WorldWideScience

Sample records for range differentially heating

  1. Exact solutions for the differential equations in fractal heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the boundary value problems for differential equations in fractal heat transfer. The exact solutions of non-differentiable type are obtained by using the local fractional differential transform method.

  2. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Osten

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181 in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  3. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Julia; Milkereit, Benjamin; Schick, Christoph; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181) in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed) was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  4. Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~80 MW as of 2004-5). Heat discharge from "slightly thermal" springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~. 660. MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct methods and totals ~160 MW, excluding the transient mid-1970s discharge at Mount Baker (~80 MW) and transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (>. 230. MW as of 2005). Other than the pronounced transients at Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker, hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range appears to be fairly steady over a ~25-year period of measurement. Of the total of ~. 1050. MW of "steady" hydrothermal heat discharge identified in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, less than 50. MW occurs north of latitude 45??15' N (~0.1 MW per km arc length from 45??15' to 49??N). Much greater rates of hydrothermal heat discharge south of 45??15'N (~1.7 MW per km arc length from 40?? to 45??15'N) may reflect the influence of Basin and Range-style extensional tectonics (faulting) that impinges on the Cascades as far north as Mount Jefferson but is not evident farther north. ?? 2010.

  5. Fem Formulation of Coupled Partial Differential Equations for Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer Ahamad, N.; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Anjum Badruddin, Irfan

    2017-08-01

    Heat Transfer in any field plays an important role for transfer of energy from one region to another region. The heat transfer in porous medium can be simulated with the help of two partial differential equations. These equations need an alternate and relatively easy method due to complexity of the phenomenon involved. This article is dedicated to discuss the finite element formulation of heat transfer in porous medium in Cartesian coordinates. A triangular element is considered to discretize the governing partial differential equations and matrix equations are developed for 3 nodes of element. Iterative approach is used for the two sets of matrix equations involved representing two partial differential equations.

  6. Impact of prescribed diabatic heating on short range weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, L.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 9 layer general circulation model developed at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS), several 4 to 5 day integrations were made to assess the impact that latent heating processes (supersaturation and moist convective) have on the model forecasts. In an earlier study by Shukla (1981) it was hypothesized that because of strong interaction between dynamics and moist convection, small initial errors grow very fast and make short range forecasting difficult. The purpose of this study was to examine if prescribed heating rates can improve the forecasts for a few days.

  7. Tunable and Broadband Differential Phase Sections in Terahertz Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiak, O. S.; Bezborodov, V. I.; Kuleshov, Ye. M.; Nesterov, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Studying the quasioptical tunable and broadband differential phase section (DPS) consisting of several birefringent elements (BE) on the basis of form birefringence effect. Design/methodology/approach: Using the polarization scattering matrix method, the impact of the mutual rotation axis of anisotropy of several BE by the amount of phase shift and the position of the plane of anisotropy of resulting DPS is considered. Findings: The DPS tunable in a wide range are shown to be possibly implemented in the case of quarter- wave DPS of two, and in the case of half-wave DPS of three, identical non-tunable BE. The analysis has shown to the possibility of creating a broadband quarter-wave and half-wave DPS. Conclusions: Experimental research has confirmed the possibility of constructing a tunable and broadband DPS. On this basis, tunable and broadband polarization converters, rotators of polarization plane, polarization phase shifters and frequency shifters in the terahertz frequency range can be created.

  8. Heat capacity and Joule-Thomson coefficient of selected n-alkanes at 0.1 and 10 MPa in broad temperature ranges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regueira Muñiz, Teresa; Varzandeh, Farhad; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2017-01-01

    Isobaric heat capacity of six n-alkanes, i.e. n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane and n-hexadecane, was determined with a Calvet type differential heat-flux calorimeter at 0.1 and 10 MPa in a broad temperature range. The measured isobaric heat capacity data were combined...

  9. Enhancement in heat transfer of a ferrofluid in a differentially heated square cavity through the use of permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, J. C.; Sharifpur, M.; Solomon, A. Brusly; Meyer, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The natural convection heat transfer of a magnetic nanofluid in a differentially heated cavity is investigated with and without an applied external magnetic field. The effects of volume fraction, magnetic field configuration, and magnetic field strength are investigated. Spherical Fe2O3 nanoparticles with a diameter of 15-20 nm are used in the nanofluids. Volume fractions ranging between 0.05% and 0.3% are tested for the case with no magnetic field, while only a volume fraction of 0.1% was tested in an externally applied magnetic field. The experiments were conducted for a range of Rayleigh numbers in 1.7 × 108 magnetic field study, it was found that the best-performing magnetic field enhanced the heat transfer behaviour by an additional 2.81% in Nu at Ra = 3.8 × 108.

  10. Wage Differentials between Heat-Exposure Risk and No Heat-Exposure Risk Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyun Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the wage differential between groups of workers who are exposed to heat and those who are not. Workers in the heat-exposure risk group are defined as workers who work in conditions that cause them to spend more than 25% of their work hours at high temperatures. To analyze the wage differential, the Blinder-Oaxaca and Juhn-Murphy-Pierce methods were applied to Korea Working Condition Survey data. The results show that the no heat-exposure risk group received higher wages. In most cases, this can be interpreted as the endowment effect of human capital. As a price effect that lowers the endowment effect, the compensating differential for the heat-exposure risk group was found to be 1%. Moreover, education level, work experience, and employment status counteracted the compensating differentials for heat-exposure risks. A comparison of data sets from 2011 and 2014 shows that the increasing wage gap between the two groups was not caused by systematic social discrimination factors. This study suggests that wage differential factors can be modified for thermal environmental risks that will change working conditions as the impact of climate change increases.

  11. Human Brain Stem Structures Respond Differentially to Noxious Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eRitter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG. The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by fMRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM. In a second experiment we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e. the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  12. Differential Radiative Heating Drives Tropical Atmospheric Circulation Weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Huang, Yi

    2017-10-01

    The tropical atmospheric circulation is projected to weaken during global warming, although the mechanisms that cause the weakening remain to be elucidated. We hypothesize that the weakening is related to the inhomogeneous distribution of the radiative forcing and feedback, which heats the tropical atmosphere in the ascending and subsiding regions differentially and thus requires the circulation to weaken due to energetic constraints. We test this hypothesis in a series of numerical experiments using a fully coupled general circulation model (GCM), in which the radiative forcing distribution is controlled using a novel method. The results affirm the effect of inhomogeneous forcing on the tropical circulation weakening, and this effect is greatly amplified by radiative feedback, especially that of clouds. In addition, we find that differential heating explains the intermodel differences in tropical circulation response to CO2 forcing in the GCM ensemble of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project.

  13. Heating uniformity and differential heating of insects in almonds associated with radio frequency energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radio frequency (RF) treatments have potential as alternatives to chemical fumigation for phytosanitary disinfestation treatments in the dried nut industry. To develop effective RF treatment protocols for almonds, it is desirable to determine heating uniformity and the occurrence of differential hea...

  14. Heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of thulium orthophosphate TmPO4 in the range of 10-1350 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryumin, M. A.; Gurevich, V. M.; Khoroshilov, A. V.; Tyurin, A. V.; Gavrichev, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    The heat capacity of TmPO4 in temperature ranges of 9.11-346.05 and 304.6-1344.6 K is measured via adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The measurement data are used to calculate the temperature dependences of the heat capacity, entropy, change in enthalpy, and reduced Gibbs energy of TmPO4 in the range of 10-1344 K. The Gibbs energy of formation of thulium orthophosphate from elements Δf G 0(298.15 K) is determined.

  15. AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM OF HEAT PUMP STATION GAS COOLER AT THE WIDE RANGE OF HEAT LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juravleov A.A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There is examined the structure the of control system of gas cooler of heat pump station, which uses the carbon dioxide as the working fluid in the transctitical thermodynamical cycle. It is analiyed the structure of the complex: heat pump station – district heating system.

  16. Improved Differential Evolution for Combined Heat and Power Economic Dispatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, C.; Basu, M.; Panigrahi, C. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an improved differential evolution to solve non-smooth non-convex combined heat and power economic dispatch (CHPED) problem. Valve-point loading and prohibited operating zones of conventional thermal generators are taken into account. Differential evolution (DE) exploits the differences of randomly sampled pairs of objective vectors for its mutation process. Consequently the variation between vectors will outfit the objective function toward the optimization process and therefore provides efficient global optimization capability. However, although DE is shown to be precise, fast as well as robust, its search efficiency will be impaired during solution process with fast descending diversity of population. This paper proposes Gaussian random variable instead of scaling factor which improves search efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified on four test systems. The results of the proposed approach are compared with those obtained by other evolutionary methods. It is found that the proposed improved differential evolution based approach is able to provide better solution.

  17. Numerical simulation of MHD free convection flow in a differentially heated square enclosure with tilted obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. M.; Alim, M. A.; Maleque, M. A.; Ahmed, Syed Sabbir

    2017-06-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to analyze the flow and heat transfer characteristics due to the effects of magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow in a differentially heated enclosure having a hot tilted square block. The vertical and horizontal walls of the cavity are non-uniformly heated while the walls of the tilted block are uniformly heated. The basic partial differential equations of the physical problem are solved numerically using finite element technique along with Galerkin's weighted residual simulation. Calculations have been performed for different values of buoyancy parameter (102 ≤ Ra ≤ 105) and magnetic field parameter (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 60) and obtained results are illustrated in terms of streamlines, isotherms, average Nusselt number and average temperature. The results show that the flow pattern and temperature distributions affected noticeably for the effect of aforementioned parameters. In addition, an increase in average Nusselt number is found for the whole range of Rayleigh number and average temperature decreased for increasing Rayleigh number. Comparison between the obtained results and the previously published results on the basis of special case is a good agreement.

  18. Heating, cooling, and uplift during Tertiary time, northern Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D.A.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in a wide area of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range show effects of heating during Tertiary time. Heating is tentatively interpreted as a response to burial during Laramide folding and thrusting and also to high heat flow during Rio Grande rifting. Fission-track ages of apatite across a section of the range show that rocks cooled abruptly below 120oC, the blocking temperature for apatite, approx 19 Ma ago. Cooling was probably in response to rapid uplift and erosion of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range during early Rio Grande rifting.-from Authors

  19. Studies for the ion cyclotron range of frequency heating in a tokamak fusion experimental device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saigusa, Mikio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-02-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency heating has been investigated as an efficient additional plasma heating and non-inductive current driving methods in a tokamak type fusion experimental device. At first, an ICRF antenna coupling code was developed for the estimation of the coupling properties of phased antenna array, so that the ICRF antennas were designed for JT-60 and JT-60U ICRF heating systems using the coupling codes. The ICRF heating experiments had been performed in JT-60 and JT-60U. The coupling properties of ICRF antenna, the physics of peripheral plasma and energy confinement by ICRF heating in various heating regimes have been investigated. Next, the Toroidicity induced Alfven Eigen (TAE) mode have been studied using minority ICRF heating for producing energetic ions which can excite TAE mode. The TAE mode could be suppressed by current profile control using current ramp operation and lower hybrid current drive. (author) 74 refs.

  20. Heat flow and hydrothermal circulation in the cascade range, north-central Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, S E; Sherrod, D R; Mariner, R H

    1989-03-17

    In north-central Oregon a large area of near-zero near-surface conductive heat flow occurs in young volcanic rocks of the Cascade Range. Recent advective heat flux measurements and a heat-budget analysis suggest that ground-water circulation sweeps sufficient heat out of areas where rocks younger than 6 Ma (million years ago) are exposed to account for the anomalously high advective and conductive heat discharge measured in older rocks at lower elevations. Earlier workers have proposed that an extensive midcrustal magmatic heat source is responsible for this anomalously high heat flow. Instead, high heat flow in the older rocks may be a relatively shallow phenomenon caused by regional ground-water flow. Any deeper anomaly may be relatively narrow, spatially variable, and essentially confined to the Quaternary (less than 2 Ma) arc. Magmatic intrusion at a rate of 9 to 33 cubic kilometers per kilometer of arc length per million years can account for the total heat flow anomaly. Deep drilling in the areas of high heat flow in the older rocks could indicate which model is more appropriate for the near-surface heat flow data.

  1. A new iteration algorithm for solving the diffusion problem in non-differentiable heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the variational iteration algorithm LFVIA-II is implemented to solve the diffusion equation occurring in non-differentiable heat transfer. The operators take in sense of the local fractional operators. The obtained results show the fractal behaviors of heat transfer with non-differentiability.

  2. Differential heating in the Indian Ocean differentially modulates precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Henebry, Geoffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Indo-Pacific sea surface temperature dynamics play a prominent role in Asian summer monsoon variability. Two interactive climate modes of the Indo-Pacific—the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean dipole mode—modulate the amount of precipitation over India, in addition to precipitation over Africa, Indonesia, and Australia. However, this modulation is not spatially uniform. The precipitation in southern India is strongly forced by the Indian Ocean dipole mode and ENSO. In contrast, across northern India, encompassing the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins, the climate mode influence on precipitation is much less. Understanding the forcing of precipitation in these river basins is vital for food security and ecosystem services for over half a billion people. Using 28 years of remote sensing observations, we demonstrate that (i) the tropical west-east differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Ganges precipitation and (ii) the north-south differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Brahmaputra precipitation. The El Niño phase induces warming in the warm pool of the Indian Ocean and exerts more influence on Ganges precipitation than Brahmaputra precipitation. The analyses indicate that both the magnitude and position of the sea surface temperature anomalies in the Indian Ocean are important drivers for precipitation dynamics that can be effectively summarized using two new indices, one tuned for each basin. These new indices have the potential to aid forecasting of drought and flooding, to contextualize land cover and land use change, and to assess the regional impacts of climate change.

  3. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2017-12-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here for

  4. Heat Stability and Species Range of Purified Staphylococcal α-Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Louis Z.; Madoff, Morton A.; Weinstein, Louis

    1966-01-01

    Cooper, Louis Z. (New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, Mass.), Morton A. Madoff, and Louis Weinstein. Heat stability and species range of purified staphylococcal α-toxin. J. Bacteriol. 91:1686–1692. 1966.—Heating of high-titer purified staphylococcal α-toxin at 60 and 80 C resulted in a double-sloped curve of inactivation of the hemolytic effect on rabbit erythrocytes. Early inactivation was less at the lower temperature, but activity persisted for a longer time at 80 C. Toxin inactivated at 60 C showed renewed activity when heated briefly at 80 C. A precipitate which formed during heating of α-toxin at 60 or 80 C yielded hemolytic activity when resuspended and heated at 80 but not at 60 C. Supernatant fluid of heat-precipitated toxin was heat-labile and did not regain activity when heated at 80 C. The results indicate that the “paradoxical effect” of heating of staphylococcal α-toxin is not due to a thermolabile inhibitor, but results from alteration of the toxin molecule to a heat-stable active form. Demonstration of renewed activity by 80 C heating of purified toxin requires potent toxin preparations and brief heating periods. Hemolysis of erythrocytes of several animal species by purified α-toxin was generally similar to that produced by impure toxin. Rabbit cells were most susceptible. Human and horse erythrocytes hemolyzed to less than 0.1% of the extent of rabbit cells. Blood cells of other species were intermediate in their response to the lytic effect of α-toxin. PMID:5937231

  5. Injection molding of nanopatterned surfaces in the sub-micrometer range with induction heating aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Replication of sub-micrometer structures by injection molding leads to special requirements for the mold in order to ensure proper replica and acceptable cycle time. This paper investigates the applicability of induction heating embedded into the mold for the improvement of nanopattern replication....... A tool insert having a surface containing functional geometries in the sub-micrometer range was produced using aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. In order to provide elevated mold temperatures necessary for the complete replica of the pattern, a new mold setup was developed, which allows...... rapid heating of the cavity wall using an induction heating system. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple placed in the mold insert. The system was used to heat up the cavity wall with heating rates of up to 10 K/s. Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC) were used...

  6. The effect of heat applied with stretch to increase range of motion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Jiro; Yamabayashi, Cristiane; Scott, Alex; Reid, W Darlene

    2012-08-01

    Application of heat to muscle is commonly advocated to enhance the efficacy of stretching. However, the effect of this combined therapy using different methods of heating, applied to different muscles, and after one or multiple treatments, is not known. To perform a systematic review to address the question: Does stretching augmented by heat application result in greater gains in range of motion (ROM) compared to stretch alone? The following databases were searched for original articles that evaluated our question: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SPORTDiscus and PEDro databases. After title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening, the quality of included articles was assessed and their data was abstracted. Screening, data abstraction and quality assessment was performed and consensus was achieved by two reviewers. Range of motion (ROM) data were synthesized by meta-analyses for overall effect and subgroup analysis according to muscle group, method of heat application, single or multiple treatments, and reported tightness of muscle. Twelve studies were included and reported the effects of stretch with or without heat on ROM of 352 participants. Heat applications included ultrasound, shortwave diathermy and hot packs. Meta-analyses and subgroup analyses demonstrated greater increases in ROM after heat and stretch (H + S) than heat alone. Subgroup analysis of muscle groups and the method of heat application showed some trends, but no significant differences. Multiple treatments (more so than single treatments) showed consistent treatment effects of H + S versus stretch alone amongst subgroups. Muscles described as tight did not show a greater treatment effect in response to H + S compared to muscles not reported as tight. Heating provides an added benefit on stretch related gains of ROM in healthy people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hsp70 and Hsp90 are differentially expressed in crayfish muscle and neurons after heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Shuang Liang, Xiaoqing Yu, Debra E Wood, Emmitt R Jolly Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Heat shock proteins are essential cellular proteins that are highly conserved across organisms and contribute to adaptive responses of organisms during changing environmental conditions. Protein members of the families of heat shock genes can be differentially regulated in response to stressors and play critical roles in protein stability, folding, and molecular trafficking. We used a crustacean species with strong adaptability to diverse environments, the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, to study expression profiles of two well known heat shock genes, Hsp90 and Hsp70. This crayfish can withstand a broad range of temperatures, and its adaptability contributes to its value for human use as an agricultural food source and as a biological control agent against snails that transmit schistosomiasis. However, it has become a harmful invasive species in some areas. To begin to understand the thermal resilience of P. clarkii, we identified and cloned Hsp90 from crayfish by degenerate polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with rapid amplification of 3' and 5' cDNA ends, and subsequently sequenced and characterized the molecular chaperone. Sequence analysis by phylogenetic alignment and polypeptide three-dimensional structure prediction of the newly identified Hsp90 gene shows that it has conserved motifs with Hsp90 s in other species. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we characterized the expression profiles of Hsp90 and Hsp70 in muscle and in central nervous system tissues. We found that Hsp70 and Hsp90 transcripts are upregulated under heat stress in both muscle and the central nervous system, but that their expression levels are more robustly increased in muscle. Keywords: crayfish, stress response, Procambarus clarkii, heat shock protein, Hsp90, schistosomiasis

  8. Optimal trajectory and heat load analysis of different shape lifting reentry vehicles for medium range application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tauqeer ul Islam Rizvi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to compute the optimal burn-out conditions and control requirements that would result in maximum down-range/cross-range performance of a waverider type hypersonic boost-glide (HBG vehicle within the medium and intermediate ranges, and compare its performance with the performances of wing-body and lifting-body vehicles vis-à-vis the g-load and the integrated heat load experienced by vehicles for the medium-sized launch vehicle under study. Trajectory optimization studies were carried out by considering the heat rate and dynamic pressure constraints. The trajectory optimization problem is modeled as a nonlinear, multiphase, constraint optimal control problem and is solved using a hp-adaptive pseudospectral method. Detail modeling aspects of mass, aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics for the launch and glide vehicles have been discussed. It was found that the optimal burn-out angles for waverider and wing-body configurations are approximately 5° and 14.8°, respectively, for maximum down-range performance under the constraint heat rate environment. The down-range and cross-range performance of HBG waverider configuration is nearly 1.3 and 2 times that of wing-body configuration respectively. The integrated heat load experienced by the HBG waverider was found to be approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of a lifting-body configuration and 5 times that of a wing-body configuration. The footprints and corresponding heat loads and control requirements for the three types of glide vehicles are discussed for the medium range launch vehicle under consideration.

  9. Climate variability of heat waves and their associated diurnal temperature range variations in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueh, M.-T.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chuang, Y.-J.; Sheng, Y.-F.; Chien, Y.-Y.

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates heat waves in Taiwan and their maintenance mechanism, based upon observations and dynamically downscaled simulations. A 95th percentile threshold is used for identifying hot extremes over a period of consecutive days. Heat waves are forecast to become more severe in the future projection. Daily minimum temperatures are generally high and diurnal temperature ranges (DTR) are relatively large. The daily minimum temperature serves as the primary control in the variation in DTR during heat waves. An apparent increase in the daily minimum temperature suggests elevated heat stress at nighttime during future heat waves. Heat waves in Taiwan are associated with abnormal warming and drying atmospheric conditions under the control of an enhanced western North Pacific subtropical high. The surrounding waters serve as a vast moisture source to suppress the drying magnitude in the surface layer as the temperature rises, thereby ensuring a high humidity level during the hot spell. The subsidence and adiabatic warming above can trap the warm and humid air in the surface layer, leading to positive feedback to the abnormally hot surface condition. The associated warming and drying atmospheric conditions cover certain spatial extents, suggesting that the extreme situation identified here is not confined to just an island-wide hot spell; the abnormal hot weather can take place across a broad geographical area.

  10. Periodic heat shock accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in pellet culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of diseases that seriously affect elderly people's quality of life. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs offer a potential promise for the joint repair in OA patients. However, chondrogenic differentiation from hMSCs in vitro takes a long time (∼ 6 weeks and differentiated cells are still not as functionally mature as primary isolated chondrocytes, though chemical stimulations and mechanical loading have been intensively studied to enhance the hMSC differentiation. On the other hand, thermal stimulations of hMSC chondrogenesis have not been well explored. In this study, the direct effects of mild heat shock (HS on the differentiation of hMSCs into chondrocytes in 3D pellet culture were investigated. Periodic HS at 41 °C for 1 hr significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan in 3D pellet culture at Day 10 of chondrogenesis. Immunohistochemical and Western Blot analyses revealed an increased expression of collagen type II and aggrecan in heat-shocked pellets than non heat-shocked pellets on Day 17 of chondrogenesis. In addition, HS also upregulated the expression of collagen type I and X as well as heat shock protein 70 on Day 17 and 24 of differentiation. These results demonstrate that HS accelerated the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs and induced an early maturation of chondrocytes differentiated from hMSCs. The results of this study will guide the design of future protocols using thermal treatments to facilitate cartilage regeneration with human mesenchymal stem cells.

  11. Sabots, Obturator and Gas-In-Launch Tube Techniques for Heat Flux Models in Ballistic Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Wilder, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    For thermal protection system (heat shield) design for space vehicle entry into earth and other planetary atmospheres, it is essential to know the augmentation of the heat flux due to vehicle surface roughness. At the NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) ballistic range, a campaign of heat flux studies on rough models, using infrared camera techniques, has been initiated. Several phenomena can interfere with obtaining good heat flux data when using this measuring technique. These include leakage of the hot drive gas in the gun barrel through joints in the sabot (model carrier) to create spurious thermal imprints on the model forebody, deposition of sabot material on the model forebody, thereby changing the thermal properties of the model surface and unknown in-barrel heating of the model. This report presents developments in launch techniques to greatly reduce or eliminate these problems. The techniques include the use of obturator cups behind the launch package, enclosed versus open front sabot designs and the use of hydrogen gas in the launch tube. Attention also had to be paid to the problem of the obturator drafting behind the model and impacting the model. Of the techniques presented, the obturator cups and hydrogen in the launch tube were successful when properly implemented

  12. Study of Particle Motion in He II Counterflow Across a Wide Heat Flux Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Brian; Takada, Suguru; Guo, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Some discrepancy exists in the results of He II counterflow experiments obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV) when compared with those obtained using particle tracking velocimetry (PTV): using PIV, it was observed that tracer particles move at roughly half the expected normal fluid velocity, v_n/2, while tracer particles observed using PTV moved at approximately v_n. A suggested explanation is that two different flow regimes were examined since the range of heat flux applied in each experiment was adjacent but non-overlapping. Another PTV experiment attempted to test this model, but the applied heat flux did not overlap with any PIV experiments. We report on the beginnings of a study of solid {D}_2 particle motion in counterflow using PTV, and the heat flux range overlaps that of all previous visualization studies. The observed particle velocity distribution transitions from a two-peak structure to a single peak as the heat flux is increased. Furthermore, the mean value of one peak in the bi-modal distributions grows at approximately the same rate as v_n, while the mean value of the single-peak distributions grows at roughly 0.4v_n, in reasonable agreement with both previous experiments and with the suggested model.

  13. Differential heat stability of amphenicols characterized by structural degradation, mass spectrometry and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franje, Catherine A; Chang, Shao-Kuang; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Davis, Jennifer L; Lee, Yan-Wen; Lee, Ren-Jye; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2010-12-01

    Heat stability of amphenicols and the relationship between structural degradation and antimicrobial activity after heating has not been well investigated. Florfenicol (FF), thiamphenicol (TAP), and chloramphenicol (CAP) were heated at 100 degrees C in water, salt water, soybean sauce and chicken meat for up to 2h. Degradation and antimicrobial activity of the compounds was evaluated using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV-DAD spectrometry, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, and gas chromatography with electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS). Heat stability of amphenicols in matrices was ranked as water> or =salt water>soybean sauce>meat, suggesting that heat degradation of amphenicols was accelerated in soybean sauce and was not protected in meat. Heat stability by drug and matrices was ranked as FF>TAP=CAP in water, FF=TAP>CAP in salt water, TAP> or =FF=CAP in soybean sauce, and TAP> or =FF=CAP in meat, indicating differential heat stability of amphenicols among the 3 drugs and in different matrices. In accordance with the less than 20% degradation, the MIC against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus did not change after 2h heating in water. A 5-min heating of amphenicols in water by microwave oven generated comparable percentage degradation to boiling in water bath for 30 min to 1h. Both CE and GC-MS analysis showed that heating of FF produced TAP but not FF amine as one of its breakdown products. In conclusion, despite close similarity in structure; amphenicols exhibited differential behavior toward heating degradation in solutions and protein matrices. Although higher degradations of amphenicols were observed in soybean sauce and meat, heating treatment may generate product with antimicrobial activity (FF to TAP), therefore, heating of amphenicol residues in food cannot always be assumed safe. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The influence of heated or cooled seats on the acceptable ambient temperature range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Wyon, David Peter; Fang, Lei

    2007-01-01

    In 11 climate chamber experiments at air temperatures ranging from 15 to 45 degrees C, a total of 24 subjects, dressed in appropriate clothing for entering a vehicle at these temperatures, were each exposed to four different seat temperatures, ranging from cool to warm. In one simulated summer...... series, subjects were preconditioned to be too hot, while in other series they were preconditioned to be thermally neutral. They reported their thermal sensations, overall thermal acceptability and comfort on visual analogue scales at regular intervals. Instantaneous heat flow to the seat was measured...

  15. Strong genetic differentiation but not local adaptation toward the range limit of a coastal dune plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samis, Karen E; López-Villalobos, Adriana; Eckert, Christopher G

    2016-11-01

    All species have limited geographic distributions; but the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms causing range limits are largely unknown. That many species' geographic range limits are coincident with niche limits suggests limited evolutionary potential of marginal populations to adapt to conditions experienced beyond the range. We provide a test of range limit theory by combining population genetic analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms with a transplant experiment within, at the edge of, and 60 km beyond the northern range of a coastal dune plant. Contrary to expectations, lifetime fitness increased toward the range limit with highest fitness achieved by most populations at and beyond the range edge. Genetic differentiation among populations was strong, with very low, nondirectional gene flow suggesting range limitation via constraints to dispersal. In contrast, however, local adaptation was negligible, and a distance-dependent decline in fitness only occurred for those populations furthest from home when planted beyond the range limit. These results challenge a commonly held assumption that stable range limits match niche limits, but also raise questions about the unique value of peripheral populations in expanding species' geographical ranges. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Natural convection in square enclosures differentially heated at sides using alumina-water nanofluids with temperature-dependent physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfrini Marta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar natural convection of Al2O3 + H2O nanofluids inside square cavities differentially heated at sides is studied numerically. A computational code based on the SIMPLE-C algorithm is used for the solution of the system of the mass, momentum and energy transfer governing equations. Assuming that the nanofluid behaves like a single-phase fluid, these equations are the same as those valid for a pure fluid, provided that the thermophysical properties appearing in them are the nanofluid effective properties. The thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of the nanofluid are calculated by means of a couple of empirical equations based on a wide variety of experimental data reported in the literature. The other effective properties are evaluated by the conventional mixing theory. Simulations are performed for different values of the nanoparticle volume fraction in the range 0-0.06, the diameter of the suspended nanoparticles in the range 25-100 nm, the temperature of the cooled sidewall in the range 293-313 K, the temperature of the heated sidewall in the range 298-343 K, and the Rayleigh number of the base fluid in the range 103-107. All computations are executed in the hypothesis of temperature-dependent effective properties. The main result obtained is the existence of an optimal particle loading for maximum heat transfer, that is found to increase as the size of the suspended nanoparticles is decreased, and the nanofluid average temperature is increased.

  17. Heat wave over India during summer 2015: an assessment of real time extended range forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, D. R.; Mohapatra, M.; Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, Arun

    2017-08-01

    Hot winds are the marked feature of summer season in India during late spring preceding the climatological onset of the monsoon season in June. Some years the conditions becomes very vulnerable with the maximum temperature ( T max) exceeding 45 °C for many days over parts of north-western, eastern coastal states of India and Indo-Gangetic plain. During summer of 2015 (late May to early June) eastern coastal states, central and northwestern parts of India experienced severe heat wave conditions leading to loss of thousands of human life in extreme high temperature conditions. It is not only the loss of human life but also the animals and birds were very vulnerable to this extreme heat wave conditions. In this study, an attempt is made to assess the performance of real time extended range forecast (forecast up to 3 weeks) of this scorching T max based on the NCEP's Climate Forecast System (CFS) latest version coupled model (CFSv2). The heat wave condition was very severe during the week from 22 to 28 May with subsequent week from 29 May to 4 June also witnessed high T max over many parts of central India including eastern coastal states of India. The 8 ensemble members of operational CFSv2 model are used once in a week to prepare the weekly bias corrected deterministic (ensemble mean) T max forecast for 3 weeks valid from Friday to Thursday coinciding with the heat wave periods of 2015. Using the 8 ensemble members separately and the CFSv2 corresponding hindcast climatology the probability of above and below normal T max is also prepared for the same 3 weeks. The real time deterministic and probabilistic forecasts did indicate impending heat wave over many parts of India during late May and early June of 2015 associated with strong northwesterly wind over main land mass of India, delaying the sea breeze, leading to heat waves over eastern coastal regions of India. Thus, the capability of coupled model in providing early warning of such killer heat wave can be very

  18. Measurement and Model Validation of Nanofluid Specific Heat Capacity with Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry O'Hanley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are being considered for heat transfer applications; therefore it is important to know their thermophysical properties accurately. In this paper we focused on nanofluid specific heat capacity. Currently, there exist two models to predict a nanofluid specific heat capacity as a function of nanoparticle concentration and material. Model I is a straight volume-weighted average; Model II is based on the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the particles and the surrounding fluid. These two models give significantly different predictions for a given system. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, a robust experimental methodology for measuring the heat capacity of fluids, the specific heat capacities of water-based silica, alumina, and copper oxide nanofluids were measured. Nanoparticle concentrations were varied between 5 wt% and 50 wt%. Test results were found to be in excellent agreement with Model II, while the predictions of Model I deviated very significantly from the data. Therefore, Model II is recommended for nanofluids.

  19. Thermal conduction study of warm dense aluminum by proton differential heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Y.; Kemp, G.; McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Shepherd, R.; Collins, G.; Sio, H.; King, J.; Freeman, R.; Hua, R.; McGuffey, C.; Kim, J.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    A differential heating platform has been developed for thermal conduction study (Ping et al. PoP 2015), where a temperature gradient is induced and subsequent heat flow is probed by time-resolved diagnostics. An experiment using proton differential heating has been carried out at Titan laser for Au/Al targets. Two single-shot time-resolved diagnostics are employed, SOP (streaked optical pyrometry) for surface temperature and FDI (Fourier Domain Interferometry) for surface expansion. Hydrodynamic simulations show that after 15ps, absorption in underdense plasma needs to be taken into account to correctly interpret SOP data. Comparison between simulations with different thermal conductivity models and a set of data with varying target thickness will be presented. This work was performed under DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 with support from OFES Early Career program and LLNL LDRD program.

  20. Immunogenetic variation and differential pathogen exposure in free-ranging cheetahs across Namibian farmlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aines Castro-Prieto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genes under selection provide ecologically important information useful for conservation issues. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and II genes are essential for the immune defence against pathogens from intracellular (e.g. viruses and extracellular (e.g. helminths origins, respectively. Serosurvey studies in Namibian cheetahs (Acinonyx juabuts revealed higher exposure to viral pathogens in individuals from north-central than east-central regions. Here we examined whether the observed differences in exposure to viruses influence the patterns of genetic variation and differentiation at MHC loci in 88 free-ranging Namibian cheetahs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic variation at MHC I and II loci was assessed through single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis and sequencing. While the overall allelic diversity did not differ, we observed a high genetic differentiation at MHC class I loci between cheetahs from north-central and east-central Namibia. No such differentiation in MHC class II and neutral markers were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that MHC class I variation mirrors the variation in selection pressure imposed by viruses in free-ranging cheetahs across Namibian farmland. This is of high significance for future management and conservation programs of this species.

  1. Features of austenite formation in low-carbon steel upon heating in the intercritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. O.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    The features of austenite formation upon continuous heating of low-carbon steel at the rates of 90-0.15 K/s in the intercritical temperature range (ICTR) have been studied. It has been found that, in the initially high-tempered, initially quenched, and initially cold-deformed steel, the α → γ transition in the ICTR consists of three stages. The thermokinetic diagrams of the austenite formation with the indication of the positions of the critical points Ac 1 and Ac 3 and also of the temperature ranges of the development of each identified stage of the α → γ transformation have been constructed. A complex of structural studies has been carried out, and a scheme of the austenite formation upon continuous heating at a rate of 90 K/s in the ICTR for the initially high-tempered steel, initially quenched steel, and initially cold-deformed low-carbon steel has been suggested, which reflects all stages of this process.

  2. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  3. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Abbasi

    Full Text Available Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros and desert zones (Kavir, with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU. At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was

  4. Activation of proliferation and differentiation of dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai Rad, M; Wise, G E; Brooks, H; Flanagan, M B; Yao, S

    2013-02-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) remain in a slowly cycling/quiescent state under normal physiological conditions, but they can be awakened from this by certain factors, such as injury signals. Previously, our group has shown that dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) appear to proliferate more rapidly than their non-stem cell counterparts at elevated temperatures. The study described here has aimed to (i) elucidate optimal temperature in which to culture DFSCs, (ii) determine whether elevated temperatures could enhance differentiation capability of DFSCs and (iii) characterize stem cell and osteogenic marker expression of DFSCs at elevated temperatures. DFSCs obtained from rat first molars were cultured at 37 (control), 38, 39, 40 and 41 ºC. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Alamar blue reduction assay and mean numbers of viable dissociated cells. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated after 7 or 14 days osteogenic induction. Expression of selected marker genes was also assessed during proliferation and differentiation of the cells. Increased cell proliferation was seen at heat-stress temperatures of 38º, 39º and 40 ºC. DFSCs revealed maximal osteogenesis when cultured at 39 and 40 ºC. Moreover, some stem cell and osteogensis-associated markers had elevated expression in heat-stress conditions. Under determined heat-stress conditions, DFSCs increased their proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and expression of some marker genes. Thus, it is likely that elevated temperature could serve as a factor to activate adult stem cells. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Activation of the proliferation and differentiation of dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by heat-stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam Rezai; Wise, Gary E.; Brooks, Hunter; Flanagan, Michael B.; Yao, Shaomian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Adult stem cells (ASCs) are maintained in a slow cycling and quiescent state under normal physiological conditions. This state could be awakened by certain factors, such as injury signals. Previously, we have shown that dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) appear to grow more rapidly than their non-stem cell counterparts at elevated temperatures. This study aimed to (a) elucidate the optimal temperature to grow DFSCs, (b) determine if the elevated temperatures could enhance the differentiation capability of DFSCs, and (c) characterize the stem cell and osteogenic markers expression in DFSCs under elevated temperatures. Materials and methods DFSCs obtained from rat first molar were cultured at 37 (control), 38, 39, 40, and 41°C. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Alamar blue reduction assay and mean number of viable dissociated cells. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated after 7 or 14 days of osteogenic induction. Expression of selected marker genes was also assessed during proliferation and differentiation of the DFSCs. Results Increased cell proliferation was seen at heat-stress temperatures of 38, 39 and 40 °C, DFSCs showed maximal osteogenesis when cultured at 39 and 40°C. Moreover, some stem cell and osteogenic associated markers increased their expression under heat-stress conditions. Conclusions Under proper heat-stress conditions, DFSCs increased proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and expression of some marker genes. Thus, it is likely that elevated temperature could serve as a factor to activate ASCs. PMID:23278983

  6. Self-Biased Differential Rectifier with Enhanced Dynamic Range for Wireless Powering

    KAUST Repository

    Ouda, Mahmoud H.

    2016-08-29

    A self-biased, cross-coupled, differential rectifier is proposed with enhanced power-conversion efficiency over an extended range of input power. A prototype is designed for UHF 433MHz RF power-harvesting applications and is implemented using 0.18μm CMOS technology. The proposed rectifier architecture is compared to the conventional cross-coupled rectifier. It demonstrates an improvement of more than 40% in the rectifier power conversion efficiency (PCE) and an input power range extension of more than 50% relative to the conventional crosscoupled rectifier. A sensitivity of -15.2dBm (30μW) input power for 1V output voltage and a peak power-conversion efficiency of 65% are achieved for a 50kω load. © 2004-2012 IEEE.

  7. Conduction and convection heat transfer characteristics of water-based au nanofluids in a square cavity with differentially heated side walls subjected to constant temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ternik Primož

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the natural convection in a square cavity filled with the water-based Au nanofluid. The cavity is heated on the vertical and cooled from the adjacent wall, while the other two horizontal walls are adiabatic. The governing differential equations have been solved by the standard finite volume method and the hydrodynamic and thermal fields were coupled together using the Boussinesq approximation. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the nanoparticles’ volume fraction on the heat transfer characteristics of Au nanofluids at the given base fluid’s (i.e. water Rayleigh number. Accurate results are presented over a wide range of the base fluid Rayleigh number and the volume fraction of Au nanoparticles. It is shown that adding nanoparticles in a base fluid delays the onset of convection. Contrary to what is argued by many authors, we show by numerical simulations that the use of nanofluids can reduce the heat transfer rate instead of increasing it.

  8. Diabatic heating rate estimates from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Vertically integrated diabatic heating rate estimates (H) calculated from 32 months of European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts daily analyses (May 1985-December 1987) are determined as residuals of the thermodynamic equation in pressure coordinates. Values for global, hemispheric, zonal, and grid point H are given as they vary over the time period examined. The distribution of H is compared with previous results and with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements. The most significant negative correlations between H and OLR occur for (1) tropical and Northern-Hemisphere mid-latitude oceanic areas and (2) zonal and hemispheric mean values for periods less than 90 days. Largest positive correlations are seen in periods greater than 90 days for the Northern Hemispheric mean and continental areas of North Africa, North America, northern Asia, and Antarctica. The physical basis for these relationships is discussed. An interyear comparison between 1986 and 1987 reveals the ENSO signal.

  9. Sex-chromosome differentiation parallels postglacial range expansion in European tree frogs (Hyla arborea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Bertholet, Youna; Wassef, Jérôme; Ghali, Karim; Savary, Romain; Pasteur, Baptiste; Brelsford, Alan; Rozenblut-Kościsty, Beata; Ogielska, Maria; Stöck, Matthias; Perrin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Occasional XY recombination is a proposed explanation for the sex-chromosome homomorphy in European tree frogs. Numerous laboratory crosses, however, failed to detect any event of male recombination, and a detailed survey of NW-European Hyla arborea populations identified male-specific alleles at sex-linked loci, pointing to the absence of XY recombination in their recent history. Here, we address this paradox in a phylogeographic framework by genotyping sex-linked microsatellite markers in populations and sibships from the entire species range. Contrasting with postglacial populations of NW Europe, which display complete absence of XY recombination and strong sex-chromosome differentiation, refugial populations of the southern Balkans and Adriatic coast show limited XY recombination and large overlaps in allele frequencies. Geographically and historically intermediate populations of the Pannonian Basin show intermediate patterns of XY differentiation. Even in populations where X and Y occasionally recombine, the genetic diversity of Y haplotypes is reduced below the levels expected from the fourfold drop in copy numbers. This study is the first in which X and Y haplotypes could be phased over the distribution range in a species with homomorphic sex chromosomes; it shows that XY-recombination patterns may differ strikingly between conspecific populations, and that recombination arrest may evolve rapidly (<5000 generations). © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Application of differential transformation method (DTM for heat and mass transfer in a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepasgozar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a differential transformation method (DTM is used to obtain the solution of momentum and heat transfer equations of non-Newtonian fluid flow in an axisymmetric channel with porous wall. The comparison between the results from the differential transformation method and numerical method are in well agreement which proofs the capability of this method for solving such problems. After this validity, results are investigated for the velocity and temperature for various values of Reynolds number, Prandtl number and power law index.

  11. Thermoregulation during flight: body temperature and sensible heat transfer in free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Jonathan D; Fellows, Spenser R; Frank, Alexander J; Kunz, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Bat wings are important for thermoregulation, but their role in heat balance during flight is largely unknown. More than 80% of the energy consumed during flight generates heat as a by-product, and thus it is expected that bat wings should dissipate large amounts of heat to prevent hyperthermia. We measured rectal (T(r)) and surface (T(s)) temperatures of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) as they emerged from and returned to their daytime roosts and calculated sensible heat transfer for different body regions (head, body, wings, and tail membrane). Bats' T(r) decreased from 36.8°C during emergence flights to 34.4°C during returns, and T(s) scaled positively with ambient temperature (T(a)). Total radiative heat loss from bats was significantly greater for a radiative sink to the night sky than for a sink with temperature equal to T(a). We found that free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats, on average, do not dissipate heat from their wings by convection but instead dissipate radiative heat (L) to the cloudless night sky during flight ([Formula: see text] W). However, within the range of T(a) measured in this study, T. brasiliensis experienced net heat loss between evening emergence and return flights. Regional hypothermia reduces heat loss from wings that are exposed to potentially high convective fluxes. Additional research is needed to establish the role of wings in evaporative cooling during flight in bats.

  12. Measurement of performance of thermoacoustic heat pump in a -3 to 160 °C temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryo; Tsuda, Kenichiro; Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Ueda, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    A thermoacoustic heat pump was constructed and tested. It was composed of a looped tube, a straight tube, and a regenerator. The looped tube contained the regenerator and was connected to the straight tube. The tubes were filled with nitrogen. When an acoustic wave was input to the tubes, a temperature difference formed along the regenerator. Our experiments showed that this heat pump could work as both a cooler and a heater. This heat pump achieved -39 °C as a cooler and 270 °C as a heater. Using antifreeze liquid and oil as heat media, the cooling and heating performance of the heat pump was measured within the temperature range from -3 to 160 °C.

  13. Influence of high range of mass transfer coefficient and convection heat transfer on direct contact membrane distillation performance

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung Gil

    2017-11-03

    In order to improve water production of membrane distillation (MD), the development of high performance membrane having better mass transfer and enhancement of convection heat transfer in MD module have been continuously investigated. This paper presents the relationship between the heat and mass transfer resistance across the membrane and the performance improvement. Various ranges of mass transfer coefficient (MTC) from normal (0.3×10−6 to 2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: currently available membranes) to high (>2.1×10−6kg/m2sPa: membranes under development) were simulated using an experimentally validated model at different ranges of convection heat transfer by varying the inlet flow rates and spacer enhancement factor. The effect of mass transfer and convection heat transfer on the MD performance parameters including temperature polarization coefficient (TPC), mean permeate flux, and specific energy consumption were investigated in a direct contact MD (DCMD) configuration. Results showed that improving the MTC at the low ranges is more important than that at the high ranges where the heat transfer resistance becomes dominant and hence the convection heat transfer coefficient must be increased. Therefore, an effort on designing MD modules using feed and permeate spacers and controlling the membrane surface roughness to increase the convection heat transfer and TPC in the channel aiming to enhance the flux is required because the currently developed mass transfer has almost reached the critical point.

  14. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Design and Fabrication for Systems with Large Pressure Differentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chordia, Lalit [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Portnoff, Marc A. [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Green, Ed [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The project’s main purpose was to design, build and test a compact heat exchanger for supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycle recuperators. The compact recuperator is required to operate at high temperature and high pressure differentials, 169 bar (~2,500 psi), between streams of sCO2. Additional project tasks included building a hot air-to-sCO2 Heater heat exchanger (HX) and design, build and operate a test loop to characterize the recuperator and heater heat exchangers. A novel counter-current microtube recuperator was built to meet the high temperature high differential pressure criteria and tested. The compact HX design also incorporated a number of features that optimize material use, improved reliability and reduced cost. The air-to-sCO2 Heater HX utilized a cross flow, counter-current, micro-tubular design. This compact HX design was incorporated into the test loop and exceeded design expectations. The test loop design to characterize the prototype Brayton power cycle HXs was assembled, commissioned and operated during the program. Both the prototype recuperator and Heater HXs were characterized. Measured results for the recuperator confirmed the predictions of the heat transfer models developed during the project. Heater HX data analysis is ongoing.

  15. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  16. Heat stress and occupational health and safety – spatial and temporal differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażejczyk Krzysztof

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of climatic health hazards on the general population has been discussed in many studies but limited focus is placed on developing a relationship between climate and its effects on occupational health. Long working hours with high physical activity can cause health problems for workers ranging from mild heat cramps to severe heat stroke leading to death. The paper presents the possible risk of heat hazard to outdoor workers, using the example of Warsaw. The heat stress hazard, defined by WBGT values above 26 and 28°C and UTCI above 32 and 38°C, is assessed from two perspectives: its spatial distribution on a local scale and its temporal changes during the 21st century due to climate change. City centre and industrial districts were identified as the places with the greatest heat stress hazard. The number of heat stress days in a year (as predicted for the 21st century is increasing, meaning that heat-related illnesses are more likely to have a direct impact on workers’ health.

  17. Specific heat of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, R.W.L.; Neal, P.D. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Fazeli, F.; Aniolek, M. [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Gezgin, S. [NETZSCH-Geratebau GmbH, Wittelsbacherstr, Selb/Bavaria (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Specific heats of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material have been measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) between 100{sup o}C and 1200{sup c}C using a heating and cooling rate of 20{sup o}C/min. A hysteresis was observed in the specific heat curves between heating and cooling. A maximum value occurs at a higher temperature on heating than on cooling, and the magnitude is larger for cooling when compared to heating. The as-manufactured tube material showed a small enthalpy change during first heating, attributed to decomposition of meta-stable β-Zr; and this did not appear on second heating after being first heated to 1200{sup o}C. Further studies are suggested to characterize the hysteresis behaviour. (author)

  18. Beetle Exoskeleton May Facilitate Body Heat Acting Differentially across the Electromagnetic Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Luis M; Ruiz, Yolanda Jiménez; Lobo, Jorge M

    Exoskeletons of beetles and their associated morphological characteristics can serve many different functions, including thermoregulation. We study the thermal role of the exoskeleton in 13 Geotrupidae dung beetle species using heating experiments under controlled conditions. The main purpose was to measure the influence of heating sources (solar radiance vs. infrared), animal position (dorsal exposure vs. ventral exposure), species identity, and phylogenetic relationships on internal asymptotic temperatures and heating rates. The thermal response was significantly influenced by phylogenetic relatedness, although it was not affected by the apterous condition. The asymptotic internal temperature of specimens was not affected by the thoracic volume but was significantly higher under simulated sunlight conditions than under infrared radiation and when exposed dorsally as opposed to ventrally. There was thus a significant interaction between heating source and body position. Heating rate was negatively and significantly influenced by thoracic volume, and, although insignificantly slower under simulated sunlight, it was significantly affected by body position, being faster under dorsal exposure. The results constitute the first evidence supporting the hypothesis that the beetle exoskeleton acts differentially across the electromagnetic spectrum determining internal body temperatures. This interesting finding suggests the existence of a kind of passive physiology imposed by the exoskeleton and body size, where interspecific relationships play a minor role.

  19. Natural Convection in a Differentially Heated Square Enclosure with a Solid Polygon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3≤N≤∞, the horizontal position, 0.25≤X0≤0.75, the polygon size, 0≤A≤π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1≤Kr≤10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 103≤Ra≤106. The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate.

  20. Differential heat sensitivity index in barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) monitored by chlorophyll a fluorescence OKJIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; El Madidi, Saïd; Strasser, Reto J

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to differentiate the heat tolerance in ten varieties of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) originating from Morocco. Five modern varieties and five landraces (local varieties) collected at five different geographical localities in the south of Morocco were investigated in the present study. After two weeks of growth, detached leaves were short term exposure to various temperatures (25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C) for 10 min in the dark. Two chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters derived from chlorophyll a fluorescence transient (OKJIP) (performance index (PIABS) and relative variable fluorescence at the K-step (VK)) were analysed. Heat treatment had a significant effect on the PIABS and VK at 45 °C treatment and the analysis of variance for PIABS and VK is highly significant between all varieties. The slope of the relationship between logPIABS and VK named heat sensitivity index (HSI) was used to evaluate the thermotolerance of photosystem II (PSII) between the studied barley varieties. According to this approach, barley varieties were screened and ranked for improving heat tolerance. HSI was found to be a new indicator with regard to distinguishing heat tolerance of different barley cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Natural convection in a differentially heated square enclosure with a solid polygon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, R; Saleh, H; Hashim, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present numerical study is to analyze the conjugate natural convection heat transfer in a differentially heated square enclosure containing a conductive polygon object. The left wall is heated and the right wall is cooled, while the horizontal walls are kept adiabatic. The COMSOL Multiphysics software is applied to solve the dimensionless governing equations. The governing parameters considered are the polygon type, 3 ≤ N ≤ ∞, the horizontal position, 0.25 ≤ X 0 ≤ 0.75, the polygon size, 0 ≤ A ≤ π/16, the thermal conductivity ratio, 0.1 ≤ K r ≤ 10.0, and the Rayleigh number, 10(3) ≤ Ra ≤ 10(6). The critical size of the solid polygon was found exists at low conductivities. The heat transfer rate increases with the increase of the size of the solid polygon, until it reaches its maximum value. Here, the size of the solid polygon is reaches its critical value. Further, beyond this critical size of the solid polygon, will decrease the heat transfer rate.

  2. THE HEAT CAPACITY OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES BY DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of the measurement (to 3% accuracy) of the constant-pressure liquid-phase heat capacities of 21 hydrogen-containing fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether (CF3OCF2H) with boiling points ranging from -34.6 to 76.7 C, using diff...

  3. Measurements of the conduction of heat in water vapor, nitrogen and mixtures of these gases in an extended temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohn, A.; Westerdorf, M.

    Experimental and analytical results are presented from trials with heat conduction in water vapor, nitrogen, and mixtures of the two in a cylindrical heat transfer cell. The pressures examined ranged from 100-0.01 mbar, corresponding to Knudsen numbers of 0.01-100. Formulations are defined for the continuum conditions, the free molecule conditions, the transition region, and the momentum equation solution. Experimentation with an instrumented configuration of an inner and outer cylinder over the temperature range 300-725 K is described, noting the use of a vacuum around the inner, gas-filled container in order to measure the radiative heat losses. The results are useful for predicting heat transfer in high altitude flight or among small droplets in natural fogs, cooling towers, and combustion chambers.

  4. Application of a New Dynamic Heating System Model Using a Range of Common Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Fong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the overall heating energy consumptions using various control strategies, secondary heat emitters, and primary plant for a building. Previous research has successfully demonstrated that a dynamic distributed heat emitter model embedded within a simplified third-order lumped parameter building model is capable of achieving improved results when compared to other commercially available modelling tools. With the enhanced ability to capture transient effects of emitter thermal capacity, this research studies the influence of control strategies and primary plant configurations on the rate of energy consumption of a heating system. Four alternative control strategies are investigated: zone feedback; weather-compensated; a combination of both of these methods; and thermostatic control. The plant alternative configurations consist of conventional boilers, biomass boilers, and heat pumps supporting radiator heating and underfloor heating. The performance of the model is tested on a primary school building and can be applied to any residential or commercial building with a heating system. Results show that the new methods reported offer greater detail and rigor in the conduct of building energy modelling.

  5. Equation for differential heat of adsorption (DHA) on a surface with discrete nonuniformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, A.L.

    1978-09-01

    An equation for differential heat of adsorption (DHA) on a surface with discrete nonuniformity, as a function of the amount of adsorbed compound, was derived from an analysis of adsorption equilibria on surfaces having any number of different types of active sites. The equation can be used in calculating the DHA as a function of surface coverage from the known energy spectrum of the active sites and vice versa. Good agreement between calculated and published experimental data was achieved when applying this equation to adsorption of ammonia on NaA, NaX, and NaY zeolites.

  6. Application of differential transformation method in micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer through permeable walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzaaghaian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we applied Differential Transformation Method (DTM to study micropolar fluid flow and heat transfer through a channel with permeable walls. In order to verify the accuracy and validity of the application of this method to this problem, comparison with numerical method (NUM is taken into account. Results reveal that DTM is an appropriate method for approximating solutions of the problem while it is smooth and straightforward to implement. The effect of significant parameters such as the Reynolds number, micro rotation/angular velocity and the Peclet number on the stream function, temperature distribution and concentration characteristics of the fluid, is discussed.

  7. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Stabile, S; Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; De Marco, R; Marcucci, F; Bruno, R; Lavraud, B; De Keyser, J; Consolini, G; Brienza, D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Retinò, A; Vaivads, A; Salatti, M; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas w...

  8. Measurement of Ion Motional Heating Rates over a Range of Trap Frequencies and Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzewicz, C D; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between $\\sim$0.6 and 1.5 MHz and $\\sim$4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below $\\sim$105$^{\\circ}$C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  9. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  10. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  11. Acute Heat Stress Induces Differential Gene Expressions in the Testes of a Broiler-Type Strain of Taiwan Country Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Han; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The expression of testicular genes following acute heat stress has been reported in layer-type roosters, but few similar studies have been conducted on broilers. This study investigated the effect of acute heat stress on the gene expression in the testes of a broiler-type strain of Taiwan country chickens. Roosters were subjected to acute heat stress (38°C) for 4 h, and then exposed to 25°C, with testes collected 0, 2, and 6 h after the cessation of heat stress, using non-heat-stressed roosters as controls (n = 3 roosters per group). The body temperature and respiratory rate increased significantly (pbroiler-type and layer-type chickens. We concluded that the transcriptional responses of testes to acute heat stress may differ between the broiler-type and layer-type roosters. Whether the differential expression patterns associate with the heat-tolerance in the strains require a further exploration. PMID:25932638

  12. Physiological thermal limits predict differential responses of bees to urban heat-island effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, April L; Youngsteadt, Elsa; López-Uribe, Margarita M; Frank, Steven D

    2017-06-01

    Changes in community composition are an important, but hard to predict, effect of climate change. Here, we use a wild-bee study system to test the ability of critical thermal maxima (CTmax, a measure of heat tolerance) to predict community responses to urban heat-island effects in Raleigh, NC, USA. Among 15 focal species, CTmax ranged from 44.6 to 51.3°C, and was strongly predictive of population responses to urban warming across 18 study sites (r(2) = 0.44). Species with low CTmax declined the most. After phylogenetic correction, solitary species and cavity-nesting species (bumblebees) had the lowest CTmax, suggesting that these groups may be most sensitive to climate change. Community responses to urban and global warming will likely retain strong physiological signal, even after decades of warming during which time lags and interspecific interactions could modulate direct effects of temperature. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Thermoeconomic Evaluation of Modular Organic Rankine Cycles for Waste Heat Recovery over a Broad Range of Heat Source Temperatures and Capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Preißinger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Industrial waste heat recovery by means of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC can contribute to the reduction of CO2 emissions from industries. Before market penetration, high efficiency modular concepts have to be developed to achieve appropriate economic value for industrial decision makers. This paper aims to investigate modularly designed ORC systems from a thermoeconomic point of view. The main goal is a recommendation for a suitable chemical class of working fluids, preferable ORC design and a range of heat source temperatures and thermal capacities in which modular ORCs can be economically feasible. For this purpose, a thermoeconomic model has been developed which is based on size and complexity parameters of the ORC components. Special emphasis has been laid on the turbine model. The paper reveals that alkylbenzenes lead to higher exergetic efficiencies compared to alkanes and siloxanes. However, based on the thermoeconomic model, the payback periods of the chemical classes are almost identical. With the ORC design, the developed model and the boundary conditions of this study, hexamethyldisiloxane is a suitable working fluid and leads to a payback period of less than 5 years for a heat source temperature of 400 to 600 °C and a mass flow rate of the gaseous waste heat stream of more than 4 kg/s.

  14. Differential temperature Carnot heat analysis shows that computing machines are thermodynamically irreversible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael C.; Walker, Stuart D.

    2008-07-01

    We perform a differential temperature Carnot analysis of the changes in energy and entropy (degrees of freedom) associated with an ideal classical computing machine. Assuming that Carnot's maximum efficiency law is as equally applicable to a computing machine as to a mechanical machine, we find that useful computation is necessarily dissipative and thermodynamically irreversible. In addition, we find that copying or cloning of information is as dissipative as the original process employed to create the information (through a computation) in the first place. We prove minimum heat dissipation kT ln 2 per output calculation bit, where T is the thermodynamic temperature of unavoidable by-product bits (i.e. not the output calculation bits) rather than a generally assumed 'surrounding environment' temperature. Overall, this places computers into the same category as conventional machines, obeying the second law of thermodynamics and always operating below 100% efficiency, such that a perpetual calculating machine cannot exist.

  15. Genetic diversity and differentiation in a wide ranging anadromous fish, American shad (Alosa sapidissima), is correlated with latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselman, Daniel J; Ricard, Daniel; Bentzen, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Studies that span entire species ranges can provide insight into the relative roles of historical contingency and contemporary factors that influence population structure and can reveal patterns of genetic variation that might otherwise go undetected. American shad is a wide ranging anadromous clupeid fish that exhibits variation in demographic histories and reproductive strategies (both semelparity and iteroparity) and provides a unique perspective on the evolutionary processes that govern the genetic architecture of anadromous fishes. Using 13 microsatellite loci, we examined the magnitude and spatial distribution of genetic variation among 33 populations across the species' range to (i) determine whether signals of historical demography persist among contemporary populations and (ii) assess the effect of different reproductive strategies on population structure. Patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation among populations varied widely and reflect the differential influences of historical demography, microevolutionary processes and anthropogenic factors across the species' range. Sequential reductions of diversity with latitude among formerly glaciated rivers are consistent with stepwise postglacial colonization and successive population founder events. Weak differentiation among U.S. iteroparous populations may be a consequence of human-mediated gene flow, while weak differentiation among semelparous populations probably reflects natural gene flow. Evidence for an effect of reproductive strategy on population structure suggests an important role for environmental variation and suggests that the factors that are responsible for shaping American shad life history patterns may also influence population genetic structure. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  17. Investigations of Temperatures of Phase Transformations of Low-Alloyed Reinforcing Steel within the Heat Treatment Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kargul T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of DSC analysis of steel B500SP produced in the process of continuous casting, which is intended for the production reinforcement rods with high ductility. Studies were carried out in the temperature range below 1000°C in a protective atmosphere of helium during samples heating program. The main objective of the study was to determine the temperature range of austenite structure formation during heating. As a result of performed experiments: Ac1s, Ac1f – temperatures of the beginning and finish of the eutectoid transformation, Ac2 – Curie temperature of the ferrite magnetic transformation and the temperature Ac3 of transformation of proeutectoid ferrite into austenite were elaborated. Experimental determination of phase transformations temperatures of steel B500SP has great importance for production technology of reinforcement rods, because good mechanical properties of rods are formed by the special thermal treatment in Tempcore process.

  18. Optimal homotopy perturbation method for nonlinear differential equations governing MHD Jeffery-Hamel flow with heat transfer problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinca Vasile

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method (OHPM is employed to determine an analytic approximate solution for the nonlinear MHD Jeffery-Hamel flow and heat transfer problem. The Navier-Stokes equations, taking into account Maxwell’s electromagnetism and heat transfer, lead to two nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The results obtained by means of OHPM show very good agreement with numerical results and with Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM results.

  19. Current instabilities under HF electron gas heating in semiconductors with negative differential conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Logvinov, G. N. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Laricheva, N. [Datmouth College, New Hampshire (United States); Mashkevich, O. L. [Kharkov University, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2001-10-01

    A nonlinear temperature dependence of the kinetic coefficients of semiconductor plasma can result in the appearance of regions of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in both the high-frequency (HF) and static current-voltage characteristics (CVC). In the present paper the formation of the static NDC under simultaneous electron gas heating by HF and static electric field is studied. As is shown below, in this case the heating electromagnetic wave has a pronounced effect on the appearance of NDC caused by the overheating mechanisms and the type of the static CVC as a whole. [Spanish] Una dependencia no lineal de la temperatura de los coeficientes cineticos del plasma del semiconductor puede llevar a la aparicion de regiones con conductividad diferencial negativa (CDN) en las caracteristicas corriente voltaje (CCV) de alta frecuencia (AF) y estatica. En este articulo se estudia la formacion de la CDN estatica bajo la accion simultanea del calentamiento del gas de electrones por AF y el campo electrico estatico. Como se muestra mas adelante, en este caso la onda electromagnetica que calienta a los electrones ejerce un fuerte efecto en la aparicion de la CDN; que se obtiene por mecanismos de sobrecalentamiento, y en el tipo de CCV estatica.

  20. Functional differentiation of small heat shock proteins in diapause-destined Artemia embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison M; Toxopeus, Jantina; MacRae, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    Encysted embryos of Artemia franciscana cease development and enter diapause, a state of metabolic suppression and enhanced stress tolerance. The development of diapause-destined Artemia embryos is characterized by the coordinated synthesis of the small heat shock proteins (sHsps) p26, ArHsp21 and ArHsp22, with the latter being stress inducible in adults. The amounts of sHsp mRNA and protein varied in Artemia cysts, suggesting transcriptional and translational regulation. By contrast to p26, knockdown of ArHsp21 by RNA interference had no effect on embryo development. ArHsp21 provided limited protection against stressors such as desiccation and freezing but not heat. ArHsp21 may have a non-essential or unidentified role in cysts. Injection of Artemia adults with amounts of ArHsp22 double-stranded RNA less than those used for other sHsps killed females and males, curtailing the analysis of ArHsp22 function in developing embryos and cysts. The results indicate that diapause-destined Artemia embryos synthesize varying amounts of sHsps as a result of differential gene expression and mRNA translation and also suggest that these sHsps have distinctive functions. © 2013 FEBS.

  1. Differentiated heated lid driven cavity interacting with tube: A lattice Boltzmann study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennacer Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple-relaxation-time (MRT lattice-Boltzmann method is implemented to investigate combined natural and forced convection occurring in a two-dimensional square cavity. The top wall slides to the right at constant speed, while the other three remain stationary. The solution is performed for a left vertical wall at a constant temperature, which is higher than of the right wall. This yields a “cooperating” case, in which dynamic and buoyancy forces are added together. The enclosure is filled with air and contains a heat conducting circular cylinder, which is placed at various positions. The double distribution model used in lattice Boltzmann methods has been adopted to simulate the hydrodynamic and thermal fields, with the D2Q9 and D2Q5 lattices selected to perform the corresponding computations. Simulations have been conducted over a wide range of Rayleigh (Ra and Reynolds (Re numbers, and the features of dynamic and thermal fields are presented for the spectra of this mixed convection phenomenon. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the cylinder position are described and analyzed in terms of the average Nusselt number (Nu. The computed results show the influence of the cylinder on the corresponding heat transfer in the enclosure. It has been found that the power (i.e. shear stress needed to lid the upper surface will depend on the governing parameters.

  2. Differentiation of free-ranging chicken using discriminant analysis of phenotypic traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed M. Al-Atiyat

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study, we investigated the differentiation of five different chicken ecotypes - Center, North, South, West, and East - of Saudi Arabia using discriminate analysis. The analysis was based on nine important morphological and phenotypic traits: body color, beak color, earlobe color, eye color, shank color, comb color, comb type, comb size, and feather distribution. There was a strong significant relationship between the phenotype and effect of geographic height in terms of comb type and earlobe color in males as well as body, beak, eye, and shank color. In particular, the comb type and earlobe color differentiated the ecotypes of males. Among the females, the beak, earlobe, eye, shank color, and feather distribution had more differentiating power. Moreover, the discriminant analysis revealed that the five ecotypes were grouped into three clusters; the Center and the North in one cluster, the West and the South ecotypes in the second for males, and the East ecotype in the last cluster. The female dendogram branching was similar to the male dendrogram branching, except that the Center ecotype was grouped with the North instead of the South. The East ecotype was highly discriminated from the other ecotypes. Nevertheless, the potential of recent individual migration between ecotypes was also noted. Accordingly, the results of the utilized traits in this study might be effective in characterization and conservation of the genetic resources of the Saudi chicken.

  3. Heat Shock Protein Augmentation of Root Hot Water Extract on Adipogenic Differentiation in Murine 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchie Marie L. Lumbera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a high association of heat shock on the alteration of energy and lipid metabolism. The alterations associated with thermal stress are composed of gene expression changes and adaptation through biochemical responses. Previous study showed that Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN root extract promoted adipogenic differentiation in murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes under the normal temperature condition. However, its effect in heat shocked 3T3-L1 cells has not been established. In this study, we investigated the effect of AGN root hot water extract in the adipogenic differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 preadipocytes following heat shock and its possible mechanism of action. Thermal stress procedure was executed within the same stage of preadipocyte confluence (G0 through incubation at 42°C for one hour and then allowed to recover at normal incubation temperature of 37°C for another hour before AGN treatment for both cell viability assay and Oil Red O. Cell viability assay showed that AGN was able to dose dependently (0 to 400 μg/mL increase cell proliferation under normal incubation temperature and also was able to prevent cytotoxicity due to heat shock accompanied by cell proliferation. Confluent preadipocytes were subjected into heat shock procedure, recovery and then AGN treatment prior to stimulation with the differentiation solution. Heat shocked preadipocytes exhibited reduced differentiation as supported by decreased amount of lipid accumulation in Oil Red O staining and triglyceride measurement. However, those heat shocked preadipocytes that then were given AGN extract showed a dose dependent increase in lipid accumulation as shown by both evaluation procedures. In line with these results, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that AGN increased adipogenic differentiation by upregulating heat shock protection related genes and proteins together with the adipogenic markers. These findings imply the potential of

  4. Differential proteomic analysis reveals sequential heat stress-responsive regulatory network in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) taproot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghua; Mei, Yi; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Yan; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liwang

    2018-01-24

    Differential abundance protein species (DAPS) involved in reducing damage and enhancing thermotolerance in radish were firstly identified. Proteomic analysis and omics association analysis revealed a HS-responsive regulatory network in radish. Heat stress (HS) is a major destructive factor influencing radish production and supply in summer, for radish is a cool season vegetable crop being susceptible to high temperature. In this study, the proteome changes of radish taproots under 40 °C treatment at 0 h (Control), 12 h (Heat12) and 24 h (Heat24) were analyzed using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tag for Relative and Absolute Quantification) approach. In total, 2258 DAPS representing 1542 differentially accumulated uniprotein species which respond to HS were identified. A total of 604, 910 and 744 DAPS was detected in comparison of Control vs. Heat12, Control vs. Heat24, and Heat12 vs. Heat24, respectively. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that annexin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, ATP synthase, heat shock protein (HSP) and other stress-related proteins were predominately enriched in signal transduction, stress and defense pathways, photosynthesis and energy metabolic pathways, working cooperatively to reduce stress-induced damage in radish. Based on iTRAQ combined with the transcriptomics analysis, a schematic model of a sequential HS-responsive regulatory network was proposed. The initial sensing of HS occurred at the plasma membrane, and then key components of stress signal transduction triggered heat-responsive genes in the plant protective metabolism to re-establish homeostasis and enhance thermotolerance. These results provide new insights into characteristics of HS-responsive DAPS and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying heat tolerance in radish and other root crops.

  5. Thermal stability and molecular microstructure of heat-induced cereal grains, revealed with Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Majibur Rahman; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-07-03

    The objectives of the present study were to use Raman molecular microspectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to reveal molecular thermal stability and thermal degradation behavior of heat-induced cereal grains and reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein structures of cereal grain tissues affected by heat processing and to quantify the protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modeling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods. Hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal components analysis (PCA) were also conducted to identify molecular differences in the Raman spectra. Three cereal grain seeds, wheat, triticale, and corn, were used as the model for feed protein in the experiment. The specimens were autoclaved (moist heating) and dry-heated (roasted) at 121 °C for 80 min, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results revealed that there are marked differences in the secondary structures of the proteins subjected to various heating treatments of different cereals. The sensitivity of cereals to moist heating was much higher than the sensitivity to dry heating. The multivariate analyses (CLA and PCA) showed that heat treatment was significantly isolated between the different Raman raw spectra. The DSC study revealed that the thermal degradation behavior of cereals was significantly changed after moist- and dry-heat treatments. The position of the major endothermic peak of dry-heated cereals shifted toward a higher temperature, from 131.7 to 134.0 °C, suggesting the high thermal stability of dry-heated cereals. In contrast, the endothermic peak position was slightly decreased to 132.1 °C in the case of moist autoclaved heating. The digestive behavior and nutritive value of rumen-undegradable protein in animals may be related to the changes of the protein secondary molecular structure and thermal stability of the cereal grain materials, which is attributed by Raman microspectroscopy and DSC endotherm profiles.

  6. Use of electronic tongue for differentiation of tomato taste by cultivar, harvest maturity, and chilling or heating exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to evaluate whether an electronic-tongue (etongue) could differentiate “taste” profiles of tomato fruit between different cultivars, harvest maturities, and postharvest chilling or heating exposure. The four cultivars included: two common commercial cultivars, ‘Tyg...

  7. Differential Leucocyte Count and Total Colony Count Changes in Heat Stressed Broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan D. EL Shoukary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to explain the role of additives in alleviation of the negative effect of heat stress on differential leucocytes count, heterophil / lymphocytic ratio with especial studies on the microbial count of duodenum, jejunum, ileum and caecum. A total of 270 day-old (Ross308 broiler chickens randomly divided into 6 groups, which were kept under elevated temperature (34-36◦C and feed diet containing 1% Nigella Sativa (G2 or a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and potassium chloride (0.3% KCL+ 0.5% NaHCO3 (G3 or 2% coriander seed (G4 or 0.03% Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin (G5 or 250 mg of Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C (G6 for 6 weeks. The previous parameters were recorded after slaughtering to take microbial sample and collecting blood parameters. The results explained that, there was a significant increase lymphocyte percentage in case of G2, G3, G4, G5 and G6. while, there was significant decreases in Heterophil percentage, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio (H/L, eosinophils percentage, monocytes percentage, jejunum total colony count and caecum total colony in case of (G2, G3, G4, G5, (G6, G2, G3, G4, G5, (G6, G3, (G5; G2, (G3; G2 and (G2, G4 respectively in compared with control group (P<0.05. It could be concluded that black seed and coriander seed have a positive effect on heat stress broiler diet.

  8. Study on an antagonist differentiated heated lid driven-cavity enclosing a tube: lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Pellerin, Nicolas; Reggio, Marcelo; Bennacer, Rachid

    2017-05-01

    The method of lattice-Boltzmann multiple relaxation time (MRT) is commonly applied to study the conversion system consisting in a combination of forced convection and natural convection occurred in a cavity. Moving the top surface horizontally at a fixed speed, while two vertical walls are applied with constant different temperatures, assuming adiabatic case on both bottom and top walls. We consider a "non-cooperating" situation, where dynamics and buoyancy forces counterbalance. The cavity contains a circular cylinder placed at various positions. Boundary conditions for velocity and temperature have been applied to handle the non-Cartesian boundary of the cylinder. In lattice Boltzmann methods we adopt the double distribution model for calculating both the thermal and hydrodynamic fields. The D2Q5 and D2Q9 lattice are chosen to perform the simulations for a wide range of Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. By calculating the average Nusselt number, we also investigated the influence of different obstacle positions on characteristics of flow and heat transfer. The results show the influence of the obstacle position on the dimensionless numbers, so as to effect the heat transfer behaviors inside the cavity. It is also indicates that the governing parameters are also related to driven power for the upper surface sliding. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  9. Sobre a primeira lei da termodinâmica: as diferenciais do calor e do trabalho On the first law of thermodynamics: heat and work differentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Anacleto

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We treat some subtleties concerning the First Law of Thermodynamics and discuss the inherent difficulties, namely the interpretation of the heat and the work differentials. By proposing a new differential equation for the First Law, which is written using both system and neighborhood variables, we overcome the mentioned difficulties and establish a criterion for the definition of heat and work.

  10. Advances on the time differential three-phase-lag heat conduction model and major open issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Apice, Ciro; Zampoli, Vittorio

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of this short contribution is to summarize the recent achievements concerning the so-called time differential three-phase-lag heat conduction model, contextually focusing attention on some of the numerous open problems associated with such an attractive theory. After having briefly recalled the origin of the model at issue, the restrictions upon the delay times and the constitutive tensors able to make it thermodynamically consistent are recalled. Under these hypotheses, the investigation of the well-posedness issue has already provided important results in terms of uniqueness and continuous dependence of the solutions (even related to the thermoelastic case), as well as in terms of existence of a domain of influence of the assigned data in connection with the thermoelastic model. Finally, some of the main problems currently object of investigation are recalled, including the very challenging issues about the different possible choices of Taylor series expansion orders for the constitutive equation, the interaction of the model with energy processes that take place on the nanoscale, with multi-porous materials and with biological systems.

  11. Differential control of Salmonella heat shock operons by structured mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdins, Annika; Roßmanith, Johanna; Langklotz, Sina; Bandow, Julia E; Narberhaus, Franz

    2013-08-01

    DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroES-GroEL are the major chaperone machineries in bacteria. In many species, dnaKJ and groESL are encoded in bicistronic operons. Quantitative proteomics revealed that DnaK and GroEL amounts in Salmonella dominate over DnaJ and GroES respectively. An imperfect transcriptional terminator in the intergenic region of dnaKJ is known to result in higher transcript levels of the first gene. Here, we examined the groESL operon and asked how the second gene in a heat shock operon can be preferentially expressed and found that an RNA structure in the 5'untranslated region of groES is responsible. The secondary structure masks the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence and AUG start codon and thereby modulates translation of groES mRNA. Reporter gene assays combined with structure probing and toeprinting analysis revealed a dynamic temperature-sensitive RNA structure. Following an increase in temperature, only the second of two RNA hairpins melts and partially liberates the SD sequence, thus facilitating translation. Translation of groEL is not temperature-regulated leading to an excess of the chaperonin in the cell at low temperature. Discussion in a broader context shows how structured RNA segments can differentially control expression of temperature-affected operons in various ways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Method for achieving hydraulic balance in typical Chinese building heating systems by managing differential pressure and flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Jianjun; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic unbalance is a common problem in Chinese district heating (DH) systems. Hydraulic unbalance has resulted in poor flow distribution among heating branches and overheating of apartments. Studies show that nearly 30% of the total heat supply is being wasted in Chinese DH systems due...... to a lack of pressure and flow control. This study investigated using pre-set radiator valves combined with differential pressure (DP) controllers to achieve hydraulic balance in building distribution systems, and consequently save energy and reduce the emissions. We considered a multi-storey building...... modelled in the IDA-ICE software, along with a self-developed mathematical hydraulic model to simulate its heat performance and hydraulic performance with various control scenarios. In contrast to the situation with no pressure or flow control, this solution achieves the required flow distribution...

  13. Genetic Basis of Differential Heat Resistance between Two Species of Congeneric Freshwater Snails: Insights from Quantitative Proteomics and Base Substitution Rate Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Huawei; Sun, Jin; Fang, Ling; Luan, Tiangang; Williams, Gray A; Cheung, Siu Gin; Wong, Chris K C; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2015-10-02

    We compared the heat tolerance, proteomic responses to heat stress, and adaptive sequence divergence in the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata and its noninvasive congener Pomacea diffusa. The LT50 of P. canaliculata was significantly higher than that of P. diffusa. More than 3350 proteins were identified from the hepatopancreas of the snails exposed to acute and chronic thermal stress using iTRAQ-coupled mass spectrometry. Acute exposure (3 h exposure at 37 °C with 25 °C as control) resulted in similar numbers (27 in P. canaliculata and 23 in P. diffusa) of differentially expressed proteins in the two species. Chronic exposure (3 weeks of exposure at 35 °C with 25 °C as control) caused differential expression of more proteins (58 in P. canaliculata and 118 in P. diffusa), with many of them related to restoration of damaged molecules, ubiquitinating dysfunctional molecules, and utilization of energy reserves in both species; but only in P. diffusa was there a shift from carbohydrate to lipid catabolism. Analysis of orthologous genes encoding the differentially expressed proteins revealed two genes having clear evidence of positive selection (Ka/Ks > 1) and seven candidates for more detailed analysis of positive selection (Ka/Ks between 0.5 and 1). These nine genes are related to energy metabolism, cellular oxidative homeostasis, signaling, and binding processes. Overall, the proteomic and base substitution rate analyses indicate genetic basis of differential resistance to heat stress between the two species, and such differences could affect their further range expansion in a warming climate.

  14. Differentiating a Diverse Range of Volatile Organic Compounds with Polyfluorophore Sensors Built on a DNA Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared using combinatoria...

  15. Reversible amorphous-crystalline phase changes in a wide range of Se(1-x)Te(x) alloys studied using ultrafast differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Paul A; Momand, Jamo; Kooi, Bart J

    2014-07-14

    The reversible amorphous-crystalline phase change in a chalcogenide material, specifically the Se1-xTex alloy, has been investigated for the first time using ultrafast differential scanning calorimetry. Heating rates and cooling rates up to 5000 K/s were used. Repeated reversible amorphous-crystalline phase switching was achieved by consecutively melting, melt-quenching, and recrystallizing upon heating. Using a well-conditioned method, the composition of a single sample was allowed to shift slowly from 15 at. %Te to 60 at. %Te, eliminating sample-to-sample variability from the measurements. Using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy composition analysis, the onset of melting for different Te-concentrations was confirmed to coincide with the literature solidus line, validating the use of the onset of melting Tm as a composition indicator. The glass transition Tg and crystallization temperature Tc could be determined accurately, allowing the construction of extended phase diagrams. It was found that Tm and Tg increase (but Tg/Tm decrease slightly) with increasing Te-concentration. Contrarily, the Tc decreases substantially, indicating that the amorphous phase becomes progressively unfavorable. This coincides well with the observation that the critical quench rate to prevent crystallization increases about three orders of magnitude with increasing Te concentration. Due to the employment of a large range of heating rates, non-Arrhenius behavior was detected, indicating that the undercooled liquid SeTe is a fragile liquid. The activation energy of crystallization was found to increase 0.5-0.6 eV when the Te concentration increases from 15 to 30 at. % Te, but it ceases to increase when approaching 50 at. % Te.

  16. Retrieval interval mapping: a tool to visualize the impact of the spectral retrieval range on differential optical absorption spectroscopy evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vogel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the retrieval parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. Of these parameters, the retrieval wavelength range is one of the most important ones. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach for finding the optimal retrieval wavelength range and quantitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to visualize the effect of different evaluation wavelength ranges. It is based on mapping retrieved column densities in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualizing the consequences of different choices of spectral retrieval ranges caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and instrumental features. Based on the information gathered, an optimal retrieval wavelength range may be determined systematically.

    The technique is demonstrated using examples of a theoretical study of BrO retrievals for stratospheric BrO and BrO measurements in volcanic plumes. However, due to the general nature of the tool, it is applicable to any type of DOAS retrieval (active or passive.

  17. In-situ probing of metallic glass formation and crystallization upon heating and cooling via fast differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-06-01

    The crystallization of small-scale Au-based metallic glass samples was investigated by fast differential scanning calorimetry. Rapid cooling and heating makes possible in-situ probing of glass formation from the supercooled liquid state or direct transition from the glassy state to the equilibrium liquid and, thereby, the determination of a critical cooling (Φc ˜ 600 Ks-1) and heating rate (Φh ˜ 6 × 103 Ks-1) for crystallization. Crystallization kinetics was studied in the whole supercooled liquid region by linear heating and isothermal calorimetry. We show that the temperature dependence of crystal growth is reflected in a "Kissinger plot" for Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 and compares well with a model for crystal growth in a glassy system. Linear heating and isothermal measurements after heating the glass show that its crystallization is always growth-controlled up to its temperature of melting. In contrast, for a low degree of direct undercooling from the equilibrium liquid isothermal crystallization is nucleation-controlled, whereas it is again growth-controlled at large undercooling. The overall crystallization behavior of the metallic glass is presented in a complete time-temperature-transformation map on cooling and, so far not accessible, on heating after various cooling procedures.

  18. Differential responses of invasive and native plants to warming with simulated changes in diurnal temperature ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Ming; Gao, Yang; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2017-07-01

    Although many studies have documented the effects of global warming on invasive plants, little is known about whether the effects of warming on plant invasion differ depending on the imposed change in different diurnal temperature ranges (DTR). We tested the impact of warming with DTR change on seed germination and seedling growth of eight species in the family Asteraceae. Four of these are invasive (Eupatorium catarium, Mikania micrantha, Biodens pilosa var. radiate, Ageratum conyzoides) in China, and four are native (Sonchus arvensis, Senecios candens, Pterocypsela indica, Eupatorium fortunei). Four temperature treatments were set in growth chambers (three warming by 3 °C with different DTRs and control), and experiments were run to mimic wintertime and summertime conditions. The control treatment (Tc ) was set to the mean temperature for the corresponding time of year, and the three warming treatments were symmetric (i.e. equal night-and-day) (DTRsym), asymmetric warming with increased (DTRinc) and decreased (DTRdec) DTR. The warming treatments did not affect seed germination of invasive species under any of the conditions, but DTRsym and DTRinc increased seed germination of natives relative to the control, suggesting that warming may not increase success of these invasive plant species via effects on seed germination of invasive plants relative to native plants. The invasive plants had higher biomass and greater stem allocation than the native ones under all of the warming treatments. Wintertime warming increased the biomass of the invasive and wintertime DTRsym and DTRinc increased that of the native plants, whereas summertime asymmetric warming decreased the biomass of the invasives but not the natives. Therefore, warming may not facilitate invasion of these invasive species due to the suppressive effects of summertime warming (particularly the asymmetric warming) on growth. Compared with DTRsym, DTRdec decreased the biomass of both the invasive and native

  19. Differentiating a diverse range of volatile organic compounds with polyfluorophore sensors built on a DNA scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samain, Florent; Dai, Nan; Kool, Eric T

    2011-01-03

    Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which DNA bases are replaced with fluorophores. A preliminary study reported that some sequences of ODFs were able to respond to a few organic small molecules in the vapor phase, giving a change in fluorescence. Here, we follow up on this finding by investigating a larger range of volatile organic analytes, and a considerably larger set of sensors. A library of tetramer ODFs of 2401 different sequences was prepared by using combinatorial methods, and was screened in air for fluorescence responses to a set of ten different volatile organics, including multiple aromatic and aliphatic compounds, acids and bases, varied functional groups, and closely related structures. Nineteen responding sensors were selected and characterized. These sensors were cross-screened against all ten analytes, and responses were measured qualitatively (by changes in color and intensity) and quantitatively (by measuring ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values averaged over five to six sensor beads; R=red, G=green, B=blue). The results show that sensor responses were diverse, with a single sensor responding differently to as many as eight of the ten analytes; multiple classes of responses were seen, including quenching, lighting-up, and varied shifts in wavelength. Responses were strong, with raw ΔR, ΔG, and ΔB values of as high as >200 on a 256-unit scale and unamplified changes in many cases apparent to the naked eye. Sensors were identified that could distinguish clearly between even very closely related compounds such as acrolein and acrylonitrile. Statistical methods were applied to select a small set of four sensors that, as a pattern response, could distinguish between all ten analytes with high confidence. Sequence analysis of the full set of sensors suggested that sequence/order of the monomer components, and not merely composition, was highly important in the responses. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Heat capacities and volumetric changes in the glass transition range: a constitutive approach based on the standard linear solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Alexander; Mittermeier, Christoph; Johlitz, Michael

    2017-09-01

    A novel approach to represent the glass transition is proposed. It is based on a physically motivated extension of the linear viscoelastic Poynting-Thomson model. In addition to a temperature-dependent damping element and two linear springs, two thermal strain elements are introduced. In order to take the process dependence of the specific heat into account and to model its characteristic behaviour below and above the glass transition, the Helmholtz free energy contains an additional contribution which depends on the temperature history and on the current temperature. The model describes the process-dependent volumetric and caloric behaviour of glass-forming materials, and defines a functional relationship between pressure, volumetric strain, and temperature. If a model for the isochoric part of the material behaviour is already available, for example a model of finite viscoelasticity, the caloric and volumetric behaviour can be represented with the current approach. The proposed model allows computing the isobaric and isochoric heat capacities in closed form. The difference c_p -c_v is process-dependent and tends towards the classical expression in the glassy and equilibrium ranges. Simulations and theoretical studies demonstrate the physical significance of the model.

  1. Introducing differential expression of human heat shock protein 27 in hepatocellular carcinoma: moving toward identification of cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rizma; Siddiqui, Nadir Naveed; Ul Haq, Ahtesham; Rahman, M Ataur

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it has to be acknowledged that overexpressed heat shock protein B27 (HSPB27) have been implicated in the etiology of wide range of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanism leading to the disease initiation to progression in liver cancer is still unknown. Present work was undertaken to investigate the differentially expressed HSPB27 in association with those damages that lead to liver cancer development. For the identification of liver cancer biomarker, samples were subjected to comparative proteomic analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and were further validated by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. After validation, in silico studies were applied to demonstrate the significantly induced phosphorylated and S-nitrosylated signals. The later included the interacting partner of HSPB27, i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase-3 and 5 (MAPK3 and 5), ubiquitin C (UBC), v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and tumor protein p53 (TP53), which bestowed with critical capabilities, namely, apoptosis, cell cycling, stress activation, tumor suppression, cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and stress resistance. Taking together, these results shed new light on the potential biomarker HSPB27 that overexpression of HSPB27 did lead to upregulation of their interacting partner that together demonstrate their possible role as a novel tumor progressive agent for the treatment of metastasis in liver cancer. HSPB27 is a promising diagnostic marker for liver cancer although further large-scale studies are required. Also, molecular profiling may help pave the road to the discovery of new therapies.

  2. Differential heat shock response of primary human cell cultures and established cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, W W; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    degrees C treatment, whereas in immortalized cell lines usually 90% of the cells were found in suspension. Enhanced expression of the major heat shock protein (hsp 70) was found in all heat-treated cells. In contrast to the primary cell cultures, established and transformed cell lines synthesized...

  3. Modelling the heat dynamics of a building using stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Kaae; Madsen, Henrik; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    2000-01-01

    variations. Besides modelling the heat transfer between thermal zones, attention is put on modelling the heat input from radiators and solar radiation. The applied modelling procedure is based on collected building performance data and statistical methods. The statistical methods are used in parameter...

  4. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  5. Radicicol, a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, inhibits differentiation and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yonghan [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223 (China); Li, Ying [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China); Zhang, Shuocheng [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Perry, Ben [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Zhao, Tiantian [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, Canada M1C 1A4 (Canada); Wang, Yanwen, E-mail: yanwen.wang@nrc.ca [Aquatic and Crop Resource Development, Life Sciences Branch, National Research Council Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Sun, Changhao, E-mail: sun2002changhao@yahoo.com [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Radicicol suppressed intracellular fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Radicicol inhibited the expression of FAS and FABP4. •Radicicol blocked cell cycle at the G1-S phase during cell differentiation. •Radicicol inhibited the PDK1/Akt pathway in adipocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is involved in various cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As adipocyte differentiation plays a critical role in obesity development, the present study investigated the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol on the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and potential mechanisms. The cells were treated with different concentrations of radicicol during the first 8 days of cell differentiation. Adipogenesis, the expression of adipogenic transcriptional factors, differentiation makers and cell cycle were determined. It was found that radicicol dose-dependently decreased intracellular fat accumulation through down-regulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR{sub γ}) and CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBP{sub α}), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that radicicol blocked cell cycle at G1-S phase. Radicicol redcued the phosphorylation of Akt while showing no effect on β-catenin expression. Radicicol decreased the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). The results suggest that radicicol inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation through affecting the PDK1/Akt pathway and subsequent inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and the expression/activity of adipogenic transcriptional factors and their downstream adipogenic proteins.

  6. Dispersal in the sub-Antarctic: king penguins show remarkably little population genetic differentiation across their range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Gemma V; Younger, Jane L; Kao, Damian; Rogers, Alex D; Handley, Jonathan; Miller, Gary D; Jouventin, Pierre; Nolan, Paul; Gharbi, Karim; Miller, Karen J; Hart, Tom

    2016-10-13

    Seabirds are important components of marine ecosystems, both as predators and as indicators of ecological change, being conspicuous and sensitive to changes in prey abundance. To determine whether fluctuations in population sizes are localised or indicative of large-scale ecosystem change, we must first understand population structure and dispersal. King penguins are long-lived seabirds that occupy a niche across the sub-Antarctic zone close to the Polar Front. Colonies have very different histories of exploitation, population recovery, and expansion. We investigated the genetic population structure and patterns of colonisation of king penguins across their current range using a dataset of 5154 unlinked, high-coverage single nucleotide polymorphisms generated via restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq). Despite breeding at a small number of discrete, geographically separate sites, we find only very slight genetic differentiation among colonies separated by thousands of kilometers of open-ocean, suggesting migration among islands and archipelagos may be common. Our results show that the South Georgia population is slightly differentiated from all other colonies and suggest that the recently founded Falkland Island colony is likely to have been established by migrants from the distant Crozet Islands rather than nearby colonies on South Georgia, possibly as a result of density-dependent processes. The observed subtle differentiation among king penguin colonies must be considered in future conservation planning and monitoring of the species, and demographic models that attempt to forecast extinction risk in response to large-scale climate change must take into account migration. It is possible that migration could buffer king penguins against some of the impacts of climate change where colonies appear panmictic, although it is unlikely to protect them completely given the widespread physical changes projected for their Southern Ocean foraging grounds

  7. Potential effect of atmospheric warming on grapevine phenology and post-harvest heat accumulation across a range of climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew; Mathews, Adam J.; Holzapfel, Bruno P.

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrates are accumulated within the perennial structure of grapevines when their production exceeds the requirements of reproduction and growth. The period between harvest and leaf-fall (the post-harvest period) is a key period for carbohydrate accumulation in relatively warmer grape-growing regions. The level of carbohydrate reserves available for utilisation in the following season has an important effect on canopy growth and yield potential and is therefore an important consideration in vineyard management. In a warming climate, the post-harvest period is lengthening and becoming warmer, evidenced through studies in wine regions worldwide that have correlated recent air temperature increases with changing grapevine phenology. Budbreak, flowering, veraison, and harvest have all been observed to be occurring earlier than in previous decades. Additionally, the final stage of the grapevine phenological cycle, leaf-fall, occurs later. This study explored the potential for increased post-harvest carbohydrate accumulation by modelling heat accumulation following harvest dates for the recent climate (1975-2004) and two warmer climate projections with mean temperature anomalies of +1.26 and +2.61 °C. Summaries of post-harvest heat accumulation between harvest and leaf-fall were produced for each of Australia's Geographical Indications (wine regions) to provide comparisons from the base temperatures to projected warmer conditions across a range of climates. The results indicate that for warmer conditions, all regions observe earlier occurring budbreak and harvest as well as increasing post-harvest growing degree days accumulation before leaf-fall. The level of increase varies depending upon starting climatic condition, with cooler regions experiencing the greatest change.

  8. An adiabatic calorimeter for heat capacity measurements of polyurethane foam with blowing agent of HFC245fa in the temperature range 60-290K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.G.; Xu, L.; Zhang, L.Q.; Chen, N. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2006-06-15

    In order to meet the urgent need of heat insulating materials used under low temperature in the area of aerospace, a new polyurethane (PU) foam with HFC245fa as blowing agent was developed. In this paper, the heat capacity in the temperature range of 60-290K of the new material was measured through an automated adiabatic calorimeter, which was composed of a heat insulation system, a power measuring system, a vacuum pumping system and a cooling system. The sample cell of the calorimeter was equipped with a miniature platinum thermometer surrounded by two adiabatic shields and housed in a high vacuum can. The temperature differences among the sample cell and the inner and outer adiabatic shields could be adjusted automatically to less than 0.05K, all which ensure there was no heat exchange between the sample and surroundings. Under these conditions, the mathematical formulation of the sample with the physical model was given. Through measuring the heat capacity of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is a standard reference material, a relatively high reliability with a deviation of +/-2.5% of this adiabatic calorimeter was shown compared with the standard data. The results indicate that the newly developed PU foam has a higher heat capacity compared with other heat insulating materials, and there is no obvious sign of any phase transition or thermal anomaly in the entire temperature range. That is to say, the material is thermodynamically stable when used in the low temperature range. (author)

  9. An adiabatic calorimeter for heat capacity measurements of polyurethane foam with blowing agent of HFC245fa in the temperature range 60-290 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.G. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: chunguang_yang@sjtu.edu.cn; Xu, L. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, L.Q. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chen, N. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2006-06-15

    In order to meet the urgent need of heat insulating materials used under low temperature in the area of aerospace, a new PU foam with HFC245fa as blowing agent was developed. In this paper, the heat capacity in the temperature range of 60-290 K of the new material was measured through an automated adiabatic calorimeter, which was composed of a heat insulation system, a power measuring system, a vacuum pumping system and a cooling system. The sample cell of the calorimeter was equipped with a miniature platinum thermometer surrounded by two adiabatic shields and housed in a high vacuum can. The temperature differences among the sample cell and the inner and outer adiabatic shields could be adjusted automatically to less than 0.05 K, all which ensure there was no heat exchange between the sample and surroundings. Under these conditions, the mathematical formulation of the sample with the physical model was given. Through measuring the heat capacity of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which is a standard reference material, a relatively high reliability with a deviation of {+-}2.5% of this adiabatic calorimeter was shown compared with the standard data. The results indicate that the newly developed PU foam has a higher heat capacity compared with other heat insulating materials, and there is no obvious sign of any phase transition or thermal anomaly in the entire temperature range. That is to say, the material is thermodynamically stable when used in the low temperature range.

  10. Empirical singular vectors of baroclinic flows deduced from experimental data of a differentially heated rotating annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hoff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Instability is related to exponentially growing eigenmodes. Interestingly, when finite time intervals are considered, growth rates of certain initial perturbations can exceed the growth rates of the most unstable modes. Moreover, even when all modes are damped, such particular initial perturbations can still grow during finite time intervals. The perturbations with the largest growth rates are called singular vectors (SVs or optimal perturbations. They not only play an important role in atmospheric ensemble predictions, but also for the theory of instability and turbulence. Starting point for a classical SV-analysis is a linear dynamical system with a known system matrix. In contrast to this traditional approach, measured data are used here to estimate the linear propagator. For this estimation, a method is applied that uses the covariances of the measured time series to find the principal oscillation patterns (POPs that are the empirically estimated linear eigenmodes of the system. By using the singular value decomposition (SVD, we can estimate the modes of maximal growth of the propagator which are thus the empirically estimated SVs. These modes can be understood as a superposition of POPs that form a complete but in general non-orthogonal basis. The data used, originate from a differentially heated rotating annulus laboratory experiment. This experiment is an analogue of the earth's atmosphere and is used to study the development of baroclinic waves in a well controlled and reproducible way without the need of numerical approximations. Baroclinic waves form the background for many studies on SV growth and it is thus straight forward to apply the technique of empirical SV estimation to these laboratory data. To test the method of SV estimation, we use a quasi-geostrophic barotropic model and compare the known SVs from that model with SVs estimated from a surrogate data set that was generated with the help of the exact model propagator and some

  11. Automatic differentiation for gradient-based optimization of radiatively heated microelectronics manufacturing equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moen, C.D.; Spence, P.A.; Meza, J.C.; Plantenga, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Automatic differentiation is applied to the optimal design of microelectronic manufacturing equipment. The performance of nonlinear, least-squares optimization methods is compared between numerical and analytical gradient approaches. The optimization calculations are performed by running large finite-element codes in an object-oriented optimization environment. The Adifor automatic differentiation tool is used to generate analytic derivatives for the finite-element codes. The performance results support previous observations that automatic differentiation becomes beneficial as the number of optimization parameters increases. The increase in speed, relative to numerical differences, has a limited value and results are reported for two different analysis codes.

  12. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ(4) chain, at the same kinetic temperature T(0), but at different configurational temperatures--one end hotter and the other end colder than T(0). While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  13. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ4 chain, at the same kinetic temperature T0, but at different configurational temperatures—one end hotter and the other end colder than T0. While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  14. Heat stress differentially modifies ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in pea floral and fruit tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savada, Raghavendra P; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Jayasinghege, Charitha P A; Waduthanthri, Kosala D; Reinecke, Dennis M

    2017-10-01

    Ethylene biosynthesis is regulated in reproductive tissues in response to heat stress in a manner to optimize resource allocation to pollinated fruits with developing seeds. High temperatures during reproductive development are particularly detrimental to crop fruit/seed production. Ethylene plays vital roles in plant development and abiotic stress responses; however, little is known about ethylene's role in reproductive tissues during development under heat stress. We assessed ethylene biosynthesis and signaling regulation within the reproductive and associated tissues of pea during the developmental phase that sets the stage for fruit-set and seed development under normal and heat-stress conditions. The transcript abundance profiles of PsACS [encode enzymes that convert S-adenosyl-L-methionine to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)] and PsACO (encode enzymes that convert ACC to ethylene), and ethylene evolution were developmentally, environmentally, and tissue-specifically regulated in the floral/fruit/pedicel tissues of pea. Higher transcript abundance of PsACS and PsACO in the ovaries, and PsACO in the pedicels was correlated with higher ethylene evolution and ovary senescence and pedicel abscission in fruits that were not pollinated under control temperature conditions. Under heat-stress conditions, up-regulation of ethylene biosynthesis gene expression in pre-pollinated ovaries was also associated with higher ethylene evolution and lower retention of these fruits. Following successful pollination and ovule fertilization, heat-stress modified PsACS and PsACO transcript profiles in a manner that suppressed ovary ethylene evolution. The normal ethylene burst in the stigma/style and petals following pollination was also suppressed by heat-stress. Transcript abundance profiles of ethylene receptor and signaling-related genes acted as qualitative markers of tissue ethylene signaling events. These data support the hypothesis that ethylene biosynthesis is

  15. On the Inverse Problem of the Fractional Heat-Like Partial Differential Equations: Determination of the Source Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülcan Özkum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study in this paper mainly concerns the inverse problem of determining an unknown source function in the linear fractional differential equation with variable coefficient using Adomian decomposition method (ADM. We apply ADM to determine the continuous right hand side functions fx and ft in the heat-like diffusion equations Dtαux,t=hxuxxx,t+fx and Dtαux,t=hxuxxx,t+ft, respectively. The results reveal that ADM is very effective and simple for the inverse problem of determining the source function.

  16. Identification by a differential proteomic approach of heat shock protein 27 as a potential marker of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Duran, Mari Carmen; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that normal and pathological vessel walls display a differential pattern of secreted proteins. We have recently set up the conditions for comparing secretomes from carotid atherosclerotic plaques and control arteries using a proteomic approach to assess whether...... differentially secreted proteins could represent markers for atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Normal endartery segments and different regions of endarterectomy pieces (noncomplicated/complicated plaques) were incubated in protein-free medium, and the released proteins were analyzed by 2D electrophoresis (2......-DE). Among the differently secreted proteins, we have identified heat shock protein-27 (HSP27). Surprisingly, compared with control arteries, HSP27 release was drastically decreased in atherosclerotic plaques and barely detectable in complicated plaque supernatants. HSP27 was expressed primarily...

  17. Shape Memory Alloys for Monitoring Minor Over-Heating/Cooling Based on the Temperature Memory Effect via Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. X.; Huang, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development in the temperature memory effect (TME) via differential scanning calorimetry in shape memory alloys is briefly discussed. This phenomenon was also called the thermal arrest memory effect in the literature. However, these names do not explicitly reveal the potential application of this phenomenon in temperature monitoring. On the other hand, the standard testing process of the TME has great limitation. Hence, it cannot be directly applied for temperature monitoring in most of the real engineering applications in which temperature fluctuation occurs mostly in a random manner within a certain range. However, as shown here, after proper modification, we are able to monitor the maximum or minimum temperature in either over-heating or over-cooling with reasonable accuracy.

  18. Shape Memory Alloys for Monitoring Minor Over-Heating/Cooling Based on the Temperature Memory Effect via Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. X.; Huang, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    The recent development in the temperature memory effect (TME) via differential scanning calorimetry in shape memory alloys is briefly discussed. This phenomenon was also called the thermal arrest memory effect in the literature. However, these names do not explicitly reveal the potential application of this phenomenon in temperature monitoring. On the other hand, the standard testing process of the TME has great limitation. Hence, it cannot be directly applied for temperature monitoring in most of the real engineering applications in which temperature fluctuation occurs mostly in a random manner within a certain range. However, as shown here, after proper modification, we are able to monitor the maximum or minimum temperature in either over-heating or over-cooling with reasonable accuracy.

  19. Who r u?: On the (in)accuracy of incumbent-based estimates of range restriction in criterion-related and differential validity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Philip L; Le, Huy; Oh, In-Sue; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Robbins, Steven B

    2017-05-01

    Correcting validity estimates for selection procedures for range restriction typically involves comparing variance in predictor scores between all job applicants and applicants who were selected. However, some research on criterion-related and differential validity of cognitive ability tests has relied on range restriction corrections based on data from job incumbents. Unfortunately, there remains ambiguity concerning the accuracy of this incumbent-based approach vis-à-vis the applicant-based approach. To address this issue, we conducted several Monte Carlo simulations, as well as an analysis of college admissions data. Our first simulation study showed that incumbent-based range restriction corrections result in downwardly biased estimates of criterion-related validity, whereas applicant-based corrections were quite accurate. Our second set of simulations showed that incumbent-based range restriction corrections can produce evidence of differential validity when there is no differential validity in the population. In contrast, applicant-based corrections tended to accurately estimate population parameters and showed little, if any, evidence of differential validity when there is no differential validity in the population. Analysis of data for the ACT as a predictor of academic performance revealed similar patterns of bias for incumbent-based corrections in an academic setting. Overall, the present findings raise serious concerns regarding the use of incumbent-based range restriction corrections in lieu of applicant-based corrections. They also cast doubt on recent evidence for differential validity of predictors of job performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Physiological and molecular evidence of differential short-term heat tolerance in Mediterranean seagrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Guirao, Lazaro; Ruiz, Juan M.; Dattolo, Emanuela; Garcia-Munoz, Rocio; Procaccini, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    The increase in extreme heat events associated to global warming threatens seagrass ecosystems, likely by affecting key plant physiological processes such as photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding species’ ability to acclimate to warming is crucial to better predict their future trends. Here, we study tolerance to warming in two key Mediterranean seagrasses, Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa. Stress responses of shallow and deep plants were followed during and after short-term heat exposure in mesocosms by coupling photo-physiological measures with analysis of expression of photosynthesis and stress-related genes. Contrasting tolerance and capacity to heat acclimation were shown by shallow and deep P. oceanica ecotypes. While shallow plants acclimated through respiratory homeostasis and activation of photo-protective mechanisms, deep ones experienced photosynthetic injury and impaired carbon balance. This suggests that P. oceanica ecotypes are thermally adapted to local conditions and that Mediterranean warming will likely diversely affect deep and shallow meadow stands. On the other hand, contrasting mechanisms of heat-acclimation were adopted by the two species. P. oceanica regulates photosynthesis and respiration at the level of control plants while C. nodosa balances both processes at enhanced rates. These acclimation discrepancies are discussed in relation to inherent attributes of the two species.

  1. Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide-Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiozis, A.N.

    2007-05-15

    This document serves as the final report documenting work completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Fraunhofer Institute in Building Physics (Holzkirchen, Germany) under an international CRADA No. 0575 with Fraunhofer Institute of Bauphysics of the Federal Republic of Germany for Researching Complex Heat, Air and Moisture Interactions for a Wide Range of Building Envelope Systems and Environmental Loads. This CRADA required a multi-faceted approach to building envelope research that included a moisture engineering approach by blending extensive material property analysis, laboratory system and sub-system thermal and moisture testing, and advanced moisture analysis prediction performance. The Participant's Institute for Building physics (IBP) and the Contractor's Buildings Technology Center (BTC) identified potential research projects and activities capable of accelerating and advancing the development of innovative, low energy and durable building envelope systems in diverse climates. This allowed a major leverage of the limited resources available to ORNL to execute the required Department of Energy (DOE) directives in the area of moisture engineering. A joint working group (ORNL and Fraunhofer IBP) was assembled and a research plan was executed from May 2000 to May 2005. A number of key deliverables were produced such as adoption of North American loading into the WUFI-software. in addition the ORNL Weather File Analyzer was created and this has been used to address environmental loading for a variety of US climates. At least 4 papers have been co-written with the CRADA partners, and a chapter in the ASTM Manual 40 on Moisture Analysis and Condensation Control. All deliverables and goals were met and exceeded making this collaboration a success to all parties involves.

  2. Satellite monitoring of different vegetation types by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS in the red spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the satellite remote sensing of different types of vegetation and ocean colour is presented. In contrast to existing algorithms relying on the strong change of the reflectivity in the red and near infrared spectral region, our method analyses weak narrow-band (few nm reflectance structures (i.e. "fingerprint" structures of vegetation in the red spectral range. It is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS, which is usually applied for the analysis of atmospheric trace gas absorptions. Since the spectra of atmospheric absorption and vegetation reflectance are simultaneously included in the analysis, the effects of atmospheric absorptions are automatically corrected (in contrast to other algorithms. The inclusion of the vegetation spectra also significantly improves the results of the trace gas retrieval. The global maps of the results illustrate the seasonal cycles of different vegetation types. In addition to the vegetation distribution on land, they also show patterns of biological activity in the oceans. Our results indicate that improved sets of vegetation spectra might lead to more accurate and more specific identification of vegetation type in the future.

  3. Heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B and fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel ranging 50 to 70°C: ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, R.; Shinozuka, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2016-03-01

    We studied heating drug delivery to vascular wall with Rhodamine B ranging 50 to 70°C ex vivo study. Porcine carotid artery was dipped in the heated Rhodamine B solution in 15 s and then cooled by 37°C saline. Rhodamine B concentration distribution in the vascular wall cross-section was measured by a fluorescence microscope using 550 nm for excitation and 620 nm emission for fluorescence detection. The total amount of measured fluorescence in the vascular wall was calculated as a indication of delivered Rhodamine B quantity. The delivered Rhodamine B quantity was increased with increasing heating temperature with 50 to 70°C. In the cases of 60 to 70°C heating, the delivered Rhodamine B quantity was 3.1 to 23.3 fold by that of 37°C. Defined penetration depth of the delivered Rhodamine B in the vascular wall was also significantly increased with 65°C and 70°C heating. We also studied heating drug delivery to the vascular wall with fluorescence labeled Paclitaxel with 70°C in 15 s and 60 s heating ex vivo. In both contact duration, the delivered Paclitaxel quantity was increased. To understand these drug delivery enhancement effects, we investigated the vascular cross-sectional structure change by the heating. Some holes over 50 nm in diameter appeared on the internal elastic lamina with 70°C heating. We prospected that vascular surface structure change by the heating might enhance drug delivery to the vascular wall.

  4. Climate of Earth-Like Planets With and Without Ocean Heat Transport Orbiting a Range of M and K Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Jablonski, Emma R.; Way, Michael J.; Del Genio, Anthony; Roberge, Aki

    2015-01-01

    The mean surface temperature of a planet is now acknowledged as insufficient to surmise its full potential habitability. Advancing our understanding requires exploration with 3D general circulation models (GCMs), which can take into account how gradients and fluxes across a planet's surface influence the distribution of heat, clouds, and the potential for heterogeneous distribution of liquid water. Here we present 3D GCM simulations of the effects of alternative stellar spectra, instellation, model resolution, and ocean heat transport, on the simulated distribution of heat and moisture of an Earth-like planet (ELP).

  5. Numerical simulation for Jeffery-Hamel flow and heat transfer of micropolar fluid based on differential evolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmat Ara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the Jeffery-Hamel flow of an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid inside non-parallel walls and observes the influence of heat transfer in the flow field. The fluid is considered to be micropolar fluid that flows in a convergent/divergent channel. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs are converted to nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs with the help of a suitable similarity transformation. The resulting nonlinear analysis is determined analytically with the utilization of the Taylor optimization method based on differential evolution (DE algorithm. In order to understand the flow field, the effects of pertinent parameters such as the coupling parameter, spin gradient viscosity parameter and the Reynolds number have been examined on velocity and temperature profiles. It concedes that the good results can be attained by an implementation of the proposed method. Ultimately, the accuracy of the method is confirmed by comparing the present results with the results obtained by Runge-Kutta method.

  6. Method for achieving hydraulic balance in typical Chinese building heating systems by managing differential pressure and flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Jianjun; Thorsen, Jan Eric

    2017-01-01

    and close-to-design room temperatures, as well as 16% heat savings, 74% pump electricity savings, and proper cooling of supply water. The energy consumption savings would therefore have positive environmental impacts, and be reflected in seasonal reductions of 2.1 kg/m2 CO2, 0.02 kg/m2 SO2, and 0.01 kg/m2...... to a lack of pressure and flow control. This study investigated using pre-set radiator valves combined with differential pressure (DP) controllers to achieve hydraulic balance in building distribution systems, and consequently save energy and reduce the emissions. We considered a multi-storey building...... NO x for 3rd step energy efficiency buildings in Beijing....

  7. ELIMINATION OF Cucumber Mozaic Virus (CMV FROM A RANGE OF CHRYSANTHEMUM CULTIVARS THROUGH MERISTEM CULTURE FOLLOWING HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniawan Budiarto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV is one of pathogenic viruses that commonly found and has caused significant losses in many chrysanthemum growers in Indonesia.  Efforts have been made to get healthy plant source through eliminating virus from infected plants and one of the promising methods was the combination of thermotherapy and meristem culture. The research was conducted to find out the effect of meristem culture following heat treatments on the existence of CMV in infected chrysanthemum plantlets. The experiment was carried out in the laboratory of tissue culture and virology at The Indonesian Ornamental Crops Research Institute (IOCRI from August 2007 until June 2008. A complete factorial with ten replications was designed to accomplish the combination of two factors.  The first factor was three chrysanthemum cultivars, namely Stroika, Dewi Sartika and White Fiji, while the second dealt with the durations of heat treatment i.e. one, two and three weeks.  The results showed that plantlet survival decreased, yet improved plantlet performance by faster bud initiation with lengthened heat duration.  The percentage of virus-free planlets also increased along with the duration of treatment and three weeks heat treatment followed by meristem culture effectively eliminated CMV from infected planlets.

  8. Profiling of differential gene expression in the hypothalamus of broiler-type Taiwan country chickens in response to acute heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Wang, Shih-Han; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Acute heat stress severely impacts poultry production. The hypothalamus acts as a crucial center to regulate body temperature, detect temperature changes, and modulate the autonomic nervous system and endocrine loop for heat retention and dissipation. The purpose of this study was to investigate global gene expression in the hypothalamus of broiler-type B strain Taiwan country chickens after acute heat stress. Twelve 30-week-old hens were allocated to four groups. Three heat-stressed groups were subjected to acute heat stress at 38 °C for 2 hours without recovery (H2R0), with 2 hours of recovery (H2R2), and with 6 hours of recovery (H2R6). The control hens were maintained at 25 °C. At the end, hypothalamus samples were collected for gene expression analysis. The results showed that 24, 11, and 25 genes were upregulated and 41, 15, and 42 genes were downregulated in H2R0, H2R2, and H2R6 treatments, respectively. The expressions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GNRH1), heat shock 27-kDa protein 1 (HSPB1), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) were upregulated at all recovery times after heat exposure. Conversely, the expression of TPH2 was downregulated at all recovery times. A gene ontology analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed genes were involved in biological processes including cellular processes, metabolic processes, localization, multicellular organismal processes, developmental processes, and biological regulation. A functional annotation analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were related to the gene networks of responses to stress and reproductive functions. These differentially expressed genes might be essential and unique key factors in the heat stress response of the hypothalamus in chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperature-programmable resistively heated micromachined gas chromatography and differential mobility spectrometry detection for the determination of non-sulfur odorants in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, J; Gras, R; Cortes, H J; Shellie, R A

    2013-03-19

    A portable, fast gas chromatographic method for the direct measurement of the parts per billion level of sulfur-free odorants in commercially available natural gas is introduced. The approach incorporates a resistively heated, temperature-programmable silicon micromachined gas chromatograph that employs a standard capillary column for the fast separation of methyl and ethyl acrylate from the natural gas matrix. The separation approach is coupled to a micromachined differential mobility detector to enhance analyte detectability, and the overall selectivity obtained against the matrix is described. A complete analysis can be conducted in less than 70 s. Furthermore, these two compounds can be measured accurately in the presence of other common volatile sulfur-based odorants such as alkyl mercaptans and alkyl sulfides. Repeatability of less than 3% RSD (n = 20) over a range from 0.5 to 5 ppm was obtained with a limit of detection for the target compounds at 50 ppb (v/v) and a linear range from 0.5 to 50 ppm with a correlation coefficient of at least 0.997.

  10. Genetic differentiation of the pine processionary moth at the southern edge of its range: contrasting patterns between mitochondrial and nuclear markers

    OpenAIRE

    El Mokhefi, M'hamed; Kerdelhue, Carole; Burban, Christian; Battisti, Andrea; Chakali, Gahdab; Simonato, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) is an important pest of coniferous forests at the southern edge of its range in Maghreb. Based on mitochondrial markers, a strong genetic differentiation was previously found in this species between western (pityocampa clade) and eastern Maghreb populations (ENA clade), with the contact zone between the clades located in Algeria. We focused on the moth range in Algeria, using both mitochondrial (a 648?bp fragment of the tRNA?cox2)...

  11. ELIMINATION OF CVB ( FROM A RANGE OF CHRYSANTHEMUM VARIETIES BY APICAL MERISTEM CULTURE FOLLOWING ANTIVIRAL AGENT AND HEAT TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KURNIAWAN BUDIARTO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CVB elimination for retaining healthy protocols from infected chrysanthemum plant wasinvestigated through combined treatment of meristem culture with synthetic antiviral ribavirinor thermotherapy under conditions. The biological materials used for the experimentconstituted of six commercial varieties: Dewi Sartika, Saraswati, Yellow Fiji, White Puma,Yellow Puma and White Reagent. Tissue culture initiation was conducted through plantletestablishment using MS supplemented with IAA. Ribavirin was added in media with theconcentration of 40 mg/l on cv. Dewi Sartika, Saraswati and Yellow Fiji. Parallel with this step,heat treatment with different durations (1, 2, and 3 weeks was also conducted on the plantletson White Puma, Yellow Puma and White Reagent. Meristem culture was done followingthe chemo- and thermotherapy. The experiment resumed the failure of single treatment ofmeristem culture in eliminating CVB from the infected chrysanthemum plantlets. Under heattreatment, percentage of virus-free plantlets increased along with the duration ofthermotherapy, though the survival rate of plantlets decreased in lengthened heat treatment.The best results regarding virus free plant percentage were obtained when meristem culture wasapplied following ribavirin or three weeks of heat treatment.

  12. ceramics by differential scanning calorimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    YbxGd2–xZr2O7 (x = 0, 1, 2) ceramics were pressureless-sintered using ceramic powders acquired by chemical-coprecipitation and calcination methods. Heat capacities of YbxGd2–xZr2O7 were measured with a heat flux-type differential scanning calorimetry in the temperature range of 298–1200 K. At 298 K, the heat.

  13. Differential Classical Conditioning of the Nocebo Effect: Increasing Heat-Pain Perception without Verbal Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräscher, Anne-Kathrin; Kleinböhl, Dieter; Hölzl, Rupert; Becker, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nocebo effects, including nocebo hyperalgesia, are a common phenomenon in clinical routine with manifold negative consequences. Both explicit expectations and learning by conditioning are known to induce nocebo effects, but the specific role of conditioning remains unclear, because conditioning is rarely implemented independent of verbal suggestions. Further, although pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, nocebo effects are usually assessed in subjective ratings only, neglecting, e.g., behavioral aspects. The aim of this study was to test whether nocebo hyperalgesia can be learned by conditioning without explicit expectations, to assess nocebo effects in different response channels, and to exploratively assess, whether contingency awareness is a necessary condition for conditioned nocebo hyperalgesia. Methods: Twenty-one healthy volunteers were classically conditioned using painful and non-painful heat stimuli that followed two different cues. The conditioned nocebo effect was assessed by subjective ratings of perceived stimulation intensity on a visual analog scale and a behavioral discrimination task, assessing sensitization and habituation in response to the same stimulation following the two cues. Results: Results show a conditioned nocebo effect indicated by the subjective intensity ratings. Conditioned effects were also seen in the behavioral responses, but paradoxically, behavioral responses indicated decreased perception after conditioning, but only for subjects successfully conditioned as indicated by the subjective ratings. Explorative analyses suggested that awareness of the contingencies and the different cues was not necessary for successful conditioning. Conclusion: Nocebo effects can be learned without inducing additional explicit expectations. The dissociation between the two response channels, possibly representing the conditioned and a compensatory response, highlights the importance of considering different outcomes in nocebo

  14. Differential Classical Conditioning of the Nocebo Effect: Increasing Heat-Pain Perception without Verbal Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Bräscher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nocebo effects, including nocebo hyperalgesia, are a common phenomenon in clinical routine with manifold negative consequences. Both explicit expectations and learning by conditioning are known to induce nocebo effects, but the specific role of conditioning remains unclear, because conditioning is rarely implemented independent of verbal suggestions. Further, although pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, nocebo effects are usually assessed in subjective ratings only, neglecting, e.g., behavioral aspects. The aim of this study was to test whether nocebo hyperalgesia can be learned by conditioning without explicit expectations, to assess nocebo effects in different response channels, and to exploratively assess, whether contingency awareness is a necessary condition for conditioned nocebo hyperalgesia.Methods: Twenty-one healthy volunteers were classically conditioned using painful and non-painful heat stimuli that followed two different cues. The conditioned nocebo effect was assessed by subjective ratings of perceived stimulation intensity on a visual analog scale and a behavioral discrimination task, assessing sensitization and habituation in response to the same stimulation following the two cues.Results: Results show a conditioned nocebo effect indicated by the subjective intensity ratings. Conditioned effects were also seen in the behavioral responses, but paradoxically, behavioral responses indicated decreased perception after conditioning, but only for subjects successfully conditioned as indicated by the subjective ratings. Explorative analyses suggested that awareness of the contingencies and the different cues was not necessary for successful conditioning.Conclusion: Nocebo effects can be learned without inducing additional explicit expectations. The dissociation between the two response channels, possibly representing the conditioned and a compensatory response, highlights the importance of considering different outcomes

  15. Electro- and Heat Transfer in Cd_{0.22}Hg_{0.78} Te Single Crystals in the Temperature Range of Their Practical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessmolniy, Yu. V.; Khadzhaj, G. Ya.; Beletskii, V. I.; Rokhmistrov, D. V.; Vovk, R. V.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2018-01-01

    The thermal and electrical conductivity of a single-crystal Cd_{0.22}Hg_{0.78}Te was studied in the temperature range of practical applications (77-300 K). The sample has impurity conductivity, which is limited by the scattering of charge carriers by phonons. Heat in the sample is transferred by phonons and thermal conductivity is limited by phonon-phonon scattering. The electron contribution to the thermal conductivity can be neglected.

  16. Development of a mathematical model for a frequency-controlled asynchronous motor rotor temperature field on the basis of differential equations of heat conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Ostashevskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the temperature field of a frequency-controlled asynchronous motor rotor is made out on the basis of differential equations of heat conduction. The model developed is approved in the course of experimental research on the motors examined.

  17. Home in the heat: Dramatic seasonal variation in home range of desert golden eagles informs management for renewable energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Melissa; Miller, Tricia A.; Duerr, Adam E.; Lanzone, Michael; Fesnock, Amy; LaPre, Larry; Driscoll, Daniel; Katzner, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Renewable energy is expanding quickly with sometimes dramatic impacts to species and ecosystems. To understand the degree to which sensitive species may be impacted by renewable energy projects, it is informative to know how much space individuals use and how that space may overlap with planned development. We used global positioning system–global system for mobile communications (GPS-GSM) telemetry to measure year-round movements of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from the Mojave Desert of California, USA. We estimated monthly space use with adaptive local convex hulls to identify the temporal and spatial scales at which eagles may encounter renewable energy projects in the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan area. Mean size of home ranges was lowest and least variable from November through January and greatest in February–March and May–August. These monthly home range patterns coincided with seasonal variation in breeding ecology, habitat associations, and temperature. The expanded home ranges in hot summer months included movements to cooler, prey-dense, mountainous areas characterized by forest, grasslands, and scrublands. Breeding-season home ranges (October–May) included more lowland semi-desert and rock vegetation. Overlap of eagle home ranges and focus areas for renewable energy development was greatest when eagle home ranges were smallest, during the breeding season. Golden eagles in the Mojave Desert used more space and a wider range of habitat types than expected and renewable energy projects could affect a larger section of the regional population than was previously thought.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of the Populus Hsp90 gene family reveals differential expression patterns, localization, and heat stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Jianbo; Liu, Bobin; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jun; Lu, Mengzhu

    2013-08-05

    Members of the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) class of proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecular chaperones. They are involved in protein folding, assembly, stabilization, activation, and degradation in many normal cellular processes and under stress conditions. Unlike many other well-characterized molecular chaperones, Hsp90s play key roles in signal transduction, cell-cycle control, genomic silencing, and protein trafficking. However, no systematic analysis of genome organization, gene structure, and expression compendium has been performed in the Populus model tree genus to date. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the Populus Hsp90 gene family and identified 10 Populus Hsp90 genes, which were phylogenetically clustered into two major groups. Gene structure and motif composition are relatively conserved in each group. In Populus trichocarpa, we identified three paralogous pairs, among which the PtHsp90-5a/PtHsp90-5b paralogous pair might be created by duplication of a genome segment. Subcellular localization analysis shows that PtHsp90 members are localized in different subcellular compartments. PtHsp90-3 is localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, PtHsp90-5a and PtHsp90-5b are in chloroplasts, and PtHsp90-7 is in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, microarray and semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses show that a number of Populus Hsp90 genes are differentially expressed upon exposure to various stresses. The gene structure and motif composition of PtHsp90s are highly conserved among group members, suggesting that members of the same group may also have conserved functions. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses show that most PtHsp90s were induced by various stresses, including heat stress. Collectively, these observations lay the foundation for future efforts to unravel the biological roles of PtHsp90 genes.

  19. The molecular background of the differential UV absorbance of the human lens in the 240-400 nm range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, Viktor; Tiboldi, Akos; Bae, Narkhyun; Li, Kongzhao; Kang, Sung Ung; Hopp, Béla; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Lubec, Gert; Nógrádi, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) absorption of various sections of the human lens was studied and compared with protein expression paralleling differential UV absorbance in anterior and posterior lenticular tissue. The UV absorbance of serial lens cryostat sections (60 μm) and that of lens capsules was determined using a Shimadzu scanning spectrophotometer, and the absorption coefficients were calculated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed using two pooled lenticular protein extracts (anterior and posterior sections). Protein spots were quantified and significantly different spots were identified by mass spectrometry following in-gel digestion with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The UV-C and UV-B absorption of the human lens increased toward the posterior parts of the lens. The anterior and posterior lens capsules also effectively absorbed UV radiation. Levels of molecular chaperone proteins Beta-crystallin B2 (UniProtKB ID:P43320), A3 (UniProtKB ID:P05813) and of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (UniProtKB ID:P04406) were significantly higher in the anterior part of the lens, whereas lens proteins Beta-crystallin B1 (UniProtKB ID:P53674) and Alpha-crystallin A chain (UniProtKB ID:P02489) were higher in the posterior sections. These results provide evidence that differential UV absorption in the anterior and posterior lens is accompanied by differential protein expression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. Experimental measurements of the heats of formation of Fe{sub 3}Pt, FePt, and FePt{sub 3} using differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.; Berry, D. C.; Chiari, Y.; Barmak, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the heats of formation of Fe{sub 3}Pt, FePt, and FePt{sub 3} were determined from the reaction of sputter deposited Fe/Pt multilayer thin-films with a periodicity of 200 nm but different overall compositions. Film compositions were measured by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The phases present along the reaction path were identified by x-ray diffraction. For the most Fe-rich phase, namely, Fe{sub 3}Pt, the measured enthalpy of formation was -9.3 {+-} 1.3 kJ/mol in a film with a composition of 70.4:29.6 ({+-}0.2 at. %) Fe:Pt. For FePt, the measured enthalpy of formation was -27.2 {+-} 2.2 kJ/g-atom in a 49.0:51.0 ({+-}0.5 at. %) Fe:Pt film. For FePt{sub 3}, which is the most Pt rich intermetallic phase, the measured enthalpy of formation was -23.7 {+-} 2.2 in a film with a composition of 22.2:77.8 ({+-}0.6 at. %) Fe:Pt. The reaction enthalpies for films with Fe:Pt compositions of 44.5:55.5 ({+-}0.3 at. %) and 38.5:61.5 ({+-}0.4 at. %) were -26.9 {+-} 1.0 and -26.6 {+-} 0.6 kJ/g-atom, respectively, which taken together with the value for the 49.0:51.0 film demonstrate the relative insensitivity of the reaction enthalpy to film composition over a broad composition range in the vicinity of the equiatomic composition. The experimental heats of formation are compared with two sets of reported first-principles calculated values for each of the three phases at exact stoichiometry.

  1. A study of three-half-turn and frame antennae for ion cyclotron range of frequency plasma heating in the URAGAN-3M torsatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysoivan, A.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Moiseenko, V.E. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Plyusnin, V.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Kasilov, S.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Bondarenko, V.N. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Chechkin, V.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Fomin, I.P. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Grigor`eva, L.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Konovalov, V.G. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Koval`ov, S.V. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Litvinov, A.P. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Mironov, Yu.K. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Nazarov, N.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Pavlichenko, O.S. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Pavlichenko, R.O. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Shapoval, A.N. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Skibenko, A.I. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center; Volkov, E.D. [Kharkov Inst. of Phys. and Tech. (Ukraine). Nat. Sci. Center

    1995-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results of Alfven wave heating of plasmas in the frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency ({omega}<{omega}{sub ci}) are presented. Two different types of antenna were used for plasma production and heating: a frame type antenna (FTA) conventionally used in the URAGAN-3M device and a three-half-turn antenna (THTA) proposed recently to avoid the deleterious effects of conversion of fast wave to slow wave in the plasma periphery and to perform plasma core heating more effectively. Numerical modeling of electromagnetic field excitation in the URAGAN-3M plasma by the FTA and THTA was performed using a one-dimensional code. The results of calculations showed better performance of the compact THTA compared with the FTA for the case of a high density plasma (approximately 10{sup 13}cm{sup -3}). When using the THTA, the experiments performed showed the possibility of dense plasma production (more than 2x10{sup 13}cm{sup -3}) and heating, which had not been obtained earlier in the URAGAN-3M. Shifting the power deposition profile deeper inside the plasma body with the THTA resulted in modification of the plasma density profile and an improvement in plasma confinement. ((orig.)).

  2. Differentiation between Carex arenaria L. populations at the eastern range margin based on female and male glumes variation

    OpenAIRE

    Lech Urbaniak; Izabella Maik; Daromiła Urbaniak

    2014-01-01

    480 spikes from 16 populations of Carex arenaria L. planted in an experimental garden were collected and analysed for 4 female and 4 male glumes each. The characteristic of the interpopulational differentiation on the area of Poland was based on multivariate analysis, Student t-test and the coefficients of variation. The separateness of three populations from the isolated inland stations - 3(Góra), 11 (Tuczno), 15 (Poznań) and individual character of - 2 (Wisełka), 6 (Sobieszewo) from the coa...

  3. Acousto-optically tuned isotopic CO{sub 2} lasers for long-range differential absorption LIDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.C.; Busch, G.E.; Hewitt, C.J.; Remelius, D.K.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strauss, C.E.M.; Wilson, C.W.

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing 2--100 kHz repetition rate CO{sub 2} lasers with milliJoule pulse energies, rapid acousto-optic tuning and isotopic gas mixes, for Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) applications. The authors explain the tuning method, which uses a pair of acousto-optic modulators and is capable of random access to CO{sub 2} laser lines at rates of 100 kHz or more. The laser system is also described, and they report on performance with both normal and isotopic gas mixes.

  4. Differentiation between Carex arenaria L. populations at the eastern range margin based on female and male glumes variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Urbaniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 480 spikes from 16 populations of Carex arenaria L. planted in an experimental garden were collected and analysed for 4 female and 4 male glumes each. The characteristic of the interpopulational differentiation on the area of Poland was based on multivariate analysis, Student t-test and the coefficients of variation. The separateness of three populations from the isolated inland stations - 3(Góra, 11 (Tuczno, 15 (Poznań and individual character of - 2 (Wisełka, 6 (Sobieszewo from the coast and 9 (Ołobok from Lower Silesia is shown. The lowest level of variation and in consequence a particular usefulness for taxonomic considerations have two characters - a and a' (length of female and male glumes. The obtained pattern of interpopulational differentiation may be caused by various factors - migration routes on the Polish territory; selection pressures associated with different ecological conditions present in fixed dunes along the Baltic Sea coast and in isolated inland stations, occupied by C. arenaria; reduction of an extensive primary populations to markedly smaller isolated subpopulations.

  5. Determination of melting temperature and temperature melting range for DNA with multi-peak differential melting curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, Dmitri Y; Fridman, Alexander S; Chang, Chun-Ling; Grigoryan, Inessa E; Galyuk, Elena N; Murashko, Oleg N; Chen, Chun-Chung; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-15

    Many factors that change the temperature position and interval of the DNA helix-coil transition often also alter the shape of multi-peak differential melting curves (DMCs). For DNAs with a multi-peak DMC, there is no agreement on the most useful definition for the melting temperature, Tm, and temperature melting width, ΔT, of the entire DNA transition. Changes in Tm and ΔT can reflect unstable variation of the shape of the DMC as well as alterations in DNA thermal stability and heterogeneity. Here, experiments and computer modeling for DNA multi-peak DMCs varying under different factors allowed testing of several methods of defining Tm and ΔT. Indeed, some of the methods give unreasonable "jagged" Tm and ΔT dependences on varying relative concentration of DNA chemical modifications (rb), [Na(+)], and GC content. At the same time, Tm determined as the helix-coil transition average temperature, and ΔT, which is proportional to the average absolute temperature deviation from this temperature, are suitable to characterize multi-peak DMCs. They give smoothly varying theoretical and experimental dependences of Tm and ΔT on rb, [Na(+)], and GC content. For multi-peak DMCs, Tm value determined in this way is the closest to the thermodynamic melting temperature (the helix-coil transition enthalpy/entropy ratio). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. All-optical 1st- and 2nd-order differential equation solvers with large tuning ranges using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaisheng; Hou, Jie; Huang, Zhuyang; Cao, Tong; Zhang, Jihua; Yu, Yuan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-02-09

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-optical temporal computation scheme for solving 1st- and 2nd-order linear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with tunable constant coefficients by using Fabry-Pérot semiconductor optical amplifiers (FP-SOAs). By changing the injection currents of FP-SOAs, the constant coefficients of the differential equations are practically tuned. A quite large constant coefficient tunable range from 0.0026/ps to 0.085/ps is achieved for the 1st-order differential equation. Moreover, the constant coefficient p of the 2nd-order ODE solver can be continuously tuned from 0.0216/ps to 0.158/ps, correspondingly with the constant coefficient q varying from 0.0000494/ps(2) to 0.006205/ps(2). Additionally, a theoretical model that combining the carrier density rate equation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with the transfer function of the Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity is exploited to analyze the solving processes. For both 1st- and 2nd-order solvers, excellent agreements between the numerical simulations and the experimental results are obtained. The FP-SOAs based all-optical differential-equation solvers can be easily integrated with other optical components based on InP/InGaAsP materials, such as laser, modulator, photodetector and waveguide, which can motivate the realization of the complicated optical computing on a single integrated chip.

  7. Geomorphic evidences of lateral propagation and differential uplift of the two segments of frontal Siwalik range, central Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, P. K.; Deopa, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Siwalik range forms the southernmost terrane of the Himalaya. The frontal mountains of this range rise abruptly against the vast Indo-Gangetic plains along the range-bounding Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT), which marks the present day principal displacement zone between Indian and Eurasian plates. With an aim of understanding the morphotectonics of different mountain segments in such a zone of intense tectonic activities, we have analyzed geomorphic indices like 'basin asymmetry factor' (AF), 'transverse topography asymmetry factor' (T), 'basin elongation ratio' (BR) and 'hypsometric integral' (HI) of fifty six drainage basins of 3rd streams in conjunction with 'mountain-front sinuosity' (Smf), 'valley-floor width to height ratio' (Vf) and drainage characteristics of the two large, neighboring segments of the frontal Siwalik mountains. Referred to here as the 'eastern segment' and 'western segment', these two mountain-segments are separated from each other and adjoining mountain-segments by antecedent streams of fourth and fifth order. In both the mountain-segments, the Smf values are mostly between 1.0-1.6 and, likewise, the Vf of most of the streams, calculated at a fix distance of 800m from the mountain-front, is invariably drainage basins and 65% of the eastern-segment's drainage basins indicate their down-tilting towards the west. The azimuths of the Ts of theses basins are not always in conformity with AF suggested down-tilting, but the azimuths of the larger magnitude Ts are by and large in conformity with the AF suggested down-tilting. However, the BR and HI values of all the drainage basins of a mountain-segment do not show any spatial variation. These results suggest that both the studied mountain-segments are actively uplifting, but with faster rate in their eastern part. Moreover, the drainage pattern and deflections in and around both the segments reveal their lateral progression from east to west.

  8. Thriving at the limit: Differential reproductive performance in range-edge populations of a Mediterranean sclerophyll (Olea europaea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado-Yela, Carlos; Balaguer, Luis; García-Verdugo, Carlos; Carrillo, Katty; Méndez, Marcos

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral populations are often lumped together on the assumption of thriving in marginal habitats where reproductive performance is compromised. We have tested this hypothesis in peripheral populations of wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.) presumably limited by different factors at the westernmost limit of the species range. Additionally, we hypothesized that differences in reproductive outcome among populations are better explained by site-specific environmental conditions (PAR, soil water, soil nutrients, air humidity and air temperature) than by differences in phenotypic traits (tree size and leaf traits). To test these hypotheses, we assessed the number of flowering trees, the flowering intensity, fruit set and seed viability in eight populations for three consecutive years. Our findings provided sufficient evidence to reject the first hypothesis. Peripheral populations that occur under oceanic conditions, resembling the Tertiary subtropical climate, consistently presented higher values for all components of reproductive performance than those at the thermal and rainfall tolerance limits. In support of our second hypothesis, the variation in reproductive performance among populations was primarily accounted for by local environmental conditions. Leaf traits, however, also explained reproductive variation but to a lesser extent. Finally, we found that small changes in tree size may cause large differences in reproductive performance. This close relationship between tree size and reproductive performance suggests that any impact on population size structure would likely jeopardize persistence and expansion at the range edge. Our results suggest that reproductive performance of wild olive trees was not shaped by the population geographic position within the species range, but by the interaction between local environment, as the main driver, and individual phenotypic traits.

  9. Supplement on 'Effects of heat-flux features on the differential scanning calorimetry curve of a thermoelastic martensitic transformation'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benke, Marton, E-mail: marton_benke@citromail.hu [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Metalforming, University of Miskolc, 3515 Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Mertinger, Valeria; Tranta, Ferenc; Barkoczy, Peter [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Metalforming, University of Miskolc, 3515 Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Daroczi, Lajos [Department of Solid State Physics, University of Debrecen, 4010 Debrecen, PO Box 2 Hungary (Hungary)

    2010-04-15

    The melting process of a high purity indium was examined with a heat-flux differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The effects of sample mass and the scanning rate on the resulting peaks are presented. The peaks were evaluated by two methods. The first one is a commercial method while the modified method involves a correction for the endpoint of the process. The results are compared to each other.

  10. Heat and Mass Transfer during Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of n-Alkanes in the C{sub 16} to C{sub 19} Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, Rune

    2002-07-01

    The main goal of this project has been to study heat and mass transfer during solid-liquid phase transition of n-alkanes in the in the C{sub 16} to C{sub 19} range. Phase transitions of both mixtures and pure components have been investigated. All experiments and simulations have been performed without any convection. Thermal conductivities have been determined at the melting point for solid and liquid unbranched alkanes ranging from C{sub 16} to C{sub 19}. An assessment of the error of the method has been performed. The measurements of solid conductivities are in accordance with measurements reported previously and confirm the applicability of the method. Liquid conductivities are higher than extrapolated values from the literature. The enhanced conductivity is believed to be caused by structural changes close to the melting point which is not taken into account when extrapolating values from the literature. Experiments have been performed for the purpose of investigating the freezing of mixtures of n-alkanes in the C{sub 16}-C{sub 19} range. The positions of the solid-liquid interfaces have been measured as freezing occurred. Calculations of the ratio of liquid and solid conductivities show that the solid structure of mixtures of the investigated n-alkanes is predominantly in a rotator structure at the temperatures investigated. There are indications of a transformation into an orthorhombic structure at lower temperatures. The temperatures on the solid-liquid interface have been measured, and compared with calculated values from chapter 4. The temperature of the interface is represented better by the measured interfacial temperatures than by the calculated interfacial temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the diffusion of heat is the limiting mechanism of phase transition. This result in a homogeneous liquid composition. A numerical model has been developed in order to simulate the experimental freezing of mixtures. The model represents the results

  11. Establishment of Heat Treatment Process for Modified 440A Martensitic Stainless Steel Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermo-Calc Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Sen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To provide a suitable microstructure and mechanical properties for modified Grade 440A martensitic stainless steel (MSS, which could facilitate the further cold deformation process (e.g., cold rolling, this work used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Thermo-Calc software to determine three soaking temperatures for annealing heat treatment processes (HT1, HT2 and HT3. To verify the feasibility of the proposed annealing heat treatment processes, the as-received samples were initially heated to 1050 °C (similar to the on-line working temperature for 30 min and air quenched to form a martensitic structure. The air-quenched samples were then subjected to three developed annealing heat treatment conditions. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the heat-treated samples were then investigated. Test results showed that considering the effects of the microstructure and the hardness, the HT1, the HT2 or the soaking temperatures between the HT1 and HT2 were the most recommended processes to modified Grade 440A MSS. When using the recommended processes, their carbides were fine and more evenly distributed, and the microhardness was as low as 210 Hv, which can be applied to the actual production process.

  12. Differentiation of different mixed Listeria strains and also acid-injured, heat-injured, and repaired cells of Listeria monocytogenes using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond; Donnelly, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to differentiate mixed strains of Listeria monocytogenes and mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. FT-IR spectroscopy was also applied to investigate the hypothesis that heat-injured and acid-injured cells would return to their original physiological integrity following repair. Thin smears of cells on infrared slides were prepared from cultures for mixed strains of L. monocytogenes, mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, and each individual strain. Heat-injured and acid-injured cells were prepared by exposing harvested cells of L. monocytogenes strain R2-764 to a temperature of 56 ± 0.2°C for 10 min or lactic acid at pH 3 for 60 min, respectively. Cellular repair involved incubating aliquots of acid-injured and heat-injured cells separately in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract for 22 to 24 h; bacterial thin smears on infrared slides were prepared for each treatment. Spectral collection was done using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared wavelength region. Application of multivariate discriminant analysis to the wavelength region from 1,800 to 900 cm(-1) separated the individual L. monocytogenes strains. Mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes cocultured with L. innocua were successfully differentiated from the individual strains when the discriminant analysis was applied. Different mixed strains of L. monocytogenes were also successfully separated when the discriminant analysis was applied. A data set for injury and repair analysis resulted in the separation of acid-injured, heat-injured, and intact cells; repaired cells clustered closer to intact cells when the discriminant analysis (1,800 to 600 cm(-1)) was applied. FT-IR spectroscopy can be used for the rapid source tracking of L. monocytogenes strains because it can differentiate between different mixed strains and individual strains of the pathogen.

  13. Differential effects of catalase on apoptosis induction in human promonocytic cells. Relationships with heat-shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Patricia; Troyano, Alfonso; Fernández, Carlos; De Blas, Elena; Aller, Patricio

    2003-03-01

    The administration of the H(2)O(2)-specific scavenger catalase attenuated the generation of apoptosis by the antitumor drugs etoposide, camptothecin, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in U-937 human promonocytic cells. By contrast, the antioxidant potentiated the generation of apoptosis by the inducers of the stress response, heat shock and cadmium, in this and other myeloid cell types. Catalase also increased the heat shock-provoked stimulation of caspase-3 and -9 activities, as well as the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. The potentiation of cell death by catalase correlated with its capacity to inhibit the stress response, as demonstrated by the suppression of 70- or 27-kDa heat-shock protein expression and the inhibition of heat-shock transcription factor 1 binding activity. Conversely, the toxicity of catalase plus heat shock was attenuated when the cells were preconditioned with a soft heating, which elevated the 70-kDa heat-shock protein levels. By contrast with catalase, the antioxidants superoxide dismutase and probucol did not inhibit heat-shock protein expression or affect apoptosis in U-937 cells. Finally, it was observed that the antitumor drugs did not activate the stress response in U-937 cells and that catalase failed to inhibit HSP expression and to potentiate apoptosis in heat shock-treated RPMI 8866 lymphoblastic cells. Taken together, these results provide the first demonstration of a proapoptotic action of catalase, suggest that H(2)O(2) is a critical regulator of both apoptosis and the stress response, and corroborate the antiapoptotic action of heat-shock proteins in myeloid cells.

  14. Range-wide genetic differentiation among North American great gray owls (Strix nebulosa) reveals a distinct lineage restricted to the Sierra Nevada, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Joshua M; Keane, John J; Savage, Wesley K; Godwin, Steven A; Shafer, Jo Ann; Jepsen, Eric P; Gerhardt, Rick; Stermer, Chris; Ernest, Holly B

    2010-07-01

    Investigations of regional genetic differentiation are essential for describing phylogeographic patterns and informing management efforts for species of conservation concern. In this context, we investigated genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among great gray owl (Strix nebulosa) populations in western North America, which includes an allopatric range in the southern Sierra Nevada in California. Based on a total dataset consisting of 30 nuclear microsatellite DNA loci and 1938-base pairs of mitochondrial DNA, we found that Pacific Northwest sampling groups were recovered by frequency and Bayesian analyses of microsatellite data and each population sampled, except for western Canada, showed evidence of recent population bottlenecks and low effective sizes. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of sequence data indicated that the allopatric Sierra Nevada population is also a distinct lineage with respect to the larger species range in North America; we suggest a subspecies designation for this lineage should be considered (Strix nebulosa yosemitensis). Our study underscores the importance of phylogeographic studies for identifying lineages of conservation concern, as well as the important role of Pleistocene glaciation events in driving genetic differentiation of avian fauna. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion electron heating in deuterium-hydrogen plasmas in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wukitch, S J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bonoli, P T [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marmar, E [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mossessian, D [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Nelson-Melby, E [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM - Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Phillips, P [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Porkolab, M [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Schilling, G [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Wolfe, S [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wright, J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Localized direct electron heating (EH) by mode-converted (MC) ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves in D(H) tokamak plasmas has been clearly observed for the first time in Alcator C-Mod. Both on- and off-axis (high field side) mode conversion EH (MCEH) have been observed. The MCEH profile was obtained from a break-in-slope analysis of electron temperature signals in the presence of radio frequency shut-off. The temperature was measured by a 32-channel high spatial resolution ({<=}7 mm) 2nd harmonic heterodyne electron cyclotron emission system. The experimental profiles were compared with the predictions from a toroidal full-wave ICRF code TORIC. Using the hydrogen concentration measured by a high-resolution optical spectrometer, TORIC predictions were shown qualitatively in agreement with the experimental results for both on- and off-axis MC cases. From the simulations, the EH from MC ion cyclotron wave and ion Bernstein wave is examined.

  16. Urinary Metabolite Profiling Offers Potential for Differentiation of Liver-Kidney Yin Deficiency and Dampness-Heat Internal Smoldering Syndromes in Posthepatitis B Cirrhosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zheng is the basic theory and essence of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM in diagnosing diseases. However, there are no biological evidences to support TCM Zheng differentiation. In this study we elucidated the biological alteration of cirrhosis with TCM “Liver-Kidney Yin Deficiency (YX” or “Dampness-Heat Internal Smoldering (SR” Zheng and the potential of urine metabonomics in TCM Zheng differentiation. Differential metabolites contributing to the intergroup variation between healthy controls and liver cirrhosis patients were investigated, respectively, and mainly participated in energy metabolism, gut microbiota metabolism, oxidative stress, and bile acid metabolism. Three metabolites, aconitate, citrate, and 2-pentendioate, altered significantly in YX Zheng only, representing the abnormal energy metabolism. Contrarily, hippurate and 4-pyridinecarboxylate altered significantly in SR Zheng only, representing the abnormalities of gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, there were significant differences between two TCM Zhengs in three metabolites, glycoursodeoxycholate, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and L-aspartyl-4-phosphate, among all differential metabolites. Metabonomic profiling, as a powerful approach, provides support to the understanding of biological mechanisms of TCM Zheng stratification. The altered urinary metabolites constitute a panel of reliable biological evidence for TCM Zheng differentiation in patients with posthepatitis B cirrhosis and may be used for the potential biomarkers of TCM Zheng stratification.

  17. Urinary metabolite profiling offers potential for differentiation of liver-kidney yin deficiency and dampness-heat internal smoldering syndromes in posthepatitis B cirrhosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Mingmei; Yu, Huan; Lin, Yan; Du, Guangli; Luo, Guoan; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Zheng is the basic theory and essence of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in diagnosing diseases. However, there are no biological evidences to support TCM Zheng differentiation. In this study we elucidated the biological alteration of cirrhosis with TCM "Liver-Kidney Yin Deficiency (YX)" or "Dampness-Heat Internal Smoldering (SR)" Zheng and the potential of urine metabonomics in TCM Zheng differentiation. Differential metabolites contributing to the intergroup variation between healthy controls and liver cirrhosis patients were investigated, respectively, and mainly participated in energy metabolism, gut microbiota metabolism, oxidative stress, and bile acid metabolism. Three metabolites, aconitate, citrate, and 2-pentendioate, altered significantly in YX Zheng only, representing the abnormal energy metabolism. Contrarily, hippurate and 4-pyridinecarboxylate altered significantly in SR Zheng only, representing the abnormalities of gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, there were significant differences between two TCM Zhengs in three metabolites, glycoursodeoxycholate, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and L-aspartyl-4-phosphate, among all differential metabolites. Metabonomic profiling, as a powerful approach, provides support to the understanding of biological mechanisms of TCM Zheng stratification. The altered urinary metabolites constitute a panel of reliable biological evidence for TCM Zheng differentiation in patients with posthepatitis B cirrhosis and may be used for the potential biomarkers of TCM Zheng stratification.

  18. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  19. Genome-wide characterization of differentially expressed genes provides insights into regulatory network of heat stress response in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghua; Mei, Yi; Xu, Liang; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Yan; Guo, Jun; Liu, Liwang

    2018-01-13

    Heat stress (HS) causes detrimental effects on plant morphology, physiology, and biochemistry that lead to drastic reduction in plant biomass production and economic yield worldwide. To date, little is known about HS-responsive genes involved in thermotolerance mechanism in radish. In this study, a total of 6600 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from the control and Heat24 cDNA libraries of radish were isolated by high-throughput sequencing. With Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis, some genes including MAPK, DREB, ERF, AP2, GST, Hsf, and Hsp were predominantly assigned in signal transductions, metabolic pathways, and biosynthesis and abiotic stress-responsive pathways. These pathways played significant roles in reducing stress-induced damages and enhancing heat tolerance in radish. Expression patterns of 24 candidate genes were validated by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Based mainly on the analysis of DEGs combining with the previous miRNAs analysis, the schematic model of HS-responsive regulatory network was proposed. To counter the effects of HS, a rapid response of the plasma membrane leads to the opening of specific calcium channels and cytoskeletal reorganization, after which HS-responsive genes are activated to repair damaged proteins and ultimately facilitate further enhancement of thermotolerance in radish. These results could provide fundamental insight into the regulatory network underlying heat tolerance in radish and facilitate further genetic manipulation of thermotolerance in root vegetable crops.

  20. Characterization of six small HSP genes from Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae): Differential expression under conditions of normal growth and heat-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Folgar, Raquel; de la Fuente, Mercedes; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2015-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) comprise the most numerous, structurally diverse, and functionally uncharacterized family of heat shock proteins. Several Hsp genes (Hsp 90, 70, 40, and 27) from the insect Chironomus riparius are widely used in aquatic toxicology as biomarkers for environmental toxins. Here, we conducted a comparative study and characterized secondary structure of the six newly identified sHsp genes Hsp17, Hsp21, Hsp22, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34. A characteristic α-crystallin domain is predicted in all the new proteins. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a strong relation to other sHSPs from insects and interesting evidence regarding evolutionary origin and duplication events. Comparative analysis of transcription profiles for Hsp27, Hsp70, and the six newly identified genes revealed that Hsp17, Hsp21, and Hsp22 are constitutively expressed under normal conditions, while under two different heat shock conditions these genes are either not activated or are even repressed (Hsp22). In contrast, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34 are significantly activated along with Hsp27 and Hsp70 during heat stress. These results strongly suggest functional differentiation within the small HSP subfamily and provide new data to help understand the coping mechanisms induced by stressful environmental stimuli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aquarius - A Modelling Package for Groundwater Flow and Coupled Heat Transport in the Range 0.1 to 100 MPa and 0.1 to 1000 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, S. J.

    2009-05-01

    Aquarius is a Windows application that models fluid flow and heat transport under conditions in which fluid buoyancy can significantly impact patterns and magnitudes of fluid flow. The package is designed as a visualization tool through which users can examine flow systems in environments, both low temperature aquifers and regions with elevated PT regimes such as deep sedimentary basins, hydrothermal systems, and contact thermal aureoles. The package includes 4 components: (1) A finite-element mesh generator/assembler capable of representing complex geologic structures. Left-hand, right-hand and alternating linear triangles can be mixed within the mesh. Planer horizontal, planer vertical and cylindrical vertical coordinate sections are supported. (2) A menu-selectable system for setting properties and boundary/initial conditions. The design retains mathematical terminology for all input parameters such as scalars (e.g., porosity), tensors (e.g., permeability), and boundary/initial conditions (e.g., fixed potential). This makes the package an effective instructional aide by linking model requirements with the underlying mathematical concepts of partial differential equations and the solution logic of boundary/initial value problems. (3) Solution algorithms for steady-state and time-transient fluid flow/heat transport problems. For all models, the nonlinear global matrix equations are solved sequentially using over-relaxation techniques. Matrix storage design allows for large (e.g., 20000) element models to run efficiently on a typical PC. (4) A plotting system that supports contouring nodal data (e.g., head), vector plots for flux data (e.g., specific discharge), and colour gradient plots for elemental data (e.g., porosity), water properties (e.g., density), and performance measures (e.g., Peclet numbers). Display graphics can be printed or saved in standard graphic formats (e.g., jpeg). This package was developed from procedural codes in C written originally to

  2. On the use of differential solubility in aqueous ethanol solutions to narrow the DP range of food-grade starch hydrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balto, Amy S; Lapis, Trina J; Silver, Rachel K; Ferreira, Andrew J; Beaudry, Christopher M; Lim, Juyun; Penner, Michael H

    2016-04-15

    Considerable research is focused on understanding the functionality of starch hydrolysis products (SHP) consisting of glucose, maltose, maltooligosaccharides (MOS), and maltopolysaccharides (MPS). A confounding factor in this research is the high molecular dispersity of commercially available SHP. The study presented herein characterizes a flexible fractionation approach for lowering the dispersity of such products. This was accomplished by fractionating a corn syrup solids (CSS) preparation based on the differential solubility of its component saccharides in aqueous-ethanol solutions. Products obtained from selected fractionations were characterized with respect to degree of polymerization (DP; liquid chromatography), dextrose equivalency (reducing sugar assays), and prevalence of branching (NMR). Glucose and maltose were preferentially removed from CSS using high (⩾90%) ethanol extractants. Preparations with relatively narrow ranges of MOS, lower DP MPS, and higher DP MPS were obtained through repetitive 70%-ethanol extractions. Linear, as opposed to branched, MOS and MPS were preferentially extracted under all conditions tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes epidemic clones III and IV and their intact compared with heat-killed populations using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond B; Puzey, Kenneth A; Donnelly, Catherine W

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis (chemometrics) could be used to rapidly differentiate epidemic clones (ECs) of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as their intact compared with heat-killed populations. FT-IR spectra were collected from dried thin smears on infrared slides prepared from aliquots of 10 μL of each L. monocytogenes ECs (ECIII: J1-101 and R2-499; ECIV: J1-129 and J1-220), and also from intact and heat-killed cell populations of each EC strain using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared region in a reflectance mode. Chemometric analysis of spectra involved the application of the multivariate discriminant method for canonical variate analysis (CVA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). CVA of the spectra in the wavelength region 4000 to 600 cm(-1) separated the EC strains while LDA resulted in a 100% accurate classification of all spectra in the data set. Further, CVA separated intact and heat-killed cells of each EC strain and there was 100% accuracy in the classification of all spectra when LDA was applied. FT-IR spectral wavenumbers 1650 to 1390 cm(-1) were used to separate heat-killed and intact populations of L. monocytogenes. The FT-IR spectroscopy method allowed discrimination between strains that belong to the same EC. FT-IR is a highly discriminatory and reproducible method that can be used for the rapid subtyping of L. monocytogenes, as well as for the detection of live compared with dead populations of the organism. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis can be used for L. monocytogenes source tracking and for clinical case isolate comparison during epidemiological investigations since the method is capable of differentiating epidemic clones and it uses a library of well-characterized strains. The FT-IR method is potentially less expensive and more rapid compared to genetic

  4. Drought and Heat Differentially Affect XTH Expression and XET Activity and Action in 3-Day-Old Seedlings of Durum Wheat Cultivars with Different Stress Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Andrea; De Caroli, Monica; Sabella, Erika; De Pascali, Mariarosaria; Rampino, Patrizia; De Bellis, Luigi; Perrotta, Carla; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Piro, Gabriella; Fry, Stephen C; Lenucci, Marcello S

    2016-01-01

    Heat and drought stress have emerged as major constraints for durum wheat production. In the Mediterranean area, their negative effect on crop productivity is expected to be exacerbated by the occurring climate change. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs) are chief enzymes in cell wall remodeling, whose relevance in cell expansion and morphogenesis suggests a central role in stress responses. In this work the potential role of XTHs in abiotic stress tolerance was investigated in durum wheat. The separate effects of dehydration and heat exposure on XTH expression and its endotransglucosylase (XET) in vitro activity and in vivo action have been monitored, up to 24 h, in the apical and sub-apical root regions and shoots excised from 3-day-old seedlings of durum wheat cultivars differing in stress susceptibility/tolerance. Dehydration and heat stress differentially influence the XTH expression profiles and the activity and action of XET in the wheat seedlings, depending on the degree of susceptibility/tolerance of the cultivars, the organ, the topological region of the root and, within the root, on the gradient of cell differentiation. The root apical region was the zone mainly affected by both treatments in all assayed cultivars, while no change in XET activity was observed at shoot level, irrespective of susceptibility/tolerance, confirming the pivotal role of the root in stress perception, signaling, and response. Conflicting effects were observed depending on stress type: dehydration evoked an overall increase, at least in the apical region of the root, of XET activity and action, while a significant inhibition was caused by heat treatment in most cultivars. The data suggest that differential changes in XET action in defined portions of the root of young durum wheat seedlings may have a role as a response to drought and heat stress, thus contributing to seedling survival and crop establishment. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying

  5. Modelling the heat dynamics of a monitored Test Reference Environment for Building Integrated Photovoltaic systems using stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodi, C.; Bacher, Peder; Cipriano, J.

    2012-01-01

    prediction of the most influential variables. The experimental data originates from tests carried out with an air-based BIPV system installed in a Test Reference Environment. BIPV systems represent an interesting application for achieving the requirements of the EU EPBD Directive. Indeed, these systems could...... reduce the ventilation thermal losses of the building by pre-heating the fresh air. Furthermore, by decreasing PV module temperature, the ventilation air heat extraction can simultaneously increase electrical and thermal energy production of the building. A correct prediction of the PV module temperature...

  6. Level of tissue differentiation influences the activation of a heat-inducible flower-specific system for genetic containment in poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Nunna, Suneetha; Reinhardt, Richard; Jeltsch, Albert; Briones, Valentina; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Differentiation level but not transgene copy number influenced activation of a gene containment system in poplar. Heat treatments promoted CRE gene body methylation. The flower-specific transgene deletion was confirmed. Gene flow between genetic modified trees and their wild relatives is still motive of concern. Therefore, approaches for gene containment are required. In this study, we designed a novel strategy for achieving an inducible and flower-specific transgene removal from poplar trees but still expressing the transgene in the plant body. Hence, pollen carrying transgenes could be used for breeding purposes under controlled conditions in a first phase, and in the second phase genetic modified poplars developing transgene-free pollen grains could be released. This approach is based on the recombination systems CRE/loxP and FLP/frt. Both gene constructs contained a heat-inducible CRE/loxP-based spacer sequence for in vivo assembling of the flower-specific FLP/frt system. This allowed inducible activation of gene containment. The FLP/frt system was under the regulation of a flower-specific promoter, either CGPDHC or PTD. Our results confirmed complete CRE/loxP-based in vivo assembling of the flower-specific transgene excision system after heat treatment in all cells for up to 30 % of regenerants derived from undifferentiated tissue cultures. Degradation of HSP::CRE/loxP spacer after recombination but also persistence as extrachromosomal DNA circles were detected in sub-lines obtained after heat treatments. Furthermore, heat treatment promoted methylation of the CRE gene body. A lower methylation level was detected at CpG sites in transgenic sub-lines showing complete CRE/loxP recombination and persistence of CRE/loxP spacer, compared to sub-lines with incomplete recombination. However, our results suggest that low methylation might be necessary but not sufficient for recombination. The flower-specific FLP/frt-based transgene deletion was confirmed in 6.3 % of

  7. Differentiation in stag beetles, Neolucanus swinhoei complex (Coleoptera: Lucanidae): four major lineages caused by periodical Pleistocene glaciations and separation by a mountain range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Lung; Wan, Xia; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2014-09-01

    Taxonomic debates on Neolucanus swinhoei complex consisting of N. swinhoei, N. doro doro, N. doro horaguchii, and N. euganiae, distributed exclusively in Taiwan, have been ongoing for several decades because of their overlapping morphological characters. To clarify their taxonomic status and phylogeographical history, we analyzed nine morphological characteristics and four molecular amplicons. Phylogenetic inferences based on COI+16S rDNA+wingless showed one eastern and three western lineages, with the latter consisting of one low-hill and two montane lineages. Intermingled DNA sequences from different populations within each lineage, many low FST values, and a high variance component between lineages indicate the possibility of gene flow among populations. However, positive relationships were observed between the genetic divergences of 16S rDNA and its FST values with geographic distance. A divergence estimation based on COI+16S revealed that these beetles might have originated from Asian mainland and differentiated into western and eastern lineages ca. 1Mya, with the differentiation of the western lineages occurring approximately 0.50-0.75Mya. Isolation by mountain ranges and limited flying capability of these beetles as well as populations retreat to and expansion from refugia in response to glaciation cycles have resulted in the current distribution of N. swinhoei complex. Although most morphological characters are variable and undistinguishable, multi-dimensional scaling analysis based on measurable characteristics could recognize hill N. swinhoei as a cluster distinct from the others. However, based on the realities of genetic admixture, shared phylogeographical history and overlapping characteristics, all of these stag beetles should be regarded as Neolucanus swinhoei Bates, 1866. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-range enhancer associated with chromatin looping allows AP-1 regulation of the peptidylarginine deiminase 3 gene in differentiated keratinocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Chavanas

    Full Text Available Transcription control at a distance is a critical mechanism, particularly for contiguous genes. The peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs catalyse the conversion of protein-bound arginine into citrulline (deimination, a critical reaction in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis, and in the metabolism of the major epidermal barrier protein filaggrin, a strong predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis. PADs are encoded by 5 clustered PADI genes (1p35-6. Unclear are the mechanisms controlling the expression of the gene PADI3 encoding the PAD3 isoform, a strong candidate for the deimination of filaggrin in the terminally differentiating epidermal keratinocyte. We describe the first PAD Intergenic Enhancer (PIE, an evolutionary conserved non coding segment located 86-kb from the PADI3 promoter. PIE is a strong enhancer of the PADI3 promoter in Ca2+-differentiated epidermal keratinocytes, and requires bound AP-1 factors, namely c-Jun and c-Fos. As compared to proliferative keratinocytes, calcium stimulation specifically associates with increased local DNase I hypersensitivity around PIE, and increased physical proximity of PIE and PADI3 as assessed by Chromosome Conformation Capture. The specific AP-1 inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid suppresses the calcium-induced increase of PADI3 mRNA levels in keratinocytes. Our findings pave the way to the exploration of deimination control during tumorigenesis and wound healing, two conditions for which AP-1 factors are critical, and disclose that long-range transcription control has a role in the regulation of the gene PADI3. Since invalidation of distant regulators causes a variety of human diseases, PIE results to be a plausible candidate in association studies on deimination-related disorders or atopic disease.

  9. Modifying the Cold Gelation Properties of Quinoa Protein Isolate: Influence of Heat-Denaturation pH in the Alkaline Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2015-09-01

    Heat-denaturation of quinoa protein isolate (QPI) at alkali pH and its influence on the physicochemical and cold gelation properties was investigated. Heating QPI at pH 8.5 led to increased surface hydrophobicity and decreases in free and bound sulfhydryl group contents. Heating at pH 10.5 caused a lesser degree of changes in sulfhydryl groups and surface hydrophobicity, and the resulting solutions showed drastically increased solubility. SDS PAGE revealed the presence of large aggregates only in the sample heated at pH 8.5, suggesting that any aggregates present in the sample heated at pH 10.5 were non-covalently bound and disintegrated in the presence of SDS. Reducing conditions partially dissolved the aggregates in the pH 8.5 heated sample indicating the occurrence of disulphide bonding, but caused no major alterations in the separation pattern of the pH 10.5 heated sample. Denaturation pH influenced the cold gelation properties greatly. Solutions heated at pH 8.5 formed a coarse coagulum with maximum G' of 5 Pa. Heat-denaturation at 10.5 enabled the proteins to form a finer and regularly structured gel with a maximum G' of 1140 Pa. Particle size analysis showed that the pH 10.5 heated sample contained a higher level of very small particles (0.1-2 μm), and these readily aggregated into large particles (30-200 μm) when pH was lowered to 5.5. Differences in the nature of aggregates formed during heating may explain the large variation in gelation properties.

  10. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangshu Dong

    Full Text Available Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5- 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT: 5.2% (2,142 genes in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology items included 'response to heat', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS', 'response to temperature stimulus', 'response to abiotic stimulus', and 'MAPKKK cascade'. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps and heat shock factor (Hsf-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292, whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853, protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A (Bra008580, Bra006382 can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965, which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852, were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41 and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1] were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a

  11. Heat Shock Protein 27 Plays a Pivotal Role in Myofibroblast Differentiation and in the Development of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah-Mee Park

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is a member of the small molecular weight HSP family. Upon treatment with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, we observed upregulation of HSP27 along with that of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation, in cultured human and mouse lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, by using siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that HSP27 was involved in cell survival and upregulation of fibronectin, osteopontin (OPN and type 1 collagen, all functional markers of myofibroblast differentiation, in TGF-β1-treated MRC-5 cells. In lung tissues of bleomycin-treated mice, HSP27 was strongly upregulated and substantially co-localized with α-SMA, OPN and type I collagen but not with proSP-C (a marker of type II alveolar epithelial cells, E-cadherin (a marker of epithelial cells or F4/80 (a marker of macrophages. A similar co-localization of HSP27 and α-SMA was observed in lung tissues of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Furthermore, airway delivery of HSP27 siRNA effectively suppressed bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Collectively, our findings indicate that HSP27 is critically involved in myofibroblast differentiation of lung fibroblasts and may be a promising therapeutic target for lung fibrotic diseases.

  12. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, LPP-ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Bilato, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Dumont, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Natural Convection Flows Simulated by both the Conservation and Incompressible Forms of the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Differentially-Heated Square Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry; Aurélia Esteve; Kurt D. Hamman; Dana A. Knoll; Ryosuke Park; William Taitano

    2009-01-01

    This report illustrates a comparative study to analyze the physical differences between numerical simulations obtained with both the conservation and incompressible forms of the Navier-Stokes equations for natural convection flows in simple geometries. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the incompressible flow assumption (which is based upon constant density advection, divergence-free flow, and the Boussinesq gravitational body force approximation) differs from the conservation form (which only assumes that the fluid is a continuum) when solving flows driven by gravity acting upon density variations resulting from local temperature gradients. Driving this study is the common use of the incompressible flow assumption in fluid flow simulations for nuclear power applications in natural convection flows subjected to a high heat flux (large temperature differences). A series of simulations were conducted on two-dimensional, differentially-heated rectangular geometries and modeled with both hydrodynamic formulations. From these simulations, the selected characterization parameters of maximum Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, and normalized pressure reduction were calculated. Comparisons of these parameters were made with available benchmark solutions for air with the ideal gas assumption at both low and high heat fluxes. Additionally, we generated body force, velocity, and divergence of velocity distributions to provide a basis for further analysis. The simulations and analysis were then extended to include helium at the Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) normal operating conditions. Our results show that the consequences of incorporating the incompressible flow assumption in high heat flux situations may lead to unrepresentative results. The results question the use of the incompressible flow assumption for simulating fluid flow in an operating nuclear reactor, where large temperature variations are present. The results show that the use of

  14. Turned on by heat: differential expression of FT and LFY-like genes in Narcissus tazetta during floral transition

    OpenAIRE

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Cohen, Doron; Mathew, Deepu; Eshel, Amram; Kamenetsky, Rina; Flaishman, Moshe A.

    2013-01-01

    In Narcissus tazetta, a monocotyledonous bulbous geophyte, floral initiation and differentiation occur within the bulb during the quiescent period in summer, when ambient temperatures are relatively high and the bulb is located underground with no foliage or roots. In many plant species, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its homologues are considered powerful promoters of flowering. The Narcissus FT gene homologue (NtFT) was isolated, and organ-specific expression patterns of NtFT during the annual ...

  15. Solvation molar enthalpies and heat capacities of n-alkanes and n-alkylbenzenes on stationary phases of wide-ranging polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrón-Aguilar, Rosa; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo; Santiuste, José María

    2010-12-03

    A comparison of the most usual gas chromatographic methods for the calculation of partial molar enthalpies of solvation (Δ(sol)H(o)) has been carried out. Those methods based on the fitting of lnV(g) or ln(k/T) vs. 1/T and ln(k/T) vs. (1/T and the temperature arrangement, T(a)) are the most adequate ones for obtaining Δ(sol)H(o) values. However, the latter is the only reliable option for Δ(sol)H(o) estimation when commercial WCOT capillary columns are used, since in this case the estimation of some variables involved in the V(g) determination is less accurate or even impossible. Consequently, in this paper, Δ(sol)H(o) obtained from ln(k/T) vs. (1/T+T(a)) fitting at 373.15 and 298.15K for n-alkanes and n-alkylbenzenes on 12 commercial capillary columns coated with stationary phases covering the 203-3608 McReynolds polarity range are reported. Moreover, molar heat capacities of solvation at constant pressure (Δ(sol)C(p)(o)) have also been calculated using this method. A clear influence on Δ(sol)H(o) of the type and content of the substitution group in the stationary phase was observed. In addition, a linear relationship of Δ(sol)C(p)(o) with the van der Waals volume of the n-alkanes and the temperature gradient of density of the stationary phase was found. The effect of the size of the hydrocarbon on both thermodynamic variables was also investigated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Turbulent natural convection in a differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5 filled with non-participating and participating grey media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, R; Trias, F X; Perez-Segarra, C D [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Lab.Termotecnia i Energetica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), C/Colom, 11, E08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Lehmkuhl, O; Colomer, G, E-mail: cttc@cttc.upc.edu, E-mail: termofluids@termofluids.com [Termofluids, S. L., Magi Colet 8, E08204 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-22

    In the present work, turbulent natural convection in a tall differentially heated cavity of aspect ratio 5:1, filled with air (Pr = 0.7) under a Rayleigh number based on the height of 4.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 10}, is studied numerically. Two different situations have been analysed. In the first one, the cavity is filled with a transparent medium. In the second one, the cavity contains a grey participating gas. The turbulent flow is described by means of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using symmetry-preserving discretizations. Simulations are compared with experimental data available in the literature and with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Surface and gas radiation have been simulated using the Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM). The influence of radiation on fluid flow behaviour has also been analysed.

  17. On the solution of the differential equation occurring in the problem of heat convection in laminar flow through a tube with slip—flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanming Wang

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique is developed for evaluation of eigenvalues in solution of the differential equation d2y/dr2+(1/rdy/dr+λ2(β−r2y=0 which occurs in the problem of heat convection in laminar flow through a circular tube with silp-flow (β>1. A series solution requires the expansions of coeffecients involving extremely large numbers. No work has been reported in the case of β>1, because of its computational complexity in the evaluation of the eigenvalues. In this paper, a matrix was constructed and a computational algorithm was obtained to calculate the first four eigenvalues. Also, an asymptotic formula was developed to generate the full spectrum of eigenvalues. The computational results for various values of β were obtained.

  18. Preparation of well-distributed titania nanopillar arrays on Ti6Al4V surface by induction heating for enhancing osteogenic differentiation of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Jun; Bai, Han-Ying; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Xu, Wen-Hua; Zhao, Jun-Han; Chen, Xin; Lu, Yu-Peng; Zhang, Yi-Lin

    2018-01-01

    Great effort has recently been devoted to the preparation of nanoscale surfaces on titanium-based implants to achieve clinically fast osteoinduction and osseointegration, which relies on the unique characteristics of the nanostructure. In this work, we used induction heating treatment (IHT) as a rapid oxidation method to fabricate a porous nanoscale oxide layer on the Ti6Al4V surface for better medical application. Well-distributed vertical nanopillars were yielded by IHT for 20–35 s on the alloy surface. The composition of the oxides contained rutile/anatase TiO2 and a small amount of Al2O3 between the TiO2 grain boundaries (GBs). This technology resulted in a reduction and subsequent increase of surface roughness of 26–32 nm when upregulating the heating time, followed by the successive enhancement of the thickness, wettability and adhesion strength of the oxidation layer to the matrix. The surface hardness also distinctly rose to 554 HV in the IHT-35 s group compared with the 350 HV of bare Ti6Al4V. The massive small-angle GBs in the bare alloy promoted the formation of nanosized oxide crystallites. The grain refinement and deformation texture reduction further improved the mechanical properties of the matrix after IHT. Moreover, in vitro experiments on a mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) culture derived from human bone marrow for 1–7 days indicated that the nanoscale layers did not cause cytotoxicity, and facilitated cell differentiation in osteoblasts by enhancing the gene and osteogenesis-related protein expressions after 1–3 weeks of culturing. The increase of the IHT time slightly advanced the BMSC proliferation and differentiation, especially during long-term culture. Our findings provide strong evidence that IHT oxidation technology is a novel nanosurface modification technology, which is potentially promising for further clinical development.

  19. High variation and very low differentiation in wide ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga): insights from mtDNA and microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    units. Both marker sets showed high levels of genetic variation and very low levels of differentiation. There was no geographical structuring of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in the phylogenetic tree, and the plains zebra showed the lowest overall differentiation recorded in any African ungulate studied...

  20. Highly differentiated magmas linked with polymetallic mineralization: A case study from the Cuihongshan granitic intrusions, Lesser Xing'an Range, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xianghui; Zhang, Zhaochong; Cheng, Zhiguo; Santosh, M.; Jin, Ziliang; Wen, Bingbing; Li, Zixi; Xu, Lijuan

    2018-03-01

    The genetic link between granitoids and polymetallic skarn mineralization has remained equivocal. The Cuihongshan skarn-porphyry W-Mo-Pb-Zn-(Fe-Cu) deposit in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt provides a unique example to address this issue. The major rock types in the mine area are Early Paleozoic intrusions composed of biotite syenogranite and biotite porphyritic granite and Early Mesozoic intrusions represented by porphyritic quartz monzonite, biotite monzogranite, and porphyritic granite. The diagnostic mineralogical and geochemical features indicate that the rocks belong to A2-type granites. The Early Paleozoic suite shows zircon U-Pb ages of 501 Ma, and εHf(t) values of - 4.4 to + 2.7 and + 2.4 to + 7.6, respectively. In combination with their coherent geochemical trends, these rocks are inferred to be products of in-situ differentiation. Although the Mesozoic suite shows crystallization ages of 194-196 Ma, εHf(t) values are in the range of - 2.5 to + 7.5 for the porphyritic quartz monzonite, the - 1.8 to + 4.5 values for the monzogranite and the + 2.3 to + 8.0 range for the porphyritic granite. The porphyritic quartz monzonite displays distinct mineral assemblage and shows significant compositional gap with the other two lithofacies. In contrast, the monzogranite and porphyritic granite have similar geochemical features, and are thus inferred to be co-magmatic. Considering the high SiO2 contents, variable εHf(t) (- 4.4 to + 8.0) and εNd(t) values (- 8.4 to + 0.28) for the two suites, we infer that both episodes of granitoid magmatism resulted from partial melting of crustal materials with a mixed source containing varying proportions of juvenile and Precambrian crustal components. The Early Mesozoic porphyritic granite shows a highly evolved F-rich geochemical affinity, and experienced magma-fluid interaction. Cassiterite from the calcic skarn and the magnesian skarn that coexists with magnetite orebodies shows a mean U-Pb age of 195

  1. Measuring Relative Motions Across a Fault Using Seafloor Transponders Installed at Close Range to each Other Based on Differential GPS/Acoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Ashi, J.; Tsuji, T.; Tomita, F.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy based on acoustic ranging technique is getting popular means to reveal crustal deformation beneath the ocean. GPS/acoustic technique can be applied to monitoring regional deformation or absolute position, while direct-path acoustic ranging can be applied to detecting localized strain or relative motion in a short distance ( 1-10 km). However the latter observation sometimes fails to keep the clearance of an acoustic path between the seafloor transponders because of topographic obstacle or of downward bending nature of the path due to vertical gradient of sound speed in deep-ocean. Especially at steep fault scarp, it is almost impossible to keep direct path between the top and bottom of the fault scarp. Even in such a situation, acoustic path to the sea surface might be always clear. Then we propose a new approach to monitor the relative motion of across a fault scarp using "differential" GPS/acoustic measurement, which account only for traveltime differences among the transponders. The advantages of this method are that: (1) uncertainty in sound speed in shallow water is almost canceled; (2) possible GPS error is also canceled; (3) picking error in traveltime detection is almost canceled; (4) only a pair of transponders can fully describe relative 3-dimensional motion. On the other hand the disadvantages are that: (5) data is not continuous but only campaign; (6) most advantages are only effective only for very short baseline (< 100-300 m). Our target being applied this method is a steep fault scarp near the Japan trench, which is expected as a surface expression of back thrust, in where time scale of fault activity is still controversial especially after the Tohoku earthquake. We have carefully installed three transponders across this scarp using a NSS system, which can remotely navigate instrument near the seafloor from a mother vessel based on video camera image. Baseline lengths among the transponders are 200-300 m at 3500 m depth. Initial

  2. Comparison of Body, Auricular, and Abdominal Acupuncture Treatments for Insomnia Differentiated as Internal Harassment of Phlegm-Heat Syndrome: An Orthogonal Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the optimum treatment protocol for insomnia among auricular, body, and abdominal needling methods. Methods. A three-factor (3 needling protocols and three-level experimental scheme was designed based on orthogonal method. 54 patients of insomnia differentiated as internal harassment of phlegm-heat syndrome were given two courses of acupuncture treatment (each with 20 times of acupuncture. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by comparing the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD scores, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA scores of patients before treatment, after one course of treatment, and after two courses of treatment as well as one month after treatment. Results. Body, auricular, and abdominal acupuncture treatments all alleviated symptoms of insomnia, depression, and anxiety, but body and auricular acupuncture had stronger therapeutic effects. Conclusions. Body acupuncture at basic points shall be given priority in protocol selection for insomnia. The second-best choice is auricular acupuncture with basic points combined with points based on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM theories. Abdominal needling with very quick effect can be an alternative protocol with basic points combined with syndrome differentiation points.

  3. IMPROVEMENT OF ACCURACY OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION METHOD FOR MULTI DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF AUTO-ADAPTABLE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential approximation is derived from radiation transfer equation by averaging over the solid angle. It is one of the more effective methods for engineering calculations of radia- tive heat transfer in complex three-dimensional thermal power systems with selective and scattering media. The new method for improvement of accuracy of the differential approximation based on using of auto-adaptable boundary conditions is introduced in the paper. The  efficiency  of  the  named  method  is  proved  for  the  test  2D-systems.  Self-consistent auto-adaptable boundary conditions taking into consideration the nonorthogonal component of the incident to the boundary radiation flux are formulated. It is demonstrated that taking in- to consideration of the non- orthogonal incident flux in multi-dimensional systems, such as furnaces, boilers, combustion chambers improves the accuracy of the radiant flux simulations and to more extend in the zones adjacent to the edges of the chamber.Test simulations utilizing the differential approximation method with traditional boundary conditions, new self-consistent boundary conditions and “precise” discrete ordinates method were performed. The mean square errors of the resulting radiative fluxes calculated along the boundary of rectangular and triangular test areas were decreased 1.5–2 times by using auto- adaptable boundary conditions. Radiation flux gaps in the corner points of non-symmetric sys- tems are revealed by using auto-adaptable boundary conditions which can not be obtained by using the conventional boundary conditions.

  4. About the possible options for models of convective heat transfer in closed volumes with local heating source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in air area surrounded on all sides enclosing structures, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the media are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The process of convective heat transfer is calculated using the models of turbulence Prandtl and Prandtl-Reichard. Takes into account the processes of heat exchange region considered with the environment. Is carried out the analysis of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient at interfaces “air – enclosures”. The distributions average along the gas temperature range are obtained.

  5. DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSE OF HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS TO UPHILL AND DOWNHILL EXERCISE IN HEART, SKELETAL MUSCLE, LUNG AND KIDNEY TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo C. B. Lollo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Running on a horizontal plane is known to increase the concentration of the stress biomarker heat-shock protein (HSP, but no comparison of the expression of HSP70 has yet been established between the uphill (predominantly concentric and downhill (predominantly eccentric muscle contractions exercise. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between eccentric and concentric contractions on the HSP70 response of the lung, kidney, gastrocnemius, soleus and heart. Twenty-four male Wistar weanling rats were divided into four groups: non-exercised and three different grades of treadmill exercise groups: horizontal, uphill (+7% and downhill (-7% of inclination. At the optimal time-point of six hours after the exercise, serum uric acid, creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH were determined by standard methods and HSP70 by the Western blot analysis. HSP70 responds differently to different types of running. For kidney, heart, soleus and gastrocnemius, the HSP70 expression increased, 230, 180, 150 and 120% respectively of the reference (horizontal. When the contraction was concentric (uphill and compared to downhill the increase in response of HSP70 was greater in 80% for kidney, 75% for gastrocnemius, 60% for soleus and 280% for the heart. Uric acid was about 50% higher (0.64 ± 0.03 mg·dL-1 in the uphill group as compared to the horizontal or downhill groups. Similarly, the activities of serum CK and LDH were both 100% greater for both the uphill and downhill groups as compared to the horizontal group (2383 ± 253 and 647.00 ± 73 U/L, respectively. The responsiveness of HSP70 appeared to be quite different depending on the type of tissue, suggesting that the impact of exercise was not restricted to the muscles, but extended to the kidney tissue. The uphill exercise increases HSP70 beyond the eccentric type and the horizontal running was a lower HSP70 responsive stimulus

  6. Turned on by heat: differential expression of FT and LFY-like genes in Narcissus tazetta during floral transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Cohen, Doron; Mathew, Deepu; Eshel, Amram; Kamenetsky, Rina; Flaishman, Moshe A

    2013-08-01

    In Narcissus tazetta, a monocotyledonous bulbous geophyte, floral initiation and differentiation occur within the bulb during the quiescent period in summer, when ambient temperatures are relatively high and the bulb is located underground with no foliage or roots. In many plant species, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its homologues are considered powerful promoters of flowering. The Narcissus FT gene homologue (NtFT) was isolated, and organ-specific expression patterns of NtFT during the annual cycle and reproductive development under different temperature regimes were analysed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and RNA in situ hybridization. During floral induction, NtFT was not expressed in bulb scales, roots, or foliage leaves, but it was detected inside the bulb in the apical meristem and leaf primordia. The expression of another key flowering gene, NLF, the LEAFY homologue in N. tazetta, was also observed only in meristem and leaf primordia within the bulbs; however, its expression did not coincide with that of NtFT during meristem transition to reproductive stage. Under high temperatures (25-30 °C) in the dark, NtFT expression occurred simultaneously with floral induction timing, indicating that floral induction is affected by high temperatures but not by photoperiod or vernalization. Monitoring the apical meristem of Narcissus in February-August of two growing seasons under ambient and controlled storage conditions showed that transition to flowering is temperature dependent and varies between years. Lack of NtFT and NLF expression in foliage leaves suggests that flower initiation control in Narcissus differs from that in common model plants.

  7. Differential cross section of the pion-nucleon charge-exchange reaction in the momentum range from 148 to 323 MeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Sadler, M E; Abaev, V V; Allgower, C; Barker, A; Bekrenev, V; Bircher, C; Briscoe, W J; Cadman, R; Carter, C; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Daugherity, M; Draper, B; Grosnick, D P; Hayden, S; Huddleston, J; Isenhower, D; Jerkins, M; Joy, M; Knecht, N; Koetke, D D; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Kycia, T; Lolos, G J; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Manweiler, R; Marusic, A; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M K; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D; Peterson, J; Phaisangittisakul, N; Prakhov, S N; Price, J W; Ramírez, A; Robinson, C; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M; Strakovsky, I I; Supek, I; Tippens, W B; Watson, S

    2004-01-01

    Measured values of the differential cross section for pion-nucleon charge exchange are presented at momenta 148, 174, 188, 212, 238, 271, 298, and 323 MeV/c, a region dominated by the Delta resonance. Complete angular distributions were obtained using the Crystal Ball detector at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Statistical uncertainties of the differential cross sections are typically 2-6%, exceptions being the results at the lowest momentum and at the most forward measurements of the five lowest momenta. We estimate the systematic uncertainties to be 3-6%.

  8. Differential cross sections of the charge-exchange reaction pi- p --> pi0 n in the momentum range from 103 to 178 MeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Mekterović, D; Abaev, V; Bekrenev, V; Bircher, C; Briscoe, W J; Cadman, R V; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Grosnick, D; Isenhover, D; Jerkins, M; Joy, M; Knecht, N; Koetke, D D; Kozlenko, N; Kulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Manweiler, R; Marušić, A; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M K; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Peaslee, D; Peterson, J; Phaisangittisakul, N; Prakhov, S N; Price, J W; Ramírez, A; Sadler, M E; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M; Strakovsky, I; Tippens, W B; Watson, S

    2009-01-01

    Measured values of the differential cross sections for pion-nucleon charge exchange, pi- p --> pi0 n, are presented for pi- momenta of 103, 112, 120, 130, 139, 152, and 178 MeV/c. Complete angular distributions were obtained by using the Crystal Ball detector at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Statistical uncertainties of the differential cross sections vary from 3% to 6% in the backward angle region, and from 6% to about 20% in the forward region with the exception of the two most forward angles. The systematic uncertainties are estimated to be about 3% for all momenta.

  9. Combined use of heat-shock protein 70 and glutamine synthetase is useful in the distinction of typical hepatocellular adenoma from atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy B; Roncalli, Massimo; Tommaso, Luca Di; Kakar, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma can mimic high-grade dysplastic nodule in cirrhotic liver and hepatocellular adenoma in non-cirrhotic liver. This study evaluates the efficacy of combined use of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glypican-3 in this setting. Immunohistochemistry for these three markers was done in 17 typical hepatocellular adenoma, 15 high-grade dysplastic nodules, 20 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms (14 clinically atypical and 6 pathologically atypical), 14 very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and 43 well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. All three markers were negative in typical adenomas. HSP70 was positive in 10, 71, and 67% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated HCC, respectively, while GS was positive in 60, 50, and 60% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Glypican-3 was negative in all atypical neoplasms and very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and was positive in 27% of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Positive staining with at least one marker (HSP70 and/or GS) was seen in 85% of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, which was similar to well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (78%, P = 0.4), and pathologically atypical cases (100%, P = 0.5), but significantly higher compared with clinically atypical cases (43%. P = 0.03) and none of typical adenomas (P hepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical neoplasms (45 vs 10%, P = 0.004). Both these markers were also more often expressed in very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical cases (38 vs 10%, P = 0.06). In conclusion, the combined use of GS and HSP70 can be useful in the diagnosis of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. These stains can also help in the distinction of typical adenoma from atypical hepatocellular neoplasms. Glypican-3

  10. Combined use of heat-shock protein 70 and glutamine synthetase is useful in the distinction of typical hepatocellular adenoma from atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy B; Roncalli, Massimo; Di Tommaso, Luca; Kakar, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma can mimic high-grade dysplastic nodule in cirrhotic liver and hepatocellular adenoma in non-cirrhotic liver. This study evaluates the efficacy of combined use of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glypican-3 in this setting. Immunohistochemistry for these three markers was done in 17 typical hepatocellular adenoma, 15 high-grade dysplastic nodules, 20 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms (14 clinically atypical and 6 pathologically atypical), 14 very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and 43 well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. All three markers were negative in typical adenomas. HSP70 was positive in 10, 71, and 67% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated HCC, respectively, while GS was positive in 60, 50, and 60% of atypical neoplasms, very well-differentiated and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. Glypican-3 was negative in all atypical neoplasms and very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and was positive in 27% of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Positive staining with at least one marker (HSP70 and/or GS) was seen in 85% of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, which was similar to well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (78%, P=0.4), and pathologically atypical cases (100%, P=0.5), but significantly higher compared with clinically atypical cases (43%. P=0.03) and none of typical adenomas (Phepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical neoplasms (45 vs 10%, P=0.004). Both these markers were also more often expressed in very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma compared with atypical cases (38 vs 10%, P=0.06). In conclusion, the combined use of GS and HSP70 can be useful in the diagnosis of very well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. These stains can also help in the distinction of typical adenoma from atypical hepatocellular neoplasms. Glypican-3 has low

  11. Range-wide genetic differentiation among North American great gray owls (Strix nebulosa) reveals a distinct lineage limited to the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Hull; J.J. Keane; W.K. Savage; S.A. Godwin; J. Shafer; E.P. Jepsen; R. Gerhardt; C. Stermer; H.B. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of regional genetic differentiation are essential for describing phylogeographic patterns and informing management efforts for species of conservation concern. In this context, we investigated genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships among great gray owl (Strix nebulosa) populations in western North America, which...

  12. Cryogenic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Randall F

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic Heat Transfer, Second Edition continues to address specific heat transfer problems that occur in the cryogenic temperature range where there are distinct differences from conventional heat transfer problems. This updated version examines the use of computer-aided design in cryogenic engineering and emphasizes commonly used computer programs to address modern cryogenic heat transfer problems. It introduces additional topics in cryogenic heat transfer that include latent heat expressions; lumped-capacity transient heat transfer; thermal stresses; Laplace transform solutions; oscillating flow heat transfer, and computer-aided heat exchanger design. It also includes new examples and homework problems throughout the book, and provides ample references for further study.

  13. Experimental determination of Poisson's ratio of a single crystal nickel heat-resistant alloy in the temperature range of 20-1000°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golynets, S. A.; Toloraiya, V. N.; Nekrasov, S. N.; Khvatskii, K. K.

    2017-09-01

    This work is devoted to the experimental determination of Poisson's ratio at temperatures of 20-1000°C, which was carried out on cylindrical samples of a single-crystal heat-resistant nickel alloy with crystallographic orientations of (CGOs) [001], [011], and [111]. The modulus of elasticity for the samples of these orientations has also been determined. It has been established that, in samples of heat-resistant nickel singlecrystal alloy with CGO [011], Poisson's ratio can vary from negative to positive values depending on the azimuthal orientation, i.e., on the crystallographic directions that lie in the plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the sample. To control the azimuthal CGO of cylindrical samples [011], a special metallographic procedure was developed based on the determination of the dendritic structure on the butt ends of these samples using etching. The data on the azimuthal orientation were subsequently used to place a sensor in order to determine the transverse deformation in these directions.

  14. Deformation and rupture behavior of Argentine Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in the temperature range from 700 to 1200deg C at different heating rates in inert atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, M.E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erbacher, F.J.

    1991-12-01

    In the tube burst apparatus TUBA burst tests were performed at CNEA/CAC-Buenos Aires in short Zircaloy-4 tube specimens. The main objective was to investigate the deformation and burst behavior of Argentine cladding tubes and to compare it with data obtained by others. It was found that the burst data e.g. burst temperature and circumferential burst strain and the influence of different heating rates are in good agreement with those from other origin. (orig.). [Deutsch] In der Rohrberstversuchsanlage TUBA (Tube Burst Apparatus) wurden bei CNEA/CAC-Buenos Aires Berstversuche an kurzen Zircaloy-4-Rohrabschnitten durchgefuehrt. Die wesentliche Zielsetzung war die Untersuchung des Verformungs- und Berstverhaltens von Huellrohren aus argentinischer Herstellung und sein Vergleich mit dem aus anderen Laendern. Ein Vergleich der ermittelten Berstdaten wie z.B. Bersttemperatur und Berstdehnung sowie deren Beeinflussung durch unterschiedliche Aufheizraten ergab eine gute Uebereinstimmung mit den Berstdaten von Zircaloy-4 Huellrohren aus anderer Herstellung. (orig.).

  15. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufi, M; Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F [Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, K [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Hirose, T; Umezu, Y [Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Y [Saga Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localized on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed

  16. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1994-01-01

    It is approximately 10 years since the Third Edition of Heat Pipes was published and the text is now established as the standard work on the subject. This new edition has been extensively updated, with revisions to most chapters. The introduction of new working fluids and extended life test data have been taken into account in chapter 3. A number of new types of heat pipes have become popular, and others have proved less effective. This is reflected in the contents of chapter 5. Heat pipes are employed in a wide range of applications, including electronics cooling, diecasting and injection mo

  17. Heat-killed probiotic bacteria differentially regulate colonic epithelial cell production of human β-defensin-2: dependence on inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habil, N; Abate, W; Beal, J; Foey, A D

    2014-12-01

    The inducible antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial products is essential to antipathogen responses of gut epithelial cells. Commensal and probiotic bacteria can augment such mucosal defences. Probiotic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, however, may have adverse effects, boosting inflammatory responses. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of selected probiotic strains on hBD-2 production by epithelial cells induced by pathologically relevant pro-inflammatory cytokines and the role of cytokine modulators in controlling hBD-2. Caco-2 colonic intestinal epithelial cells were pre-incubated with heat-killed probiotics, i.e. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) or Lactobacillus fermentum strain MS15 (LF), followed by stimulation of hBD-2 by interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the absence or presence of exogenous IL-10 or anti-IL-10 neutralising antibody. Cytokines and hBD-2 mRNA and protein were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LcS augmented IL-1β-induced hBD-2, whereas LF enhanced TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. LF enhanced TNF-α-induced TNF-α and suppressed IL-10, whereas augmented IL-1β-induced IL-10. LcS upregulated IL-1β-induced TNF-α mRNA and suppressed IL-10. Endogenous IL-10 differentially regulated hBD-2; neutralisation of IL-10 augmented TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. Exogenous IL-10, however, suppressed both TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced hBD-2; LcS partially rescued suppression in TNF-α- and IL-1β-stimulation, whereas LF further suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. It can be concluded that probiotic strains differentially regulate hBD-2 mRNA expression and protein secretion, modulation being dictated by inflammatory stimulus and resulting cytokine environment.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C/heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70)/transcription factor B-cell translocation gene 2 signaling in rat bone marrow stromal cell differentiation to cholinergic neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jing; Sun, Chunhui; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2012-12-01

    Although bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can differentiate into neuron-like cells, the mechanisms underlying neuronal differentiation are not well understood. We recently found that inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) by its inhibitor D609 promoted BMSCs' differentiation into cholinergic neuron-like cells. Using the effective small molecule D609 and gene microarray technology, we investigated the change of gene expression profile to identify key mediators involved in the neuronal differentiation. We selected heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and transcription factor B-cell translocation gene 2 (Btg2) that were maximally up-regulated for further study. We found that functional suppression of Hsp70 blocked D609-induced increase of Btg2 expression and cholinergic neuronal differentiation of BMSCs. These results demonstrated that Hsp70 was the pivotal factor in PC-PLC-medicated neuronal differentiation of BMSCs, and Btg2 might be its downstream target. Our findings provide new clues for controlling BMSCs' differentiation into cholinergic neuron-like cells and provide a putative strategy for neurodegenerative diseases therapies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Th2 differentiation features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat resistant antigen-activated human γδT cells and the regulation of transcription factor T-bet/GATA-3 on differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Anyou; Lv, Hezuo; Zhang, Lunjun; Hu, Jianguo; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Baiqing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Th2 differentiation features of Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat resistant antigens (MTB-HAg)-activated human γδT cells and the regulation of transcription factor T-box expression in T cells (T-bet) and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) on differentiation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with MTB-HAg to generate MTB-HAg-activated T cells (MTBAT) and expanded in the neutral condition or Th2 polarizing condition. After restimulation for 6 hours with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 10 ng/mL), ionomycin (500 ng/mL) and monensin (2.5 μmol/L), intracellular cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4) of γδT cells and αβT cells among MTBAT were detected by four-color fluorescence mAb staining combined with flow cytometry. The highly purified γδT cells and CD4⁺ T cells were sorted by flow cytometer from MTBAT that were cultured in neutral and Th2 polarizing conditions for 28 days. The expressions of T-bet and GATA-3 mRNA in purified γδT cells and CD4⁺ T cells were determined by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) technique. γδT cells among MTBAT cultured in the neutral or Th2 polarizing condition predominantly produced IFN-γ, whereas the percentage of IFN-γ⁺ αβT cells significantly decreased in the Th2 polarizing condition as the culture time went by. Compared with the neutral condition, Th0 type (IFN-γ⁺ IL-4⁺) γδT cells significantly increased, and Th2 type (IFN-γ⁻ IL-4⁺) αβT cells also significantly increased in the Th2 polarizing condition. RT-PCR showed that mRNA expression of T-bet was still at a high level in γδT cells that were expanded in the Th2 polarizing condition, but at a low level in Th2 polarized CD4⁺ T cells. Moreover, the mRNA expressions of GATA-3 in both Th2 polarized γδT cells and CD4⁺T cells were up-regulated. In the Th2 polarizing condition, the majority of γδT cells in MTBAT still remained Th1 profile, whereas the portion of γδT cells differentiated into Th0 type cells. Both

  20. Passive exposure of adult cats to moderate-level tone pip ensembles differentially decreases AI and AII responsiveness in the exposure frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienkowski, Martin; Eggermont, Jos J

    2010-09-01

    Passive exposure of adult animals to a random ensemble of tone pips band limited between 4 and 20 kHz has been shown to suppress neural activity in primary auditory cortex (AI) to sounds in the exposure frequency range. In the long-term (>3 months), the suppressed neurons can be reactivated by frequencies above and below the exposure range, i.e., tonotopic map reorganization occurs. The suppression can be at least partially reversed after a long period of quiet recovery, as the moderate-level exposure does not impair peripheral hearing. Here we exposed adult cats, for 7-13 weeks without interruption, to two different moderate-level tone pip ensembles, in separate experiments. One exposure stimulus consisted of an octave-wide 2-4 kHz band, which overlaps substantially with the cat vocalization range; the other consisted of a pair of third-octave bands centered at 4 and 16 kHz. We again report a decrease in AI responsiveness in the exposure frequency range, irrespective of the exposure stimulus bandwidth or center frequency, and a slow, partial recovery over a 12-week post-exposure window. In contrast to our previous studies, the suppression in both of the present experiments extended well beyond the exposure frequency range. In particular, following the 4 and 16 kHz experimental acoustic environment, AI activity was strongly suppressed not only in response to frequencies close to the two exposure bands, but also in response to frequencies between the bands, i.e., the results resembled those to a single broadband stimulus spanning the 3-18 kHz range. On the other hand, responses in secondary auditory cortex (AII) were suppressed predominantly around 4 and 16 kHz, with little or no suppression in between. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic diversity and differentiation of yellowwood [Cladrastis kentukea (Dum.Cours.) Rudd] growing in the wild and in planted populations outside the natural range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas LaBonte; Jadelys Tonos; Colleen Hartel; Keith E. Woeste

    2017-01-01

    Yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea) grows in small, widely scattered populations in the wild, but is also a popular ornamental tree that thrives when planted in urban areas outside its natural range. Since the small native populations of yellowwood in several states are considered at risk of extirpation, the cultivated population could serve as an ex...

  2. Revision in Reference Ranges of Peripheral Total Leukocyte Count and Differential Leukocyte Percentages Based on a Normal Serum C-Reactive Protein Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zei-Shung Huang

    2007-08-01

    Conclusion: In view of the abundant evidence showing that a higher peripheral total leukocyte count is harmful to health, a down-correction of its upper reference range from the currently used 11.0 × 109/L to the proposed 8.83 × 109/L, based on a normal CRP level, should allow more abnormal health conditions to be identified and promote the usefulness of peripheral leukocyte analysis.

  3. From Africa to Europe and back: refugia and range shifts cause high genetic differentiation in the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea

    OpenAIRE

    Rödder Dennis; Lens Luc; Habel Jan C; Schmitt Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The glacial-interglacial oscillations caused severe range modifications of biota. Thermophilic species became extinct in the North and survived in southern retreats, e.g. the Mediterranean Basin. These repeated extinction and (re)colonisation events led to long-term isolation and intermixing of populations and thus resulted in strong genetic imprints in many European species therefore being composed of several genetic lineages. To better understand these cycles of repeated...

  4. Analysis of state-to-state differential cross sections in two-dimensional Xe-CO{sub 2} scattering with long-range effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pliego, J.R. Jr.; Belchior, J.C.; Braga, J.P. [Departamento de Quimica-ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Pampulha, 31.270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    1996-09-01

    Differential rotational cross sections as a function of {Delta}{ital j} and the scattering angle are calculated using the two-dimensional (2D) close-coupled equations and a comparison with the 2D classical trajectory method is presented. A full potential, i.e., including repulsive and attractive forces, is used and the analysis of rainbow structure is discussed in detail. The rainbow positions have been identified by following the classical trajectory and it has been found that the rainbows can be attributed mainly to the attractive part of the interaction potential. The 2D ellipsoid model [Phys. Rev. A {bold 22}, 2617 (1980)] is also applied to analyze the rainbow trajectory and did not predict the same number of rainbows obtained via 2D classical trajectory. In addition, it showed a large deviation for the angular region of the first impact. This model, as expected, was able to explain a larger {Delta}{ital j} transition when attractive forces were included. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  6. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS. The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  7. Prognostic value of lymph node metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC according to the local advancement and range of surgical excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czarniecka Agnieszka

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC with primary tumor smaller than 1 cm, the routine central lymph node (LN dissection is questioned, due to increased risk of post-surgery complications and lack of confirmed benefit. Aim The analysis of prognostic significance of LN metastases, in DTC patients to verify the potential role of central neck lymphadenectomy on disease staging. Materials and methods The group of 195 DTC patients, primarily operated between 2004 and 2005, was retrospectively analyzed. 184 patients after radical operation, with no distant metastases diagnosed before surgery, were included into analysis. LN metastases were observed in 55 of cases (28%. In 124 cases only dissection of central LN compartment was performed, in 36 patients also uni- or bilateral modified cervical lymphadectomy was carried out. In 24 patients with tumor limited to the thyroid gland without suspicious lymph nodes, the routine central lymph node dissection was not done. Results Median follow-up was 4 years. The 5-year overall and disease free survival standardized ratio were 100% and 95% respectively. The risk of LN metastases increased with the more locally advanced cancer. In the group of 124 patients, in whom only central LN dissection was performed, LN metastases were diagnosed in 15 cases (12%. No significant relation between multifocality and frequency of central and/or lateral LN metastases was noticed. Significant correlation between N feature and extrathyroidal invasion was observed (p = 0,0003. The presence of LN metastases was related to worsening of disease free survival from 99 to 90%. During the follow-up recurrence occurred in 6 (3% cases. In 24 patients in whom only total thyroidectomy was done, no local or distant recurrence was observed. The assessment of early postoperative complications (hypoparathyroidism, paresis of vocal cords indicated that the frequency of early calcium balance disturbances was significantly lower in

  8. Measurements of double differential charged particle emission cross sections and development of a wide range charged particles spectrometer for ten`s MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauchi, Yasushi; Baba, Mamoru; Kiyosumi, Takehide [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    We measured (n,xp), (n,xd) cross sections of C and Al for En=64.3 MeV neutrons at the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron sources facility at TIARA (Takasaki Establishment, JAERI) by using a conventional SSD-NaI telescope placed in the air. They show characteristic energy and angular dependence in high energy regions. In order to extend the measurements to low energy protons and {alpha} particles, a new spectrometer consisting of low pressure gas counters and BaF{sub 2} scintillators is now under development. A low threshold for low energy {alpha} particles will be achieved by using the gas counters. The particle identification over a wide energy range will be achieved by combining the {Delta}E-E method for low energy particles with the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) method of BaF{sub 2} for high energy particles. (author)

  9. From Africa to Europe and back: refugia and range shifts cause high genetic differentiation in the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rödder Dennis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glacial-interglacial oscillations caused severe range modifications of biota. Thermophilic species became extinct in the North and survived in southern retreats, e.g. the Mediterranean Basin. These repeated extinction and (recolonisation events led to long-term isolation and intermixing of populations and thus resulted in strong genetic imprints in many European species therefore being composed of several genetic lineages. To better understand these cycles of repeated expansion and retraction, we selected the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea. Fourty-one populations scattered over Europe and the Maghreb and one population of the sibling taxon M. lachesis were analysed using allozyme electrophoresis. Results We obtained seven distinct lineages applying neighbour joining and STRUCTURE analyses: (i Morocco, (ii Tunisia, (iii Sicily, (iv Italy and southern France, (v eastern Balkans extending to Central Europe, (vi western Balkans with western Carpathian Basin as well as (vii south-western Alps. The hierarchy of these splits is well matching the chronology of glacial and interglacial cycles since the Günz ice age starting with an initial split between the galathea group in North Africa and the lachesis group in Iberia. These genetic structures were compared with past distribution patterns during the last glacial stage calculated with distribution models. Conclusions Both methods suggest climatically suitable areas in the Maghreb and the southern European peninsulas with distinct refugia during the last glacial period and underpin strong range expansions to the North during the Postglacial. However, the allozyme patterns reveal biogeographical structures not detected by distribution modelling as two distinct refugia in the Maghreb, two or more distinct refugia at the Balkans and a close link between the eastern Maghreb and Sicily. Furthermore, the genetically highly diverse western Maghreb might have acted as source

  10. From Africa to Europe and back: refugia and range shifts cause high genetic differentiation in the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Jan C; Lens, Luc; Rödder, Dennis; Schmitt, Thomas

    2011-07-21

    The glacial-interglacial oscillations caused severe range modifications of biota. Thermophilic species became extinct in the North and survived in southern retreats, e.g. the Mediterranean Basin. These repeated extinction and (re)colonisation events led to long-term isolation and intermixing of populations and thus resulted in strong genetic imprints in many European species therefore being composed of several genetic lineages. To better understand these cycles of repeated expansion and retraction, we selected the Marbled White butterfly Melanargia galathea. Fourty-one populations scattered over Europe and the Maghreb and one population of the sibling taxon M. lachesis were analysed using allozyme electrophoresis. We obtained seven distinct lineages applying neighbour joining and STRUCTURE analyses: (i) Morocco, (ii) Tunisia, (iii) Sicily, (iv) Italy and southern France, (v) eastern Balkans extending to Central Europe, (vi) western Balkans with western Carpathian Basin as well as (vii) south-western Alps. The hierarchy of these splits is well matching the chronology of glacial and interglacial cycles since the Günz ice age starting with an initial split between the galathea group in North Africa and the lachesis group in Iberia. These genetic structures were compared with past distribution patterns during the last glacial stage calculated with distribution models. Both methods suggest climatically suitable areas in the Maghreb and the southern European peninsulas with distinct refugia during the last glacial period and underpin strong range expansions to the North during the Postglacial. However, the allozyme patterns reveal biogeographical structures not detected by distribution modelling as two distinct refugia in the Maghreb, two or more distinct refugia at the Balkans and a close link between the eastern Maghreb and Sicily. Furthermore, the genetically highly diverse western Maghreb might have acted as source or speciation centre of this taxon, while the

  11. Differential procoagulant effects of saw-scaled viper (Serpentes: Viperidae: Echis) snake venoms on human plasma and the narrow taxonomic ranges of antivenom efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Aymeric; Soerensen, Christoffer; Op den Brouw, Bianca; Lister, Callum; Dashevsky, Daniel; Arbuckle, Kevin; Gloria, Alexandra; Zdenek, Christina N; Casewell, Nicholas R; Gutiérrez, José María; Wüster, Wolfgang; Ali, Syed A; Masci, Paul; Rowley, Paul; Frank, Nathaniel; Fry, Bryan G

    2017-10-05

    Saw-scaled vipers (genus Echis) are one of the leading causes of snakebite morbidity and mortality in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and vast regions of Asia, constituting a public health burden exceeding that of almost any other snake genus globally. Venom-induced consumption coagulopathy, owing to the action of potent procoagulant toxins, is one of the most relevant clinical manifestations of envenomings by Echis spp. Clinical experience and prior studies examining a limited range of venoms and restricted antivenoms have demonstrated for some antivenoms an extreme lack of antivenom cross-reactivity between different species of this genus, sometimes resulting in catastrophic treatment failure. This study undertook the most comprehensive testing of Echis venom effects upon the coagulation of human plasma, and also the broadest examination of antivenom potency and cross-reactivity, to-date. 10 Echis species/populations and four antivenoms (two African, two Asian) were studied. The results indicate that the venoms are, in general, potently procoagulant but that the relative dependence on calcium or phospholipid cofactors is highly variable. Additionally, three out of the four antivenoms tested demonstrated only a very narrow taxonomic range of effectiveness in preventing coagulopathy, with only the SAIMR antivenom displaying significant levels of cross-reactivity. These results were in conflict with previous studies using prolonged preincubation of antivenom with venom to suggest effective cross-reactivity levels for the ICP Echi-Tab antivenom. These findings both inform upon potential clinical effects of envenomation in humans and highlight the extreme limitations of available treatment. It is hoped that this will spur efforts into the development of antivenoms with more comprehensive coverage for bites not only from wild snakes but also from specimens widely kept in zoological collections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fundamental Study of a Combined Hyperthermia System with RF Capacitive Heating and Interstitial Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Saitoh, Yoshiaki; Hori, Junichi; 斉藤, 義明; 堀, 潤一

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial RF heating with an inserted electrode allows the heating position selection in a subject, but the narrow heating region is problematic. This study elucidates development of new interstitial RF heating methods, combining with external RF heating using paired electrodes, heating the subject broadly in advance in order to selectively extend the heating region. Two kinds of heating system were developed by controlling a differential mode and a common mode of RF currents. Heating expe...

  13. Dual solutions in hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer towards a stretching/shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink and variable surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El-Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The steady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a viscous, incompressible and heat generating/absorbing fluid over a shrinking sheet in the presence of a non-uniform heat source/sink is considered. The system of partial differential equations was transformed to a system of ordinary differential equations, which was solved numerically. Numerical results were obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the surface temperature as well as the velocity and temperature profiles for some values of the governing parameters. The study reveals that the range of velocity ratio parameter for which the solution exists increases as the magnetic field increase.

  14. Heating of the intergalactic medium by primordial miniquasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaroubi, Saleem; Thomas, Rajat M.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Silk, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    A simple analytical model is used to calculate the X-ray heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) for a range of black hole masses. This process is efficient enough to decouple the spin temperature of the IGM from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and produce a differential

  15. Heating of the Intergalactic Medium by Primordial Miniquasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaroubi, S.; Thomas, R. M.; Sugiyama, N.; Silk, J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: A simple analytical model is used to calculate the X-ray heating of the IGM for a range of black hole masses. This process is efficient enough to decouple the spin temperature of the intergalactic medium from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and produce a differential

  16. Identification of the Peptide PyroQ-βCasein194-209as a Highly Specific and Sensitive Marker to Differentiate between Ultrahigh-Temperature Processed (UHT) Milk and Mildly Heated Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalabasmaz, Sevim; Ebner, Jennifer; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2017-12-13

    In this study, a new approach was introduced to identify marker peptides that reflect the thermal treatment of commercial milk samples and differentiate ultrahigh-temperature processed (UHT) milk from mildly heated milk. Peptide profiles of training set samples, pasteurized (n = 20), extended shelf life (n = 29), and UHT (n = 29) milk, were recorded by MALDI-TOF-MS after StageTip microextraction. As marker candidates, 13 peptides were selected, and their cutoff levels were defined. The quality of the cutoff levels was then tested with a blind test set. Thus, the peptide m/z 1701.0, which was identified as pyroQ-βcasein 194-209 , could ideally differentiate UHT milk from mildly heated milk with an accuracy of 100%. Due to its high reliability and sensitivity, this peptide may be applied in routine analysis to monitor thermal processing of milk. An additional heating experiment showed that the marker peptide candidates are formed during milk processing by endogenous enzymes and selective thermal cleavage.

  17. Heat convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, L.M. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the following ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters. (orig.)

  18. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  19. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  20. Use of propidium monoazide and quantitative PCR for differentiation of viable Escherichia coli from E. coli killed by mild or pasteurizing heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianqin; Badoni, Madhu; Gill, Colin O

    2011-12-01

    Suspensions of Escherichia coli in peptone water were heated at temperatures between 52 and 90 °C, inclusive. Samples withdrawn at suitable times were not or were treated with propidium monoazide (PMA) or deoxycholate then PMA before extraction of DNA. DNA was quantified by real-time PCR for estimation of the numbers of E. coli from which template DNA for the PCR was obtained. Numbers of viable E. coli in suspensions at the times of sampling were determined from plate counts. For samples from suspensions heated at temperatures ≥ 52 ≤ 72 °C, PCR cycle threshold (Ct) values were little or no different for DNA from corresponding samples that were or were not treated with PMA. PMA treatment of samples heated to ≥ 80 °C largely inactivated E. coli DNA for PCR. When samples heated to ≤ 72 °C were treated with deoxycholate before treatment with PMA, Ct values for treated samples were greater than the Ct values for the corresponding untreated samples. Similar results were obtained with E. coli suspended in milk or fluid from ground beef pummeled with diluent. The results indicate that cells killed by heating to ≥ 80 °C are permeable to PMA, but most cells killed by heating to ≤ 72 °C are not. However, treatment with deoxycholate renders a substantial fraction of the latter cells permeable to PMA. Numbers of viable or dead E. coli can then be estimated from Ct values for samples not treated or treated with deoxycholate and PMA, provided viable cells are ≥ 1% of the total. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stochastic Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cecconi, Jaures

    2011-01-01

    C. Doleans-Dade: Stochastic processes and stochastic differential equations.- A. Friedman: Stochastic differential equations and applications.- D.W. Stroock, S.R.S. Varadhan: Theory of diffusion processes.- G.C. Papanicolaou: Wave propagation and heat conduction in a random medium.- C. Dewitt Morette: A stochastic problem in Physics.- G.S. Goodman: The embedding problem for stochastic matrices.

  2. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Heat Capacity of Metals and Demonstration of Law of Dulong and Petit

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelia, Ronald P.; Stracuzzi, Vincent; Nirode, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Today's general chemistry students are introduced to many of the principles and concepts of thermodynamics. In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamic properties such as heat capacity are frequently discussed. Classical calorimetric methods of analysis and thermal equilibrium experiments are used to determine heat…

  3. Optimal Control Method of Parabolic Partial Differential Equations and Its Application to Heat Transfer Model in Continuous Cast Secondary Cooling Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work is devoted to a class of optimal control problems of parabolic partial differential equations. Because of the partial differential equations constraints, it is rather difficult to solve the optimization problem. The gradient of the cost function can be found by the adjoint problem approach. Based on the adjoint problem approach, the gradient of cost function is proved to be Lipschitz continuous. An improved conjugate method is applied to solve this optimization problem and this algorithm is proved to be convergent. This method is applied to set-point values in continuous cast secondary cooling zone. Based on the real data in a plant, the simulation experiments show that the method can ensure the steel billet quality. From these experiment results, it is concluded that the improved conjugate gradient algorithm is convergent and the method is effective in optimal control problem of partial differential equations.

  4. Quantum heat traces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramidi, Ivan G.

    2017-02-01

    We study new invariants of elliptic partial differential operators acting on sections of a vector bundle over a closed Riemannian manifold that we call the relativistic heat trace and the quantum heat traces. We obtain some reduction formulas expressing these new invariants in terms of some integral transforms of the usual classical heat trace and compute the asymptotics of these invariants. The coefficients of these asymptotic expansion are determined by the usual heat trace coefficients (which are locally computable) as well as by some new global invariants.

  5. Heat stroke and related heat stress disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochel, J P

    1989-05-01

    Medical disorders related to environmental heat exposure are exceptionally common in persons who perform hard work in hot climates. They are also common in competitive athletes as well as in persons who participate in casual exercise to maintain health. The important issue of salt and water disturbances consequent to heavy sweating in hot climates is discussed in detail as are mechanisms of potassium deficiency and its implications. The major forms of environmental heat illness including heat syncope, heat cramp, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke are presented in detail with relevant clinical examples. A discussion of the differential diagnosis of hyperthermia and rhabdomyolysis follows. Because of the difference in treatment and complications, heat stroke is subdivided into the classic variety that affects the elderly and very young and that form that follows heavy physical work and is always associated with rhabdomyolysis. Because severe heat exhaustion and heat stroke are life-threatening disorders, the chapter includes a detailed discussion of complications and plans for treatment.

  6. Differential Targeting of Hsp70 Heat Shock Proteins HSPA6 and HSPA1A with Components of a Protein Disaggregation/Refolding Machine in Differentiated Human Neuronal Cells following Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Brown

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps co-operate in multi-protein machines that counter protein misfolding and aggregation and involve DNAJ (Hsp40, HSPA (Hsp70, and HSPH (Hsp105α. The HSPA family is a multigene family composed of inducible and constitutively expressed members. Inducible HSPA6 (Hsp70B' is found in the human genome but not in the genomes of mouse and rat. To advance knowledge of this little studied HSPA member, the targeting of HSPA6 to stress-sensitive neuronal sites with components of a disaggregation/refolding machine was investigated following thermal stress. HSPA6 targeted the periphery of nuclear speckles (perispeckles that have been characterized as sites of transcription. However, HSPA6 did not co-localize at perispeckles with DNAJB1 (Hsp40-1 or HSPH1 (Hsp105α. At 3 h after heat shock, HSPA6 co-localized with these members of the disaggregation/refolding machine at the granular component (GC of the nucleolus. Inducible HSPA1A (Hsp70-1 and constitutively expressed HSPA8 (Hsc70 co-localized at nuclear speckles with components of the machine immediately after heat shock, and at the GC layer of the nucleolus at 1 h with DNAJA1 and BAG-1. These results suggest that HSPA6 exhibits targeting features that are not apparent for HSPA1A and HSPA8.

  7. Heat Stress in the Urban and Suburban Landscape and its Spatial Differentiation Through the Example of a Medium-Sized City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vysoudil

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of heat stress in a Central European city and its surroundings was examined. We evaluated the length of time for which the threshold values of Humidex and air temperatures were exceeded at individual stations. The longest interval of temperature discomfort was detected at the border of open mid-rise development and open spaces. The shortest intervals were found in compact mid-rise development and near a forest. There are spatial differences between locations with long periods of high temperatures and locations with long intervals of high Humidex values. However, when the heat stress is being assessed in relation to the mortality rate, Humidex does not show better results than the air temperature.

  8. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  9. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  10. Mixed quantum/classical calculations of total and differential elastic and rotationally inelastic scattering cross sections for light and heavy reduced masses in a broad range of collision energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-28

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for rotationally inelastic scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is benchmarked against the full quantum calculations for two molecular systems: He + H2 and Na + N2. This allows testing new method in the cases of light and reasonably heavy reduced masses, for small and large rotational quanta, in a broad range of collision energies and rotational excitations. The resultant collision cross sections vary through ten-orders of magnitude range of values. Both inelastic and elastic channels are considered, as well as differential (over scattering angle) cross sections. In many cases results of the mixed quantum/classical method are hard to distinguish from the full quantum results. In less favorable cases (light masses, larger quanta, and small collision energies) some deviations are observed but, even in the worst cases, they are within 25% or so. The method is computationally cheap and particularly accurate at higher energies, heavier masses, and larger densities of states. At these conditions MQCT represents a useful alternative to the standard full-quantum scattering theory.

  11. 10 ps resolution, 160 ns full scale range and less than 1.5% differential non-linearity time-to-digital converter module for high performance timing measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, B.; Tamborini, D.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    We present a compact high performance time-to-digital converter (TDC) module that provides 10 ps timing resolution, 160 ns dynamic range and a differential non-linearity better than 1.5% LSB{sub rms}. The TDC can be operated either as a general-purpose time-interval measurement device, when receiving external START and STOP pulses, or in photon-timing mode, when employing the on-chip SPAD (single photon avalanche diode) detector for detecting photons and time-tagging them. The instrument precision is 15 ps{sub rms} (i.e., 36 ps{sub FWHM}) and in photon timing mode it is still better than 70 ps{sub FWHM}. The USB link to the remote PC allows the easy setting of measurement parameters, the fast download of acquired data, and their visualization and storing via an user-friendly software interface. The module proves to be the best candidate for a wide variety of applications such as: fluorescence lifetime imaging, time-of-flight ranging measurements, time-resolved positron emission tomography, single-molecule spectroscopy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, diffuse optical tomography, optical time-domain reflectometry, quantum optics, etc.

  12. HEAT EXCHANGERS IN SEWAGE PIPES

    OpenAIRE

    Podobeková, Veronika; Peráčková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses utilization of heat from waste water in sewage. During the year, temperature of water in sewage ranges between 10 °C and 20 °C and the heat from sewage could be used for heating, cooling and hot water preparation in building. The heat is extracted through a transfer surface area of the heat exchanger into the heat pump, which is able to utilize the low–potential energy. Different design and types of the heat exchangers in sewage are dealt with: heat exchangers embedded i...

  13. Cloning and differential expression of five heat shock protein genes associated with thermal stress and development in the polyphagous predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Dunsong; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yunlong; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Guren

    2015-09-01

    In order to explore the role of heat shock proteins (Hsps) during thermal stress and development in the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans), we cloned and characterized five full-length Hsp genes. We investigated the expression levels of these genes by quantitative real-time PCR. The five genes characterized here were NcHsp90, NcHsp75, NcHsp70, NcHsp60, and NcHsp40. These Hsps showed high sequence conservation and had greatest identity with heat shock proteins of Metaseiulus occidentalis and other mite and insect species. All five NcHsp genes showed changes in their levels of expression during development. Higher levels of expression were observed in adult females than in adult males, but there were no significant changes between pre-oviposition and post-oviposition stages in the females. NcHsp90, NcHsp75, and NcHsp70 expression levels were up-regulated after a heat shock, and the increases in NcHsp75 and NcHsp70 expression levels were maintained for at least 3 h. Up-regulation of NcHsp60 and NcHsp40 was not detected after 1 h at a high temperature (35-45 °C); however, a significant down-regulation was observed after 3 h heat exposure at 35 °C and 3 h recovery at 25 °C. Cold shock treatment (-5 to 15 °C) for 1 h did not acute elicit changes in the expression levels of any of the genes. At 5 °C, the expression levels of NcHsp90 significantly increased after 6 or 24 h exposure compared to the levels after 1 h exposure. Thus, expression of Hsp genes in N. cucumeris reflected developmental changes, sexual difference, and variable induced response to thermal stress. Increased expression of Hsps might protect N. cucumeris individuals under extreme temperature conditions. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance the thermal tolerance of commercially available N. cucumeris using temperature acclimation. Treatment at 35 °C should be suitable for such acclimation.

  14. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  15. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Bagaturia, Iuri; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0...

  16. Heat transfer II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1988-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Heat Transfer II reviews correlations for forced convection, free convection, heat exchangers, radiation heat transfer, and boiling and condensation.

  17. Upregulation of heat shock protein 70 and the differential protein expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances migration and inhibits apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bee-Piao; Lin, Chun-Shiang; Wang, Chau-Jong; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays diverse roles in liver damage and hepatocarcinogenesis with its multipotent bioactivity. However, the influence of TNFα on protein expression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is incompletely understood. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differential protein expression of HCC in response to TNFα stimulus. We observed that HepG2 cell revealed a higher resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis as compared to the non-tumorigenic hepatocyte THLE-2. By using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis, we found that 520 proteins were differentially expressed in the HepG2 cells exposed to TNFα, including 211 up-regulated and 309 down-regulated proteins. We further confirmed several proteins with significant expression change (TNFα/control ratio>2.0 or expressed proteins using Gene ontology and KEGG annotations, and the results implicated that TNFα might regulate ribosome, spliceosome, antigen processing and presentation, and energy metabolism in HepG2 cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that upregulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was involved in both the promoted migration and the inhibited apoptosis of HepG2 cells in response to TNFα. Collectively, these findings indicate that TNFα alters protein expression such as HSP70, which triggering specific molecular processes and signaling cascades that promote migration and inhibit apoptosis of HepG2 cells.

  18. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  19. Differential Scanning Calorimetry Analysis of the Effects of Heat and Pressure on Protein Denaturation in Soy Flour Mixed with Various Types of Plasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Meera; Slade, Louise; Levine, Harry

    2017-02-01

    The effects of heat and pressure on protein denaturation in soy flour were explored by an experimental design that used pressure (atmospheric to 600 MPa), temperature (room to 90 °C), time (1 to 60 min), and type of aqueous plasticizer (NaCl, sucrose, betaine, and lactobionic acid (LBA)) as factors. When 50% (w/w) soy flour-water paste was high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)-treated for 20 min at 25 °C, the treatment at 200 MPa showed a small effect on denaturation of only the 7S soy globulin, but the treatment at 600 MPa showed a significant effect on denaturation of both the 7S and 11S soy globulins. The treatment at 60 °C showed a less-pronounced effect on denaturation of the 11S globulin, even at 600 MPa, but that at 90 °C showed a similar extent of denaturation of the 11S globulin at 600 MPa to that at 25 °C. Chaotropic 2N NaCl, 50% sucrose-, 50% betaine-, or 50% LBA-water solutions showed protective effects on protein denaturation during HHP treatment at 25 °C. Although LBA enhanced the extent of thermostability of soy protein less than did 2N NaCl, LBA exhibited better stabilization against pressure. The results from DSC analysis demonstrated that thermostable soy proteins were not always barostable. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Stochastic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    2014-01-01

    Preliminaries Introduction Some Examples Brownian Motions and Martingales Stochastic Integrals Stochastic Differential Equations of Itô Type Lévy Processes and Stochastic IntegralsStochastic Differential Equations of Lévy Type Comments Scalar Equations of First Order Introduction Generalized Itô's Formula Linear Stochastic Equations Quasilinear Equations General Remarks Stochastic Parabolic Equations Introduction Preliminaries Solution of Stochastic Heat EquationLinear Equations with Additive Noise Some Regularity Properties Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Equations Parabolic Equations with Grad

  1. Differentially expressed seed aging responsive heat shock protein OsHSP18.2 implicates in seed vigor, longevity and improves germination and seedling establishment under abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmeet eKaur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins (sHSP are a diverse group of proteins and are highly abundant in plant species. Although majority of these sHSPs were shown to express specifically in seed, their potential function in seed physiology remains to be fully explored. Our proteomic analysis revealed that OsHSP18.2, a class II cytosolic HSP is an aging responsive protein as its abundance significantly increased after artificial aging in rice seeds. OsHSP18.2 transcript was found to markedly increase at the late maturation stage being highly abundant in dry seeds and sharply decreased after germination. Our biochemical study clearly demonstrated that OsHSP18.2 forms homooligomeric complex and is dodecameric in nature and functions as a molecular chaperon. OsHSP18.2 displayed chaperone activity as it was effective in preventing thermal inactivation of Citrate Synthase. Further, to analyze the function of this protein in seed physiology, seed specific Arabidopsis overexpression lines for OsHSP18.2 were generated. Our subsequent functional analysis clearly demonstrated that OsHSP18.2 has ability to improve seed vigor and longevity by reducing deleterious ROS accumulation in seeds. In addition, transformed Arabidopsis seeds displayed better performance in germination and cotyledon emergence under adverse conditions as well. Collectively, our work demonstrates that OsHSP18.2 is an aging responsive protein which functions as a molecular chaperon and possibly protect and stabilize the cellular proteins from irreversible damage particularly during maturation drying, desiccation and aging in seeds by restricting ROS accumulation and thereby improves seed vigor, longevity and seedling establishment.

  2. Subcooled boiling heat transfer in a short vertical SUS304-tube at liquid Reynolds number range 5.19 x 10{sup 4} to 7.43 x 10{sup 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Koichi, E-mail: hata@iae.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Masuzaki, Suguru, E-mail: masuzaki@LHD.nifs.ac.j [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The subcooled boiling heat transfer and the steady-state critical heat fluxes (CHFs) in a short vertical SUS304-tube for the flow velocities (u = 17.28-40.20 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T{sub in} = 293.30-362.49 K), the inlet pressures (P{sub in} = 842.90-1467.93 kPa) and the exponentially increasing heat input (Q = Q{sub 0} exp(t/tau), tau = 8.5 s) are systematically measured by the experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The SUS304 test tubes of inner diameters (d = 3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L = 33 and 59.5 mm), effective lengths (L{sub eff} = 23.3 and 49.1 mm), L/d (=11 and 9.92), L{sub eff}/d (=7.77 and 8.18), and wall thickness (delta = 0.5 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra = 3.18 mum) are used in this work. The inner surface temperature and the heat flux from non-boiling to CHF are clarified. The subcooled boiling heat transfer for SUS304 test tube is compared with our Platinum test tube data and the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the subcooled boiling heat transfer. The influence of flow velocity on the subcooled boiling heat transfer and the CHF is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the subcooled boiling heat transfer for turbulent flow of water in a short vertical SUS304-tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the subcooled boiling heat transfer obtained in this work within 15% difference. Nucleate boiling surface superheats for the SUS304 test tube become very high. Those at the high flow velocity are close to the lower limit of Heterogeneous Spontaneous Nucleation Temperature. The dominant mechanisms of the flow boiling CHF in a short vertical SUS304-tube are discussed.

  3. Heat capacity and heat of dissociation of methane hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, R.M.; Sloan, E.D.; Yesavage, V.F.

    1988-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the heat capacity and heat of dissociation of methane hydrates. A technique has been devised which circumvents the two major problems encountered in measuring gas hydrate heat capacity: the need to impose a mechanical pressure during the measurement and the need to have an absolutely pure hydrate sample. The technique was shown to be successful utilizing high-pressure, constant-volume cells in a differential scanning calorimeter.

  4. Solar assisted heat pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Godbold, R; Paurine, A; Maidment, GG

    2016-01-01

    Solar Assisted Heat Pumps have the potential to provide low carbon heat for domestic hot water generation and low temperature heating. They have advantages over conventional solar thermal systems because they can generate heating and hot water during periods of low or zero solar, whist still maintain the advantage of not needing to be connected to the gas grid. They are simple in nature and can be installed in a wide range of applications. They are also currently uncommon in the UK so a thoro...

  5. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  6. Heat transfer, condensation and fog formation in crossflow plastic heat exchangers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Jos; van der Geld, C.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper heat transfer of air-water-vapour mixtures in plastic crossflow heat exchangers is studied theoretically and experimentally. First, a model for heat transfer without condensation is derived, resulting in a set of classical differential equations. Subsequently, heat transfer with wall

  7. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  8. Design, construction, operation, and evaluation of solar systems for industrial process-heat applications in the intermediate-temperature range (212/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F). Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The environmental impacts are assessed for a proposed 50,000 square foot field of single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors along the Ohio River in southern Ohio. The facility is planned to produce process steam for use in the production of polystyrene. Absorbed solar energy would heat an aliphatic hydrocarbon synthetic heat transfer fluid to a maximum temperature of 500/sup 0/F. The existing environment is briefly described, particularly regarding air quality. The potential environmental impacts of the solar process heat system on the air, water, soil, endangered species and archaeological and historical resources are examined, including risks due to flood and glare and a comparison of alternatives. Also included are a Consent Judgment relating to two coal-fired boilers in violation of EPA regulations, property data of Gulf Synfluid 4CS (a candidate heat transfer fluid), piping and instrumentation diagrams and schematics, site grade and drainage plan, geological survey map, subsurface soil investigation, Ohio endangered species list, Ohio Archaeological Counsel certification list, and a study of heat transfer fluids and their properties. (LEW)

  9. Insights into glass transition and relaxation behavior using temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, J.C.; Allan, D.C.

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) is based on conventional DSC but with a sinusoidally modulated temperature path. Our simulations of TMDSC signals prove that the frequency correction of non-reversing heat flow can give a master curve within a certain range of freque...

  10. Nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  11. Heat tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari

    genetic determination (GD). An initial mass screening of 1,274 wheat cultivars (diverse origin) showed a GD of 8.5%. A stronger heat treatment was given in the second screening with 138 selected cultivars resulting in larger differentiation of cultivars (GD 15.4%). The GD further increased to 27....../Fm and dry matter accumulation during heat stress is a step forward to document that phenotypic differences measured by phenomic approaches can be translated into overall plant performance under heat stress. The fourth study focussed on associating phenotypic variations identified by Fv/Fm to genetic......As a consequence of global climate change, heat stress together with other abiotic stresses will remain an important determinant of future food security. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the third most important crop of the world feeding one third of the world population. Being a crop of temperate...

  12. Phase synchronization of baroclinic waves in a differentially heated rotating annulus experiment subject to periodic forcing with a variable duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, P. L.; Morice-Atkinson, X.; Allen, E. J.; Castrejón-Pita, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    A series of laboratory experiments in a thermally driven, rotating fluid annulus are presented that investigate the onset and characteristics of phase synchronization and frequency entrainment between the intrinsic, chaotic, oscillatory amplitude modulation of travelling baroclinic waves and a periodic modulation of the (axisymmetric) thermal boundary conditions, subject to time-dependent coupling. The time-dependence is in the form of a prescribed duty cycle in which the periodic forcing of the boundary conditions is applied for only a fraction δ of each oscillation. For the rest of the oscillation, the boundary conditions are held fixed. Two profiles of forcing were investigated that capture different parts of the sinusoidal variation and δ was varied over the range 0.1 ≤δ≤1 . Reducing δ was found to act in a similar way to a reduction in a constant coupling coefficient in reducing the width of the interval in forcing frequency or period over which complete synchronization was observed (the "Arnol'd tongue") with respect to the detuning, although for the strongest pulse-like forcing profile some degree of synchronization was discernible even at δ=0.1 . Complete phase synchronization was obtained within the Arnol'd tongue itself, although the strength of the amplitude modulation of the baroclinic wave was not significantly affected. These experiments demonstrate a possible mechanism for intraseasonal and/or interannual "teleconnections" within the climate system of the Earth and other planets that does not rely on Rossby wave propagation across the planet along great circles.

  13. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  14. Spatially Explicit Regions Of Peak Velocity Are Highly Differentiated At Different Discharges Ranging from 0.2 to 20 Times Bankfull In A Dynamic Gravel/Cobble Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, M.; Depsky, N. J.; Wyrick, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have identified velocity and Shield stress reversals as key mechanisms that maintain riffle-pool morphology. However, those studies have 4 primary limitations: (1) generally small stream size, (2) narrow range of discharge rarely above bankfull, (3) few analyzed cross-sections, and (4) simple binary characterization of channel morphology as riffle or pool. The goal of this study was to develop and assess spatially explicit indicators of velocity reversal and relate them to landform attributes. The four test variables were (1) mean and maximum velocity with increasing discharge for diverse sub-width morphological units (MUs), (2) percent overlap of peak velocity areas (i.e. spatial persistence) between different discharges, (3) distribution of area of peak velocity among MUs with increasing discharge, and (4) percent of total areas of individual MUs that occurs within peak velocity regions with increasing discharge. The testbed for this study was the Lower Yuba River (LYR), a regulated gravel-cobble bed river with an active floodplain that provides anadromous salmonid habitat. Hydraulics were predicted with a validated 2D hydraulic model over 35 km at 1 m resolution for discharges ranging from 0.2-20 times bankfull. Fluvial landforms were classified into 8 reaches, 4 inundation zones, and 31 MUs. This study compared results for a wide meandering reach and a narrow valley-confined reach. At low discharge, high velocities in the wide alluvial reach occurred due to flow constriction imposed by in-channel bars, but with increasing discharge these regions of high velocity shifted to meander bends where vortex flow dominates. The narrower reach exhibited a similar spatial occurrence of the highest velocities at low discharge due to in-channel bars, but upon inundation of these features the valley walls and bedrock outcrops activated as hydraulic controls. In contrast to small streams, these controls activate at flows much greater than bankfull discharge

  15. Heat pipes as perspective base elements of heat recovery in heat supply and ventilating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matveev Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermotechnical characteristics of heat pipes are considered as high-efficient heat-transfer devices, which can provide energy-saving technologies for heat supply and ventilating systems and for different branches of industry. Thermotechnical and working (”performance capability” characteristics of heat pipes are investigated. By ”performance capability” of heat pipes and heat-transfer devices on heat pipes we mean the system state, where it can perform set functions and keep parameter values (thermal power, conductivity, thermal resistance, heat-transfer coefficient, temperature level and differential, etc. within the regulations of standardized specifications. The article presents theoretical and experimental methods of «gaslock» length determination on noncondensable gases during long-lasting tests of ammonia heat pipes made of aluminum shape АS – КRА 7.5 – R1 (alloy АD – 31. The paper gives results of research of thermotechnical characteristics of heat pipes in horizontal and vertical states (separate and as a set part while using different systems of thermal insulation. The obtained results of thermotechnical and resource tests show the advantages of ammonia heat pipes as basic elements for heat exchanger design in heating and ventilation systems.

  16. Cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswary, M; Macintosh, J; Cassey, J

    2006-06-01

    Cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma is a relatively rare tumour of the kidney usually affecting infants. Cystic Wilms' tumour and multilocular cystic nephroma should be distinguished from cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma. Multilocular cystic nephroma is a benign tumour whereas cystic Wilms' tumour is at the malignant end of the range of classification of such tumours. Cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma may undergo local recurrence but there is no report of metastasis.

  17. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenspan, Donald

    2000-01-01

    Designed for use in a one-semester course by seniors and beginning graduate students, this rigorous presentation explores practical methods of solving differential equations, plus the unifying theory underlying the mathematical superstructure. Topics include basic concepts, Fourier series, second-order partial differential equations, wave equation, potential equation, heat equation, approximate solution of partial differential equations, and more. Exercises appear at the ends of most chapters. 1961 edition.

  18. HEAT RECUPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Rovin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery is an effective method of shortening specific energy consumption. new constructions of recuperators for heating and cupola furnaces have been designed and successfully introduced. two-stage recuperator with computer control providing blast heating up to 600 °C and reducing fuel consumption by 30% is of special interest.

  19. Solving evolutionary-type differential equations and physical problems using the operator method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a general operator method based on the advanced technique of the inverse derivative operator for solving a wide range of problems described by some classes of differential equations. We construct and use inverse differential operators to solve several differential equations. We obtain operator identities involving an inverse derivative operator, integral transformations, and generalized forms of orthogonal polynomials and special functions. We present examples of using the operator method to construct solutions of equations containing linear and quadratic forms of a pair of operators satisfying Heisenberg-type relations and solutions of various modifications of partial differential equations of the Fourier heat conduction type, Fokker-Planck type, Black-Scholes type, etc. We demonstrate using the operator technique to solve several physical problems related to the charge motion in quantum mechanics, heat propagation, and the dynamics of the beams in accelerators.

  20. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  1. Improved solar heating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  2. Solar heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, James M.; Dorsey, George F.

    1982-01-01

    An improved solar heating system in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75.degree. to 180.degree. F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing and releasing heat for distribution.

  3. Meteorite heat capacities: Results to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolmagno, G.; Macke, R.; Britt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Heat capacity is an essential thermal property for modeling asteroid internal metamorphism or differentiation, and dynamical effects like YORP or Yarkovsky perturbations. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive method for measuring the heat capacity of meteorites at low temperature [1]. A sample is introduced into a dewar of liquid nitrogen and an electronic scale measures the amount of nitrogen boiled away as the sample is cooled from the room temperature to the liquid nitrogen temperature; given the heat of vaporization of liquid nitrogen, one can then calculate the heat lost from the sample during the cooling process. Note that heat capacity in this temperature range is a strong function of temperature, but this functional relation is essentially the same for all materials; the values we determine are equivalent to the heat capacity of the sample at 175 K. To correct for systematic errors, samples of laboratory-grade quartz are measured along with the meteorite samples. To date, more than 70 samples of more than 50 different meteorites have been measured in this way, including ordinary chondrites [1], irons [2], basaltic achondrites [3], and a limited number of carbonaceous chondrites [1]. In general, one can draw a number of important conclusions from these results. First, the heat capacity of a meteorite is a function of its mineral composition, independent of shock, metamorphism, or other physical state. Second, given this relation, heat capacity can be strongly altered by terrestrial weathering. Third, the measurement of heat capacity in small (less than 1 g) samples as done typically by commercial systems runs a serious risk of giving misleading results for samples that are heterogeneous on scales of tens of grams or more. Finally, we demonstrate that heat capacity is a useful tool for determining and classifying a sample, especially if used in conjunction with other intrinsic variables such as grain density and magnetic susceptibility

  4. Thermochemical cycles for the heat and cold long-range transport. Final report of the PRI 9.2 Cold transport. Annual report of the PR 2-8; Cycles thermochimiques pour le transport de chaleur et de froid a longue distance. Rapport final du PRI 9.2. Transport de froid. Rapport annuel du PR 2-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, L.; Tondeur, D. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (LSGC), 54 - Nancy (France); Mazet, N.; Neveu, P.; Stitou, D.; Spinner, B. [Institut de Science et de Genie des Materiaux et Procedes (IMP), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2004-07-01

    This PRI deals with the use of thermochemical processes, based on solid-gas reversible transformation, to transfer heat of cold at long-range distance (> 10 km), in order to enhance the energy efficiency. Four main aspects have been studied to confirm the process feasibility: the process identification and the operating conditions, the selection of compatible reagents, the design of an auto-thermal reactor and the gas transport impact on the global performances. (A.L.B.)

  5. MHD Stagnation-Point Flow and Heat Transfer with Effects of Viscous Dissipation, Joule Heating and Partial Velocity Slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Mohd Hafizi Mat; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2015-12-09

    The steady two-dimensional stagnation-point flow and heat transfer past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with effects of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and partial velocity slip in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated. The partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by shooting technique. Results indicate that the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number increase as magnetic parameter increases. It is found that for the stretching sheet the solution is unique while for the shrinking sheet there exist nonunique solutions (dual solutions) in certain range of parameters. The stability analysis shows that the upper branch solution is stable while the lower branch solution is unstable.

  6. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  7. Microchannel heat sink assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Wayne L.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watetight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures.

  8. Heated Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrically heated ski goggles shown incorporate technology similar to that once used in Apollo astronauts' helmet visors, and for the same reason-providing fogfree sight in an activity that demands total vision. Defogging is accomplished by applying heat to prevent moisture condensation. Electric heat is supplied by a small battery built into the h goggles' headband. Heat is spread across the lenses by means of an invisible coating of electrically conductive metallic film. The goggles were introduced to the market last fall. They were designed by Sierracin Corporation, Sylmar, California, specialists in the field of heated transparent materials. The company produces heated windshields for military planes and for such civil aircraft as the Boeing 747, McDonnell Douglas DC-10 and Lockheed L-1011 TriStar.

  9. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  10. Differential uplift and denudation of the Kungei and Terzkey ranges bordering the Issyk-Kul intermontane basin, Kyrgyz Tien Shan mountains (Central Asia): constraints from apatite fission-track analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Grave, J.; Buslov, M. M.; van den Haute, P.

    2003-04-01

    The Tien Shan mountain belt forms one of the most active intracontinental belts in the world. Its Cenozoic evolution is directly related to ongoing convergence of the Indian and Eurasian plates. The Tien Shan are draped along the northern rim of the rigid and stable Tarim Basin in Central Asia, north of the Tibetan Plateau. The mountain belt is composed of E-W trending ranges, alternating with intermontane basins. The lens shaped Issyk-Kul (IK) basin in northern Kyrgyzstan is a striking example of such a basin and accommodates the Issyk-Kul Lake. It is bordered by the Kungei (north) and the Terzkey ranges (south). While the present lake level is situated at 1607 m a.s.l., the elevation of both ranges reaches 5000 m. Both mountain ranges (cored by pink Ordovician granites and exhibiting large altitude differences) were sampled for AFT analysis along elevation profiles. In addition, samples from other IK basement rocks were collected in areas outside the ranges. AFT ages in the Kungei range fall roughly between 120 Ma and 170 Ma, while those for the Terzkey range were substantially lower (60 Ma to 110 Ma). The additional basement apatites sampled throughout the area have ages between 110 Ma and 160 Ma, corresponding to those of the Kungei range. The Kungei age-elevation plot is quite normal with ages decreasing with decreasing altitude, while the Terzkey range samples exhibit additional scatter. No "break in slope" is observed in any of the profiles and this together with the fact that all track length distributions carry a substantial Apatite Partial Annealing Zone signature (mean lengths are between 12.5 and 13.0 µm for both ranges) gives evidence of the mixed nature of the AFT ages. In contrast with the AFT data by Bullen et al. (2001) from the Kyrgyz range to the west of the IK basin, no late Cenozoic AFT ages were found for our samples. Hence the active tectonic phase experienced by the Tien Shan since the Late Miocene must undoubtedly have uplifted the Kungei

  11. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Yuanming [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  12. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-01

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume VP within a warm plasma of volume V (VP≪V) is studied. Charged particles mutually repel via a shielded repulsion which is like an effective pressure, i.e., electrostatic pressure PE. The law of thermodynamics involving PE and an equation of state for PE are obtained. It is shown that the expansion/compression of electrostatic fields associated with charged particles is a new mechanism that converts mechanical work into plasma heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of PE are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  13. Ion and electron heating in ICRF heating experiments on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating conducted in 1999 in the 3rd experimental campaign on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with an emphasis on the optimization of the heating regime. Specifically, an exhaustive study of seven different heating regimes was carried out by changing the RF frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity, and the dependence of the heating efficiency on H-minority concentration was investigated. It was found in the experiment that both ion and electron heating are attainable with the same experimental setup by properly choosing the frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity. In the cases of both electron heating and ion heating, the power absorption efficiency depends on the minority ion concentration. An optimum minority concentration exists in the ion heating case while, in the electron heating case, the efficiency increases with concentration monotonically. A simple model calculation is introduced to provide a heuristic understanding of these experimental results. Among the heating regimes examined in this experiment, one of the ion heating regimes was finally chosen as the optimized heating regime and various high performance discharges were realized with it. (author)

  14. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  15. Heat Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Sofie Søndergaard; Andersen, Johnny Dohn Holmgren; Bestle, Morten Heiberg

    2017-01-01

    Heat stroke is an acute, life-threatening emergency characterized clinically by elevated body temperature and central nervous system dysfunction. Early recognition and treatment including aggressive cooling and management of life-threatening systemic complications are essential to reduce morbidity...... and mortality. This case report describes two Danish patients diagnosed with heat stroke syndrome during a heat wave in the summer of 2014. Both patients were morbidly obese and had several predisposing illnesses. However since heat stroke is a rare condition in areas with temperate climate, they were...... not diagnosed until several days after admittance; hence treatment with cooling was delayed. Both patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, where they were treated with an external cooling device and received treatment for complications. Both cases ended fatally. As global warming continues, more heat...

  16. Experimental study of the naphtaline heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, I.; Suzuki, A.; Abe, Y.; Sugihara, S.

    1984-03-01

    Industrial needs for heat pipes which are operable at medium and high temperature ranges over 200 C are increasing in order to recover waste heat from high temperature furnaces or to cool aluminum diecasting molds. Naphthaline is attractive working fluid due to its cost and easiness of handling for medium temperature range. In the heat transfer characteristics, the fabrication method and also the life test result of the heat pipes using naphtaline as the working fluid are reported.

  17. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 3, Water heaters, pool heaters, direct heating equipment, and mobile home furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This is Volume 3 in a series of documents on energy efficiency of consumer products. This volume discusses energy efficiency of water heaters. Water heaters are defined by NAECA as products that utilize oil, gas, or electricity to heat potable water for use outside the heater upon demand. These are major appliances, which use a large portion (18% on average) of total energy consumed per household (1). They differ from most other appliances in that they are usually installed in obscure locations as part of the plumbing and are ignored until they fail. Residential water heaters are capable of heating water up to 180{degrees}F, although the setpoints are usually set lower.

  18. Differential equations problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    Arterburn, David R

    2012-01-01

    REA's Problem Solvers is a series of useful, practical, and informative study guides. Each title in the series is complete step-by-step solution guide. The Differential Equations Problem Solver enables students to solve difficult problems by showing them step-by-step solutions to Differential Equations problems. The Problem Solvers cover material ranging from the elementary to the advanced and make excellent review books and textbook companions. They're perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.The Differential Equations Problem Solver is the perfect resource for any class, any exam, and

  19. Periodontal wound healing/regeneration following implantation of recombinant human growth/differentiation factor-5 (rhGDF-5) in an absorbable collagen sponge carrier into one-wall intrabony defects in dogs: a dose-range study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Gyun; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Chai, Jung-Kiu; Pippig, Susanne D; Siedler, Michael; Kim, Chong-Kwan

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant human growth/differentiation factor-5 (rhGDF-5) is being evaluated as a candidate therapy in support of periodontal regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate cementum and alveolar bone formation, and aberrant healing events following surgical implantation of rhGDF-5 in an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) carrier using an established periodontal defect model. Bilateral 4 x 5 mm (width x depth), one-wall, critical-size, intrabony periodontal defects were surgically created at the mandibular second and fourth pre-molar teeth in 15 Beagle dogs. Five animals received 1 microg/defect and five animals 20 microg/defect rhGDF-5 in unilateral defect sites. Contralateral sites received treatments reported elsewhere. Five animals received rhGDF-5/ACS with 0 (buffer control) and 100 microg/defect rhGDF-5 in contralateral defect sites. The animals were euthanized at 8 weeks post-surgery for histologic and histometric evaluation. Surgical implantation of rhGDF-5 stimulated significant periodontal regeneration. Cementum formation was significantly enhanced in sites implanted with rhGDF-5 (1 and 100 microg) compared with control (pperiodontal wound healing/regeneration in intrabony periodontal defects without complications.

  20. Unitary water-to-air heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-10-01

    Performance and cost functions for nine unitary water-to-air heat pumps ranging in nominal size from /sup 1///sub 2/ to 26 tons are presented in mathematical form for easy use in heat pump computer simulations. COPs at nominal water source temperature of 60/sup 0/F range from 2.5 to 3.4 during the heating cycle; during the cooling cycle EERs range from 8.33 to 9.09 with 85/sup 0/F entering water source temperatures. The COP and EER values do not include water source pumping power or any energy requirements associated with a central heat source and heat rejection equipment.

  1. On the radiogenic heat production of igneous rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hasterok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiogenic heat production is a physical parameter crucial to properly estimating lithospheric temperatures and properly understanding processes related to the thermal evolution of the Earth. Yet heat production is, in general, poorly constrained by direct observation because the key radiogenic elements exist in trace amounts making them difficulty image geophysically. In this study, we advance our knowledge of heat production throughout the lithosphere by analyzing chemical analyses of 108,103 igneous rocks provided by a number of geochemical databases. We produce global estimates of the average and natural range for igneous rocks using common chemical classification systems. Heat production increases as a function of increasing felsic and alkali content with similar values for analogous plutonic and volcanic rocks. The logarithm of median heat production is negatively correlated (r2 = 0.98 to compositionally-based estimates of seismic velocities between 6.0 and 7.4 km s−1, consistent with the vast majority of igneous rock compositions. Compositional variations for continent-wide models are also well-described by a log-linear correlation between heat production and seismic velocity. However, there are differences between the log-linear models for North America and Australia, that are consistent with interpretations from previous studies that suggest above average heat production across much of Australia. Similar log-linear models also perform well within individual geological provinces with ∼1000 samples. This correlation raises the prospect that this empirical method can be used to estimate average heat production and natural variance both laterally and vertically throughout the lithosphere. This correlative relationship occurs despite a direct causal relationship between these two parameters but probably arises from the process of differentiation through melting and crystallization.

  2. Two-Dimensional Problem of Turbulent Natural Convection in a Semi-Open Cavity with Radiant Heating of Internal Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nee Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modelling of turbulent natural convection in a semi-open cavity with a heat-conducting walls of finite thickness with radiant heating of internal boundaries was performed. Two-dimensional problem of the conjugate heat transfer was solved by means of the finite difference method. Scale influence of open boundaries and radiant heating of the gas – wall interfaces on the formation of differential and integral heat transfer characteristics was established. An increase in the dimensionless time (τ led to displacement of extremum temperatures in the typical cross section (Y = 0.5 to an open vertical boundary. The average Nusselt number monotonically increased at the gas – a wall interfaces in a range of 400<τ<1200.

  3. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  4. Differential systems

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Joseph Miller

    1937-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to present the theory of systems of partial differential equations and the theory of Pfaffian systems so as to exhibit clearly the relations between them. In presenting the theory of Pfaffian systems, the author develops, in detail, the theories of Grassmann algebras and rings with differentiation. In particular, following Grassmann and É. Cartan, he introduces and freely uses what is now known as a ring of differential forms with functional coefficients. In presenting the theory of systems of partial differential equations, the author concentrates on the existenc

  5. Modular Heat Exchanger With Integral Heat Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    1992-01-01

    Modular heat exchanger with integral heat pipe transports heat from source to Stirling engine. Alternative to heat exchangers depending on integrities of thousands of brazed joints, contains only 40 brazed tubes.

  6. Harnessing solar heat

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Systems engineered by man to harness solar heat in a controlled manner now include a diverse range of technologies each serving distinctive needs in particular climate contexts. This text covers the breadth of solar energy technologies for the conversion of solar energy to provide heat, either as the directly-used output or as an intermediary to other uses such as power generation or cooling. It is a wholly updated, extended and revised version of “Solar Energy Thermal Technology” first published in 1992. The text draws on the own author’s research and that of numerous colleagues and

  7. Heat Sponge: A Concept for Mass-Efficient Heat Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Blosser, Max L.; Gifford, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    The heat sponge is a device for mass-efficient storage of heat. It was developed to be incorporated in the substructure of a re-entry vehicle to reduce thermal- protection-system requirements. The heat sponge consists of a liquid/vapor mixture contained within a number of miniature pressure vessels that can be embedded within a variety of different types of structures. As temperature is increased, pressure in the miniature pressure vessels also increases so that heat absorbed through vaporization of the liquid is spread over a relatively large temperature range. Using water as a working fluid, the heat-storage capacity of the liquid/vapor mixture is many times higher than that of typical structural materials and is well above that of common phase change materials over a temperature range of 200 F to 700 F. The use of pure ammonia as the working fluid provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 730 deg R, or the use of the more practical water-ammonia solution provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 1160 deg R or in between that of water and pure ammonia. Prototype heat sponges were fabricated and characterized. These heat sponges consisted of 1.0-inch-diameter, hollow, stainless-steel spheres with a wall thickness of 0.020 inches which had varying percentages of their interior volumes filled with water and a water-ammonia solution. An apparatus to measure the heat stored in these prototype heat sponges was designed, fabricated, and verified. The heat-storage capacity calculated from measured temperature histories is compared to numerical predictions.

  8. Characterization and Thermal Properties of Nitrate Based Molten Salt for Heat Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal Tukimon, Mohd; Muhammad, Wan Nur Azrina Wan; Nor Annuar Mohamad, Md; Yusof, Farazila

    2017-10-01

    Molten salt can acts like a storage medium or heat transfer fluid in heat recovery system. Heat transfer fluid is a fluid that has the capability to deliver heat this one side to another while heat recovery system is a system that transfers heat to produce energy. This studies shows about determining the new formulation of different molten nitrate/nitrite salts consisting of LiNO3, KNO2, KNO3 and NaNO2 that give a low temperature of melting point and high average specific heat capacity. Mixed alkaline molten nitrate/nitrite salt can act as a heat transfer fluid due to their advantageous in terms of its properties that feasible in heat recovery system such as high specific heat capacity, low vapour pressure, low cost and wide range of temperature in its application. The mixing of these primary substances will form a new line of quaternary nitrate salt (LiNO3 - KNO2 - KNO3 - NaNO2). The quaternary mixture was heated inside the box furnace at 150°C for four hours and rose up the temperature to 400°C for eight hours to homogenize the mixture. Through heating process, the elements of nitrate/nitrite base were mixed completely. The temperature was then reduced to 115°C for several hours before removing the mixture from the furnace. The melting point of each sample were testified by using thermal gravimetric analysis, TGA/DTA and experiment of determining the specific heat capacity were conducted by using Differential Scanning Calorimeter, DSC. From the result, it is found that the melting point Sample 1 with percentage of weightage (25.4wt% of LiNO3, 33.8wt% of KNO2, 20.7wt% of KNO3 and 20.1wt% of NaNO2) is 94.4°C whereas the average specific heat capacity was 1.0484/g°C while for Sample 3 with percentages of weightage (30.0wt% of LiNO3, 50.2wt% of KNO2, 3.1wt% of KNO3 and 16.7wt% of NaNO2), the melting point is 86.1°C with average specific heat capacity of 0.7274 J/g°C. In the nut shell, the quaternary mixture salts had been a good mixture with good thermal

  9. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  10. Differentiating knowledge, differentiating (occupational) practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hordern, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends arguments for differentiating knowledge into conceptualisations of occupational practice. It is argued that specialised forms of knowledge and practice require recognition and differentiation in ways that many contemporary approaches to practice theory deny. Drawing on Hager’s interpretation of MacIntyre is it suggested that occupational practices are differentiated from non-occupational practices by their ‘purposiveness’, and by how their internal and external goods relate...

  11. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...

  12. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  13. Low-temperature heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of vitamin B{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knyazev, A.V., E-mail: knyazevav@gmail.com; Smirnova, N.N.; Plesovskikh, A.S.; Shushunov, A.N.; Knyazeva, S.S.

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B{sub 12} has been measured by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. • The thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B{sub 12} have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. • The character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. • The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. - Abstract: In the present work temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B{sub 12} (cyanocobalamin) has been measured for the first time in the range from 6 to 343 K by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Based on the experimental data, the thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B{sub 12}, namely, the heat capacity, enthalpy H°(T) − H°(0), entropy S°(T) − S°(0) and Gibbs function G°(T) − H°(0) have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. The value of the fractal dimension D in the function of multifractal generalization of Debye's theory of the heat capacity of solids was estimated and the character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was also studied by differential scanning calorimetry.

  14. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of heat stroke or exhaustion. Heat Stroke and Exhaustion Symptoms of early heat exhaustion symptoms ... heavy sweating; nausea; and giddiness. Symptoms of heat stroke (late stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, ...

  15. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  16. REVIEW OF PCMs AND HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    for power applications. The various methods of heat transfer enhancement in latent heat storage systems were also reviewed systematically. The review showed that three commercially-available PCMs are suitable in the operating temperature range of parabolic trough plants. Many heat transfer enhancement methods ...

  17. Heat transfer direction dependence of heat transfer coefficients in annuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinsloo, Francois P. A.; Dirker, Jaco; Meyer, Josua P.

    2017-11-01

    In this experimental study the heat transfer phenomena in concentric annuli in tube-in-tube heat exchangers at different annular Reynolds numbers, annular diameter ratios, and inlet fluid temperatures using water were considered. Turbulent flow with Reynolds numbers ranging from 15,000 to 45,000, based on the average bulk fluid temperature was tested at annular diameter ratios of 0.327, 0.386, 0.409 and 0.483 with hydraulic diameters of 17.00, 22.98, 20.20 and 26.18 mm respectively. Both heated and cooled annuli were investigated by conducting tests at a range of inlet temperatures between 10 °C to 30 °C for heating cases, and 30 °C to 50 °C for cooling cases. Of special interest was the direct measurement of local wall temperatures on the heat transfer surface, which is often difficult to obtain and evasive in data-sets. Continuous verification and re-evaluation of temperatures measurements were performed via in-situ calibration. It is shown that inlet fluid temperature and the heat transfer direction play significant roles on the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient. A new adjusted Colburn j-factor definition is presented to describe the heating and cooling cases and is used to correlate the 894 test cases considered in this study.

  18. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  19. Infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    IR heating was first industrially used in the 1930s for automotive curing applications and rapidly became a widely applied technology in the manufacturing industry. Contrarily, a slower pace in the development of IR technologies for processing foods and agricultural products was observed, due to lim...

  20. Utilization of low-temperature heat sources for heat and power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haglind, Fredrik; Elmegaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature heat sources are available in many applications, ranging from waste heat from marine diesel engines, industries and refrigeration plants to biomass, geothermal and solar heat sources. There is a great potential for enhancing the utilization of these heat sources by novel.......Both power production and heat pumps may benefit from the development as both technologies utilize a heat source. This makes it possible to cover the complete temperature range of low temperature sources. The development may contribute to significantly lower energy consumption in Danish industry and shipping...

  1. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  2. Fluid to fluid contact heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop test results for a fluid to fluid contact heat exchanger are reported. The heat exchanger, fabricated and tested to demonstrate one method of transferring heat between structures in space, had a total contact area of 0.18 sq m. It utilized contact surfaces which were flexible and conformed to the mating contact surfaces upon pressurization of the fluid circulating within the heat exchanger. During proof-of-concept performance tests, the heat exchanger was operated in a typical earth environment. It demonstrated a contact conductance of 3.8 kW/sq m C at contact pressures in the 15 to 70 kPa range.

  3. Partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Harold

    1997-01-01

    The subject matter, partial differential equations (PDEs), has a long history (dating from the 18th century) and an active contemporary phase. An early phase (with a separate focus on taut string vibrations and heat flow through solid bodies) stimulated developments of great importance for mathematical analysis, such as a wider concept of functions and integration and the existence of trigonometric or Fourier series representations. The direct relevance of PDEs to all manner of mathematical, physical and technical problems continues. This book presents a reasonably broad introductory account of the subject, with due regard for analytical detail, applications and historical matters.

  4. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Amiya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a systematic and comprehensive account of the theory of differentiable manifolds and provides the necessary background for the use of fundamental differential topology tools. The text includes, in particular, the earlier works of Stephen Smale, for which he was awarded the Fields Medal. Explicitly, the topics covered are Thom transversality, Morse theory, theory of handle presentation, h-cobordism theorem, and the generalised Poincaré conjecture. The material is the outcome of lectures and seminars on various aspects of differentiable manifolds and differential topology given over the years at the Indian Statistical Institute in Calcutta, and at other universities throughout India. The book will appeal to graduate students and researchers interested in these topics. An elementary knowledge of linear algebra, general topology, multivariate calculus, analysis, and algebraic topology is recommended.

  5. Differential Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stoker, J J

    2011-01-01

    This classic work is now available in an unabridged paperback edition. Stoker makes this fertile branch of mathematics accessible to the nonspecialist by the use of three different notations: vector algebra and calculus, tensor calculus, and the notation devised by Cartan, which employs invariant differential forms as elements in an algebra due to Grassman, combined with an operation called exterior differentiation. Assumed are a passing acquaintance with linear algebra and the basic elements of analysis.

  6. Fiscal 1980 Sunshine Project research report. Development of hydrothermal power plant. Development of binary cycle power plant (Research on heat cycle, heat medium, material and heat medium turbine); 1980 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (netsu cycle oyobi netsubaitai no kenkyu, zairyo no kenkyu narabini netsubaitai turbine no kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1980 research result on each element of the next 10MW class geothermal binary cycle power plant, following last year. In the research on heat cycle and heat medium, measurement was made on the liquid density, vapor density, liquid specific heat, vapor specific heat and thermal conductivity of 8 heat media to prepare the precise pressure enthalpy chart. The thermal stability of each medium was also measured under a flow condition. The heat cycle of each medium was calculated in a hydrothermal temperature range of 120-160 degrees C for evaluation of its output. In the research on material, field corrosion test and laboratory simulation were made on 3 kinds of heat exchanger martials for acidic hot water to study the corrosion behavior of welding members. In the research on heat medium turbine, study was made on sealing characteristics such as differential pressure, flow rate and friction of sealing oil for oil film seal and mechanical seal as shaft seal devices of heat medium turbines for the 10MW class geothermal plant. (NEDO)

  7. Differential Harnack Inequalities Under a Coupled Ricci Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Linfeng, E-mail: wlf711178@126.com [Nantong University, School of Science (China)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we prove several differential Harnack inequalities under a coupled Ricci flow. As applications, we get Harnack inequalities for positive solutions of backward heat-type equations with potentials under the coupled Ricci flow. We also derive Perelman's differential Harnack inequality for fundamental solution of the conjugate heat equation under the Ricci flow.

  8. Thermoeconomic comparison of industrial heat pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Christen Malte; Reinholdt, L.

    2011-01-01

    , limitations and design, a generic comparison is used. To establish the optimal individual temperature range of operation, a thermoeconomic evaluation is performed, with heat price as the decision parameter. Each individual heat pump is favourable in specific temperature intervals, which will vary according......Four natural working fluids in various heat pump cycles are expected to cover the heating range between 50oC and 150°C. The different thermodynamic cycles are the Condensing Vapour, Transcritical and Compression/Absorption. As the considered technologies have significant differences in application...... to the temperature lift between sink and source. At temperature lifts below 30°C the entire temperature range is covered. Exceeding this temperature lift, the range of sink temperatures is not completely covered above 125°C. Three of the heat pumps prove very cost competitive when compared to heating with natural...

  9. Report to the DOE nuclear data committee. [EV RANGE 10-100; CROSS SECTIONS; PHOTONEUTRONS; NEUTRONS; GAMMA RADIATION; COUPLED CHANNEL THEORY; DIFFERENTIAL CROSS SECTIONS; MEV RANGE 01-10; ; CAPTURE; GAMMA SPECTRA; THERMAL NEUTRONS; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; DECAY; FISSION PRODUCTS; FISSION YIELD; SHELL MODELS; NUCLEAR DATA COLLECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Haight, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    Topics covered include: studies of (n, charged particle) reactions with 14 to 15 MeV neutrons; photoneutron cross sections for /sup 15/N; neutron radiative capture; Lane-model analysis of (p,p) and (n,n) scattering on the even tin isotopes; neutron scattering cross sections for /sup 181/Ta, /sup 197/Au, /sup 209/Bi, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange cross sections; neutron-induced fission cross sections of /sup 245/Cm and /sup 242/Am; fission neutron multiplicities for /sup 245/Cm and /sup 242/Am; the transport of 14 MeV neutrons through heavy materials 150 < A < 208; /sup 249/Cm energy levels from measurement of thermal neutron capture gamma rays; /sup 231/Th energy levels from neutron capture gamma ray and conversion electron spectroscopy; new measurements of conversion electron binding energies in berkelium and californium; nuclear level densities; relative importance of statistical vs. valence neutron capture in the mass-90 region; determination of properties of short-lived fission products; fission yield of /sup 87/Br and /sup 137/I from 15 nuclei ranging from /sup 232/Th to /sup 249/Cf; evaluation of charged particle data for the ECPL library; evaluation of secondary charged-particle energy and angular distributions for ENDL; and evaluated nuclear structure libraries derived from the table of isotopes. (GHT)

  10. Partial differential equations of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sobolev, S L

    1964-01-01

    Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics emphasizes the study of second-order partial differential equations of mathematical physics, which is deemed as the foundation of investigations into waves, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and other physical problems. The book discusses in detail a wide spectrum of topics related to partial differential equations, such as the theories of sets and of Lebesgue integration, integral equations, Green's function, and the proof of the Fourier method. Theoretical physicists, experimental physicists, mathematicians engaged in pure and applied math

  11. Heat pump

    OpenAIRE

    Klíma, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Bakalářská práce popisuje a charakterizuje tepelné čerpadlo. Obsahuje souhrn jednotlivých druhů tepelných čerpadel z hlediska získávání energie, princip jejich funkce a popis odlišností mezi jednotlivými druhy kompresorů, použití pracovní látky a její vývin do budoucna. Závěrem je zde uveden můj vlastní názor na tepelné čerpadlo, které bych preferoval. Bachelor thesis describes and characterizes the heat pump. Summarizes the various types of heat pumps in terms of energy production, princi...

  12. Heat Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Bottomley, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Heat Exchange’ is an international touring exhibition of enamel metalwork curated by Turrell.E (UK), Gegenwart (Germany/UK) and Cameron (Australia). Bottomley was one of twenty-three international artists invited to join a transcontinental on-line blog and forum that recorded individual contemporary approaches to working with vitreous enamel the year prior to the 2012 exhibition that coincided with the SNAG (Society of North American Goldsmiths) National Conference in Phoenix Arizona USA.Vitr...

  13. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  14. Dual solutions of magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow and heat transfer of viscoelastic nanofluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusoh, R.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2017-09-01

    The present study is intended to encompass the stagnation point flow and heat transfer of viscoelastic nanofluid with the presence of thermal radiation. The viscous incompressible electrically conducting and Jeffrey fluid model is taken into account. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by using the appropriate similarity variables. The resulting differential equations are solved numerically using the built in bvp4c function in Matlab. Dual solutions are discovered for a certain range of the governing parameters. Numerical results for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number are elucidated through tables and graphs.

  15. Differential calculus and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Based on undergraduate courses in advanced calculus, the treatment covers a wide range of topics, from soft functional analysis and finite-dimensional linear algebra to differential equations on submanifolds of Euclidean space. 1976 edition.

  16. Heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  17. Evaluation of heat transfer enhancement in air-heating collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattox, D. L.

    1979-06-01

    The present research effort was initiated for the purpose of increasing the thermal efficiency of air heating solar collectors through identification and development of optimum design and operation criteria for solar absorber-to-air heat exchangers. Initially this effort took the form of a solar collector systems analysis to evaluate the impact of various techniques for enhancing the heat transfer between the absorber and air stream on overall thermal performance of the entire solar collector. This systems analysis resulted in the selection of solar collector designs providing ducted cooling air on the absorber shaded side as a base line. A transient heat transfer analysis of a complete solar air heating collector was used to demonstrate that an optimum absorber-to-air heat exchanger design could be provided with several interrupted fin configurations. Additional analyses were performed to establish that the maximum solar collector thermal performance to required pumping power was realized for a Reynolds number range of 1000 to 2000. This Reynolds number range was used to establish a theoretical design limit curve for maximum thermal performance versus required pumping power for all interrupted fin designs as published in the open literature. Heat and momentum transfer empirical relationships were defined for scaling the state-of-the-art high conductance fin designs identified from a compact configuration to the less compact designs needed for solar collectors.

  18. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  19. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-11-07

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  20. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Maria Carlomagno

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors’ research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  1. Heat-Exchanger/Heat-Pipe Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, H. J.; Van Hagan, T. H.

    1987-01-01

    Monolithic assembly reliable and light in weight. Heat exchanger and evaporator ends of heat pipes integrated in monolithic halves welded together. Interface assembly connects heat exchanger of furnace, reactor, or other power source with heat pipes carrying heat to radiator or power-consuming system. One of several concepts proposed for nuclear power supplies aboard spacecraft, interface useful on Earth in solar thermal power systems, heat engines, and lightweight cooling systems.

  2. Boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in plate-fin heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Shamirzaev, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in a vertical plate-fin heat exchanger with transverse size of the channels that is smaller than the capillary constant. The heat transfer coefficients obtained in ranges of small mass velocities and low heat fluxes, which are typical of the industry, have been poorly studied yet. The characteristic patterns of the upward liquid-vapor flow in the heat exchanger channels and the regions of their existence are detected. The obtained data show a weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient on equilibrium vapor quality, mass flow rate, and heat flux density and do not correspond to calculations by the known heat transfer models. A possible reason for this behavior is a decisive influence of evaporation of thin liquid films on the heat transfer at low heat flux.

  3. Stirling engine external heat system design with heat pipe heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godett, Ted M.; Ziph, Benjamin

    1986-01-01

    This final report presents the conceptual design of a liquid fueled external heating system (EHS) and the preliminary design of a heat pipe heater for the STM-4120 Stirling cycle engine, to meet the Air Force mobile electric power (MEP) requirement for units in the range of 20 to 60 kW. The EHS design had the following constraints: (1) Packaging requirements limited the overall system dimensions to about 330 mm x 250 mm x 100 mm; (2) Heat flux to the sodium heat pipe evaporator was limited to an average of 100 kW/m and a maximum of 550 kW/m based on previous experience; and (3) The heat pipe operating temperature was specified to be 800 C based on heat input requirements of the STM4-120. An analysis code was developed to optimize the EHS performance parameters and an analytical development of the sodium heat pipe heater was performed; both are presented and discussed. In addition, construction techniques were evaluated and scale model heat pipe testing performed.

  4. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  5. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  6. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guggenheimer, Heinrich W

    1977-01-01

    This is a text of local differential geometry considered as an application of advanced calculus and linear algebra. The discussion is designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate study, and presumes of readers only a fair knowledge of matrix algebra and of advanced calculus of functions of several real variables. The author, who is a Professor of Mathematics at the Polytechnic Institute of New York, begins with a discussion of plane geometry and then treats the local theory of Lie groups and transformation groups, solid differential geometry, and Riemannian geometry, leading to a

  7. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graustein, William C

    2006-01-01

    This first course in differential geometry presents the fundamentals of the metric differential geometry of curves and surfaces in a Euclidean space of three dimensions. Written by an outstanding teacher and mathematician, it explains the material in the most effective way, using vector notation and technique. It also provides an introduction to the study of Riemannian geometry.Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, the text presupposes a knowledge of calculus. The first nine chapters focus on the theory, treating the basic properties of curves and surfaces, the mapping of

  8. Renewables for Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This timely report examines the technologies, current markets and relative costs for heat and cold production using biomass, geothermal and solar-assisted systems. It evaluates a range of national case studies and relevant policies. Should the successful and more cost-effective policies be implemented by other countries, then the relatively untapped economic potential of renewable energy heating and cooling systems could be better realised, resulting in potential doubling of the present market within the next few years.

  9. Heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, Peter D

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of the theory, design and manufacture of heat pipes and their applications. This latest edition has been thoroughly revised, up-dated and expanded to give an in-depth coverage of the new developments in the field. Significant new material has been added to all the chapters and the applications section has been totally rewritten to ensure that topical and important applications are appropriately emphasised. The bibliography has been considerably enlarged to incorporate much valuable new information. Thus readers of the previous edition, which has established

  10. Differential Transformation Method for Temperature Distribution in a Radiating Fin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahimi, M.; Hosseini, M. J.; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Radiating extended surfaces are widely used to enhance heat transfer between a primary surface and the environment. In this paper, the differential transformation method (DTM) is proposed for solving nonlinear differential equation of temperature distribution in a heat radiating fin. The concept...... of differential transformation is briefly introduced, and then we employed it to derive solutions of two nonlinear equations. The results obtained by DTM are compared with those derived from the analytical solution to verify the accuracy of the proposed method....

  11. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at ... about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the ...

  12. Low temperature nuclear heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotakorpi, J.; Tarjanne, R. (comps.)

    1977-08-01

    The meeting was concerned with the use of low grade nuclear heat for district heating, desalination, process heat, and agriculture and aquaculture. The sessions covered applications and demand, heat sources, and economics.

  13. Regenerative Hydride Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Hydride heat pump features regenerative heating and single circulation loop. Counterflow heat exchangers accommodate different temperatures of FeTi and LaNi4.7Al0.3 subloops. Heating scheme increases efficiency.

  14. Advanced differential quadrature methods

    CERN Document Server

    Zong, Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Modern Tools to Perform Numerical DifferentiationThe original direct differential quadrature (DQ) method has been known to fail for problems with strong nonlinearity and material discontinuity as well as for problems involving singularity, irregularity, and multiple scales. But now researchers in applied mathematics, computational mechanics, and engineering have developed a range of innovative DQ-based methods to overcome these shortcomings. Advanced Differential Quadrature Methods explores new DQ methods and uses these methods to solve problems beyond the capabilities of the direct DQ method.After a basic introduction to the direct DQ method, the book presents a number of DQ methods, including complex DQ, triangular DQ, multi-scale DQ, variable order DQ, multi-domain DQ, and localized DQ. It also provides a mathematical compendium that summarizes Gauss elimination, the Runge-Kutta method, complex analysis, and more. The final chapter contains three codes written in the FORTRAN language, enabling readers to q...

  15. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in tube under injection of gas through permeable walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, M. S.; Lushchik, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Using a differential turbulence model, a numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a tube is carried out and the dependences of the flow and heat transfer characteristics on the intensity of the coolant injection through permeable walls are obtained. It is shown that the coefficients of friction and heat transfer decrease with increasing of injection rate. The comparison of calculation results reflecting the main features of rather complicated processes of flow in tube under gas injection with well-known experimental data over a wide range of the Reynolds number and the intensity of injection show their satisfactory agreement.

  16. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hochstadt, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Modern approach to differential equations presents subject in terms of ideas and concepts rather than special cases and tricks which traditional courses emphasized. No prerequisites needed other than a good calculus course. Certain concepts from linear algebra used throughout. Problem section at end of each chapter.

  17. Differential belongings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldrup, Helene

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores suburban middle-class residents’ narratives about housing choice, everyday life and belonging in residential areas of Greater Copenhagen, Denmark, to understand how residential processes of social differentiation are constituted. Using Savage et al.’s concepts of discursive re...

  18. Experimental design and modeling of a microscale differential thermal calorimeter for the purposes of cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armes, James L.

    In order to develop successful cryopreservation protocols for various biological materials, it is necessary to determine the thermodynamic properties of nanoliter- scale biological samples: ranging from heat capacity to heat of fusion. Differential thermal analysis is a calorimetric technique which is efficacious at determining these thermodynamic properties and will help lend insight into the formation of intracellular ice which depends heavily on the rate at which the sample is cooled. If too much intracellular ice is formed during the cooling process, the biological material can be destroyed. To investigate the effects of a range of cooling and warming rates on a cell, a control system and data acquisition software has been developed for use with a custom microfabricated differential thermal analyzer (muDTA). Utilizing either an a-priori prediction of the muDTA's thermal response or an integrated software-based PID control system, the program developed allows for precise control over the cooling and warming rate of the muDTA. In order to enhance the accuracy of the a-priori predicted current profile, a 2D numeric model was developed of the muDTA. This model also has allowed for geometric optimization to be performed on the next generation prototype of the muDTA. The muDTA has been shown to accurately measure the freezing point and heat of fusion of deionized water samples, with sample volumes on the order of nanoliters. The heat capacity of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has also been experimentally determined.

  19. Range management visual impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce R. Brown; David Kissel

    1979-01-01

    Historical overgrazing of western public rangelands has resulted in the passage of the Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978. The main purpose of this Act is to improve unsatisfactory range conditions. A contributing factor to unfavorable range conditions is adverse visual impacts. These visual impacts can be identified in three categories of range management: range...

  20. Homotopy Perturbation Method for Thin Film Flow and Heat Transfer over an Unsteady Stretching Sheet with Internal Heating and Variable Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chung Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the effects of variable heat flux and internal heat generation on the flow and heat transfer in a thin film on a horizontal sheet in the presence of thermal radiation. Similarity transformations are used to transform the governing equations to a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The obtained differential equations are solved approximately by the homotopy perturbation method (HPM. The effects of various parameters governing the flow and heat transfer in this study are discussed and presented graphically. Comparison of numerical results is made with the earlier published results under limiting cases.

  1. Thermal design heat sinks, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, compact heat exchangers, and solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H S

    2010-01-01

    The proposed is written as a senior undergraduate or the first-year graduate textbook,covering modern thermal devices such as heat sinks, thermoelectric generators and coolers, heat pipes, and heat exchangers as design components in larger systems. These devices are becoming increasingly important and fundamental in thermal design across such diverse areas as microelectronic cooling, green or thermal energy conversion, and thermal control and management in space, etc. However, there is no textbook available covering this range of topics. The proposed book may be used as a capstone design cours

  2. Upregulation of heat shock protein 70 and the differential protein expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances migration and inhibits apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Bee-Piao; Lin, Chun-Shiang; Wang, Chau-Jong; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) plays diverse roles in liver damage and hepatocarcinogenesis with its multipotent bioactivity. However, the influence of TNF? on protein expression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is incompletely understood. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differential protein expression of HCC in response to TNF? stimulus. We observed that HepG2 cell revealed a higher resistance to TNF?-induced apoptosis as compared to the non-tumorigenic hepatocyte THLE-2. By usin...

  3. Differential cross section measurements of {sup 27}Al(p,p{sup /}γ){sup 27}Al and {sup 27}Al(p,αγ){sup 24}Mg reactions in the energy range of 1.6–3.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokar, A., E-mail: arezajokar@gmail.com [Physics & Accelerators Research School, NSTRI, PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Physics & Accelerators Research School, NSTRI, PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sharifzadeh, N. [Payame Noor University, PO Box 19395-13697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathollahi, V. [Physics & Accelerators Research School, NSTRI, PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    In this work measurement of differential cross sections of {sup 27}Al(p,p{sup /}γ){sup 27}Al (E{sub γ} = 844, 1014 keV) and {sup 27}Al(p,αγ){sup 24}Mg (E{sub γ} = 1369 keV) nuclear reactions in the proton energy range of 1.6–3.0 MeV are described and the measured values are presented. Thin Al target was prepared by evaporating a 26 μg/cm{sup 2} Al onto a 129 μg/cm{sup 2} self-supporting Ag film. The gamma-rays and backscattered protons were detected simultaneously. The gamma-rays and protons were collected by an HPGe detector placed at an angle of 90° with respect to beam direction and an ion implanted Si detector placed at a scattering angle of 165°, respectively. In this experimental setup the great advantage is that differential cross sections could be independent on absolute values of the collected beam charge. The overall systematic uncertainty of cross sections was estimated to be ±9% while statistical errors were less than ±5%.

  4. Melting and crystallization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate: effect of heating/cooling rates on phase transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Maria Ramos Wellen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe studied the crystallization and melting phenomena of poly (3- hydroxybutyrate (PHB, a biodegradable and biocompatible semi-crystalline thermoplastic, obtained from renewable resources. Its high crystallinity motivated several studies on crystallization and melting behavior, and also on ways to increase the amorphous polymer fraction. The effect of heating and cooling rates on the crystallization and melting of commercial PHB was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. Several rates, ranging from 2.5 to 20 °C min–1, were used to study the phase changes during heating/cooling/reheating cycles. The results showed that PHB partially crystallizes from the melt during the cooling cycle and partially cold crystallizes on reheating, and that the relative amount of polymer crystallizing in each stage strongly depends on the cooling rate. The melt and cold crystallization temperatures, as well as the rates of phase change, depend strongly on the cooling and heating rates.

  5. Assessment of heating rate and non-uniform heating in domestic microwave ovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy; Birla, Sohan L; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2012-01-01

    Due to the inherent nature of standing wave patterns of microwaves inside a domestic microwave oven cavity and varying dielectric properties of different food components, microwave heating produces non-uniform distribution of energy inside the food. Non-uniform heating is a major food safety concern in not-ready-to-eat (NRTE) microwaveable foods. In this study, we present a method for assessing heating rate and non-uniform heating in domestic microwave ovens. In this study a custom designed container was used to assess heating rate and non-uniform heating of a range of microwave ovens using a hedgehog of 30 T-type thermocouples. The mean and standard deviation of heating rate along the radial distance and sector of the container were measured and analyzed. The effect of the location of rings and sectors was analyzed using ANOVA to identify the best location for placing food on the turntable. The study suggested that the best location to place food in a microwave oven is not at the center but near the edge of the turntable assuming uniform heating is desired. The effect of rated power and cavity size on heating rate and non-uniform heating was also studied for a range of microwave ovens. As the rated power and cavity size increases, heating rate increases while non-uniform heating decreases. Sectors in the container also influenced heating rate (p microwave ovens were inconsistent in producing the same heating patterns between the two replications that were performed 4 h apart.

  6. The effect of heating direction on flow boiling heat transfer of R134a in micro-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingchen; Jia, Li; Dang, Chao; Peng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents effects of heating directions on heat transfer performance of R134a flow boiling in micro- channel heat sink. The heat sink has 30 parallel rectangular channels with cross-sectional dimensions of 500μm width 500μm depth and 30mm length. The experimental operation condition ranges of the heat flux and the mass flux were 13.48 to 82.25 W/cm2 and 373.3 to 1244.4 kg/m2s respectively. The vapor quality ranged from 0.07 to 0.93. The heat transfer coefficients of top heating and bottom heating both were up to 25 kW/m2 K. Two dominate transfer mechanisms of nucleate boiling and convection boiling were observed according to boiling curves. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 13.9% higher than top heating in low heat flux, while in high heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 9.9%.higher than the top heating, because bubbles were harder to divorce the heating wall. And a modified correlation was provided to predict heat transfer of top heating.

  7. Influence of thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption on MHD heat transfer flow of a micropolar fluid past a wedge considering hall and ion slip currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddin Ziya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a numerical model is developed to examine the effect of thermal radiation on magnetohydrodynamic heat transfer flow of a micropolar fluid past a non-conducting wedge in presence of heat source/sink. In the model it is assumed that the fluid is viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting. The Hall and ion slip effects have also been taken into consideration. The model contains highly non-linear coupled partial differential equations which have been converted into ordinary differential equation by using the similarity transformations. These equations are then solved numerically by Shooting technique along with the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration scheme for entire range of parameters with appropriate boundary conditions. The effects of various parameters involved in the problem have been studied with the help of graphs. Numerical values of skin friction coefficients and Nusselt number are presented in tabular form. The results showed that the micropolar fluids are better to reduce local skin drag as compared to Newtonian fluids and the presence of heat sink increases the heat transfer rate.

  8. A new compact heat engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Miodrag

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Differential Cylinder Heat Engine (DCHE reported consists of two different size cylinders with pistons where four passages (channels enable fluid communications between cylinders. The pistons are connected in opposition to share the work. As the channels are open and closed by movement of pistons the working fluid passing through the adequate channel is heated, cooled or let adiabaticaly flown from one cylinder to the other. The arrangement enables different thermodynamic cycles to be performed. Here the Brayton cycle is chosen by adequate choice of volume ratio and by positioning the channel apertures. During isobaric parts of the cycle the gas is adequately heated or cooled when passing through corresponding channel. During these process temperatures remain constant (and different in each cylinder. The performance of the engine is analyzed and the parameters and efficiency determined.

  9. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  10. Segmented heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  11. Dual source heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  12. About the possible options for models of convective heat transfer in closed volumes with local heating source

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.; Nagornova Tatiana A.; Shestakov Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Results of mathematical modeling of convective heat transfer in air area surrounded on all sides enclosing structures, in the presence of heat source at the lower boundary of the media are presented. Solved the system of differential equations of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations with the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The process of convective heat transfer is calculated using the models of turbulence Prandtl and Prandtl-Reichard. Takes into account the processes of heat exchang...

  13. Approximate series solution of multi-dimensional, time fractional-order (heat-like) diffusion equations using FRDTM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K; Srivastava, Vineet K

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present a new approximate series solution of the multi-dimensional (heat-like) diffusion equation with time-fractional derivative in Caputo form using a semi-analytical approach: fractional-order reduced differential transform method (FRDTM). The efficiency of FRDTM is confirmed by considering four test problems of the multi-dimensional time fractional-order diffusion equation. FRDTM is a very efficient, effective and powerful mathematical tool which provides exact or very close approximate solutions for a wide range of real-world problems arising in engineering and natural sciences, modelled in terms of differential equations.

  14. Unsteady Stagnation Point Flow and Heat Transfer over a Stretching/Shrinking Sheet with Suction or Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Suali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady stagnation point flow and heat transfer over a stretching/shrinking sheet with suction/injection is studied. The governing partial differential equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation and solved numerically. Both stretching and shrinking cases are considered. Results for the skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity, and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the dual solutions exist for the shrinking case, whereas the solution is unique for the stretching case. Numerical results show that the range of dual solutions increases with mass suction and decreases with mass injection.

  15. Differential equations I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Differential Equations I covers first- and second-order equations, series solutions, higher-order linear equations, and the Laplace transform.

  16. Effect of the Presence of Semi-circular Cylinders on Heat Transfer From Heat Sources Placed in Two Dimensional Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed W. Mustava

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a semi-circular cylinders in a two dimensional channel on heat transfer by forced convection from two heat sources with a constant temperature has been studied numerically. Each channel contains two heat sources; one on the upper surface of the channel and the other on the lower surface of the channel. There is semi-circular cylinder under the source in upper surface and there is semi-circular cylinder above the source in lower surface. The location of the second heat source with its semi-cylinder has been changed and keeps the first source with its semi- cylinder at the same location. The flow and temperature field are studied numerically with different values of Reynolds numbers and for different spacing between the centers of the semi-cylinders. The laminar flow field is analyzed numerically by solving the steady forms of the two-dimensional incompressible Navier- Stokes and energy equations.  The Cartesian velocity components and pressure on a collocated (non-staggered grid are used as dependent variables in the momentum equations, which discretized by finite volume method, body fitted coordinates are used to represent the complex channel geometry accurately, and grid generation technique based on elliptic partial differential equations is employed. SIMPLE algorithm is used to adjust the velocity field to satisfy the conservation of mass.  The range of Reynolds number is (Re= 100 – 800 and the range of the spacing between the semi-cylinders is(1-4 and the Prandtl number is 0.7.The results showed that increasing the spacing between the semi-cylinders increases the average of Nusselt number of the first heat source for all Reynolds numbers. As well as the results show that the best case among the cases studied to enhance the heat transfer is when the second heat source and its semi-cylinder located on at the distance (S=1.5 from the first half of the cylinder and the Reynolds number is greater than (Re ≥ 400 because of the

  17. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Margalef-Roig, J

    1992-01-01

    ...there are reasons enough to warrant a coherent treatment of the main body of differential topology in the realm of Banach manifolds, which is at the same time correct and complete. This book fills the gap: whenever possible the manifolds treated are Banach manifolds with corners. Corners add to the complications and the authors have carefully fathomed the validity of all main results at corners. Even in finite dimensions some results at corners are more complete and better thought out here than elsewhere in the literature. The proofs are correct and with all details. I see this book as a reliable monograph of a well-defined subject; the possibility to fall back to it adds to the feeling of security when climbing in the more dangerous realms of infinite dimensional differential geometry. Peter W. Michor

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations of a small scale double-reflector concentrating solar system with latent heat storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woh, Foong Chee

    2011-07-01

    The main aim of this doctoral thesis is to analyze a small scale double- reflector concentrating solar system with latent heat storage in temperature range 230 to 250 Celsius so that cooking can be done efficiently and effectively in the late evening or at night time. Many solar heat collection systems are based on transportation of heat from the focal point to the storage by a circulating heat transfer fluid. In this study, double-reflector arrangement is designed and tested to heat up the thermal heat storage directly without using any heat transport fluid. This makes the system more simple and easy to fabricate. NaNO3-KNO3 binary mixture is selected as the latent heat storage medium because the melting temperature of around 220 Celsius is in a suitable range.There are several objectives in this study. First of all, characterization of phase change materials has been carried out using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Important information such as heat capacity as a function of temperature, melting temperature, solid-solid phase transition temperature, enthalpy of fusion, and enthalpy of solid-solid phase transition can be obtained and used in the phase change numerical simulations.After the characterization and selection of a phase change material, a double-reflector system with thermal energy storage was designed and constructed. In order to test the concept of the design, a reflection system using laser diode technique was used in a smoke chamber. Focal point of the primary reflector was determined experimentally and compared with the theoretical calculations. The latent heat storage unit was filled with the NaNO3-KNO3 binary mixture until 90% full. Copper top plate and fin was used to increase the heat transfer rate into the phase change material. With the double-reflector system, thermal charging of the heat storage was carried out under the sun.Numerical simulations of the thermal charging process have been done using finite element model from COMSOL

  19. Partial differential equations for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Farlow, Stanley J

    1993-01-01

    Most physical phenomena, whether in the domain of fluid dynamics, electricity, magnetism, mechanics, optics, or heat flow, can be described in general by partial differential equations. Indeed, such equations are crucial to mathematical physics. Although simplifications can be made that reduce these equations to ordinary differential equations, nevertheless the complete description of physical systems resides in the general area of partial differential equations.This highly useful text shows the reader how to formulate a partial differential equation from the physical problem (constructing th

  20. Minnesota Pheasant Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset delineates the spatial range of wild pheasant populations in Minnesota as of 2002 by dividing the MN state boundary into 2 units: pheasant range and...

  1. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... for substring range reporting generalize to substring range counting and substring range emptiness variants. We also obtain non-trivial time-space trade-offs for these problems. Our bounds for substring range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures...

  2. High-Density Polyethylene and Heat-Treated Bamboo Fiber Composites: Nonisothermal Crystallization Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat-treated bamboo fibers (BFs on nonisothermal crystallization of high-density polyethylene (HDPE was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry under nitrogen. The Avrami-Jeziorny model was used to fit the measured crystallization data of the HDPE/BF composites and to obtain the model parameters for the crystallization process. The heat flow curves of neat HDPE and HDPE/heat-treated BF composites showed similar trends. Their crystallization mostly occurred within a temperature range between 379 K and 399 K, where HDPE turned from the liquid phase into the crystalline phase. Values of the Avrami exponent (n were in the range of 2.8~3.38. Lamellae of neat HDPE and their composites grew in a three-dimensional manner, which increased with increased heat-treatment temperature and could be attributed to the improved ability of heterogeneous nucleation and crystallization completeness. The values of the modified kinetic rate constant (KJ first increased and then decreased with increased cooling rate because the supercooling was improved by the increased number of nucleating sites. Heat-treated BF and/or a coupling agent could act as a nucleator for the crystallization of HDPE.

  3. Heat capacities and thermal diffusivities of n-alkane acid ethyl esters—biodiesel fuel components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatishcheva, N. S.; Faizullin, M. Z.; Nikitin, E. D.

    2017-09-01

    The heat capacities and thermal diffusivities of ethyl esters of liquid n-alkane acids C n H2 n-1O2C2H5 with the number of carbon atoms in the parent acid n = 10, 11, 12, 14, and 16 are measured. The heat capacities are measured using a DSC 204 F1 Phoenix heat flux differential scanning calorimeter (Netzsch, Germany) in the temperature range of 305-375 K. Thermal diffusivities are measured by means of laser flash method on an LFA-457 instrument (Netzsch, Germany) at temperatures of 305-400 K. An equation is derived for the dependence of the molar heat capacities of the investigated esters on temperature. It is shown that the dependence of molar heat capacity C p,m (298.15 K) on n ( n = 1-6) is close to linear. The dependence of thermal diffusivity on temperature in the investigated temperature range is described by a first-degree polynomial, but thermal diffusivity a (298.15 K) as a function of n has a minimum at n = 5.

  4. Natural Convection Flow along an Isothermal Vertical Flat Plate with Temperature Dependent Viscosity and Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mamun Molla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the natural convection laminar flow along an isothermal vertical flat plate immersed in a fluid with viscosity which is the exponential function of fluid temperature in presence of internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a nondimensional form and the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations is reduced to a convenient form which are solved numerically using an efficient marching order implicit finite difference method with double sweep technique. Numerical results are presented in terms of the velocity and temperature distribution of the fluid as well as the heat transfer characteristics, namely, the wall shear stress and the local and average rate of heat transfer in terms of the local skin-friction coefficient, the local and average Nusselt number for a wide range of the viscosity-variation parameter, heat generation parameter, and the Rayleigh number. Increasing viscosity variation parameter and Rayleigh number lead to increasing the local and average Nusselt number and decreasing the wall shear stress. Wall shear stress and the rate of heat transfer decreased due to the increase of heat generation.

  5. Detection of nanoflare-heated plasma in the solar corona by the FOXSI-2 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm; Christe, Steven; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Narukage, Noriyuki; Vievering, Juliana

    2017-11-01

    The processes that heat the solar and stellar coronae to several million kelvins, compared with the much cooler photosphere (5,800 K for the Sun), are still not well known1. One proposed mechanism is heating via a large number of small, unresolved, impulsive heating events called nanoflares2. Each event would heat and cool quickly, and the average effect would be a broad range of temperatures including a small amount of extremely hot plasma. However, detecting these faint, hot traces in the presence of brighter, cooler emission is observationally challenging. Here we present hard X-ray data from the second flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI-2), which detected emission above 7 keV from an active region of the Sun with no obvious individual X-ray flare emission. Through differential emission measure computations, we ascribe this emission to plasma heated above 10 MK, providing evidence for the existence of solar nanoflares. The quantitative evaluation of the hot plasma strongly constrains the coronal heating models.

  6. The heat budgets of magmatic arcs: Discrepancies between heat flow measurements, volatile fluxes, and interpretations of the geologic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buer, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Arc magmatic processes, from differentiation to emplacement, depend crucially on the rate at which heat and magma are supplied to the arc crust. In active arcs, the total heat flow can be estimated relatively directly by measuring and quantifying the amounts of heat lost via conduction, hydrothermal circulation, and eruption. This total heat flow can be used to calculate the implied magmatic flux at depth. Alternatively, magmatic flux in active arcs can be estimated from measured rates of volatile emissions, usually SO2. Unfortunately, heat flow and volatile flux data sufficiently detailed to make these calculations exist for only a handful of active arcs. In the geologic record, rates of arc magmatic flux have most frequently been estimated by measuring the preserved volumes of intrusive and extrusive products and dividing by the geochronologically determined duration of arc activity. This can be converted to heat flow by assuming a certain amount of heat carried per volume of magma. The ranges of magmatic flux estimated via either heat flow or SO2 are similar for modern arcs, but, on average, estimates from the geologic record are lower by about a factor of three (Fig. 1). This discrepancy may indicate that the assumption that preserved igneous rock volumes represent the total advective flux is a poor choice when interpreting the geologic record. Recycling of early solidified magma and loss of cumulates to the mantle may be important, i.e., the time-integrated advective flux might significantly exceed the net preserved intrusive volume. This is also supported by other lines of evidence, including geochemical mass-balance arguments, thermal models of basalt flux needed to allow substantial assimilation and/or crystal fractionation in the lower crust, high-temperature thermochronology in arcs, and thermal models of the conditions necessary to cause large, explosive eruptions from upper crustal magma chambers. Substantial recycling or convection within the arc crust

  7. Nonazeotropic Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealker, David H.; Deming, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    Heat pump collects heat from water circulating in heat-rejection loop, raises temperature of collected heat, and transfers collected heat to water in separate pipe. Includes sealed motor/compressor with cooling coils, evaporator, and condenser, all mounted in outer housing. Gradients of temperature in evaporator and condenser increase heat-transfer efficiency of vapor-compression cycle. Intended to recover relatively-low-temperature waste heat and use it to make hot water.

  8. Low heat cement; Teihatsunetsu cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K.; Igarashi, H. [Ube Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    This paper summarizes the result of studies on low heat (low hydration heat) cement intended to prevent cracking. Good compositional proportions of alite and belite as components of Portland cement are belite at 63% and alite at 37% when hydration heat, strength, and concrete durability are taken into account. Mixing the blast furnace slag into cement fills the voids at low hydration heat, and raises the strength without increasing the hydration heat. However, the voids remain in a long-term material age. The strength of the belite-based cement is improved when the higher the temperature within a range from 20 to 60{degree}C. In the case of a mixed cement of belite-based cement and blast furnace slag, using the blast furnace slag at 60% maintains the strength and reduces the hydration heat. The strength decreases at a curing temperature of 60{degree}C or higher. Hardened mortar with a material age of three days has its voids disappear at 40{degree}C. More void disappearance cannot be recognized even if the material age gets older. Hydration heat decreases largely in the belite-based cement and flyash mixed cement. The strength also decreases, but it increases conversely when the material age gets as old as one year. Flyash causes the temperature to rise more moderately than blast furnace slag. 21 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Theory of heat

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, James Clerk

    2001-01-01

    Though James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) is best remembered for his epochal achievements in electricity and magnetism, he was wide-ranging in his scientific investigations, and he came to brilliant conclusions in virtually all of them. As James R. Newman put it, Maxwell ""combined a profound physical intuition, an exquisite feeling for the relationship of objects, with a formidable mathematical capacity to establish orderly connections among diverse phenomena. This blending of the concrete and the abstract was the chief characteristic of almost all his researches.""Maxwell's work on heat and st

  10. Measurement and Evaluation of Heating Performance of Heat Pump Systems Using Wasted Heat from Electric Devices for an Electric Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate heating performance characteristics of a coolant source heat pump using the wasted heat from electric devices for an electric bus. The heat pump, using R-134a, is designed for heating a passengers’ compartment by using discharged energy from the coolant of electric devices, such as motors and inverters of the electric bus. The heating performance of the heat pump was tested by varying the operating parameters, such as outdoor temperature and volume flow rate of the coolant water of the electrical devices. Heating capacity, compressor work, and heating COP were measured; their behaviors with regard to the parameters were observed. Experimental results showed that heating COP increased with decrease of outdoor temperature, from 20.0 °C to 0 °C, and it observed to be 3.0 in the case of 0 °C outdoor temperature. The observed characteristics of the heating COP suggest that the heat pump is applicable as the cabin heater of an electric vehicle, which is limited by short driving range.

  11. High heat flux single phase heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Izenson, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux, single-phase heat exchanger for spacecraft thermal management. The intended application is a net generation interface heat exchanger to couple the crew module water thermal bus to the two-phase ammonia main thermal bus in the Space Station Freedom. The large size of the interface heat exchanger is dictated by the relatively poor water-side heat transfer characteristics. The objective of this program is to develop a single-phase heat transfer approach which can achieve heat fluxes and heat transfer coefficients comparable to those of the evaporation ammonia side. A new heat exchanger concept has been developed to meet these objecties. The main feature of this heat exchanger is that it can achieve very high heat fluxes with a pressure drop one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of previous microchannel or jet impingement high heat flux heat exchangers. This paper describes proof-of-concept experiments performed in air and water and presents analytical model of the heat exchanger.

  12. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  13. Software for computing and annotating genomic ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lawrence

    Full Text Available We describe Bioconductor infrastructure for representing and computing on annotated genomic ranges and integrating genomic data with the statistical computing features of R and its extensions. At the core of the infrastructure are three packages: IRanges, GenomicRanges, and GenomicFeatures. These packages provide scalable data structures for representing annotated ranges on the genome, with special support for transcript structures, read alignments and coverage vectors. Computational facilities include efficient algorithms for overlap and nearest neighbor detection, coverage calculation and other range operations. This infrastructure directly supports more than 80 other Bioconductor packages, including those for sequence analysis, differential expression analysis and visualization.

  14. Multiple source heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  15. Differential topology

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemin, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Differential Topology provides an elementary and intuitive introduction to the study of smooth manifolds. In the years since its first publication, Guillemin and Pollack's book has become a standard text on the subject. It is a jewel of mathematical exposition, judiciously picking exactly the right mixture of detail and generality to display the richness within. The text is mostly self-contained, requiring only undergraduate analysis and linear algebra. By relying on a unifying idea-transversality-the authors are able to avoid the use of big machinery or ad hoc techniques to establish the main

  16. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  17. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, FG

    2013-01-01

    Based on his extensive experience as an educator, F. G. Tricomi wrote this practical and concise teaching text to offer a clear idea of the problems and methods of the theory of differential equations. The treatment is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students and addresses only questions that can be resolved with rigor and simplicity.Starting with a consideration of the existence and uniqueness theorem, the text advances to the behavior of the characteristics of a first-order equation, boundary problems for second-order linear equations, asymptotic methods, and diff

  18. Heat pump technology

    CERN Document Server

    Von Cube, Hans Ludwig; Goodall, E G A

    2013-01-01

    Heat Pump Technology discusses the history, underlying concepts, usage, and advancements in the use of heat pumps. The book covers topics such as the applications and types of heat pumps; thermodynamic principles involved in heat pumps such as internal energy, enthalpy, and exergy; and natural heat sources and energy storage. Also discussed are topics such as the importance of the heat pump in the energy industry; heat pump designs and systems; the development of heat pumps over time; and examples of practical everyday uses of heat pumps. The text is recommended for those who would like to kno

  19. Elliptic partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Volpert, Vitaly

    If we had to formulate in one sentence what this book is about it might be "How partial differential equations can help to understand heat explosion, tumor growth or evolution of biological species". These and many other applications are described by reaction-diffusion equations. The theory of reaction-diffusion equations appeared in the first half of the last century. In the present time, it is widely used in population dynamics, chemical physics, biomedical modelling. The purpose of this book is to present the mathematical theory of reaction-diffusion equations in the context of their numerous applications. We will go from the general mathematical theory to specific equations and then to their applications. Mathematical anaylsis of reaction-diffusion equations will be based on the theory of Fredholm operators presented in the first volume. Existence, stability and bifurcations of solutions will be studied for bounded domains and in the case of travelling waves. The classical theory of reaction-diffusion equ...

  20. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  1. Waste heat recovery for offshore applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Kandepu, Rambabu; Haglind, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    energy in the gas turbine off-gas using heat exchangers, and the recovered thermal energy acts as heat source for some of the heat loads on the platform. The amount of the recovered thermal energy depends on the heat loads and thus the full potential of waste heat recovery units may not be utilized......With increasing incentives for reducing the CO2 emissions offshore, optimization of energy usage on offshore platforms has become a focus area. Most of offshore oil and gas platforms use gas turbines to support the electrical demand on the platform. It is common to operate a gas turbine mostly...... vary in the range 20-30%. There are several technologies available for onshore gas turbines (and low/medium heat sources) to convert the waste heat into electricity. For offshore applications it is not economical and practical to have a steam bottoming cycle to increase the efficiency of electricity...

  2. Identification of convective heat loss on exterior cavity wall assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1999-03-01

    Most present day low and medium rise buildings constructed in Canada use some form of cavity wall design for their exterior walls. These types of wall assemblies use a broad range of cladding materials such as brick, stone, wood, sheet metal, porcelain enamel or metal panels, cementitious materials and plastics. The interior assemblies of these walls include the air barrier, vapor barrier and insulation layers. The cladding is separated from the interior wall assembly by an air space of varying thickness. Dependent upon the temperature differential between the interior and exterior, the temperature between the outer surface of the interior wall assembly and the inner surface of the exterior cladding under conditions in which air movement is restricted will give rise to convective heat loss mechanisms. This paper will look at how these convective heat loss patterns manifest themselves as thermal patterns on exterior surfaces of cladding materials. Similar details will be illustrated under various pressure differential conditions through the entire building envelope assembly. Various types of exterior wall assemblies will be discussed.

  3. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  4. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Recently redesignated to honor Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, NASA's Dryden Aeronautical Test Range (DATR) supports aerospace flight research and technology integration, space...

  5. TEACHING PHYSICS: Teaching about heat and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Kevin

    2000-03-01

    Students encountering thermal physics at introductory level often have difficulty distinguishing between heat and temperature. It has been found with teacher education students at Canterbury Christ Church University College that challenging misconceptions by experiment and through discussion can quickly enable them to acquire the necessary concepts to equip them to develop their understanding of thermal physics. The key concepts are those of thermal equilibrium, the notion of flow of heat energy and the ability to differentiate between heat and temperature. This paper outlines a possible combination of activities to illustrate how this may be accomplished.

  6. Replication of the Apparent Excess Heat Effect in a Light Water-Potassium Carbonate-Nickel Electrolytic Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Myers, Ira T.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of experiments claiming to demonstrate excess heat production in light water-Ni-K2CO3 electrolytic cells was found to produce an apparent excess heat of 11 W maximum, for 60 W electrical power into the cell. Power gains range from 1.06 to 1.68. The cell was operated at four different dc current levels plus one pulsed current run at 1 Hz, 10% duty cycle. The 28 liter cell used in these verification tests was on loan from a private corporation whose own tests with similar cells are documented to produce 50 W steady excess heat for a continuous period exceeding hundreds of days. The apparent excess heat can not be readily explained either in terms of nonlinearity of the cell's thermal conductance at a low temperature differential or by thermoelectric heat pumping. However, the present data do admit efficient recombination of dissolved hydrogen-oxygen as an ordinary explanation. Calorimetry methods and heat balance calculations for the verification tests are described. Considering the large magnitude of benefit if this effect is found to be a genuine new energy source, a more thorough investigation of evolved heat in the nickel-hydrogen system in both electrolytic and gaseous loading cells remains warranted.

  7. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  8. HEAT RESISTANCE OF GRAPHITIZED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Savchenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The investigation of temperature dependences of steels' mechanical properties and heat resistance under conditions of thermal cyclic loads. It's necessary to determine the mechanical properties and heat resistance indices of graphitized steels and cast iron VCh400 within the temperature range of 20…800°С. Methodology. Graphitized steels of the following chemical composition (mass %: 0.61…1.04C; 1.19…1.59%Si; 0.32…0.37%Mn; 0.12…0.17%Al; 0.008…0.014%S and 0.016…0.025%Р have been heat-treated according to the mode: heating up to 810°С – holding for 2 hours; cooling down to 680°С – holding for 2 hours with further cooling using the furnace in order to provide the ferrite-pearlite metallic base with graphite inclusions. In order to determine heat resistance indices (heat stresses index K and the material's resistance criterion at thermal cyclic load C the indices of graphitized steels' and cast irons' mechanical properties in the temperature range of 20…800°С have been investigated. Findings. It has been established that as a result of lower carbon content and smaller quantity of graphite inclusions, graphitized steel exceeds such indices of nodular cast iron VCh400 as: tensile strength and plasticity at room and high temperatures, and also heat resistance criteria K and C. This steel can be used to manufacture articles operating under conditions of thermal cyclic loads. Originality. Tensile strength and percent elongation of graphitized steels within the temperature range of 20…800°С have been determined. Calculations of heat resistance criteria to the heat stresses index K and the material's resistance criterion at thermal cyclic loads C within the temperature range 20…800°С in comparison with nodular cast iron of VCh400 grade have been carried out. Practical value. The expediency of using graphitized steel for manufacturing of articles operating under conditions of thermal cyclic loads has been shown.

  9. Oscillating heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental fluid flow and heat transfer principles occurring in oscillating heat pipes and also provides updated developments and recent innovations in research and applications of heat pipes. Starting with fundamental presentation of heat pipes, the focus is on oscillating motions and its heat transfer enhancement in a two-phase heat transfer system. The book covers thermodynamic analysis, interfacial phenomenon, thin film evaporation,  theoretical models of oscillating motion and heat transfer of single phase and two-phase flows, primary  factors affecting oscillating motions and heat transfer,  neutron imaging study of oscillating motions in an oscillating heat pipes, and nanofluid’s effect on the heat transfer performance in oscillating heat pipes.  The importance of thermally-excited oscillating motion combined with phase change heat transfer to a wide variety of applications is emphasized. This book is an essential resource and learning tool for senior undergraduate, gradua...

  10. Heat Related Illnesses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carter, R; Cheuvront, S. N; Sawka, M. N

    2006-01-01

    .... The risk of serious heat illness can be markedly reduced by implementing a variety of countermeasures, including becoming acclimated to the heat, managing heat stress exposure, and maintaining hydration...

  11. Heat Roadmap Europe 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2012-01-01

    Heat Roadmap Europe (Pre-study 1) investigates the role of district heating in the EU27 energy system by mapping local conditions across Europe, identifying the potential for district heating expansion, and subsequently simulating the potential resource in an hourly model of the EU27 energy system....... In 2010, approximately 12% of the space heating demand in Europe is met by district heating, but in this study four alternative scenarios are considered for the EU27 energy system: 1. 2010 with 30% district heating 2. 2010 with 50% district heating 3. 2030 with 30% district heating 4. 2050 with 50......% district heating These scenarios are investigated in two steps. Firstly, district heating replaces individual boilers by converting condensing power plants to combined heat and power plants (CHP) to illustrate how district heating improves the overall efficiency of the energy system. In the second step...

  12. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  13. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sweating; nausea; and giddiness. Symptoms of heat stroke (late stage of heat illness) include flushed, hot, dry ... consciousness, vomiting or a high body temperature. For late stage heat stroke symptoms, cool the person further ...

  14. Absorption heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  15. Heat Pipe Embedded AlSiC Plates for High Conductivity - Low CTE Heat Spreaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Matthew (DOE/NNSA Kansas City Plant (United States)); Weyant, J.; Garner, S. (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (Lancaster, PA (United States)); Occhionero, M. (CPS Technologies Corporation, Norton, MA (United States))

    2010-01-07

    Heat pipe embedded aluminum silicon carbide (AlSiC) plates are innovative heat spreaders that provide high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Since heat pipes are two phase devices, they demonstrate effective thermal conductivities ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 W/m-K, depending on the heat pipe length. Installing heat pipes into an AlSiC plate dramatically increases the plate’s effective thermal conductivity. AlSiC plates alone have a thermal conductivity of roughly 200 W/m-K and a CTE ranging from 7-12 ppm/ deg C, similar to that of silicon. An equivalent sized heat pipe embedded AlSiC plate has effective thermal conductivity ranging from 400 to 500 W/m-K and retains the CTE of AlSiC.

  16. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  17. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  18. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  19. Opportunities for direct-contact waste heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richlen, S. L.; Semler, T. T.

    The potential industrial applications of the direct-contact waste heat recuperator (DCWHR) for the 353 K to 672 K temperature range were identified. The DCWHR increases the heat transfer area per unit volume over typical heat exchangers, and holds promise for latent heat recovery from waste streams. Results show that, for selected industrial waste heat sources, the production of hot process water by direct-contact heat exchange can be economically accomplished for waste heat (hot gas) streams at 478 K to 672 K with greater than 4.72 cu m/sec exhaust. Additionally, a DCWHR is particularly recommended for particulate-laden exhaust streams where scrubbing is already required by environmental consideration; the recovered heat becomes a factor in reducing the negative cash flow attributable to the use of scrubbing equipment. Incentives and obstacles to early market penetration of the technology are recognized.

  20. Transient characteristics of a grooved water heat pipe with variable heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The transient characteristics of a grooved water heat pipe were studied by using variable heat load. First, the effects of the property variations of the working fluid with temperature were investigated by operating the water heat pipe at several different temperatures. The experimental results show that, even for the same heat input profile and heat pipe configuration, the heat pipe transports more heat at higher temperature within the tested temperature range. Adequate liquid return to the evaporator due to decreasing viscosity of the working fluid permits continuous vaporization of water without dry-out. Second, rewetting of the evaporator was studied after the evaporator had experienced dry-out. To rewet the evaporator, the elevation of the condenser end was the most effective way. Without elevating the condenser end, rewetting is not straight-forward even with power turned off unless the heat pipe is kept at isothermal condition for sufficiently long time.

  1. Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems. Part two

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Kwan Woo; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Control of the heating and cooling system needs to be able to maintain the indoor temperatures within the comfort range under the varying internal loads and external climates. To maintain a stable thermal environment, the control system needs to maintain the balance between the heat gain/loss of ...

  2. Enhanced heat transfer in confined pool boiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rops, C.M.; Lindken, R.; Velthuis, J.F.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the heat transfer during nucleate boiling on a spatially confined boiling surface. The heat flux as a function of the boiling surface temperature was measured in pool boiling pots with diameters ranging from 15 mm down to 4.5 mm. It was found

  3. Heat Exchange in a Liquid with Energy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A. V.; Kudinov, I. V.; Dovgyallo, A. I.; Kudinov, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    A method of analytical solution of the problem on the heat exchange in a liquid moving in a tube with dissipation of its energy at the first-kind boundary conditions, i.e., under the conditions of heat shock at the walls of the tube, was developed on the basis of the integral method of heat balance. The approach proposed involves the introduction of an additional desired function and additional boundary conditions, which allows one to reduce the solution of the partial differential equation to the integral ordinary differential equation for the additional desired function determined by only the longitudinal space variable. In this method there is no need to perform integration of the differential equation with respect to the transverse coordinate, involving the use of the heat-balance integral, which enables it to be used for solving the problem on the heat exchange in a medium with variable physical properties as well as nonlinear boundary-value problems.

  4. Investigation of failures in operation of heat networks of large heat supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskaya, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of deviations in heat network parameters on operation of heating system and hot-water supply systems in buildings is examined. The consequences of a decrease in the water temperature in a heat network under extreme weather conditions in a range below the design ambient air temperature, the efficiency of disconnection of a hot water supply system (HWSS) heater in this period, and deviations in the normal heat supply in the transition period at relatively high outdoor temperatures are considered. The specific and scope of failures depend on the design-heating load to design hot water supply load ratio for the heat network. A mathematical model was developed, and numerical investigation was performed of modern schemes of heat points which are designed primarily for covering the hot water supply load and recovering the heating system heat output in case of low or no hot water consumption in HWSS. The performed calculations demonstrate that the heating system has no time to restore its heat output, thereby considerably reducing air temperature in the heated premises. The lower the ambient air temperature and the lower the ratio of the design loads for hot water supply and heating, the greater is this decrease. At the same time, in case of a sudden decrease in the outdoor temperature and an accident in the heat supply system, the heating system must be the priority consumer, since a heating failure not only decreases the thermal comfort of consumers but can cause emergency situations in local utility systems, such as a cold water supply system. Correction of failures in a heat supply system requires calculation of operating conditions of heat networks.

  5. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  6. Ammonia and Carbon Dioxide Heat Pumps for Heat Recovery in Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Wiebke; Christensen, Stefan W.; Markussen, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    . Calculations of cycle performances are performed using a reference cycle for both ammonia and carbon dioxide as refrigerant. For each cycle a thorough sensitivity analysis reveals that the forward and return temperatures of the heat sink (condenser or gas cooler) of the heat pump are most important......This paper presents a generic, numerical study of high temperature heat pumps for waste heat recovery in industry using ammonia and carbon dioxide as refrigerants. A study of compressors available on the market today, gives a possible application range of the heat pumps in terms of temperatures...

  7. Effect of low and high heating rates on reaction path of Ni(V)/Al multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Łukasz, E-mail: l.maj@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, Jerzy; Szlezynger, Maciej [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, 30 Kawiory St., 30-055 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    The effect of heating rates of Ni(V)/Al NanoFoils{sup ®} was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni(V)/Al were subjected to heating by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ TEM or electric pulse. Local chemical analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Phase analysis was done with X-ray diffractions (XRD) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED). The experiments showed that slow heating in DSC results in development of separate exothermic effects at ∼230 °C, ∼280 °C and ∼390 °C, corresponding to precipitation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl phases, respectively, i.e. like in vanadium free Ni/Al multilayers. Further heating to 700 °C allowed to obtain a single phase NiAl foil. The average grain size (g.s.) of NiAl phase produced in the DSC heat treated foil was comparable with the Ni(V)/Al multilayer period (∼50 nm), whereas in the case of reaction initiated with electric pulse the g.s. was in the micrometer range. Upon slow heating vanadium tends to segregate to zones parallel to the original multilayer internal interfaces, while in SHS process vanadium-rich phases precipitates at grain boundaries of the NiAl phase. - Highlights: • Peaks in DSC heating of Ni(V)/Al were explained by in-situ TEM observations. • Nucleation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl at slow heating of Ni(V)/Al was documented. • Near surface NiAl obtained from NanoFoil show Ag precipitates at grain boundaries.

  8. Fractional model for heat conduction in polar bear hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing-Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-fractional differential equations can accurately describe heat conduction in fractal media, such as wool fibers, goose down and polar bear hair. The fractional complex transform is used to convert time-fractional heat conduction equations with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative into ordinary differential equations, and exact solutions can be easily obtained. The solution process is straightforward and concise.

  9. Solar process heat is becoming sexy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhart, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    Linear concentrating solar collectors for solar medium-temperature process heat: an exotic niche market has turned into a wide range of offers for commercial and private customers - and there is no end in sight to the technical developments. (orig.)

  10. Heat pumps in district heating networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Wiebke Brix; Elmegaard, Brian

    constraints limit the power plants. Efficient heat pumps can be used to decouple the constraints of electricity and heat production, while maintaining the high energy efficiency needed to match the politically agreed carbon emission goals. The requirements in terms of COP, location, capacity and economy...... are calculated using an energy system model which includes power plants, heat pumps and district heating consumption profiles. The model is developed with focus on accurate representation of the performance of the units in different locations and operating modes. The model can assist in investment decisions...... and strategic planning in the energy sector. The paper presents a case study of optimal implementation of heat pumps in the present energy system of the Copenhagen area. By introduction of the correct capacity of heat pumps, a 1,6 % reduction in fuel consumption for electricity and heat production can...

  11. Long range image enhancement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available and Vision Computing, Auckland, New Zealand, 23-24 November 2015 Long Range Image Enhancement Bernardt Duvenhage Council for Scientific and Industrial Research South Africa Email: bduvenhage@csir.co.za Abstract Turbulent pockets of air...

  12. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  13. Atlantic Test Range (ATR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATR controls fully-instrumented and integrated test ranges that provide full-service support for cradle-to-grave testing. Airspace and surface target areas are used...

  14. Light Detection And Ranging

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) discrete-return point cloud data are available in the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) LAS format....

  15. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  16. On Range of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Dueholm; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Sørensen, Troels Bjerre

    2008-01-01

    is a small number, but only gave heuristic arguments for this. In this paper, we provide the first methods for rigorously estimating the Range of Skill of a given game. We provide some general, asymptotic bounds that imply that the Range of Skill of a perfectly balanced game tree is almost exponential in its......At AAAI'07, Zinkevich, Bowling and Burch introduced the Range of Skill measure of a two-player game and used it as a parameter in the analysis of the running time of an algorithm for finding approximate solutions to such games. They suggested that the Range of Skill of a typical natural game...... size (and doubly exponential in its depth). We also provide techniques that yield concrete bounds for unbalanced game trees and apply these to estimate the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe and Heads-Up Limit Texas Hold'em Poker. In particular, we show that the Range of Skill of Tic-Tac-Toe is more than...

  17. Liquid metal heat exchanger for efficient heating of soils and geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C [Knoxville, TN; Wesolowski, David J [Kingston, TN

    2010-02-23

    Apparatus for efficient heating of subterranean earth includes a well-casing that has an inner wall and an outer wall. A heater is disposed within the inner wall and is operable within a preselected operating temperature range. A heat transfer metal is disposed within the outer wall and without the inner wall, and is characterized by a melting point temperature lower than the preselected operating temperature range and a boiling point temperature higher than the preselected operating temperature range.

  18. Insect heat shock proteins during stress and diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allison M; MacRae, Thomas H

    2015-01-07

    Insect heat shock proteins include ATP-independent small heat shock proteins and the larger ATP-dependent proteins, Hsp70, Hsp90, and Hsp60. In concert with cochaperones and accessory proteins, heat shock proteins mediate essential activities such as protein folding, localization, and degradation. Heat shock proteins are synthesized constitutively in insects and induced by stressors such as heat, cold, crowding, and anoxia. Synthesis depends on the physiological state of the insect, but the common function of heat shock proteins, often working in networks, is to maintain cell homeostasis through interaction with substrate proteins. Stress-induced expression of heat shock protein genes occurs in a background of protein synthesis inhibition, but in the course of diapause, a state of dormancy and increased stress tolerance, these genes undergo differential regulation without the general disruption of protein production. During diapause, when ATP concentrations are low, heat shock proteins may sequester rather than fold proteins.

  19. Probabilistic representations of solutions to the heat equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    representation of solutions of the heat equation to initial conditions that are arbitrary tempered distributions. Keywords. Brownian motion; heat equation; translation operators; infinite dimen- sional stochastic differential equations. 1. Introduction. Let (Xt)t≥0 be a d-dimensional Brownian motion, with X0 ≡ 0. Let ϕ ∈ S (Rd), ...

  20. Probabilistic representations of solutions to the heat equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we provide a new (probabilistic) proof of a classical result in partial differential equations, viz. if is a tempered distribution, then the solution of the heat equation for the Laplacian, with initial condition , is given by the convolution of with the heat kernel (Gaussian density). Our results also extend the ...

  1. Numerical study of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing upward flow in a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the laminar upward mixed convection heat transfer for thermally developing air flow in the entrance region of a vertical circular cylinder under buoyancy effect and wall heat flux boundary condition has been numerically investigated. An implicit finite difference method and the Gauss elimination technique have been used to solve the governing partial differential equations of motion (Navier Stocks equations for two-dimensional model. This investigation covers Reynolds number range from 400 to 1600, heat flux is varied from 70 W/m2 to 400 W/m2. The results present the dimensionless temperature profile, dimensionless velocity profile, dimensionless surface temperature along the cylinder, and the local Nusselt number variation with the dimensionless axial distance Z+. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profile results have revealed that the secondary flow created by natural convection have a significant effect on the heat transfer process. The results have also shown an increase in the Nusselt number values as the heat flux increases. The results have been compared with the available experimental study and with the available analytical solution for pure forced convection in terms of the local Nusselt number. The comparison has shown satisfactory agreement. .

  2. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  3. Transient Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of transient heat conduction.Fourier's law. General heat conducation equation. Thermal diffusivity. Biot and Fourier numbers. Lumped analysis and time constant. Semi-infinite body: fixed surface temperature, convective heat transfer at the surface, or constant surface heat flux...

  4. Solar Heating Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Solar Unlimited, Inc.'s suncatcher line includes a variety of solar arrays, derived from NASA's satellite program: water heating only, partial home heating, or water and whole house central heating. Solar Unlimited developed a set of vigorous requirements to avoid problems common to solar heating technologies.

  5. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  6. Mathematical Model of Moving Heat-Transfer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Yesman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of moving heat-transfer agents which is applied in power systems and plants has been developed in the paper. A paper presents the mathematical model as a closed system of differential convective heat-transfer equations that includes a continuity equation, a motion equation, an energy equation.Various variants of boundary conditions on the surfaces of calculation flow and heat exchange zone are considered in the paper.

  7. How to Measure Heat Capacity at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    This chapter is devoted to the description of calorimetric techniques used to measure heat capacity of solids: pulse heat calorimetry (Sect. 2.3), relaxation calorimetry (Sect. 2.4), dual slope calorimetry (Sect. 2.5), a.c. calorimetry (Sect. 2.6), differential scanning calorimetry (Sect. 2.7). Examples of measurements of heat capacity are reported in Sects. 2.3 and 2.4.

  8. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  9. Binding affinities and interactions among different heat shock element types and heat shock factors in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Dheeraj; Enoki, Yasuaki; Lavania, Dhruv; Singh, Amanjot; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Grover, Anil

    2011-09-01

    Binding of heat shock factors (Hsfs) to heat shock elements (HSEs) leads to transcriptional regulation of heat shock genes. Genome-wide, 953 rice genes contain perfect-type, 695 genes gap-type and 1584 genes step-type HSE sequences in their 1-kb promoter region. The rice genome contains 13 class A, eight class B and four class C Hsfs (OsHsfs) and has OsHsf26 (which is of variant type) genes. Chemical cross-linking analysis of in vitro synthesized OsHsf polypeptides showed formation of homotrimers of OsHsfA2c, OsHsfA9 and OsHsfB4b proteins. Binding analysis of polypeptides with oligonucleotide probes containing perfect-, gap-, and step-type HSE sequences showed that OsHsfA2c, OsHsfA9 and OsHsfB4b differentially recognize various model HSEs as a function of varying reaction temperatures. The homomeric form of OsHsfA2c and OsHsfB4b proteins was further noted by the bimolecular fluorescence complementation approach in onion epidermal cells. In yeast two-hybrid assays, OsHsfB4b showed homomeric interaction as well as distinct heteromeric interactions with OsHsfA2a, OsHsfA7, OsHsfB4c and OsHsf26. Transactivation activity was noted in OsHsfA2c, OsHsfA2d, OsHsfA9, OsHsfC1a and OsHsfC1b in yeast cells. These differential patterns pertaining to binding with HSEs and protein-protein interactions may have a bearing on the cellular functioning of OsHsfs under a range of different physiological and environmental conditions. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  10. Mathematical model of induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Josef

    2017-07-01

    One of mathematical models of induction heating can be described by a parabolic differential equation with the specific Joule looses in the body. Advantage of this method is that the detailed knowledge of the 3D-magnetic field is not necessary and move of the body or the inductor can be easily implemented. The specific Joule looses can computed by solving the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the eddy current of density by the Nyström method with the singularity subtraction.

  11. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kenneth; Connolly, David; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    of supplying sustainable heating. Different heat production options are included in terms of individual and community heating systems. Furthermore, the levelised cost of supplying sustainable heat is estimated for both a single technology and from an energy system perspective. The results are analysed...... by assessing various parameters such as socio-economic costs and energy efficiency improvements in the national energy systems. The results demonstrate the economically feasible levels of heat savings and heat production for various European countries, highlighting differences in their national conditions......The cost of heat savings in buildings increase as more heat savings are achieved due to the state of the building stock and hence, alternatives other than savings typically become more economically feasible at a certain level of heat reductions. It is important to identify when the cost of heat...

  12. Heat Roadmap Europe 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    Many strategies have already been proposed for the decarbonisation of the EU energy system by the year 2050. These typically focus on the expansion of renewable energy in the electricity sector and subsequently, electrifying both the heat and transport sectors as much as possible...... are identified and then, the EU27 energy system is modelled to investigate the impact of district heating. The results indicate that a combination of heat savings, district heating in urban areas, and individual heat pumps in rural areas will enable the EU27 to reach its greenhouse gas emission targets by 2050....... In these strategies, the role of district heating has never been fully explored system, nor have the benefits of district heating been quantified at the EU level. This study combines the mapping of local heat demands and local heat supplies across the EU27. Using this local knowledge, new district heating potentials...

  13. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    information systems (GIS) and energy system analyses. In this report, the inputs for other modelling tools such as PRIMES are presented, in order to enable other researches to generate similar heating scenarios for Europe. Although Heat Roadmap Europe presents a complete heat strategy for Europe, which...... includes energy efficiency, individual heating units (such as boilers and heat pumps), and heat networks, the recommendations here are primarily relating to the potential and modelling of district heating. Although other solutions will play a significant role in decarbonising the heating and cooling sector...... in a low-carbon energy system context, so we have focused on this area based on our extensive experience in this area [1-10]. This report includes guidelines on the potential heat demand in European buildings that can be met by district heating as well as some general guidelines on how this district...

  14. Performance testing of a hydrogen heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J.; Kosson, R.

    1980-01-01

    Test results are presented for a reentrant groove heat pipe with hydrogen working fluid. The heat pipe became operational between 20 and 30 K after a cooldown from 77 K without any difficulty. Steady-state performance data taken over a 19 to 23 K temperature range indicated the following: (1) maximum heat transport capacity = 5.4 W-m; (2) static wicking height = 1.42 cm; and (3) overall heat pipe conductance = 1.7 W/C. These data agreed remarkably well with extrapolations made from comparable ammonia test results. The maximum heat transport capacity is 9.5% larger than the extrapolated value, but the static wicking height is the same. The overall conductance is 29% of the ammonia value, which is close to the ratio of liquid thermal conductivities (24%). Also, recovery from a completely frozen condition was accomplished within 5 min by simply applying an evaporater heat load of 1.8 W.

  15. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  16. MODEL OF HEAT SIMULATOR FOR DATA CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Novotný

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a design and a development of a heat simulator, which will be used for a flow research in data centers. The designed heat simulator is based on an ideological basis of four-processor 1U Supermicro server. The designed heat simulator enables to control the flow and heat output within the range of 10–100 %. The paper covers also the results of testing measurements of mass flow rates and heat flow rates in the simulator. The flow field at the outlet of the server was measured by the stereo PIV method. The heat flow rate was determined, based on measuring the temperature field at the inlet and outlet of the simulator and known mass flow rate.

  17. Forced convective heat transfer in curved diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity characteristics of the flows in two curved diffusers of rectangular cross section with C and S-shaped centerlines are presented and related to measurements of wall heat transfer coefficients along the heated flat walls of the ducts. The velocity results were obtained by laser-Doppler anemometry in a water tunnel and the heat transfer results by liquid crystal thermography in a wind tunnel. The thermographic technique allowed the rapid and inexpensive measurement of wall heat transfer coefficients along flat walls of arbitrary boundary shapes with an accuracy of about 5 percent. The results show that an increase in secondary flow velocities near the heated wall causes an increase in the local wall heat transfer coefficient, and quantify the variation for maximum secondary-flow velocities in a range from 1.5 to 17 percent of the bulk flow velocity.

  18. Introduction to heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    SUNDÉN, B

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the basic mechanisms for transfer of heat, Introduction to Heat Transfer gives a deeper and more comprehensive view than existing titles on the subject. Derivation and presentation of analytical and empirical methods are provided for calculation of heat transfer rates and temperature fields as well as pressure drop. The book covers thermal conduction, forced and natural laminar and turbulent convective heat transfer, thermal radiation including participating media, condensation, evaporation and heat exchangers.

  19. High temperature active heat exchanger research for latent heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J.; Haslett, R.

    1982-02-01

    An active heat exchange method in a latent heat (salt) thermal energy storage system that prevents a low conductivity solid salt layer from forming on heat transfer surfaces was developed. An evaluation of suitable media with melting points in the temperature range of interest (250 to 400 C) limited the candidates to molten salts from the chloride, hydroxide and nitrate families, based on high storage capacity, good corrosion characteristics and availability in large quantities at reasonable cost. The specific salt recommended for laboratory tests was a choride eutectic (20.5KCL o 24.5NaCL o 55.MgCl2% by wt.), with a nominal melting point of 385 C. Various active heat exchange concepts were given a technical and economic comparison to a passive tube shell design for a reference application (300 MW sub t for 6 hours). Test hardware was then built for the most promising concept: a direct contact heat exchanger in which molten salt droplets are injected into a cooler counter flowing stream of liquid metal carrier fluid (lead/Bismuth).

  20. Two phase flow and heat transfer characteristics of a separate-type heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiwei; Liu, Aijie; Jiang, Zhangyan

    2011-07-01

    Two phase flow and heat transfer characteristics of a separate-type heat pipe have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The experimental apparatus have the same geometry for the evaporator and the condenser which consist of 5-tube-banks, with working temperature ranges of 80-125°C. The experimental working fluid is dual-distilled water with corrosion-resistant agents. Heat transfer coefficients for boiling and condensation along with heat flux and working temperature are measured at different filling ratio. According to the results of the experiments, the optimized filling ratio ranges from 16 to 36%. Fitted correlations of average heat transfer coefficients of the evaporator and Nusselt numbers of the condenser at the proposed filling ratio are obtained. Two phase flow characteristics of the evaporator and the condenser as well as their influence on heat transfer are described on the basis of simplified analysis. Reasons for the pulse-boiling process remain to be studied.

  1. The effect of heat on tissue extensibility: a comparison of deep and superficial heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Val J; Ward, Alex R; Jung, Peter

    2005-04-01

    To compare the effects of deep heating (shortwave diathermy [SWD]) and superficial heating (hydrocollator packs) on tissue extensibility. A double-blind, repeated-measures study. Possible effects of sex and intervention order were controlled. A clinical laboratory. Twenty-four subjects with no neurologic or musculoskeletal pathologies affecting their lower limbs. Three intervention conditions: deep heating (SWD), superficial heating (hot packs), and no heating were applied in preallocated order to each subject at least 36 hours apart. Ankle dorsiflexion in weight bearing was measured by using an inclinometer to ascertain changes in the extensibility of the calf muscles and associated soft tissues. Deep heating increased the range of ankle dorsiflexion by 1.8 degrees +/-1.9 degrees . The change in ankle dorsiflexion after superficial and no heating was 0.7 degrees +/-1.5 degrees and -0.1 degrees +/-1.0 degrees , respectively. Deep heating, in the absence of stretching, increases tissue extensibility more than superficial heating or no heating. Superficial heating is more effective than no heating, but the difference was not statistically significant.

  2. Optimization of parameters of heat exchangers vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei MELEKHIN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the topic due to the decision of problems of the economy of resources in heating systems of vehicles. To solve this problem we have developed an integrated method of research, which allows to solve tasks on optimization of parameters of heat exchangers vehicles. This method decides multicriteria optimization problem with the program nonlinear optimization on the basis of software with the introduction of an array of temperatures obtained using thermography. The authors have developed a mathematical model of process of heat exchange in heat exchange surfaces of apparatuses with the solution of multicriteria optimization problem and check its adequacy to the experimental stand in the visualization of thermal fields, an optimal range of managed parameters influencing the process of heat exchange with minimal metal consumption and the maximum heat output fin heat exchanger, the regularities of heat exchange process with getting generalizing dependencies distribution of temperature on the heat-release surface of the heat exchanger vehicles, defined convergence of the results of research in the calculation on the basis of theoretical dependencies and solving mathematical model.

  3. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  4. Range Selection and Median

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    that supports queries in constant time, needs n1+ (1) space. For data structures that uses n logO(1) n space this matches the best known upper bound. Additionally, we present a linear space data structure that supports range selection queries in O(log k= log log n + log log n) time. Finally, we prove that any...

  5. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  6. A study on experiment and numerical simulation of heat exchanger in heating furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. C. Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, air preheater is used the research object and its heat transfer law is studied by experiment and numerical simulation. The experimental data showed that with the increases of inlet air velocity, the comprehensive heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer efficiency increase, but the temperature efficiency decreases and the resistance loss on the air side increases. The numerical simulation results showed that the larger the diameter of the tube, the better the heat transfer effect. When horizontal spacing in the range of 290 - 305 mm and longitudinal spacing is 70 - 90 mm, the heat transfer effect is best. The optimized heat exchanger structure is that diameter is 60 mm, horizontal spacing is 300 mm, longitudinal spacing is 90 mm. As the inlet air flow rate increases, the heat transfer efficiency increases, but the temperature efficiency decreases and the resistance loss on the air side increases.

  7. Quantum optomechanical heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keye; Bariani, Francesco; Meystre, Pierre

    2014-04-18

    We investigate theoretically a quantum optomechanical realization of a heat engine. In a generic optomechanical arrangement the optomechanical coupling between the cavity field and the oscillating end mirror results in polariton normal mode excitations whose character depends on the pump detuning and the coupling strength. By varying that detuning it is possible to transform their character from phononlike to photonlike, so that they are predominantly coupled to the thermal reservoir of phonons or photons, respectively. We exploit the fact that the effective temperatures of these two reservoirs are different to produce an Otto cycle along one of the polariton branches. We discuss the basic properties of the system in two different regimes: in the optical domain it is possible to extract work from the thermal energy of a mechanical resonator at finite temperature, while in the microwave range one can in principle exploit the cycle to extract work from the blackbody radiation background coupled to an ultracold atomic ensemble.

  8. Confirmation of bistable stellar differential rotation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Solar-like differential rotation is characterized by a rapidly rotating equator and slower poles. However, theoretical models and numerical simulations can also result in a slower equator and faster poles when the overall rotation is slow. Aims: We study the critical rotational influence under which differential rotation flips from solar-like (fast equator, slow poles) to an anti-solar one (slow equator, fast poles). We also estimate the non-diffusive (Λ effect) and diffusive (turbulent viscosity) contributions to the Reynolds stress. Methods: We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of mildly turbulent convection in spherical wedge geometry. Here we apply a fully compressible setup which would suffer from a prohibitive time step constraint if the real solar luminosity was used. To avoid this problem while still representing the same rotational influence on the flow as in the Sun, we increase the luminosity by a factor of roughly 106 and the rotation rate by a factor of 102. We regulate the convective velocities by varying the amount of heat transported by thermal conduction, turbulent diffusion, and resolved convection. Results: Increasing the efficiency of resolved convection leads to a reduction of the rotational influence on the flow and a sharp transition from solar-like to anti-solar differential rotation for Coriolis numbers around 1.3. We confirm the recent finding of a large-scale flow bistability: contrasted with running the models from an initial condition with unprescribed differential rotation, the initialization of the model with certain kind of rotation profile sustains the solution over a wider parameter range. The anti-solar profiles are found to be more stable against perturbations in the level of convective turbulent velocity than the solar-type solutions. Conclusions: Our results may have implications for real stars that start their lives as rapid rotators implying solar-like rotation in the early main

  9. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2016-01-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100–180 K. The apparatus

  10. Residential Heat Supply by Waste-Heat Re-Use: Sources, Supply Potential and Demand Coverage—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Loibl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with climate change mitigation and addresses waste heat reuse as a measure which is until now considered only to a limited extent. The City of Vienna serves as a case study to explore potentials to improve the urban heat supply using waste heat as an additional energy source. As no observation data about waste heat and detailed heating demand is available, this data is derived from proxy data for estimating waste heat reuse potential and residential heating demand patterns. Heat requirements for manufacturing and service provision is explored and, based on the distribution of the companies within the city, mapped as waste heat sources. Employees per company serves as proxy data to allocate the heat volume. Waste heat share and temperature ranges is reviewed from literature. Heating demand is mapped based on floor space of the buildings by age class and building type. Merging supply and demand maps allows to quantify the residential heating demand coverage through local waste heat in the potential supply areas within different distance ranges and housing density classes. In high density housing areas, only a small share of the demand can be covered by waste heat supply even within 250 m distance from sources due to few companies which could provide waste heat. In medium to low density housing areas in Vienna’s outer districts with more industry, a higher share of residential heating demand near the sources can be covered by waste heat within a 250 m distance. Within a 500 m distance, around half of the residential heating demand can be covered only in low density housing areas near the waste heat sources.

  11. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  12. ICRF heating on helical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues.

  13. Melting and solidification characteristics of a mixture of two types of latent heat storage material in a vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, JikSu; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito; Kato, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the fundamental melting and solidification characteristics of mannitol, erythritol, and their mixture (70 % by mass mannitol: 30 % by mass erythritol) as potential phase-change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage systems, specifically those pertaining to industrial waste heat, having temperatures in the range of 100-250 °C. The melting point of erythritol and mannitol, the melting peak temperature of their mixture, and latent heat were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal performance of the mannitol mixture was determined during melting and solidification processes, using a heat storage vessel with a pipe heat exchanger. Our results indicated phase-change (fusion) temperatures of 160 °C for mannitol and 113 and 150 °C for the mannitol mixture. Nondimensional correlation equations of the average heat transfer during the solidification process, as well as the temperature and velocity efficiencies of flowing silicon oil in the pipe and the phase-change material (PCM), were derived using several nondimensional parameters.

  14. Heat-induced conversion of beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme into amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Yagi, Hisashi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2007-09-28

    Thermodynamic parameters characterizing protein stability can be obtained for a fully reversible folding/unfolding system directly by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). However, the reversible DSC profile can be altered by an irreversible step causing aggregation. Here, to obtain insight into amyloid fibrils, ordered and fibrillar aggregates responsible for various amyloidoses, we studied the effects on human beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme of a combination of agitation and heating. Aggregates formed by mildly agitating protein solutions in the native state in the presence of NaCl were heated in the cell of the DSC instrument. For beta(2)-microglobulin, with an increase in the concentration of NaCl at neutral pH, the thermogram began to show an exothermic transition accompanied by a large decrease in heat capacity, followed by a kinetically controlled thermal response. Similarly, the aggregated lysozyme at a high concentration of NaCl revealed a similar distinct transition in the DSC thermogram over a wide pH range. Electron microscopy demonstrated the conformational change into amyloid fibrils. Taken together, the combined use of agitation and heating is a powerful way to generate amyloid fibrils from two proteins, beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme, and to evaluate the effects of heat on fibrillation, in which the heat capacity is crucial to characterizing the transition.

  15. mixed type partial differential equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Denche

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a mixed problem with integral boundary conditions for a high order partial differential equation of mixed type. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution. The proof is based on energy inequality, and on the density of the range of the operator generated by the considered problem.

  16. Heat Pipe Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The heat pipe, a sealed chamber whose walls are lined with a "wick," a thin capillary network containing a working fluid in liquid form was developed for a heat distribution system for non-rotating satellites. Use of the heat pipe provides a continuous heat transfer mechanism. "Heat tubes" that improve temperature control in plastics manufacturing equipment incorporated the heat pipe technology. James M. Stewart, an independent consultant, patented the heat tubes he developed and granted a license to Kona Corporation. The Kona Nozzle for heaterless injection molding gets heat for its operation from an external source and has no internal heating bands, reducing machine maintenance and also eliminating electrical hazards associated with heater bands. The nozzles are used by Eastman Kodak, Bic Pen Corporation, Polaroid, Tupperware, Ford Motor Company, RCA, and Western Electric in the molding of their products.

  17. Function Substitution in Partial Differential Equations: Nonhomogeneous Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Oblakova

    2017-01-01

    values of the time variable that exceeds relaxation time.This effect extends not only to parabolic equations, but is also observed in equations describing oscillatory processes with damping. It is also shown that in the simplest particular case of an equation with constant coefficients without heat exchange with the surrounding medium, the proposed substitution becomes appropriately linear and coincides with the classical one.The use of the proposed approach allows students majoring in engineering to expand a range of educational and research tasks while learning a course in partial differential equations.

  18. Introduction to partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Borthwick, David

    2016-01-01

    This modern take on partial differential equations does not require knowledge beyond vector calculus and linear algebra. The author focuses on the most important classical partial differential equations, including conservation equations and their characteristics, the wave equation, the heat equation, function spaces, and Fourier series, drawing on tools from analysis only as they arise.Within each section the author creates a narrative that answers the five questions: (1) What is the scientific problem we are trying to understand? (2) How do we model that with PDE? (3) What techniques can we use to analyze the PDE? (4) How do those techniques apply to this equation? (5) What information or insight did we obtain by developing and analyzing the PDE? The text stresses the interplay between modeling and mathematical analysis, providing a thorough source of problems and an inspiration for the development of methods.

  19. A note on the Lie symmetries of complex partial differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Folklore suggests that the split Lie-like operators of a complex partial differential equation are symmetries of the split system of real partial differential equations. However, this is not the case generally. We illustrate this by using the complex heat equation, wave equation with dissipation, the nonlinear Burgers equation and ...

  20. A note on the Lie symmetries of complex partial differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Folklore suggests that the split Lie-like operators of a complex partial differential equa- tion are symmetries of the split system of real partial differential equations. However, this is not the case generally. We illustrate this by using the complex heat equation, wave equation with dissipation, the nonlinear Burgers ...

  1. Technical and Economic Working Domains of Industrial Heat Pumps: Part 1 - Vapour Compression Heat Pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2014-01-01

    the constraints of available refrigeration equipment and a requirement of a positive Net Present Value of the investment. The considered sink outlet temperature range is from 40 °C to 140 °C, but for the heat pumps considered in this paper, the upper limit is 100 °C. Five heat pumps are studied. For each set...

  2. Basic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, D H

    2013-01-01

    Basic Heat Transfer aims to help readers use a computer to solve heat transfer problems and to promote greater understanding by changing data values and observing the effects, which are necessary in design and optimization calculations.The book is concerned with applications including insulation and heating in buildings and pipes, temperature distributions in solids for steady state and transient conditions, the determination of surface heat transfer coefficients for convection in various situations, radiation heat transfer in grey body problems, the use of finned surfaces, and simple heat exc

  3. Ideal Heat Exchange System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The requirements with which a heat exchange system should comply in order that at certain values of the total contact surface and heat load the entropy production in it should be minimal have been determined. It has been shown that this system can serve as a standard for real systems of irreversible heat exchange. We have found the conditions for physical realizability of a heat exchange system in which heat exchange occurs by a law linear with respect to the temperature difference between contacting flows. Analogous conditions are given without deriving for the case of heat exchange by the Fourier law.

  4. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  5. New eutectic alloys and their heats of transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; Birchenall, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermetallic compounds in binary and multicomponent systems among common elements such as Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, P, Si, and Zn may be useful for high temperature heat storage. In this work, heats of fusion of new multicomponent eutectics and intermetallic phases are reported, some of which are competitive with molten salts in heat storage density at high temperatures. The method used to determine unknown eutectic compositions combined results of differential thermal analysis, metallography, and microprobe analysis. The method allows determination of eutectic compositions in no more than three steps. The heats of fusion of the alloys were measured using commercial calorimeters, a differential thermal analyzer, and a differential scanning calorimeter.

  6. Differential invariants in nonclassical models of hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublik, Vasily V.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, differential invariants are used to construct solutions for equations of the dynamics of a viscous heat-conducting gas and the dynamics of a viscous incompressible fluid modified by nanopowder inoculators. To describe the dynamics of a viscous heat-conducting gas, we use the complete system of Navier—Stokes equations with allowance for heat fluxes. Mathematical description of the dynamics of liquid metals under high-energy external influences (laser radiation or plasma flow) includes, in addition to the Navier—Stokes system of an incompressible viscous fluid, also heat fluxes and processes of nonequilibrium crystallization of a deformable fluid. Differentially invariant solutions are a generalization of partially invariant solutions, and their active study for various models of continuous medium mechanics is just beginning. Differentially invariant solutions can also be considered as solutions with differential constraints; therefore, when developing them, the approaches and methods developed by the science schools of academicians N. N. Yanenko and A. F. Sidorov will be actively used. In the construction of partially invariant and differentially invariant solutions, there are overdetermined systems of differential equations that require a compatibility analysis. The algorithms for reducing such systems to involution in a finite number of steps are described by Cartan, Finikov, Kuranishi, and other authors. However, the difficultly foreseeable volume of intermediate calculations complicates their practical application. Therefore, the methods of computer algebra are actively used here, which largely helps in solving this difficult problem. It is proposed to use the constructed exact solutions as tests for formulas, algorithms and their software implementations when developing and creating numerical methods and computational program complexes. This combination of effective numerical methods, capable of solving a wide class of problems, with

  7. Thermal expansion and the heat capacity of nanocrystalline and coarse-crystalline silver sulfide Ag2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal expansion and the heat capacity of coarse-crystalline and nanocrystalline silver sulfide Ag2S were studied by dilatometry and differential scanning calorimentry for the first time in the temperature range 290-970 K. It is found that the thermal expansion coefficient and the heat capacity of nanocrystalline silver sulfide in this temperature range are higher than those in the case of the coarse-crystalline sulfide. It is revealed that the transformation of α-Ag2S acanthite to β-Ag2S argentite and β-Ag2S argentite to γ-Ag2S phase are the first-order phase transitions; the temperatures and the enthalpies of these transformations have been determined.

  8. Concentrated Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dwork, Cynthia; Rothblum, Guy N.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Concentrated Differential Privacy, a relaxation of Differential Privacy enjoying better accuracy than both pure differential privacy and its popular "(epsilon,delta)" relaxation without compromising on cumulative privacy loss over multiple computations.

  9. Long-range antigravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrae, K.I.; Riegert, R.J. (Maryland Univ., College Park (USA). Center for Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-01

    We consider a theory in which fermionic matter interacts via long-range scalar, vector and tensor fields. In order not to be in conflict with experiment, the scalar and vector couplings for a given fermion must be equal, as is natural in a dimensionally reduced model. Assuming that the Sun is not approximately neutral with respect to these new scalar-vector charges, and if the couplings saturate the experimental bounds, then their strength can be comparable to that of gravity. Scalar-vector fields of this strength can compensate for a solar quadrupole moment contribution to Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession.

  10. Heat and mass transfer in building services design

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Building design is increasingly geared towards low energy consumption. Understanding the fundamentals of heat transfer and the behaviour of air and water movements is more important than ever before. Heat and Mass Transfer in Building Services Design provides an essential underpinning knowledge for the technology subjects of space heating, water services, ventilation and air conditioning. This new text: *provides core understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow from a building services perspective *complements a range of courses in building services engineering *

  11. Heat Transfer Phenomena in Supercritical Water Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark H. Anderson; MichaelL. Corradini; Riccardo Bonazza; Jeremy R. Licht

    2007-10-03

    A supercritical water heat transfer facility has been built at the University of Wisconsin to study heat transfer in ancircular and square annular flow channel. A series of integral heat transfer measurements has been carried out over a wide range of heat flux, mas velocity and bulk water temperatures at a pressure of 25 MPa. The circular annular test section geometry is a 1.07 cm diameter heater rod within a 4.29 diameter flow channel.

  12. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  13. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding beta-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaldo, C B; Steindel, M; Sousa, M A; Tavares, C C

    2001-01-01

    The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of beta-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70) and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of beta-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  14. Model for the spontaneous heating of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmal, D.; Duyzer, J.H.; Heuven, J.W. van

    1985-07-01

    As part of an investigation into the spontaneous heating of coal piles, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the spontaneous heating process at relatively low temperatures (less than about 100 C). The ultimate unsteady-state model takes into account depletion of oxygen and production of heat by chemisorption of oxygen in the coal, transport of oxygen by diffusion and convection and transport of heat by conduction, convection and evaporation/condensation of coal moisture. It consists of four differential equations, for conservation of oxygen mass, of coal moisture and of heat and rate of reaction of oxygen with coal. Calculations using data from laboratory and field experiments give results that describe the process of spontaneous heating semiquantitatively. The most important parameters in the process of spontaneous heating, particularly for the time between stacking and spontaneous ignition, are the porosity of the pile (degree of compaction), the initial temperature of the coal and the evaporation and condensation of coal moisture. The influence of other parameters (e.g. reactivity of the coal, thermal conductivity) is much less pronounced. 12 references.

  15. Analytical models of Ohmic heating and conventional heating in food processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serventi, A.; Bozzoli, F.; Rainieri, S.

    2017-11-01

    Ohmic heating is a food processing operation in which an electric current is passed through a food and the electrical resistance of the food causes the electric power to be transformed directly into heat. The heat is not delivered through a surface as in conventional heat exchangers but it is internally generated by Joule effect. Therefore, no temperature gradient is required and it origins quicker and more uniform heating within the food. On the other hand, it is associated with high energy costs and its use is limited to a particular range of food products with an appropriate electrical conductivity. Sterilization of foods by Ohmic heating has gained growing interest in the last few years. The aim of this study is to evaluate the benefits of Ohmic heating with respect to conventional heat exchangers under uniform wall temperature, a condition that is often present in industrial plants. This comparison is carried out by means of analytical models. The two different heating conditions are simulated under typical circumstances for the food industry. Particular attention is paid to the uniformity of the heat treatment and to the heating section length required in the two different conditions.

  16. Heat index trends and climate change implications for occupational heat exposure in Da Nang, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Opitz-Stapleton

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Occupational extreme heat exposure can lead to a number of detrimental heat-health impacts on workers. Excessive night-time temperatures following hot days do not allow for workers to recover and can compound work heat-health impacts. A number of heat indices have been developed to estimate thermal comfort – how hot it feels – based on meteorological, physiological, and working conditions. We investigated potential changes in day and night-time ambient temperatures and heat indices for Da Nang, Vietnam over the period 2020–2049 when compared with 1970–1999 after downscaling daily minimum and maximum temperatures and humidity variables from six CMIP5 climate models. Two heat indices were employed, the U.S. National Weather Service Heat Index for day and the indoor Apparent Temperature for night. The Vietnam Ministry of Health (MOH sets thermal comfort thresholds for particular workloads and rates. By 2050, daytime heat index values breach the average 32 °C MOH threshold for light work nearly continuously during the months of April to October. The number of nights per annum in which the heat index exceeds 28 °C is likely to range between 131 and 170 nights per year. Occupational heat exposure in Da Nang for outdoor workers or indoor workers without adequate ventilation, breaks or other cooling and heat precautionary and treatment measures will be exacerbated by climate change.

  17. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries...... in optimal O(k) time. The structure uses O(n) words of space and can be constructed in O(n logn) time. The data structure can be extended to solve the online version of the problem, where the elements in A[i..j] are reported one-by-one in sorted order, in O(1) worst-case time per element. The problem...... is motivated by (and is a generalization of) a problem with applications in search engines: On a tree where leaves have associated rank values, report the highest ranked leaves in a given subtree. Finally, the problem studied generalizes the classic range minimum query (RMQ) problem on arrays....

  18. Essential Specification Elements for Heat Exchanger Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, L.

    2015-07-01

    Performance upgrade and equipment degradation are the primary impetuses for a nuclear power plant to engage in the large capital cost project of heat exchanger replacement. Along with attention to these issues, consideration of heat exchanger Codes and Standards, material improvements, thermal redesign, and configuration are essential for developing User’s Design Specifications for successful replacement projects. The User’s Design Specification is the central document in procuring ASME heat exchangers. Properly stated objectives for the heat exchanger replacement are essential for obtaining the materials, configurations and thermal designs best suited for the nuclear power plant. Additionally, the code of construction required and the applied manufacturing standard (TEMA or HEI) affects how the heat exchanger may be designed or configured to meet the replacement goals. Knowledge of how Codes and Standards affect design and configuration details will aid in writing the User’s Design Specification. Joseph Oat Corporation has designed and fabricated many replacement heat exchangers for the nuclear power industry. These heat exchangers have been constructed per ASME Section III to various Code-Years or ASME Section VIII-1 to the current Code-Year also in accordance with TEMA and HEI. These heat exchangers have been a range of like-for-like replacement to complete thermal, material and configuration redesigns. Several examples of these heat exchangers with their Code, Standard and specification implications are presented. (Author.

  19. Flexible heat pipes with integrated bioinspired design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the facile fabrication and performance evaluation of flexible heat pipes that have integrated bioinspired wick structures and flexible polyurethane polymer connector design between the copper condenser and evaporator. Inside the heat pipe, a bioinspired superhydrophilic strong-base-oxidized copper mesh with multi-scale micro/nano-structures was used as the wicking material and deionized water was selected as working fluid. Thermal resistances of the fabricated flexible heat pipes charged with different filling ratios were measured under thermal power inputs ranging from 2 W to 12 W while the device was bent at different angles. The fabricated heat pipes with a 30% filling ratio demonstrated a low thermal resistance less than 0.01 K/W. Compared with the vertically oriented straight heat pipes, bending from 30° up to 120° has negligible influence on the heat-transfer performance. Furthermore, repeated heating tests indicated that the fabricated flexible heat pipes have consistent and reliable heat-transfer performance, thus would have important applications for advanced thermal management in three dimensional and flexible electronic devices.

  20. Heat transfer characteristics of rotating triangular thermosyphon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, E.; Moawed, M.; Berbish, N. S.

    2012-09-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study heat transfer characteristics of a rotating triangular thermosyphon, using R-134a refrigerant as the working fluid. The tested thermosyphon is an equilateral triangular tube made from copper material of 11 mm triangular length, 2 mm thickness, and a total length of 1,500 mm. The length of the evaporator section is 600 mm, adiabatic section is 300 mm, and condenser section is 600 mm. The effects of the rotational speed, filling ratio, and the evaporator heat flux on each of the evaporator heat transfer coefficient, he, condenser heat transfer coefficient, hc, and the overall effective thermal conductance, Ct are studied. Experiments are performed with a vertical position of thermosyphon within heat flux ranges from 11 to 23 W/m2 for the three selected filling ratios of 10, 30 and 50 % of the evaporator section volume. The results indicated that the maximum values of the tested heat transfer parameters of the rotational equilateral triangular thermosyphon are obtained at the filling ratio of 30 %. Also, it is found that the heat transfer coefficient of the condensation is increased with increasing the rotational speed. The tested heat transfer parameters of the thermosyphon are correlated as a function of the evaporator heat flux and angular velocity.

  1. Selected papers on analysis and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Society, American Mathematical

    2010-01-01

    This volume contains translations of papers that originally appeared in the Japanese journal Sūgaku. These papers range over a variety of topics in ordinary and partial differential equations, and in analysis. Many of them are survey papers presenting new results obtained in the last few years. This volume is suitable for graduate students and research mathematicians interested in analysis and differential equations.

  2. Differentiated Instruction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susan G.

    2008-01-01

    As classrooms become more culturally diverse, it becomes more imperative that differentiated instruction occur in elementary classrooms. Today's classrooms usually contain students with a wide range of abilities and varied experiential backgrounds. These students learn at different rates and in different ways. Differentiation is important in the…

  3. School Leadership Actions to Support Differentiated Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Jennifer Pallon

    2011-01-01

    Schools are required to meet a range of students' learning needs and effective school leadership is needed for the implementation of pedagogical practices responsive to the challenges of increasing student diversity and academic accountability. Literature on differentiated instruction and its constituent elements suggests differentiation results…

  4. Effect of dry-heating with pectin on gelatinization properties of sweet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of dry-heating with pectin at different dry heating temperatures, heating times and pH on the gelatinization properties of sweet potato starch. Methods: The gelatinization properties of sweet potato starch - pectin blend were analyzed using a rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA), differential scanning ...

  5. The specific heat of the solid electrolyte system CuI - AgI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, M.; Ito, Y.; Tamaki, S.

    1996-09-01

    The specific heat for AgI-doped CuI has been measured by the method of differential scanning calorimetry. Anomalous specific heats were observed around the transition temperature from non-superionic to superionic phases. These were well explained in terms of the Schottky-type excess specific heat.

  6. Local Fractional Homotopy Perturbation Method for Solving Non-Homogeneous Heat Conduction Equations in Fractal Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the local fractional Homotopy perturbation method is utilized to solve the non-homogeneous heat conduction equations. The operator is considered in the sense of the local fractional differential operator. Comparative results between non-homogeneous and homogeneous heat conduction equations are presented. The obtained result shows the non-differentiable behavior of heat conduction of the fractal temperature field in homogeneous media.

  7. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Be Prepared Safe Citizen Day Organize Important Medical Information ER Checklists Preparing for Emergencies Be ready to ... anyone can be affected. Here you will find information about heat cramps and heat stroke and exhaustion. ...

  8. Heat Roadmap Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Andrei; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Averfalk, Helge

    2017-01-01

    The Heat Roadmap Europe (HRE) studies estimated a potential increase of the district heating (DH) share to 50% of the entire heat demand by 2050, with approximately 25–30% of it being supplied using large-scale electric heat pumps. This study builds on this potential and aims to document...... that such developments can begin now with technologies currently available. We present a database and the status of the technology and its ability of expansion to other European locations by reviewing experiences aimed at further research or application in the heating industry. This is based on a survey of the existing...... capacity of electric large-scale heat pumps with more than 1 MW thermal output, operating in European DH systems. The survey is the first database of its kind containing the technical characteristics of these heat pumps, and provides the basis for the analysis of this paper. By quantifying the heat sources...

  9. Heat resistant microorganism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Bennik, Maria H.J.; Kuipers, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to a kit and methods and means for the determination of the presence of heat resistant organisms. The invention further relates to the provision organisms wherein the heat resistance is modulated.

  10. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heat stroke and exhaustion. Heat Cramps Symptoms include muscle spasms, usually in the legs and stomach area. ... Z Teeth (Dental Emergencies) Sprains and Strains Head Injury Resources Home Safety Checklist ACEP Coloring Book Download ...

  11. Isolated quantum heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, O; Hallwood, D W

    2012-02-24

    We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of a quantum system that is capable of functioning as a heat engine. This system could be realized experimentally using cold bosonic atoms confined to a double well potential that is created by splitting a harmonic trap with a focused laser. The system shows thermalization, and can model a reversible heat engine cycle. This is the first demonstration of the operation of a heat engine with a finite quantum heat bath.

  12. Isolated quantum heat engine

    OpenAIRE

    Fialko, O.; Hallwood, D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of a quantum system that is capable of functioning as a heat engine. This system could be realized experimentally using cold bosonic atoms confined to a double well potential that is created by splitting a harmonic trap with a focused laser. The system shows thermalization, and can model a reversible heat engine cycle. This is the first demonstration of the operation of a heat engine with a finite quantum heat bath.

  13. Solar heat receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  14. Applied analysis and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cârj, Ovidiu

    2007-01-01

    This volume contains refereed research articles written by experts in the field of applied analysis, differential equations and related topics. Well-known leading mathematicians worldwide and prominent young scientists cover a diverse range of topics, including the most exciting recent developments. A broad range of topics of recent interest are treated: existence, uniqueness, viability, asymptotic stability, viscosity solutions, controllability and numerical analysis for ODE, PDE and stochastic equations. The scope of the book is wide, ranging from pure mathematics to various applied fields such as classical mechanics, biomedicine, and population dynamics.

  15. Selected papers on analysis and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Nomizu, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    This volume contains translations of papers that originally appeared in the Japanese journal, Sugaku. The papers range over a variety of topics, including nonlinear partial differential equations, C^*-algebras, and Schrödinger operators.

  16. Lightning detection and ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, C. L.; Poehler, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    A lightning detector and ranging (LDAR) system developed at the Kennedy Space Center and recently transferred to Wallops Island is described. The system detects pulsed VHF signals due to electrical discharges occurring in a thunderstorm by means of 56-75 MHz receivers located at the hub and at the tips of 8 km radial lines. Incoming signals are transmitted by wideband links to a central computing facility which processes the times of arrival, using two independent calculations to determine position in order to guard against false data. The results are plotted on a CRT display, and an example of a thunderstorm lightning strike detection near Kennedy Space Center is outlined. The LDAR correctly identified potential ground strike zones and additionally provided a high correlation between updrafts and ground strikes.

  17. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this! Home » Emergency 101 Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at Mercy Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be caused by overexposure to the sun or any situation that involves extreme heat. Young children and the elderly are most at risk, ...

  18. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this! Home » Emergency 101 Heat-Related Illnesses Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at Mercy Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be caused by overexposure to the sun or any situation that involves extreme heat. Young children and the elderly are most at risk, ...

  19. Heat roadmap China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Weiming; Wang, Yu; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2015-01-01

    District heating is regarded as a key element of energy saving actions in the Chinese national energy strategy, while space heating in China is currently still dominated by coal boilers. However, there is no existing quantitative study to analyse the future heat strategy for China. Therefore...

  20. Microwave processing heats up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microwaves are a common appliance in many households. In the United States microwave heating is the third most popular domestic heating method food foods. Microwave heating is also a commercial food processing technology that has been applied for cooking, drying, and tempering foods. It's use in ...