the development of new technologies providing greater resistance against earthquakes and tsunamis. It is crucial both for students of nuclear energy courses and for young engineers in nuclear power generation industries to understand the basics and principles of earthquake- and tsunami-resistant design of nuclear facilities. In Part I, "Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants", the design of nuclear power plants to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis is explained, focusing on buildings, equipment's, and civil engineering structures. In Part II, "Basics of Earthquake Engineering", fundamental knowledge of earthquakes and tsunamis as well as the dynamic response of structures and foundation ground...